THESIS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

Analysis, Modeling and Control of Doubly-Fed
Induction Generators for Wind Turbines
ANDREAS PETERSSON
Division of Electric Power Engineering
Department of Energy and Environment
CHALMERS UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY
G¨ oteborg, Sweden 2005
Analysis, Modeling and Control of Doubly-Fed Induction
Generators for Wind Turbines
ANDREAS PETERSSON
ISBN 91-7291-600-1
c ( ANDREAS PETERSSON, 2005.
Doktorsavhandlingar vid Chalmers tekniska h¨ ogskola
Ny serie nr. 2282
ISSN 0346-718x
Division of Electric Power Engineering
Department of Energy and Environment
Chalmers University of Technology
SE-412 96 G¨ oteborg
Sweden
Telephone + 46 (0)31-772 1000
Chalmers Bibliotek, Reproservice
G¨ oteborg, Sweden 2005
Analysis, Modeling and Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generators for Wind Turbines
ANDREAS PETERSSON
Division of Electric Power Engineering
Department of Energy and Environment
Chalmers University of Technology
Abstract
This thesis deals with the analysis, modeling, and control of the doubly-fed induction gener-
ator (DFIG) for wind turbines. Different rotor current control methods are investigated with
the objective of eliminating the influence of the back electromotive force (EMF), which is
that of, in control terminology, a load disturbance, on the rotor current. It is found that the
method that utilizes both feed forward of the back EMF and so-called “active resistance”
manages best to suppress the influence of the back EMF on the rotor current, particularly
when voltage sags occur, of the investigated methods. This method also has the best stability
properties. In addition it is found that this method also has the best robustness to parameter
deviations.
The response of the DFIG wind turbine system to grid disturbances is simulated and ver-
ified experimentally. A voltage sag to 80% (80% remaining voltage) is handled very well.
Moreover, a second-order model for prediction of the response of small voltage sags of the
DFIG wind turbines is derived, and its simulated performance is successfully verified exper-
imentally.
The energy production of the DFIG wind turbine is investigated and compared to that of
other wind turbine systems. The result found is that the energy capture of the DFIG wind tur-
bine is almost the same as for an active stall-controlled fixed-speed (using two fixed speeds)
wind turbine. Compared to a full-power-converter wind turbine the DFIG wind turbine can
deliver a couple of percentage units more energy to the grid.
Voltage sag ride-through capabilities of some different variable-speed wind turbines has
been investigated. It has been found that the energy production cost of the investigated wind
turbines with voltage sag ride-through capabilities is between 1–3 percentage units higher
than that of the ordinary DFIG wind turbine without the ride-through capability.
Finally, a flicker reduction control law for stall-controlled wind turbines with induction
generators, using variable rotor resistance, is derived. The finding is that it is possible to
reduce the flicker contribution by utilizing the derived rotor resistance control law with 40–
80% depending on the operating condition.
Keywords: Doubly-fed induction generator, wind turbine, wind energy, current control,
voltage sag, power quality.
iii
iv
Acknowledgements
This research project has been carried out at the Department of Energy and Environment
(and the former Department of Electric Power Engineering) at Chalmers University of Tech-
nology. The financial support provided by the Swedish National Energy Agency is gratefully
acknowledged.
I would like to thank my supervisors Dr. Torbj¨ orn Thiringer and Prof. Lennart Harnefors
for help, inspiration, and encouragement. I would also like to thank my examiner Prof. Tore
Undeland for valuable comments and encouragement. Thanks goes to my fellow Ph.D. stu-
dents who have assisted me: Stefan Lundberg for a pleasant collaboration with the efficiency
calculations, Dr. Rolf Ottersten for many interesting discussions and a nice cooperation, es-
pecially with the analysis of the full-power converter, Dr. Tom´ aˇ s Petr˚ u for valuable and time
saving collaboration with practical field measurement set-ups, and Oskar Wallmark for a
good companionship and valuable discussions.
Many thanks go to the colleagues at the Division of Electric Power Engineering and the
former Department of Electric Power Engineering, who have assisted me during the work of
this Ph.D. thesis.
Finally, I would like to thank my family for their love and support.
v
vi
Table of Contents
Abstract iii
Acknowledgements v
Table of Contents vii
1 Introduction 1
1.1 Review of Related Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.2 Purpose and Contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.3 List of Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2 Wind Energy Systems 7
2.1 Wind Energy Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2.1.1 Wind Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2.1.2 Aerodynamic Power Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.1.3 Aerodynamic Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.2 Wind Turbine Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.2.1 Fixed-Speed Wind Turbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.2.2 Variable-Speed Wind Turbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.2.3 Variable-Speed Wind Turbine with Doubly-Fed Induction Generator 12
2.3 Doubly-Fed Induction Generator Systems for Wind Turbines . . . . . . . . 13
2.3.1 Equivalent Circuit of the Doubly-Fed Induction Generator . . . . . 14
2.3.2 Power Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.3.3 Stator-to-Rotor Turns Ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.3.4 Lowering Magnetizing Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
2.3.5 Other Types of Doubly-Fed Machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
3 Energy Efficiency of Wind Turbines 23
3.1 Determination of Power Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
3.1.1 Aerodynamic Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
3.1.2 Gearbox Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
3.1.3 Induction Generator Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
3.1.4 Converter Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
3.1.5 Total Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
3.2 Energy Production of the DFIG System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.2.1 Investigation of the Influence of the Converter’s Size on the Energy
Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
vii
3.2.2 Reduction of Magnetizing Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.3 Comparison to Other Wind Turbine Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.4 Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
3.5 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
4 Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generator System 35
4.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
4.1.1 Space Vectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
4.1.2 Power and Reactive Power in Terms of Space Vectors . . . . . . . . 36
4.1.3 Phase-Locked Loop (PLL)-Type Estimator . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
4.1.4 Internal Model Control (IMC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
4.1.5 “Active Damping” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
4.1.6 Saturation and Integration Anti-Windup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
4.1.7 Discretization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
4.2 Mathematical Models of the DFIG System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
4.2.1 Machine Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
4.2.2 Grid-Filter Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
4.2.3 DC-Link Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
4.2.4 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
4.3 Field Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
4.3.1 Stator-Flux Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
4.3.2 Grid-Flux Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
4.4 Control of Machine-Side Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
4.4.1 Current Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
4.4.2 Torque Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
4.4.3 Speed Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
4.4.4 Reactive Power Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
4.4.5 Sensorless Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.5 Control of Grid-Side Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
4.5.1 Current Control of Grid Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
4.5.2 DC-Link Voltage Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
5 Evaluation of the Current Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generators 59
5.1 Stability Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
5.1.1 Stator-Flux-Oriented System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
5.1.2 Grid-Flux-Oriented System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
5.1.3 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
5.2 Influence of Erroneous Parameters on Stability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
5.2.1 Leakage Inductance, L
σ
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
5.2.2 Stator and Rotor Resistances, R
s
and R
R
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
5.3 Experimental Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
5.3.1 Comparison Between Stator-Flux and Grid-Flux-Oriented System . 71
5.4 Impact of Stator Voltage Sags on the Current Control Loop . . . . . . . . . 71
5.4.1 Influence of Erroneous Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
5.4.2 Generation Capability During Voltage Sags . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
5.5 Flux Damping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
5.5.1 Stator-Flux Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
viii
5.5.2 Grid-Flux Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
5.5.3 Parameter Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
5.5.4 Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
5.5.5 Response to Symmetrical Voltage Sags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
5.6 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
6 Evaluation of Doubly-Fed Induction Generator Systems 81
6.1 Reduced-Order Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
6.2 Discretization of the Doubly-Fed Induction Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
6.2.1 Stator-Flux Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
6.2.2 Grid-Flux Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
6.3 Response to Grid Disturbances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
6.4 Implementation in Grid Simulation Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
6.5 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
7 Voltage Sag Ride-Through of Variable-Speed Wind Turbines 89
7.1 Voltage Sags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
7.1.1 Symmetrical Voltage Sags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
7.1.2 Unsymmetrical Voltage Sags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
7.2 Full-Power Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
7.2.1 Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
7.2.2 Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
7.2.3 Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
7.2.4 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
7.3 Doubly-Fed Induction Generator with Shunt Converter . . . . . . . . . . . 102
7.3.1 Response to Small Voltage Sags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
7.3.2 Response to Large Voltage Sags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
7.3.3 Candidate Ride-Through System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
7.3.4 Evaluation of the Ride-Through System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
7.4 Doubly-Fed Induction Generator with Series Converter . . . . . . . . . . . 118
7.4.1 Possible System Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
7.4.2 System Modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
7.4.3 Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
7.4.4 Speed Control Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
7.4.5 Response to Voltage Sags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
7.4.6 Steady-State Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
7.4.7 Discussion and Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
7.5 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
8 Flicker Reduction of Stalled-Controlled Wind Turbines using Variable Rotor
Resistances 133
8.1 Modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
8.1.1 Reduced-Order Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
8.2 Current Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
8.2.1 Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
8.3 Reference Value Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
8.3.1 Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
ix
8.4 Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
8.4.1 Flicker Contribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
8.4.2 Flicker Reduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
8.5 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
9 Conclusion 147
9.1 Future Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
References 149
A Nomenclature 159
B Data and Experimental Setup 163
B.1 Data of the DFIG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
B.2 Laboratory Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
B.2.1 Data of the Induction Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
B.3 Jung Data Acquisition Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
x
Chapter 1
Introduction
The Swedish Parliament adopted new energy guidelines in 1997 following the trend of mov-
ing towards an ecologically sustainable society. The energy policy decision states that the
objective is to facilitate a change to an ecologically sustainable energy production system.
The decision also confirmed that the 1980 and 1991 guidelines still apply, i.e., that the nu-
clear power production is to be phased out at a slow rate so that the need for electrical energy
can be met without risking employment and welfare. The first nuclear reactor of Barseb¨ ack
was shut down 30th of November 1999. Nuclear power production shall be replaced by im-
proving the efficiency of electricity use, conversion to renewable forms of energy and other
environmentally acceptable electricity production technologies [97]. According to [97] wind
power can contribute to fulfilling several of the national environmental quality objectives de-
cided by Parliament in 1991. Continued expansion of wind power is therefore of strategic
importance. The Swedish National Energy Agency suggest that the planning objectives for
the expansion of wind power should be 10 TWh/year within the next 10–15 years [97]. In
Sweden, by the end of 2004, there was 442 MW of installed wind power, corresponding to
1% of the total installed electric power in the Swedish grid [23, 98]. These wind turbines
produced 0.8 TWh of electrical energy in 2004, corresponding to approximately 0.5% of the
total generated and imported electrical energy [23, 98].
Wind turbines (WTs) can either operate at fixed speed or variable speed. For a fixed-
speed wind turbine the generator is directly connected to the electrical grid. For a variable-
speed wind turbine the generator is controlled by power electronic equipment. There are
several reasons for using variable-speed operation of wind turbines; among those are pos-
sibilities to reduce stresses of the mechanical structure, acoustic noise reduction and the
possibility to control active and reactive power [11]. Most of the major wind turbine man-
ufactures are developing new larger wind turbines in the 3-to-5-MW range [3]. These large
wind turbines are all based on variable-speed operation with pitch control using a direct-
driven synchronous generator (without gearbox) or a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG).
Fixed-speed induction generators with stall control are regarded as unfeasible [3] for these
large wind turbines. Today, doubly-fed induction generators are commonly used by the wind
turbine industry (year 2005) for larger wind turbines [19, 29, 73, 105].
The major advantage of the doubly-fed induction generator, which has made it popular,
is that the power electronic equipment only has to handle a fraction (20–30%) of the total
system power [36, 68, 110]. This means that the losses in the power electronic equipment can
1
be reduced in comparison to power electronic equipment that has to handle the total system
power as for a direct-driven synchronous generator, apart from the cost saving of using a
smaller converter.
1.1 Review of Related Research
According to [12] the energy production can be increased by 2–6% for a variable-speed wind
turbine in comparison to a fixed-speed wind turbine, while in [112] it is stated that the in-
crease in energy can be 39%. In [69] it is shown that the gain in energy generation of the
variable-speed wind turbine compared to the most simple fixed-speed wind turbine can vary
between 3–28% depending on the site conditions and design parameters. Efficiency calcu-
lations of the DFIG system have been presented in several papers, for instance [52, 86, 99].
A comparison to other electrical systems for wind turbines are, however, harder to find. One
exception is in [16], where Datta et al. have made a comparison of the energy capture for
various WT systems. According to [16] the energy capture can be significantly increased by
using a DFIG. They state an increased energy capture of a DFIG by over 20% with respect to
a variable-speed system using a cage-bar induction machine and by over 60% in comparison
to a fixed-speed system. One of the reasons for the various results is that the assumptions
used vary from investigation to investigation. Factors such as speed control of variable-speed
WTs, blade design, what kind of power that should be used as a common basis for compari-
son, selection of maximum speed of the WT, selected blade profile, missing facts regarding
the base assumptions etc, affect the outcome of the investigations. There is thus a need to
clarify what kind of energy capture gain there could be when using a DFIG WT, both com-
pared to another variable-speed WT and towards a traditional fixed-speed WT.
Control of the DFIG is more complicated than the control of a standard induction ma-
chine. In order to control the DFIG the rotor current is controlled by a power electronic
converter. One common way of controlling the rotor current is by means of field-oriented
(vector) control. Several vector control schemes for the DFIG have been proposed. One
common way is to control the rotor current with stator-flux orientation [46, 61, 80, 99], or
with air-gap-flux orientation [107, 110]. If the stator resistance can be considered small,
stator-flux orientation gives in principle orientation also with the stator voltage (grid-flux
orientation) [17, 61, 68]. Wang et al. [107] have by simulations found that the flux is in-
fluenced both by load changes and stator power supply variations. The flux response to a
disturbance is a damped oscillation. Heller et al. [43] and Congwei et al. [13] have inves-
tigated the stability of the DFIG analytically, showing that the dynamics of the DFIG have
poorly damped eigenvalues (poles) with a corresponding natural frequency near the line fre-
quency, and, also, that the system is unstable for certain operating conditions, at least for a
stator-flux-oriented system. These poorly damped poles influence the rotor current dynamics
through the back electromotive force (EMF). The author has, however, not found in the lit-
erature any evaluation of the performance of different rotor current control laws with respect
to eliminating the influence of the back EMF, which is dependent on the stator voltage, rotor
speed, and stator flux, in the rotor current.
The flux oscillations can be damped in some different ways. One method is to reduce the
bandwidth of the current controllers [43]. Wang et al. [107] have introduced a flux differ-
entiation compensation that improves the damping of the flux. Kelber et al. [54] have used
2
another possibility; to use an extra (third) converter that substitutes the Y point of the stator
winding, i.e., an extra degree of freedom is introduced that can be used to actively damp the
flux oscillations. Kelber has in [55] made a comparison of different methods of damping the
flux oscillations. It was found that the methods with a flux differentiation compensation and
the method with an extra converter manage to damp the oscillations best.
The response of wind turbines to grid disturbances is an important issue, especially since
the rated power of wind-turbine installations steadily increases. Therefore, it is important
for utilities to be able to study the effects of various voltage sags and, for instance, the cor-
responding wind turbine response. For calculations made using grid simulation programs, it
is of importance to have as simple models as possible that still manage to model the dynam-
ics of interest. In [22, 26, 60, 84], a third-order model has been proposed that neglects the
stator-flux dynamics of the DFIG. This model gives a correct mean value [22] but a draw-
back is that some of the main dynamics of the DFIG system are also neglected. In order
to preserve the dynamic behavior of the DFIG system, a slightly different model approach
must be made. As described earlier a dominating feature of the DFIG system is the natural
frequency of the flux dynamics, which is close to the line frequency. Since the dynamics
of the DFIG are influenced by two poorly damped eigenvalues (poles) it would be natural
to reduce the model of the DFIG to the flux dynamics described by a second-order model.
This is a common way to reduce the DFIG model in classical control theory stability analy-
sis [13, 43]. The possibility to use it as simulation model remains to be shown. In order to
preserve the behavior of an oscillatory response, it is obvious that a second-order model is
the simplest that can be used.
New grid codes will require WTs and wind farms to ride through voltage sags, meaning
that normal power production should be re-initiated once the nominal grid voltage has been
recovered. Such codes are in progress both in Sweden [96] and in several other countries
[8]. These grid codes will influence the choice of electrical system in future WTs, which has
initiated industrial research efforts [8, 20, 28, 30, 42, 72] in order to comply. Today, the DFIG
WT will be disconnected from the grid when large voltage sags appear in the grid. After the
DFIG WT has been disconnected, it takes some time before the turbine is reconnected to the
grid. This means that new WTs have to ride through these voltage sags. The DFIG system,
of today, has a crowbar in the rotor circuit, which at large grid disturbances has to short
circuit the rotor circuit in order to protect the converter. This leads to that the turbine must
be disconnected from the grid, after a large voltage sag.
In the literature there are some different methods to modify the DFIG system in order to
accomplish voltage sag ride-through proposed. In [20] anti-parallel thyristors is used in the
stator circuit in order to achieve a quick (within 10 ms) disconnection of the stator circuit,
and thereby be able to remagnetize the generator and reconnect the stator to the grid as fast
as possible. Another option proposed in [72] is to use an “active” crowbar, which can break
the short circuit current in the crowbar. A third method, that has been mentioned earlier,
is to use an additional converter to substitute the Y point of the stator circuit [54, 55]. In
[55], Kelber has shown that such a system can effectively damp the flux oscillations caused
by voltage sags. All of these systems have different dynamical performance. Moreover,
the efficiency and cost of the different voltage sag ride-through system might also influence
the choice of system. Therefore, when modifying the DFIG system for voltage sag ride-
3
through it is necessary to evaluate consequences for cost and efficiency. Any evaluation of
different voltage sag ride-through methods for DFIG wind turbines and how they affect the
efficiency is hard to find in the literature. Consequences for the efficiency is an important
issue since, as mentioned earlier, one of the main advantage with the DFIG system was
that losses of the power electronic equipment is reduced in comparison to a system where
the power electronic equipment has to handle the total power. Moreover, it is necessary to
compare the ride-through system with a system that utilizes a full-power converter, since
such a system can be considered to have excellent voltage sag ride-through performance (as
also will be shown in Chapter 7) [74].
1.2 Purpose and Contributions
The main purpose of this thesis is the analysis of the DFIG for a WT application both during
steady-state operation and transient operation. In order to analyze the DFIG during transient
operation both the control and the modeling of the system is of importance. Hence, the
control and the modeling are also important parts of the thesis. The main contribution of this
thesis is dynamic and steady-state analysis of the DFIG, with details being as follows.
• In Chapter 3 an investigation of the influence of the converter’s size on the energy
production for a DFIG system is analyzed. A smaller converter implies that the con-
verter losses will be lower. On the other hand it also implies a smaller variable-speed
range, which influences the aerodynamical efficiency. Further, in Chapter 3, a com-
parison of the energy efficiency of DFIG system to other electrical systems is pre-
sented. The investigated systems are two fixed-speed induction generator systems and
three variable-speed systems. The variable-speed systems are: a doubly-fed induc-
tion generator, an induction generator (with a full-power converter) and a direct-driven
permanent-magnet synchronous generator system. Important electrical and mechani-
cal losses of the systems are included in the study. In order to make the comparison as
fair as possible the base assumption used in this work is that the maximum (average)
shaft torque of the wind turbine systems used should be the same. Finally, two different
methods of reducing the magnetizing losses of the DFIG system are compared.
• In Chapter 4 a general rotor current control law is derived for the DFIG system. Terms
are introduced in order to allow the possibility to include feed-forward compensation
of the back EMF and/or “active resistance.” “Active resistance” has been used for the
squirrel-cage induction machines to damp disturbances, such as varying back EMF
[18, 41]. The main contribution of Chapter 5 is an evaluation of different rotor cur-
rent control laws with respect to eliminating the influence of the back EMF. Stability
analysis of the system is performed for different combinations of the terms introduced
in the current control law, in both the stator-flux-oriented and the grid-flux-oriented
reference frames, for both correctly and erroneously known parameters.
• In Chapter 6, the grid-fault response of a DFIG wind turbine system is studied. Sim-
ulations are verified with experimental results. Moreover, another objective is also to
study how a reduced-order (second-order) model manages to predict the response of
the DFIG system.
4
• The contribution of Chapter 7 is to analyze, dynamically and in the steady state, two
different voltage sag ride-through systems for the DFIG. Moreover, these two methods
are also compared to a system that utilizes a full-power converter. The reason for
comparing these two systems with a system that utilizes a full-power converter is that
the latter system is capable of voltage sag ride-through.
• Finally, in Chapter 8, a rotor resistance control law for a stall-controlled wind tur-
bine is derived and analyzed. The objective of the control law is to minimize torque
fluctuations and flicker.
1.3 List of Publications
Some of the results presented in this thesis have been published in the following publications.
1. A. Petersson and S. Lundberg, “Energy efficiency comparison of electrical systems for
wind turbines,” in Proc. IEEE Nordic Workshop on Power and Industrial Electronics
(NORpie/2002), Stockholm, Sweden, Aug. 12–14, 2002.
The efficiency of some different electrical systems for wind turbines are compared.
This paper is an early version of the material presented in Chapter 3.
2. T. Thiringer, A. Petersson, and T. Petr˚ u, “Grid Disturbance Response of Wind Turbines
Equipped with Induction Generator and Doubly-Fed Induction Generator,” in Proc.
IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting, vol. 3, Toronto, Canada, July 13–
17, 2003, pp. 1542–1547.
The grid disturbance response to fixed-speed wind turbines and wind turbines with
DFIG were presented.
3. A. Petersson, S. Lundberg, and T. Thiringer, “A DFIG Wind-Turbine Ride-Through
System Influence on the Energy Production,” in Proc. Nordic Wind Power Conference,
G¨ oteborg, Sweden, Mar. 1–2, 2004.
In this paper a voltage sag ride-through system for a DFIG WT based on increased
rating of the valves of the power electronic converter was investigated. This paper
presents one of the voltage sag ride-through system for a DFIG wind turbine that is
compared in Chapter 7.
The organizing committee of the conference recommended submission of this paper
to Wind Energy. The paper has been accepted for publication.
4. A. Petersson, T. Thiringer, and L. Harnefors, “Flicker Reduction of Stall-Controlled
Wind Turbines using Variable Rotor Resistances,” in Proc. Nordic Wind Power Con-
ference, G¨ oteborg, Sweden, Mar. 1–2, 2004.
In this paper a rotor resistance control law is derived for a stall-controlled wind turbine.
The objective of the control law is to minimize the flicker (or voltage fluctuations) con-
tribution. This study is presented in Chapter 8.
5
5. T. Thiringer and A. Petersson, “Grid Integration of Wind Turbines,” Przeglad Elek-
trotechniczny, no. 5, pp. 470–475, 2004.
This paper gives an overview of the three most common wind turbine systems, their
power quality impact, and its the response to grid disturbances.
6. R. Ottersten, A. Petersson, and K. Pietil¨ ainen, “Voltage Sag Response of PWM Rec-
tifiers for Variable-Speed Wind Turbines,” in Proc. IEEE Nordic Workshop on Power
and Industrial Electronics (NORpie/2004), Trondheim, Norway, June 14–16, 2004.
The voltage sag response of a PWMrectifier for wind turbines that utilizes a full-power
converter were studied. This paper serves as a basis for the comparison of ride-through
systems of wind turbines in Chapter 7.
The organizing committee of the conference recommended submission of this paper
to EPE Journal. The paper has been accepted for publication.
7. A. Petersson, L. Harnefors, and T. Thiringer, “Comparison Between Stator-Flux and
Grid-Flux Oriented Rotor-Current Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generators,” in
Proc. IEEE Power Electronics Specialists Conference (PESC’04), vol. 1, Aachen,
Germany, June 20–25, 2004, pp. 482–486.
The comparison between grid-flux and stator-flux-oriented current control of the DFIG
presented in Chapter 5 were studied in this paper.
8. A. Petersson, L. Harnefors, and T. Thiringer, “Evaluation of Current Control Meth-
ods for Wind Turbines Using Doubly-Fed Induction Machines,” IEEE Trans. Power
Electron., vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 227–235, Jan. 2005.
In this paper the analysis of the stator-flux oriented current control of the DFIG pre-
sented in Chapter 5 was studied.
9. A. Petersson, T. Thiringer, L. Harnefors, and T. Petr˚ u, “Modeling and Experimental
Verification of Grid Interaction of a DFIG Wind Turbine,” IEEE Trans. Energy Con-
version (accepted for publication)
Here a full-order model and a reduced-order model of the DFIG is compared during
grid disturbances. The models are experimentally verified with an 850 kW DFIG wind
turbine. These results are also presented in Chapter 6.
6
Chapter 2
Wind Energy Systems
2.1 Wind Energy Conversion
In this section, properties of the wind, which are of interest in this thesis, will be described.
First the wind distribution, i.e., the probability of a certain average wind speed, will be
presented. The wind distribution can be used to determine the expected value of certain
quantities, e.g. produced power. Then different methods to control the aerodynamic power
will be described. Finally, the aerodynamic conversion, i.e., the so-called C
p
(λ, β)-curve,
will be presented. The interested reader can find more information in, for example, [11, 53].
2.1.1 Wind Distribution
The most commonly used probability density function to describe the wind speed is the
Weibull functions [53]. The Weibull distribution is described by the following probability
density function
f(w) =
k
c

w
c

k−1
e
−(w/c)
k
(2.1)
where k is a shape parameter, c is a scale parameter and w is the wind speed. Thus, the
average wind speed (or the expected wind speed), w, can be calculated from
w =


0
wf(w)dw =
c
k
Γ

1
k

(2.2)
where Γ is Euler’s gamma function, i.e.,
Γ(z) =


0
t
z−1
e
−t
dt. (2.3)
If the shape parameter equals 2, the Weibull distribution is known as the Rayleigh distribu-
tion. For the Rayleigh distribution the scale factor, c, given the average wind speed can be
found from (k=2, and Γ(
1
2
) =

π)
c =
2

π
w. (2.4)
In Fig. 2.1, the wind speed probability density function of the Rayleigh distribution is plotted.
The average wind speeds in the figure are 5.4 m/s, 6.8 m/s, and 8.2 m/s. A wind speed of
5.4 m/s correspond to a medium wind speed site in Sweden [100], while 8–9 m/s are wind
speeds available at sites located outside the Danish west coast [24].
7
0 5 10 15 20 25
0
0.05
0.1
0.15
Wind speed [m/s]
P
r
o
b
a
b
i
l
i
t
y
d
e
n
s
i
t
y
Fig. 2.1. Probability density of the Rayleigh distribution. The average wind speeds are 5.4 m/s
(solid), 6.8 m/s (dashed) and 8.2 m/s (dotted).
2.1.2 Aerodynamic Power Control
At high wind speeds it is necessary to limit the input power to the wind turbine, i.e., aero-
dynamic power control. There are three major ways of performing the aerodynamic power
control, i.e., by stall, pitch, or active stall control. Stall control implies that the blades are
designed to stall in high wind speeds and no pitch mechanism is thus required [11].
Pitch control is the most common method of controlling the aerodynamic power gen-
erated by a turbine rotor, for newer larger wind turbines. Almost all variable-speed wind
turbines use pitch control. Below rated wind speed the turbine should produce as much
power as possible, i.e., using a pitch angle that maximizes the energy capture. Above rated
wind speed the pitch angle is controlled in such a way that the aerodynamic power is at its
rated [11]. In order to limit the aerodynamic power, at high wind speeds, the pitch angle is
controlled to decrease the angle of attack, i.e., the angle between the chord line of the blade
and the relative wind direction [53]. It is also possible to increase the angle of attack towards
stall in order to limit the aerodynamic power. This method can be used to fine-tune the power
level at high wind speeds for fixed-speed wind turbines. This control method is known as
active stall or combi stall [11].
2.1.3 Aerodynamic Conversion
Some of the available power in the wind is converted by the rotor blades to mechanical power
acting on the rotor shaft of the WT. For steady-state calculations of the mechanical power
from a wind turbine, the so called C
p
(λ, β)-curve can be used. The mechanical power, P
mech
,
can be determined by [53]
P
mech
=
1
2
ρA
r
C
p
(λ, β)w
3
(2.5)
λ =
Ω
r
r
r
w
(2.6)
8
where C
p
is the power coefficient, β is the pitch angle, λ is the tip speed ratio, w is the wind
speed, Ω
r
is the rotor speed (on the low-speed side of the gearbox), r
r
is the rotor-plane
radius, ρ is the air density and A
r
is the area swept by the rotor. In Fig. 2.2, an example of a
C
p
(λ, β) curve and the shaft power as a function of the wind speed for rated rotor speed, i.e.,
a fixed-speed wind turbine, can be seen. In Fig. 2.2b) the solid line corresponds to a fixed
0 5 10 15 20
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
5 10 15 20 25
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
Tip speed ratio
C
p
(
λ
)
a)
Wind speed [m/s]
P
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
b)
Fig. 2.2. a) The power coefficient, C
p
, as a function of the tip speed ratio, λ. b) Mechanical power as
a function of wind speed at rated rotor speed (solid line is fixed pitch angle, i.e., stall control
and dashed line is active stall).
pitch angle, β, while dashed line corresponds to a varying β (active stall).
Fig. 2.3 shows an example of how the mechanical power, derived from the C
p
(λ, β)
curve, and the rotor speed vary with the wind speed for a variable-speed wind turbine. The
rotor speed in the variable-speed area is controlled in order to keep the optimal tip speed
ratio, λ, i.e., C
p
is kept at maximum as long as the power or rotor speed is below its rated
values. As mentioned before, the pitch angle is at higher wind speeds controlled in order
to limit the input power to the wind turbine, when the turbine has reached the rated power.
As seen in Fig. 2.3b) the turbine in this example reaches the rated power, 1 p.u., at a wind
speed of approximately 13 m/s. Note that there is a possibility to optimize the radius of the
wind turbines rotor to suit sites with different average wind speeds. For example, if the rotor
radius, r
r
, is increased, the output power of the turbine is also increased, according to (2.5).
This implies that the nominal power will be reached for a lower wind speed, referred to
Fig. 2.3b). However, increasing the rotor radius implies that for higher wind speed the output
power must be even more limited, e.g., by pitch control, so that the nominal power of the
generator is not exceeded. Therefore, there is a trade-off between the rotor radius and the
nominal power of the generator. This choice is to a high extent dependent on the average
wind speed of the site.
2.2 Wind Turbine Systems
Wind turbines can operate with either fixed speed (actually within a speed range about 1 %)
or variable speed. For fixed-speed wind turbines, the generator (induction generator) is di-
9
5 10 15 20 25
10
15
20
25
5 10 15 20 25
0
20
40
60
80
100
R
o
t
o
r
s
p
e
e
d
[
r
p
m
]
a)
Wind speed [m/s] Wind speed [m/s]
P
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
b)
Fig. 2.3. Typical characteristic for a variable-speed wind turbine. a) Rotor speed as a function of
wind speed. b) Mechanical power as a function of wind speed.
rectly connected to the grid. Since the speed is almost fixed to the grid frequency, and most
certainly not controllable, it is not possible to store the turbulence of the wind in form of
rotational energy. Therefore, for a fixed-speed system the turbulence of the wind will result
in power variations, and thus affect the power quality of the grid [77]. For a variable-speed
wind turbine the generator is controlled by power electronic equipment, which makes it pos-
sible to control the rotor speed. In this way the power fluctuations caused by wind variations
can be more or less absorbed by changing the rotor speed [82] and thus power variations
originating from the wind conversion and the drive train can be reduced. Hence, the power
quality impact caused by the wind turbine can be improved compared to a fixed-speed tur-
bine [58].
The rotational speed of a wind turbine is fairly low and must therefore be adjusted to
the electrical frequency. This can be done in two ways: with a gearbox or with the number
of pole pairs of the generator. The number of pole pairs sets the mechanical speed of the
generator with respect to the electrical frequency and the gearbox adjusts the rotor speed of
the turbine to the mechanical speed of the generator.
In this section the following wind turbine systems will be presented:
1. Fixed-speed wind turbine with an induction generator.
2. Variable-speed wind turbine equipped with a cage-bar induction generator or synchro-
nous generator.
3. Variable-speed wind turbine equipped with multiple-pole synchronous generator or
multiple-pole permanent-magnet synchronous generator.
4. Variable-speed wind turbine equipped with a doubly-fed induction generator.
There are also other existing wind turbine concepts; a description of some of these systems
can be found in [36].
10
2.2.1 Fixed-Speed Wind Turbine
For the fixed-speed wind turbine the induction generator is directly connected to the electrical
grid according to Fig. 2.4. The rotor speed of the fixed-speed wind turbine is in principle
IG
Soft
starter
Gear-
box
Transformer
Capacitor bank
Fig. 2.4. Fixed-speed wind turbine with an induction generator.
determined by a gearbox and the pole-pair number of the generator. The fixed-speed wind
turbine system has often two fixed speeds. This is accomplished by using two generators
with different ratings and pole pairs, or it can be a generator with two windings having
different ratings and pole pairs. This leads to increased aerodynamic capture as well as
reduced magnetizing losses at low wind speeds. This system (one or two-speed) was the
“conventional” concept used by many Danish manufacturers in the 1980s and 1990s [36].
2.2.2 Variable-Speed Wind Turbine
The system presented in Fig. 2.5 consists of a wind turbine equipped with a converter con-
nected to the stator of the generator. The generator could either be a cage-bar induction
Power electronic
converter
G
Transformer
Gear-
box
=
= ≈

Fig. 2.5. Variable-speed wind turbine with a synchronous/induction generator.
generator or a synchronous generator. The gearbox is designed so that maximum rotor speed
corresponds to rated speed of the generator. Synchronous generators or permanent-magnet
synchronous generators can be designed with multiple poles which implies that there is no
need for a gearbox, see Fig. 2.6. Since this “full-power” converter/generator system is com-
monly used for other applications, one advantage with this system is its well-developed and
robust control [7, 39, 61]. A synchronous generator with multiple poles as a wind turbine
generator is successfully manufactured by Enercon [25].
11
Power electronic
converter
SG
Transformer
=
= ≈

Fig. 2.6. Variable-speed direct-driven (gear-less) wind turbine with a synchronous generator (SG).
2.2.3 Variable-Speed Wind Turbine with Doubly-Fed Induction Gener-
ator
This system, see Fig. 2.7, consists of a wind turbine with doubly-fed induction generator.
This means that the stator is directly connected to the grid while the rotor winding is con-
nected via slip rings to a converter. This system have recently become very popular as gen-
Power electronic
converter
DFIG
Transformer
Gear-
box
=
= ≈

Fig. 2.7. Variable-speed wind turbine with a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG).
erators for variable-speed wind turbines [36]. This is mainly due to the fact that the power
electronic converter only has to handle a fraction (20–30%) of the total power [36, 110].
Therefore, the losses in the power electronic converter can be reduced, compared to a system
where the converter has to handle the total power, see Chapter 3. In addition, the cost of the
converter becomes lower.
There exists a variant of the DFIG method that uses controllable external rotor resistances
(compare to slip power recovery). Some of the drawbacks of this method are that energy is
unnecessary dissipated in the external rotor resistances and that it is not possible to control
the reactive power.
Manufacturers, that produce wind turbines with the doubly-fed induction machine as
generator are, for example, DeWind, GE Wind Energy, Nordex, and Vestas [19, 29, 73, 105].
12
2.3 Doubly-Fed Induction Generator Systems for Wind Tur-
bines
For variable-speed systems with limited variable-speed range, e.g. ±30% of synchronous
speed, the DFIG can be an interesting solution [61]. As mentioned earlier the reason for
this is that power electronic converter only has to handle a fraction (20–30%) of the total
power [36, 110]. This means that the losses in the power electronic converter can be reduced
compared to a system where the converter has to handle the total power. In addition, the cost
of the converter becomes lower. The stator circuit of the DFIG is connected to the grid while
the rotor circuit is connected to a converter via slip rings, see Fig. 2.8. Amore detailed picture
Converter
Fig. 2.8. Principle of the doubly-fed induction generator.
of the DFIG system with a back-to-back converter can be seen in Fig. 2.9. The back-to-back
converter consists of two converters, i.e., machine-side converter and grid-side converter,
that are connected “back-to-back.” Between the two converters a dc-link capacitor is placed,
as energy storage, in order to keep the voltage variations (or ripple) in the dc-link voltage
small. With the machine-side converter it is possible to control the torque or the speed of
DFIG Grid
converter converter
Grid-side Machine-side
dc link

≈ =
=
Fig. 2.9. DFIG system with a back-to-back converter.
the DFIG and also the power factor at the stator terminals, while the main objective for the
grid-side converter is to keep the dc-link voltage constant. The speed–torque characteristics
of the DFIG system can be seen in Fig. 2.10 [61]. As also seen in the figure, the DFIG can
operate both in motor and generator operation with a rotor-speed range of ±Δω
max
r
around
the synchronous speed, ω
1
.
13
Motor
Generator
T
ω
r
ω
1
2Δω
max
r
Fig. 2.10. Speed–torque characteristics of a DFIG.
A typical application, as mentioned earlier, for DFIG is wind turbines, since they operate
in a limited speed range of approximately ±30%. Other applications, besides wind turbines,
for the DFIG systems are, for example, flywheel energy storage system [4], stand-alone
diesel systems [78], pumped storage power plants [6, 43], or rotating converters feeding a
railway grid from a constant frequency public grid [61].
2.3.1 Equivalent Circuit of the Doubly-Fed Induction Generator
The equivalent circuit of the doubly-fed induction generator, with inclusion of the magnetiz-
ing losses, can be seen in Fig. 2.11. This equivalent circuit is valid for one equivalent Y phase
and for steady-state calculations. In the case that the DFIG is Δ-connected the machine can
still be represented by this equivalent Y representation. In this section the jω-method is
adopted for calculations. Note, that if the rotor voltage, V
r
, in Fig. 2.11, is short circuited
+ +
− −
R
s

1
L


1
L
m
R
m
R
r
/s jω
1
L

I
s
I
r
V
s
I
R
m
V
r
s
Fig. 2.11. Equivalent circuit of the DFIG.
the equivalent circuit for the DFIG becomes the ordinary equivalent circuit for a cage-bar
induction machine. Applying Kirchhoff’s voltage law to the circuit in Fig. 2.11 yields [87]
V
s
= R
s
I
s
+ jω
1
L

I
s
+ jω
1
L
m
(I
s
+I
r
+I
R
m
) (2.7)
V
r
s
=
R
r
s
I
r
+ jω
1
L

I
r
+ jω
1
L
m
(I
s
+I
r
+I
R
m
) (2.8)
0 = R
m
I
R
m
+ jω
1
L
m
(I
s
+I
r
+I
R
m
) (2.9)
14
where the following notation is used.
V
s
stator voltage; R
s
stator resistance;
V
r
rotor voltage; R
r
rotor resistance;
I
s
stator current; R
m
magnetizing resistance;
I
r
rotor current; L

stator leakage inductance;
I
R
m
magnetizing resistance current; L

rotor leakage inductance;
ω
1
stator frequency; L
m
magnetizing inductance;
s slip.
The slip, s, equals
s =
ω
1
−ω
r
ω
1
=
ω
2
ω
1
(2.10)
where ω
r
is the rotor speed and ω
2
is the slip frequency. Moreover, if the air-gap flux, stator
flux and rotor flux are defined as
Ψ
m
= L
m
(I
s
+I
r
+I
R
m
) (2.11)
Ψ
s
= L

I
s
+ L
m
(I
s
+I
r
+I
R
m
) = L

I
s
+ Ψ
m
(2.12)
Ψ
r
= L

I
r
+ L
m
(I
s
+I
r
+I
R
m
) = L

I
r
+ Ψ
m
(2.13)
the equations describing the equivalent circuit, i.e., (2.7)–(2.9), can be rewritten as
V
s
= R
s
I
s
+ jω
1
Ψ
s
(2.14)
V
r
s
=
R
r
s
I
r
+ jω
1
Ψ
r
(2.15)
0 = R
m
I
R
m
+ jω
1
Ψ
m
. (2.16)
The resistive losses of the induction generator are
P
loss
= 3

R
s
[I
s
[
2
+ R
r
[I
r
[
2
+ R
m
[I
R
m
[
2

(2.17)
and it is possible to express the electro-mechanical torque, T
e
, as
T
e
= 3n
p
Im

Ψ
m
I

r

= 3n
p
Im

Ψ
r
I

r

(2.18)
where n
p
is the number of pole pairs. Table 2.1 shows some typical parameters of the induc-
tion machine in per unit (p.u.).
TABLE 2.1. TYPICAL PARAMETERS OF THE INDUCTION MACHINE IN P.U., [101].
Small Medium Large
Machine Machine Machine
4 kW 100 kW 800 kW
Stator and rotor resistance R
s
and R
r
0.04 0.01 0.01
Leakage inductance L

+ L

≈ L
σ
0.2 0.3 0.3
Magnetizing inductance L
m
≈ L
M
2.0 3.5 4.0
15
2.3.2 Power Flow
In order to investigate the power flow of the DFIG system the apparent power that is fed to
the DFIG via the stator and rotor circuit has to be determined. The stator apparent power S
s
and rotor apparent power S
r
can be found as
S
s
= 3V
s
I

s
= 3R
s
[I
s
[
2
+ j3ω
1
L

[I
s
[
2
+ j3ω
1
Ψ
m
I

s
(2.19)
S
r
= 3V
r
I

r
= 3R
r
[I
r
[
2
+ j3ω
1
sL

[I
r
[
2
+ j3ω
1

m
I

r
(2.20)
which can be rewritten, using the expressions in the previous section, as
S
s
= 3R
s
[I
s
[
2
+ j3ω
1
L

[I
s
[
2
+ j3ω
1

m
[
2
L
m
+ 3R
m
[I
R
m
[
2
−j3ω
1
Ψ
m
I

r
(2.21)
S
r
= 3R
r
[I
r
[
2
+ j3ω
1
sL

[I
r
[
2
+ j3ω
1

m
I

r
. (2.22)
Now the stator and rotor power can be determined as
P
s
= Re [S
s
] = 3R
s
[I
s
[
2
+ 3R
m
[I
R
m
[
2
+ 3ω
1
Im[Ψ
m
I

r
] ≈ 3ω
1
Im[Ψ
m
I

r
] (2.23)
P
r
= Re [S
r
] = 3R
r
[I
r
[
2
−3ω
1
sIm[Ψ
m
I

r
] ≈ −3ω
1
sIm[Ψ
m
I

r
] (2.24)
where the approximations are because the resistive losses and the magnetizing losses have
been neglected. From the above equations the mechanical power produced by the DFIG can
be determined as the sum of the stator and rotor power as
P
mech
= 3ω
1
Im[Ψ
m
I

r
] −3ω
1
sIm[Ψ
m
I

r
] = 3ω
r
Im[Ψ
m
I

r
] . (2.25)
Then, by dividing P
mech
with mechanical rotor speed, ω
m
= ω
r
/n
p
, the produced electro-
mechanical torque, as given in (2.18), can be found. Moreover, this means that P
s

P
mech
/(1 − s) and P
r
≈ −sP
mech
/(1 − s). In Fig. 2.12 the power flow of a “lossless”
DFIG system can be seen. In the figure it can be seen how the mechanical power divides
P
mech
P
mech
P
mech
/(1 −s)
sP
mech
/(1 −s)
DFIG
Converter
Grid
Fig. 2.12. Power flow of a “lossless” DFIG system.
between the stator and rotor circuits and that it is dependent on the slip. Moreover, the rotor
power is approximately minus the stator power times the slip: P
r
≈ −sP
s
. Therefore, as
mentioned earlier, the rotor converter can be rated as a fraction of the rated power of the
DFIG if the maximum slip is low.
An example of how the stator and rotor powers depend on the slip is shown in Table 2.2.
It can be seen in the table that the power through the converter, given the mechanical power,
16
TABLE 2.2. EXAMPLE OF THE POWER FLOW FOR DIFFERENT SLIPS OF THE DFIG SYSTEM.
slip, s, [%] rotor speed, ω
r
, [p.u.] rotor power, P
r
stator power, P
s
0.3 0.7 −0.43 P
mech.
1.43 P
mech.
0 1.0 0 P
mech.
−0.3 1.3 0.23 P
mech.
0.77 P
mech.
is higher for positive slips (ω
r
< ω
1
). This is due to the factor 1/(1 − s) in the expressions
for the rotor power. However, for a wind turbine, the case is not as shown in Table 2.2. For a
wind turbine, in general, at low mechanical power the slip is positive and for high mechanical
power the slip is negative, as seen in Fig. 2.13. The figure is actually the same as Fig. 2.3, but
the stator and rotor power of the DFIG system is also shown and instead of the rotor speed
the slip is shown. In the figure it is assumed that the gearbox ratio is set in such a way that
5 10 15 20 25
−50
−25
0
25
50
5 10 15 20 25
0
20
40
60
80
100
S
l
i
p
[
%
]
a)
Wind speed [m/s] Wind speed [m/s]
P
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
b)
Fig. 2.13. Typical characteristic for a variable speed DFIG wind turbine. a) Slip as a function of wind
speed. b) Mechanical power (dotted), rotor power (solid) and stator power (dashed) as a
function of wind speed.
the average value of the rotor-speed range corresponds to synchronous speed of the DFIG.
Moreover, for the wind turbine in Fig. 2.13 the stator power is at maximum only 0.7 times
the rated power.
2.3.3 Stator-to-Rotor Turns Ratio
Since the losses in the power electronic converter depend on the current through the valves, it
is important to have a stator-to-rotor turns ratio of the DFIG that minimizes the rotor current
without exceeding the maximum available rotor voltage. In Fig. 2.14 a transformer is placed
between the rotor circuit and the converter. The transformer is to highlight and indicate the
stator-to-rotor turns ratio, but it does not exist in reality.
For example, if the stator-to-rotor turns ratio, n
s
/n
r
, is 0.4, the rotor current is ap-
proximately 0.4 times smaller than the stator current, if the magnetizing current is ne-
glected. Moreover, if the slip s of the DFIG is 30%, the rotor voltage will approximately be
V
rotor
R
= s/(n
s
/n
r
)V
s
= 0.3/0.4V
s
= 0.75V
s
, i.e., 75% of the stator voltage, which leaves
room for a dynamic control reserve. Note that V
rotor
R
= (n
r
/n
s
)V
R
is the actual (physical)
17
Converter
DFIG
n
s
/n
r
Fig. 2.14. Stator-to-rotor turns ratio indicated with a “virtual” transformer.
rotor voltage, while V
R
is rotor voltage referred to the stator circuit. In this thesis, all rotor
variables and parameters are referred to the stator circuit if not otherwise stated.
2.3.4 Lowering Magnetizing Losses
In an ordinary induction machine drive the stator is fed by a converter, which means that it is
possible to reduce the losses in the machine by using an appropriate flux level. At low loads
it is possible to reduce the flux level, which means that the magnetizing losses are lowered,
leading to a better efficiency. However, in the DFIG system the stator is connected to the
grid, and accordingly the flux level is closely linked to the stator voltage. Still, for the DFIG
system there are, at least, two methods to lower the magnetizing losses of the DFIG. This
can be done by:
1. short-circuiting the stator of the induction generator at low wind speeds, and trans-
mitting all the turbine power through the converter. This set-up is referred to as the
short-circuited DFIG.
2. having the stator Δ-connected at high wind speeds and Y-connected at low wind
speeds; referred to as the Y-Δ-connected DFIG.
The influence that these two methods have on the overall efficiency of a DFIG system will
be further analyzed in Chapter 3. A brief description of these two systems follows:
“Short-Circuited DFIG”
Fig. 2.15 shows a diagram of the “short-circuited DFIG.” In the figure two switches can be
seen. Switch S2 is used to disconnect the turbine from the grid and switch S1 is then used
to short-circuit the stator of the DFIG. Now the turbine is operated as a cage-bar induction
machine, except that the converter is connected to the rotor circuit instead of the stator circuit.
This means, that in this operating condition, the DFIG can be controlled in a similar way as
an ordinary cage-bar induction generator. For instance, at low wind speeds the flux level in
the generator can be lowered.
Y-Δ-connected DFIG
Fig. 2.16 presents a set-up of the Y-Δ-connected DFIG. As shown in the figure, a device
for changing between Y and Δ connection has been inserted in the stator circuit. Before a
18
Power electronic
converter
DFIG
Transformer
S1
S2
=
= ≈

Fig. 2.15. Principle of the “short-circuited DFIG.”
Power electronic
converter
DFIG
Transformer
Y/Δ
S1
=
= ≈

Fig. 2.16. Principle of the Y-Δ-connected DFIG.
change from Y to Δ connection (or vice versa) the power of the turbine is reduced to zero and
the switch S1 disconnects the stator circuit from the grid. Then the stator circuit is connected
in Δ (or vice versa) and the turbine is synchronized to the grid.
2.3.5 Other Types of Doubly-Fed Machines
In this section a short presentation of other kinds of doubly-fed machines is made: a cascaded
doubly-fed induction machine, a single-frame cascaded doubly-fed induction machine, a
brushless doubly-fed induction machine, and a doubly-fed reluctance machine.
Cascaded Doubly-Fed Induction Machine
The cascaded doubly-fed induction machine consists of two doubly-fed induction machines
with wound rotors that are connected mechanically through the rotor and electrically through
the rotor circuits. See Fig. 2.17 for a principle diagram. The stator circuit of one of the ma-
chines is directly connected to the grid while the other machine’s stator is connected via a
19
Converter
Fig. 2.17. Principle of cascaded doubly-fed induction machine.
converter to the grid. Since the rotor voltages of both machines are equal, it is possible to
control the induction machine that is directly connected to the grid with the other induction
machine.
It is possible to achieve decoupled control of active and reactive power of the cascaded
doubly-fed induction machine in a manner similar to the doubly-fed induction machine [47].
It is doubtful whether it is practical to combine two individual machines to form a cas-
caded doubly-fed induction machine, even though it is the basic configuration of doubly-fed
induction machine arrangement. Due to a large amount of windings, the losses are expected
to be higher than for a standard doubly-fed induction machine of a comparable rating [48].
Single-Frame Cascaded Doubly-Fed Induction Machine
The single-frame cascaded doubly-fed induction machine is a cascaded doubly-fed induction
machine, but with the two induction machines in one common frame. Although this machine
is mechanically more robust than the cascaded doubly-fed induction machine, it suffers from
comparatively low efficiency [48].
Brushless Doubly-Fed Induction Machine
This is an induction machine with two stator windings in the same slot. That is, one winding
for the power and one winding for the control. See Fig. 2.18 for a principle sketch. To
avoid a direct transformer coupling between the two-stator windings, they can not have the
same number of pole pairs. Furthermore, to avoid unbalanced magnetic pull on the rotor the
difference between the pole pairs must be greater than one [106]. The number of poles in
the rotor must equal the sum of the number of poles in the two stator windings [106]. For
further information and more details, see [106, 108, 111].
Doubly-Fed Reluctance Machine
The stator of the doubly-fed reluctance machine is identical to the brushless doubly-fed in-
duction machine, while the rotor is based on the principle of reluctance. An equivalent circuit
with constant parameters can be obtained for the doubly-fed reluctance machine, in spite the
20
Converter
Fig. 2.18. Principle of the brushless doubly-fed induction machine.
fact that the machine is characterized by a pulsating air-gap flux. It has almost the same
equivalent circuit as the standard doubly-fed induction generator [109].
21
22
Chapter 3
Energy Efficiency of Wind Turbines
The purpose of this chapter is to investigate the energy efficiency of the DFIG system and to
relate this study to other types of WTs with various electrical systems. This study focuses on
1) reducing the magnetizing losses of the DFIG system, 2) influence of the converter’s size
on the energy production (i.e., smaller converter implies a smaller variable-speed range for
the DFIG system) and finally 3) comparison of the DFIG system to other electrical systems.
In order to make the comparison as fair as possible the base assumption used in this work
is that the maximum (average) shaft torque of the wind turbine systems used should be the
same. Moreover, the rated WT power used in this chapter is 2 MW.
3.1 Determination of Power Losses
Steady-state calculations are carried out in this section in order to determine the power losses
of the DFIG system. Moreover, in order to compare the performance of the DFIG system,
the power losses of other systems with induction generators will also be presented. The
following systems are included in this study:
• FSIG 1 system — Fixed-speed system, as described in Section 2.2.1, with one genera-
tor.
• FSIG 2 system — Fixed-speed system, as described in Section 2.2.1, with two gener-
ators or a pole-pair changing mechanism.
• VSIG system — Variable-speed system with an induction generator and a full-power
converter, as described in Section 2.2.2.
• DFIG system — Variable-speed system with a DFIG, as described in Section 2.2.3.
The following losses are taken into account: aerodynamic losses, gearbox losses, gener-
ator losses and converter losses.
3.1.1 Aerodynamic Losses
Fig. 3.1 shows the turbine power as a function of wind speed both for the fixed-speed and
variable-speed systems. In the figure it is seen that the fixed-speed system with only one
generator has a lower input power at low wind speeds. The other systems produce almost
23
5 10 15 20 25
0
20
40
60
80
100
T
u
r
b
i
n
e
p
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
Wind speed [m/s]
Fig. 3.1. Turbine power. The power is given in percent of maximum shaft power. The solid line
corresponds to the variable-speed systems (VSIG and DFIG) and the two-speed system
(FSIG 2). The dotted line corresponds to a fixed-speed system (FSIG 1).
identical results. In order to calculate the power in Fig. 3.1, a so-called C
p
(λ, β)-curve, as
described in Section 2.1.3, derived using blade-element theory has been used used.
In order to avoid making the results dependent on the torque, speed and pitch control
strategy, that vary from turbine to turbine, and anyway the settings used by the manufacturers
are not in detail known by the authors, only the average wind speed is used in the calculations,
i.e., the influence of the turbulence is ignored. The interested reader can find information of
the influence of the turbulence on the energy production in [69].
3.1.2 Gearbox Losses
One way to estimate the gearbox losses, P
loss,GB
, is, [33],
P
loss,GB
= ηP
lowspeed
+ ξP
nom
Ω
r
Ω
r,nom
(3.1)
where η is the gear-mesh losses constant and ξ is a friction constant. According to [34], for
a 2-MW gearbox, the constants η = 0.02 and ξ = 0.005 are reasonable. In Fig. 3.2 the
gearbox losses are shown for the investigated systems.
3.1.3 Induction Generator Losses
In order to calculate the losses of the generator, the equivalent circuit of the induction gener-
ator, with inclusion of magnetizing losses, has been used, see Section 2.3.1.
For the DFIG system, the voltage drop across the slip rings has been neglected. More-
over, the stator-to-rotor turns ratio for the DFIG is adjusted so that maximum rotor voltage
is 75% of the rated grid voltage. This is done in order to have safety margin, i.e., a dynamic
reserve to handle, for instance, a wind gust. Observe that instead of using a varying turns
ratio, the same effect can also be obtained by using different rated voltages on the rotor and
stator [81].
24
4 6 8 10 12 14 16
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
G
e
a
r
b
o
x
l
o
s
s
e
s
[
%
]
Wind speed [m/s]
FSIG 2
FSIG 1
VSIG
Fig. 3.2. Gearbox losses. The losses are given in percent of maximum shaft power. The solid line
corresponds to the variable-speed systems (VSIG and DFIG). The dotted lines correspond
to fixed-speed systems, i.e., FSIG 1 and 2 (both one-speed and two-speed generators).
In Fig. 3.3 the induction generator losses of the DFIG system are shown. The reason that
the generator losses are larger for high wind speeds for the VSIG system compared to the
DFIG system is that the gearbox ratio is different between the two systems. This implies
that the shaft torque of the generators will be different for the two systems, given the same
input power. It can also be noted that the losses of the DFIG are higher than those of the
5 10 15 20 25
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
G
e
n
e
r
a
t
o
r
l
o
s
s
e
s
[
%
]
Wind speed [m/s]
DFIG
VSIG
FSIG 1 & 2
Fig. 3.3. Induction generator losses. The losses are given in percent of maximum shaft power. DFIG
is solid, dashed is the variable-speed system (VSIG) and dotted are the fixed-speed systems
(FSIG 1 and 2).
VSIG for low wind speeds. The reason for this is that the flux level of the VSIG system has
been optimized from an efficiency point of view while for the DFIG system the flux level is
almost fixed to the stator voltage. This means that for the VSIG system a lower flux level is
25
used for low wind speeds, i.e., the magnetizing losses are reduced.
For the IGs used in this chapter operated at 690 V 50 Hz and with a rated current of 1900
A and 390 A, respectively, the following parameters are used:
2-MW power: See Appendix B.1.
0.4-MW power: R
s
= 0.04 p.u., R
r
= 0.01 p.u., R
m
= 192 p.u., L

= 0.12 p.u.,
L

= 0.04 p.u., L
m
= 3.7 p.u. and n
p
= 3.
3.1.4 Converter Losses
In order to be able to feed the IG with a variable voltage and frequency source, the IG can
be connected to a pulse-width modulated (PWM) converter. In Fig. 3.4, an equivalent circuit
of the converter is drawn, where each transistor, T1 to T6, is equipped with a reverse diode.
A PWM circuit switches the transistors to on and off states. The duty cycle of the transistor
and the diode determines whether the transistor or a diode is conducting in a transistor leg
(e.g., T1 and T4).
T1 T2 T3
T4 T5 T6
V
CE0
r
CE
V
T0
r
T


Fig. 3.4. Converter scheme.
The losses of the converter can be divided into switching losses and conducting losses.
The switching losses of the transistors are the turn-on and turn-off losses. For the diode the
switching losses mainly consist of turn-off losses [103], i.e., reverse-recovery energy. The
turn-on and turn-off losses for the transistor and the reverse-recovery energy loss for a diode
can be found from data sheets. The conducting losses arise from the current through the
transistors and diodes. The transistor and the diode can be modeled as constant voltage drops,
V
CE0
and V
T0
, and a resistance in series, r
CE
and r
T
, see Fig. 3.4. Simplified expressions of
the transistor’s and diode’s conducting losses, for a transistor leg, are (with a third harmonic
voltage injection) [2]
P
c,T
=
V
CE0
I
rms

2
π
+
I
rms
V
CE0
m
i
cos(φ)

6
+
r
CE
I
2
rms
2
+
r
CE
I
2
rms
m
i

3 cos(φ)6π

4r
CE
I
2
rms
m
i
cos(φ)
45π

3
(3.2)
P
c,D
=
V
T0
I
rms

2
π

I
rms
V
T0
m
i
cos(φ)

6
+
r
T
I
2
rms
2

r
T
I
2
rms
m
i

3 cos(φ)6π
+
4r
T
I
2
rms
m
i
cos(φ)
45π

3
(3.3)
26
where I
rms
is the root mean square (RMS) value of the (sinusoidal) current to the grid or the
generator, m
i
is the modulation index, and φ is the phase shift between the voltage and the
current.
Since, for the values in this chapter, which are based on [89, 90, 91, 92] (see Table 3.1
for actual values), r
IGBT
= r
CE
≈ r
T
and V
IGBT
= V
CEO
≈ V
TO
. Hence, it is possible
to reduce the loss model of the transistor and the diode to the same model. The conduction
TABLE 3.1. CONVERTER CHARACTERISTIC DATA (IGBT AND INVERSE DIODE).
Nominal current I
C,nom
500 A 1200 A 1800 A 2400 A
Operating dc-link voltage V
CC
1200 V 1200 V 1200 V 1200 V
V
CEO
1.0 V 1.0 V 1.0 V 1.0 V
Lead resistance (IGBT) r
CE
3 mΩ 1.5 mΩ 1 mΩ 0.8 mΩ
Turn-on and turn-off
E
on
+ E
off
288 mJ 575 mJ 863 mJ 1150 mJ
energy (IGBT)
V
TO
1.1 V 1.1 V 1.1 V 1.1 V
Lead resistance (diode) r
T
2.6 mΩ 1.5 mΩ 1.0 mΩ 0.8 mΩ
Reverse recovery
E
rr
43 mJ 86 mJ 128 mJ 171 mJ
energy (diode)
losses can, with the above-mentioned approximation, be written as
P
c
= P
c,T
+ P
c,D
= V
IGBT
2

2
π
I
rms
+ r
IGBT
I
2
rms
. (3.4)
The switching losses of the transistor can be considered to be proportional to the current, for
a given dc-link voltage, as is assumed here [2]. This implies that the switching losses from
the transistor and the inverse diode can be expressed as
P
s,T
= (E
on
+ E
off
)
2

2
π
I
rms
I
C,nom
f
sw
≈ V
sw,T
2

2
π
I
rms
(3.5)
P
s,D
= E
rr
2

2
π
I
rms
I
C,nom
f
sw
≈ V
sw,D
2

2
π
I
rms
(3.6)
where E
on
and E
off
are the turn-on and turn-off energy losses, respectively, for the transistor,
E
rr
is the reverse recovery energy for the diode and I
C,nom
is the nominal current through the
transistor. In the equations above, two voltage drops, V
sw,T
and V
sw,D
, have been introduced.
This is possible since the ratios (E
on
+E
off
)/I
C,nom
and E
rr
/I
C,nom
are practically constant
for all the valves in Table 3.1. This means that for a given dc-link voltage and switching
frequency (which both are assumed in this thesis), the switching losses of the IGBT and
diode can be modeled as a constant voltage drop that is independent of the current rating of
the valves. The switching frequency used in this thesis is 5 kHz. Moreover, since the products
r
CE
I
C,nom
and r
T
I
C,nom
also are practically constant and equal to each other, it is possible
to determine a resistance, r
IGBT,1 A
, that is valid for a nominal current I
C,nom
= 1 A. Then,
the resistance of a specific valve can be determined from r
IGBT
= r
IGBT,1 A
/I
C,nom
, where
I
C,nom
is the nominal current of the valve. In this thesis, I
C,nom
is chosen as I
C,nom
= 2I
max
rms
where I
max
rms
is the maximum RMS value of the current in the valve. By performing the above
simplification the model of the IGBT and valve can be scaled to an arbitrary rating. Using
27
the values given in Table 3.1 it is possible to determine the voltage drops V
sw,T
= 2.5 V and
V
sw,D
= 0.38 V, assuming a switching frequency of 5 kHz and the resistance r
IGBT,1 A
=
1.76 Ω. When determining V
sw,T
, V
sw,D
, and r
IGBT,1 A
the average values of all of the valves
in Table 3.1 has been used. Now, the total losses fromthe three transistor legs of the converter
become
P
loss
= 3(P
c
+ P
s,T
+ P
s,D
)
= 3

(V
IGBT
+ V
sw,T
+ V
sw,D
)
2

2
π
I
rms
+ r
IGBT
I
2
rms

.
(3.7)
The back-to-back converter can be seen as two converters which are connected together: the
machine-side converter (MSC) and the grid-side converter (GSC). For the MSC, the current
through the valves, I
rms
, is the stator current for the VSIG system or the rotor current for the
DFIG system. One way of calculating I
rms
for the GSC is by using the active current that is
produced by the machine, adjusted with the ratio between machine-side voltage and the grid
voltage. The reactive current can be freely chosen. Thus it is now possible to calculate the
losses of the back-to-back converter as
P
loss,converter
= P
loss,GSC
+ P
loss,MSC
. (3.8)
The total converter losses are now presented as a function of wind speed in Fig. 3.5.
From the figure it can, as expected, be noted that the converter losses in the DFIG system are
5 10 15 20 25
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
C
o
n
v
e
r
t
e
r
l
o
s
s
e
s
[
%
]
Wind speed [m/s]
DFIG
VSIG
Fig. 3.5. Converter losses. The losses are given in percent of maximum shaft power. DFIG is solid
and VSIG is dashed.
much lower compared to the full-power converter system.
3.1.5 Total Losses
The total losses (aerodynamic, generator, converter, gearbox) are presented in Fig. 3.6. From
the figure it can be noted that the DFIG system and the two-speed system (FSIG 2) has
roughly the same total losses while the full-power converter system has higher total losses.
28
5 10 15 20 25
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
T
o
t
a
l
l
o
s
s
e
s
[
%
]
Wind speed [m/s]
DFIG
VSIG
FSIG 1 & 2
Fig. 3.6. Total losses. The losses are given in percent of maximum shaft power. DFIG is solid, FSIG
1 and 2 is dotted and VSIG is dashed.
3.2 Energy Production of the DFIG System
In the previous section, the power loss as a function of transmitted power (or wind speed)
was determined. However, for the wind-turbine application, the most important quantity is
the energy delivered to the grid (electric energy capture). Accordingly, in this section the
results in the previous section have been used to determine the energy capture (or energy
efficiency) of the various systems.
In order to do this, the distribution of wind speeds must be known. As mentioned earlier
one commonly used probability density functions to describe the wind speed is the Rayleigh
function [53]. Given a probability density functions, f(w), the average (or expected) value
of the power, P(w), can be found as
P
avg
=


0
P(w)f(w)dw (3.9)
where w is the wind speed.
3.2.1 Investigation of the Influence of the Converter’s Size on the En-
ergy Production
As was mentioned earlier, it is not possible to obtain a full speed range with the DFIG system
if the converter is smaller than the rated power of the turbine. This means that the smaller
the converter is, the more the WT will operate at a non-ideal tip-speed ratio, λ, for low
wind speeds. Fig. 3.7 illustrates the impact of having a smaller converter and thus a smaller
rotor-speed range, i.e., the aerodynamic losses become higher.
In Fig. 3.8 the converter losses are presented for different designs of the rotor-speed
range, i.e., a smaller rotor-speed range implies smaller ratings of the converter. It can be seen
in the figure that the converter losses are lower for smaller rotor-speed ranges (or smaller
converter ratings). Note, as mentioned earlier, that the stator-to-rotor turns ratio has to be
29
4 6 8 10
10
14
18
22
26
4 6 8 10
0
5
10
15
20
R
o
t
o
r
s
p
e
e
d
[
r
p
m
]
T
u
r
b
i
n
e
p
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
Wind speed [m/s] Wind speed [m/s]
Fig. 3.7. Rotor speed and the corresponding turbine power.
5 10 15 20 25
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
C
o
n
v
e
r
t
e
r
l
o
s
s
e
s
[
%
]
Average wind speed [m/s]
12-25 rpm
15-25 rpm
18-25 rpm
21-25 rpm
Fig. 3.8. Converter losses for some different rotor-speed ranges as a function of the wind speed.
designed according to desired variable-speed range in order to minimize the converter losses.
However, the most interesting information is the total energy efficiency. In Fig. 3.9 the energy
efficiency of the DFIG for different rotor-speed ranges (or converter sizes) can be seen. It can
be seen in the figure that the gain in energy increases with the rotor-speed range (converter
size), even though the converter losses of the DFIG system increase with the rotor-speed
range (converter size), as shown in Fig. 3.8. The increased aerodynamic capture has thus a
larger impact than the increased converter losses. If the rotor-speed range is set to 12–25, it
is possible to run at optimal tip-speed ratio in the whole variable-speed area. It can be seen in
the figure, as expected, that the rotor-speed range is of greater importance for a low average
wind-speed compared to a high average wind speed.
30
24−25 20−25 16−25 12−25
86
88
90
92
94
96
E
f

c
i
e
n
c
y
[
%
]
Rotor-speed range [rpm]
Fig. 3.9. Efficiency, for average wind speeds of 5.4 m/s (solid), 6.8 m/s (dashed) and 8.2 m/s (dotted),
of the DFIG system as a function of the rotor-speed range. Note that the aerodynamic
efficiency is also taken into account.
3.2.2 Reduction of Magnetizing Losses
As presented in Section 2.3.4 there are at least two ways of lowering the magnetizing losses,
i.e., this can be done by:
1. short-circuiting the stator of the induction generator at low wind speeds, and trans-
mitting all the turbine power through the converter. This set-up is referred to as the
short-circuited DFIG.
2. having the stator Δ-connected at high wind speeds and Y-connected at low wind
speeds; referred to as the Y-Δ-connected DFIG.
The break-even point of the total losses or the rated values of the equipment determines the
switch-over point for the doubly-fed generators, i.e., the Y-Δ coupling or the synchronization
of the stator voltage to the grid.
In Fig. 3.10 the energy gain using the two methods are presented. It can be seen in the
figure that the Y-Δ-connected DFIG system produces approximately 0.2 percentage units
more energy than the short-circuited DFIG system, at least for low average wind speeds.
Since the Y-Δ-connected DFIG system performs better than the short-circuited DFIG
system the Y-Δ-connected DFIG system will henceforth be referred to as the DFIG system,
and the other variants will not be subjected to any further studies.
3.3 Comparison to Other Wind Turbine Systems
The base assumption made here is that all wind turbine systems have the same average max-
imum shaft torque as well as the same mean upper rotor speed. In Fig. 3.11 the produced
grid power together with the various loss components for an average wind speed of 6 m/s are
presented for the various systems. The systems are the DFIG system, the full variable-speed
31
5 6 7 8 9 10
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
G
a
i
n
i
n
e
n
e
r
g
y
[
%
]
Average wind speed [m/s]
Fig. 3.10. Gain in energy production by lowering the magnetizing losses for a DFIG system as a
function of the average wind speed. Solid line is the Y-Δ-connected DFIG and dashed line
is short-circuited DFIG.
system (VSIG), one-speed system (FSIG 1), two-speed system (FSIG 2), and, a variable-
speed system equipped with a permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG). The aver-
age efficiency for the PMSG is taken from [34]. The converter losses of the PMSG system
are assumed equal to that of the VSIG system. It would also be possible to have the PMSG
connected to a diode rectifier with series or shunt compensating capacitors, which may give
a possibility to reduce the converter losses [32]. However, a transistor rectifier has the poten-
tial to utilize the generator best [32]. In the figure it can be seen that the one-speed system
FSIG 1 FSIG 2 VSIG PMSG DFIG
80
85
90
95
100
Gearbox losses
Generator losses
Converter losses
Grid power
A
v
e
r
a
g
e
p
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
Fig. 3.11. The produced average grid power and generator, converter and gearbox losses for an av-
erage wind speed of 6 m/s. 100% correspond to the input turbine power at optimal, with
respect to the rotor speed, aerodynamic efficiency.
32
(FSIG 1) has the disadvantage of poor aerodynamic efficiency. However, with the two-speed
system (FSIG 2) the aerodynamic efficiency is improved and close to the variable speed
systems (VSIG, PMSG and DFIG).
In Fig. 3.12 the produced energy of the different systems, for various average wind
speeds, are presented. In the figure, the DFIG is operated with a rotor-speed range set to
12–25 rpm.
5 6 7 8 9 10
84
86
88
90
92
94
96
PMSG
FSIG 2
FSIG 1
VSIG
DFIG
P
r
o
d
u
c
e
d
e
n
e
r
g
y
[
%
]
Average wind speed [m/s]
Fig. 3.12. Energy efficiency of the FSIG 1, FSIG 2, VSIG, PMSG and the DFIG system as a function
of the average wind speed.
Detailed information of the gearless electrically magnetized generator system was not
available. However, it is reasonable to assume that the losses in the diode rectifier connected
to the stator, the boost converter on the dc-link, transistor converter towards the grid and the
magnetizing system of the generator are in the same range as the PMSG system. In [35], a
lower fixed-speed IG WT efficiency was reported than in this study. The reason for this is
that the IG in this study has two generators and lower iron losses.
3.4 Discussion
In Fig. 3.12 it can be seen that the two-generator system (FSIG 2), the DFIG system, and the
PMSG system have almost the same efficiency. In [16] it was found that the DFIG system
produced 60% more energy compared to a fixed-speed system. However, in this study the
produced energy of the systems was found to be similar. The difference between the result
here and in [16] is due to the different base assumptions used. Further, it was found in this
investigation that there is a possibility to gain a few percentage units (approximately 2%)
in energy using the DFIG system compared to the full variable-speed system. This can be
compared to a gain of 20% for the DFIG system compared to the variable-speed system
reported in [16]. The reason for the difference is again, that the base assumptions differ.
Reference [16] sets the rating of the stator windings equal while we choose the shaft power
and maximum speed instead.
33
The focus in this chapter is on the electrical energy efficiency of the DFIG-system in
relation to other systems. However, aerodynamics must be accounted for when fixed-speed
and variable-speed turbines are compared. In order to reduce the number of uncertainties,
only the average wind speed has been used and the influence of turbulence has not been
treated. Reference [69] showed that a two-speed active stall turbine and a variable-speed
pitch turbine is fairly unaffected by the turbulence intensity for turbulence intensities up to
15%. For the more unusual turbulence intensities of 20–25% the variable-speed turbines
gained a couple of percentage units in energy production compared to the two-speed active
stall-regulated system.
Of great importance to point out is that when comparing the DFIG system to the full
variable system, the turbulence intensity, regardless of value plays an unimportant role since
the torque and speed control of the turbines are in principle the same. (The rotor-speed
range of the DFIG system is assumed to be almost the same as for the full-variable speed
system). Another problem when incorporating the effect of the turbulence intensity is that
the selection of torque, speed and pitch control influences the result. Also, among other
factors, the time delay between generator switchings for the fixed-speed systems, start and
stop, Δ-Y-reconnections for the DFIG-systems must be known, in order to perform a detailed
energy capture calculation. So, in order not to include uncertainties that might not be the best
chosen, the ambition has instead been to make the comparison as clean as possible, using
only the facts that can be presented clearly and with best certainty.
3.5 Conclusion
In this chapter, it has been found that there is a possibility to gain a few percentage units
in energy efficiency for a doubly-fed induction generator system compared to a cage-bar
induction generator, controlled by a full-power converter. In comparison to a direct-driven
permanent-magnet synchronous generator, controlled by a converter or a two-speed genera-
tor system the difference in energy efficiency was found to be small.
Moreover, two methods to reduce the magnetizing losses (and thereby increase the gain in
energy) of the DFIG system, have been investigated. It was found that the method utilizing a
Y-Δswitch in the stator circuit had the largest gain in energy of the two investigated methods.
Finally, it was found that the converter losses of the DFIG can be reduced if the available
rotor-speed range is made smaller. However, the aerodynamic capture of the wind turbine is
reduced with a smaller rotor-speed range. This means that the increased aerodynamic capture
that can be achieved by a larger converter has, thus, a greater impact than the increased
converter losses.
Worth stressing is that the main reason for using a variable-speed turbine instead of a
fixed-speed turbine is not the energy efficiency, instead it is the possibility of lowering the
mechanical stresses [53] and also improving the power quality [58].
34
Chapter 4
Control of Doubly-Fed Induction
Generator System
4.1 Introduction
In this section, different aspects of designing and implementing control systems for doubly-
fed induction generators (DFIGs) are treated.
4.1.1 Space Vectors
The idea behind space vectors is to describe the induction machine with two phases instead
of three. Space vectors were originally invented to describe the spatial flux of an ac machine
[39]. A three-phase stator winding, which is supplied with three-phase currents, forms a
rotating flux in the air gap. The same rotating flux could also be formed with only two
phases, as seen in Fig. 4.1. This is the principle of space vectors. In order to determine the
⇐⇒
Im Im
Re Re
ψ ψ
Fig. 4.1: Principle of space vectors.
space vector, s
s
, of the three-phase quantities, s
a
, s
b
, and s
c
, the following transformation is
applied [39]
s
s
= s
α
+ js
β
=
2K
3

s
a
+as
b
+a
2
s
c

(4.1)
35
where K is the space-vector scaling constant and a = e
j2π/3
. Superscript “s” indicates that
the space vectors are referred to the reference frame of the stator of the induction machine.
The constant K can be chosen arbitrary, though if it is chosen as
K =
1

2
(4.2)
the space vector will be scaled according to the RMS value of the three-phase quantities.
This choice of K will be used throughout this thesis.
A general space vector can be expressed as
s
s
= se
j(θ
1
+φ)
(4.3)
where φ is a phase shift and θ
1
is the synchronous angle corresponding to the synchronous
frequency, ω
1
, as dω
1
/dt = θ
1
. It is possible to transform the vector to synchronous coordi-
nates (dq coordinates) as
s = s
d
+ js
q
= e
−jθ
1
s
s
= se

. (4.4)
The synchronous coordinate system is not indicated by a superscript. The synchronous co-
ordinate system has to be aligned with a quantity, normally the stator or rotor flux of an
induction machine. However, it is also possible to align the synchronous coordinate system
with, for example, the grid voltage. Space vectors in synchronous coordinates will be dc
quantities in the steady state.
4.1.2 Power and Reactive Power in Terms of Space Vectors
The instantaneous power, P, in a three-phase system is given by
P = v
a
i
a
+ v
b
i
b
+ v
c
i
c
=
3
2K
2
Re [v
s
(i
s
)

] =
3
2K
2
Re [vi

] . (4.5)
The above-mentioned scaling, i.e. K = 1/

2, yields
P = 3Re [vi

] . (4.6)
In (4.6) the instantaneous power is the real part of voltage times the complex conjugate of
the current, i.e., the same as active power in terms of phasors. It is also possible to define
a quantity the instantaneous reactive power, Q, as the corresponding imaginary part of the
above equation [5]:
Q = 3Im[vi

] . (4.7)
4.1.3 Phase-Locked Loop (PLL)-Type Estimator
A PLL-type estimator can be used for estimation of the angle and frequency of a signal, e.g.,
the synchronous frequency, ω
1
, and its corresponding angle, θ
1
. The PLL-type estimator
used in this thesis is described by [37]
dˆ ω
1
dt
= γ
1
ε (4.8)
d
ˆ
θ
1
dt
= ˆ ω
1
+ γ
2
ε (4.9)
36
where ε = sin(θ
1

ˆ
θ
1
) and θ
1

ˆ
θ
1
is the error in the estimated angle. In the above equations
γ
1
and γ
2
are gain parameters. The notation “ˆ” indicates an estimated variable or parameter.
If the true frequency and position are given by dω
1
/dt = 0 and dθ
1
/dt = ω
1
, then it is
shown in [37] that the estimation error equations for ˜ ω
1
= ω
1
− ˆ ω
1
and
˜
θ
1
= θ
1

ˆ
θ
1
are
asymptotically stable if ¦γ
1
, γ
2
¦ > 0. This implies that ˆ ω
1
and
ˆ
θ
1
will converge to ω
1
and θ
1
respectively, asymptotically. If the difference θ
1

ˆ
θ
1
is small, it is possible to approximate
sin(θ
1

ˆ
θ
1
) ≈ θ
1

ˆ
θ
1
, and the following characteristic polynomial of the system described
by (4.8) and (4.9) can be found:
p
2
+ γ
2
p + γ
1
(4.10)
where p = d/dt. If the parameters are chosen as
γ
1
= ρ
2
γ
2
= 2ρ (4.11)
then ρ can be adjusted to the desired bandwidth of the PLL-type estimator.
Modified PLL-Type Estimator
If the PLL-type estimator should synchronize to a constant (or at least close to constant)
frequency, such as the grid frequency, it is possible to simplify the PLL-type estimator in
(4.8)–(4.9). This is done by neglecting (4.8); then the modified PLL-type estimator becomes
[76]
d
ˆ
θ
1
dt
= ω
1
= ω
g
+ ρε. (4.12)
In [76] it is shown that the modified PLL-type estimator rejects better voltage harmonics than
the PLL-type estimator in (4.8)–(4.9). For small bandwidths the rejection is twice as good.
4.1.4 Internal Model Control (IMC)
Due to the simplicity of IMC for designing controllers, this method will be used throughout
this thesis. IMC can, for instance, be used for designing current or speed control laws of any
ac machine [40, 44, 102]. The idea behind IMC is to augment the error between the process,
G(p) and a process model,
ˆ
G(p), by a transfer function C(p), see Fig. 4.2. Controller design
is then just a matter of choosing the “right” transfer function C(p). One common way is [31]
C(p) =

α
p + α

n
ˆ
G
−1
(p) (4.13)
where n is chosen so that C(p) become proper, i.e., the order of the denominator is equal to
or greater than that of the numerator. The closed-loop system will be
G
cl
(p) = G(p)

1 + C(p)[G(p) −
ˆ
G(p)]

−1
C(p) (4.14)
which simplifies to
G
cl
(p) = G(p)C(p) =

α
p + α

n
(4.15)
37
¸
¸
G(p)
ˆ
G(p)
C(p)
i
ref
i
v
F(p)
+
+


Fig. 4.2. Principle of IMC.
when G(p) =
ˆ
G(p). The parameter α is a design parameter, which for n = 1, is set to the
desired bandwidth of the closed-loop system. The relationship between the bandwidth and
the rise time (10%–90%) is α = ln 9/t
rise
. The controller, F(p), (inside the dashed area in
Fig. 4.2) becomes
F(p) =

1 −C(p)
ˆ
G(p)

−1
C(p). (4.16)
For a first-order system, n = 1 is sufficient. The controller then typically becomes an ordi-
nary PI controller:
F(p) =
α
p
ˆ
G
−1
(p) = k
p
+
k
i
p
. (4.17)
4.1.5 “Active Damping”
For a first-order system designed with IMC, the transfer function from the load disturbance
E to output signal i is given by
G
Ei
(p) =
G(p)
1 + G(p)F(p)
=
p
p + α
G(p) (4.18)
if all parameters are assumed to be known. If the dynamics of G(p) are fast, the load dis-
turbance rejection should be sufficient. However, as the dynamics of the process, G(p), are
normally much slower than the dynamics of the closed-loop system, the disturbance rejection
is to a large extent determined by the process [76]. Therefore, addition of an inner feed-back
loop, see Fig. 4.3, can improve the disturbance rejection. Then, the transfer function in (4.18)
is changed to
G
Ei
(p) =
p
p + α
G(p)
1 + G(p)R
=
p
p + α
1
G
−1
(p) + R
. (4.19)
For a first-order system it is possible to choose R so that the above transfer function can be
reduced to
G
Ei
(p) = K
p
(p + α)
2
(4.20)
38
¸ ¸ ¸
G(p)
R
F(p)
i
ref
i
v
v

E(p)
+
+ + +
− −
Fig. 4.3. Principle of “active damping.”
where K is a constant. This means that a load disturbance E is damped with the same
time constant as the control loop. This will be refereed to as “active damping” or “active
resistance.” “Active damping” has been used for the cage-bar induction machine to damp
disturbances, such as varying back EMF [18, 41].
For example, consider the following first-order system (e.g., a dc machine)
L
di
dt
= v −Ri + e (4.21)
where i is the state (current), v is the input signal (applied voltage), and e is a load disturbance
(back emf). Then the “active damping” can be introduced by letting v = v

−R
a
i, where the
term R
a
i is the “active damping” term. Then, the system can be rewritten as
L
di
dt
= v

−(R + R
a
)i + e (4.22)
which has the following transfer function
G(p) =
i(p)
v

(p)
=
1
Lp + R + R
a
. (4.23)
By using IMC, the following PI controller can be found:
F(p) =
α
p
G
−1
(p) = αL + α
R + R
a
p
. (4.24)
Then, from (4.19), the transfer function from the load disturbance e to the output i can be
determined as
G
ei
(p) =
p
p + α
1
G
−1
(p) + R
a
. (4.25)
By choosing R
a
= αL −R, the transfer function is reduced to
G
ei
(p) =
p
L(p + α)
2
. (4.26)
This means that the disturbance is damped with the same time constant as the dynamics of
the control loop.
39
4.1.6 Saturation and Integration Anti-Windup
When designing control laws, the control signal cannot be arbitrary large due to design lim-
itations of the converter or the machine. Therefore, the control signal must be limited (satu-
rated). This causes the integral part of the PI controller to accumulate the control error during
the saturation, so called integrator wind-up. This might cause overshoots in the controlled
variable since the integration part of control law will keep the ideal control signal high even
when the controlled variable is getting closer to the reference value [39].
One method to avoid integration wind-up is to use the “back-calculation” method [39].
The idea behind the back-calculation method is to modify the reference value in case of
saturation, so that the ideal control signal, u, does not exceed the maximum value, i.e.,
[u[ = u
max
. The algorithm can be described as [39]
u = k
p
e + k
i
I (4.27)
u
sat
= sat(u) (4.28)
dI
dt
= e +
u
sat
−u
k
p
(4.29)
where e is the control error and I is the integral of the control error.
4.1.7 Discretization
Throughout the thesis, differential equations and control laws will be described in continuous
time. However, when implementing control laws in computers, they have to be discretized.
The forward Euler method will be used, i.e., a derivative is approximated as
dx
dt

x(n + 1) −x(n)
T
sample
(4.30)
where n indicates the sample number, at time t = nT
sample
. For a continuous system given
as
˙ x(t) = Ax(t) + Bu(t) (4.31)
y(t) = Cx(t) (4.32)
the discrete equivalent using the forward Euler method becomes
x(n + 1) = (I + AT
sample
)x(n) + T
sample
Bu(n) (4.33)
y(n) = Cx(n). (4.34)
The forward Euler discretization can also be written as
p −→
q −1
T
sample
(4.35)
where q is the forward shift operator. Stability of a linear time-invariant continuous system
requires that the poles are in the left half plane. For a linear time-invariant discrete system
the corresponding stability region is inside the unit circle [88]. Mapping the unit circle
40
Im
Re
p plane
1/T
sample
Fig. 4.4: Region of stability.
onto the continuous p plane using (4.35) gives the region in the p plane where the poles
of the continuous system must be located in order to get a stable discretization [38]. Fig.
4.4 shows where the poles of continuous system must be located so that the forward Euler
discretization, in (4.35), becomes stable. As seen in the figure the poles must be inside a
circle with the radius of 1/T
sample
with the center point located at (−1/T
sample
, 0) in order
for the forward Euler discretization to be stable.
4.2 Mathematical Models of the DFIG System
In Fig. 4.5 an equivalent circuit of the DFIG system can be seen. As mentioned earlier, the
system consists of a DFIG and a back-to-back voltage source converter with a dc link. The
back-to-back converter consists of a grid-side converter (GSC) and a machine-side converter
(MSC). Moreover, a grid filter is placed in between the GSC and the grid, since both the
grid and the voltage source converter are voltage stiff and to reduce the harmonics caused
by the converter. For voltage source converters the grid filter used is mainly an L-filter or
an LCL-filter [62]. However, in this thesis the L-grid filter will be used, as shown in Fig.
4.5. More detailed description of the models of the components of the DFIG system will be
performed in the following sections. In addition, the variables and the parameters in Fig. 4.5
will also be explained.
4.2.1 Machine Model
Due to its simplicity for deriving control laws for the DFIG, the Γ representation of the IG
model will be used. Note, that from a dynamic point of view, the rotor and the stator leakage
inductance have the same effect. Therefore, it is possible to use a different representation of
the Park model in which the leakage inductance is placed in the rotor circuit, the so-called
Γ representation of the induction machine [94]. The name is due to the formation of a “Γ”
of the inductances; see Fig. 4.6. This model is described by the following space-vector
41
+ +
+ + +
− −
− − −
E
s
g
i
s
g
i
s
f
v
s
s
i
s
s
R
f
L
f
Grid filter
R
s
L
M
v
s
f
L
σ


=
=
DFIG
GSC
R
R
C
dc

r
Ψ
s
R i
s
R
v
s
R
v
dc
dc-link
MSC
Fig. 4.5. Equivalent circuit of the DFIG system.
+
+
+



R
s
L
σ
L
M
R
R i
s
s
i
s
R

r
Ψ
s
R
v
s
s
v
s
R
Fig. 4.6. Γ representation of the IG in stator coordinates. Superscript “s” indicates that the space
vectors are referred to the reference frame of the stator of the DFIG.
equations in stator coordinates [94]:
v
s
s
= R
s
i
s
s
+

s
s
dt
(4.36)
v
s
R
= R
R
i
s
R
+

s
R
dt
−jω
r
Ψ
s
R
(4.37)
where superscript s indicates stator coordinates. The model can also be described in syn-
chronous coordinates as
v
s
= R
s
i
s
+

s
dt
+ jω
1
Ψ
s
(4.38)
v
R
= R
R
i
R
+

R
dt
+ jω
2
Ψ
R
(4.39)
where the following notation is used:
42
v
s
stator voltage; Ψ
s
stator flux;
v
R
rotor voltage; Ψ
R
rotor flux;
i
s
stator current; R
s
stator resistance;
i
R
rotor current; R
R
rotor resistance;
ω
1
synchronous frequency; ω
2
slip frequency.
The stator flux, rotor flux, and electromechanical torque are given by
Ψ
s
= L
M
(i
s
+i
R
) (4.40)
Ψ
R
= (L
M
+ L
σ
)i
R
+ L
M
i
s
= Ψ
s
+ L
σ
i
R
(4.41)
T
e
= 3n
p
Im

Ψ
s
i

R

(4.42)
where L
M
is the magnetizing inductance, L
σ
is the leakage inductance, and n
p
is the number
of pole pairs. Finally, the mechanical dynamics of the induction machine are described by
J
n
p

r
dt
= T
e
−T
s
(4.43)
where J is the inertia and T
s
is the shaft torque. The quantities and parameters of the Γ
model relate to the Park model (or the T representation) as follows:
v
R
= γv
R
i
R
=
i
r
γ
Ψ
R
= γΨ
r
γ =
L

+ L
m
L
m
R
R
= γ
2
R
r
L
σ
= γL

+ γ
2
L

L
M
= γL
m
.
4.2.2 Grid-Filter Model
In Fig. 4.7 the equivalent circuit of the grid filter in stator coordinates can be seen. The filter
consists of an inductance L
f
and its resistance R
f
. Applying Kirchhoffs voltage law to the
+ +
− −
L
f
R
f
E
s
g
v
s
f
i
s
f
Fig. 4.7. Grid-filter model in stator coordinates.
circuit in the figure the following model in synchronous coordinates can be found:
E
g
= −(R
f
+ jω
1
L
f
) i
f
−L
f
di
f
dt
+v
f
(4.44)
where E
g
is the grid voltage, i
f
is the grid-filter current, and v
f
is the grid-filter voltage
supplied from the grid-side converter.
43
Harmonics
The transfer function, G
f
(p), of the grid filter can be expressed as
G
f
(p) =
i
s
f
(p)
v
s
f
(p)
=
1
L
f
p + R
f
. (4.45)
This means that the damping of the grid filter is given by
[G
f
(jω)[ =
1

L
2
f
ω
2
+ R
2
f
. (4.46)
If L
f
ω R
f
, the gain can be approximated as [G
f
(jω)[ ≈ 1/(L
f
ω). For example, if the
switching frequency of the converter is ω = 100 p.u. and L
f
= 0.2 p.u., then the gain of
the grid filter is [G
f
(j100)[ ≈ 0.05 p.u. (corresponding to a damping of 26 dB) if R
f
can be
neglected.
4.2.3 DC-Link Model
The energy, W
dc
, stored in the dc-link capacitor, C
dc
, is given by
W
dc
=
1
2
C
dc
v
2
dc
(4.47)
where v
dc
is the dc-link voltage. In Fig. 4.8 an equivalent circuit of the dc-link model, where
the definition of the power flow through the grid-side converter (GSC) and the machine-
side converter (MSC, can be seen. Moreover, if the losses in the actual converter can be

≈ =
=
+

P
r
P
f
C
dc
v
dc
MSC GSC
Fig. 4.8. DC-link model.
considered small and thereby be neglected, the energy in the dc-link capacitor is dependent
on the power delivered to the grid filter, P
f
, and the power delivered to the rotor circuit of
the DFIG, P
r
, as [76]
dW
dc
dt
=
1
2
C
dc
d
dt
v
2
dc
= −P
f
−P
r
. (4.48)
This means that the dc-link voltage will vary as
C
dc
v
dc
dv
dc
dt
= −P
f
−P
r
(4.49)
which means that P
f
= −P
r
for a constant dc-link voltage.
44
4.2.4 Summary
The total model of the DFIG system, presented in Fig. 4.5 can now be summarized in syn-
chronous coordinate, as

s
dt
= E
g
−R
s
i
s
−jω
1
Ψ
s
(4.50)

R
dt
= v
R
−R
R
i
R
−jω
2
Ψ
R
(4.51)
L
f
di
f
dt
= v
f
−(R
f
+ jω
1
L
f
) i
f
−E
g
(4.52)
C
dc
v
dc
dv
dc
dt
= −P
f
−P
r
(4.53)
J
n
p

r
dt
= T
e
−T
s
(4.54)
where
Ψ
s
= L
M
(i
s
+i
R
) (4.55)
Ψ
R
= L
σ
i
R
+ L
M
(i
s
+i
R
) (4.56)
T
e
= 3n
p
Im

Ψ
s
i

R

(4.57)
P
r
= 3Re [v
R
i

R
] (4.58)
P
f
= 3Re

v
f
i

f

. (4.59)
Note that in (4.50) that the stator voltage, v
s
, has been changed to the grid voltage, E
g
.
4.3 Field Orientation
In order to control the rotor current of a DFIG by means of vector control, the reference
frame has to be aligned with a flux linkage. One common way is to control the rotor currents
with stator-flux orientation [46, 61, 80, 99], or with air-gap-flux orientation [107, 110]. If the
stator resistance is considered to be small, stator-flux orientation gives orientation also with
the stator voltage [17, 61, 68]. According to [17], pure stator-voltage orientation can be done
without any significant error. Note that in this thesis stator-voltage orientation will be, from
now on, referred to as grid-flux orientation [21], i.e., the machine is aligned with a virtual
grid flux.
Fig. 4.9 shows an example of the space vectors of the grid voltage and the stator flux.
As illustrated by the figure there is only a small angular difference between the grid-voltage
and stator-flux space vectors in the stator-flux reference frame compared to the grid-flux
reference frame.
4.3.1 Stator-Flux Orientation
For a stator-flux-oriented system the synchronous angle θ
1
is defined as
θ
1
= ∠Ψ
s
s
(4.60)
45
a)
b)
d d
q q
E
g
E
g
Ψ
s
Ψ
s
Ψ
g
Fig. 4.9. Space-vector diagram of grid voltage and stator flux. a) Stator-flux orientation. b) Grid-flux
orientation.
where Ψ
s
s
is the stator flux in stator coordinates. Then the stator flux can be transformed to
synchronous coordinates as
Ψ
s
= Ψ
s
s
e
−j
ˆ
θ
1
= ψ
s
e
j
˜
θ
1
(4.61)
where
ˆ
θ
1
is the estimate of θ
1
, ψ
s
is the stator flux magnitude, and
˜
θ
1
= θ
1

ˆ
θ
1
is the error
between the synchronous angle and its estimate. This means that for perfect field orientation,
i.e. θ
1
=
ˆ
θ
1
, that Ψ
s
= ψ
s
, i.e., the space vector of the flux is real valued. Moreover, if
the stator current, rotor current and the rotor position are measured, the stator flux can be
calculated and thus the transformation angle can be found.
4.3.2 Grid-Flux Orientation
The basic idea behind grid-flux orientation is to define a virtual grid flux, Ψ
s
g
, as [21, 76]
Ψ
s
g
=
E
s
g

g
= −
jE
g
e

g
ω
g
(4.62)
where ω
g
is the frequency of the grid voltage and θ
g
is the corresponding angle. Since ω
g
is close to constant, the virtual grid flux is linked to the grid voltage. This means that the
relationship between the synchronous angle, θ
1
, and the grid voltage angle, θ
g
, for a grid-flux
oriented (or stator-voltage oriented) system, is
θ
1
= ∠Ψ
s
g
= ∠ −jE
s
g
= θ
g

π
2
. (4.63)
Then, the grid voltage can be transformed to synchronous coordinates as
E
g
= E
s
g
e
−j
ˆ
θ
1
= jE
g
e
j
˜
θ
1
(4.64)
where E
g
is the grid voltage magnitude. This means that for perfect field orientation, i.e.,
θ
1
=
ˆ
θ
1
, that E
g
= jE
g
, i.e., the space vector of the grid voltage is imaginary. Note that
the grid-flux orientation is equal to the stator-flux orientation in the steady state, if the stator
resistance can be neglected, since then
v
s
= E
g
= R
s
i
s
+

s
dt
+ jω
1
Ψ
s
≈ jω
1
Ψ
s
(4.65)
46
and ω
1
= ω
g
. The transformation angle for a grid-flux oriented system can be found directly
from measurements of the stator voltage. However, in order to have some filtering effect a
PLL-estimator, as described in Section 4.1.3, can be used to track the grid frequency and its
corresponding angle.
4.4 Control of Machine-Side Converter
The main task of the machine-side converter is, of course, to control the machine. This is
done by having an inner fast field-oriented current control loop that controls the rotor current.
The field orientation could, for example, either be aligned with the stator flux of the DFIG
or the grid flux. For both reference frames the q component of the rotor current largely
determines the produced torque while the d component can be used to control, for instance,
the reactive power at the stator terminals.
4.4.1 Current Control
As mentioned earlier, it is common to control the rotor current with either stator-flux orien-
tation or grid-flux orientation. In order to derive the rotor-current control law, it is advanta-
geous to eliminate i
s
and Ψ
R
from (4.38) and (4.39), which yields
v
s
= −R
s
i
R
+

s
dt
+

R
s
L
M
+ jω
1

Ψ
s
(4.66)
v
R
= (R
R
+ jω
2
L
σ
)i
R
+ L
σ
di
R
dt
+

s
dt
+ jω
2
Ψ
s
= (R
R
+ R
s
+ jω
2
L
σ
)i
R
+ L
σ
di
R
dt
+E
(4.67)
E = v
s

R
s
L
M
+ jω
r

Ψ
s
(4.68)
where E is the back EMF. It is possible to decouple the cross coupling between the d and q
components of the rotor current—jω
2
L
σ
i
R
in (4.67)—in the control law [17, 80]. Further, it
is possible to include a feed-forward compensating term in the control law that will compen-
sate for the tracking error caused by variations in the back EMF. In [46, 61, 80] this is done
by feed forward of the term jω
2
Ψ
s
and neglecting the derivative of the flux in (4.67). Here,
an estimate of the whole back EMF,
ˆ
E, will be used:
v
R
= v

R
+ (j ˆ ω
2
ˆ
L
σ
−R
a
)i
R
+ k
E
ˆ
E
= k
p
e + k
i

e dt + (j ˆ ω
2
ˆ
L
σ
−R
a
)i
R
+ k
E
ˆ
E. (4.69)
where “ˆ” indicates an estimated quantity. A coefficient k
E
is introduced in order to make
the control law more general and to simplify the analysis in Chapter 5:
k
E
=

0 for control without feed forward of E
1 for control with feed forward of E.
(4.70)
Furthermore, in (4.69), an “active resistance,” R
a
, has been introduced. The “active re-
sistance” is used to increase the damping of disturbances and variations in the back EMF.
47
Similar approaches have been used for the squirrel-cage IG [18, 41]. How to choose the
“active resistance” will be shown in next section. If the estimate of the slip frequency, ˆ ω
2
, is
put to zero in (4.69), the d and the q components of the rotor current will not be decoupled.
In [46] it is stated that the influence of the decoupling term jω
2
L
σ
i
R
is of minor importance,
since it is an order of magnitude smaller than the term jω
2
Ψ
s
. Nevertheless, here the d and q
components of the rotor current will be decoupled, since for a DSP-based digital controller
it is easy to implement.
Substituting (4.69) in (4.67), the rotor current dynamics formed by the inner loop in
Fig. 4.10 are now given by
L
σ
di
R
dt
= v

R
−(R
R
+ R
s
+ R
a
)i
R
(4.71)
where the estimated parameters in the control law are assumed to have the correct values. If
the back EMF is not compensated for, i.e., k
E
= 0 in (4.69), it is treated as a disturbance to
the rotor current dynamics. The transfer function from v

R
to i
R
is
G(p) =
1
pL
σ
+ R
R
+ R
s
+ R
a
which via (4.17) yields the following controller parameters
k
p
= α
c
ˆ
L
σ
k
i
= α
c
(
ˆ
R
R
+
ˆ
R
s
+ R
a
) (4.72)
where α
c
is closed-loop bandwidth of the current dynamics, giving
G
cl
(p) =
p
p + α
c
. (4.73)
+
+
+ +

− −
¸ ¸ ¸
G(p)
i
R i
ref
R
k
p
+
k
i
p
R
a
−j ˆ ω
2
ˆ
L
σ
v
R v

R
E
ˆ
E
DFIG
Fig. 4.10. Block diagram of the current control system. The dashed box is the model for the doubly-
fed induction generator.
48
Selection of the “Active Resistance”
If the “active resistance” is set to R
a
= k
R

c
ˆ
L
σ

ˆ
R
R

ˆ
R
s
), the transfer function from the
back EMF, E, to the current, i
R
, cf. Fig. 4.10, is given as
G
Ei
(p) =
−p/(p + α
c
)
pL
σ
+ L
σ
α
c
k
R
+ (1 −k
R
)(R
r
+ R
s
)
(4.74)
if all model parameters are assumed to be accurate. A parameter k
R
is introduced in a fashion
similar to (4.70):
k
R
=

0 for control without “active resistance”
1 for control with “active resistance.”
(4.75)
This yields
G
Ei
(p) =





−p
(p + α
c
)(pL
σ
+ R
R
+ R
s
)
k
R
= 0
−p
L
σ
(p + α
c
)
2
k
R
= 1
(4.76)
This means that the above choice of R
a
will force a change in the back EMF to be damped
with the same bandwidth as the closed-loop current dynamics. Since R
a
should be greater
than zero, the minimum bandwidth of the current control loop when using “active resistance”
becomes
α
c,min
= (R
R
+ R
s
)/L
σ
. (4.77)
For the investigated system, α
c,min
equals 0.08 p.u., which can be considered as a low value
since for modern drive, a current control loop bandwidth of 7 p.u. is reasonable [40], corre-
sponding to a rise time of 1 ms at a base frequency of 50 Hz.
In order to investigate the performance of the “active resistance” with regards to damping
of disturbances, we study the ratio between the moduli of the frequency function correspond-
ing to (4.74), with and without “active resistance”:
G
r
(ω) =
[G
Ei
(jω)[
k
R
=1
[G
Ei
(jω)[
k
R
=0
=

(R
R
+ R
s
)
2
+ ω
2
L
2
σ

2
c
+ ω
2
)L
2
σ
. (4.78)
The following two extreme values of the above ratio are worth noting:
G
r
(ω) =



R
R
+ R
s
α
c
L
σ
when ω −→0
1 when ω −→∞
(4.79)
which shows that while the “active resistance” has little impact on high-frequency distur-
bances, the damping of low-frequency disturbances is significantly improved, since, typi-
cally, R
R
+R
s

c
L
σ
. In Fig. 4.11, G
r
(ω), is depicted for a current control loop bandwidth
of 7 p.u. It can be seen that when using “active resistance,” the damping of low-frequency
disturbances has been significantly improved.
49
0 5 10 15 20 25
−100
−50
0
ω [p.u.]
G
r
(
ω
)
[
d
B
]
Fig. 4.11. Ratio of the damping improvement when using “active resistance” as a function of the
frequency, ω, of the back EMF. The bandwidth of the current control loop is set to 7 p.u.
4.4.2 Torque Control
The electromechanical torque can be found from (4.42) as
T
e
= 3n
p
Im

Ψ
s
i

R

≈ −3n
p
ψ
s
i
Rq
. (4.80)
For a stator-flux-oriented system the above approximation is actually an equality. Since the
stator flux, ψ
s
, is almost fixed to the stator voltage, the torque can be controlled by the q
component of the rotor current, i
Rq
. Since it is difficult to measure the torque, it is most
often controlled in an open-loop manner. Therefore, the q component reference current, i
ref
Rq
,
can be determined from the reference torque, T
ref
e
, as
i
ref
Rq
= −
T
ref
e
3n
p
ˆ
ψ
s
. (4.81)
Instead of using the actual flux in (4.81), the approximation
ˆ
ψ
s
≈ E
g,nom

1
can be used.
Fig. 4.12 shows a block diagram of the open-loop torque control scheme.
T
ref
e
i
ref
Rq

1
3n
p
ˆ
ψ
s
Fig. 4.12: Block diagram of the open-loop torque control.
4.4.3 Speed Control
Since the current dynamics, i.e., with the bandwidth α
c
, should be set much faster than the
speed dynamics, the speed can be controlled in cascade with the current. The mechanical
dynamics are described by
J
n
p

r
dt
= T
e
−T
s
(4.82)
50
where T
e
is the electromechanical torque and T
s
is the shaft torque. The electromechanical
torque can be expressed, under the assumption that the current dynamics are much faster
than the speed dynamics, as
T
e
= T
ref
e
(4.83)
where the reference torque is set to
T
ref
e
= T
ref
e
−B
a
ω
r
(4.84)
where an “active damping” term, B
a
, is introduced. This is, as mentioned earlier, an inner
feedback loop [41], that can be used to improve the damping of disturbances. How to de-
termine the “active damping” will be shown in the next section. The transfer function from
T
ref
e
to ω
r
, treating the shaft torque, T
s
, as a disturbance, then becomes
G(p) =
ω
r
(p)
T
ref
e
(p)
=
1
J
n
p
p + B
a
. (4.85)
Using IMC, as described in Section 4.1.4, the following PI controller can be found:
F(p) =
α
s
p
G
−1
(p) = k
p
+
k
i
p
=
ˆ

s
n
p
+
B
a
α
s
p
(4.86)
where α
s
is the desired closed-loop bandwidth of the speed-control loop and the notation
“ˆ” indicates an estimated quantity. Fig. 4.13 shows a block diagram of the speed control
system.
¸ ¸ ¸ n
p
Jp
B
a
F(p)
ω
ref
r
ω
r
T
ref
e
T
ref
e
T
s
+ + +

− −
Fig. 4.13. Speed control loop.
Choosing the “Active Damping”
The transfer function from the shaft torque, T
s
, to the rotational speed can be described by,
see Fig. 4.13,
ω
r
(p)
T
s
=
p
ˆ
J
n
p
p
2
+ (B
a
+ k
p
)p + k
i
(4.87)
51
if the active damping term is chosen as B
a
= α
s
ˆ
J/n
p
, (4.87), becomes
ω
r
(p)
T
s
=
p
J
n
p
(p + α
s
)
2
(4.88)
i.e., change in the shaft torque, T
s
, is damped with the same time constant as the bandwidth
of the speed-control loop. In (4.88) all parameters are assumed to be ideal.
Evaluation
Fig. 4.14 shows a simulation of the speed control loop with rated driving torque. The band-
width of the current control loop is set to 1.4 p.u. and the bandwidth of the speed control
loop, α
s
, is set to 0.014 p.u. A bandwidth of 1.4 p.u. corresponds to a rise time of 5 ms and
0.014 p.u. corresponds to 0.5 s. Initially the speed reference is set to 1.25 p.u., after 1 s it is
changed to 0.75 p.u. After 4 s it is changed back to 1.25 p.u., and after 7 s the reference is
ramped down during 3 s to 1 p.u. Finally, after 13 s the driving torque is changed to 50%
of its rated value. The simulations shows that the speed-control loop behaves as expected.
Moreover, it can be seen in the simulation that the speed reference step at 1 s forces limita-
tion of the rotor current, since the maximum rotor current has been reached. This causes the
rise time of the rotor speed to be longer than the ideal.
0 5 10 15
0.5
1
1.5
0 5 10 15
0
0.5
1
1.5
R
o
t
o
r
S
p
e
e
d
[
p
.
u
.
] a)
Time [s]
R
o
t
o
r
C
u
r
r
e
n
t
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
Fig. 4.14. Simulation of the speed-control loop. a) Rotor speed. b) Rotor current (q component).
4.4.4 Reactive Power Control
The instantaneous apparent power at the stator terminals, S
s
= P
s
+jQ
s
, can now be found
as
S
s
= 3v
s
i

s
= 3

R
s
i
s
+

s
dt
+ jω
1
Ψ
s

i

s
(4.89)
52
Then the active and reactive power, neglecting the derivative of the stator flux, can thus be
written as
P
s
= 3R
s
[i
s
[
2
+ 3ω
1

sd
i
sq
−ψ
sq
i
sd
) (4.90)
Q
s
= 3ω
1

sd
i
sd
+ ψ
sq
i
sq
) . (4.91)
For a stator-flux-oriented system, i.e., ψ
sd
= ψ
s
and ψ
sq
= 0, the above is reduced to
P
s
= 3R
s
[i
s
[
2
+ 3ω
1
ψ
s
i
sq
= 3R
s

[i
R
[
2
−2
ψ
s
L
M
i
Rd
+
ψ
2
s
L
2
M

−3ω
1
ψ
s
i
Rq
(4.92)
Q
s
= 3ω
1
ψ
s
i
sd
= 3ω
1
ψ
s

ψ
s
L
M
−i
Rd

. (4.93)
For a grid-flux-oriented system, where the voltage is aligned with the q axis, the expression
in (4.92) and (4.93), still holds approximately since R
s
can be considered as small. From
(4.93) it can be seen that if
i
ref
Rd
=
ˆ
ψ
s
ˆ
L
M
(4.94)
the DFIG is operated at unity power factor.
Closed-Loop Reactive Power Control
Since the flux for a DFIG system can be considered as constant, there will be a static rela-
tionship between the reactive power and the d component of the rotor current, G
Qi
Rd
. This
means that IMC yields in an I controller, as
F
Q
=
α
Q
p
G
−1
Qi
Rd
= −
α
Q

1
ˆ
ψ
s
1
p
(4.95)
where α
Q
is the bandwidth of the reactive power control loop. Moreover, since, in the steady
state,
ˆ
ψ
s
≈ E
g,nom

1
, the controller reduces to
F
Q
= −
α
Q
3E
g,nom
1
p
(4.96)
or as
i
ref
Rd
= −
α
Q
3E
g,nom

Q
ref
s
−Q
s

dt. (4.97)
Of course, it would be possible to add a feed-forward term in order to compensate for the
magnetizing current, i.e., ψ
s
/L
M
, in the above control law. However, since ψ
s
/L
M
is close
to constant, the integration of the controller will compensate for the magnetizing current.
Therefore, feed-forward compensation has not been considered for the reactive power control
loop.
53
4.4.5 Sensorless Operation
“Sensorless” operation implies in this thesis that neither the rotor position nor the rotor speed
is measured. This means that the stator frequency, ω
1
, and the slip frequency, ω
2
, and their
corresponding angles, θ
1
and θ
2
, must be estimated. The purpose of this section is to give an
overview of some different estimation techniques that are available in literature. Note that if
no stator variables exist in the control law, it might be unnecessary to estimate ω
1
.
Estimation of Synchronous Frequency Angle
For a system which is oriented with the grid flux, or the voltage drop across the stator resis-
tance is negligible, the angle
ˆ
θ
1
can easily be found by using a PLL, see Section 4.1.3, on the
measured grid (stator) voltage. For a stator-flux-oriented control of the doubly-fed induction
generator, where the voltage drop across the stator resistance can not be neglected, the stator
flux can be estimated in stator coordinates using (4.36) as [46, 56]
ˆ
Ψ
s
s
=

(v
s
s

ˆ
R
s
i
s
s
)dt (4.98)
and the estimate of the transformation angle, θ
1
, can then be found from
ˆ
θ
1
= ∠
ˆ
Ψ
s
s
. The
notation “ ˆ ” is used for estimated variables and parameters. Since the estimator in (4.98) is
an open-loop integration, it is marginally stable. Thus, it has to be modified in order to gain
stability. This could be done by replacing the open-loop integration with a low-pass filter
[39]. It is also possible to estimate the transformation angle in synchronous coordinates.
Starting with the stator voltage equation in stator coordinates and taking into account that for
a stator-flux-oriented system, Ψ
s
s
= ψ
s
e

1
, yields
v
s
s
= R
s
i
s
s
+

s
s
dt
= R
s
i
s
s
+

s
dt
e

1
+ jω
1
ψ
s
e

1
. (4.99)
If v
s
s
= v
s
e
j
ˆ
θ
1
and i
s
s
= i
s
e
j
ˆ
θ
1
, the above equation can be rewritten in synchronous coordi-
nates as
v
s
= R
s
i
s
+

s
dt
e
j
˜
θ
1
+ jω
1
ψ
s
e
j
˜
θ
1
(4.100)
where
˜
θ
1
= θ
1

ˆ
θ
1
is the angular estimation error. Taking the real part of the above equation
and neglecting the flux dynamics yield
v
sd
= R
s
i
sd
−ω
1
ψ
s
sin(
˜
θ
1
). (4.101)
Now, it is possible to form an error signal suitable for the PLL-type estimator, described in
Section 4.1.3, as
ε = sin(θ
1

ˆ
θ
1
) = sin(
˜
θ
1
) = −
v
sd

ˆ
R
s
i
sd
ω
1
ψ
s
≈ −
v
sd

ˆ
R
s
i
sd
v
s
(4.102)
where the approximation is due to the fact that the stator is directly connected to the grid, so
ω
1
ψ
s
≈ v
s
.
54
Estimation of Slip-Frequency Angle
In the literature there are at least two methods to perform sensorless operation. In the first
method, a set of variables is estimated or measured in one reference frame and then the
variables are used in another reference frame to estimate the slip angle θ
2
. Estimating the
rotor currents from the flux and the stator currents can do this. In [15] the estimation of the
rotor currents has been carried out in stator coordinates, while in [46, 68] it has been done
in synchronous coordinates. The method will here be described in synchronous coordinates.
Starting with the stator flux, which, in synchronous coordinates, is given by
Ψ
s
= ψ
s
= L
M
(i
s
+i
R
) (4.103)
and since the stator flux is known, i.e., it is to a great extent determined by the stator voltage,
it is possible to use the above-mentioned equation to estimate the rotor current as follows:
ˆ
i
R
=
ˆ
ψ
s
ˆ
L
M
−i
s
(4.104)
where the stator current has been measured and transformed with the transformation angle
θ
1
; see previous section for determination of this angle. The magnitude of the stator flux can
be estimated as
ˆ
ψ
s
= v
s

1
[46]. Then, if the rotor current is measured in rotor coordinates
the estimate of the slip angle can be found as
ˆ
θ
2
= ∠i
r
R
−∠
ˆ
i
R
. (4.105)
The second method is based on determining the slip frequency by the rotor circuit equation.
In [56] a stator-flux-oriented sensorless control using the rotor voltage circuit equation is
proposed. The rotor voltage equation is given by
v
R
= R
R
i
R
+

R
dt
+ jω
2
Ψ
R
. (4.106)
Neglecting the derivative of the flux, the slip frequency, ω
2
, can be estimated from the imag-
inary part of the above equation as
ˆ ω
2
=
v
Rq

ˆ
R
R
i
Rq
ψ
Rd
=
v
Rq

ˆ
R
R
i
Rq
ψ
s
+
ˆ
L
σ
i
sd
. (4.107)
Then, the estimate of the slip angle,
ˆ
θ
2
, can be found from integration of the estimate of the
slip frequency, ˆ ω
2
, as
ˆ
θ
2
=

ˆ ω
2
dt. (4.108)
4.5 Control of Grid-Side Converter
The main objective of the grid-side converter is to control the dc-link voltage. The control of
the grid-side converter consists of a fast inner current control loop, which controls the current
through the grid filter, and an outer slower control loop that controls the dc-link voltage. The
reference frame of the inner current control loop will be aligned with the grid flux. This
means that the q component of the grid-filter current will control the active power delivered
from the converter and the d component of the filter current will, accordingly, control the
reactive power. This implies that the outer dc-link voltage control loop has to act on the q
component of the grid-filter current.
55
4.5.1 Current Control of Grid Filter
In (4.44) the dynamics of the grid filter are described:
L
f
di
f
dt
= v
f
−(R
f
+ jω
1
L
f
) i
f
−E
g
. (4.109)
In order to introduce “active damping” and decouple the d and the q components of the
grid-filter current, the applied grid-filter voltage, v
f
, is chosen as
v
f
= v

f
−(R
af
−jω
1
ˆ
L
f
)i
f
. (4.110)
This means that the inner closed-loop transfer function, assuming ideal parameters, becomes
G(p) =
i
f
(p)
v

f
(p)
=
1
L
f
p + R
f
+ R
af
(4.111)
and, hence, by using IMC a PI controller can be determined with the bandwidth α
f
. By
choosing the active damping according to Section 4.1.5, i.e., R
af
= α
f
ˆ
L
f

ˆ
R
f
, the transfer
function from grid voltage (“back emf”), E
g
, to the grid-filter current with ideal parameters
then becomes
G
E
g
i
f
(p) =
p
L
f
(p + α
f
)
2
. (4.112)
Finally, the grid-filter current control law can now be written as
v
f
=

k
pf
+
k
if
p

(i
ref
f
−i
f
) −(R
af
−jω
1
ˆ
L
f
)i
f
(4.113)
where
k
pf
= α
f
ˆ
L
f
k
if
= α
f
(
ˆ
R
f
+ R
af
) = α
2
f
ˆ
L
f
R
af
= α
f
ˆ
L
f

ˆ
R
f
. (4.114)
4.5.2 DC-Link Voltage Control
The dc-link voltage control in this thesis is essentially following [76]. One way of simplify-
ing the control of the dc-link voltage is by utilizing feedback linearization, i.e., the nonlinear
dynamics of the dc link are transformed into an equivalent linear system where linear control
techniques can be applied [95]. This can be done by letting W = v
2
dc
[50, 76, 79]. The
dc-link dynamics (4.48) are, thus, reduced to the following linear system
1
2
C
dc
dW
dt
= −P
f
−P
r
(4.115)
where, as mentioned earlier, P
f
is the power delivered to the grid filter and P
r
is the power
delivered to the rotor circuit of the DFIG. If the power losses of the grid filter are small and
the current control of the grid filter is aligned with the grid flux, the power delivered to the
grid filter can be approximated as P
f
≈ 3E
gq
i
fq
. Moreover, by assuming the current control
loop to be fast, i.e., i
fq
= i
ref
fq
, and adding an “active damping” term as
i
ref
fq
= i
ref
fq
+ G
a
W (4.116)
56
where G
a
is the gain of the “active damping,” it is possible to write the dc-link dynamics as
1
2
C
dc
dW
dt
= −3E
g
i
ref
fq
−3E
g
G
a
W −P
r
. (4.117)
The inner closed-loop transfer function becomes
G

(p) =
W(p)
i
ref
fq
(p)
=
−6E
g
pC
dc
+ 6E
g
G
a
. (4.118)
Then, by utilizing IMC, the following PI controller is obtained
F(p) =
α
w
p
G
−1
(p) = −
α
w
ˆ
C
dc
6E
g,nom

α
w
G
a
p
(4.119)
where the magnitude of the grid voltage, E
g
, is put to its nominal value, E
g,nom
, and α
w
is the bandwidth of the dc-link voltage control loop. If the active damping is chosen as
G
a
= α
w
ˆ
C
dc
/(6E
g,nom
), a disturbance, i.e., P
r
, will be damped as
G
PW
(p) =
−2p
C
dc
(p
2
+ 2α
w
ξp + α
2
w
ξ)
(4.120)
where ξ = E
gq
/E
g,nom
and
ˆ
C
dc
= C
dc
. With E
gq
= E
g,nom
, i.e., ξ = 1, G
PW
(p) is reduced
to
G
PW
(p) =
−2α
w
p
C
dc
(p + α
w
)
2
(4.121)
which means that a disturbance is damped with the same bandwidth as the dc-link voltage
control loop. A block diagram of the dc-link voltage controller is depicted in Fig. 4.15.
¸ ¸ ¸ 2
pC
dc
G

(p)
G
a
F(p)
W
ref
W = v
2
dc
i
fq
i

fq
P
r
3E
gq
+
+
+



Fig. 4.15. DC-link voltage control loop.
57
58
Chapter 5
Evaluation of the Current Control of
Doubly-Fed Induction Generators
In this chapter the current control law derived for the DFIG in the previous chapter is ana-
lyzed with respect to eliminating the influence of the back EMF, which is dependent on the
stator voltage, rotor speed, and stator flux, in the rotor current. Further, stability analysis of
the system is performed for different combinations of these terms in both a stator-flux and
grid-flux-oriented reference frame, for both correctly known and erroneously parameters.
5.1 Stability Analysis
In order to investigate the influence of the feed-forward compensation of the back EMF and
the influence of the “active resistance” on the stability of the system, an analysis is performed
in this section. The analysis will be performed both for a stator-flux-oriented system and for
a grid-flux-oriented system. In this section a full-order analysis of the system is performed,
since one of the objectives is to study the impact of the current control law derived in the
previous chapter.
5.1.1 Stator-Flux-Oriented System
Consider the system described by (4.66)–(4.68). Splitting (4.66) into real and imaginary
parts, assuming stator-flux orientation, i.e., Ψ
s
s
= ψ
s
e

1
, the stator voltage equals the grid
voltage, i.e., v
s
= jE
g
e
j(θ
g
−θ
1
)
. Making the variable substitution Δθ = θ
g
− θ
1
, the system
model can be rearranged as
dI
dt
= e (5.1)

s
dt
= −
R
s
L
M
ψ
s
−E
g
sin(Δθ) + R
s
i
Rd
(5.2)
dΔθ
dt
=

g
dt


1
dt
= ω
g

E
g
cos(Δθ) + R
s
i
Rq
ψ
s
(5.3)
di
R
dt
=
k
p
e + k
i
I + (j ˆ ω
2
ˆ
L
σ
−R
a
)i
R
+ k
E
ˆ
E
L
σ

(R
R
+ R
s
+ jω
2
L
σ
)i
R
+E
L
σ
(5.4)
59
where
E = E
g

R
s
L
M
+ jω
r

Ψ
s
= jE
g
e
jΔθ
−(
R
s
L
M
+ jω
r

s
. (5.5)
In (5.1)–(5.4), the termI is the integration variable of the control error and e = i
ref
R
−i
R
is the
control error. Note that (5.1) and (5.4) are complex-valued equations while (5.2) and (5.3)
are real-valued equations. In the following analysis, the rotational speed ω
r
will be assumed
to be varying slowly, and is, therefore, treated as a parameter. Throughout this section, the
machine model parameters will be assumed to be ideal and known.
If, for example, the rotor current is controlled by a high-gain feedback, it is possible
to force the system to have both slow and fast time scales, i.e., the system behaves like a
singularly perturbed system [57]. This means, that if the bandwidth of the current control
loop is high enough, it is sufficient to study the system described by (5.2) and (5.3) in order
to analyze the dynamic behavior of the DFIG. A stability analysis, assuming fast current
dynamics, can be found in [13, 43]. Later on, analysis not neglecting the current dynamics
will be compared to analysis neglecting the current dynamics; therefore a short summary
will be presented. By linearization of the nonlinear system described by (5.2) and (5.3),
the characteristic polynomial can be found. A first-order Taylor series expansion of the
characteristic polynomial around R
s
= 0 (as R
s
is small, typically less than 0.1 p.u.) yields
p
2
+
R
s
L
M

2 −
ω
g
L
M
i
ref
Rd
E
g

p +

1 −
R
s
i
ref
Rq
E
g

ω
2
g
(5.6)
where i
ref
Rq
is the active current reference and i
ref
Rd
is the magnetization current supplied from
the rotor converter. Since R
s
is small (< 0.1 p.u.), i
ref
Rq
will only have a minor influence on
the dynamics. However, i
ref
Rd
will influence the dynamic performance. It is required that
i
ref
Rd
<
2E
g
ω
g
L
M
(5.7)
in order to maintain stability. A similar constraint can be found in [13, 43]. In order to
operate the DFIG with unity power factor, one should select [99]
i
ref
Rd
=
ψ
s
L
M

E
g
ω
g
L
M
(5.8)
which value is half of the value in the condition in (5.7).
For the case when it is not possible to separate the time scales by a high-gain feedback in
the current control loop, a full-order analysis should be performed. By linearizing the non-
linear system described by (5.1)–(5.4) in a similar manner as previously, the characteristic
polynomial for the complete system can be found. A first-order Taylor series expansion of
the characteristic polynomial around R
s
= 0 yields
(p + α
c
)

p + k
R
α
c
+ (1 −k
R
)
R
R
L
σ

(p
4
+ a
3
p
3
+ a
2
p
2
+ a
1
p + a
0
). (5.9)
60
where expressions for the coefficients a
3
to a
0
become
a
3
= α
c
(1 + k
R
) +
2R
s
L
M

R
s
ω
g
i
ref
Rd
E
g
+ (1 −k
R
)
R
R
+ 2R
s
L
σ
(5.10)
a
2
= α
2
c
k
R
+ ω
2
g

i
ref
Rq
R
s
ω
2
g
E
g
+ (1 + k
R

c
R
s

2
L
M

i
ref
Rd
ω
g
E
g

+
1 −k
R
L
σ
α
c

R
R
+ 2R
s

+
1 −k
R
L
σ
R
R
R
s

2
L
M

i
ref
Rd
ω
g
E
g

(5.11)
a
1
=

2
c
k
R
R
s
L
M
+ (1 −k
R
)

c
R
R
R
s
L
M
L
σ

α
2
c
k
R
R
s
i
ref
Rd
ω
g
E
g
−(1 −k
R
)
α
c
i
ref
Rd
R
R
R
s
ω
g
L
σ
E
g
−(1 −k
E
)
R
s
ω
r
ω
g
L
σ
+ (1 + k
R

c
ω
2
g

1 −
i
ref
Rq
R
s
E
g

+ (1 −k
R

2
g
R
R
L
σ

1 −
i
ref
Rq
R
s
E
g

+
R
s
L
σ
(1 −2k
R
+ k
E

2
g
(5.12)
a
0
= α
2
c
ω
2
g
k
R

α
2
c
i
ref
Rq
R
s
ω
2
g
k
R
E
g
+ α
c
ω
2
g
1 −k
R
L
σ

R
R
+ 2R
s

i
ref
Rq
R
R
R
s
E
g

. (5.13)
The parameters k
E
and k
R
affect the roots of (5.9), directly and via a
0
–a
3
. The four different
combinations of k
E
and k
R
available are, according to Table 5.1, termed Methods I–IV.
Below, the characteristic polynomial (5.9) is investigated for the four different options.
TABLE 5.1. INVESTIGATED CURRENT CONTROL METHODS.
k
E
k
R
Method I 0 0
Method II 0 1
Method III 1 0
Method IV 1 1
Methods I and II
Both methods give two real-valued poles (at −α
c
, −R
R
/L
M
for Method I and two at −α
c
for Method II) and four poles given by the fourth-degree factor. In Fig. 5.1, it is shown how
one of the complex-conjugated poles given by the fourth-degree factor move with increasing
bandwidth of the current control loop, α
c
. The other complex-conjugated poles given by the
fourth-degree factor are well damped and are therefore not shown in the figure. The IM is
running as a generator at half of the rated torque, synchronous speed, and is magnetized from
the rotor circuit. It can be seen in the figure that the poorly damped poles of Method II move
with increasing bandwidth of the current control loop from stable to unstable and back to be
stable again, while for Method I the poles are stable. Method II is unstable for bandwidths
of the current control loop between 1.0–5.6 p.u. for the above mentioned operating point.
Moreover, as shown in Fig. 5.1, the real part of the poorly damped pole is very small. This
means that, when approximating fast current dynamics (marked with “x” in the figure), even
a small error (due to the approximation of a fast current dynamics) may play a significant
61
−0.05 −0.025 0 0.025 0.05
0.97
0.975
0.98
0.985
0.99
0.995
1
Re
I
m
Fig. 5.1. Root loci of one of the poorly damped poles of the doubly-fed induction generator using
current control methods without feed forward of the back EMF without “active resistance”
(Method I, solid) and with “active resistance” (Method II, dashed). The arrow shows how
the poles move with increasing bandwidth (0.5–15 p.u.) of the current control loop. The
symbol “x” indicates the pole location when the current dynamics are neglected.
role for the result of the stability analysis. Hence, it is necessary to make a careful stability
analysis, at least when using Methods I or II.
A similar approach, as will be performed in the next section, with Routh’s table pro-
duces very large expressions of which it is difficult to determine any constrains for stability.
Therefore, the approach with Routh’s table is not carried out for Methods I and II.
Method III
When using Method III, i.e., feed forward of the back EMF, the characteristic polynomial
in (5.9) is reduced to
(p + α
c
)
2

p +
R
R
L
σ

(p
3
+ b
2
p
2
+ b
1
p + b
0
). (5.14)
The system has at least three real-valued poles, two located at −α
c
and one at −R
R
/L
σ
. The
coefficients in the third-degree factor become
b
2
=
2R
s
L
M
+
R
R
+ 2R
s
L
σ

i
ref
Rd
R
s
ω
g
E
g
(5.15)
b
1
=
(E
g
−i
ref
Rq
R
s

2
g
E
g
+
R
R
R
s
(2E
g
−i
ref
Rd
L
M
ω
g
)
L
M
L
σ
E
g
(5.16)
b
0
=

−i
ref
Rq
R
R
R
s
+ (R
R
+ 2R
s
)E
g

ω
2
g
L
σ
E
g
. (5.17)
As can be seen, the coefficients are not dependent on α
c
for Method III.
62
TABLE 5.2. ROUTH’S TABLE.
p
3
1 b
1
p
2
b
2
b
0
p
1
B =
b
2
b
1
−b
0
b
2
0
p
0
Bb
0
−0
B
= b
0
0
To investigate the stability of the system, Routh’s table can be used [14], see Table 5.2.
In order for the system to be stable, the coefficients in the first column must not change
sign. Since the first coefficient in Routh’s table is 1, all other coefficients must be positive in
order to maintain stability. The expression for the coefficient B becomes quite complex; an
approximation is
B ≈
R
s

2E
g
−ω
g
L
M
i
ref
Rd
(R
2
R
+ ω
2
g
L
2
σ
)

L
M
L
σ
R
R
E
g
(5.18)
where a first-order Taylor series expansion of the coefficient B with respect to the stator
resistance, R
s
(around R
s
= 0), has been carried out. The following constraint can be set on
i
ref
Rd
in order to keep the coefficient b
2
positive:
i
ref
Rd
<
E
g
R
s
ω
g

2R
s
L
M
+
R
R
+ 2R
s
L
σ

. (5.19)
For keeping the coefficient B positive, the following constraint has to be set
i
ref
Rd
<
2E
g
ω
g
L
M
. (5.20)
Since the term−i
ref
Rq
R
R
R
s
in b
0
is at least one order of magnitude lower than the term (R
R
+
2R
s
)E
g
, b
0
can be considered to be positive. The constraint in (5.20) is “harder” than the
constraint in (5.19). The constraint in (5.20) is identical to the constraint in (5.7) where
the stability analysis was performed assuming fast current dynamics. The system has two
poorly damped poles, caused by the flux dynamics, and the constraint on i
ref
Rd
relates to the
flux dynamics. Therefore, the constraint on i
ref
Rd
, which relates to the flux dynamics, can be
found more easily assuming fast current dynamics. Generally, a full-order analysis is still
valuable, if the current dynamics are not fast, since other parameters also may influence the
stability (for stability analysis assuming fast current dynamics).
Method IV
For Method IV, i.e., with feed forward of the back EMF and “active resistance,” the charac-
teristic polynomial in (5.9) is reduced to
(p + α
c
)
4

p
2
+
R
s
L
M

2 −
ω
g
L
M
i
ref
Rd
E
g

p +

1 −
R
s
i
ref
Rq
E
g

ω
2
g

. (5.21)
The characteristic polynomial has four real roots located at −α
c
. The second-degree factor
is identical to (5.6), where the current dynamics were neglected. Therefore, for Method IV,
the same analysis as for the case with the assumption of fast current dynamics can be used.
63
5.1.2 Grid-Flux-Oriented System
The corresponding dynamics for the grid-flux-oriented system become
dI
dt
= e (5.22)

s
dt
= E
g

R
s
L
M
+ jω
g

Ψ
s
+ R
s
i
R
(5.23)
di
R
dt
=
k
p
e + k
i
I + (j ˆ ω
2
ˆ
L
σ
−R
a
)i
R
+ k
E
ˆ
E
L
σ

(R
R
+ R
s
+ jω
2
L
σ
)i
R
+E
L
σ
. (5.24)
Note that (5.22)–(5.24) are complex-valued equations. As for the case with stator-flux ori-
ented analysis, the rotational speed ω
r
will be assumed to be varying slowly and is therefore
treated as a parameter. Throughout this section, parameters will exactly as in the previous
section be assumed to be ideal and known.
If, as for the stator-flux orientation, the rotor current is controlled by a high-gain feed-
back, it is sufficient to study the dynamics described by (5.23), which have the following
equilibrium points:
ψ
sd0
=
L
M

i
ref
Rd
R
2
s
+ L
M

i
ref
Rq
R
s
+ E
g

ω
g

R
2
s
+ L
2
M
ω
2
g

E
g
+ R
s
i
ref
Rq
ω
g
(5.25)
ψ
qd0
=
L
M
R
s

i
ref
Rq
R
s
+ E
g
−i
ref
Rd
L
M
ω
g

R
2
s
+ L
2
M
ω
2
g

R
s
(E
g
−i
ref
Rd
L
M
ω
g
)
L
M
ω
2
g
(5.26)
where the approximation is due to a first-order Taylor series expansion of R
s
around R
s
= 0.
Then, the following characteristic polynomial can be determined:
p
2
+ 2
R
s
L
M
p + ω
2
g
+
R
2
s
L
2
M
. (5.27)
In (5.27) it can be seen that the DFIG is poorly damped, and that the damping is only depen-
dent of R
s
and L
M
. Moreover if the PLL-type estimator, described in Section 4.1.3 is used
to track the grid voltage, the dynamics of the PLL will be separated from the flux dynamics
in (5.27).
If the rotor currents cannot be neglected, a full-order analysis has to be performed. As
in the previous section, the dynamic systems described by (5.22)–(5.24) consists of two
parameters k
E
and k
R
that could be either set to zero or unity. This yields, in the same way
as for the stator-flux-oriented system, four different options, Method I to Method IV, for the
current control law, see Table 5.1.
Methods I and II
Linearizing of the non-linear systemdescribed by (5.22)–(5.24), its characteristic polynomial
can be found. A first-order Taylor series expansion of the characteristic polynomial with
respect to the stator resistance, R
s
(around R
s
= 0) yields
(p + α
c
)

p + k
R
α
c
+ (1 −k
R
)
R
R
L
σ

(p
4
+ a
3
p
3
+ a
2
p
2
+ a
1
p + a
0
). (5.28)
64
where the coefficients a
3
to a
0
become
a
3
= 2
R
s
L
M
+ α
c
(1 + k
R
) −(k
R
−1)
R
R
+ 2R
s
L
σ
(5.29)
a
2
= α
2
c
k
R
+
2(1 + k
R

c
R
s
L
σ

(k
R
−1) (2R
R
R
s
+ α
c
L
M
(R
R
+ 2R
s
))
L
M
L
σ
+ ω
2
g
(5.30)
a
1
= 2
α
2
c
k
R
R
s
L
M
+ α
c
(1 + k
R

2
g
−(k
R
−1)

c
R
R
R
s
+ (R
R
+ 2R
s
)L
M
ω
2
g
L
M
L
σ
−2
R
s
ω
g
ω
r
L
σ
(5.31)
a
0
= α
2
c
k
R
ω
2
g

(k
R
−1)(R
R
+ 2R
s

c
ω
2
g
L
σ
. (5.32)
In Fig. 5.2 it is shown how one of the complex-conjugated poles, as given by the fourth-
order characteristic polynomial, move with increasing bandwidth of the current control loop,
α
c
. The second-complex conjugated poles are well damped and are therefore not shown
in the figure. The operating condition is as in Fig. 5.1. It can be seen in the figure that
−0.05 −0.025 0 0.025 0.05
0.97
0.975
0.98
0.985
0.99
0.995
1
Re
I
m
Fig. 5.2. Root loci of one of the poorly damped poles of the doubly-fed induction generator using
current control methods without feed forward of the back EMF without “active resistance”
(Method I, solid) and with “active resistance” (Method II, dashed). The arrow shows how
the poles move with increasing bandwidth (0.5–15 p.u.) of the current control loop. The
symbol “x” indicates the pole location when the current dynamics are neglected.
for Method I the poorly damped pole is stable and for Method II the poorly damped pole
moves with increasing bandwidth of the current control loop from stable to unstable and
back to be stable again. For the in the figure investigated case, the system is unstable for
bandwidths between 1.1 p.u. and 3.8 p.u. for Method II. Of course, since the root loci are
plotted with numerical values the result are only valid for the given operation conditions
and for the investigated machine. As could also be seen for the stator-flux oriented case, a
current control loop bandwidth of approximately 15 p.u. might not be high enough in order
to be able to make the assumption of a fast current dynamics (marked with “x” in the figure),
65
at least for Method I, since the error is in the same order of magnitude as the real part of the
pole, see Fig. 5.2.
Method III
When using Method III, i.e., feed forward of the back EMF, the characteristic polynomial
can be found from the system (5.22)–(5.24) as
(p + α
c
)
2

p +
R
R
+ R
s
L
σ

2

p
2
+ 2
R
s
L
M
p +
R
2
s
L
2
M
+ ω
2
g

. (5.33)
Note that the above characteristic polynomial has not been expanded by a Taylor series. The
system has at least four real-valued poles, two located at −α
c
and two at −(R
R
+ R
s
)/L
σ
.
Method IV
For Method IV, i.e., with feed forward of the back EMF and “active resistance,” the charac-
teristic polynomial becomes
(p + α
c
)
4

p
2
+ 2
R
s
L
M
p +
R
2
s
L
2
M
+ ω
2
g

. (5.34)
Note that the above characteristic polynomial has not been expanded by a Taylor series.
The characteristic polynomial has four real roots located at −α
c
. The second-degree factor
is identical to the characteristic polynomial in (5.27) where the current dynamics were ne-
glected, i.e., assumed to be much faster than the flux dynamics. Therefore, for Method IV,
the same analysis as for the case with the assumption of fast current dynamics can be used.
5.1.3 Conclusion
It has been shown that by using grid-flux orientation the stability and the damping of the
system is independent of the rotor current, in contrast to stator-flux orientation. This implies
that for a grid-flux-oriented system, it is possible to magnetize the DFIG entirely from the ro-
tor circuit without reducing the damping of the system. Moreover, for the grid-flux-oriented
system, it is possible to produce as much reactive power as possible and still have a stable
system with the same damping from a stability point of view.
By utilizing the feed-forward compensation, stability of the derived current control law
is independent of the bandwidth of the current control loop and the order of the system to
analyze is reduced. Further, as shown in Section 4.4.1, the inclusion of the “active resistance”
improves significantly the damping of low-frequency disturbances, for higher bandwidths of
the current control loop. Therefore, Method IV with both feed-forward compensation and
“active resistance” can be assumed to be the best one of the investigated methods.
5.2 Influence of Erroneous Parameters on Stability
We now study how the closed-loop current-control transfer function, G
cl
(p), given by (4.73)
and the transfer function from a disturbance to the rotor current, G
Ei
(p), given by (4.74) are
66
influenced by non-ideal parameters. For ideal parameters the rotor current is determined by
i
R
= G
cl
(p)i
ref
R
+ G
Ei
(p)E. (5.35)
The methods where the back EMF is compensated for using feed forward (Methods III and
IV), the back EMF will not be totally compensated for due to non-ideal parameters. This
means that the conditions for impact of parameter variations also hold for the methods with
feed forward of the back EMF, even though the effect might be less severe. Note that (5.35)
is independent of the field orientation.
In the analysis below, the error in a parameter is denoted with the symbol ˜, e.g.
˜
L
σ
=
L
σ

ˆ
L
σ
. The parameters to be studied in the following are L
σ
, R
s
, and R
R
. Since L
M
is
only included in the feed-forward compensation, it has no impact in the following analysis,
and, hence, it is not included.
5.2.1 Leakage Inductance, L
σ
For errors in
ˆ
L
σ
, the rotor current, given by (5.35) for ideal parameters, is given by
i
R

α
c
p + α
c

1 + j
˜
L
σ
ω
2
G
Ei
(p)

i
ref
R
+

1 −j
˜
L
σ
ω
2
α
c
p + α
c

G
Ei
(p)E (5.36)
where the approximation is due to a first-order Taylor series expansion of
˜
L
σ
around
˜
L
σ
= 0
and L
σ

˜
L
σ
. From (5.36) it can be seen that small values of
˜
L
σ
do not significantly
influence the dynamic performance. A similar analytical expression for larger errors in
ˆ
L
σ
is
difficult to derive. In order to study the behavior for larger
˜
L
σ
, root loci are shown in Fig. 5.3
for Method I with three different values of
ˆ
L
σ
. The operating condition corresponds to that
of Fig. 5.1; however, the rotor speed is set to 1.3 p.u. so that the effect of the cross coupling
between the d and the q components is included. It can be seen in Fig. 5.3 that the influence
of errors in
ˆ
L
σ
is small for the investigated 2-MW DFIG. However, for smaller DFIGs such
as the 22-kW laboratory DFIG, the difference is larger. This is shown in Fig. 5.4. Clearly,
it is preferable to overestimate
ˆ
L
σ
. One reason for this is that the proportional part of the
controller will be increased, see (4.72). Hence, the bandwidth of the current control loop is
increased if
ˆ
L
σ
is overestimated.
5.2.2 Stator and Rotor Resistances, R
s
and R
R
Since errors in R
s
and R
R
influence the performance in the same way, we will study the sum
of the errors in the resistances:
˜
R =
˜
R
s
+
˜
R
R
.
For Methods II and IV where “active resistance” is used, the rotor current is given by
(5.35) if 2α
c
L
σ

˜
R. This means that when using “active resistance,” the system is not
dependent on errors in R
s
and R
R
. For Methods I and III, the rotor current is found to be
i
R

α
c
(L
σ
p + R
s
+ R
R

˜
R)
L
σ
p
2
+ α
c
L
σ
p + (R
s
+ R
R

˜
R)α
c
i
ref
R

p
L
σ
p
2
+ α
c
L
σ
p + (R
s
+ R
R

˜
R)α
c
E
(5.37)
67
−0.05 −0.025 0 0.025
0.95
0.96
0.97
0.98
0.99
1
−0.05 −0.025 0 0.025
0.95
0.96
0.97
0.98
0.99
1
a)
Re Re
I
m
I
m
b)
Fig. 5.3. Root loci of one of the poorly damped poles of the doubly-fed induction generator using
Method I for three different errors in the leakage inductance parameter
˜
L
σ
. Solid is
˜
L
σ
= 0,
dashed
˜
L
σ
= −0.5L
σ
, and dotted
˜
L
σ
= 0.5L
σ
. The arrow shows how the poles move with
increasing bandwidth (0.5–15 p.u.) of the current control loop. a) Stator-flux orientation.
b) Grid-flux orientation.
−0.15 −0.1 −0.05 0 0.05
0.85
0.9
0.95
1
−0.15 −0.1 −0.05 0 0.05
0.85
0.9
0.95
1
a)
Re Re
I
m
I
m
b)
Fig. 5.4. Root loci of one of the poorly damped poles of the laboratory 22 kW doubly-fed induction
generator using Method I for three different errors in the leakage inductance parameter
˜
L
σ
.
Solid is
˜
L
σ
= 0, dashed
˜
L
σ
= −0.5L
σ
, and dotted
˜
L
σ
= 0.5L
σ
. The arrow shows how the
poles move with increasing bandwidth (0.5–15 p.u.) of the current control loop. a) Stator-
flux orientation. b) Grid-flux orientation.
the approximation assuming α
c
L
σ
R
s
+R
R
. In (5.37) it can be seen that if the resistances
are overestimated, i.e.,
˜
R < 0, the damping of the current dynamics are actually improved,
i.e., the same phenomenon as using “active resistance.” Fig. 5.5 shows the root loci for
Method I of the investigated 2-MW DFIG. In the figure it can be seen that the influence of
errors in the resistance is small. However, as for the case with errors in
ˆ
L
σ
, the difference
is larger for smaller DFIGs, such as the 22-kW laboratory DFIG. This is shown in Fig. 5.4.
68
−0.05 −0.025 0 0.025
0.97
0.975
0.98
0.985
0.99
0.995
1
−0.05 −0.025 0 0.025
0.97
0.975
0.98
0.985
0.99
0.995
1
a)
Re Re
I
m
I
m
b)
Fig. 5.5. Root loci of one of the poorly damped poles of the doubly-fed induction generator using
Method I for three different errors in the stator and rotor resistances parameters
˜
R. Solid
is
˜
R = 0, dashed
˜
R = −0.5R, and dotted
˜
R = 0.5R. The arrow shows how the poles
move with increasing bandwidth (0.5–15 p.u.) of the current control loop. a) Stator-flux
orientation. b) Grid-flux orientation.
Moreover, as shown previously when only using “active resistance” (Method II), the poorly
damped poles (corresponding to the flux dynamics) could be unstable for certain operating
conditions. Therefore, especially for Method I and smaller machines, the system can become
−0.15 −0.1 −0.05 0 0.05
0.85
0.9
0.95
1
−0.15 −0.1 −0.05 0 0.05
0.85
0.9
0.95
1
a)
Re Re
I
m
I
m
b)
Fig. 5.6. Root loci of one of the poorly damped poles of the laboratory 22 kW doubly-fed induction
generator using Method I for three different errors in the stator and rotor resistances para-
meters
˜
R. Solid is
˜
R = 0, dashed
˜
R = −0.5R, and dotted
˜
R = 0.5R. The arrow shows
how the poles move with increasing bandwidth (0.5–15 p.u.) of the current control loop.
a) Stator-flux orientation. b) Grid-flux orientation.
unstable if the resistances are overestimated, as illustrated in Fig. 5.6. It can also be seen in
the figures that the grid-flux-oriented system seems, even though the difference is small, to
69
be less sensitive to overestimated R = R
s
+ R
R
in comparison to the stator-flux-oriented
system.
5.3 Experimental Evaluation
The performance of the various current control methods are evaluated by reference step
responses, see Fig. 5.7. See Appendix B.2 for data and parameters of the laboratory setup.
This has been done by letting i
ref
Rq
change from −0.25 p.u. to 0.25 p.u. when the rotor speed,
ω
r
, reaches 0.32 p.u., and vice versa when the rotor speed reaches 0.16 p.u. The DFIG is
magnetized entirely from the stator, i.e., i
ref
Rd
= 0, and is operated under no-load conditions.
Further, the stator voltage of the DFIG was 230 V. Data have been sampled with 10 kHz and
low-pass filtered with a cut-off frequency set to 5 kHz. In the measurements the bandwidth
of the current control was set to 1.4 p.u. Offsets in the stator voltage measurements caused
0 0.25 0.5 0.75 1
−0.5
0
0.5
0 0.25 0.5 0.75 1
−0.5
0
0.5
0 0.25 0.5 0.75 1
−0.5
0
0.5
0 0.25 0.5 0.75 1
−0.5
0
0.5
M
e
t
h
o
d
I
M
e
t
h
o
d
I
I
M
e
t
h
o
d
I
I
I
Time [s]
M
e
t
h
o
d
I
V
d
d
d
d
q
q
q
q
Fig. 5.7. Experiment of the stator-flux oriented current control step responses of the q component of
the rotor current.
a 100-Hz frequency component in the stator voltage, which influenced the performances of
the current control Methods III and VI, since the stator voltage is included in the control law.
However, a notch filter limited the influence of the 100-Hz frequency component. A scrutiny
investigation of Fig. 5.7 shows that Method II gives a 50-Hz ripple. The reason for this is
that by using only “active resistance” to damp the back EMF, the system might be degraded,
i.e., unstable, depending on the bandwidth of the current control loop, as shown earlier. Even
70
though the difference is fairly small, it can be seen in Fig. 5.7 that Method IV managed best
to follow its reference values in this comparison.
5.3.1 Comparison Between Stator-Flux and Grid-Flux-Oriented Sys-
tem
The aim of this section is to experimentally verify the analytical result obtained in Section
5.1, that by using grid-flux orientation the stability and the damping of the system is inde-
pendent of the rotor current, in contrast to stator-flux orientation
In Fig. 5.8 shows an experimental case of a stator-flux-oriented and a grid-flux-oriented
rotor current control. In the figures the d component of the rotor current is increased from 0
p.u. to 1 p.u. after 0.1 s. The q component of the rotor current is set to 0.5 p.u. When i
Rd
is
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−1
0
1
2
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−1
0
1
2
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
a) b)
C
u
r
r
e
n
t
[
p
.
u
.
]
C
u
r
r
e
n
t
[
p
.
u
.
]
c)
d
d
q
q
Time [s] Time [s]
F
l
u
x
[
p
.
u
.
]
F
l
u
x
[
p
.
u
.
]
d)
Fig. 5.8. Experimental comparison between stator-flux-oriented and grid-flux-oriented systems.
a) Rotor current (stator-flux orientation). b) Stator-flux magnitude (stator-flux orientation).
c) Rotor current (grid-flux orientation). d) Stator-flux magnitude (grid-flux orientation).
increased to 1 p.u. it can be seen that the stator-flux-oriented system becomes unstable with
an increasing amplitude of the flux oscillations. After 0.32 s the rotor current is put to zero in
order to put back the system into a stable operating condition. As expected from the analyt-
ical results, the grid-flux-oriented system remains stable throughout the whole experiment.
During this evaluation, the bandwidth of the current control loop was set to 2.3 p.u. and the
rotor speed, ω
r
, was controlled by a d.c. machine to be 1 p.u.
5.4 Impact of Stator Voltage Sags on the Current Control
Loop
Due to the poorly damped poles, in case of a voltage sag, the flux will enter a damped
oscillation. It is essential that the magnitude of the rotor current is below the rated value of
71
the converter in order not to force the crowbar to go into action, and thereby lose control of
the rotor currents and thus the power production.
Neglecting the current dynamics, the rotor voltage as given in (4.67) can be expressed as
v
R
= (R
r
+ R
s
+ jω
2
L
σ
)i
R
+v
s

R
s
L
M
+ jω
r

ψ
s
≈ v
s
−jω
r
ψ
s
= jE
g
e
j(θ
g
−θ
1
)
−jω
r
ψ
s
.
(5.38)
From this equation it can be noted that (since v
s
≈ jω
g
ψ
s
)
Im[v
R
] > 0 if ω
r
< ω
g
Im[v
R
] < 0 if ω
r
> ω
g
Im[v
R
] ≈ 0 if ω
r
= ω
g
.
(5.39)
If the rotor voltage is v
R,0
before the voltage sag, then the change in the rotor voltage will be
Δv
R
= v
R,0
− v
R
. Assuming that the grid voltage (or stator voltage) drops from E
g,nom
to
E
g
at t
sag
, then, at the time instant t
sag
, the rotor voltage will drop
Δv
R
(t = t
sag
) = jE
g,nom
e
jΔθ
0
−jE
g
e
jΔθ
≈ j(E
g,nom
−E
g
) = jΔE
g
(5.40)
since the stator flux and the rotor speed will not change instantaneously. From (5.39) and
(5.40) it can be seen that for ω
r
> ω
g
, the magnitude of the rotor voltage will be instan-
taneously increased with ΔE
g
. If ω
r
< ω
g
, then the value of the rotor voltage magni-
tude will, accordingly, be instantaneously decreased. This implies that the worst case oc-
curs for ω
r
> ω
g
according to (5.39) and (5.40). For example, if ω
r
= 1.3, implying
v
R
≈ −j0.3 before the voltage sag, then, according to (5.40), the rotor voltage will be
v
R
(t = t
sag
) = v
R,0
+jΔE
g
= −j0.3 −j0.4 = −j0.7 for a grid voltage drop ΔE
g
=0.4 p.u.
In Fig. 5.9, the maximum rotor voltage needed due to a symmetrical voltage sag for
current control Methods I and IV can be seen. Method II is not considered, since it is actually
unstable for certain operating conditions as indicated by Fig. 5.1 and Method III due that the
results are relatively similar to those of Method IV. The DFIG is running as a generator
at rated torque and is fully magnetized from the rotor circuit. The rotor speed is 1.3 p.u.
This implies that the rotor voltage is approximately 0.3 p.u. immediately before the voltage
sag occurs. For a wind turbine, this operating condition is disadvantageous since a rotor
voltage of 0.3 p.u. is close to the maximum value needed in order to achieve the desired
variable-speed range for a wind turbine. It can be seen that the maximum rotor voltage will
increase with the size of the voltage sag. Further, the maximum rotor voltage is relatively
independent of the bandwidth of the current control loop for Method IV. It can also be noted
that, generally, Method I requires slightly more rotor voltage than Method IV, especially for
low bandwidths. Further, for higher bandwidths of the current control loop, it can be seen
that the increase in rotor voltage due to a voltage sag follows (5.40).
In Fig. 5.10, the corresponding maximum rotor current needed due to the voltage sag for
Method I can be seen. Method IV is not shown in the figure, since it manages to keep the
rotor current unaffected during the voltage sag, with known parameters. It can be seen in the
figure that the maximum rotor current increases with the size of the voltage sag, especially
for low bandwidths of the current control loop. For higher bandwidths, it can be seen that
72
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0
5
10
0
0.5
1
1.5
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0
5
10
0
0.5
1
1.5
a)
ΔE
g
[p.u.] ΔE
g
[p.u.] α
c
[p.u.] α
c
[p.u.]
b)
v
m
a
x
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
v
m
a
x
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
Fig. 5.9. Maximum rotor voltage, v
max
R
, due to a symmetrical voltage sag as a function of the sag
size, ΔE
g
, and the current control bandwidth, α
c
. a) Method I (stator-flux-oriented system).
b) Method IV (stator-flux-oriented system).
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0
5
10
0
1
2
3
4
ΔE
g
[p.u.] α
c
[p.u.]
i
m
a
x
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
Fig. 5.10. Maximum rotor current, i
max
R
, for Method I, due to a symmetrical voltage sag as a function
of the sag size, ΔE
g
, and the current control bandwidth, α
c
(stator-flux-oriented system).
the maximum rotor current is practically constant, independent of the voltage sag magnitude.
The reason is that when the bandwidth is increased, the “need” for compensating the back
EMF vanishes, see (4.74).
It is, thus, not only necessary to design the converter according to the desired variable-
speed range, but also according to a certain voltage sag to withstand.
5.4.1 Influence of Erroneous Parameters
As mentioned earlier, the methods are mostly sensitive to an underestimated L
σ
, mainly since
the bandwidth of the current control loop then becomes lower than the desired. Simulations
with
˜
L
σ
= 0.5L
σ
shows that Method I is very sensitive to an underestimated L
σ
during
voltage sags, especially for low bandwidths of the current control loop, see Fig. 5.11. By
using Method IV, the influence of an erroneous value of L
σ
is, in principle, removed. If the
current control loop bandwidth is below 2 p.u., the difference in the maximum rotor current
73
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0
5
10
−0.5
0
0.5
1
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0
5
10
0
0.02
0.04
0.06
0.08
a)
ΔE
g
[p.u.] ΔE
g
[p.u.] α
c
[p.u.] α
c
[p.u.]
b)
Δ
i
m
a
x
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
Δ
i
m
a
x
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
Fig. 5.11. Increased maximum rotor current, Δi
max
R
, for Method I (a) and Method IV (b), when the
leakage inductance is underestimated,
˜
L
σ
= 0.5L
σ
, due to a symmetrical voltage sag as a
function of the sag size, ΔE
g
, and the current control bandwidth, α
c
(stator-flux-oriented
system).
is below 0.02 p.u., as can be seen in Fig. 5.11.
For Method IV and variations in R
s
, R
R
, and L
M
with ±50%, the difference in maximum
rotor current is insignificant; while for Method I, R
s
and R
R
have small impacts for smaller
α
c
. However, for higher values of α
c
, this impact is also insignificant.
5.4.2 Generation Capability During Voltage Sags
As an example of this, Fig. 5.12 shows the minimum remaining grid voltage that can be
handled without triggering the crowbar as a function of the power. The maximum rotor
voltage is limited to 0.4 p.u. and the crowbar short circuits the rotor circuit when the rotor
current is above 1.25 p.u. This means that when the current controller needs to put out
a higher rotor voltage in order to compensate for the sag, it will lose control of the rotor
current, and the crowbar may be triggered if the rotor current becomes too high. From the
figure it can be seen that for low bandwidths of the current control loop (allowing a lower
switching frequency), Method IVmanages to survive deeper sags than Method I. However, as
indicated by the figure, for higher bandwidths, the difference between the methods vanishes.
A bandwidth of 7 p.u. for Method IV produces very similar results as a bandwidth of 1 p.u.,
and is therefore not shown in the figure.
5.5 Flux Damping
As previously mentioned there are different methods of damping the flux oscillations. As
mentioned before, one method is to reduce the bandwidth of the current control loop [43]. In
[107], a feedback of the derivative of flux was introduced in order to improve the damping
of the flux. Another possibility is to use a converter to substitute the Y point of the stator
winding, i.e., an extra degree of freedom is introduced that can be used to actively damp out
the flux oscillations, [54].
74
0 20 40 60 80 100
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
α
c
= 1,
˜
L
σ
= 0.5L
σ
α
c
= 1,
˜
L
σ
= 0
α
c
= 1,
˜
L
σ
= 0
α
c
= 7,
˜
L
σ
= 0
R
e
m
a
i
n
i
n
g
v
o
l
t
a
g
e
[
p
.
u
.
]
Power before voltage sag [%]
Fig. 5.12. Minimum remaining voltage without triggering the crowbar of a voltage sag, for Methods
I (solid) and IV (dashed) as a function of the power. The maximum rotor voltage is set
to 0.4 p.u. and a rotor current above 1.25 p.u. triggers the crowbar (stator-flux-oriented
system).
Kelber made a comparison of different methods of damping the flux oscillations in [55].
The methods are 1) reducing the bandwidth of the current control loop, 2) compensation of
the transformation angle (to synchronous coordinates), 3) feedback of the derivative of the
flux, and 4) the method with a converter substituting the star point in the stator winding. It
is concluded in [55] that the method of reducing the bandwidth works quite well, although it
has the disadvantage of slowly damping of a grid disturbances. Compensation of the trans-
formation angle method improves the damping only slightly. Feedback of the flux derivative
method performs well and has a low cost; the disadvantage of this method is that the method
cause relatively high rotor currents. The method with a converter in the star point of the stator
winding performs very well, but the disadvantage of this method is the required addition in
hardware and software. Since there is a need for another converter, the cost is also increased.
In this section, the flux oscillations will be damped by feedback of the derivative of the
flux. The reason that this method is chosen is that it has low cost (i.e., no extra hardware), is
easy to implement, and can damp the flux oscillations well. Due to the fact that the method
with an extra converter connected to the Y point of the stator winding has to handle the sta-
tor current, implying an increase of the losses, and the increased cost for an extra converter
this method, is not considered in this section since some of the benefits and reasons for the
doubly-fed induction generator, e.g., smaller (cheaper) converter and lower losses, vanishes.
However, later on in Chapter 7 where different methods for voltage sag ride-through are dis-
cussed and compared, the system with the converter in Y point becomes very interesting and
is accordingly further investigated.
The q component of the rotor current is used for controlling the torque, but the d compo-
nent of the current can be used to damp the oscillations and improve stability. If we add a
75
component Δi
ref
Rd
to the d component of the rotor current reference, which we control as
Δi
ref
Rd
(p) = −
p
p + α
co
α
d
ˆ
R
s
ψ
s
= −

1 −
α
co
p + α
co

α
d
ˆ
R
s
ψ
s
(5.41)
then, a flux differentiation compensation term has been introduced, that will improve the
damping of the system. In the above equation, a high-pass filter is used since a pure differ-
entiation is not implementable. This means that i
ref
Rd
is set to
i
ref
Rd
= i
ref
Rd,0
+ Δi
ref
Rd
(5.42)
where i
ref
Rd,0
is used to control the reactive power as discussed in a previous chapter.
5.5.1 Stator-Flux Orientation
Under the assumption that the current dynamics are set much faster than the flux dynamics
and α
co
is small, the characteristic polynomial in (5.6) can be rewritten as (with correctly
known parameters)
p
2
+

α
d
+
R
s
L
M

2 −
ω
g
L
M
i
ref
Rd,0
E
g

p +

1 −
R
s
i
ref
Rq
E
g
+ α
d
R
s
E
g
−i
ref
Rd,0
L
M
ω
g
E
g
L
M
ω
2
g

ω
2
g
.
(5.43)
With the inclusion of a flux damping, the constraint on the d component becomes
i
Rd,0
<

2 + α
d
L
M
R
s

E
g
ω
g
L
M
(5.44)
in order to guarantee stability. Comparing to (5.7), it is seen that the constraint on the d
component rotor current has increased 1 + α
d
L
M
/(2R
s
) times.
5.5.2 Grid-Flux Orientation
For a grid-flux-oriented system the characteristic polynomial in (5.27) is changed to (with
correctly known parameters)
p
2
+

α
d
+ 2
R
s
L
M

p +
α
d
R
s
L
M
+
R
2
s
L
2
M
+ ω
2
g
(5.45)
if α
co
is small. Moreover, since R
s
is small and L
M
is large, see Table 2.1 for typical
parameters, it is possible to approximate the above characteristic polynomial as
p
2
+ α
d
p + ω
2
g
. (5.46)
5.5.3 Parameter Selection
As can be seen in (5.41), the flux damping uses two parameters, α
d
and α
co
, that have to be
determined. Obviously, the cut-off frequency, α
co
, of the low-pass filter must be set lower
than the oscillating frequency in order to be able to damp the oscillation at all. The damping
term, α
d
, must be chosen smaller than the bandwidth of the current control loop, α
c
, so that
the flux damper becomes slower than the current dynamics. Of course, if a flux estimator
is used to determine the flux, the bandwidth of the damper, α
d
, must be smaller than the
bandwidth of the flux estimator.
76
5.5.4 Evaluation
Fig. 5.13 shows a simulation of a vector-controlled doubly-fed induction generator, accord-
ing to Section 4.4.1 (k
E
= 1 and k
R
= 1), with and without flux damping. The reference
frame is aligned with the stator flux. The reference value i
ref
Rd,0
is initially zero and is at 0.4 s
changed to 0.5 p.u. The reference value of i
ref
Rq
is initially zero and is at 0.1 s changed to
0.5 p.u., and at 0.7 s to −0.5 p.u. The bandwidth of the system, α
c
, is set to 4.7 p.u., while
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1
−0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1
−1
0
1
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1
0.95
1
1.05
a)
C
u
r
r
e
n
t
[
p
.
u
.
]
C
u
r
r
e
n
t
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
Time [s]
F
l
u
x
[
p
.
u
.
]
c)
Fig. 5.13. Simulation of current control using a stator-flux oriented reference frame with (solid) and
without (dashed) damping of the flux oscillations. a) i
Rd
. b) i
Rq
. c) ψ
s
.
α
d
is set to 0.7 p.u., and α
co
is set to 0.05 p.u. In the simulation it is assumed that the flux
can be determined from measurements of the stator and the rotor currents. The figure shows
that the oscillations in the flux has been damped with the flux damper. Since it is difficult to
see the effect of the flux damper in a measured time series, due to noise, a frequency spectra
of the flux magnitude has been plotted instead in Fig. 5.14. In the figure the current control
method with feed forward of the back EMF and with “active resistance” has been used, with
and without flux damping. The frequency spectra is based on a 6 s long measurement on the
laboratory DFIG setup described in Appendix B.2. The DFIG is operated as in Section 5.3.
The bandwidth of the current control loop, α
c
, was set to 2.3 p.u., the damping term, α
d
, was
set to 0.7 p.u. and, the cut-off frequency term, α
co
, was set to 0.05 p.u. It can be seen in the
figure that the 50-Hz component has been to a large extent damped, i.e., a factor of ten, by
the flux damper.
5.5.5 Response to Symmetrical Voltage Sags
In this section the flux damper’s response will be analyzed with respect to symmetrical volt-
age sags. It is assumed that before and directly after the voltage sag, the magnitude of the
77
10
0
10
1
10
2
10
−5
10
−4
10
−3
10
−2
10
−1
10
0
10
1
10
2
10
−5
10
−4
10
−3
10
−2
10
−1 a)
Frequency [Hz] Frequency [Hz]
F
l
u
x
a
m
p
l
i
t
u
d
e
[
p
.
u
.
]
F
l
u
x
a
m
p
l
i
t
u
d
e
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
Fig. 5.14. Frequency spectra of the flux (data from measurements). The reference frame is aligned
with the stator flux. a) Without flux damping. b) With flux damping.
stator flux can be expressed as
t < 0 : ψ
s
(t) = ψ
s0
(5.47)
t ≥ 0 : ψ
s
(t) ≈ ψ
s0
V
E
g,nom
+

1 −
V
E
g,nom

ψ
s0
e
−α
d
t/2
cos(ω
g
t) (5.48)
where ψ
s0
is the steady-state stator flux prior the voltage sag and V is the remaining voltage
after the voltage sag. This means that the term 1 − V/E
g,nom
corresponds to the magnitude
of the sag. Then, from (5.41) the response in Δi
Rd
is estimated as
Δi
ref
Rd
(t) = L
−1

1 −
α
co
p + α
co

α
d
R
s
L ¦ψ
s
(t)¦

(5.49)
or as
Δi
ref
Rd
(t) = L
−1


α
d
R
s

L ¦ψ
s
(t)¦ −
α
co
p + α
co
L ¦ψ
s
(t)¦

. (5.50)
If α
co
is considered small, i.e., the low-pass filter α
co
/(p + α
co
) has low bandwidth, it is
possible to describe Δi
ref
Rd
(t) after the voltage sag as
t ≥ 0 : Δi
ref
Rd
(t) ≈ −
α
d
R
s
Δψ
s
(t) = −
α
d
R
s

s
(t) −ψ
s0
) (5.51)
which can be written as
t ≥ 0 : Δi
ref
Rd
(t) ≈
α
d
R
s

1 −
V
E
g,nom

ψ
s0

1 −e
−α
d
t/2
cos(ω
g
t)

. (5.52)
The above expression has a local maximum for t = arccos

−2ω
g
/

α
2
d
+ 4ω
2
g


g
. How-
ever, if α
2
d
<4ω
2
g
it is possible to approximate t as t ≈ arccos(−1)/ω
g
= π/ω
g
. This means
that the extreme value of Δi
ref
Rd
(t) due to a symmetrical voltage sag can be expressed as
Δi
ref
Rd
(t = π/ω
g
) ≈
α
d
R
s
ψ
s0

1 + e
−α
d
π/(2ω
g
)

1 −
V
E
g,nom

. (5.53)
78
Consider the following values: V = 0.9 p.u., α
d
= 0.7 p.u., ψ
s0
= 1 p.u., and R
s
= 0.01 p.u.
for a numerical example. This means that the maximum value of Δi
ref
Rd
due to the voltage
sag is Δi
ref
Rd
= 0.7/0.01 1

1 + e
−0.7π/(2·1)

(1 −0.9/1) = 9.3 p.u. This value is, of course,
an unrealistically high value. However, it indicates that the flux damper is very sensitive to
voltage sags. In Fig. 5.15 the maximum value of Δi
ref
Rd
due to a voltage sag as a function
of the bandwidth α
d
of the flux damper can be seen. The results are presented for four
different symmetrical voltage sags between V = 0.8 to V = 0.95 p.u. (note that V is the
remaining voltage). In the figure both simulated results (using stator-flux orientation) as well
as analytically results from (5.53) is shown. Both methods produce similar results, although
the analytical results are generally slightly higher. The results in the figure shows that the
flux damper is very sensitive to voltage sags. This means that if the flux damper should work
during (small) voltage sags, the bandwidth, α
d
, of the flux damper should be small. However,
then some of the advantage of the flux damper is lost.
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7
0
5
10
15
20
M
a
x
.
Δ
i
r
e
f
R
d
[
p
.
u
.
]
α
d
[p.u.]
V = 0.95
V = 0.9
V = 0.85
V = 0.8
Fig. 5.15. Maximum of Δi
ref
Rd
due to a voltage sag as a function of α
d
. Solid lines correspond to
simulation and dashed lines correspond to results from an analytical expression.
5.6 Conclusion
In this chapter, the general rotor current control law derived in Chapter 4, with the option of
including feed-forward compensation of the back EMF and “active resistance,” in order to
eliminate the influence of the back EMF on the rotor current, has been analyzed. It was found
that the method that combines both the feed-forward compensation of the back EMF and the
“active resistance” manages best to suppress the influence of the back EMF on the rotor cur-
rent. Moreover, this method was found to be the least sensitive one to erroneous parameters
and it manages to keep the rotor current close to unaffected, even with erroneous parameters,
during a voltage sag. The choice of current control method is of greater importance if the
bandwidth of the current control loop is low.
It has been shown that by using grid-flux orientation, the stability and the damping of
the system is independent of the rotor current, in contrast to the stator-flux-oriented system.
79
This implies that for a grid-flux-oriented system it is possible to magnetize the DFIG entirely
from the rotor circuit without reducing the damping of the system.
By utilizing feed-forward compensation, stability of the system resulting from the pro-
posed current controller was found independent of the bandwidth of the current control loop,
and the order of the system to analyze could be reduced. The introduction of an “active
resistance” in the current control law improves the damping of low-frequency disturbances
significantly.
Finally, it is shown that the design of the converter for a doubly-fed induction generator
should also take into account a certain voltage sag to withstand and not only the desired
variable-speed range.
80
Chapter 6
Evaluation of Doubly-Fed Induction
Generator Systems
6.1 Reduced-Order Model
If, for example, the rotor current dynamics and the grid-filter current dynamics are controlled
by a high-gain feedback, it is possible to force the system to have both slow and fast time
scales, i.e., the system behaves like a singularly perturbed system [57]. This means, that the
rotor and grid-filter current can be assumed to follow their reference values accurately.
As pointed out in the Introduction, the flux dynamics of the DFIG are strongly influenced
by a pair of poorly damped poles, with an oscillating frequency close to 1 p.u., i.e. close to
the line frequency. If the current control loop is much faster than the flux dynamics, it is
sufficient to study only the flux dynamics and put the rotor current to its reference value, i.e.,

s
dt
= E
g

R
s
L
M
+ jω
1

Ψ
s
+ R
s
i
ref
R
(6.1)
where the stator voltage has been put equal to the grid voltage. For a stator-flux-oriented sys-
tem the above equation can be reduced to (5.2) and (5.3), where the equation is in polar form.
While for a grid-flux oriented system the above equation can be used directly. However, the
synchronous frequency, ω
1
, must be determined. Either a PLL-estimator, as described in
Section 4.1.3, can be used to track the frequency of the grid voltage, or, if the frequency of
the grid is constant (or at least close to constant), the synchronous frequency can be put equal
to the grid frequency, i.e. ω
1
= ω
g
.
6.2 Discretization of the Doubly-Fed Induction Generator
If the simple-to-use forward Euler method, see Section 4.1.7, is used to simulate the sys-
tem, care must be taken not to use a too long time step or sampling period, T
sample
. For
instance, in PSCAD/EMTDC [66], when writing user-defined modules, the module must be
discretizised, and this often due to its simplicity results in using the forward Euler method.
The forward Euler discretization is given by (4.35). As mentioned in Section 4.1.7, the
poles must be inside a circle with a radius of 1/T
sample
and the center point located at
(−1/T
sample
, 0) in order for the forward Euler discretization to be stable.
81
It should be pointed out that in some other programs, for instance Simpow [1] and PSS/E
[85], user-defined modules return expressions for the derivatives and advanced integration
algorithms are used. In this case, the allowed time step can be made longer.
6.2.1 Stator-Flux Orientation
The solution to the characteristic polynomial for a stator-flux oriented system in (5.6) is
found as
p
1,2
= −
R
s
2L
M

2 −
ω
g
L
M
i
ref
Rd
E
g

±

R
2
s
4L
2
M

2 −
ω
g
L
M
i
ref
Rd
E
g

2

1 −
R
s
i
ref
Rq
E
g

ω
2
g
≈ −
R
s
2L
M

2 −
ω
g
L
M
i
ref
Rd
E
g

±jω
g
. (6.2)
In order for the discretization to be stable, the above-mentioned poles should be located
inside the circle, i.e.,


1
T
sample
, 0


R
s
2L
M

2 −
ω
g
L
M
i
ref
Rd
E
g

, ±ω
g

<
1
T
sample
(6.3)
which yields
T
sample
<
R
s
L
M

2 −
ω
g
L
M
i
ref
Rd
E
g

R
2
s
L
2
M

2 −
ω
g
L
M
i
ref
Rd
E
g

2
4
+ ω
2
g
<
R
s
ω
2
g
L
M

2 −
ω
g
L
M
i
ref
Rd
E
g

. (6.4)
For unity power factor, i.e. i
ref
Rd
= ψ
s
/L
M
≈ E
g
/(ω
1
L
M
), the above expression is reduced to
T
sample
<
R
s
ω
2
g
L
M
. (6.5)
For the system investigated later on in this chapter and using the forward Euler method, the
sampling period should be T
s
< 4.6 µs.
6.2.2 Grid-Flux Orientation
The solution to the characteristic polynomial in (5.27), corresponding to grid-flux-oriented
system, is found as
p
1,2
=
R
s
L
M
±jω
g
(6.6)
In order for the discretization to be stable, the above-mentioned poles should be located
inside the circle, i.e.,


1
T
sample
, 0


R
s
L
M
, ±ω
g

<
1
T
sample
. (6.7)
82
The solution to the above equation becomes
T
sample
<
2R
s
L
M
1
R
2
s
L
2
M
+ ω
2
g

2R
s
L
M
ω
2
g
(6.8)
which is twice the value obtained by (6.5). Moreover, the minimum sample time for the
grid-flux-oriented system is independent, in contrast to a stator-flux-oriented system, of the
d component of the rotor current.
6.3 Response to Grid Disturbances
In this section, simulations and experimental results of the response of a DFIG wind turbine
to voltage sags are presented. The experiments were made on a VESTAS V-52 850 kW
WT and in Appendix B.3 a short description of the used data acquisition setup is presented.
Moreover, the simulations presented are carried out on a fictitious 850-kW DFIG WT. The
following parameters were used in the simulations: R
s
= 0.0071 p.u., R
R
= 0.01 p.u.,
L
M
= 4.9 p.u., and L
σ
= 0.21 p.u. The grid filter for the grid-side converter R
i
= 0.01 p.u.
and L
i
= 0.07 p.u. The dc-link capacitance is set to C
dc
= 2.8 p.u. The simulations have
been carried out both with a “full-order” model and a second-order model.
Fig. 6.1 shows experimental results of the response of a DFIG wind turbine to a voltage
sag. The voltage drops down approximately 25%, i.e., a 75% sag, at t=0.1 s, and after 0.1 s
the fault causing the voltage sag on the grid is cleared, and the voltage starts to recover. The
wind turbine produces about 20% of the nominal power. The oscillation close to 50 Hz,
caused by the poorly damped poles due to the voltage sag, is clearly seen. In Fig. 6.2, a
simulation of the response to the same voltage sag, as shown in Fig. 6.1, is presented, for
the full-order model. Fig. 6.3 shows the corresponding simulation with the reduced-order
model of the system. It can be seen in the figure that the full-order model and the reduced-
order model produce almost the same results. One reason for this is that the bandwidth of
the current control loops (of the machine and grid-side converter) are set to 7 p.u., which is
sufficiently higher than the eigenfrequency of the flux dynamics (close to 1 p.u.), shown in
Section 5.1. Comparing the two figures it is seen that the agreement between the experiment
and simulation is quite satisfactory. An exact agreement is not to be expected, since real
machine parameters were unknown.
In Fig. 6.4, experimental results of the response due to an unsymmetrical voltage sag are
presented. The WT now produces approximately 10% of its nominal power. Fig. 6.5 shows
a simulation of the response to the same voltage sag as in Fig. 6.4, for the full-order model
and Fig. 6.6 shows the corresponding simulation for the reduced-order model. Again, it is
seen that the agreement is quite satisfactory.
In Fig. 6.7, a severe voltage disturbance is presented. In this case the disturbance is so
large that the over voltage protection short-circuits the rotor and, after 40 ms, the breaker dis-
connects the stator from the grid. Before the disturbance the WT is producing approximately
half of its rated power.
As mentioned earlier, the simulations shown in this section are carried out for a stator-
flux-oriented system. However, similar results from simulations can also be found from a
83
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1.1
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0
10
20
30
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−10
0
10
V
o
l
t
a
g
e
[
p
.
u
.
]
a)
C
u
r
r
e
n
t
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
P
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
c)
Time [s] Time [s]
Time [s] Time [s]
R
e
a
c
t
i
v
e
p
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
d)
Fig. 6.1. Experiment of the response to a voltage sag. a) Grid-voltage magnitude. b) Grid-current
magnitude. c) Active power. d) Reactive power.
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1.1
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0
10
20
30
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−10
0
10
V
o
l
t
a
g
e
[
p
.
u
.
]
a)
C
u
r
r
e
n
t
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
P
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
c)
Time [s] Time [s]
Time [s] Time [s]
R
e
a
c
t
i
v
e
p
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
d)
Fig. 6.2. Simulation of the response to a voltage sag with the full-order model. a) Grid-voltage
magnitude. b) Grid-current magnitude. c) Active power. d) Reactive power.
stator-voltage oriented (or grid-flux oriented) system.
84
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1.1
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0
10
20
30
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−10
0
10
V
o
l
t
a
g
e
[
p
.
u
.
]
a)
C
u
r
r
e
n
t
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
P
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
c)
Time [s] Time [s]
Time [s] Time [s]
R
e
a
c
t
i
v
e
p
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
d)
Fig. 6.3. Simulation of the response to a voltage sag with the reduced-order model. a) Grid-voltage
magnitude. b) Grid-current magnitude. c) Active power. d) Reactive power.
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1.1
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0
0.05
0.1
0.15
0.2
0.25
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−10
0
10
20
30
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−10
−5
0
5
10
V
o
l
t
a
g
e
[
p
.
u
.
]
a)
C
u
r
r
e
n
t
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
P
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
c)
Time [s] Time [s]
Time [s] Time [s]
R
e
a
c
t
i
v
e
p
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
d)
Fig. 6.4. Experiment of the response to a unsymmetrical voltage sag. a) Grid-voltage magnitude.
b) Grid-current magnitude. c) Active power. d) Reactive power.
85
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1.1
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0
0.05
0.1
0.15
0.2
0.25
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−10
0
10
20
30
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−10
−5
0
5
10
V
o
l
t
a
g
e
[
p
.
u
.
]
a)
C
u
r
r
e
n
t
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
P
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
c)
Time [s] Time [s]
Time [s] Time [s]
R
e
a
c
t
i
v
e
p
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
d)
Fig. 6.5. Simulation of the response to an unsymmetrical voltage sag. The simulation has been per-
formed with the full-order model. a) Grid-voltage magnitude. b) Grid-current magnitude.
c) Active power. d) Reactive power.
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1.1
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0
0.05
0.1
0.15
0.2
0.25
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−10
0
10
20
30
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−10
−5
0
5
10
V
o
l
t
a
g
e
[
p
.
u
.
]
a)
C
u
r
r
e
n
t
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
P
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
c)
Time [s] Time [s]
Time [s] Time [s]
R
e
a
c
t
i
v
e
p
o
w
e
r
[
%
]
d)
Fig. 6.6. Simulation of the response to an unsymmetrical voltage sag. The simulation has been per-
formed with the reduced-order model. a) Grid-voltage magnitude. b) Grid-current magni-
tude. c) Active power. d) Reactive power.
86
0 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.1
0
0.5
1
1.5
0 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.1
0
2
4
0 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.1
0
2
4
V
o
l
t
a
g
e
[
p
.
u
.
]
a)
C
u
r
r
e
n
t
(
d
)
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
Time [s]
C
u
r
r
e
n
t
(
q
)
[
p
.
u
.
]
c)
Fig. 6.7. Severe voltage disturbance. a) Grid voltage. b) d component of the grid current. c) q
component of the grid current.
6.4 Implementation in Grid Simulation Programs
Some grid simulation programs can handle three-phase instantaneous quantities. Examples
are EMTDC and Simpow. Other programs are designed to handle the voltages as phasors,
and for these programs, 50-Hz oscillations in the output quantities cannot be captured, since
the time step is often too large for these oscillations; an example is PSS/E. However, when
handling simulations of large systems, it may not be possible to use such a short time step
(about 5 µs) as is required in order to simulate the control of the DFIGsystem. The suggested
approach is to simply ignore the 50-Hz oscillations when the DFIG system is implemented
in simulations with long time steps, as long as the disturbances are small enough not to cause
the rotor to be short-circuited. For this case, a steady-state model of the DFIG is sufficient.
However, if a disturbance is large enough to cause the rotor to be short-circuited, the machine
will act as a standard squirrel-cage induction machine which can be adequately modeled with
a fifth-order model of the induction machine [83].
As pointed out in [84, 60], the stator flux transients may be negligible from the power
system stability analysis point of view. This means that if stator flux transients are negligible
a steady-state model of the DFIG dynamics are sufficient as long as the rotor circuit is not
short-circuited due to a too large grid disturbance.
87
6.5 Summary
In this chapter, simulations and experimental verification of the dynamic response to voltage
sags of a DFIG wind turbine were presented. Simulations were carried out using a full-
order model and a reduced-order model. Both models produced acceptable results. Perfect
correspondence with experiments were not expected since the simulations were carried out
on a fictitious DFIG wind turbine. The response to symmetrical as well as unsymmetrical
voltage sags was verified.
88
Chapter 7
Voltage Sag Ride-Through of
Variable-Speed Wind Turbines
As mentioned in the Introduction, new grid codes are in progress both in Sweden and other
countries. This means that new wind turbine installations have to stay connected to the grid
for voltage sags above a certain reference sag, i.e., WTs have to ride through these voltage
sags. In Fig. 7.1, the proposed Swedish requirements for voltage sags is depicted.
−0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
V
o
l
t
a
g
e
[
p
.
u
.
]
Time [s]
Fig. 7.1. Proposed regulations from the Swedish national grid company, Svenska Kraftn¨ at [96]. Solid
line is the requirement for wind parks with a rated power larger than 100 MW. Dashed line
is the requirement for wind turbines and wind parks with a rated power between 0.3–100
MW.
First, simple space vector models will be presented for some common voltage sags that
will be used in this chapter. Then, the voltage sag response of a WT that utilizes a full-power
converter is investigated. This investigation will the serve as a basis for the comparison of
DFIG ride-through systems. In the next sections the voltage sag response of the DFIG will
be further analyzed, and systems for voltage sag ride-through will be investigated. Finally,
these systems will be compared dynamically as well as for steady-state operation.
89
7.1 Voltage Sags
With the expression “voltage sag,” it is normally implied that the grid rms voltage drops from
1 p.u. to 0.1–0.9 p.u. for a short period of time, i.e., 0.5–30 cycles. The duration of voltage
sags is mainly determined by the clearing time of the protection used in the grid [9]. The
fault clearing time for protective relays varies from 50 ms up to 2000 ms [9]. There are other
protection devices, e.g., current-limiting fuses, that might have a shorter fault clearing time
(less than one cycle). Voltage sags caused by these fuses are short and deep if the fault is in
the local distribution network but if the fault is in a remote distribution network the sag is
short and shallow [9]. The origin and classification of voltage sags are well explained in [9].
In this section, simple space vector models will be presented for some common voltage sags.
These models are developed in [74] and the aim of the models are to estimate the moduli of
the positive- and negative-sequence voltage vectors for different types of sags.
7.1.1 Symmetrical Voltage Sags
Symmetrical (or balanced) voltage sags implies an equally reduction of the rms voltage and,
possibly, a “phase-angle jump” in all three phases [9]. Directly after a symmetrical voltage
sag, the grid voltage vector can be expressed in the synchronous reference frame as
E
g
(t = 0
+
) = jV e
j
˜
θ
0
= jV e

(7.1)
where V is the remaining rms voltage in the faulted phases,
˜
θ
0
is the initial error angle, and
φ is the “phase-angle jump.” The majority of all “phase-angle jumps” are smaller than 45

[9], and the remaining rms voltage can be as low as V = 0 for a direct-to-ground fault.
7.1.2 Unsymmetrical Voltage Sags
Unsymmetrical (or unbalanced) voltage sags are more difficult to model since, for instance,
the impedance of each symmetrical component can be hard to derive. However, in order
to simplify the derivation of models suitable for unsymmetrical voltage sags, the positive-,
negative-, and zero-sequence impedance are assumed to be equal. For ground faults, it is
assumed that the source and feeder impedance are much larger compared to the line-to-
ground impedance. The impedance between the two faulted lines for a line-to-line fault is
neglected. Zero sequences are not critical for a PWM rectifier since such sequences ideally
disappear from the phase currents due to the absence of a neutral conductor.
Single-Line-to-Ground Fault
After a single-line-to-ground fault (SLGF) in the first phase the grid phase voltages can be
expressed as
E
1
(t = 0
+
) =

2V cos(θ
g
+ π/2 + φ) (7.2)
E
2
(t = 0
+
) =

2E
g,nom
cos(θ
g
+ π/2 −2π/3) (7.3)
E
3
(t = 0
+
) =

2E
g,nom
cos(θ
g
+ π/2 + 2π/3) (7.4)
90
where E
1
, E
2
, and E
3
are the grid phase voltages directly after the sag, and V and φ are the
remaining rms voltage and “phase-angle jump” in the first phase, respectively. The space
vector in a stationary reference frame that corresponds to (7.2)–(7.4) is then found as
E
s
g0
= j

E
p0
e

g
+E
n0
e
−jθ
g

(7.5)
where
E
p0
=
1
3

2E
nom
+ V e

, E
n0
=
1
3

E
nom
−V e
−jφ

(7.6)
are the stationary parts of the positive- and negative-sequence voltage vectors, respectively.
For perfect pre-sag field orientation, i.e., θ
1
= θ
g
, (7.5) can be transformed to the synchro-
nous reference frame by substituting E
s
g0
= E
g0
e

g
and solving the resulting equation for
E
g0
:
E
g0
= j

E
p0
+E
n0
e
−j2θ
g

. (7.7)
As expected, the negative sequence becomes in the synchronous reference frame a compo-
nent with a frequency of twice the fundamental frequency, i.e. −2ω
g
. From (7.6), it is seen
that minimal modulus of the positive-sequence voltage vector is E
p
= 2E
g,nom
/3 and that
the maximum negative-sequence voltage vector is E
n
= E
g,nom
/3. This occurs when V = 0,
i.e., a total loss of voltage in the faulted phase.
The initial error angle of the positive-sequence voltage vector due to a SLGF is
˜
θ
0
= arg(E
p0
) = arctan

V sin φ
2E
g,nom
+ V cos φ

. (7.8)
Eventually, the PLL will track the position of the positive-sequence voltage vector, such
that, ideally, E
p
becomes real valued and, hence,
˜
θ ≈ 0. Consider the following values for a
numerical example: E
g,nom
= 1 p.u., V = 0.5 p.u. and φ = −45

. This gives an initial error
angle of
˜
θ = arctan[−0.5 0.71/(2+0.5 0.71)] ≈ −0.15 rad ≈ −9

. The initial error angle
becomes even smaller if V is smaller than 0.5 p.u.;
˜
θ
0
= 0 for V = 0, for instance.
Two-Lines-to-Ground Fault
After a two-lines-to-ground fault (TLGF) between the first and second phase, the grid phase
voltages can be expressed as
E
1
(t = 0
+
) =

2V cos(θ
g
+ π/2 + φ) (7.9)
E
2
(t = 0
+
) =

2V cos(θ
g
+ π/2 −2π/3 + φ) (7.10)
E
3
(t = 0
+
) =

2E
g,nom
cos(θ
g
+ π/2 + 2π/3) (7.11)
which correspond to the following space vector in the synchronous reference frame:
E
g0
= j

E
p0
+E
n0
e
−j2θ
g

(7.12)
where
E
p0
=
E
g,nom
3
+
2
3
V e

, E
n0
=

E

p0
−V e
−jφ

e
−jπ/3
. (7.13)
91
From (7.12) and (7.13), it can be seen that the minimal modulus for the positive-sequence
voltage vector is E
p
= E
g,nom
/3 and that the maximal modulus for the negative-sequence
voltage vector is E
n
= E
g,nom
/3 for V = 0.
The initial error angle directly after a TLGF is
˜
θ
0
= arg(E
p0
) = arctan

2V sin φ
E
g,nom
+ 2V cos φ

. (7.14)
An initial error angle of −23

is obtained as a numerical example using the same values as
in the previous section.
Line-to-Line Fault
Directly after a worst-case (no feeder impedance) line-to-line fault (LLF) between phases 2
and 3, the grid phase voltages are found as
E
1
=

2E
g,nom
cos(θ
g
+ π/2) (7.15)
E
2
=
E
g,nom

2
cos(θ
g
+ π/2 −π) (7.16)
E
3
=
E
g,nom

2
cos(θ
g
+ π/2 −π) (7.17)
which correspond to the following space vector in the synchronous reference frame:
E
g0
= j

1 −e
−j2θ
g

E
g,nom
2
. (7.18)
Obviously, the modulus of the positive- and negative-sequence voltage vectors both equal
E
g,nom
/2, and the initial error angle moments after the LLF equals zero.
7.2 Full-Power Converter
In this section, the voltage sag response of PWM rectifiers, designed for the rated WT power,
is analyzed. The system configuration consists of a generator and two converters connected
“back-to-back” as depicted in Fig. 7.2. The main focus of this section is put on the PWM
rectifier and the achieved results and conclusions are independent of the type of converter
at the generator side. As a result of the analysis, accurate estimates of the transient and
steady-state response of the grid current and dc-link voltage during voltage sags are provided.
These results can be useful when designing a PWM rectifier for various grid codes and
requirements.
7.2.1 Analysis
First, the dc-link voltage dynamics are analyzed for various disturbances and voltage sags.
The dc-link voltage controller presented in Section 4.5.2 will be considered, with the ex-
ception of P
r
= −P
t
. Note that for this case, the grid-filter current equals the grid current.
This exception indicates that the rotor power, P
r
, used for the DFIG is changed to the total
turbine power, P
t
, for the full-power converter analyzed in this section. It is assumed that
92
SG Grid
Grid filter
PWM “rectifier”
L
g
C
dc
Fig. 7.2. Wind turbine with a full power rectifier.
the dc-link capacitance is accurately modeled, i.e.,
ˆ
C
dc
= C
dc
. The transfer function from
the turbine power P
t
to the error signal, e
w
= W
ref
dc
− W
dc
, will be considered which, with
(4.120), becomes
G
Pe
(p) = −G
PW
(p) =
−2p
C
dc

p
2
+ 2α
w
ξp + α
2
w
ξ
. (7.19)
Since the dc-link dynamics are considered to be much slower than the switching and sam-
pling frequency, f
sw
, of the PWM rectifier, the grid-filter current dynamics and the switching
transients at the dc link are, thus, neglected. For instance, if the bandwidth of the dc-link volt-
age control loop is α
w
= 0.2 p.u. and the switching and sampling frequency is f
sw
= 4.9
kHz. Then, for a 50-Hz grid, α
w
is 4900/(0.2 50) = 490 times smaller than f
sw
. Moreover,
steady-state condition, symmetrical and nominal grid voltage, and perfect field orientation
are assumed to precede the different disturbances.
Minimal DC-link Capacitance
In PWM rectifiers, the current in the dc-link capacitors is heavily distorted which gives rise
to a small (compared to diode rectifiers) ripple in the dc-link voltage. To ensure that this
voltage ripple remains below a tolerable value, the dc-link capacitance should be selected no
smaller than [59]
C
dc,min
=

3i
nom
fq
8f
sw
˜ v
p-p
dc
(7.20)
where i
nom
fq
= 1 p.u. is the nominal q-axis current and ˜ v
p-p
dc
is the tolerable peak-to-peak ripple
for the dc-link voltage. The value ˜ v
p-p
dc
= 0.028 pu, which corresponds to 1 % peak-to-peak
ripple at v
ref
dc
= 2.8 and f
sw
= 4.9 kHz, are considered for a numerical example. For a base
frequency of ω
b
= 314 rad/s, these values yield C
dc,min
=

3 1/(8 4900/314 0.028) ≈
0.5 p.u. However, very high demands [50] are placed on the dc-link voltage control loop
when using such small a dc-link capacitance, so (7.20) is mainly a benchmark that can be
used for comparison to more realistic operating conditions. Henceforth, a dc-link capacitance
of C
dc
= 3.5 p.u. is considered, which equals the capacitance of the experimental setup in
Section 7.2.3.
93
Assessment of Turbine Power Reduction
The grid-voltage modulus is normally close to its nominal value. Therefore, it is natural to
let E
gq
= E
g,nom
when analyzing the capability of the dc-link voltage control loop to reject
disturbances in P
t
. Therefore, (7.19) is reduced to
G
nom
Pe
(p) = G
Pe
(p)

E
gq
=E
g,nom
=
−2p
C
dc
(p + α
w
)
2
. (7.21)
For a step in the turbine power, from P
t
(0

) = 0 to P
t
(0
+
) = ΔP, the error, e
w
(t), becomes
e
w
(t) = L
−1

G
nom
Pe
(p)
ΔP
p

= −
2ΔP
C
dc
e
−α
w
t
t. (7.22)
Depending on whether ΔP is positive or negative, (7.22) has a local minimum or maximum
for t = 1/α
w
(determined by solving ˙ e
w
(t) = 0). Then, the maximum/minimum value of
e
w
(t) is
e
max/min
w
(t = 1/α
w
) = −
2ΔP
α
w
C
dc
e
−1
≈ −
0.74ΔP
α
w
C
dc
. (7.23)
The values ΔP = −1.5 p.u. (50 % of nominal power), α
w
= 0.2 p.u. and C
dc
= 3.5 p.u.
are considered for a numerical example which yield a local maximum for e
w
(t) at e
max
w
=
0.74 1.5/(0.2 3.5) ≈ 1.6 p.u. With v
ref
dc
= 2.8 p.u., this corresponds to a minimum dc-link
voltage of v
min
dc
= ((v
ref
dc
)
2
−e
max
w
)
0.5
= (2.8
2
−1.6)
0.5
= 2.5 p.u.
Response to Symmetrical Voltage Sags
As mentioned earlier, it is assumed that symmetrical voltage sags are preceded by symmetri-
cal and nominal grid voltage, perfect field orientation and steady-state condition, i.e.,
˙
W = 0.
This implies that:
t < 0 : 0 = −3E
g,nom
i
fq
+ P
t0
(7.24)
where P
t0
is the pre-sag turbine power. Moments after a symmetrical voltage sag occurs,
it can be assumed that E
gq
= V while P
t
remains at its pre-sag value. These assumptions
imply the following dynamics for W:
t ≥ 0 :
1
2
C
dW
dt
= −3V i
fq
+ P
t0
(7.25)
after a sag at t = 0. Since the power to the grid filter is P
f
= 3E
gq
(t)i
fq
(v
dc
), where
E
gq
(t) changes stepwise at t = 0 and i
fq
(v
dc
) is a function of the dc-link voltage (via the
v
dc
control loop), the dynamics in (7.25) appear to be time-varying. However, this is not the
case, though, which can be deduced by multiplying (7.24) by V/E
g,nom
:
t < 0 : 0 = −3V i
fq
+ P
t0
V
E
g,nom
. (7.26)
Then by introducing the “new” turbine power, P

t
(t) = P
t0
V/E
g,nom
, it follows from (7.25)
and (7.26) that a symmetrical voltage sag is equivalent to a positive step in P

t
, which changes
from P

t
(0

) = P
g0
V/E
g,nom
to P

t
(0
+
) = P
t0
. This means that the net power step is ΔP

=
(1 − V/E
g,nom
)P
t0
. Meanwhile, the q-axis grid voltage can considered to be constant at
94
E
gq
= V provided that accurate field orientation is maintained. The single exception to
this power step equivalence is when V = 0, which corresponds to that power cannot be
transferred to the utility grid.
Once the equivalence to turbine power steps has been revealed, the dynamics of e
w
during
symmetrical voltage sags are, hence, given by (7.19). By substituting E
gq
= V , the poles of
this transfer function are
p
1,2
= −
α
w
E
g,nom

V ±j

E
g,nom
V −V
2

. (7.27)
For normal operation, i.e., V = E
g,nom
, the poles are located at −α
w
, as seen in (7.21).
Moreover, the poles of (7.27) are well damped for V ≥ E
g,nom
/2. More troublesome how-
ever, is that symmetrical voltage sags may require very large i
fq
in order to counteract the
reduction in the grid rms voltage such that P
f
= P
g
in the steady state. Consider P
t
= 3 p.u.
(nominal power) and V = 0.1 p.u., for instance, which demands for i
fq
= 3/(3 0.1) = 10
p.u. in order to regain steady-state conditions during a sag. Remedies for avoiding severe
overcurrents during symmetrical voltage sags are discussed in Section 7.2.2.
Provided that overcurrent is avoided, e
w
(t), after a symmetrical voltage sag, is obtained
from the inverse Laplace transform of (7.19) multiplied by the step ΔP

/p:
e
w
(t) = L
−1

G
Pe
(p)
ΔP

p

= −
2ΔP

ω
w
C
e
−α
w
ξt
sin (ω
w
t) (7.28)
where ω
w
= α
w

(1 −ξ)ξ. Depending on the sign of ΔP

, (7.28) has a local minimum or
maximum for t = arcsin(

1 −ξ)/ω
w
. By substituting this instant in (7.28), the extreme
value for e
w
(t) is obtained as
e
w
= −
2ΔP

ω
w
C
exp

ξ
1 −ξ
arcsin

1 −ξ

1 −ξ. (7.29)
The values C = 3.5 p.u., α
w
= 0.2 p.u., P
t0
= −1.5 p.u., V = 0.6 p.u. are considered
for a numerical example. This means that ΔP

= −1.5 0.4 = −0.6 p.u., ξ = 0.6 and
ω
w
= 0.2

0.4 0.6 ≈ 0.1 p.u. This yields a local maximum of e
max
w
≈ 0.94 p.u. With
v
ref
dc
= 2.8 p.u., this corresponds to a minimal dc-link voltage of v
min
dc
=

2.8
2
−0.94 ≈ 2.6
p.u., i.e., the dc-link voltage decreases by 0.2/2.8 100 ≈ 7 %.
Response to “Phase-Angle Jumps”
For reasons of simplicity and clarity, it is assumed that the modulus of the grid voltage vector
remains constant at E
g,nom
, i.e., no voltage sag accompanies the “phase-angle jump.” The
response of PWM rectifiers to “phase-angle jumps” is, to a large extent, determined by the
dynamics of the error angle. For a PLL tuned assuming a bandwidth of ρ, the time function
of the error angle after a “phase-angle jump” can be modeled as
˜
θ(t) =
˜
θ
0
e
−ρt
. (7.30)
In the time interval when
˜
θ(t) converges exponentially to zero with the rise time 1/ρ, the
q-axis grid voltage varies as E
gq
(t) = E
g,nom
cos[
˜
θ(t)] which yields the instantaneous grid-
filter power as P
f
= 3E
g,nom
i
fq
(v
dc
) cos[
˜
θ(t)]. Since P
f
is a function of time and v
dc
, the
95
dynamics of W, are time varying during “phase-angle jumps” in contrast to symmetrical
voltage sags. As a remedy for this, the seemingly daring assumption of nearly constant
dc-link voltage during “phase-angle jumps” is adopted. This assumption is validated by
simulations and experiments in Section 7.2.3 which show that the approximation is, indeed,
reasonable. With
˙
W ≈ 0, the “dynamics” after a “phase-angle jump” at t = 0 simplify to
t ≥ 0 : 0 ≈ −3E
g,nom
i
fq
cos
˜
θ + P
t0
= −3E
g,nom
i
fq
+
P
t0
cos
˜
θ
. (7.31)
The approximated “dynamics” in (7.31) are time-invariant, since P
f
= 3E
g,nom
i
fq
(v
dc
)
is a function of v
dc
only. Therefore, from (7.24) and (7.31), a “phase-angle jump” is in
close correspondence to a time varying P

t
which changes from P

t
(0

) = P
t0
to P

t
(t) =
P
t0
/ cos[
˜
θ(t)] at constant E
gq
= E
g,nom
. For small
˜
θ, such that 1/ cos
˜
θ ≈ 1 +
˜
θ
2
/2, the net
change in P

t
is
ΔP(t) =

1 +
˜
θ
2
(t)
2

P
t0
−P
t0
=
ˆ
θ
2
0
2
e
−2ρt
P
t0
(7.32)
where the latter expression results from (7.30). The time function of the error signal can be
derived by taking the inverse Laplace transform of the product of (7.21) and ΔP(p):
e
w
(t) = L
−1
¸
G
nom
Pe
(p)L¦ΔP(t)¦
¸
=
2
˜
θ
2
0
P
t0
ρC
dc

e
−ρt
+
ρ
2
t −1

e
−ρt
(7.33)
where α
w
= ρ is assumed since proper rejection of the negative-sequence voltage requires a
PLL bandwidth of ρ ≈ 0.2 p.u. [76] (this happens to coincide with the selection of α
w
= 0.2
p.u. in the beginning of this section). Within a short time interval after a “phase-angle jump,”
e
w
(t) can be approximated by
e
w
(t) ≈
2
˜
θ
2
0
P
t0
ρC
dc

e
−ρt
−1

e
−ρt
= e

w
(t) (7.34)
since e
−ρt
initially decays faster than ρt/2 increases. The error signal e
w
(t) has a local
minimum/maximum for t = ln 2/ρ. By substituting this instant in (7.33), the extreme value
for e
w
(t) is found as
e
w

2
˜
θ
2
0
P
t0
ρC
dc

1
2
+
ln 2
2
−1

1
2
≈ −
0.15
˜
θ
2
0
P
t0
ρC
dc
. (7.35)
The values P
t0
= −1.5 p.u.,
˜
θ
0
= −π/4 rad, α
w
= ρ = 0.2 p.u. and C
dc
= 3.5 p.u. are
considered for a numerical example, which gives a local maximum of e
max
w
= 0.15 1.5
π
2
/(4
2
0.2 3.5) ≈ 0.2 p.u. With v
ref
dc
= 2.8 p.u., this implies that the dc-link voltage
decreases to v
min
dc
= (2.8
2
− 0.2)
0.5
≈ 2.76 p.u., i.e., a decrement by 0.04/2.8 100 ≈ 1 %.
From this analytic finding, which is supported by simulations and experiments in Section
7.2.3, it can be concluded that “phase-angle jumps” are believed not to be critical for PWM
rectifiers.
Response to Unsymmetrical Voltage Sags
The response of PWM rectifiers to unsymmetrical voltage sags is partly similar to the re-
sponse to symmetrical voltage sags, although less critical, since the remaining positive-
sequence voltage of unsymmetrical sags is never as small as that of the worst-case sym-
metrical sag, as discussed previously. A unique property of unsymmetrical sags is, on the
96
other hand, that the negative-sequence voltage vector introduces a ripple in the instanta-
neous grid power. This power ripple in turn gives rise to ripple in the dc-link voltage and
in i
fq
, which can be expressed as i
fq
= i
avg
fq
+ ˜ı
fq
, where i
avg
fq
is the average value of i
fq
and ˜ı
fq
is the current ripple. Two simplifications are introduced in order to analyze these
ripples. First shortly after an unsymmetrical sag it is assumed that the PLL recovers the po-
sition of the positive-sequence voltage vector, i.e., the q-axis grid voltage eventually varies
as E
gq
(t) = E
p
+ E
n
cos(−2θ
g
+ ϕ) where ϕ is the angle of the negative-sequence voltage
vector for
˜
θ = t = 0. Provided with this expression for E
gq
and, secondly, small current
ripple, such that [i
avg
fq
[ [˜ı
fq
[, the dc-link voltage dynamics simplify to
1
2
C
dc
dW
dt
≈ −3E
p
i
fq
−3E
n
i
avg
fq
cos(2θ
g
−ϕ) + P
t
. (7.36)
From (7.36), the power ripple can be treated as a turbine power disturbance, denoted by
˜
P
t
= 3E
n
i
avg
q
cos(2θ
g
− ϕ) =
˜
P
pk
t
cos(2θ
g
− ϕ), with constant E
gq
= E
p
. The dc voltage
ripple that results from
˜
P
t
are obtained from the static gain of G
Pe
(p) in (7.19) at the relevant
frequency 2ω
g
and E
gq
= E
p
:
[G
Pe
(j2ω
g
)[ =

g
C
dc


2
w
ξ
p
−4ω
2
g
)
2
+ (4ω
g
α
w
ξ
p
)
2
(7.37)
where ξ
p
= E
p
/E
g,nom
. If α
w
is selected at least three times smaller than ω
g
, i.e., smaller
than 0.3 p.u., such that ω
2
g
α
2
w
, then (7.37) can be approximated as
[G
Pe
(j2ω
g
)[ ≈

g
C
dc

(−4ω
2
g
)
2
=
1
ω
g
C
dc
. (7.38)
Hence, the ripple in e
w
, due to an unsymmetrical voltage sag, is determined, to a large
extent, by the dc-link capacitance. An LLF is considered for a numerical example. The
values E
n
= 0.5 p.u., i
avg
fq
= 1 p.u., v
ref
dc
= 2.8 p.u. and C
dc
= 3.5 p.u. yield a peak ripple
of ˜ e
pk
w

˜
P
pk
t
/(ω
g
C
dc
) = 3 0.5 1/(1 3.5) = 0.43 p.u. at a frequency of 2ω
g
. The
corresponding peak value of the v
dc
ripple is ˜ v
pk
dc
= 2.8 − (2.8
2
− 0.43)
0.5
≈ 0.08 p.u., or a
ripple of 0.08/2.8 100 ≈ 3 %. This is a fairly small ripple which is not critical for the proper
operation of a PWM rectifier. As for symmetrical sags, the modulus of the positive-sequence
voltage vector is the most critical consequence. This indicates that if E
p
= 0.5 p.u., a q-axis
current of i
avg
fq
= 1 p.u. yields P
f
= 3E
p
i
avg
fq
= 1.5 p.u., whereas nominal power, i.e., P
f
= 3
p.u., requires i
avg
fq
= 1/0.5 = 2 p.u. This may be too large a current to be tolerated in a WT
application; remedies for avoiding large q-axis currents are to be discussed in Section 7.2.2.
As previously discussed, the power ripple during unsymmetrical voltage sags also trans-
fers to the q-axis current, via the dc voltage control system. In order to analyze the resulting
q current ripple, which adds to the grid current distortion during faults, the transfer function
from P
t
to i
fq
can be derived from Fig. 4.15, which results in
G
Pi
(p) =
−2[G
a
+ F(p)]/(pC
dc
)
1 −6E
q
[G
a
+ F(p)]/(pC
dc
)
=

w
(p + α
w
/2)
3E
g,nom
(p
2
+ 2α
w
E
gq
/E
g,nom
p + α
2
w
E
gq
/E
g,nom
)
.
(7.39)
97
By substituting E
gq
= E
p
in this expression, the static gain of G
Pi
(p) at the relevant fre-
quency 2ω
g
is obtained as
[G
Pi
(j2ω
g
)[ =
α
w
3E
g,nom

α
2
w
+ 16ω
2
g

2
w
ξ
p
−4ω
2
g
)
2
+ (4ω
g
α
w
ξ
p
)
2

α
w

g
E
g,nom
(7.40)
where the latter approximation holds when α
w
is selected at least three times smaller than
ω
g
. The relation in (7.40) implies that the resulting ripple in i
fq
is mainly determined by the
bandwidth of the dc voltage control system. Therefore, a less distorted grid current during
unsymmetrical voltage sags can be obtained by selecting α
w
smaller. This yields a peak
ripple of ˜ı
pk
fq
≈ α
w
˜
P
pk
t
/(3ω
g
E
g,nom
) = 0.2 1.5/3 = 0.1 p.u. during an LLF, with identical
values as previously and α
w
= 0.2 p.u. This is a fairly large ripple although the previous
assumption on [i
avg
fq
[ [˜ı
fq
[ is still reasonable.
7.2.2 Discussion
In general, WTs using PWM rectifiers are robust towards voltage sags but large reductions
in modulus of the positive-sequence voltage vector appear to be critical. For a voltage sag
where the modulus reduces to V , no more than P
max
f
= 3V i
max
fq
can be transferred to the
utility grid. Depending on the wind situation when the voltage sag occurs, it may happen
that the turbine power is larger compared to P
max
f
. For such operating conditions, the dc-link
voltage begins to increase, unless the excess energy is somehow stored or dissipated. The
design of such energy storages depends on several factors of which some are:
• Cost.
• Grid codes.
• The remaining modulus of the positive-sequence grid voltage vector and the duration
of the voltage sag.
Depending on these factors, one, or possibly a combination, of the following four solutions
may be applicable:
Rotor Energy Storage
In this solution, the turbine power is controlled to P
t
= P
f
by changing the torque reference
for the turbine. If the pre-sag grid power must be restored moments after the voltage sag
is cleared, the blades should preferably remain in their pre-sag position, unless the WT ap-
proaches overspeed. If there is no need for instantaneous power restoration, the blades can
be pitched out of the wind directly.
“Braking” Chopper
A “braking” chopper, acting as a load dump, can be installed at the dc link. The limiting fac-
tor of this solution is the heat generated by the “braking” resistor which may be troublesome
to remove for long-duration voltage sags or interruptions.
98
DC-Link Energy Storage
Alarge dc-link capacitor bank can possibly be used, such that energy fromthe WT is buffered
at the dc link during the sag. The required size of the capacitor bank can be calculated
by substituting
˙
W = W
Δ
/t
Δ
in (7.25), assuming i
fq
= i
max
fq
, and solving the resulting
expression for C
dc
:
C
dc
=
2Δt
ΔW

−3V i
max
fq
+ P
t

. (7.41)
If the dc-link voltage is allowed to increase by no more than 10 %, then W
Δ
= (1.1v
dc
)
2

(v
ref
dc
)
2
= 0.21(v
ref
dc
)
2
. The values ΔW = 0.21 2.7
2
≈ 1.5 p.u., Δt = 0.25 s, V = 0,
i
max
fq
= 1 p.u. and P
t
= 3 p.u. are considered for a numerical example, which gives C
dc
=
2 0.25 314 3/1.5 ≈ 310 p.u. This is a very large value, so a dc-link energy storage appears
to be suitable mainly for small voltage sags that appear for a short period of time.
Overcurrent
The PWM rectifier can be designed for overcurrent, i.e., i
max
fq
> 1 pu. However, the thermal
limit of the utility grid may not be designed for such overcurrent, especially if several WTs
are connected to a common point.
7.2.3 Evaluation
This section presents simulated and experimental results of a PWM rectifier which is sub-
jected to various disturbances and voltage sags. The base values are 85 A, 105 V, 50 Hz,
and 1.2 Ω. The dc-link capacitance is C
dc
= 9.2 mF, which corresponds to C
dc
= 3.5 p.u.
The PWM rectifier uses 4.9 kHz sampling and switching frequency and the reference for the
dc-link voltage is normally 2.8 p.u. The PWM rectifier is loaded by a dc-link resistor which
corresponds to P
t
= −1.5 p.u. and i
fq
= −0.5 pu at v
dc
= 2.8 p.u.
The closed-loop grid current and dc-link voltage control loops are tuned for the band-
widths 2.3 p.u. and α
w
= 0.2 p.u. respectively, which corresponds to a current rise time
of 3 ms and a dc-link voltage rise time of 35 ms. The d current reference equals zero, the
maximum current modulus allowed is 1 pu, and the PLL bandwidth is ρ = 0.2 p.u.
Fig. 7.3 shows the results from the first simulation and experiment. A pure “phase-angle
jump” of φ = −45

≈ −0.8 rad occurs at t = 0.05 s, which yields an initial error angle of
˜
θ
0.05
= −0.8 rad. As seen from
˜
θ in Fig. 7.3b), the PLL recovers accurate field orientation
at approximately 40 ms after the “phase-angle jump” so the PWM rectifier is hardly affected
by the “jump,” as already concluded. A symmetrical voltage sag occurs in the time interval
t =0.1–0.3 s, giving, eventually, E
g
= 0.5 p.u. and requiring i
q
to be close to 1 p.u. in the
steady state. Moments after t = 0.1 s, the grid voltage modulus is E
g
≈ 0.6 p.u. which
causes the dc-link voltage to drop to v
dc
= 2.65 p.u. at t = 0.12 s. This is close to the
predicted value v
dc
= 2.6 p.u., resulting from the numerical example in Section 7.2.1. The
grid voltage is recovered at t = 0.32 s, causing the dc-link voltage to increase to v
dc
= 3 p.u.
Fig. 7.4 shows the results of an unsymmetrical voltage sag, characterized by E
p
= 0.6
p.u. and E
n
= 0.4 p.u. The sag occurs in the time interval t =0.1–0.3 s. In all other aspects,
the simulation and corresponding experiment are carried out under similar conditions as in
Fig. 7.3. The simulated and experimental waveforms are similar to those in Fig. 7.3 except
99
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
2.5
3
3.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
2.5
3
3.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−1.5
−1
−0.5
0
0.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−1.5
−1
−0.5
0
0.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0
1
2
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0
1
2
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−1
0
1
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−1
0
1
a)
v
d
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
v
d
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
c)
i
f
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
i
f
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
d)
e)
E
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
E
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
f)
g)
˜ θ
1
[
r
a
d
]
˜ θ
1
[
r
a
d
]
h)
Time [s] Time [s]
Fig. 7.3. Response to “phase-angle jump” and symmetrical voltage sag. a) DC-link voltage, v
dc
(simulation). b) DC-link voltage, v
dc
(experiment). c) Grid-filter current, i
fq
(simulation).
d) Grid-filter current, i
fq
(experiment). e) Grid voltage, E
q
(simulation). f) Grid voltage,
E
q
(experiment). g) PLL error angle,
˜
θ
1
(simulation). h) PLL error angle,
˜
θ
1
(experiment).
that a ripple of approximately 0.1 p.u. is superimposed on the dc-link voltage, and the ripple
in the q-axis current is close to 0.12 p.u. These ripples are in close correspondence to the
values predicted by the numerical example in the analysis section.
In the last experiment, the load power is stepped fromP
t
= 0 to P
t
= −1.5 p.u. at t = 0.1
s, and 0.2 s later, the reference for the dc-link voltage changes stepwise from v
ref
dc
= 2.8 p.u.
to v
ref
dc
= 3 p.u. Fig. 7.5 shows the results. The dc-link voltage reduces to 2.5 p.u., as
predicted in Section 7.2.1, 15 ms after the load power step. The step response for t > 0.3 s
is well damped and the dc voltage rise time (10–90 % of the final value) appears to equal the
intended 35 ms.
7.2.4 Conclusion
The voltage sag response of PWM rectifiers has been investigated for a candidate dc-link
voltage control system. A method of analysis was derived, which showed good agreement
between analytical predictions and experimental results. For several types and magnitudes
of voltage sags, the candidate dc-link voltage control system can successfully reduce dis-
turbances from both symmetrical and unsymmetrical voltage sags such that nominal power
100
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
2.5
3
3.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
2.5
3
3.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−1.5
−1
−0.5
0
0.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−1.5
−1
−0.5
0
0.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−1
0
1
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−1
0
1
a)
v
d
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
v
d
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
c)
i
f
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
i
f
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
d)
e)
E
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
E
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
f)
g)
˜ θ
1
[
r
a
d
]
˜ θ
1
[
r
a
d
]
h)
Time [s] Time [s]
Fig. 7.4. Response to “phase-angle jump” and LLF unsymmetrical voltage sag. a) DC-link voltage,
v
dc
(simulation). b) DC-link voltage, v
dc
(experiment). c) Grid-filter current, i
fq
(simu-
lation). d) Grid-filter current, i
fq
(experiment). e) Grid voltage, E
q
(simulation). f) Grid
voltage, E
q
(experiment). g) PLL error angle,
˜
θ
1
(simulation). h) PLL error angle,
˜
θ
1
(experiment).
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
2.4
2.6
2.8
3
3.2
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
2.4
2.6
2.8
3
3.2
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−1.5
−1
−0.5
0
0.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−1.5
−1
−0.5
0
0.5
a)
v
d
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
v
d
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
c)
i
f
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
i
f
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
d)
Time [s] Time [s]
Fig. 7.5. Steps in P
s
and v
ref
dc
. a) DC-link voltage, v
dc
(simulation). b) DC-link voltage, v
dc
(experi-
ment). c) Grid-filter current, i
fq
(simulation). d) Grid-filter current, i
fq
(experiment).
101
production can be restored once the grid voltage recovers. However, large reductions in the
positive-sequence voltage were found to be critical. Unless suitable actions are taken, such a
voltage reduction sag may result in a dc-link overvoltage since the transferable active power
reduces with reducing grid voltage. Remedies for avoiding overvoltage at the dc link have
also been discussed.
7.3 Doubly-Fed Induction Generator with Shunt Converter
Fig. 7.6 shows a principle sketch of the DFIG. In the figure a crowbar is also depicted,
which short-circuits the rotor circuit in case of too large a grid disturbance causing high
rotor current, and thereby protects the rotor converter. After such an action, rotor current
control has been lost and the turbine must be disconnected from the grid. The crowbar in
Crowbar
DFIG Grid
=
= ≈

Fig. 7.6. Doubly-fed induction generator system with a crowbar.
Fig. 7.6 consists of a diode rectifier and a thyristor that is triggered when the rotor circuit
should be short circuited. One disadvantage with this system is that once the crowbar has
been triggered, the turbine must be disconnected from the grid, since the current through the
thyristor is a continuous dc current and can only be interrupted if the turbine is disconnected
from the grid [72]. However, one possibility is to still have a rotor converter, but one that can
handle a higher current for a short period of time of some 100s of ms. Assuming such a short
over-current time, this means that only the IGBT modules need to be designed for a higher
current while the rotor winding and the converter (cooling etc) still can be designed according
to the slip power only. This means that the converter shortly can handle a higher current and
thereby stay connected to the grid longer without any crowbar action. Still, this system will
have high fault currents from the stator during the voltage sag. Since the relatively low
power losses in the power electronic equipment were a major reason for selecting a DFIG, it
is accordingly important to study how the ride-through system influences the power losses,
since additional hardware or modifications may reduce the efficiency.
Before explaining the candidate DFIG ride-through system, we will look further into the
dynamics of the DFIG during a voltage sag.
102
7.3.1 Response to Small Voltage Sags
In order to explain what happens to the DFIG during and after a voltage sag, we will start
by looking at the flux dynamics. First, we will assume that the converter is ideal an can
supply the desired rotor voltage and current, and steady-state conditions are assumed to
precede the voltage sag. As discussed several times before, the flux dynamics of the DFIG
are poorly damped. As also previously shown a voltage sag will cause the stator flux to
enter a poorly damped oscillation with an oscillating frequency close to the line frequency.
The amplitude of the oscillation will be proportional to the size of the voltage sag, which
can be realized from the fact that ψ
s
≈ E
g

g
. If the DFIG system survives the voltage
sag, i.e., no crowbar action, the amplitude of the flux oscillations can, after the voltage sag,
i.e., when the voltage returns, vary between zero and close to twice the flux oscillations in
the beginning of the sag. The reason that the amplitude of the stator flux oscillation can
almost vary between zero and twice the initial amplitude is that steady-state condition hardly
precedes the returning of the voltage. This can be realized from Fig. 7.7, where a phase
portrait and corresponding time series of the flux can be seen. Note, that in order to make the
figure more lucid, the duration of the voltage sags in the time series is two periods longer.
In the figure, two different voltage sags are shown, with the duration of the sag as the only
difference. The cross marks the equilibrium point during normal operation and the circle
marks the equilibrium point during the voltage sag. It can be seen in the figure that directly
after the voltage sag has occurred, the flux will circularly approach the “new” equilibrium
point (the circle) very slowly. This is indicated by the dashed lines in the figure. Then, when
the voltage returns, the flux will again approach circularly the equilibrium point (the cross)
indicated with the solid line. However, as indicated by the difference between Fig. 7.7a) and
Fig. 7.7b), the duration of the sag is important. In Figs. 7.7a) and c), the voltage returns
when the flux is close to the original equilibrium point (the cross), which leads to that the
flux oscillations after the voltage sag are relatively small. However, as shown in Fig. 7.7b)
and d), if the voltage returns at an unfortunate moment, when the flux is far away from the
original equilibrium point (the cross), the oscillations become even worse when the voltage
returns after the sag.
Symmetrical Voltage Sags
In this section, the dc-link dynamics of the DFIG system will be analyzed in a similar way as
for the full-power converter system in Section 7.2. In the analysis below, it will be assumed
that the “disturbance” is applied at t = 0 and that steady-state conditions precede the fault
causing the voltage sag. In order to analyze the response to voltage sags we will assume that
the magnitude of the stator flux can be expressed in a similar way as in (5.47) and (5.48) as
t < 0 : Ψ
s
(t) = ψ
s0

E
g,nom
ω
g
(7.42)
t ≥ 0 : Ψ
s
(t) ≈ ψ
s0
V
E
g,nom
+

1 −
V
E
g,nom

ψ
s0
e
−R
s
t/L
M
e
−jω
g
t
(7.43)
103
0.5 0.75 1 1.25 1.5
−0.5
−0.25
0
0.25
0.5
0.5 0.75 1 1.25 1.5
−0.5
−0.25
0
0.25
0.5
0 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.1
−0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
0 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.1
−0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
a)
ψ
sd
ψ
sd
ψ
s
q
ψ
s
q
b)
c)
d
d
q
q
Time [s] Time [s]
ψ
s
d
,
ψ
s
q
ψ
s
d
,
ψ
s
q
d)
Fig. 7.7. Phase portrait and time series of the flux dynamics during a symmetrical voltage sag. For
clarity of the figure, the voltage sag duration for the time series is two periods longer. a) 18.5
ms long voltage sag. b) 10 ms long voltage sag. c) Time series of the flux in a). d) Time
series of the flux in b).
or as
t < 0 : Ψ
s
(t) = ψ
s0

E
g,nom
ω
g
(7.44)
t ≥ 0 : Ψ
s
(t) ≈ ψ
s0
V
E
g,nom
+ ψ
pk
s
e
−R
s
t/L
M
e
−jω
g
t
(7.45)
where ψ
pk
s
= (1 −V/E
g,nom

s0
is the peak value of the stator flux oscillation. The expres-
sion for the stator flux in (7.43) and (7.45) can be found by solving the differential equation
in (6.1). The dynamics of the dc-link are described by (4.48), and are governed both by the
rotor power P
r
and the grid-filter power P
f
, which can be approximated as
P
r
≈ 3E
gq
i
Rq
−3ω
r
Re[jΨ
s
i

R
] ≈ 3E
gq
i
Rq
−3ψ
s
i
Rq
ω
r
(7.46)
P
f
≈ 3E
gq
i
fq
. (7.47)
104
The expression for P
r
is derived from the fact that P
r
= Re[3v
R
i

R
] and by using the approx-
imation of the rotor voltage given by (5.38), i.e., v
R
≈ E
gq
−jω
r
Ψ
s
, where the stator voltage
has been changed to the grid voltage. This means that just before the voltage sag, P
r
and P
f
equal
P
r
(t = 0

) ≈ 3E
gq
i
Rq
−3ψ
s0
i
Rq
ω
r
(7.48)
P
f
(t = 0

) ≈ 3E
gq
i
fq
. (7.49)
Moreover, since steady-state conditions are assumed to precede the sag, we have that P
r
(t =
0

) = −P
f
(t = 0

), giving i
fq
(t = 0

) = −(E
gq
i
Rq
−ψ
s,0
i
Rq
ω
r
)/E
gq
≈ −(1−ω
r

g
)i
Rq
.
Under the assumption that the rotor current controller and grid-filter controller manage to
keep the current at (or at least close to) its reference value, moments after the sag has oc-
curred, it is possible to express P
r
and P
f
as
t ≥ 0 : P
r
(t) ≈ 3V i
Rq
−3

V
E
g,nom
i
Rq
ω
r
ψ
s0
+ ψ
pk
s
i
R
ω
r
e
−R
s
t/L
M
sin(ω
g
t + φ
r
)

(7.50)
t ≥ 0 : P
f
(t) ≈ 3V i
fq
≈ −3V

1 −
ω
r
ω
g

i
Rq
(7.51)
where i
R
= [i
R
[ and φ
r
= ∠i
R
. Then, as the stator flux prior to the voltage sag can be
approximated as ψ
s0
≈ E
g,nom

g
, the above expression can be further reduced as
t ≥ 0 : P
r
(t) ≈ 3V

1 −
ω
r
ω
g

i
Rq
−3ψ
pk
s
i
R
ω
r
e
−R
s
t/L
M
sin(ω
g
t + φ
r
) (7.52)
t ≥ 0 : P
f
(t) ≈ −3V

1 −
ω
r
ω
g

i
Rq
. (7.53)
The dc-link dynamics in (4.48) are governed by the term −P
r
− P
f
. This means that the
power drop in the first term of (7.52) is compensated for by the same drop in P
f
as can be
seen in (7.53). However, the second term in (7.52) will act as a disturbance to the dc-link, as
˜
P
r
= 3ψ
pk
s
i
R
ω
r
e
−R
s
t/L
M
sin(ω
g
t + φ
r
) =
˜
P
pk
r
e
−R
s
t/L
M
sin(ω
g
t + φ
r
). (7.54)
This disturbance will cause a ripple in the dc-link voltage with the frequency ω
g
. In order to
determine the amplitude of the ripple the static gain of (4.120), with G
Pe
(p) = −G
PW
(p),
at the relevant frequency can be used. This yields
[G
Pe
(jω
g
)[ =

g
C
dc


2
w
ξ −ω
2
g
)
2
+ (2ω
g
α
w
ξ)
2
(7.55)
where ξ = V/E
g,nom
. If ω
g
α
w
, the above expression can be further approximated as
[G
Pe
(jω
g
)[ ≈
2
C
dc
ω
g
. (7.56)
For example, consider a voltage sag with V = 0.75 p.u., and C
dc
= 3.5 p.u. This means
that ψ
pk
s
= (1 − V/E
g,nom

s0
= (1 − 0.75) 1 = 0.25 p.u., yielding
˜
P
pk
r
= 3ψ
pk
s
i
R
ω
r
=
105
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
0
0.25
0.5
0.75
1
1.25
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−100
0
100
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
3
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
0
0.25
0.5
0.75
1
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
0
0.25
0.5
0.75
a)
E
g
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
Ψ
s
[
p
.
u
.
]
d
q
c)
P
r
+
P
f
[
%
]
d)
v
d
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
e)
i
R
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
f)
i
f
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
Time [s] Time [s]
Fig. 7.8. Simulation of the response of the DFIG system to a small symmetrical voltage sag. a) Grid
voltage. b) Stator flux. c) Sum of rotor and grid-filter power. d) DC-link voltage. e) q-
component rotor current. f) q-component grid-filter current.
3 0.25 1 1 1.3 = 0.98 p.u. Then, according to (7.56), the peak ripple ˜ e
pk
w
in the error
signal e
w
= W
ref
dc
− W
dc
will be ˜ e
pk
w
= 2
˜
P
pk
r
/(C
dc
ω
g
) = 2 0.98/(3.5 1) = 0.56 p.u. The
corresponding peak value of the ripple in v
dc
is ˜ v
pk
dc
= 2.8−(2.8
2
−0.56)
0.5
= 0.1 p.u. when
v
ref
dc
= 2.8 p.u. In Fig. 7.8, a corresponding simulation is shown. The simulation verifies the
finding that the sum of the rotor and grid-filter powers consists of a corresponding oscillating
power at a frequency of ω
g
. Moreover, the ripple in the dc-link voltage is 0.1 p.u., which is
according to the analytical result. However, as previously discussed, at the time when the
voltage returns, the amplitude of the stator-flux oscillations can be close to twice the value
at the beginning of the sag. This means, of course, that the amplitude in the dc-link voltage
ripple will be increased accordingly. Since there is ripple in the dc-link voltage, this will also
be transferred to i
fq
, since it is used for controlling the dc-link voltage. With the transfer
function in (7.39) the static gain of the ripple in i
fq
can be calculated (note that −G
Pi
is
actually used since here P
t
= −P
r
). This yields
[G
Pi
(jω
g
)[ =
α
w
3E
g,nom

α
2
w
+ 4ω
2
g

2
w
ξ
p
−ω
2
g
)
2
+ (2ω
g
α
w
ξ
p
)
2


w

g
E
g,nom
(7.57)
where the approximation holds if ω
g
α
w
. For the example given above we have, with
α
w
= 0.2, that ˜ı
pk
fq
= 2α
w
˜
P
pk
r
/(3ω
g
E
g,nom
) = 2 0.2 0.98/(3 1 1) = 0.13 p.u. This value
106
is also confirmed by the simulation shown in Fig. 7.8. Moreover, the stator-flux oscillations
will also cause a ripple in the stator current. The stator current can be found from (4.40) as
i
s
=
Ψ
s
L
M
−i
R
. (7.58)
Then if the rotor current is controlled accurately, i.e., i
R
= i
ref
R
, the ripple in the stator current
will be ˜ı
pk
s
= ψ
pk
s
/L
M
, which, with L
M
= 4.6 p.u., yields ˜ı
pk
s
= 0.25/4.6 = 0.05 p.u.
“Phase-Angle Jumps”
In this section we will study how the DFIG system responds to small “phase-angle jumps.”
Moreover, in the analysis it will be assumed that the magnitude of the grid voltage remains
at its nominal value after the “phase-angle jump.” This has been done in order to study the
effect of the actual “phase-angle jump” and not the influence of a voltage sag. After a pure
“phase-angle jump,” i.e, without any voltage sag, the grid voltage vector can be expressed as
E
g
= jE
g,nom
e
j
˜
θ(t)
≈ jE
g,nom

1 + j
˜
θ(t)

≈ jE
g,nom

1 + j
˜
θ
0
e
−ρt

(7.59)
where
˜
θ(t) is the error angle and the approximation holds if
˜
θ(t) is small. In (7.59) the error
angle
˜
θ(t) is modeled as in (7.30). Substituting (7.59) in (6.1) and solving the differential
equation, the following solution is obtained
t < 0 : Ψ
s
(t) = ψ
s0

E
g,nom
ω
g
(7.60)
t ≥ 0 : Ψ
s
(t) ≈
E
g,nom
ω
g
ω
2
g
+ ρ
2
+ (1 + j)ω
g
ρ
˜
θ
0
e
−ρt

ω
g
ρ + jω
2
g

˜
θ
0
e
−(R
s
/L
M
+jω
g
)t
ω
2
g
+ ρ
2
(7.61)
if the stator resistance in the solution is assumed to be zero—except in e
−R
s
t/L
M
—and ψ
s0

E
g,nom

g
. If ω
g
ρ, it is possible to further approximate the above equation as
t < 0 : Ψ
s
(t) = ψ
s0

E
g,nom
ω
g
(7.62)
t ≥ 0 : Ψ
s
(t) ≈
E
g,nom
ω
g
+ j
E
g,nom
ω
g
˜
θ
0

e
−ρt
−e
−R
s
t/L
M
e
−jω
g
t

. (7.63)
Using (7.46) and (7.47), the rotor and grid filter powers can be determined in a similar way
as for the symmetrical voltage sag as
t ≥ 0 :
P
r
(t) ≈3E
g,nom

1 −
ω
r
ω
g

i
Rq
+ 3E
g,nom
ω
r
ω
g
˜
θ
0

i
Rd
e
−ρt
−i
R
e
−R
s
t/L
M
cos(ω
g
t + φ
r
)

(7.64)
t ≥ 0 : P
f
(t) ≈−3E
g,nom

1 −
ω
r
ω
g

i
Rq
. (7.65)
As for the case with symmetrical voltage sags, the dc-link dynamics in (4.48) are governed by
the term−P
r
−P
f
. This means that the power drop in the first term of (7.64) is compensated
107
for by the same drop in P
f
; see (7.65). However, the second term in (7.64) will act as a
disturbance to the dc link, as
˜
P
r
= −3E
g,nom
˜
θ
0
ω
r
ω
g

i
Rd
e
−ρt
−i
R
e
−R
s
t/L
M
cos(ω
g
t + φ
r
)

. (7.66)
In (7.66), the disturbance consists of two terms: one that depends on the bandwidth, ρ, of
the PLL-type estimator and one that depends on the stator flux dynamics. It is difficult to
use the disturbance in (7.66) in order to find the extreme value in the error signal e
w
since
it consists of two terms of which one is sinusoidal. One way of estimating the “worst case”
impact of a specific “phase-angle jump” is to treat the two terms independently and then add
them together. Of course, the result should be used with care since adding the results will
not, generally, give mathematically correct results. However, the analysis will still give some
valuable information of the system. The first term’s impact on the dc-link dynamics can be
found from the extreme value of
e
w
(t) = L
−1

G
Pe
(p)L

−3E
g,nom
˜
θ
0
ω
r
ω
g
i
Rd
e
−ρt

= 3E
g,nom
˜
θ
0
ω
r
ω
g
i
Rd

w
t −2)te
α
w
t
C
dc
(7.67)
where G
Pe
(p) is given by (7.21). The extreme value of (7.67) occurs for t = (2 −

2)/α
w
if ρ = α
w
. This means that the extreme value of (7.67) becomes
e
max/min
w
= 3E
g,nom
˜
θ
0
ω
r
ω
g
i
Rd
2(−1 +

2)e
−2+

2
C
dc
α
w
≈ 3E
g,nom
˜
θ
0
ω
r
ω
g
i
Rd
0.46
C
dc
α
w
(7.68)
if ρ = α
w
. The second term in (7.66) will cause ripple in the dc-link voltage with the static
gain according to (7.56).
The values
˜
θ
0
= −15

≈ −0.26 rad, α
w
= ρ = 0.2 p.u., C
dc
= 3.5 p.u., w
r
= 1.3 p.u.,
i
R
= 1 p.u., and i
Rd
= 0.34 (corresponding to unity power factor) are used for a numerical
example. From (7.68) we have that e
max/min
w
= 3(−0.26)1.30.340.46/(3.50.2) = −0.23
p.u., which corresponds to a dc-link voltage of v
dc
= (2.8
2
− (−0.23))
0.5
= 2.84 p.u. The
amplitude of the second termin (7.66) becomes −3E
g,nom
˜
θ
0
ω
r

g
i
R
= −3(−0.26)1.31 =
1.01 p.u., giving according to (7.56) a ripple with the amplitude 1.01 2/3.5 = 0.58 p.u.,
which will cause a ripple in the dc-link voltage of ˜ v
pk
dc
= 2.8 − (2.8
2
− 0.58)
0.5
= 0.11 p.u.
This means that the “worst case” dc-link voltage could be v
wc
dc
= 2.84 + 0.11 = 2.95 p.u.
In Fig. 7.9 shows a simulation of the “phase-angle jump” used in the example. It can be
seen that the amplitude of the oscillation in the dc-link voltage and the maximum value of
the dc-link voltage is close to the predicted values. Eq. (7.57) can be used to determine the
amplitude of the oscillation in i
fq
. Since the amplitude of the oscillation in
˜
P
r
is 1.01 p.u.
the oscillation in i
fq
becomes ˜ı
pk
fq
= 2 0.2 1.01/(3 1 1) = 0.13 p.u.
For comparison to larger “phase-angle jumps” a corresponding simulation of a −45

“phase-angle jump” can be seen in Fig. 7.10. With the same analysis as above will give a
dc-link voltage ripple of 0.33 p.u. and a “worst case” dc-link voltage of v
wc
dc
= 3.25 p.u.
Unsymmetrical Voltage Sags
Similar analysis, as for symmetrical voltage sags and “phase-angle jumps,” for unsymmetri-
cal sags is more difficult to derive, since the system also will be excited with the negative-
sequence voltage. Therefore, the analysis here will be limited to simulations. In Fig. 7.11
108
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
0
0.25
0.5
0.75
1
1.25
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−1
0
1
2
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−50
0
50
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
2.6
2.8
3
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
0
0.25
0.5
0.75
1
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
0
0.25
0.5
a)
E
g
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
Ψ
s
[
p
.
u
.
]
d
d
q
q
c)
P
r
+
P
f
[
%
]
d)
v
d
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
e)
i
R
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
f)
i
f
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
Time [s] Time [s]
Fig. 7.9. Simulation of the response of the DFIG system to a small “phase-angle jump” of −15

.
a) Grid voltage. b) Stator flux. c) Sum of rotor and grid-filter powers. d) DC-link voltage.
e) q-component rotor current. f) q-component grid-filter current.
the response to an SLGF occurring at t = 0.1 ms with V = 0.75 p.u. is presented. In the
figure it can be seen that in, for instance, the flux, the dc-link voltage, and in the grid-filter
current oscillations with both frequencies of ω
g
and 2ω
g
. The oscillation with the frequency
ω
g
arises from the flux dynamics while the oscillation with the frequency 2ω
g
arises from the
negative-sequence voltage. However, depending on the phase angle at the time instance of
the sag the oscillation at ω
g
can in principle be removed for an SLGF. This is indicated in
Fig. 7.12 where the sag occurs at t = 0.105 ms, all other conditions are as in Fig. 7.11.
Summary
The response of the DFIG system due to different grid disturbances has been investigated.
It has been shown that the amplitude of the flux oscillation when the voltage returns after a
voltage sag can vary between zero and twice the initial amplitude of the flux oscillations due
the sag. Moreover, the DFIG system has been analyzed for symmetrical voltage sags with
good agreement. However, the response to “phase-angle jumps” and unsymmetrical voltage
sags are analytically harder to derive. Moreover, the DFIG system is roughly as sensitive to
“phase-angle jumps” as to symmetrical voltage sags.
109
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
0
0.25
0.5
0.75
1
1.25
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−2
0
2
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−200
−100
0
100
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
0
0.25
0.5
0.75
1
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−0.5
0
0.5
1
a)
E
g
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
Ψ
s
[
p
.
u
.
]
d
d
q
q
c)
P
r
+
P
f
[
%
]
d)
v
d
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
e)
i
R
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
f)
i
f
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
Time [s] Time [s]
Fig. 7.10. Simulation of the response of the DFIG system to a “phase-angle jump” of −45

. a) Grid
voltage. b) Stator flux. c) Sum of rotor and grid-filter powers. d) DC-link voltage. e) q-
component rotor current. f) q-component grid-filter current.
7.3.2 Response to Large Voltage Sags
In previous section the voltage sags were assumed to be small enough, not causing the rotor
converter to fail in controlling the rotor current. However, this cannot be assumed for larger
voltage sags. As shown in (5.40), the rotor voltage will change in proportion to the depth
of the voltage sag. So, for larger voltage sags, the rotor voltage will hit its maximum value
and lose control of the rotor current. In this section, the DFIG system will be analyzed and it
is assumed that the converter is large enough to handle excess currents. This has been done
in order to study the behavior of the DFIG and not the influence of the converter and the
crowbar. Still, the rotor voltage in the simulations is, anyhow, limited to ±0.4 p.u. (referred
to the stator circuit). This limitation of the rotor voltage is a major difference compared to
the analysis in the previous section, since the converter will lose control of the rotor current.
In Fig. 7.13 a simulation of a symmetrical voltage sag (at 0.05 s) down to 0.25 p.u. is
presented. Before the voltage sag the DFIG is running at rated power and a rotor speed
of 1.3 p.u. The duration of the voltage sag in the simulation is 102 ms and 92 ms. In
the figure it can be seen that the rotor voltage will hit its maximum value directly after the
voltage sag. This means that the converter loses control of the rotor current, leading to an
uncontrolled rotor current. As shown in Section 7.3.1 the situation might be even worse when
the voltage returns. This is also indicated in Fig. 7.13, i.e., with two identical simulations
110
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−0.25
0
0.25
0.5
0.75
1
1.25
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−1
0
1
2
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−50
0
50
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
2.7
2.8
2.9
3
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
0
0.25
0.5
0.75
1
1.25
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
0
0.2
0.4
a)
E
g
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
Ψ
s
[
p
.
u
.
]
d
d
q
q
c)
P
r
+
P
f
[
%
]
d)
v
d
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
e)
i
R
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
f)
i
f
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
Time [s] Time [s]
Fig. 7.11. Simulation of the response of the DFIG system to an unsymmetrical (SLGF) voltage sag.
a) Grid voltage. b) Stator flux. c) Sum of rotor and grid-filter powers. d) DC-link voltage.
e) q-component rotor current. f) q-component grid-filter current.
except the duration of the voltage sag. It can be seen that the maximum rotor current can be
much higher when the voltage returns than when the voltage drops at the beginning of the
disturbance, if the machine flux is in the wrong “direction.” In Fig. 7.14, the maximum rotor
current and the maximum rotor power due to a symmetrical voltage sag for three different
operating conditions can be seen. In the figure, the effect of returning voltage has not been
taken into consideration. From the figure it can be seen that the maximum rotor current due
to a voltage sag will increase with the magnitude of the sag. Moreover, the maximum rotor
power that is fed into the dc link can be up to almost 250% of nominal power. It should be
kept in mind that for the ordinary DFIG system, the converter and dc link are only rated for
30–40% of the nominal power. This means that there is a huge rotor power that needs to be
dealt with. Based on these findings a candidate ride-through system will be presented in the
next section.
7.3.3 Candidate Ride-Through System
The aim of this section is to present a candidate ride-through DFIG system, based on the
result in the previous section. The main idea is to overdimension the valves of the power
electronic converter so that they can handle the rotor current occurring at deep voltage sags.
However, as indicated in Fig. 7.13, the maximum rotor current actually might be much
111
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−0.25
0
0.25
0.5
0.75
1
1.25
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−1
0
1
2
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−50
0
50
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
2.75
2.8
2.85
2.9
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
0
0.25
0.5
0.75
1
1.25
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
0.25
0.3
0.35
a)
E
g
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
Ψ
s
[
p
.
u
.
]
d
d
q
q
c)
P
r
+
P
f
[
%
]
d)
v
d
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
e)
i
R
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
f)
i
f
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
Time [s] Time [s]
Fig. 7.12. Simulation of the response of the DFIG system to an unsymmetrical (SLGF) voltage sag.
a) Grid voltage. b) Stator flux. c) Sum of rotor and grid-filter powers. d) DC-link voltage.
e) q-component rotor current. f) q-component grid-filter current.
higher, i.e., up to twice as high, when the voltage returns than at the voltage drop. Of course,
this means that the valves have to be even more overdimensioned. In order to avoid these
high current when the voltage returns, anti-parallel thyristors can be connected in series with
the stator in order to achieve a quick disconnection of the stator circuit [20]. By interrupt-
ing the stator circuit, the flux oscillation will also be interrupted. As soon as the flux is
interrupted it is possible to remagnetize the DFIG quickly through the rotor converter and
connect the stator circuit to the grid again. The converter needs not to be disconnected from
the rotor circuit since the valves of the converter are overdimensioned. In order remove the
excess power that is fed into the dc link, a “dc-link breaking chopper” is used to dissipate
the excess power. Moreover, if required, the grid-side converter may provide the grid with
reactive power during the sag. The system with anti-parallel thyristors is illustrated in Fig.
7.15. The anti-parallel thyristor switch can disconnect the stator within a half cycle, i.e., in
10 ms, [9, 20]. The anti-parallel thyristor switch needs to be equipped with a forced commu-
tation unit in case of a dc component in the stator fault current [20]. Another option would
be to have gate-turn-off thyristors; then, the disconnection time can be lowered. However,
a complex driving circuit is needed, since typically a large negative gate current is required
to turn off that device [67]. A third option would be to have anti-parallel IGBTs. Since a
normal IGBT, a so-called punch-through IGBT, cannot handle reverse voltages as high as the
forward blocking voltages, a diode has to be put in series with the IGBT. Instead of using the
112
0 0.1 0.2 0.3
0
0.5
1
1.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3
0
0.5
1
0 0.1 0.2 0.3
0
5
10
0 0.1 0.2 0.3
0
5
10
0 0.1 0.2 0.3
0
1
2
3
0 0.1 0.2 0.3
−4
−2
0
2
a)
E
g
[
p
.
u
.
]
v
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
i
s
[
p
.
u
.
]
c)
i
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
d)
ψ
s
[
p
.
u
.
]
e)
P
r
[
p
.
u
.
]
f)
Time [s] Time [s]
Fig. 7.13. Simulation of the response of a DFIG system to a voltage sag down to 0.25 p.u. Solid line
correspond to a voltage sag of 102 ms and dashed line correspond to a voltage sag of 92
ms. a) Stator voltage. b) Rotor voltage magnitude. c) Stator current magnitude. d) Rotor
current magnitude. e) Stator flux magnitude. f) Rotor power.
punch-through IGBT, the so-called non-punch through IGBT can be used. The non-punch
through IGBT can handle a reverse voltage as high as the forward blocking voltage. How-
ever, this device has higher on-state losses [67]. One last option would be to have a contactor
as a circuit breaker. However, the disconnection time for the contactor will be longer, while
on the other hand, in principle, without losses.
Thus, the IGBT modules of the machine-side converter are designed for a higher current
rating, in order to withstand voltage sags. Moreover, in order to avoid the possible higher
rotor currents when the voltage returns, the stator circuit is disconnected from the grid. Then,
after a disconnection, the rotor current controller re-magnetizes the DFIG, and then the DFIG
can be synchronized to the grid as soon as the voltage has returned to an acceptable, prede-
fined, level. For the investigated system, the maximum rotor current and rotor power due to
symmetrical voltage sag is shown in Fig. 7.16, if the stator circuit is disconnected within 10
ms.
Of course, for IGBT modules that can handle higher currents temporarily, the stator
circuit can be disconnected less often due to voltage sags. Fig. 7.17 shows the maximum
rotor current and rotor power when the stator is not disconnected from the grid and the grid
voltage returns at the worst instance around 50 ms. This means that the duration of the
voltage sag is approximately 50 ms. It can be seen in the figure that for voltage sags down to
113
0 0.5 1
0
1
2
3
4
5
0 0.5 1
−250
−200
−150
−100
−50
0
50
M
a
x
i
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
a)
Voltage sag V [p.u.] Voltage sag V [p.u.]
M
a
x
P
r
[
%
]
b)
Case 1
Case 1
Case 2
Case 2
Case 3
Case 3
Fig. 7.14. Maximum rotor current and rotor power for three different operating conditions. Case 1
corresponds to rated power and a rotor speed of 1.3 p.u. Case 2 corresponds to 23% of
rated power and a rotor speed of 1.0 p.u. Case 3 corresponds to 11% of rated power and
a rotor speed of 0.7 p.u. a) Maximum rotor current. b) Maximum rotor power (Note that
negative rotor power means that the power is fed into the dc link).
Machine-side Grid-side
converter converter
DFIG
Switch
Y
Δ
“Breaking chopper”
=
= ≈

Fig. 7.15. DFIG with anti-parallel thyristors in the stator circuit.
0.5 p.u. the maximum rotor current is approximately as large as the maximum rotor current
when the stator is disconnected. However, the maximum rotor power fed to the dc link
becomes higher compared to when the stator circuit is disconnected.
7.3.4 Evaluation of the Ride-Through System
The aim of this section is to make a theoretical case study on the candidate voltage sag
ride-through system presented in the previous section. This study will focus on the energy
production and energy production cost of such a system for a 2-MW DFIG WT.
114
0 0.5 1
0
1
2
3
4
5
0 0.5 1
−250
−200
−150
−100
−50
0
50
M
a
x
i
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
a)
Voltage sag V [p.u.] Voltage sag V [p.u.]
M
a
x
P
r
[
%
]
b)
Case 1
Case 1
Case 2
Case 2
Case 3
Case 3
Fig. 7.16. Maximum rotor current and rotor power for three different operating conditions if the
stator circuit is disconnected within 10 ms. Case 1 corresponds to rated power and a rotor
speed of 1.3 p.u. Case 2 corresponds to 23% of rated power and a rotor speed of 1.0 p.u.
Case 3 corresponds to 11% of rated power and a rotor speed of 0.7 p.u. a) Maximum rotor
current. b) Maximum rotor power (note that negative rotor power means that the power is
fed into the dc link).
0.4 0.6 0.8 1
0
2
4
6
8
0.4 0.6 0.8 1
−400
−300
−200
−100
0
M
a
x
i
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
a)
Voltage sag V [p.u.] Voltage sag V [p.u.]
M
a
x
P
r
[
%
]
b)
Case 1
Case 1
Case 2
Case 2
Case 3
Case 3
Fig. 7.17. Maximum rotor current and rotor power fed to the dc link for three different operating
conditions with returning voltage at the worst instance around 50 ms. Case 1 corresponds
to rated power and a rotor speed of 1.3 p.u. Case 2 corresponds to 23% of rated power and
a rotor speed of 1.0 p.u. Case 3 corresponds to 11% of rated power and a rotor speed of 0.7
p.u. a) Maximum rotor current. b) Maximum rotor power (note that negative rotor power
means that the power is fed into the dc link).
Calculation of Power Losses
The losses taken into consideration are the losses in the aerodynamic conversion, gearbox,
generator and in the semiconductor devices, i.e., the same losses as in Chapter 3. The calcu-
lation of the will also follow the loss models used in Chapter 3.
The losses in the anti-parallel thyristor switch used in the stator circuit, see Fig. 7.15, can
115
be described by (3.4). Since the switching occurs at zero current and at low frequency (the
grid frequency), the switching losses in the switch will be neglected. The parameters for the
thyristors used here are r
Thy
= 0.164 mΩ and V
Thy
= 0.88 V [93]. The dc-link “chopper” is
not used during normal operation; hence, it will not influence the energy production.
In Fig. 7.18 the losses in the semiconductor devices are shown. It can be noticed in Fig.
5 10 15 20 25
0
0.05
0.1
0.15
0.2
0.25
0.3
0.35
L
o
s
s
e
s
[
%
]
Wind speed [m/s]
Ordinary DFIG
Candidate DFIG
Thyristor switch
Grid-side converter
Fig. 7.18. The losses in the semiconductor devices used in this work. The solid lines show the losses
in the MSC for ordinary and the candidate DFIG system. The dashed line shows the losses
for the GSC and the dotted line shows the losses in the anti-parallel thyristor switch.
7.18, that the losses of the MSC can be reduced by approximately 0.05 percentage units at
rated operation by increasing the current rating of the valves. This reduction is only due
to that the resistance in the valves decreases with an increasing current rating. However, the
losses of the thyristor switch are much larger than the reduction of losses due to the increased
current rating of the valves. The steps in the curves at 7.8 m/s are due to that the stator of the
generator is switch from a Y connection to a Δ connection, as discussed in Section 2.3.4.
In Fig. 7.19 the expected efficiency of the candidate DFIG system as a function of the
average wind speed is presented. In the figure expected efficiencies of the ordinary DFIG
system as well as a system that utilizes a full power electronic converter can also be seen.
In the figure it can be seen that the ordinary DFIG system has the highest efficiency, even
though the difference towards the candidate DFIG system is relatively small. See Section
2.1.1 for details of calculation of the expected efficiency.
Energy Cost
For the calculation of the energy production cost, it has been assumed that the standard
2-MW DFIG WT costs e1600000 [65] and that one IGBT converter and the anti-parallel
thyristor switch costs e6000/p.u. current. The cost of the IGBTs is an estimate based on
cost information obtain from some IGBT manufactures. In Fig. 7.20, the relative energy
production cost of the candidate system normalized with the energy production cost of the
ordinary DFIG system can be seen. As could be expected, the energy production cost of the
candidate system is higher than for the ordinary DFIG system. The energy production cost
116
5 6 7 8 9 10
91
92
93
94
95
96
Full power converter system
Candidate DFIG system
Ordinary DFIG system
E
f

c
i
e
n
c
y
[
%
]
Average wind speed [m/s]
Fig. 7.19. Expected efficiency as a function of the average wind speed for the candidate DFIGsystem,
the ordinary DFIG system, and a system with a full-power converter.
5 6 7 8 9 10
1
1.01
1.02
1.03
1.04
1.05
Candidate DFIG system without thyristor switch
Full power converter system
Candidate DFIG system
R
e
l
a
t
i
v
e
e
n
e
r
g
y
c
o
s
t
[
%
]
Average wind speed [m/s]
Fig. 7.20. Energy cost of the candidate DFIG, candidate DFIG without thyristor switch, and the
system that utilizes a full-power converter. The energy cost is related to the ordinary DFIG
system.
of the candidate system is approximately two percentage units higher then for the ordinary
DFIG system. A full power electronic conversion, which handles the total power, has ap-
proximately three percentage units higher energy cost than the ordinary DFIG system. The
increase in energy production cost is due to the lower energy production of the candidate
system, but it is mainly due to the increased cost of the valves. In Fig. 7.20 the normalized
energy production cost of a modified candidate system, i.e., without anti-parallel thyristor
switch in the stator circuit, is also shown.
117
Conclusion
The influence on the energy production of a DFIG ride-through system has been investigated.
This system is based on increased current rating of the converter and anti-parallel thyristors
in the stator circuit. It has been found that the increased cost for a ride-through system for a
DFIG turbine might be reasonable, in comparison to the cost of full-power converter system
connected to a cage-bar induction generator.
7.4 Doubly-Fed Induction Generator with Series Converter
After a voltage sag, the stator flux of the DFIG will start to oscillate. This oscillation often
causes very high rotor currents, which necessitates a disconnection of the WT. Today, the
grid-side converter is connected to the grid in a shunt configuration, see Fig. 7.21. This
means that the converter injects a current into the grid. However, if the converter is instead
connected in series with the grid, a voltage is introduced in series with the stator voltage,
i.e., the stator voltage of the DFIG is the sum of the grid and converter voltages. Then, the
series voltage can be used in order to control the stator flux of the machine and prevent, for
instance, high rotor current with resulting disconnection of the turbine. Kelber has shown
that such a system can effectively damp the flux oscillations caused by voltage sags [55].
Conv. Conv.
DFIG DFIG
Grid Grid
Shunt connected Series connected
Fig. 7.21. Schematic figure showing shunt- and series-connected converters for doubly-fed induction
generator systems.
The contribution and purpose of this section is to analyze and present the advantages and
drawbacks of a DFIG system for a wind-turbine application with a series converter with the
focus on handling voltage sags. In addition, a goal is also to study the energy efficiency,
and, in particular, compare it to a system that utilizes a full-power converter. The reason for
comparing these two systems is that they are both capable of voltage sag ride-through.
7.4.1 Possible System Configurations
As mentioned in the Introduction, the idea is to have a converter connected in series with
the stator circuit and the grid. Fig. 7.21 shows both the ordinary DFIG system where the
converter is connected in shunt to the grid, and the system where it is connected in series.
The purpose of the series-connected converter is to control the stator flux of the DFIG, and in
this way be able to control the DFIG during voltage sags. By having the converter connected
118
in series, the stator voltage v
s
of the DFIG is, ideally, the sum of grid voltage E
g
and the
voltage v
c
from the series converter:
v
s
= E
g
+v
c
. (7.69)
Some of the demands on the series converter for a DFIG system may be:
• A sufficiently fast stator-flux control in order to damp the oscillations and control the
stator flux.
• Accurate control of the dc-link voltage.
There are at least two methods of accomplishing this series voltage, which are presented
below.
Series-Injection Transformer
In this configuration, the voltage source converter is connected to the grid via a series-
injection transformer, as depicted in Fig. 7.22. This configuration of a series-injection trans-
former and a voltage source converter is also used in dynamic voltage restorers (DVRs)
[27, 49]. The protection system of such a system is complicated since a simple discon-
nection does not work [70]. Normally the system is equipped with an LC filter with the
objective of reducing voltage and current harmonics generated from the voltage source con-
verter. Note that the LC filter can be placed on either side of the transformer [49]. The
series-injection transformer is necessary for galvanic insulation. Moreover, in order to avoid
magnetic saturation, the series-injection transformer must be rated to handle twice the nom-
inal flux [27]. Another option, in order to avoid the series-injection transformer, is to have
a converter for each phase with separate dc links [63]. For DVRs, there are, at least, three
Converter
DFIG
Grid
Transformer
Fig. 7.22. Doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) with the grid-side converter connected in series
via a series-injection transformer.
methods of controlling the series voltage: 1) in an open-loop manner [45], 2) directly control
the series voltage [71], and 3) by two control loops, i.e., an inner fast current control loop
that controls the current through the inductance and an outer cascade loop controlling the
capacitor (series) voltage [10]. One advantage of controlling both the inductor current and
capacitor voltage is that it is easy to avoid the resonant frequency of the LC filter. How-
ever, a drawback for the DFIG is that bandwidth is lost for the stator-flux controller, since
the stator flux is then controlled in cascade with both the capacitor (series) voltage and the
inductor current. For example, if it is desired to separate the control loops by one decade,
119
the bandwidth of the flux control loop is a factor of hundred lower than the current control
loop. This means that a very high bandwidth of the current control loop is necessary and,
accordingly, a very high switching frequency is needed.
Converter in the Y Point of the DFIG
The second method of accomplishing a series voltage for the DFIG is to connect a voltage
source converter where the Y point of the stator circuit usually is [54, 55]. Hereafter, this
will be referred to as the Y point. In [54, 55], this is accomplished using an additional (third)
converter, which is only used to damp the occurring stator flux oscillations. During normal
operation, the extra converter voltage is zero. In [54, 55], the converter in the Y point of the
DFIG system is only used to damp disturbances, while here it can also be used to control the
magnitude of the stator flux and the dc-link voltage.
Fig. 7.23 shows a principle sketch of the system when a voltage source converter is
connected to the Y point of the stator circuit of the DFIG. For this system, the converter
Converter
Stator circuit
Rotor circuit
Grid
Fig. 7.23. Doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) with the grid-side converter connected to the Y
point of the stator circuit.
voltage is directly used to control the stator flux in the machine, while the rotor current is
controlled by the machine-side converter. One disadvantage of this method is that all of
the stator current is passed through the Y-point converter, which may cause additional high
losses in the power electronic equipment.
7.4.2 System Modeling
As mentioned earlier the stator voltage is ideally the sum of the grid and series voltage. This
means that (4.38) and (4.39) become
v
s
= E
g
+v
c
= R
s
i
s
+

s
dt
+ jω
1
Ψ
s
(7.70)
v
R
= R
R
i
R
+

R
dt
+ jω
2
Ψ
R
(7.71)
where v
c
is the series voltage. The dc-link dynamics are described by
C
dc
2
dv
2
dc
dt
= v
dc
C
dc
dv
dc
dt
= −P
r
−P
c
(7.72)
120
where P
r
is the rotor power and P
c
is the power from the grid-side converter, which are given
by
P
r
= 3Re [v
R
i

R
] (7.73)
P
c
= 3Re [v
c
i

s
] (7.74)
or as
P
r
= 3

R
R
i
2
Rq
+ R
R
ψ
2
sd
L
2
M
+ ψ
sd
i
Rq
ω
2

(7.75)
P
c
= 3

R
s
i
2
Rq
+ E
g
i
Rq
−ψ
sd
i
Rq
ω
1

(7.76)
in the steady state if ψ
sq
= 0, i.e., controlled to be zero. Moreover, in the above equations
the d component of the rotor current is controlled so that the system operates at unity power
factor, i.e., i
Rd
= ψ
sd
/L
M
.
Steady-State Operation
For a constant dc-link voltage it is required that P
r
= −P
c
. This means that ψ
sd
must be
used to control the dc-link voltage, and in the steady state ψ
sd
approximately becomes
ψ
sd

E
g
ω
r
(7.77)
where the approximation is that the stator resistance has been neglected. Since the magne-
tizing losses depend on the flux in the machine, (7.77) indicates that the system will have an
undesirable feature. At low wind speeds (low power), the rotor speed is also low, causing
the flux to be high and thereby also the magnetizing losses to increase. At high wind speeds
(high power), the rotor speed is low, which means that the stator flux is low. Since the stator
flux is low, a higher torque-producing current is needed.
In the steady state, the rotor voltage can be expressed as
v
R
= (R
R
+ jω
2
L
σ
) i
ref
R
+ jω
2
Ψ
s
= (R
R
+ jω
2
L
σ
) i
ref
R
+ jω
2
ψ
sd
. (7.78)
If ψ
sd
= E
g

r
, (7.78) becomes
v
R
= (R
R
+ jω
2
L
σ
) i
ref
R
+ jω
2
E
g
ω
r
(7.79)
= (R
R
+ jω
2
L
σ
) i
ref
R
+ j

ω
1
ω
r
−1

E
g
(7.80)
≈ j

ω
1
ω
r
−1

E
g
. (7.81)
For example, we have, with ω
1
= E
g
= 1 p.u.
v
R

0.43 p.u. for ω
r
= 0.7 p.u.
−0.23 p.u. for ω
r
= 1.3 p.u.
(7.82)
121
showing that the rotor voltage is not symmetrically distributed around the synchronous speed,
as for the case with constant stator flux.
The series voltage v
c
of the grid-side converter is given by
v
c
= R
s
i
s
+ jω
1
Ψ
s
−E
g
≈ jω
1
Ψ
s
−E
g
(7.83)
in steady state. Then, as ψ
sq
= 0 and E
g
= jE
g
, we have
v
c
≈ jω
1
ψ
sd
−jE
g
= jω
1
E
g
ω
r
−jE
g
= j

ω
1
ω
r
−1

E
g
. (7.84)
As seen in (7.81) and (7.84), the rotor voltage will approximately equal the converter voltage,
i.e., v
R
≈ v
c
.
Close to No-Load Operation
It is required that (7.72) equals zero at steady-state operation in order to have a constant dc-
link voltage. If the rotor current and stator flux are controlled with high-gain feedback, we
have that
R
R
i
2
Rq
+ R
R
ψ
2
sd
L
2
M
+ ψ
sd
i
Rq
ω
2
+ R
s
i
2
Rq
+ E
g
i
Rq
−ψ
sd
i
Rq
ω
1
= 0 (7.85)
in order to have a constant dc-link voltage. Note that in (7.85), ψ
sq
= 0. Eq. (7.85) can be
rewritten as
ψ
2
sd
−ω
r
i
Rq
L
2
M
R
R
ψ
sd
+
L
2
M
R
R

(R
s
+ R
R
)i
2
Rq
+ E
g
i
Rq

= 0 (7.86)
which has the following solution:
ψ
sd
= ω
r
i
Rq
L
2
M
2R
R
±

ω
2
r
i
2
Rq
L
4
M
4R
2
R

L
2
M
R
R

(R
s
+ R
R
)i
2
Rq
+ E
g
i
Rq

. (7.87)
The expression under the square root cannot be negative, implying that
L
2
M
R
R
i
Rq
¸
ω
2
r
L
2
M
4R
R
−(R
s
+ R
R
)

i
Rq
−E
g

≥ 0 (7.88)
or
[i
Rq
[ ≥
E
g
ω
2
r
L
2
M
4R
R
−(R
s
+ R
R
)

4E
g
R
R
ω
2
r
L
2
M
. (7.89)
If [i
Rq
[ < 4E
g
R
R
/(ω
2
r
L
2
M
), ψ
sd
cannot keep the dc-link voltage constant. For the values
given in the Appendix, the constraint becomes [i
Rq
[ < 4 1 0.009/(1
2
4.6
2
) = 0.0017 p.u.,
which is a small value. In order to handle this problem an extra converter that controls the
dc-link voltage is added. It might be possible to use either a diode rectifier (depending on the
power flow) or an IGBT converter as the extra converter. However, later on when the losses
122
and efficiency are calculated, an IGBT converter has been used. Here two different sizes of
this extra converter will be investigated:
Option 1. In this case, the extra converter is designed to be as small as possible. However,
since this converter would be small and only used at very low powers another way could be
to increase energy storage on the dc-link, and thereby make the third converter unnecessary.
Option 2. For this option the extra converter is designed so that it is used in the whole
operating region. This means that for this option the stator flux is not used for controlling
the dc-link voltage. Kelber et al. used this option [54, 55]. However, in contrast to [54, 55],
the stator flux is here controlled to reduce the magnetizing losses. This means as the extra
converter controls the dc-link voltage, the stator-flux reference value is set to minimize the
losses of the generator. Note, that for this option the flux does not follow (7.77).
7.4.3 Control
The basic idea of the control system is to have an inner fast rotor current controller. The rotor
current is controlled with the machine-side converter. With the rotor current it is possible to
control the active and reactive powers. Then, the stator flux is controlled using the grid-side
converter. The stator-flux control loop is about a decade slower than the current control loop.
Then, finally, the dc-link voltage is controlled in cascade with the stator flux in order to keep
the dc-link voltage constant.
As mentioned in the previous section, to be able to control the dc-link voltage with the
stator flux there is a minimum rotor current. Therefore, when designing the control laws it
will be assumed that an additional power electronic device keeps the dc-link voltage constant
when i
Rq
is small. This means that when i
Rq
is below a certain value, ψ
sd
is not used to con-
trol the dc-link voltage anymore. For this case, the stator flux can be controlled “arbitrarily,”
meaning that the stator flux can be controlled so that the losses are reduced.
Rotor Current Control
The d component of the rotor current, i
Rd
, is used to control the reactive power while the q
component of the rotor current, i
Rq
, controls the active power or the torque, for details see
Chapter 4.
Stator-Flux Control
The stator voltage equation (7.70) can be rewritten as
E
g
+v
c
= −R
s
i
ref
R
+

s
dt
+

R
s
L
M
+ jω
1

Ψ
s
(7.90)
where the rotor current has been put to its reference value. Then, v
c
= v

c
−E
g
+(jω
1
−Ω
a

s
is chosen where Ω
a
is the “active damping.” The above equation then reduces to
v

c
= −R
s
i
ref
R
+

s
dt
+

R
s
L
M
+ Ω
a

Ψ
s
. (7.91)
123
The term R
s
i
ref
R
is treated as a disturbance and the transfer function from v

c
to Ψ
s
is found
as
G(p) =
Ψ
s
(p)
v

c
(p)
=
1
p + R
s
/L
M
+ Ω
a
. (7.92)
IMC yields the following PI controller tuned for a closed-loop bandwidth α
f
F(p) =
α
f
p
G
−1
(p) = α
f
+ α
f
R
s
/L
M
+ Ω
a
p
. (7.93)
If the “active damping” is set to Ω
a
= α
f
− R
s
/L
M
a disturbance is damped with the
same bandwidth as the closed-loop stator-flux control loop, i.e., the transfer function from a
disturbance, D(p), to Ψ
s
is
G

s
(p) =
Ψ
s
(p)
D(p)
=
p
(p + α
f
)
2
. (7.94)
DC-Link Voltage Control
For a dc-link voltage controller with a shunt converter, see Section 4.5.2. If the resistive
losses are treated as a disturbance, the dc-link dynamics in (7.72) can be written as
C
dc
2
dv
2
dc
dt
= 3i
Rq

sd
ω
r
−E
g
) + D (7.95)
where D is the disturbance. Moreover, if the variable substitution W = v
2
dc
is made, the
following system is obtained
C
dc
2
dW
dt
= 3i
ref
Rq

ψ
ref
sd
ω
r
−E
g

+ D. (7.96)
where i
Rq
and ψ
sd
are put to their reference values. By choosing the reference value of the
flux as
ψ
ref
sd
=
ψ

ref
sd
−G
a
W
i
ref
Rq
ω
r
+
E
g
ω
r
(7.97)
the dc-link dynamics are reduced to
C
dc
2
dW
dt
= 3ψ

ref
sd
−3G
a
W + D. (7.98)
In (7.97), G
a
is the “active damping.” Then, the transfer function, treating D as a disturbance,
becomes
G(p) =
W(p)
ψ

ref
sd
=
3
C
dc
/2p + 3G
a
. (7.99)
By using IMC, we obtain the following PI controller
F(p) =
α
dc
p
G
−1
(p) =
C
dc
α
dc
6
+
G
a
α
dc
p
. (7.100)
Then, if G
a
= C
dc
α
dc
/6, the transfer function from D to W becomes
W(p)
D(p)
=
G
1 + FG
=
p
C
dc
2
(p + α
dc
)
2
. (7.101)
This means that a disturbance is damped with the same bandwidth as the dc-link voltage
control loop.
124
Simulation of Electromechanical Torque Steps
In the simulation shown here, it is assumed that the rotor speed can by the pitch mechanism
of the wind turbine, if desired, be controlled with a bandwidth of α
s
.
Fig. 7.24 shows a simulation of the investigated system during current (or torque) control
mode. After 50 ms, i
Rq
is stepped from −0.9 p.u. to −0.1 p.u., and between 0.5 s and 1.0 s
the rotor speed is ramped from 1.2 p.u. down to 0.8 p.u. using pitch control. Finally, at 1.25 s,
i
Rq
is stepped back to −0.9 p.u. It can be seen in the figure that the control system manages
0 0.5 1 1.5
−1
−0.5
0
0.5
0 0.5 1 1.5
−1
0
1
2
0 0.5 1 1.5
2.6
2.8
3
0 0.5 1 1.5
0.8
1
1.2
0 0.5 1 1.5
−0.5
0
0.5
0 0.5 1 1.5
−0.5
0
0.5
i
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
a)
Ψ
s
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
v
d
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
c)
ω
r
[
p
.
u
.
]
d)
v
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
e)
Time [s] Time [s]
v
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
f)
d d
d
d
q q
q
q
Fig. 7.24. Simulation of the system when the DFIG is in current control (or torque) mode. a) Rotor
current. b) Stator flux. c) DC-link voltage. d) Rotor speed. e) Rotor voltage. f) Series
voltage.
to control i
Rd
, i
Rq
, and v
dc
well. Moreover, the simulation verifies the result previously
presented in Section 7.4.2, which indicated that the q component of the rotor voltage and
converter voltage are close to identical. There is a small difference in the d component due
to the fact that the rotor converter also supplies the magnetizing current.
7.4.4 Speed Control Operation
At low wind speeds, the pitch angle of the turbine is fixed and the DFIG is operated in speed
control operation. In this section, a rotor speed control law will be derived using IMC. The
125
mechanical dynamics are given by
J
n
p

r
dt
= T
e
−T
s
(7.102)
where T
e
is the electromechanical torque, T
s
is the shaft torque, J is the inertia and, n
p
is the
number of pole pairs. Assuming ψ
sq
= 0, the electromechanical torque can be expressed as
T
e
= −3n
p
ψ
sd
i
Rq
. Then, since ψ
sd
≈ E
g

r
, (7.102) can be expressed as
J
n
p

r
dt
= −3n
p
E
g
ω
r
i
ref
Rq
−T
s
(7.103)
where i
Rq
has been changed to its reference value. Now, we choose
i
ref
Rq
=
ω
r
3n
p
E
g

i
ref
Rq
+ B
a
ω
r

(7.104)
where B
a
is the “active damping.” This means that the mechanical dynamics can be rewritten
as
J
n
p

r
dt
= −i
ref
Rq
−B
a
ω
r
−T
s
. (7.105)
Then, with IMC, the following controller is obtained
F(p) = k
p
+
k
i
p
= −α
s
J
n
p
−α
s
B
a
p
(7.106)
and if B
a
= α
s
J/n
p
, a change in T
s
is damped with the same bandwidth, α
s
, as the speed
control loop:
G

(p) =
P
J
n
p
(p + α
s
)
2
(7.107)
Fig. 7.25 shows an example of the proposed DFIG series system with the DFIG operated
in speed-control mode. In order to validate the performance, the machine is exposed to shaft
torque steps of 30% to 100% of rated torque. These torque steps are much faster than what
would be the case in reality and they are performed for verification purposes only. The rotor
speed is controlled by the DFIG to be 0.8 p.u. during the whole simulation. It can be seen in
the figure that the control system manages to control i
Rd
, ω
r
, and v
dc
well.
7.4.5 Response to Voltage Sags
Fig. 7.26 shows the response to a 0% voltage sag, i.e., the remaining voltage is 0 p.u. The
voltage drops after 0.1 s and the sag has a duration of 250 ms. This is an extreme voltage sag
and if the system manages this sag, it manages the Swedish transmission system operator’s
demands for large production facilities [96]. During the simulation, the DFIG is operated
at i
Rq
= −1 p.u. which corresponds to generator operation at rated current (full power). In
this case, the rotor speed is controlled by the pitch mechanism to 1.2 p.u. During the sag,
the stator flux is controlled by the series-connected converter to be close to zero. The rotor
126
0 0.5 1 1.5 2
0
0.25
0.5
0 0.5 1 1.5 2
−0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
0 0.5 1 1.5 2
2.79
2.8
2.81
2.82
0 0.5 1 1.5 2
0.5
0.75
1
i
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
a)
Ψ
s
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
d
d
q
q
v
d
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
c)
ω
r
[
p
.
u
.
]
d)
Time [s] Time [s]
Fig. 7.25. Simulation of the system when the DFIG is in speed-control mode. a) Rotor current.
b) Stator flux. c) DC-link voltage. d) Rotor speed.
current is practically constant during the sag. Some minor current transients can be observed
at the instant of the sag and at the instant where the voltage returns. The main reason for
this is that both the rotor and converter voltages have been limited to their maximum values.
Otherwise, the dynamic performance of the system is promising.
Although the sag in the simulation is only 250 ms, the system can stay connected to the
grid for indefinitely long voltage sags. This can be realized from the fact that the stator flux is
controlled down to an appropriate level. The system then returns to a steady-state operating
condition, in this case at a voltage level of 0 p.u. However, one issue that must be kept
in mind is that, since the stator flux is reduced according to the voltage sag, the maximum
torque that can be handled by the generator is reduced in proportion to the voltage sag. This
means that the pitch mechanism must reduce the incoming torque accordingly, as otherwise
overspeed occurs and the overspeed protection trips the turbine.
7.4.6 Steady-State Performance
As mentioned in the Introduction, the main reasons for choosing a DFIG system are cost and
efficiency. Therefore, when modifying the DFIG system it is necessary to evaluate how the
modifications affects both cost and efficiency. In Chapter 3, the average efficiency of the or-
dinary DFIG WT system has been calculated and compared to other electrical configurations
used in wind turbine systems. This study serves as a basis for the efficiency calculations and
comparisons in this section. Details of the calculations methods used here are described in
Chapter 3. Moreover, the systems are compared to an ordinary DFIG system and a system
that utilizes a full-power converter.
In this section, the efficiency will be calculated for the two options presented in the last
part of Section 7.4.2.
127
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−2
−1
0
1
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−1
0
1
2
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
2.5
3
3.5
4
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−0.5
0
0.5
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5
−0.5
0
0.5
i
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
a)
Ψ
s
[
p
.
u
.
]
b)
v
d
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
c)
ω
r
[
p
.
u
.
]
d)
v
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
e)
Time [s] Time [s]
v
c
[
p
.
u
.
]
f)
d d
d
d
q q
q
q
Fig. 7.26. Response to a 0% symmetrical voltage sag. a) Rotor current. b) Stator flux. c) DC-link
voltage. d) Rotor speed. e) Rotor voltage. f) Series voltage.
Series-Injection Transformer
Fig. 7.27 shows the converter losses for the ordinary DFIG system, and in addition it presents
the losses of the series-injection transformer for the two options of the DFIG series system
presented earlier.
In Fig. 7.28, the average efficiencies of the ordinary DFIG system, the series system
with the two options, and a system with a full-power converter are shown as functions of
the average wind speed. As seen in Fig. 7.28, the efficiency of the standard DFIG system
is highest. The efficiency of the DFIG series system with Option 1 is roughly same as the
system that utilizes a full-power converter, although the efficiency is slightly lower at low
average wind speeds and slightly higher at higher average wind speeds. The efficiency of
the DFIG series system with Option 2 is between the ordinary DFIG system and the full-
power converter system. Accordingly, this is the most energy efficient system with voltage
sag ride-through facility.
Converter in the Y Point of the DFIG
Fig. 7.29 shows the magnetizing and resistive losses of the generator and the converter losses
for the ordinary DFIG system and for the two options of the DFIG series system.
In Fig. 7.30, the efficiencies of the ordinary DFIG system, full-power converter system,
128
5 10 15 20 25
0
0.5
1
1.5
5 10 15 20 25
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
5 10 15 20 25
0
0.5
1
1.5
5 10 15 20 25
0
0.5
1
M
a
g
n
e
t
i
z
i
n
g
l
o
s
s
e
s
[
%
]
a)
R
e
s
i
s
t
i
v
e
l
o
s
s
e
s
[
%
] b)
C
o
n
v
e
r
t
e
r
l
o
s
s
e
s
[
%
]
c)
T
r
a
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
l
o
s
s
e
s
[
%
]
Wind speed [m/s] Wind speed [m/s]
d)
Fig. 7.27. Losses of the system with a series-injection transformer with the same turns ratio as the
stator-to-rotor turns ratio. Dashed lines correspond to the series DFIG system with Option
1, solid line to the series DFIG with Option 2, and dotted line to the ordinary DFIG system.
a) Magnetizing loses of the generator. b) Resistive losses of the generator. c) Converter
losses. d) Transformer losses.
5 6 7 8 9 10
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
E
f

c
i
e
n
c
y
[
%
]
Average wind speed [m/s]
Option 1
Option 2
Fig. 7.28. Expected efficiency as a function of the average wind speed for the system with a series-
injection transformer. Dashed line corresponds to the ordinary DFIG system, solid line to
the DFIG series system, and dotted line to a system with a full-power converter.
and the two different options for the series DFIG system are shown as functions of the av-
erage wind speed. If Fig. 7.30 is compared to Fig. 7.28, it can be seen that the results are
almost identical when connecting the converter to the Y point of the stator circuit. One rea-
son for this is that the increased losses in the converter are almost the same as the losses of
129
5 10 15 20 25
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
C
o
n
v
e
r
t
e
r
l
o
s
s
e
s
[
%
]
Wind speed [m/s]
Fig. 7.29. Converter losses when the converter is connected to the Y point of the stator circuit of
the DFIG. Dashed line is the series DFIG system with Option 1, solid line is the series
DFIG with Option 2, and dotted line is the ordinary DFIG system. The generator losses
are identical to that of Fig. 7.27.
5 6 7 8 9 10
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
E
f

c
i
e
n
c
y
[
%
]
Average wind speed [m/s]
Option 1
Option 2
Fig. 7.30. Expected efficiency as a function of the average wind speed. The converter is connected to
the Y point of the stator circuit of the DFIG. Dashed line corresponds to the ordinary DFIG
system, solid line to the DFIG series system, and dotted line to a system with a full-power
converter.
the series-injection transformer.
Energy Production Cost
Fig. 7.31 shows the relative energy cost of the DFIG series system in comparison to the
ordinary DFIG system. From an initial cost perspective, an extra converter for the DFIG
series system seems to be disadvantageous. However, as indicated in Fig. 7.31, from the
130
5 6 7 8 9 10
1
1.01
1.02
1.03
1.04
1.05
R
e
l
a
t
i
v
e
e
n
e
r
g
y
c
o
s
t
[
p
.
u
.
]
Average wind speed [m/s]
Option 1
Option 2
Fig. 7.31. Energy cost of the DFIG series system. The energy cost is related to the ordinary DFIG
system. Solid lines are with the series-injection transformer, dashed lines are with the
converter connected to the Y point, and dashed-dotted line is the system that utilize a
full-power converter.
energy cost point of view it is beneficial to use the extra (third) converter to control the dc-
link voltage. In the figure it is shown that the increased energy cost for this series system
using Option 2 is approximately 1.5 percentage units. Moreover, as seen in the figure, for
the system with a full-power converter the corresponding energy cost is approximately 1.5
percentage unit higher than for the series system with Option 2.
7.4.7 Discussion and Conclusion
A control law for the doubly-fed induction generator with the grid side converter connected
in series with the stator circuit has been derived. The rotor current (torque and power factor),
stator flux, and dc-link voltage are controlled. Simulations showed that the dynamic perfor-
mance of the system is promising both during normal operation and during conditions when
voltage sags are present in the grid. The derived control law is not capable of controlling
the dc-link voltage at very low loads. As a remedy for this, two different options using an
additional converter to solve this problem have been proposed and investigated. It was found
that the best option was to use an additional converter for controlling the dc-link voltage in
the whole operating area. Then, the series-connected converter can be used to control the
flux to an optimal value from an overall efficiency point of view.
Two different methods of connecting the series converter resulted in almost the same
efficiency. The efficiency of the DFIG series system with the best performance was found
to be between the ordinary DFIG system and a system that utilizes a full-power converter
system, i.e., a cage-bar induction generator equipped with a back-to-back converter.
131
7.5 Conclusion
In this chapter, voltage sag ride-through of variable-speed wind turbines has been investi-
gated. It has been shown that a variable-speed wind turbine with a full-power converter
system, e.g., a cage-bar induction generator with a back-to-back converter, can successfully
reduce disturbances from both symmetrical and unsymmetrical voltage sags. Two candidate
methods, with one shunt-connected and one series-connected grid-side converter respec-
tively, of improving the voltage sag ride-through of DFIG variable-speed wind turbines have
also been investigated. The shunt connected DFIG system with ride-through capabilities still
suffers, at least initially, from high fault currents, while the series-connected DFIG system
seems to have similar dynamic performance as the full-power converter system. However,
the control of the DFIG series system is much more complicated than that of the full-power
converter system. Another drawback of the series-connected DFIG system in comparison
to the full-power converter system is that the maximum torque that can be handled by the
generator is reduced in proportion to the voltage sag.
The energy production cost of the full-power converter system was found to be three per-
centage units higher than that of the ordinary DFIG system. The shunt DFIG system and the
series system have approximately the same energy production cost, which is approximately
1.5 percentage unit higher compared to the ordinary DFIG system.
132
Chapter 8
Flicker Reduction of Stalled-Controlled
Wind Turbines using Variable Rotor
Resistances
Although there will be very large wind power installations, the installations of small-scale
wind turbines (WTs) will most likely proceed. Small WTs, 1 MW and below, have been de-
veloped successfully using the fixed-speed stall-regulated concept, and will probably domi-
nate the small-turbine market also in the near future. Worth pointing out is that fixed-speed
WTs have the same energy production given a certain rotor diameter as variable-speed WTs
(see Chapter 3).
The power quality impact, for instance the flicker (or voltage fluctuations) contribution,
of WTs is an important concern for grid owners. For individual installations of these types
of WTs, the flicker contribution can be the limiting factor from a power quality point of
view, especially in weak grids [64]. One possibility to reduce flicker from a stall-controlled
WT with an induction generator (IG) directly connected to the grid could be to introduce a
variable rotor resistance. In other words, the rotor resistance could be used to control the
rotor speed in a limited range and, in this way, absorb torque fluctuations and thereby reduce
the flicker emission. The purpose of this chapter is to derive a rotor resistance control law,
with the objective of minimizing torque fluctuations and flicker, for a stall-controlled WT.
8.1 Modeling
In Fig. 8.1, the system with turbine, gearbox, generator, and external rotor resistances, is
presented. It is possible to control the slip of the IG with the external rotor resistances. The
value of the external rotor resistances is adjusted with the power electronic equipment. How-
ever, in this chapter the power electronic equipment is not included in the model, i.e., it is
assumed to be ideal. Therefore, the external rotor resistances can be treated as a continuous
variable.
One way of representing the IG dynamically is to the use the so called Γ model as de-
133
IG
Gear-
box
External
rotor resistances
Grid
Fig. 8.1. Wind turbine with variable-rotor-resistance induction generator.
scribed in Section 4.2.1. The mechanical dynamics are described by
J
n
p

g
dt
= T
g

T
t
g
r
(8.1)
where T
g
is the electromechanical torque produced by the generator, T
t
is the torque pro-
duced by the turbine, on the low-speed side of the gearbox, and g
r
is the gear ratio of the
gearbox. The drive train (soft axis) is not included in the model, since the objective is to
investigate the relative performance of the derived control law and, for instance, absolute
flicker values are of minor importance.
For the 1-MW IG considered in this chapter, operated at 690 V and 50 Hz the following
parameters are used: R
s
=0.007 p.u., R
max
R
=0.05 p.u., R
min
R
=0.01 p.u., R
avg
R
=0.03 p.u., L
M
=5
p.u., L
σ
=0.2 p.u., n
p
=2, g
r
=61, and, J=32000 p.u. (without turbine J=3000 p.u.).
8.1.1 Reduced-Order Model
A common way to reduce the order of the induction machine model in (4.38) and (4.39) is
to neglect the stator-flux dynamics. Then, the electrical dynamics of the induction machine
dynamics are described by (4.39). Eliminating ψ
R
from (4.39) yields
0 = (R
R
+ jω
2
L
σ
)i
R
+ L
σ
di
R
dt
+ jω
2
Ψ
s
.
(8.2)
Note that in the above equation, the stator-flux dynamics have also been neglected. Further,
if i
Rd
can be assumed constant or at least small, and Ψ
s
≈ ψ
sd

v
s
ω
1
, the dynamic system
reduces to
L
σ
di
Rq
dt
= −R
R
i
Rq
−(ω
1
−ω
g
)L
σ
i
Rd
−(ω
1
−ω
g
)
v
s
ω
1
(8.3)
J
n
p

g
dt
= −k
T
i
Rq

T
t
g
r
(8.4)
where k
T
= 3v
s
n
p

1
. This means that the model has been reduced to the second order, i.e.,
one electrical and one mechanical equation.
In Fig. 8.2, simulations of the induction machine are presented, both with the fifth-order
and the second-order model of the system. In the simulations, the rotor resistance is increased
by 40% after 50 ms and, after 250 ms, the shaft torque is increased from half of the rated
torque to rated. Note that in this simulation, only the inertia of the generator has been taken
into account and not the inertia of the turbine. This has been done in order to get a quicker
134
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−0.5
0
0.5
1
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
−1.2
−1
−0.8
−0.6
−0.4
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
1.01
1.02
1.03
1.04
1.05
1.06
0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4
0.95
1
1.05
R
o
t
o
r
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
[
p
.
u
.
]
d
q
a)
T
o
r
q
u
e
[

T
n
o
m
]
b)
R
o
t
o
r
s
p
e
e
d
[
p
.
u
.
]
c)
S
t
a
t
o
r

u
x
[
p
.
u
.
]
Time [s] Time [s]
Time [s] Time [s]
d)
Fig. 8.2. Example of the response of the induction machine due to a step in the rotor resistance.
The rotor resistance is increased 40% after 50 ms and after 250 ms the shaft torque is
increased to the rated torque. Solid lines correspond to the fifth-order model while dashed
lines correspond to the second-order model. a) Rotor current, b) Torque, c) Rotor speed and
d) Stator flux.
response of the rotor speed and thereby a more lucid figure. The figure shows that both
models produce approximately the same results. However, there is a small deviation in the d
component of the rotor current. This reduced-order model will be used to derive the control
law.
8.2 Current Control
In order to remove the multiplication between the R
R
and i
Rq
, i.e., the term R
R
i
Rq
, in (8.3),
we will introduce the following non-linear control law
R
ref
R
=
R

R
+ R
Ra
i
Rq
i
Rq
i
Rq
= 0
(8.5)
where R
Ra
is an “active damping,” which can be used damp disturbances as described earlier.
How to chose R
Ra
will be described in the next section. Substitution of the above control
135
law in (8.3) yields
L
σ
di
Rq
dt
= −R

R
−R
Ra
i
Rq
+ D (8.6)
D = −(ω
1
−ω
t
)i
Rd
L
σ
−(ω
1
−ω
t
)
v
s
ω
1
= −ω
2

i
Rd
L
σ
+
v
s
ω
1
(8.7)
where a term D has been introduced. By treating the term D as a disturbance the following
open-loop transfer function can be found
G
ol
(p) =
i
Rq
(p)
R

R
(p)
=
−1
L
σ
p + R
Ra
. (8.8)
Then, by using IMC, the following current controller is obtained
F
c
(p) = k
pc
+
k
ic
p
= −L
σ
α
c

R
Ra
α
c
p
(8.9)
where α
c
is the closed-loop bandwidth of the current control loop. A block diagram of the
current control loop is shown in Fig. 8.3.
¸ ¸
R
Ra
i
ref
Rq
i
Rq
F
c
(p) 1/i
Rq
G
ol
(p)
R
ref
R
+
+
+

Fig. 8.3. Current Control Block Diagram.
Determination of the Active Damping
The transfer function, from a disturbance D to the current i
Rq
, is found as
G
D,i
Rq
(p) =
−p
L
σ
p
2
+ (R
Ra
+ L
σ
α
c
)p + R
Ra
α
c
. (8.10)
If R
Ra
= L
σ
α
c
, the above transfer function is reduced to
G
D,i
Rq
(p) =
−p
L
σ
(p + α
c
)
2
. (8.11)
This choice of R
Ra
causes a disturbance to be damped with the same time constant as the
current control loop. A Bode diagram of (8.11) can be seen in Fig. 8.4 for three different
values of the current control loop bandwidth α
c
.
136
0 50 100 150 200 250
10
−3
10
−2
10
−1
10
0
10
1
10
2
G
a
i
n
Frequency [Hz]
Fig. 8.4. Bode diagram. Solid α
c
=22 rad/s, dashed α
c
=220 rad/s and dotted α
c
=2200 rad/s.
0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3
−0.65
−0.6
−0.55
−0.5
−0.45
0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3
0
0.02
0.04
0.06
i
R
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
a)
T
g
,
T
s
[

T
n
o
m
]
b)
R
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
Time [s]
c)
Fig. 8.5. Example of current control of an IG with external rotor resistances. a) q component of
the rotor current (dashed line is the reference value), b) Torque (dashed line is the shaft
torque), c) Rotor resistance (dashed line is the minimum, average and maximum value of
the available rotor resistance).
137
8.2.1 Evaluation
Fig. 8.5 shows a simulation with the above derived rotor current control law. In the simulation
the bandwidth of the current control loop is set to 220 rad/s which corresponds to a (10–90%)
rise time of 10 ms. In the figure, it is seen that the current controller manages to control the
rotor current with the desired bandwidth. Moreover, the controller manages to keep the
generator torque at the shaft torque step (at 150 ms) until the current reference is adjusted
according to the new shaft torque (at 250 ms). However, the rotor resistance varies over its
entire range even for small current variations and shaft torque steps, as seen in the figure. It
is also seen that when the shaft and generator torques differ (between 150–250 ms), the rotor
resistance is constantly increased (or decreased for opposite sign of the torque difference).
If the rotor resistance has to be limited, the current controller will not manage to keep the
rotor current and thereby the generator torque. Because of the limited range in which the
rotor resistance can vary, the setting of the current reference will be of great importance for
the over-all performance of the system. How to set the rotor current reference will be further
addressed in the next section. First, however, in this section, a brief analytical investigation
of how the rotor resistance varies due to a shaft torque step is made.
By controlling the rotor current with a high-gain feedback, the rotor-current dynamics in
(8.3) can be expressed as
L
σ
di
Rq
dt
= −R
ref
R
i
Rq
−ω
2

L
σ
i
Rd
+
v
s
ω
1

= 0. (8.12)
This implies that the rotor-resistance reference value varies as
R
ref
R
= −
ω
2
i
ref
Rq

L
σ
i
Rd
+
v
s
ω
1

≈ −
ω
2
i
ref
Rq
v
s
ω
1
i
ref
Rq
= 0.
(8.13)
From (8.13), it is seen that the rotor resistance is depending on the slip, ω
2
, and the operating
condition, i.e. i
ref
Rq
. Moreover, if the generator is exposed to a shaft-torque step, ΔT
t
, the
generator speed becomes according to (8.1)
J
n
p

g
dt
= −
ΔT
t
g
r
(8.14)
if the system initially was in the steady state and the electromechanical torque, T
g
, is kept
constant. This means that (8.13) can be rewritten as
R
ref
R
≈ −
v
s
ω
1
i
ref
Rq

n
p
Jg
r
ΔT
t
dt
i
ref
Rq
= 0
(8.15)
since ω
g
= ω
1
− ω
2
and dω
1
/dt = 0. The integral can be evaluated easily since ΔT
t
is
constant. This means that rotor resistance has changed ΔR
R
over the time
Δt = −
Jg
r
ω
1
n
p
v
s
i
ref
Rq
ΔT
t
ΔR
R
. (8.16)
138
For the shaft torque step at 150 ms in Fig. 8.5, the increase in rotor resistance (ΔR
R
= 0.024)
would, according to the above formula, take 0.2 s, which also can be seen in the figure.
Moreover, if ±ΔR
max
R
is the maximum available rotor resistance, the time, Δt
lim
, to reach
maximum or minimum value of the rotor resistance becomes
Δt
lim
=
Jg
r
ω
1
n
p
v
s
i
ref
Rq
ΔT
t
ΔR
max
R
. (8.17)
This means that for a given step in the shaft torque, the time until the rotor resistance must
be limited depends on i
ref
Rq
. That is, smaller values of i
ref
Rq
imply a shorter time until the rotor
resistance must be limited. This nonlinearity makes the setting of the rotor current reference
i
ref
Rq
more difficult.
8.3 Reference Value Selection
In the steady state, the rotor resistance should be (or at least close to) its desired value, R
R0
.
One idea is to set i
ref
Rq
as
i
ref
Rq
= k
R

(R
R0
−R
R
)dt −B
a
ω
2
(8.18)
where only an integration term of the error in the rotor resistance is used in order to avoid an
algebraic loop. If the current control loop is fast, i.e., i
Rq
= i
ref
Rq
= k
R
I − B
a
ω
2
, where I is
the integration of the error in the rotor resistance, the system becomes
J
n
p

2
dt
= k
T
i
ref
Rq
+
T
t
g
r
= k
T
(k
R
I −B
a
ω
2
) +
T
t
g
r
(8.19)
dI
dt
= R
R0
−R
R
. (8.20)
Note that the slip dynamics are found from (8.1), ω
g
= ω
1
−ω
2
and dω
1
/dt = 0. Moreover,
since the bandwidth of the current control loop is fast, it can be assumed that R
R
= R
ref
R
.
Therefore, according to (8.13), R
R
equals to
R
R
= R
ref
R
≈ −
ω
2
i
ref
Rq
v
s
ω
1
= −
ω
2
k
R
I −B
a
ω
2
v
s
ω
1
. (8.21)
This means, finally, that the following system must be analyzed
J
n
p

2
dt
= k
T
(k
R
I −B
a
ω
2
) +
T
t
g
r
(8.22)
dI
dt
= R
R0
+
ω
2
k
R
I −B
a
ω
2
v
s
ω
1
. (8.23)
The above system has an equilibrium point at
ω
2,0
=
R
R0
T
t0
ω
1
g
r
k
T
v
s
(8.24)
I
0
=
T
t0

1
R
R0
B
a
−v
s
)
g
r
k
R
k
T
v
s
. (8.25)
139
Linearization and insertion around the equilibrium point yields
Δ˙ x =


−B
a
k
T
n
p
/J k
R
k
T
n
p
/J
g
r
k
T

1
R
R0
B
a
−v
s
)
T
t0
ω
1
−g
r
k
R
k
T
R
R0
T
t0


Δx +
¸
n
p
g
r
J
0
¸
Δu (8.26)
where
Δx =
¸
Δω
2
ΔI

Δu = ΔT
t
. (8.27)
Now, it is interesting to see how a change in the incoming torque influences the rotor resis-
tance. Therefore, one option is to study the error in the rotor resistance, e = R
R0
− R
R
.
However, e cannot be found directly from the state variables but since I is the integration of
e, it is possible to use the derivative of I. This means that
G
T
t
e
= p G
T
t
I
(p) (8.28)
where G
T
t
I
(p) is the transfer function from T
t
to I which can be found from the system in
(8.26). If k
R
and B
a
are chosen as
k
R
=
α
2
R
JT
t0
ω
1
g
r
k
2
T
n
p
v
s
(8.29)
B
a
= −
α
2
R
J
2
R
R0
ω
1
−2a
R
Jk
T
n
p
v
s
k
2
T
n
2
p
v
s
(8.30)
where α
R
is a parameter that can be set “freely,” the above transfer function G
T
t
e
(p) becomes
G
T
t
e
(p) = −
(k
T
n
p
v
s
−α
R
JR
R0
ω
1
)
2
Jk
T
n
p
v
s
ω
1
T
t0
p
(p + α
R
)
2
(8.31)
which is a band-pass filter centered at α
R
. Moreover, the damping of the above transfer
function and the parameter k
R
is dependent on the operating condition, i.e., T
t0
.
8.3.1 Evaluation
For a given operating condition it possible to express (8.31) as
G
T
t
e
(p) = K
p
(p + α
R
)
2
(8.32)
where K is a constant that depends on the operating condition. If the system is exposed to a
step, we will get
e(t) = L
−1
¸
1
p
G
T
t
e
(p)

= Kte
−α
R
t
(8.33)
where L is the Laplace transformation symbol. From the above equation, it is seen that
after a torque step, the rotor resistance returns to its desired value R
R0
, i.e., e(t →∞) = 0.
140
0 5 10 15 20
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
0 5 10 15 20
−1
−0.8
−0.6
−0.4
−0.2
0 5 10 15 20
0
0.02
0.04
0.06
i
R
q
[
p
.
u
.
]
a)
T
g
,
T
s
[

T
n
o
m
]
b)
R
R
[
p
.
u
.
]
Time [s]
c)
Fig. 8.6. Example of outer reference selection control loop. a) q component of the rotor current
(dashed line is the reference value), b) Torque (dashed line is the shaft torque), c) Rotor
resistance (dashed line is the minimum, average and maximum value of the available rotor
resistance).
Moreover, by looking at the derivative of the above function it is possible to determine that
the function has a maximum at
t

max(R
R
)

=
1
α
R
. (8.34)
Fig. 8.6 shows a simulation of the system with the reference selection control loop. The
bandwidth of the current control loop is set to a high value (2200 rad/s) and the parameter α
R
is set to 1 rad/s. It is seen in the figure that after the torque step (at t = 1 s) the rotor resistance
has its maximum value after 1 s (at t = 2 s), which is also verified by the expression (8.34).
Moreover, after the torque step the rotor resistance is returning to its desired value.
8.4 Evaluation
In order to evaluate the derived control law, the flicker emission is compared to a similar
system with uncontrolled rotor resistances, i.e., R
R
is fixed. Flicker emission or rapid voltage
fluctuations can be described with the dimensionless quantity P
st
: the short-term severity
index. In the standard IEC 61000-21, it is described how this value is determined [51]. The
141
system is simulated for 10 minutes, since the 10 minute P
st
-value is used. The applied shaft
torque has been precalculated using blade element momentum theory with different average
wind speeds and turbulence intensities. Then the P
st
value has been calculated on a fictive
grid with a short-circuit power of 50 times the nominal power of the WT and with an X/R
ratio of 0.5. The average torque, corresponding to the average wind speed, for each 10 minute
period is used to set the parameters that are dependent on the operating condition, i.e., k
R
.
Naturally, in a real system, they can be adjusted according to a changing operating condition.
However, since this should be done on a much slower time scale than the bandwidths of the
control loops, it has been ignored in the simulation presented here.
Fig. 8.7 shows an example of how the derived rotor resistance control law operates for a
short piece of one of the above mentioned 10-minute simulation. The average wind speed in
the 10 minute simulation was 14 m/s and the turbulence intensity was 25%. The bandwidth
0 5 10 15 20
−1.5
−1
−0.5
0
0 5 10 15 20
−4
−3
−2
−1
0
0 5 10 15 20
0
0.02
0.04
0.06
T
o
r
q
u
e
[

r
a
t
e
d
]
a)
S
l
i
p
[
%
]
b)
R
o
t
o
r
r
e
s
i
s
t
a
n
c
e
[
p
.
u
.
]
c)
Time [s]
Fig. 8.7. Example of the behaviour of the derived control law. a) Torque (generator torque is solid
and turbine torque is dashed), b) Slip and c) Rotor resistance.
of the current control loop, α
c
, is 2200 rad/s and the parameter α
R
, of the reference value
selection control loop is 0.5 rad/s. The set point value for the rotor resistance, R
R0
, has been
set to the average value of the available rotor resistance R
avg
R
.
142
8.4.1 Flicker Contribution
In Fig. 8.8, the P
st
value is seen for a system with fixed rotor resistance and with the derived
control law as a function of the turbulence intensity and for different average wind speeds.
The control parameter is as in Fig. 8.7, except for the parameter α
R
that is 1 rad/s. In the
5 10 15 20 25
0
0.05
0.1
0.15
5 10 15 20 25
0
0.05
0.1
0.15
5 10 15 20 25
0
0.05
0.1
0.15
a)
b)
F
l
i
c
k
e
r
P
s
t
F
l
i
c
k
e
r
P
s
t
F
l
i
c
k
e
r
P
s
t
c)
Turbulence intenisity [%]
Fig. 8.8. Flicker as a function of the turbulence intensity. Solid line is WT with controlled rotor
resistance, dashed line is with fixed rotor resistance, R
R
= R
avg
R
and dotted line is with
fixed rotor resistance, R
R
= R
max
R
. The average wind speed is a) 6 m/s, b) 14 m/s and c) 20
m/s.
figure, the system with fixed rotor resistance has been simulated with two different values
of the rotor resistance, i.e., the average value, R
avg
R
, and the maximum value (in continuous
operation), R
max
R
, of the available rotor resistance. It can be seen that the derived control
law produces lower P
st
values than the system with fixed rotor resistance. Even though
the P
st
value for the fixed rotor resistance system with R
R
= R
max
R
is close to the system
with controlled rotor resistances, it suffers from a drawback, namely, that the higher the
rotor resistance is, the higher the losses in the rotor resistance will be. These higher losses
imply that it will be necessary to increase the cooling of the generator. Finally, during the
simulation, the average value of the rotor resistance R
R
is very close to R
avg
R
.
143
8.4.2 Flicker Reduction
In Fig. 8.9 the relative flicker contribution for the proposed controller for five different values
of a
R
is shown. The flicker in the comparison is related to a system with a fixed rotor
resistance. The rotor resistance of this system is set to the average value of the available
rotor resistance, i.e., R
R
= R
avg
R
. A relative flicker of 1 corresponds to a flicker contribution
equal to that of the fixed rotor resistance system. Lower values of the relative flicker imply
a lower flicker contribution and vice versa. The relative flicker is given as a function of
turbulence intensities for an average wind speed of 6 m/s. In general, it can be seen that the
5 10 15 20 25
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
1.6
0.25 rad/s
0.5 rad/s
1 rad/s
1.5 rad/s
2 rad/s
R
e
l
a
t
i
v
e

i
c
k
e
r
Turbulence intensity [%]
Fig. 8.9. Reduction in flicker for different bandwidths of α
R
. The average wind speed is 6 m/s.
lower the parameter α
R
is, the more reduction in the P
st
value is achieved. However, if the
frequency is too low or the turbulence intensity is too high, the rotor resistance will hit its
maximum or minimum value to a high extent which will make the result worse. For example,
for the case with α
R
put to 0.5 rad/s in the figure, the number of times the rotor resistance
has to be limited is rapidly increased from a turbulence intensity of 7% and upwards. For
the case with α
R
equal 0.25 rad/s the rotor resistance has been limited to its maximum or
minimum value between 20–70% of the total simulation time depending on the turbulence
intensity. Due to this fact, the P
st
value is actually worse for this case than for the case with
fixed rotor resistance.
In Figs. 8.10 and 8.11 the corresponding diagrams for an average wind speed of 14 and
20 m/s are shown. It is seen that when the turbulence intensity becomes higher, for low
values of α
R
, the rotor resistance can not follow its reference value and has to be limited to a
higher and higher degree (i.e., the same phenomena as in Fig. 8.9). This will have a negative
impact on the performance.
As mentioned earlier, the damping of the flicker (or the torque fluctuation) is dependent
on the operating condition. This is also verified by the simulation since it is possible to
reduce more of the flicker at higher average wind speeds (i.e., higher average torques). On
the other hand, the flicker contribution is lower at lower average wind speeds. Moreover,
from the figures it can be seen that in order to have an “optimal” reduction in flicker, over the
whole operating area, with the derived control law, the parameter α
R
should be a function of
144
5 10 15 20 25
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
1.6
0.25 rad/s
0.5 rad/s
1 rad/s
1.5 rad/s
2 rad/s
R
e
l
a
t
i
v
e

i
c
k
e
r
Turbulence intensity [%]
Fig. 8.10. Reduction in flicker for different bandwidths of α
R
. The average wind speed is 14 m/s.
5 10 15 20 25
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
1.6
0.25 rad/s
0.5 rad/s
1 rad/s
1.5 rad/s
2 rad/s
R
e
l
a
t
i
v
e

i
c
k
e
r
Turbulence intensity [%]
Fig. 8.11. Reduction in flicker for different bandwidths of α
R
. The average wind speed is 20 m/s.
both the average torque and turbulence intensity.
8.5 Conclusion
A non-linear rotor resistance control law has been derived with the objective of minimizing
the flicker contribution of a stall-controlled fixed-speed wind turbine to the grid.
It was shown that it is possible to reduce the flicker contribution by utilizing the derived
rotor resistance control law with 40–80% depending on the operating condition. However,
since the rotor resistance can be varied only within a limited range, the reduction in the flicker
contribution will be dependent on the operating condition. Moreover, the non-linearity of the
system will make an “optimal” reduction in flicker, over the whole operating area, difficult.
145
146
Chapter 9
Conclusion
The electrical energy efficiency of wind turbine systems equipped with doubly-fed induction
generators in comparison to other wind turbine generator systems has been investigated. It
was found that the energy efficiency of a doubly-fed induction generator system is a few per-
centage units higher compared to a system using a cage-bar induction generator, controlled
by a full-power converter. In comparison to a direct-driven permanent-magnet synchronous
generator, controlled by a converter or a two-speed generator system the difference in energy
efficiency was found to be small. Moreover, the converter losses of the doubly-fed induction
generator can be reduced if the available rotor-speed range is made smaller. However, the
aerodynamic capture of the wind turbine is reduced with a smaller rotor-speed range. This
means that the increased aerodynamic capture that can be achieved by a larger converter has,
thus, a greater impact than the increased converter losses. Finally, two methods to reduce the
magnetizing losses of the doubly-fed induction generator system, have been investigated. It
was found that the method, utilizing a Y-Δ switch in the stator circuit had the largest gain in
energy, of the two investigated methods.
In order to evaluate different methods of reducing the influence of the back EMF on the
rotor current control loop, a general rotor current control law has been derived with the op-
tion of having feed-forward compensation of the back EMF and “active resistance.” It was
found that the method that combines both the feed-forward compensation of the back EMF
and the “active resistance” manages to suppress the influence of the back EMF on the rotor
current best and was found to be the least sensitive to erroneous parameters. The choice of
current control method is of greater importance if the bandwidth of the current control loop
is low. Moreover, it has been shown that by using grid-flux orientation, the stability and
the damping of the system is independent of the rotor current, in contrast to the stator-flux
oriented system.
Dynamic models of the DFIG wind turbines have been experimentally verified, with a
850-kW wind turbine. Simulations and experimental results of the dynamic response to
symmetrical as well as unsymmetrical voltage sags of a DFIG wind turbine were presented.
Simulations were carried out both with a full-order model, and also with a reduced-order
(second-order) model. Both models produced acceptable results.
Voltage sag ride-through capabilities of some different variable-speed wind turbines have
been investigated and compared. A variable-speed wind turbine with a full-power converter
147
system can handle voltage sags very well. Two candidate methods for improving the voltage
sag ride-through capability of DFIG variable-speed wind turbines have been investigated.
One of the methods still suffers, at least initially, from high fault currents, while the other
method seems to have similar dynamical performance as the full-power converter system.
However, the control of the latter method is much more complicated than that of the full-
power converter system. In addition, the maximum torque that can be handled by the gener-
ator is reduced in proportion to the voltage sag. The energy production cost of the full-power
converter system was found to be three percentage units higher than that of the ordinary
DFIG system without ride through capability. The two DFIG candidate methods have ap-
proximately the same energy production cost, which is approximately 1.5 percentage units
higher in comparison to the ordinary DFIG system.
Finally, a non-linear rotor resistance control law has been derived with the objective of
minimizing the flicker contribution of a stall-controlled fixed-speed wind turbine to the grid.
It has been found that the flicker contribution can be reduced with 40–80%, depending on
the operating condition, with the derived control law.
9.1 Future Research
The following candidate topics are proposed for future research:
• Development of a unified estimator for both stator-flux and grid-flux field orientation.
Since the flux dynamics are poorly damped, a desired property would be a relatively
good damping of the flux dynamics.
• More thorough dynamic, steady-state, and experimental analysis of the voltage sag
ride-through systems for the DFIG wind turbine. In addition, it is essential to study
the hardware configuration of the voltage sag ride-through systems.
• Development of mathematical models of wind turbines with voltage sag ride-through
properties. Experimental evaluation of the developed models with commercial wind
turbines with voltage sag ride-through properties.
• Derivation of analytical expressions for the response of the DFIG to unsymmetrical
voltage sags.
148
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158
Appendix A
Nomenclature
Symbols
A
r
swept area
C capacitor
C
p
power coefficient
E back EMF
E
g
, E
g
grid-voltage modulus and space vector
F controller
f(w) probability density function
G transfer function
g
r
gearbox ratio
I steady-state complex-valued current
i, i current modulus and space vector
J inertia
j

−1
k
E
, k
R
coefficients in the rotor current control law
k
p
, k
i
proportional and integral gain
L inductance
L Laplace transform
L
−1
inverse Laplace transform
n
p
number of pole pairs
n
s
/n
r
stator-to-rotor turns ratio
P active power
p d/dt
Q reactive power
R resistance
S apparent power
s slip
T
e
, T
s
electromechanical and shaft torque
T
sample
sample time
V steady-state complex-valued voltage
V remaining voltage
v, v voltage modulus and space vector
159
α closed loop bandwidth
β pitch angle
λ tip-speed ratio
ρ density of air or bandwidth of PLL
Ψ flux space vector or steady-state complex-valued flux
ψ flux modulus
ω
1
, θ
1
synchronous frequency and angle
ω
2
slip frequency
ω
g
, θ
g
grid frequency and angle
ω
r
(electrical) rotor speed of generator
˜ error
ˆ estimated
Superscripts
avg average
max maximum
min minimum
s stator-oriented reference frame
pk peak
ref reference
Subscripts
cl closed loop
co cut off
d real part of synchronous-frame space vector
f (grid-) filter or flux
g grid
GB gearbox
m mutual
M mutual (Γ representation)
mech mechanical
n negative sequence
nom nominal
R rotor (Γ representation)
r rotor
s stator
sw switch
t turbine
q imaginary part of synchronous-frame space vector
p positive sequence
λ leakage
σ leakage (Γ-representation)
160
Abbreviations
DFIG doubly-fed induction generator
EMF electromotive force
FSIG fixed-speed wind turbine with an induction generator
G generator
GSC grid-side converter
IG induction generator
IGBT insulated gate bipolar transistor
IMC internal model control
LLF line-to-line fault
MSC machine-side converter
PLL phase-locked loop
PMSG permanent-magnet synchronous generator
p.u. per unit
PWM pulse width modulation
RMS root mean square
SG synchronous generator
SLGF single-line-to-ground fault
TLGF two-lines-to-ground fault
VSIG variable-speed wind turbine with an induction generator and
a full-power converter
WT wind turbine
161
162
Appendix B
Data and Experimental Setup
B.1 Data of the DFIG
These data and parameters of the DFIG are used throughout the thesis if not otherwise stated.
In Table B.1, Table B.2, and in Table B.3 the nominal values, base values, and the parameters
of the DFIG are shown respectively.
TABLE B.1. NOMINAL VALUES OF THE DFIG.
Rated voltage (Y) V
n,p−p
690 V
Rated current I
n
1900 A
Rated frequency f
n
50 Hz
Rated power P
n
2 MW
Number of pole pairs n
p
2
TABLE B.2. BASE VALUES.
Base voltage (phase-neutral) V
b
400 V
Base current I
b
1900 A
Base frequency ω
b
2π 50 Hz
Base impedance Z
b
= V
b
/I
b
0.21 Ω
TABLE B.3. PARAMETERS OF THE INDUCTION MACHINE.
Stator resistance R
s
0.0022 Ω ⇔ 0.01 p.u.
Rotor resistance R
r
0.0018 Ω ⇔ 0.009 p.u.
Rotor resistance (Γ equivalent) R
R
0.0019 Ω ⇔ 0.0093 p.u.
Stator leakage inductance L

0.12 mH ⇔ 0.18 p.u.
Rotor leakage inductance L

0.05 mH ⇔ 0.07 p.u.
Leakage inductance (Γ equivalent) L
σ
0.18 mH ⇔ 0.27 p.u.
Magnetizing resistance R
m
42 Ω ⇔ 198 p.u.
Magnetizing inductance L
m
2.9 mH ⇔ 4.4 p.u.
Magnetizing inductance (Γ equivalent) L
M
3.1 mH ⇔ 4.6 p.u.
A dc-link capacitor of C
dc
= 53 mH = 3.5 p.u. is used.
163
B.2 Laboratory Setup
The laboratory setup consists of one slip-ringed wound rotor induction machine, one voltage
source converter, two measurement boxes, one digital signal processing (DSP) system and
one measurement computer. Data of the induction machine is given in Section B.2.1. Fig.
B.1 shows a principle sketch of the laboratory setup. In the measurement boxes voltages and
IM dc mach.
DSP Converter
Meas.
computer
dc supply
ac supply
θ
r
v, i
v, i
Fig. B.1. Laboratory setup. Thick lines indicates cables with power while dashed lines implies mea-
surements signals.
currents are measured. One measurement box is attached to the stator circuit while the other
measure the rotor circuit. There is also a resolver that measure the rotor position, θ
r
, of the
induction machine. When running the machine as doubly-fed the stator circuit is directly
connected to the grid (during the experiments in this thesis the stator circuit was connected
to a 230-V, 50-Hz source, note that the nominal voltage of the induction machine is 380 V).
Normally, the converter operates as a back-to-back converter, but during the experiments the
converter was directly fed by a dc source of 450 V dc. Although the converter here is fed
directly from a dc source, it is possible to run it as a back-to-back converter. The loading dc
machine is fed through a thyristor inverter and could be both speed or torque controlled.
The control laws were all written in the C-language and downloaded to the DSP-unit
(Texas TMS320c30). The DSP-unit has 16 analog input channels, for measurement signals,
and 8 analog output channels, for signals that is desired to be fed to the measurement com-
puter. The voltage references to the converter are modulated digitally and via optic fibers
sent to the converter.
The measurement system consists of one filter box and one computer equipped with the
LabView software. With this system it is possible to measure up to 16 channels, i.e., from
the measurements boxes or from the DSP unit.
A more thorough description of the laboratory set up can be found in [75].
B.2.1 Data of the Induction Generator
In Table B.4, Table B.5, and in Table B.6 the nominal values, base values, and the parameters
of the laboratory DFIG are shown respectively.
164
TABLE B.4. NOMINAL VALUES OF THE INDUCTION GENERATOR.
Rated voltage (Y) V
n,p−p
380 V
Rated current I
n
44 A
Rated frequency f
n
50 Hz
Rated rotor speed n
n
1440 rpm
Rated power P
n
22 kW
Rated torque T
n
145 Nm
Power factor 0.89
TABLE B.5. BASE VALUES.
Base voltage (phase-neutral) V
b
220 V
Base current I
b
44 A
Base frequency ω
b
2π 50 Hz
Base impedance Z
b
= V
b
/I
b
5 Ω
TABLE B.6. PARAMETERS OF THE INDUCTION MACHINE.
Stator resistance R
s
0.115 Ω ⇔ 0.0230 p.u.
Rotor resistance R
r
0.184 Ω ⇔ 0.0369 p.u.
Stator leakage inductance L

1.65 mH ⇔ 0.104 p.u.
Rotor leakage inductance L

1.68 mH ⇔ 0.106 p.u.
Magnetizing resistance R
m
224 Ω ⇔ 44.9 p.u.
Magnetizing inductance L
m
46.6 mH ⇔ 2.93 p.u.
Inertia J 0.334 kgm
2
⇔ 178 p.u.
B.3 Jung Data Acquisition Setup
The experiments were made on a VESTAS V-52 850 kWWT, located at the inland (≈100 km
from the west coast) in the southern part of Sweden. The wind turbine is located in a flat
surroundings and is connected to the 10-kV distribution grid via a transformer, which trans-
forms the voltage to the wind-turbine voltage of 690 V. See Fig. B.2 for a picture of the
turbine and the data acquisition computer. In Table B.7 some data of VESTAS V-52 850 kW
WT is given. The currents and voltages are measured using transformers, which transform
TABLE B.7. DATA OF VESTAS V-52 850 KW WT [104].
Rated voltage (Y) 690 V
Rated power 850 kW
Rotor diameter 52 m
Rotor speed 14.0–31.0 rpm (26 rpm)
Cut-in wind speed 4 m/s
Nominal wind speed 16 m/s
Maximum wind speed 25 m/s
the current to 5 A and the voltage to 110 V. In addition, the stator currents are also measured
directly using LEM modules.
165
Fig. B.2. Jung wind turbine and the data acquisition computer.
166

Analysis, Modeling and Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generators for Wind Turbines ANDREAS PETERSSON ISBN 91-7291-600-1

c ANDREAS PETERSSON, 2005.

Doktorsavhandlingar vid Chalmers tekniska h¨ gskola o Ny serie nr. 2282 ISSN 0346-718x

Division of Electric Power Engineering Department of Energy and Environment Chalmers University of Technology SE-412 96 G¨ teborg o Sweden Telephone + 46 (0)31-772 1000

Chalmers Bibliotek, Reproservice G¨ teborg, Sweden 2005 o

Analysis, Modeling and Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generators for Wind Turbines ANDREAS PETERSSON Division of Electric Power Engineering Department of Energy and Environment Chalmers University of Technology

Abstract
This thesis deals with the analysis, modeling, and control of the doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) for wind turbines. Different rotor current control methods are investigated with the objective of eliminating the influence of the back electromotive force (EMF), which is that of, in control terminology, a load disturbance, on the rotor current. It is found that the method that utilizes both feed forward of the back EMF and so-called “active resistance” manages best to suppress the influence of the back EMF on the rotor current, particularly when voltage sags occur, of the investigated methods. This method also has the best stability properties. In addition it is found that this method also has the best robustness to parameter deviations. The response of the DFIG wind turbine system to grid disturbances is simulated and verified experimentally. A voltage sag to 80% (80% remaining voltage) is handled very well. Moreover, a second-order model for prediction of the response of small voltage sags of the DFIG wind turbines is derived, and its simulated performance is successfully verified experimentally. The energy production of the DFIG wind turbine is investigated and compared to that of other wind turbine systems. The result found is that the energy capture of the DFIG wind turbine is almost the same as for an active stall-controlled fixed-speed (using two fixed speeds) wind turbine. Compared to a full-power-converter wind turbine the DFIG wind turbine can deliver a couple of percentage units more energy to the grid. Voltage sag ride-through capabilities of some different variable-speed wind turbines has been investigated. It has been found that the energy production cost of the investigated wind turbines with voltage sag ride-through capabilities is between 1–3 percentage units higher than that of the ordinary DFIG wind turbine without the ride-through capability. Finally, a flicker reduction control law for stall-controlled wind turbines with induction generators, using variable rotor resistance, is derived. The finding is that it is possible to reduce the flicker contribution by utilizing the derived rotor resistance control law with 40– 80% depending on the operating condition. Keywords: Doubly-fed induction generator, wind turbine, wind energy, current control, voltage sag, power quality. iii

iv .

Thanks goes to my fellow Ph. and Oskar Wallmark for a good companionship and valuable discussions. especially with the analysis of the full-power converter. who have assisted me during the work of this Ph. v .D. students who have assisted me: Stefan Lundberg for a pleasant collaboration with the efficiency calculations. The financial support provided by the Swedish National Energy Agency is gratefully acknowledged. Many thanks go to the colleagues at the Division of Electric Power Engineering and the former Department of Electric Power Engineering. Finally. Dr. thesis.Acknowledgements This research project has been carried out at the Department of Energy and Environment (and the former Department of Electric Power Engineering) at Chalmers University of Technology. inspiration. Tore Undeland for valuable comments and encouragement. Torbj¨ rn Thiringer and Prof. Rolf Ottersten for many interesting discussions and a nice cooperation. Lennart Harnefors o for help. Tom´ s Petr˚ for valuable and time aˇ u saving collaboration with practical field measurement set-ups. Dr. I would also like to thank my examiner Prof.D. I would like to thank my supervisors Dr. and encouragement. I would like to thank my family for their love and support.

vi .

. . . . . . . . 3. . .5 Total Losses . . .3. . . . . . . . . .1 Equivalent Circuit of the Doubly-Fed Induction Generator . . . . . . 3. .1 Wind Energy Conversion . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Variable-Speed Wind Turbine . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Induction Generator Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . . .4 Converter Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Aerodynamic Conversion . . . . . . . . 3.3 Variable-Speed Wind Turbine with Doubly-Fed Induction Generator 2. . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . .2 Wind Turbine Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Energy Efficiency of Wind Turbines 3. . . 2. . . . . 2. . . . . .1 Aerodynamic Losses . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. .2 Purpose and Contributions . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . .5 Other Types of Doubly-Fed Machines . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Wind Distribution . . . . . . . .Table of Contents Abstract Acknowledgements Table of Contents 1 Introduction 1. . . . . . . . . .3. . .1 Determination of Power Losses . . . . . . . .2 Aerodynamic Power Control . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. .1 Review of Related Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 List of Publications . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Gearbox Losses . . . . . . . . . . .3 Doubly-Fed Induction Generator Systems for Wind Turbines . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . .1 Investigation of the Influence of the Converter’s Size on the Energy Production . . . 2 Wind Energy Systems 2.4 Lowering Magnetizing Losses . . .2. . .1 Fixed-Speed Wind Turbine .1. 3. . . . . vii iii v vii 1 2 4 5 7 7 7 8 8 9 11 11 12 13 14 16 17 18 19 23 23 23 24 24 26 28 29 29 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . 2. . . . . 1. . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Power Flow . . . . .3. . . .2 Energy Production of the DFIG System . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . .1. . . .3 Stator-to-Rotor Turns Ratio . . .1. .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . .1 Current Control of Grid Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Summary . . . 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. . . . . . 4. 5. . . . . . . . . . 4. . . . . . 4. . .2 Mathematical Models of the DFIG System . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . viii . . 4. . . . . . .4. . . . . . .2. . . 4. 4. . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . Rs and RR . .5. . . 5. . . . . . . . . .5 Sensorless Operation . 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . .1. . . . . . . . .1 Comparison Between Stator-Flux and Grid-Flux-Oriented System 5. 5. . . . 5. . . . . .2 Torque Control . . .6 Saturation and Integration Anti-Windup . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . .4 Impact of Stator Voltage Sags on the Current Control Loop . . .5. . .1 Stator-Flux-Oriented System . . .2 Grid-Flux-Oriented System . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . 4. . . .1. . Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . 5. . . . . .1 Machine Model . 5. .7 Discretization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Conclusion . .2. . . . . . . . . . . .4. . 4. . . 5. .2 Influence of Erroneous Parameters on Stability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . .2 Grid-Filter Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 4 3. . . . . . . . .4. . . .2 Grid-Flux Orientation . . . . . .2 DC-Link Voltage Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Control of Machine-Side Converter . . .3. . . . . . 4. . . . . . . . 4. . . . . . . . . . . 5. . .2 Generation Capability During Voltage Sags . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . .3 Experimental Evaluation .1 Stator-Flux Orientation . . . . . . . . .4 Reactive Power Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Space Vectors .3 Phase-Locked Loop (PLL)-Type Estimator .1 Leakage Inductance. . . .3 DC-Link Model . . . . . 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . Comparison to Other Wind Turbine Systems Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. . . .5 Control of Grid-Side Converter . . 5 Evaluation of the Current Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generators 5. . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . 31 31 33 34 35 35 35 36 36 37 38 40 40 41 41 43 44 45 45 45 46 47 47 50 50 52 54 55 56 56 59 59 59 64 66 66 67 67 70 71 71 73 74 74 76 Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generator System 4. .1. . . . Lσ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Current Control .1 Stability Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Influence of Erroneous Parameters . . . . . . 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . .2 Power and Reactive Power in Terms of Space Vectors 4. . . . 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Flux Damping . . . . . . . . .3 Speed Control . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 3. . . . . . . .2 Reduction of Magnetizing Losses . . . . . . . . .1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . .4 3. . . .2. . 5. . . . . . . . . . . 4. . . . . . . . 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Stator-Flux Orientation . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Stator and Rotor Resistances. . . . . . .4 Internal Model Control (IMC) . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Field Orientation . 4. . . . . . . 4.5 “Active Damping” . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.

. . . . . . . 134 . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . .4. . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . .1 Stator-Flux Orientation . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . .2 Current Control . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . .1 Voltage Sags .5. . . ix . . . . . . . . .1 Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . .3. .4 Conclusion . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Reduced-Order Model . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . .4 Evaluation . . . . . . . . 7. . . .3 Reference Value Selection . . . 7. . . . . . . .2 System Modeling .5 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . .4. . 8. . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Response to Small Voltage Sags .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Reduced-Order Model . . . . . . . . . 138 . . . .4 Implementation in Grid Simulation Programs . . . . . 7. . . .7 Discussion and Conclusion . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Candidate Ride-Through System . . . .4. . . . . 76 76 77 77 79 81 81 81 82 82 83 87 88 89 90 90 90 92 92 98 99 100 102 103 110 111 114 118 118 120 123 125 126 127 131 132 6 Evaluation of Doubly-Fed Induction Generator Systems 6. 8 Flicker Reduction of Stalled-Controlled Wind Resistances 8. . 133 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . .2. . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . .3 Doubly-Fed Induction Generator with Shunt Converter . . . . .2 Full-Power Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . .1 Evaluation . . . . 7. 5. . . . . . . . . 7. . . . .3 Parameter Selection . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.3. . . . . . . .1 Modeling . . . . 7 Voltage Sag Ride-Through of Variable-Speed Wind Turbines 7. 6.2. . . 6. .1. . . . . . . .4 Speed Control Operation . 7. . . .2 Discretization of the Doubly-Fed Induction Generator 6. . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . 7. . . . . .6 5. . . . . . . . . . 133 . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . 139 . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . .2 Discussion . . . . . . . . . .2.2 Response to Large Voltage Sags . . . . . . . . . . .4 Evaluation of the Ride-Through System .6 Steady-State Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possible System Configurations . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Response to Symmetrical Voltage Sags Conclusion . . . . . .5 Response to Voltage Sags . . .4. . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Unsymmetrical Voltage Sags . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Response to Grid Disturbances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . .3. . . . .1 Analysis . . . .2 Grid-Flux Orientation . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Turbines using Variable Rotor . .1 Symmetrical Voltage Sags . . . . 5. . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Grid-Flux Orientation . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . 140 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . 7.4 Doubly-Fed Induction Generator with Series Converter . . . . . .5 Summary . . . . . . . . . . .3 Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8. . . . . . . .3 Jung Data Acquisition Setup .1 Data of the Induction Generator B. . . . . . . B. . . . . . . . . .1 Data of the DFIG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . Conclusion . .2. . . . . . . . . . . .5 9 Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 143 144 145 147 148 149 159 163 163 164 164 165 Conclusion 9. . . . . . . .1 Flicker Contribution 8. . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x . . . . . .1 Future Research . . . . . .2 Flicker Reduction . . . . . .4 8. . . . . .2 Laboratory Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . References A Nomenclature B Data and Experimental Setup B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . B. . . . . . . . . .

The major advantage of the doubly-fed induction generator. 98]. Nuclear power production shall be replaced by improving the efficiency of electricity use. These wind turbines produced 0. conversion to renewable forms of energy and other environmentally acceptable electricity production technologies [97]. i. 110]. 29. Fixed-speed induction generators with stall control are regarded as unfeasible [3] for these large wind turbines. by the end of 2004. The first nuclear reactor of Barseb¨ ck a was shut down 30th of November 1999. Today. that the nuclear power production is to be phased out at a slow rate so that the need for electrical energy can be met without risking employment and welfare.Chapter 1 Introduction The Swedish Parliament adopted new energy guidelines in 1997 following the trend of moving towards an ecologically sustainable society. According to [97] wind power can contribute to fulfilling several of the national environmental quality objectives decided by Parliament in 1991. This means that the losses in the power electronic equipment can 1 . corresponding to approximately 0. among those are possibilities to reduce stresses of the mechanical structure.8 TWh of electrical energy in 2004. 73. The Swedish National Energy Agency suggest that the planning objectives for the expansion of wind power should be 10 TWh/year within the next 10–15 years [97]. There are several reasons for using variable-speed operation of wind turbines. For a variablespeed wind turbine the generator is controlled by power electronic equipment. In Sweden. These large wind turbines are all based on variable-speed operation with pitch control using a directdriven synchronous generator (without gearbox) or a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG).5% of the total generated and imported electrical energy [23. The decision also confirmed that the 1980 and 1991 guidelines still apply. corresponding to 1% of the total installed electric power in the Swedish grid [23. Continued expansion of wind power is therefore of strategic importance.e. Wind turbines (WTs) can either operate at fixed speed or variable speed. 68. For a fixedspeed wind turbine the generator is directly connected to the electrical grid. Most of the major wind turbine manufactures are developing new larger wind turbines in the 3-to-5-MW range [3]. is that the power electronic equipment only has to handle a fraction (20–30%) of the total system power [36. doubly-fed induction generators are commonly used by the wind turbine industry (year 2005) for larger wind turbines [19. The energy policy decision states that the objective is to facilitate a change to an ecologically sustainable energy production system. which has made it popular.. 98]. acoustic noise reduction and the possibility to control active and reactive power [11]. 105]. there was 442 MW of installed wind power.

Control of the DFIG is more complicated than the control of a standard induction machine. also.be reduced in comparison to power electronic equipment that has to handle the total system power as for a direct-driven synchronous generator. blade design. rotor speed. One method is to reduce the bandwidth of the current controllers [43]. [43] and Congwei et al. at least for a stator-flux-oriented system. Wang et al. In order to control the DFIG the rotor current is controlled by a power electronic converter. apart from the cost saving of using a smaller converter. According to [16] the energy capture can be significantly increased by using a DFIG.1 Review of Related Research According to [12] the energy production can be increased by 2–6% for a variable-speed wind turbine in comparison to a fixed-speed wind turbine. selected blade profile. harder to find. or with air-gap-flux orientation [107. One exception is in [16]. 99]. These poorly damped poles influence the rotor current dynamics through the back electromotive force (EMF). A comparison to other electrical systems for wind turbines are. while in [112] it is stated that the increase in energy can be 39%. The author has. 86. what kind of power that should be used as a common basis for comparison. and stator flux. which is dependent on the stator voltage. If the stator resistance can be considered small. and. [107] have by simulations found that the flux is influenced both by load changes and stator power supply variations. 61. [54] have used 2 . where Datta et al. Heller et al. that the system is unstable for certain operating conditions. Several vector control schemes for the DFIG have been proposed. [13] have investigated the stability of the DFIG analytically. affect the outcome of the investigations. The flux oscillations can be damped in some different ways. Kelber et al. selection of maximum speed of the WT. not found in the literature any evaluation of the performance of different rotor current control laws with respect to eliminating the influence of the back EMF. Wang et al. 80. There is thus a need to clarify what kind of energy capture gain there could be when using a DFIG WT. 68]. Efficiency calculations of the DFIG system have been presented in several papers. One common way is to control the rotor current with stator-flux orientation [46. in the rotor current. 99]. In [69] it is shown that the gain in energy generation of the variable-speed wind turbine compared to the most simple fixed-speed wind turbine can vary between 3–28% depending on the site conditions and design parameters. They state an increased energy capture of a DFIG by over 20% with respect to a variable-speed system using a cage-bar induction machine and by over 60% in comparison to a fixed-speed system. stator-flux orientation gives in principle orientation also with the stator voltage (grid-flux orientation) [17. both compared to another variable-speed WT and towards a traditional fixed-speed WT. showing that the dynamics of the DFIG have poorly damped eigenvalues (poles) with a corresponding natural frequency near the line frequency. however. however. Factors such as speed control of variable-speed WTs. have made a comparison of the energy capture for various WT systems. 61. missing facts regarding the base assumptions etc. 110]. 1. One of the reasons for the various results is that the assumptions used vary from investigation to investigation. One common way of controlling the rotor current is by means of field-oriented (vector) control. The flux response to a disturbance is a damped oscillation. for instance [52. [107] have introduced a flux differentiation compensation that improves the damping of the flux.

This is a common way to reduce the DFIG model in classical control theory stability analysis [13. New grid codes will require WTs and wind farms to ride through voltage sags. meaning that normal power production should be re-initiated once the nominal grid voltage has been recovered. As described earlier a dominating feature of the DFIG system is the natural frequency of the flux dynamics. Such codes are in progress both in Sweden [96] and in several other countries [8]. The possibility to use it as simulation model remains to be shown.another possibility. Another option proposed in [72] is to use an “active” crowbar. which at large grid disturbances has to short circuit the rotor circuit in order to protect the converter. In the literature there are some different methods to modify the DFIG system in order to accomplish voltage sag ride-through proposed. 72] in order to comply. It was found that the methods with a flux differentiation compensation and the method with an extra converter manage to damp the oscillations best. the efficiency and cost of the different voltage sag ride-through system might also influence the choice of system. a slightly different model approach must be made. The response of wind turbines to grid disturbances is an important issue. 20. a third-order model has been proposed that neglects the stator-flux dynamics of the DFIG. it is obvious that a second-order model is the simplest that can be used. 60. which has initiated industrial research efforts [8. 55]. Kelber has shown that such a system can effectively damp the flux oscillations caused by voltage sags. This leads to that the turbine must be disconnected from the grid. it is important for utilities to be able to study the effects of various voltage sags and. 26. After the DFIG WT has been disconnected. after a large voltage sag. The DFIG system. In [22. This means that new WTs have to ride through these voltage sags. 43]. 42. 30. has a crowbar in the rotor circuit. when modifying the DFIG system for voltage sag ride3 . Kelber has in [55] made a comparison of different methods of damping the flux oscillations. it is of importance to have as simple models as possible that still manage to model the dynamics of interest. Therefore. and thereby be able to remagnetize the generator and reconnect the stator to the grid as fast as possible.e. A third method. For calculations made using grid simulation programs.. the DFIG WT will be disconnected from the grid when large voltage sags appear in the grid. which can break the short circuit current in the crowbar. In order to preserve the behavior of an oscillatory response. In order to preserve the dynamic behavior of the DFIG system. is to use an additional converter to substitute the Y point of the stator circuit [54. especially since the rated power of wind-turbine installations steadily increases. that has been mentioned earlier. which is close to the line frequency. 84]. the corresponding wind turbine response. All of these systems have different dynamical performance. Since the dynamics of the DFIG are influenced by two poorly damped eigenvalues (poles) it would be natural to reduce the model of the DFIG to the flux dynamics described by a second-order model. for instance. Today. i. of today. to use an extra (third) converter that substitutes the Y point of the stator winding. In [55]. Therefore. it takes some time before the turbine is reconnected to the grid. Moreover. This model gives a correct mean value [22] but a drawback is that some of the main dynamics of the DFIG system are also neglected. 28. These grid codes will influence the choice of electrical system in future WTs. an extra degree of freedom is introduced that can be used to actively damp the flux oscillations. In [20] anti-parallel thyristors is used in the stator circuit in order to achieve a quick (within 10 ms) disconnection of the stator circuit.

The investigated systems are two fixed-speed induction generator systems and three variable-speed systems. a comparison of the energy efficiency of DFIG system to other electrical systems is presented. 4 . in both the stator-flux-oriented and the grid-flux-oriented reference frames. Simulations are verified with experimental results. for both correctly and erroneously known parameters. • In Chapter 6. which influences the aerodynamical efficiency. another objective is also to study how a reduced-order (second-order) model manages to predict the response of the DFIG system. The variable-speed systems are: a doubly-fed induction generator. the control and the modeling are also important parts of the thesis. the grid-fault response of a DFIG wind turbine system is studied. 41]. in Chapter 3. an induction generator (with a full-power converter) and a direct-driven permanent-magnet synchronous generator system. one of the main advantage with the DFIG system was that losses of the power electronic equipment is reduced in comparison to a system where the power electronic equipment has to handle the total power.2 Purpose and Contributions The main purpose of this thesis is the analysis of the DFIG for a WT application both during steady-state operation and transient operation. On the other hand it also implies a smaller variable-speed range. In order to make the comparison as fair as possible the base assumption used in this work is that the maximum (average) shaft torque of the wind turbine systems used should be the same. since such a system can be considered to have excellent voltage sag ride-through performance (as also will be shown in Chapter 7) [74]. • In Chapter 3 an investigation of the influence of the converter’s size on the energy production for a DFIG system is analyzed. Finally. Stability analysis of the system is performed for different combinations of the terms introduced in the current control law.” “Active resistance” has been used for the squirrel-cage induction machines to damp disturbances. such as varying back EMF [18. 1. as mentioned earlier.through it is necessary to evaluate consequences for cost and efficiency. Consequences for the efficiency is an important issue since. Any evaluation of different voltage sag ride-through methods for DFIG wind turbines and how they affect the efficiency is hard to find in the literature. Important electrical and mechanical losses of the systems are included in the study. it is necessary to compare the ride-through system with a system that utilizes a full-power converter. Moreover. with details being as follows. Further. Hence. Terms are introduced in order to allow the possibility to include feed-forward compensation of the back EMF and/or “active resistance. In order to analyze the DFIG during transient operation both the control and the modeling of the system is of importance. The main contribution of this thesis is dynamic and steady-state analysis of the DFIG. Moreover. A smaller converter implies that the converter losses will be lower. • In Chapter 4 a general rotor current control law is derived for the DFIG system. The main contribution of Chapter 5 is an evaluation of different rotor current control laws with respect to eliminating the influence of the back EMF. two different methods of reducing the magnetizing losses of the DFIG system are compared.

3. Lundberg. a rotor resistance control law for a stall-controlled wind turbine is derived and analyzed. Petersson. July 13– 17. “A DFIG Wind-Turbine Ride-Through System Influence on the Energy Production. vol.3 List of Publications Some of the results presented in this thesis have been published in the following publications. “Flicker Reduction of Stall-Controlled Wind Turbines using Variable Rotor Resistances. Moreover. S. Thiringer. dynamically and in the steady state. in Chapter 8. Toronto. Petr˚ . T. 2003. G¨ teborg. 1–2. The organizing committee of the conference recommended submission of this paper to Wind Energy. 3. 2. IEEE Nordic Workshop on Power and Industrial Electronics (NORpie/2002). A. o In this paper a rotor resistance control law is derived for a stall-controlled wind turbine. Petersson and S. Canada. The objective of the control law is to minimize torque fluctuations and flicker.• The contribution of Chapter 7 is to analyze. The reason for comparing these two systems with a system that utilizes a full-power converter is that the latter system is capable of voltage sag ride-through. 12–14.” in Proc. 2004. 1. Stockholm. Aug.” in Proc. The grid disturbance response to fixed-speed wind turbines and wind turbines with DFIG were presented. This paper is an early version of the material presented in Chapter 3. This study is presented in Chapter 8. Sweden. Mar. these two methods are also compared to a system that utilizes a full-power converter. Nordic Wind Power Conference. and L. A. “Grid Disturbance Response of Wind Turbines u Equipped with Induction Generator and Doubly-Fed Induction Generator. 1–2. • Finally. Petersson. Sweden. Sweden. The objective of the control law is to minimize the flicker (or voltage fluctuations) contribution. Petersson.” in Proc. Nordic Wind Power Conference. and T. G¨ teborg. IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting. 5 . o In this paper a voltage sag ride-through system for a DFIG WT based on increased rating of the valves of the power electronic converter was investigated. Harnefors. A. 2002. 1. Mar. “Energy efficiency comparison of electrical systems for wind turbines. The paper has been accepted for publication. Lundberg. Thiringer. and T. A. 4. pp. This paper presents one of the voltage sag ride-through system for a DFIG wind turbine that is compared in Chapter 7. 2004. 1542–1547.” in Proc. Thiringer. The efficiency of some different electrical systems for wind turbines are compared. two different voltage sag ride-through systems for the DFIG. T.

Germany. 470–475. Norway. A. Harnefors. 2004. In this paper the analysis of the stator-flux oriented current control of the DFIG presented in Chapter 5 was studied. IEEE Nordic Workshop on Power and Industrial Electronics (NORpie/2004). 8. Petersson. IEEE Power Electronics Specialists Conference (PESC’04). A. Harnefors. Thiringer and A. L. “Modeling and Experimental u Verification of Grid Interaction of a DFIG Wind Turbine. 6. and T. Petr˚ . 6 . R. their power quality impact.” IEEE Trans. L. pp. Petersson. A. 7. 2004. “Voltage Sag Response of PWM Reca tifiers for Variable-Speed Wind Turbines. “Evaluation of Current Control Methods for Wind Turbines Using Doubly-Fed Induction Machines. 20. no. A. and its the response to grid disturbances. This paper gives an overview of the three most common wind turbine systems. June 14–16. The paper has been accepted for publication. and T. June 20–25.” IEEE Trans. These results are also presented in Chapter 6. The organizing committee of the conference recommended submission of this paper to EPE Journal. no. vol. The models are experimentally verified with an 850 kW DFIG wind turbine. 1. Aachen. 1. Energy Conversion (accepted for publication) Here a full-order model and a reduced-order model of the DFIG is compared during grid disturbances. vol. Thiringer. and K. Ottersten. 482–486. Jan.5. 2004. The comparison between grid-flux and stator-flux-oriented current control of the DFIG presented in Chapter 5 were studied in this paper. T. Power Electron.” in Proc. The voltage sag response of a PWM rectifier for wind turbines that utilizes a full-power converter were studied. pp. Petersson. Thiringer. Trondheim. “Comparison Between Stator-Flux and Grid-Flux Oriented Rotor-Current Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generators.. 5. pp. This paper serves as a basis for the comparison of ride-through systems of wind turbines in Chapter 7. T. Pietil¨ inen. 2005. and T. 9. Harnefors. Thiringer.” in Proc. Petersson. 227–235. Petersson. “Grid Integration of Wind Turbines. L.” Przeglad Elektrotechniczny.

can be calculated from ∞ c 1 w= wf (w)dw = Γ (2. will be presented. will be described. Thus.Chapter 2 Wind Energy Systems 2..e. for example. i. will be presented.g.4) c = √ w.2) k k 0 where Γ is Euler’s gamma function. Γ(z) = 0 ∞ tz−1 e−t dt. the average wind speed (or the expected wind speed). c is a scale parameter and w is the wind speed.. Finally. i. The average wind speeds in the figure are 5.2 m/s. For the Rayleigh distribution the scale factor. 2. Then different methods to control the aerodynamic power will be described. π In Fig. i. produced power. given the average wind speed can be √ found from (k=2. 6. while 8–9 m/s are wind speeds available at sites located outside the Danish west coast [24]. the aerodynamic conversion. the wind speed probability density function of the Rayleigh distribution is plotted.8 m/s.1. First the wind distribution. which are of interest in this thesis. and 8. β)-curve. the probability of a certain average wind speed.3) If the shape parameter equals 2. e.. c. w.4 m/s. The Weibull distribution is described by the following probability density function k w k−1 −(w/c)k e (2. properties of the wind. and Γ( 1 ) = π) 2 2 (2. 7 . [11. the so-called Cp (λ. the Weibull distribution is known as the Rayleigh distribution. (2. 2. A wind speed of 5. The wind distribution can be used to determine the expected value of certain quantities.1 Wind Energy Conversion In this section.4 m/s correspond to a medium wind speed site in Sweden [100].1 Wind Distribution The most commonly used probability density function to describe the wind speed is the Weibull functions [53]. 53].1) f (w) = c c where k is a shape parameter.e. The interested reader can find more information in.e.1.

2.2 m/s (dotted).. Below rated wind speed the turbine should produce as much power as possible. It is also possible to increase the angle of attack towards stall in order to limit the aerodynamic power. 2.e.5) (2.. For steady-state calculations of the mechanical power from a wind turbine.2 Aerodynamic Power Control At high wind speeds it is necessary to limit the input power to the wind turbine. The mechanical power. i.. Stall control implies that the blades are designed to stall in high wind speeds and no pitch mechanism is thus required [11].e.e.05 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 Wind speed [m/s] Fig. Probability density of the Rayleigh distribution.1.8 m/s (dashed) and 8.e. β)w3 2 Ωr rr λ= w 8 (2. for newer larger wind turbines.3 Aerodynamic Conversion Some of the available power in the wind is converted by the rotor blades to mechanical power acting on the rotor shaft of the WT. i. In order to limit the aerodynamic power. the so called Cp (λ. can be determined by [53] 1 Pmech = ρAr Cp (λ. pitch. by stall. 6. Almost all variable-speed wind turbines use pitch control. There are three major ways of performing the aerodynamic power control. The average wind speeds are 5. Pitch control is the most common method of controlling the aerodynamic power generated by a turbine rotor.0. at high wind speeds. using a pitch angle that maximizes the energy capture. the angle between the chord line of the blade and the relative wind direction [53]. or active stall control. i.1.4 m/s (solid).6) . β)-curve can be used.1. Pmech . This control method is known as active stall or combi stall [11]. the pitch angle is controlled to decrease the angle of attack. i.15 Probability density 0.1 0. 2.. This method can be used to fine-tune the power level at high wind speeds for fixed-speed wind turbines. aerodynamic power control. Above rated wind speed the pitch angle is controlled in such a way that the aerodynamic power is at its rated [11].

5). as a function of the tip speed ratio. In Fig.. λ. according to (2. Cp . This choice is to a high extent dependent on the average wind speed of the site.e.u. Note that there is a possibility to optimize the radius of the wind turbines rotor to suit sites with different average wind speeds. However.2 Wind Turbine Systems Wind turbines can operate with either fixed speed (actually within a speed range about 1 %) or variable speed. derived from the Cp (λ.3 0. rr .4 b) 120 100 Cp (λ) 0. 2. the pitch angle is at higher wind speeds controlled in order to limit the input power to the wind turbine. This implies that the nominal power will be reached for a lower wind speed.2. As mentioned before. i.e. at a wind speed of approximately 13 m/s. β) curve. increasing the rotor radius implies that for higher wind speed the output power must be even more limited. β) curve and the shaft power as a function of the wind speed for rated rotor speed. In Fig. Ωr is the rotor speed (on the low-speed side of the gearbox). 2. can be seen. 1 p. b) Mechanical power as a function of wind speed at rated rotor speed (solid line is fixed pitch angle..2. Cp is kept at maximum as long as the power or rotor speed is below its rated values.5 0. by pitch control. stall control and dashed line is active stall). As seen in Fig. 2. λ is the tip speed ratio.3b). i.. e. w is the wind speed. when the turbine has reached the rated power. Fig. a) The power coefficient. ρ is the air density and Ar is the area swept by the rotor.where Cp is the power coefficient.1 0 0 5 10 15 20 Power [%] 80 60 40 20 0 5 10 15 20 25 Tip speed ratio Wind speed [m/s] Fig.. the output power of the turbine is also increased. 2. is increased. while dashed line corresponds to a varying β (active stall). β. there is a trade-off between the rotor radius and the nominal power of the generator.e. referred to Fig. an example of a Cp (λ. 2. pitch angle. β is the pitch angle. so that the nominal power of the generator is not exceeded. 2. For example.2b) the solid line corresponds to a fixed a) 0.2 0. rr is the rotor-plane radius. The rotor speed in the variable-speed area is controlled in order to keep the optimal tip speed ratio. Therefore.3 shows an example of how the mechanical power.. λ.g. For fixed-speed wind turbines.3b) the turbine in this example reaches the rated power. the generator (induction generator) is di9 . 2. if the rotor radius. a fixed-speed wind turbine. i. and the rotor speed vary with the wind speed for a variable-speed wind turbine.

2. it is not possible to store the turbulence of the wind in form of rotational energy. the power quality impact caused by the wind turbine can be improved compared to a fixed-speed turbine [58]. Hence. a description of some of these systems can be found in [36]. 10 . Variable-speed wind turbine equipped with a cage-bar induction generator or synchronous generator. Therefore. In this way the power fluctuations caused by wind variations can be more or less absorbed by changing the rotor speed [82] and thus power variations originating from the wind conversion and the drive train can be reduced. b) Mechanical power as a function of wind speed. 3. Variable-speed wind turbine equipped with a doubly-fed induction generator. 4. The rotational speed of a wind turbine is fairly low and must therefore be adjusted to the electrical frequency. and most certainly not controllable. Fixed-speed wind turbine with an induction generator. Since the speed is almost fixed to the grid frequency. The number of pole pairs sets the mechanical speed of the generator with respect to the electrical frequency and the gearbox adjusts the rotor speed of the turbine to the mechanical speed of the generator. 2. a) Rotor speed as a function of wind speed. For a variable-speed wind turbine the generator is controlled by power electronic equipment. and thus affect the power quality of the grid [77]. Variable-speed wind turbine equipped with multiple-pole synchronous generator or multiple-pole permanent-magnet synchronous generator.3. which makes it possible to control the rotor speed. This can be done in two ways: with a gearbox or with the number of pole pairs of the generator. rectly connected to the grid. There are also other existing wind turbine concepts. Typical characteristic for a variable-speed wind turbine. In this section the following wind turbine systems will be presented: 1. for a fixed-speed system the turbulence of the wind will result in power variations.a) 25 b) 100 80 20 Rotor speed [rpm] Power [%] 5 10 15 20 25 60 40 20 15 10 0 5 10 15 20 25 Wind speed [m/s] Wind speed [m/s] Fig.

The gearbox is designed so that maximum rotor speed corresponds to rated speed of the generator. The fixed-speed wind turbine system has often two fixed speeds.6. or it can be a generator with two windings having different ratings and pole pairs.4. see Fig. 2. 11 . 2. This is accomplished by using two generators with different ratings and pole pairs. A synchronous generator with multiple poles as a wind turbine generator is successfully manufactured by Enercon [25]. The rotor speed of the fixed-speed wind turbine is in principle Gearbox IG Soft starter Transformer Capacitor bank Fig. Fixed-speed wind turbine with an induction generator.2. generator or a synchronous generator. 61]. This leads to increased aerodynamic capture as well as reduced magnetizing losses at low wind speeds. determined by a gearbox and the pole-pair number of the generator. 2.2. 39. 2.5 consists of a wind turbine equipped with a converter connected to the stator of the generator. The generator could either be a cage-bar induction Gearbox G ≈ = = ≈ Transformer Power electronic converter Fig. Since this “full-power” converter/generator system is commonly used for other applications.4.5. 2.2.2 Variable-Speed Wind Turbine The system presented in Fig. Synchronous generators or permanent-magnet synchronous generators can be designed with multiple poles which implies that there is no need for a gearbox. one advantage with this system is its well-developed and robust control [7. This system (one or two-speed) was the “conventional” concept used by many Danish manufacturers in the 1980s and 1990s [36].1 Fixed-Speed Wind Turbine For the fixed-speed wind turbine the induction generator is directly connected to the electrical grid according to Fig. Variable-speed wind turbine with a synchronous/induction generator. 2.

the losses in the power electronic converter can be reduced. This is mainly due to the fact that the power electronic converter only has to handle a fraction (20–30%) of the total power [36. 2. 2. Therefore. Variable-speed direct-driven (gear-less) wind turbine with a synchronous generator (SG). 105]. see Fig.6. Variable-speed wind turbine with a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG). In addition. see Chapter 3. erators for variable-speed wind turbines [36]. DeWind. consists of a wind turbine with doubly-fed induction generator. for example. that produce wind turbines with the doubly-fed induction machine as generator are.7. 29. 2. This means that the stator is directly connected to the grid while the rotor winding is connected via slip rings to a converter. compared to a system where the converter has to handle the total power. There exists a variant of the DFIG method that uses controllable external rotor resistances (compare to slip power recovery). 110].7. This system have recently become very popular as gen- Transformer Gearbox DFIG ≈ = = ≈ Power electronic converter Fig. Nordex.SG ≈ = = ≈ Transformer Power electronic converter Fig. and Vestas [19. GE Wind Energy. Manufacturers.3 Variable-Speed Wind Turbine with Doubly-Fed Induction Generator This system.2. the cost of the converter becomes lower. 73. 2. Some of the drawbacks of this method are that energy is unnecessary dissipated in the external rotor resistances and that it is not possible to control the reactive power. 12 .

The stator circuit of the DFIG is connected to the grid while the rotor circuit is connected to a converter via slip rings. as energy storage. 110].8.g. 2. that are connected “back-to-back. 2. the DFIG and also the power factor at the stator terminals. of the DFIG system with a back-to-back converter can be seen in Fig. machine-side converter and grid-side converter. This means that the losses in the power electronic converter can be reduced compared to a system where the converter has to handle the total power.2. As mentioned earlier the reason for this is that power electronic converter only has to handle a fraction (20–30%) of the total power [36.9. As also seen in the figure. while the main objective for the grid-side converter is to keep the dc-link voltage constant.9.10 [61]. see Fig.8.” Between the two converters a dc-link capacitor is placed. In addition. the DFIG can max operate both in motor and generator operation with a rotor-speed range of ±Δωr around the synchronous speed. DFIG system with a back-to-back converter. With the machine-side converter it is possible to control the torque or the speed of DFIG dc link ≈ = Machine-side converter = ≈ Grid-side converter Grid Fig.3 Doubly-Fed Induction Generator Systems for Wind Turbines For variable-speed systems with limited variable-speed range. Principle of the doubly-fed induction generator. e.. 2. the cost of the converter becomes lower. 13 . in order to keep the voltage variations (or ripple) in the dc-link voltage small. the DFIG can be an interesting solution [61]. 2. ω1 .e. The speed–torque characteristics of the DFIG system can be seen in Fig. i. 2. A more detailed picture Converter Fig. The back-to-back converter consists of two converters. ±30% of synchronous speed.

Equivalent circuit of the DFIG. in Fig. besides wind turbines. since they operate in a limited speed range of approximately ±30%.T Motor ωr ω1 Generator max 2Δωr Fig. pumped storage power plants [6.3.8) (2.11. A typical application. 43]. as mentioned earlier. 2.7) (2. In the case that the DFIG is Δ-connected the machine can still be represented by this equivalent Y representation. Vr . In this section the jω-method is adopted for calculations. that if the rotor voltage.11 yields [87] Vs = Rs Is + jω1 Lsλ Is + jω1 Lm (Is + Ir + IRm ) Vr Rr = Ir + jω1 Lrλ Ir + jω1 Lm (Is + Ir + IRm ) s s 0 = Rm IRm + jω1 Lm (Is + Ir + IRm ) 14 (2. Note. Applying Kirchhoff’s voltage law to the circuit in Fig. for example. 2. Speed–torque characteristics of a DFIG. Other applications.9) .1 Equivalent Circuit of the Doubly-Fed Induction Generator The equivalent circuit of the doubly-fed induction generator. for DFIG is wind turbines. 2.10. 2. Rs Is jω1 Lsλ jω1 Lrλ Ir Rr /s + Vr s − jω1 Lm Rm IRm the equivalent circuit for the DFIG becomes the ordinary equivalent circuit for a cage-bar induction machine. can be seen in Fig. flywheel energy storage system [4].11. with inclusion of the magnetizing losses. stand-alone diesel systems [78]. or rotating converters feeding a railway grid from a constant frequency public grid [61]. 2. This equivalent circuit is valid for one equivalent Y phase and for steady-state calculations. 2. is short circuited + Vs − Fig. for the DFIG systems are.11.

magnetizing inductance.u. magnetizing resistance.04 0. ω1 − ωr ω2 = ω1 ω1 (2. stator current..01 0.12) (2. The slip.9). rotor resistance.0 15 .01 0.2 2.14) (2.0 Medium Machine 100 kW 0.5 Large Machine 800 kW 0.10) where ωr is the rotor speed and ω2 is the slip frequency. stator leakage inductance. ω1 s slip.15) (2. as Te = 3np Im Ψm I∗ = 3np Im Ψr I∗ r r (2. stator frequency. Te . T YPICAL PARAMETERS OF THE I NDUCTION M ACHINE IN P.where the following notation is used.e. s. stator flux and rotor flux are defined as Ψm = Lm (Is + Ir + IRm ) Ψs = Lsλ Is + Lm (Is + Ir + IRm ) = Lsλ Is + Ψm Ψr = Lrλ Ir + Lm (Is + Ir + IRm ) = Lrλ Ir + Ψm the equations describing the equivalent circuit.7)–(2. can be rewritten as Vs = Rs Is + jω1 Ψs Rr Vr = Ir + jω1 Ψr s s 0 = Rm IRm + jω1 Ψm .11) (2. rotor leakage inductance. (2. Stator and rotor resistance Rs and Rr Leakage inductance Lsλ + Lrλ ≈ Lσ Magnetizing inductance Lm ≈ LM Small Machine 4 kW 0. The resistive losses of the induction generator are Ploss = 3 Rs |Is |2 + Rr |Ir |2 + Rm |IRm |2 and it is possible to express the electro-mechanical torque.3 3. [101]. Ir IRm magnetizing resistance current. Is rotor current.1. equals s= Rs Rr Rm Lsλ Lrλ Lm stator resistance. if the air-gap flux. Moreover.17) (2. U .). Vs stator voltage.1 shows some typical parameters of the induction machine in per unit (p.3 4. i.13) where np is the number of pole pairs.16) (2.. Table 2. TABLE 2.18) (2. Vr rotor voltage.

Moreover. using the expressions in the previous section. In the figure it can be seen how the mechanical power divides Pmech DFIG Converter sPmech /(1 − s) Fig. the rotor power is approximately minus the stator power times the slip: Pr ≈ −sPs .3.21) (2. given the mechanical power.19) (2.2 Power Flow In order to investigate the power flow of the DFIG system the apparent power that is fed to the DFIG via the stator and rotor circuit has to be determined. r 2 2 (2.12.2.24) 3ω1 sIm [Ψm I∗ ] r ≈ −3ω1 sIm [Ψm I∗ ] r where the approximations are because the resistive losses and the magnetizing losses have been neglected. Pmech /(1 − s) Pmech Grid between the stator and rotor circuits and that it is dependent on the slip. From the above equations the mechanical power produced by the DFIG can be determined as the sum of the stator and rotor power as Pmech = 3ω1 Im [Ψm I∗ ] − 3ω1 sIm [Ψm I∗ ] = 3ωr Im [Ψm I∗ ] . The stator apparent power Ss and rotor apparent power Sr can be found as Ss = 3Vs I∗ = 3Rs |Is |2 + j3ω1 Lsλ |Is |2 + j3ω1 Ψm I∗ s s Sr = 3Vr I∗ = 3Rr |Ir |2 + j3ω1 sLrλ |Ir |2 + j3ω1 sΨm I∗ r r which can be rewritten. Therefore.23) (2. as |Ψm |2 Ss = 3Rs |Is | + j3ω1 Lsλ |Is | + j3ω1 + 3Rm |IRm |2 − j3ω1 Ψm I∗ r Lm Sr = 3Rr |Ir |2 + j3ω1 sLrλ |Ir |2 + j3ω1 sΨm I∗ . 2.25) Then. by dividing Pmech with mechanical rotor speed. In Fig.20) (2. the produced electromechanical torque. r r r (2.18). as mentioned earlier. 2. as given in (2. can be found. 16 . Moreover. ωm = ωr /np .22) Now the stator and rotor power can be determined as Ps = Re [Ss ] = 3Rs |Is |2 + 3Rm |IRm |2 + 3ω1 Im [Ψm I∗ ] ≈ 3ω1 Im [Ψm I∗ ] r r Pr = Re [Sr ] = 3Rr |Ir | − 2 (2. the rotor converter can be rated as a fraction of the rated power of the DFIG if the maximum slip is low. An example of how the stator and rotor powers depend on the slip is shown in Table 2.12 the power flow of a “lossless” DFIG system can be seen. Power flow of a “lossless” DFIG system.2. It can be seen in the table that the power through the converter. this means that Ps ≈ Pmech /(1 − s) and Pr ≈ −sPmech /(1 − s).

the rotor voltage will approximately be rotor = s/(ns /nr )Vs = 0.TABLE 2. 75% of the stator voltage.] 0.13 the stator power is at maximum only 0. ns /nr .7 0 1. as seen in Fig. 2.3/0. slip. i. but the stator and rotor power of the DFIG system is also shown and instead of the rotor speed the slip is shown. In Fig. if the slip s of the DFIG is 30%. [%] rotor speed.13. 2. 2. Moreover.75Vs . rotor power (solid) and stator power (dashed) as a function of wind speed. 0 0.3 rotor power. 2. Typical characteristic for a variable speed DFIG wind turbine.43 · Pmech. Ps 1.4Vs = 0. s. for the wind turbine in Fig. For a wind turbine. stator power. E XAMPLE OF THE P OWER F LOW FOR D IFFERENT S LIPS OF THE DFIG SYSTEM . the average value of the rotor-speed range corresponds to synchronous speed of the DFIG.14 a transformer is placed between the rotor circuit and the converter. Note that VR 17 .u.43 · Pmech. However. ωr .3. the case is not as shown in Table 2. Pmech. if the stator-to-rotor turns ratio. For example. is 0.3 Stator-to-Rotor Turns Ratio Since the losses in the power electronic converter depend on the current through the valves.13.2. b) Mechanical power (dotted). [p.23 · Pmech.e. at low mechanical power the slip is positive and for high mechanical power the slip is negative.2. This is due to the factor 1/(1 − s) in the expressions for the rotor power. for a wind turbine.3 0. The figure is actually the same as Fig. is higher for positive slips (ωr < ω1 ). The transformer is to highlight and indicate the stator-to-rotor turns ratio.7 times the rated power.77 · Pmech.4. a) Slip as a function of wind speed. the rotor current is approximately 0. In the figure it is assumed that the gearbox ratio is set in such a way that a) 50 25 b) 100 80 Power [%] 5 10 15 20 25 Slip [%] 60 40 20 0 0 −25 −50 5 10 15 20 25 Wind speed [m/s] Wind speed [m/s] Fig. in general.. if the magnetizing current is neglected.3. which leaves VR rotor = (nr /ns )VR is the actual (physical) room for a dynamic control reserve.4 times smaller than the stator current.0 −0. Pr −0. Moreover. 2. 2. it is important to have a stator-to-rotor turns ratio of the DFIG that minimizes the rotor current without exceeding the maximum available rotor voltage. but it does not exist in reality.3 1. 0.

2.” In the figure two switches can be seen. This can be done by: 1.4 Lowering Magnetizing Losses In an ordinary induction machine drive the stator is fed by a converter. Still. 2. the DFIG can be controlled in a similar way as an ordinary cage-bar induction generator.DFIG Converter ns /nr Fig. referred to as the Y-Δ-connected DFIG.16 presents a set-up of the Y-Δ-connected DFIG. and accordingly the flux level is closely linked to the stator voltage.14. However. Y-Δ-connected DFIG Fig. As shown in the figure. while VR is rotor voltage referred to the stator circuit. all rotor variables and parameters are referred to the stator circuit if not otherwise stated. and transmitting all the turbine power through the converter. at low wind speeds the flux level in the generator can be lowered. two methods to lower the magnetizing losses of the DFIG. Before a 18 . short-circuiting the stator of the induction generator at low wind speeds. leading to a better efficiency. which means that the magnetizing losses are lowered. that in this operating condition. For instance. Switch S2 is used to disconnect the turbine from the grid and switch S1 is then used to short-circuit the stator of the DFIG. Stator-to-rotor turns ratio indicated with a “virtual” transformer. for the DFIG system there are. At low loads it is possible to reduce the flux level. The influence that these two methods have on the overall efficiency of a DFIG system will be further analyzed in Chapter 3. 2. A brief description of these two systems follows: “Short-Circuited DFIG” Fig. having the stator Δ-connected at high wind speeds and Y-connected at low wind speeds. This means.3. in the DFIG system the stator is connected to the grid. 2.15 shows a diagram of the “short-circuited DFIG. This set-up is referred to as the short-circuited DFIG. at least. a device for changing between Y and Δ connection has been inserted in the stator circuit. Now the turbine is operated as a cage-bar induction machine. which means that it is possible to reduce the losses in the machine by using an appropriate flux level. In this thesis. 2. rotor voltage. except that the converter is connected to the rotor circuit instead of the stator circuit.

16. 2. See Fig.5 Other Types of Doubly-Fed Machines In this section a short presentation of other kinds of doubly-fed machines is made: a cascaded doubly-fed induction machine. Principle of the “short-circuited DFIG.3.15. a single-frame cascaded doubly-fed induction machine. Cascaded Doubly-Fed Induction Machine The cascaded doubly-fed induction machine consists of two doubly-fed induction machines with wound rotors that are connected mechanically through the rotor and electrically through the rotor circuits. 2. 2.S1 Transformer DFIG S2 ≈ = Power electronic converter Fig.” = ≈ Transformer DFIG Y/Δ S1 ≈ = ≈ = Power electronic converter Fig. Principle of the Y-Δ-connected DFIG.17 for a principle diagram. change from Y to Δ connection (or vice versa) the power of the turbine is reduced to zero and the switch S1 disconnects the stator circuit from the grid. Then the stator circuit is connected in Δ (or vice versa) and the turbine is synchronized to the grid. a brushless doubly-fed induction machine. and a doubly-fed reluctance machine. The stator circuit of one of the machines is directly connected to the grid while the other machine’s stator is connected via a 19 . 2.

2. It is doubtful whether it is practical to combine two individual machines to form a cascaded doubly-fed induction machine. Principle of cascaded doubly-fed induction machine. see [106.Converter Fig. while the rotor is based on the principle of reluctance. To avoid a direct transformer coupling between the two-stator windings. it suffers from comparatively low efficiency [48]. 111]. it is possible to control the induction machine that is directly connected to the grid with the other induction machine. That is. they can not have the same number of pole pairs. to avoid unbalanced magnetic pull on the rotor the difference between the pole pairs must be greater than one [106]. one winding for the power and one winding for the control. in spite the 20 . Since the rotor voltages of both machines are equal. Due to a large amount of windings. The number of poles in the rotor must equal the sum of the number of poles in the two stator windings [106]. the losses are expected to be higher than for a standard doubly-fed induction machine of a comparable rating [48]. converter to the grid. For further information and more details. Although this machine is mechanically more robust than the cascaded doubly-fed induction machine. 2.18 for a principle sketch. 108. Furthermore. but with the two induction machines in one common frame. Brushless Doubly-Fed Induction Machine This is an induction machine with two stator windings in the same slot. Doubly-Fed Reluctance Machine The stator of the doubly-fed reluctance machine is identical to the brushless doubly-fed induction machine. An equivalent circuit with constant parameters can be obtained for the doubly-fed reluctance machine. See Fig. even though it is the basic configuration of doubly-fed induction machine arrangement. Single-Frame Cascaded Doubly-Fed Induction Machine The single-frame cascaded doubly-fed induction machine is a cascaded doubly-fed induction machine.17. It is possible to achieve decoupled control of active and reactive power of the cascaded doubly-fed induction machine in a manner similar to the doubly-fed induction machine [47].

fact that the machine is characterized by a pulsating air-gap flux.Converter Fig. 2. 21 . It has almost the same equivalent circuit as the standard doubly-fed induction generator [109].18. Principle of the brushless doubly-fed induction machine.

22 .

2) influence of the converter’s size on the energy production (i. In the figure it is seen that the fixed-speed system with only one generator has a lower input power at low wind speeds. as described in Section 2. Moreover.2. The following systems are included in this study: • FSIG 1 system — Fixed-speed system. the rated WT power used in this chapter is 2 MW. 3. generator losses and converter losses.1. smaller converter implies a smaller variable-speed range for the DFIG system) and finally 3) comparison of the DFIG system to other electrical systems. In order to make the comparison as fair as possible the base assumption used in this work is that the maximum (average) shaft torque of the wind turbine systems used should be the same. 3.1.3. as described in Section 2. with one generator.2. in order to compare the performance of the DFIG system. The other systems produce almost 23 . gearbox losses. • VSIG system — Variable-speed system with an induction generator and a full-power converter. the power losses of other systems with induction generators will also be presented.1.2.1 Determination of Power Losses Steady-state calculations are carried out in this section in order to determine the power losses of the DFIG system. 3. The following losses are taken into account: aerodynamic losses.e. Moreover. as described in Section 2. • DFIG system — Variable-speed system with a DFIG.1 Aerodynamic Losses Fig.1 shows the turbine power as a function of wind speed both for the fixed-speed and variable-speed systems.Chapter 3 Energy Efficiency of Wind Turbines The purpose of this chapter is to investigate the energy efficiency of the DFIG system and to relate this study to other types of WTs with various electrical systems.. This study focuses on 1) reducing the magnetizing losses of the DFIG system. as described in Section 2. • FSIG 2 system — Fixed-speed system.2. with two generators or a pole-pair changing mechanism.2.

The solid line corresponds to the variable-speed systems (VSIG and DFIG) and the two-speed system (FSIG 2).1) where η is the gear-mesh losses constant and ξ is a friction constant. has been used. for instance.3. for a 2-MW gearbox. According to [34]. the stator-to-rotor turns ratio for the DFIG is adjusted so that maximum rotor voltage is 75% of the rated grid voltage.02 and ξ = 0. The dotted line corresponds to a fixed-speed system (FSIG 1). i. This is done in order to have safety margin. 3.nom (3.1. [33].e. a wind gust. In order to avoid making the results dependent on the torque. is. In order to calculate the power in Fig.1.1.3 Induction Generator Losses In order to calculate the losses of the generator. 3. 3.2 Gearbox Losses One way to estimate the gearbox losses.e. For the DFIG system. the equivalent circuit of the induction generator. Ploss. identical results. 3.1.005 are reasonable. a so-called Cp (λ. a dynamic reserve to handle. the influence of the turbulence is ignored. derived using blade-element theory has been used used.1. speed and pitch control strategy.1. and anyway the settings used by the manufacturers are not in detail known by the authors. In Fig. as described in Section 2. Moreover. 24 ..GB = ηPlowspeed + ξPnom Ωr Ωr. Turbine power. 3.2 the gearbox losses are shown for the investigated systems. the same effect can also be obtained by using different rated voltages on the rotor and stator [81]. the constants η = 0. Observe that instead of using a varying turns ratio. that vary from turbine to turbine. β)-curve. with inclusion of magnetizing losses.GB . only the average wind speed is used in the calculations.. i. the voltage drop across the slip rings has been neglected.3. The power is given in percent of maximum shaft power. see Section 2. Ploss. The interested reader can find information of the influence of the turbulence on the energy production in [69].100 Turbine power [%] 80 60 40 20 0 5 10 15 20 25 Wind speed [m/s] Fig.

DFIG is solid. The losses are given in percent of maximum shaft power.5 1 0. given the same input power. 3.5 0 5 10 15 20 25 Wind speed [m/s] Fig. FSIG 1 and 2 (both one-speed and two-speed generators). Induction generator losses.5 1 FSIG 1 FSIG 2 0.3 2. The solid line corresponds to the variable-speed systems (VSIG and DFIG). It can also be noted that the losses of the DFIG are higher than those of the 3 2.3 the induction generator losses of the DFIG system are shown. dashed is the variable-speed system (VSIG) and dotted are the fixed-speed systems (FSIG 1 and 2). Gearbox losses. 3.5 VSIG 0 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Wind speed [m/s] Fig. The dotted lines correspond to fixed-speed systems.e. i.3. This implies that the shaft torque of the generators will be different for the two systems.5 FSIG 1 & 2 VSIG DFIG Generator losses [%] 2 1.. 3. The reason for this is that the flux level of the VSIG system has been optimized from an efficiency point of view while for the DFIG system the flux level is almost fixed to the stator voltage. VSIG for low wind speeds. The losses are given in percent of maximum shaft power. This means that for the VSIG system a lower flux level is 25 .2. In Fig. The reason that the generator losses are larger for high wind speeds for the VSIG system compared to the DFIG system is that the gearbox ratio is different between the two systems.5 Gearbox losses [%] 2 1.

i. and np = 3. 0. The transistor and the diode can be modeled as constant voltage drops. Rr = 0.4 Converter Losses In order to be able to feed the IG with a variable voltage and frequency source... see Fig.1.u.2) 2 2 rCE Irms mi 4rCE Irms mi cos(φ) √ +√ − 3 cos(φ)6π 45π 3 √ 2 VT 0 Irms 2 Irms VT 0 mi cos(φ) rT Irms √ − Pc.3) 2 2 rT Irms mi 4rT Irms mi cos(φ) √ −√ + 45π 3 3 cos(φ)6π 26 . 3. The conducting losses arise from the current through the transistors and diodes. respectively.4.u. are (with a third harmonic voltage injection) [2] √ 2 VCE0 Irms 2 Irms VCE0 mi cos(φ) rCE Irms √ + + Pc. T1 T2 T3 ⇔ VCE0 rCE VT 0 rT T4 T5 T6 ⇔ Fig.e. 3.. Converter scheme.04 p. The losses of the converter can be divided into switching losses and conducting losses. Lm = 3. For the diode the switching losses mainly consist of turn-off losses [103].u. for a transistor leg.7 p. reverse-recovery energy. Lrλ = 0. For the IGs used in this chapter operated at 690 V 50 Hz and with a rated current of 1900 A and 390 A.e. VCE0 and VT 0 .used for low wind speeds. the following parameters are used: 2-MW power: See Appendix B.. where each transistor.01 p.4-MW power: Rs = 0.T = π 2 6 (3.12 p. Simplified expressions of the transistor’s and diode’s conducting losses.g. The switching losses of the transistors are the turn-on and turn-off losses. i. the magnetizing losses are reduced. Lsλ = 0. T1 and T4). and a resistance in series. 3..04 p.4.. rCE and rT .. an equivalent circuit of the converter is drawn. A PWM circuit switches the transistors to on and off states.u. The turn-on and turn-off losses for the transistor and the reverse-recovery energy loss for a diode can be found from data sheets.4.D = + π 2 6 (3.. Rm = 192 p. 3. T1 to T6. The duty cycle of the transistor and the diode determines whether the transistor or a diode is conducting in a transistor leg (e.u. is equipped with a reverse diode.u. the IG can be connected to a pulse-width modulated (PWM) converter. In Fig.1.

0 mΩ 128 mJ 2400 A 1200 V 1. 90. In the equations above. Since.8 mΩ 1150 mJ 1. Nominal current IC. The switching frequency used in this thesis is 5 kHz.1 for actual values). C ONVERTER C HARACTERISTIC DATA (IGBT AND I NVERSE D IODE ). be written as √ 2 2 2 Irms + rIGBT Irms . for a given dc-link voltage. it is possible to determine a resistance. IC. have been introduced. rIGBT. This means that for a given dc-link voltage and switching frequency (which both are assumed in this thesis). mi is the modulation index. two voltage drops.6) Irms π IC.nom π where Eon and Eoff are the turn-on and turn-off energy losses.8 mΩ 171 mJ losses can. with the above-mentioned approximation.nom Operating dc-link voltage VCC VCEO Lead resistance (IGBT) rCE Turn-on and turn-off Eon + Eoff energy (IGBT) VT O Lead resistance (diode) rT Reverse recovery Err energy (diode) 500 A 1200 V 1. which are based on [89. as is assumed here [2]. and φ is the phase shift between the voltage and the current.0 V 0.T (3.1 V 1. Pc = Pc.0 V 1 mΩ 863 mJ 1.1 A /IC. Vsw.nom are practically constant for all the valves in Table 3. Hence. that is valid for a nominal current IC.nom and rT IC.nom also are practically constant and equal to each other. rIGBT = rCE ≈ rT and VIGBT = VCEO ≈ VT O .1 V 2.0 V 1. 91. By performing the above simplification the model of the IGBT and valve can be scaled to an arbitrary rating. the switching losses of the IGBT and diode can be modeled as a constant voltage drop that is independent of the current rating of the valves.T = (Eon + Eoff ) fsw ≈ Vsw. Using 27 . This is possible since the ratios (Eon + Eoff )/IC. for the transistor.nom = 2Irms max where Irms is the maximum RMS value of the current in the valve.0 V 3 mΩ 288 mJ 1.1 V 0.5 mΩ 86 mJ 1800 A 1200 V 1. for the values in this chapter. This implies that the switching losses from the transistor and the inverse diode can be expressed as √ √ 2 2 Irms 2 2 Ps. it is possible to reduce the loss model of the transistor and the diode to the same model. The conduction TABLE 3.4) The switching losses of the transistor can be considered to be proportional to the current.1 V 1.nom = 1 A.nom and Err /IC.D (3.nom .T + Pc.nom is the nominal current of the valve. the resistance of a specific valve can be determined from rIGBT = rIGBT.nom is chosen as IC.D = VIGBT π (3. where max IC.nom is the nominal current through the transistor. Moreover.D = Err fsw ≈ Vsw.D .6 mΩ 43 mJ 1200 A 1200 V 1.nom π √ √ 2 2 Irms 2 2 Ps. In this thesis.5) Irms π IC.T and Vsw.1. since the products rCE IC.1. Err is the reverse recovery energy for the diode and IC.1 A . Then. respectively. 92] (see Table 3.5 mΩ 575 mJ 1.where Irms is the root mean square (RMS) value of the (sinusoidal) current to the grid or the generator.

From the figure it can be noted that the DFIG system and the two-speed system (FSIG 2) has roughly the same total losses while the full-power converter system has higher total losses.GSC + Ploss. Irms .MSC .5 Total Losses The total losses (aerodynamic. assuming a switching frequency of 5 kHz and the resistance rIGBT.38 V.5.8) The total converter losses are now presented as a function of wind speed in Fig. gearbox) are presented in Fig. The losses are given in percent of maximum shaft power. 28 . Now. From the figure it can. be noted that the converter losses in the DFIG system are 3 2. 3. much lower compared to the full-power converter system. When determining Vsw. converter. the total losses from the three transistor legs of the converter become Ploss = 3(Pc + Ps.T √ 2 2 2 Irms + rIGBT Irms .converter = Ploss. For the MSC.the values given in Table 3.5 Converter losses [%] VSIG 2 1. and rIGBT.T .5 0 5 10 15 20 25 Wind speed [m/s] Fig.1 it is possible to determine the voltage drops Vsw. as expected. Thus it is now possible to calculate the losses of the back-to-back converter as Ploss. The reactive current can be freely chosen. the current through the valves.T + Ps.5 V and Vsw.D . 3. is the stator current for the VSIG system or the rotor current for the DFIG system. 3.T = 2. generator. + Vsw. adjusted with the ratio between machine-side voltage and the grid voltage. Converter losses.1.5. DFIG is solid and VSIG is dashed.5 1 DFIG 0. 3. (3.76 Ω.1 A the average values of all of the valves in Table 3. Vsw.1 A = 1.D = 0.D ) π (3.D ) = 3 (VIGBT + Vsw.6.1 has been used.7) The back-to-back converter can be seen as two converters which are connected together: the machine-side converter (MSC) and the grid-side converter (GSC). One way of calculating Irms for the GSC is by using the active current that is produced by the machine.

3.6. the power loss as a function of transmitted power (or wind speed) was determined. the most important quantity is the energy delivered to the grid (electric energy capture). FSIG 1 and 2 is dotted and VSIG is dashed. 3. for low wind speeds.7 illustrates the impact of having a smaller converter and thus a smaller rotor-speed range. Given a probability density functions. 3. 3. In order to do this. in this section the results in the previous section have been used to determine the energy capture (or energy efficiency) of the various systems. f (w). However.. the aerodynamic losses become higher.8 the converter losses are presented for different designs of the rotor-speed range. This means that the smaller the converter is. As mentioned earlier one commonly used probability density functions to describe the wind speed is the Rayleigh function [53]. 3. the distribution of wind speeds must be known. i. can be found as Pavg = 0 ∞ P (w)f (w)dw (3. The losses are given in percent of maximum shaft power. In Fig. Total losses. it is not possible to obtain a full speed range with the DFIG system if the converter is smaller than the rated power of the turbine. It can be seen in the figure that the converter losses are lower for smaller rotor-speed ranges (or smaller converter ratings).e. the more the WT will operate at a non-ideal tip-speed ratio.9) where w is the wind speed.. Note. the average (or expected) value of the power. a smaller rotor-speed range implies smaller ratings of the converter. as mentioned earlier.2 Energy Production of the DFIG System In the previous section. λ.2.e. P (w).8 7 VSIG Total losses [%] 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 5 10 15 20 25 FSIG 1 & 2 DFIG Wind speed [m/s] Fig. i. that the stator-to-rotor turns ratio has to be 29 . DFIG is solid. for the wind-turbine application. Fig. Accordingly.1 Investigation of the Influence of the Converter’s Size on the Energy Production As was mentioned earlier.

4 0. that the rotor-speed range is of greater importance for a low average wind-speed compared to a high average wind speed. as expected. 3. it is possible to run at optimal tip-speed ratio in the whole variable-speed area.26 20 22 Turbine power [%] 4 6 8 10 Rotor speed [rpm] 15 18 10 14 5 10 0 4 6 8 10 Wind speed [m/s] Wind speed [m/s] Fig. It can be seen in the figure that the gain in energy increases with the rotor-speed range (converter size). designed according to desired variable-speed range in order to minimize the converter losses. Rotor speed and the corresponding turbine power. even though the converter losses of the DFIG system increase with the rotor-speed range (converter size). However. 3.8.1 0 5 10 15 20 15-25 rpm 18-25 rpm 21-25 rpm 25 Average wind speed [m/s] Fig. 0. It can be seen in the figure.8 12-25 rpm 0. The increased aerodynamic capture has thus a larger impact than the increased converter losses. In Fig.7. 3.6 0. 3.2 0. the most interesting information is the total energy efficiency.3 0.5 0.8. as shown in Fig. 30 .7 Converter losses [%] 0. Converter losses for some different rotor-speed ranges as a function of the wind speed.9 the energy efficiency of the DFIG for different rotor-speed ranges (or converter sizes) can be seen. If the rotor-speed range is set to 12–25.

4 there are at least two ways of lowering the magnetizing losses. 2. this can be done by: 1. referred to as the Y-Δ-connected DFIG. The systems are the DFIG system.2. the full variable-speed 31 .4 m/s (solid).11 the produced grid power together with the various loss components for an average wind speed of 6 m/s are presented for the various systems. and the other variants will not be subjected to any further studies. It can be seen in the figure that the Y-Δ-connected DFIG system produces approximately 0. 3. i. Note that the aerodynamic efficiency is also taken into account. 6. Efficiency.3 Comparison to Other Wind Turbine Systems The base assumption made here is that all wind turbine systems have the same average maximum shaft torque as well as the same mean upper rotor speed.8 m/s (dashed) and 8.9.2 Reduction of Magnetizing Losses As presented in Section 2. 3. The break-even point of the total losses or the rated values of the equipment determines the switch-over point for the doubly-fed generators. short-circuiting the stator of the induction generator at low wind speeds. 3. of the DFIG system as a function of the rotor-speed range.e.96 94 Efficiency [%] 92 90 88 86 24−25 20−25 16−25 12−25 Rotor-speed range [rpm] Fig. This set-up is referred to as the short-circuited DFIG.. i. 3. for average wind speeds of 5.3. In Fig. 3. having the stator Δ-connected at high wind speeds and Y-connected at low wind speeds.. Since the Y-Δ-connected DFIG system performs better than the short-circuited DFIG system the Y-Δ-connected DFIG system will henceforth be referred to as the DFIG system. the Y-Δ coupling or the synchronization of the stator voltage to the grid. at least for low average wind speeds.2 m/s (dotted). and transmitting all the turbine power through the converter.10 the energy gain using the two methods are presented.e. In Fig.2 percentage units more energy than the short-circuited DFIG system.

The produced average grid power and generator.10. a variablespeed system equipped with a permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG). aerodynamic efficiency.2 Gain in energy [%] 1 0. with respect to the rotor speed.1.6 0. a transistor rectifier has the potential to utilize the generator best [32]. which may give a possibility to reduce the converter losses [32]. The average efficiency for the PMSG is taken from [34]. 32 . It would also be possible to have the PMSG connected to a diode rectifier with series or shunt compensating capacitors. The converter losses of the PMSG system are assumed equal to that of the VSIG system. Gain in energy production by lowering the magnetizing losses for a DFIG system as a function of the average wind speed. 100% correspond to the input turbine power at optimal.11. system (VSIG). However. 3.2 0 5 6 7 8 9 10 Average wind speed [m/s] Fig.8 0.4 0. In the figure it can be seen that the one-speed system 100 Average power [%] 95 90 85 Gearbox losses Generator losses Converter losses Grid power FSIG 1 FSIG 2 VSIG PMSG DFIG 80 Fig. one-speed system (FSIG 1).4 1. and. 3. Solid line is the Y-Δ-connected DFIG and dashed line is short-circuited DFIG. two-speed system (FSIG 2). converter and gearbox losses for an average wind speed of 6 m/s.

that the base assumptions differ. it was found in this investigation that there is a possibility to gain a few percentage units (approximately 2%) in energy using the DFIG system compared to the full variable-speed system. 3. However. PMSG and the DFIG system as a function of the average wind speed. VSIG. and the PMSG system have almost the same efficiency. However. 96 94 Produced energy [%] 92 90 88 86 84 5 6 7 8 9 10 PMSG FSIG 2 FSIG 1 VSIG DFIG Average wind speed [m/s] Fig.4 Discussion In Fig. 3. 3. the boost converter on the dc-link. for various average wind speeds. Reference [16] sets the rating of the stator windings equal while we choose the shaft power and maximum speed instead. transistor converter towards the grid and the magnetizing system of the generator are in the same range as the PMSG system. Further.12. the DFIG is operated with a rotor-speed range set to 12–25 rpm. However. PMSG and DFIG). This can be compared to a gain of 20% for the DFIG system compared to the variable-speed system reported in [16].(FSIG 1) has the disadvantage of poor aerodynamic efficiency. in this study the produced energy of the systems was found to be similar. the DFIG system. The reason for the difference is again. with the two-speed system (FSIG 2) the aerodynamic efficiency is improved and close to the variable speed systems (VSIG. 3. In [16] it was found that the DFIG system produced 60% more energy compared to a fixed-speed system. 33 . it is reasonable to assume that the losses in the diode rectifier connected to the stator. In the figure.12 it can be seen that the two-generator system (FSIG 2). a lower fixed-speed IG WT efficiency was reported than in this study. The difference between the result here and in [16] is due to the different base assumptions used.12 the produced energy of the different systems. The reason for this is that the IG in this study has two generators and lower iron losses. FSIG 2. In Fig. In [35]. Detailed information of the gearless electrically magnetized generator system was not available. are presented. Energy efficiency of the FSIG 1.

two methods to reduce the magnetizing losses (and thereby increase the gain in energy) of the DFIG system. it has been found that there is a possibility to gain a few percentage units in energy efficiency for a doubly-fed induction generator system compared to a cage-bar induction generator. So. only the average wind speed has been used and the influence of turbulence has not been treated. among other factors. the turbulence intensity. aerodynamics must be accounted for when fixed-speed and variable-speed turbines are compared. Also. controlled by a full-power converter. the aerodynamic capture of the wind turbine is reduced with a smaller rotor-speed range. However. Reference [69] showed that a two-speed active stall turbine and a variable-speed pitch turbine is fairly unaffected by the turbulence intensity for turbulence intensities up to 15%. Worth stressing is that the main reason for using a variable-speed turbine instead of a fixed-speed turbine is not the energy efficiency. thus. In comparison to a direct-driven permanent-magnet synchronous generator. For the more unusual turbulence intensities of 20–25% the variable-speed turbines gained a couple of percentage units in energy production compared to the two-speed active stall-regulated system. the time delay between generator switchings for the fixed-speed systems. Finally. instead it is the possibility of lowering the mechanical stresses [53] and also improving the power quality [58]. Moreover. the ambition has instead been to make the comparison as clean as possible. This means that the increased aerodynamic capture that can be achieved by a larger converter has. it was found that the converter losses of the DFIG can be reduced if the available rotor-speed range is made smaller. using only the facts that can be presented clearly and with best certainty. Another problem when incorporating the effect of the turbulence intensity is that the selection of torque. start and stop. in order to perform a detailed energy capture calculation. regardless of value plays an unimportant role since the torque and speed control of the turbines are in principle the same.The focus in this chapter is on the electrical energy efficiency of the DFIG-system in relation to other systems.5 Conclusion In this chapter. However. a greater impact than the increased converter losses. 3. 34 . have been investigated. In order to reduce the number of uncertainties. Of great importance to point out is that when comparing the DFIG system to the full variable system. speed and pitch control influences the result. (The rotor-speed range of the DFIG system is assumed to be almost the same as for the full-variable speed system). in order not to include uncertainties that might not be the best chosen. controlled by a converter or a two-speed generator system the difference in energy efficiency was found to be small. It was found that the method utilizing a Y-Δ switch in the stator circuit had the largest gain in energy of the two investigated methods. Δ-Y-reconnections for the DFIG-systems must be known.

1 Space Vectors The idea behind space vectors is to describe the induction machine with two phases instead of three. forms a rotating flux in the air gap. which is supplied with three-phase currents.1 Introduction In this section.1: Principle of space vectors.1. 4. space vector. A three-phase stator winding. different aspects of designing and implementing control systems for doublyfed induction generators (DFIGs) are treated. 4. 4.1) . The same rotating flux could also be formed with only two phases. as seen in Fig. of the three-phase quantities. sb . sa . In order to determine the Im ψ Im ψ Re ⇐⇒ Re Fig.1. the following transformation is applied [39] ss = sα + jsβ = 2K sa + asb + a2 sc 3 35 (4. This is the principle of space vectors. Space vectors were originally invented to describe the spatial flux of an ac machine [39]. ss .Chapter 4 Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generator System 4. and sc .

1.e.. 4. i. A general space vector can be expressed as ss = sej(θ1 +φ) (4. as the corresponding imaginary part of the above equation [5]: Q = 3Im [vi∗ ] . ω1 .. The constant K can be chosen arbitrary.where K is the space-vector scaling constant and a = ej2π/3 .1.2) 2 the space vector will be scaled according to the RMS value of the three-phase quantities. (4.4) The synchronous coordinate system is not indicated by a superscript.8) (4. e. the grid voltage. This choice of K will be used throughout this thesis.g.e. for example. Superscript “s” indicates that the space vectors are referred to the reference frame of the stator of the induction machine. though if it is chosen as 1 K=√ (4.7) 4. However.2 Power and Reactive Power in Terms of Space Vectors The instantaneous power. and its corresponding angle.9) . 2 2 2K 2K √ The above-mentioned scaling. normally the stator or rotor flux of an induction machine. the same as active power in terms of phasors.3) where φ is a phase shift and θ1 is the synchronous angle corresponding to the synchronous frequency. The PLL-type estimator used in this thesis is described by [37] dˆ 1 ω = γ1 ε dt ˆ dθ1 = ω1 + γ2 ε ˆ dt 36 (4. Q. θ1 . i. yields P = 3Re [vi∗ ] . ω1 . K = 1/ 2. the synchronous frequency. (4.5) (4. It is also possible to define a quantity the instantaneous reactive power.3 Phase-Locked Loop (PLL)-Type Estimator A PLL-type estimator can be used for estimation of the angle and frequency of a signal.6) In (4. Space vectors in synchronous coordinates will be dc quantities in the steady state. (4. in a three-phase system is given by 3 3 P = v a ia + v b ib + v c ic = Re [vs (is )∗ ] = Re [vi∗ ] .6) the instantaneous power is the real part of voltage times the complex conjugate of the current. as dω1 /dt = θ1 . P . It is possible to transform the vector to synchronous coordinates (dq coordinates) as s = sd + jsq = e−jθ1 ss = sejφ . The synchronous coordinate system has to be aligned with a quantity. it is also possible to align the synchronous coordinate system with.

The notation “ˆ” indicates an estimated variable or parameter.1. asymptotically. 44.9). ˆ G(p) and a process model.11) (4. This implies that ω1 and θ1 will converge to ω1 and θ1 ˆ1 is small.8)–(4. Controller design is then just a matter of choosing the “right” transfer function C(p).15) . If the true frequency and position are given by dω1 /dt = 0 and dθ1 /dt = ω1 .8). 4. it is possible to approximate respectively. If the parameters are chosen as γ1 = ρ 2 γ2 = 2ρ (4. such as the grid frequency. If the difference θ1 − θ ˆ ˆ sin(θ1 − θ1 ) ≈ θ1 − θ1 .2. the order of the denominator is equal to or greater than that of the numerator.4 Internal Model Control (IMC) Due to the simplicity of IMC for designing controllers. see Fig.14) (4. i. For small bandwidths the rejection is twice as good. IMC can.12) In [76] it is shown that the modified PLL-type estimator rejects better voltage harmonics than the PLL-type estimator in (4.9).ˆ ˆ where ε = sin(θ1 − θ1 ) and θ1 − θ1 is the error in the estimated angle.8)–(4. and the following characteristic polynomial of the system described by (4. Modified PLL-Type Estimator If the PLL-type estimator should synchronize to a constant (or at least close to constant) frequency. The idea behind IMC is to augment the error between the process. be used for designing current or speed control laws of any ac machine [40. then the modified PLL-type estimator becomes [76] ˆ dθ1 = ω1 = ωg + ρε. The closed-loop system will be ˆ Gcl (p) = G(p) 1 + C(p)[G(p) − G(p)] which simplifies to Gcl (p) = G(p)C(p) = 37 α p+α n −1 C(p) (4. G(p).e.10) then ρ can be adjusted to the desired bandwidth of the PLL-type estimator. by a transfer function C(p). 102].13) where n is chosen so that C(p) become proper. it is possible to simplify the PLL-type estimator in (4. 4. γ2 } > 0. In the above equations γ1 and γ2 are gain parameters. dt (4.. This is done by neglecting (4.8) and (4. this method will be used throughout this thesis.9) can be found: p 2 + γ2 p + γ1 where p = d/dt. for instance. then it is ˜ ˆ ˆ shown in [37] that the estimation error equations for ω1 = ω1 − ω1 and θ1 = θ1 − θ1 are ˜ ˆ ˆ asymptotically stable if {γ1 . One common way is [31] C(p) = α p+α n ˆ G−1 (p) (4.

1. The relationship between the bandwidth and the rise time (10%–90%) is α = ln 9/trise . the transfer function from the load disturbance E to output signal i is given by GEi (p) = G(p) p = G(p) 1 + G(p)F (p) p+α (4. as the dynamics of the process. 4. can improve the disturbance rejection.18) if all parameters are assumed to be known. (inside the dashed area in Fig. addition of an inner feed-back loop.20) GEi (p) = K (p + α)2 38 .17) 4. the transfer function in (4. −1 (p) + R p + α 1 + G(p)R p+αG (4. Then. (4. 4.2. ˆ when G(p) = G(p). Principle of IMC. However. the disturbance rejection is to a large extent determined by the process [76].18) is changed to GEi (p) = p G(p) p 1 = .16) For a first-order system. The controller then typically becomes an ordinary PI controller: F (p) = α ˆ −1 ki G (p) = kp + . see Fig. The controller.3.2) becomes ˆ F (p) = 1 − C(p)G(p) −1 C(p). G(p). is set to the desired bandwidth of the closed-loop system. p p (4. the load disturbance rejection should be sufficient.19) For a first-order system it is possible to choose R so that the above transfer function can be reduced to p (4. Therefore. F (p). The parameter α is a design parameter. which for n = 1. are normally much slower than the dynamics of the closed-loop system. n = 1 is sufficient. 4.iref + − C(p) v G(p) ˆ G(p) − + i F (p) Fig. If the dynamics of G(p) are fast.5 “Active Damping” For a first-order system designed with IMC.

the following PI controller can be found: F (p) = R + Ra α −1 G (p) = αL + α . Principle of “active damping.24) Then. L (p + α)2 (4.iref + − F (p) v + − v + E(p) + G(p) i R Fig. −1 (p) + R p+αG a p .” “Active damping” has been used for the cage-bar induction machine to damp disturbances.21) where i is the state (current).3.22) which has the following transfer function G(p) = (4.26) This means that the disturbance is damped with the same time constant as the dynamics of the control loop. 39 . = v (p) Lp + R + Ra (4. p p (4. where the term Ra i is the “active damping” term. and e is a load disturbance (back emf). consider the following first-order system (e. v is the input signal (applied voltage).23) By using IMC. This will be refereed to as “active damping” or “active resistance. the transfer function from the load disturbance e to the output i can be determined as Gei (p) = p 1 .19). For example. 41]. 4. This means that a load disturbance E is damped with the same time constant as the control loop.” where K is a constant. the transfer function is reduced to Gei (p) = (4. such as varying back EMF [18. a dc machine) L di = v − Ri + e dt (4. from (4. Then the “active damping” can be introduced by letting v = v − Ra i. the system can be rewritten as L di = v − (R + Ra )i + e dt i(p) 1 ..25) By choosing Ra = αL − R.g. Then.

28) (4. so called integrator wind-up. when implementing control laws in computers. For a linear time-invariant discrete system the corresponding stability region is inside the unit circle [88]. This might cause overshoots in the controlled variable since the integration part of control law will keep the ideal control signal high even when the controlled variable is getting closer to the reference value [39]. does not exceed the maximum value.1.4.. The algorithm can be described as [39] u = kp e + ki I usat = sat(u) dI usat − u =e+ dt kp where e is the control error and I is the integral of the control error.7 Discretization Throughout the thesis. i.. Therefore.30) where n indicates the sample number.29) 4. This causes the integral part of the PI controller to accumulate the control error during the saturation. Mapping the unit circle 40 . The idea behind the back-calculation method is to modify the reference value in case of saturation. Stability of a linear time-invariant continuous system requires that the poles are in the left half plane. they have to be discretized.27) (4. the control signal must be limited (saturated). (4. However. The forward Euler discretization can also be written as p −→ q−1 Tsample (4. the control signal cannot be arbitrary large due to design limitations of the converter or the machine.e.6 Saturation and Integration Anti-Windup When designing control laws.e. For a continuous system given as x(t) = Ax(t) + Bu(t) ˙ y(t) = Cx(t) the discrete equivalent using the forward Euler method becomes x(n + 1) = (I + ATsample )x(n) + Tsample Bu(n) y(n) = Cx(n). One method to avoid integration wind-up is to use the “back-calculation” method [39]. differential equations and control laws will be described in continuous time.34) (4. u. so that the ideal control signal. a derivative is approximated as x(n + 1) − x(n) dx ≈ dt Tsample (4.35) (4.31) (4. at time t = nTsample .32) where q is the forward shift operator. The forward Euler method will be used.33) (4.1. |u| = umax . i.

the system consists of a DFIG and a back-to-back voltage source converter with a dc link.1 Machine Model Due to its simplicity for deriving control laws for the DFIG. As mentioned earlier. in this thesis the L-grid filter will be used. The name is due to the formation of a “Γ” of the inductances.6.2. a grid filter is placed in between the GSC and the grid. Fig. 4. the rotor and the stator leakage inductance have the same effect. that from a dynamic point of view. the Γ representation of the IG model will be used.5 an equivalent circuit of the DFIG system can be seen. 0) in order for the forward Euler discretization to be stable. as shown in Fig. see Fig. in (4. since both the grid and the voltage source converter are voltage stiff and to reduce the harmonics caused by the converter.5. 4. In addition. becomes stable. As seen in the figure the poles must be inside a circle with the radius of 1/Tsample with the center point located at (−1/Tsample . The back-to-back converter consists of a grid-side converter (GSC) and a machine-side converter (MSC). it is possible to use a different representation of the Park model in which the leakage inductance is placed in the rotor circuit. the so-called Γ representation of the induction machine [94]. More detailed description of the models of the components of the DFIG system will be performed in the following sections. 4.4: Region of stability. the variables and the parameters in Fig.4 shows where the poles of continuous system must be located so that the forward Euler discretization. 4. 4.35) gives the region in the p plane where the poles of the continuous system must be located in order to get a stable discretization [38]. 4. This model is described by the following space-vector 41 . However. onto the continuous p plane using (4. Note.5 will also be explained. Therefore.35). For voltage source converters the grid filter used is mainly an L-filter or an LCL-filter [62]. 4.2 Mathematical Models of the DFIG System In Fig. 4. Moreover.Im p plane 1/Tsample Re Fig.

39) . equations in stator coordinates [94]: dΨs s = + dt dΨs R s s vR = RR iR + − jωr Ψs R dt s vs Rs is s (4. Equivalent circuit of the DFIG system.5. The model can also be described in synchronous coordinates as dΨs + jω1 Ψs dt dΨR vR = RR iR + + jω2 ΨR dt vs = Rs is + where the following notation is used: 42 (4.36) (4.37) where superscript s indicates stator coordinates. Γ representation of the IG in stator coordinates.DFIG is g + Es g − is f is s + s vs Rs LM Lσ RR jωr Ψs R is R + s vR MSC ≈ = − Rf Lf + s vf − + Cdc = GSC vdc − dc-link ≈ − Grid filter Fig. 4. Superscript “s” indicates that the space vectors are referred to the reference frame of the stator of the DFIG.6. 4.38) (4. + s vs is s Rs Lσ RR jωr Ψs R + − iR s + s vR LM − − Fig.

ω2 slip frequency. Lσ is the leakage inductance.2. and vf is the grid-filter voltage supplied from the grid-side converter. stator current. Finally. and electromechanical torque are given by Ψs = LM (is + iR ) ΨR = (LM + Lσ )iR + LM is = Ψs + Lσ iR Te = 3np Im Ψs i∗ R (4. Ψs stator flux. The stator flux. ω1 synchronous frequency. 4. rotor flux.44) where Eg is the grid voltage. if is the grid-filter current.42) where LM is the magnetizing inductance.vs stator voltage. vR rotor voltage.43) where J is the inertia and Ts is the shaft torque. Applying Kirchhoffs voltage law to the Rf Lf is f + Es g − + s vf − Fig. Rs stator resistance.2 Grid-Filter Model In Fig. circuit in the figure the following model in synchronous coordinates can be found: Eg = − (Rf + jω1 Lf ) if − Lf dif + vf dt (4. The quantities and parameters of the Γ model relate to the Park model (or the T representation) as follows: vR = γvR RR = γ 2 Rr iR = ir ΨR = γΨr γ Lσ = γLsλ + γ 2 Lrλ γ= LM Lsλ + Lm Lm = γLm .40) (4. ΨR rotor flux. the mechanical dynamics of the induction machine are described by J dωr = Te − Ts np dt (4. 4. 4. The filter consists of an inductance Lf and its resistance Rf .7 the equivalent circuit of the grid filter in stator coordinates can be seen. 43 . and np is the number of pole pairs. iR rotor current. Grid-filter model in stator coordinates.7.41) (4. is RR rotor resistance.

Moreover. 4.u. dt 2 dt This means that the dc-link voltage will vary as Cdc vdc dvdc = −Pf − Pr dt (4. (4.8.8 an equivalent circuit of the dc-link model.3 DC-Link Model The energy. if the switching frequency of the converter is ω = 100 p. 4. GSC + vdc − Pf ≈ = considered small and thereby be neglected.u. and Lf = 0.2 p. is given by 1 2 Wdc = Cdc vdc 2 (4.. DC-link model. Cdc . can be seen. then the gain of the grid filter is |Gf (j100)| ≈ 0. Wdc . (corresponding to a damping of 26 dB) if Rf can be neglected. Gf (p) = s = vf (p) Lf p + Rf This means that the damping of the grid filter is given by |Gf (jω)| = 1 2 L2 ω 2 + Rf f (4. In Fig. where the definition of the power flow through the grid-side converter (GSC) and the machineside converter (MSC. Pr .2.05 p. and the power delivered to the rotor circuit of the DFIG.Harmonics The transfer function. stored in the dc-link capacitor. 44 .49) (4. the energy in the dc-link capacitor is dependent on the power delivered to the grid filter. the gain can be approximated as |Gf (jω)| ≈ 1/(Lf ω).47) where vdc is the dc-link voltage. as [76] dWdc d 2 1 = Cdc vdc = −Pf − Pr .48) which means that Pf = −Pr for a constant dc-link voltage.46) If Lf ω Rf . 4. Pf . of the grid filter can be expressed as is (p) 1 f .u.45) . Gf (p). if the losses in the actual converter can be MSC ≈ Cdc = Pr Fig. For example.

i.55) (4. 99]. pure stator-voltage orientation can be done without any significant error.50) that the stator voltage. (4. According to [17].3 Field Orientation In order to control the rotor current of a DFIG by means of vector control. If the stator resistance is considered to be small. 68].53) (4. the reference frame has to be aligned with a flux linkage.2.57) (4. 61. presented in Fig. 61.e.50) (4. As illustrated by the figure there is only a small angular difference between the grid-voltage and stator-flux space vectors in the stator-flux reference frame compared to the grid-flux reference frame.52) (4. the machine is aligned with a virtual grid flux. from now on.9 shows an example of the space vectors of the grid voltage and the stator flux.1 Stator-Flux Orientation For a stator-flux-oriented system the synchronous angle θ1 is defined as θ1 = ∠Ψs s 45 (4.51) (4. Note that in this thesis stator-voltage orientation will be.56) (4. 4. 110].60) .54) Note that in (4.3. 4. vs . referred to as grid-flux orientation [21]..4. 80.59) = Eg − Rs is − jω1 Ψs = vR − RR iR − jω2 ΨR = vf − (Rf + jω1 Lf ) if − Eg = −Pf − Pr = Te − Ts (4. or with air-gap-flux orientation [107. 4.5 can now be summarized in synchronous coordinate.4 Summary The total model of the DFIG system. Fig. One common way is to control the rotor currents with stator-flux orientation [46.58) (4. as dΨs dt dΨR dt dif Lf dt dvdc Cdc vdc dt J dωr np dt where Ψs = LM (is + iR ) ΨR = Lσ iR + LM (is + iR ) Te = 3np Im Ψs i∗ R Pr = 3Re [vR i∗ ] R Pf = 3Re vf i∗ f . Eg . stator-flux orientation gives orientation also with the stator voltage [17. 4. has been changed to the grid voltage.

i.. is θ1 = ∠Ψs = ∠ − jEs = θg − g g π . ˆ i. 2 (4. and the grid voltage angle. the space vector of the flux is real valued.64) where Eg is the grid voltage magnitude. that Eg = jEg . rotor current and the rotor position are measured. 4.e. ψs is the stator flux magnitude. since then vs = Eg = Rs is + dΨs + jω1 Ψs ≈ jω1 Ψs dt 46 (4. θ1 . This means that for perfect field orientation.63) Then.e. Note that the grid-flux orientation is equal to the stator-flux orientation in the steady state. ˆ θ1 = θ1 . that Ψs = ψs .2 Grid-Flux Orientation The basic idea behind grid-flux orientation is to define a virtual grid flux. Since ωg is close to constant. i. Ψs . b) Grid-flux orientation. if the stator current.3. i. the virtual grid flux is linked to the grid voltage. and θ1 = θ1 − θ1 is the error between the synchronous angle and its estimate. the grid voltage can be transformed to synchronous coordinates as Eg = Es e−j θ1 = jEg ej θ1 g ˆ ˜ (4. for a grid-flux oriented (or stator-voltage oriented) system.9.q Eg q Eg Ψs d b) Ψg d Ψs a) Fig.62) where ωg is the frequency of the grid voltage and θg is the corresponding angle.65) . Then the stator flux can be transformed to s synchronous coordinates as Ψs = Ψs e−j θ1 = ψs ej θ1 s ˆ ˜ (4.. Space-vector diagram of grid voltage and stator flux. the stator flux can be calculated and thus the transformation angle can be found. the space vector of the grid voltage is imaginary. 4.. This means that for perfect field orientation.e. θ1 = θ1 . where Ψs is the stator flux in stator coordinates. if the stator resistance can be neglected. Moreover.61) ˆ ˜ ˆ where θ1 is the estimate of θ1 . as [21. a) Stator-flux orientation. This means that the relationship between the synchronous angle. 76] g Ψs = g Es jEg ejθg g =− jωg ωg (4.e. θg .

which yields dΨs Rs + jω1 Ψs + dt LM diR dΨs vR = (RR + jω2 Lσ )iR + Lσ + + jω2 Ψs dt dt diR = (RR + Rs + jω2 Lσ )iR + Lσ +E dt Rs + jωr Ψs E = vs − LM vs = −Rs iR + (4.4 Control of Machine-Side Converter The main task of the machine-side converter is. 80]. ˆ ˆ (4. ˆ an estimate of the whole back EMF. (4.3. it is common to control the rotor current with either stator-flux orientation or grid-flux orientation. it is possible to include a feed-forward compensating term in the control law that will compensate for the tracking error caused by variations in the back EMF.4. Further. Here.” Ra . In [46. for instance. for example. it is advantageous to eliminate is and ΨR from (4. can be used to track the grid frequency and its corresponding angle.66) (4. 80] this is done by feed forward of the term jω2 Ψs and neglecting the derivative of the flux in (4. has been introduced.1. However.67) (4. the reactive power at the stator terminals. 47 .39). in (4. 4.68) where E is the back EMF. an “active resistance. E.1 Current Control As mentioned earlier.67)—in the control law [17. as described in Section 4.38) and (4.67).and ω1 = ωg . of course.69) where “ˆ” indicates an estimated quantity. will be used: ˆ ˆ ˆ vR = vR + (j ω2 Lσ − Ra )iR + kE E = kp e + ki ˆ e dt + (j ω2 Lσ − Ra )iR + kE E. A coefficient kE is introduced in order to make the control law more general and to simplify the analysis in Chapter 5: kE = 0 for control without feed forward of E 1 for control with feed forward of E. In order to derive the rotor-current control law. 4. It is possible to decouple the cross coupling between the d and q components of the rotor current—jω2 Lσ iR in (4. The field orientation could. This is done by having an inner fast field-oriented current control loop that controls the rotor current. 61. The “active resistance” is used to increase the damping of disturbances and variations in the back EMF. either be aligned with the stator flux of the DFIG or the grid flux.69). For both reference frames the q component of the rotor current largely determines the produced torque while the d component can be used to control.70) Furthermore. The transformation angle for a grid-flux oriented system can be found directly from measurements of the stator voltage. to control the machine. in order to have some filtering effect a PLL-estimator.

the d and the q components of the rotor current will not be decoupled. kE = 0 in (4.. is ˆ put to zero in (4. p + αc (4. since it is an order of magnitude smaller than the term jω2 Ψs . 41].Similar approaches have been used for the squirrel-cage IG [18. the rotor current dynamics formed by the inner loop in Fig.10.69).67). it is treated as a disturbance to the rotor current dynamics.10 are now given by Lσ diR = vR − (RR + Rs + Ra )iR dt (4. 4.72) where αc is closed-loop bandwidth of the current dynamics.73) DFIG ˆ E E vR + +vR + − − iref+ R − kp + ki p G(p) iR ˆ ˆ Ra − j ω2 Lσ Fig. If the estimate of the slip frequency. ω2 .69).69) in (4. The transfer function from vR to iR is G(p) = 1 pLσ + RR + Rs + Ra which via (4. Block diagram of the current control system. since for a DSP-based digital controller it is easy to implement. 4. i. 48 . How to choose the “active resistance” will be shown in next section.e. here the d and q components of the rotor current will be decoupled.71) where the estimated parameters in the control law are assumed to have the correct values.17) yields the following controller parameters ˆ kp = αc Lσ ˆ ˆ ki = αc (RR + Rs + Ra ) (4. giving Gcl (p) = p . Nevertheless. If the back EMF is not compensated for. In [46] it is stated that the influence of the decoupling term jω2 Lσ iR is of minor importance. Substituting (4. The dashed box is the model for the doublyfed induction generator.

typiαc Lσ .u.75) −p kR = 0 (p + αc )(pLσ + RR + Rs ) GEi (p) = −p ⎪ ⎩ kR = 1 Lσ (p + αc )2 (4. Since Ra should be greater than zero. which can be considered as a low value since for modern drive.. the damping of low-frequency disturbances is significantly improved.74). It can be seen that when using “active resistance. is given as GEi (p) = −p/(p + αc ) pLσ + Lσ αc kR + (1 − kR )(Rr + Rs ) (4. E.10.70): kR = This yields 0 for control without “active resistance” 1 for control with “active resistance. A parameter kR is introduced in a fashion similar to (4. 49 . cf. with and without “active resistance”: Gr (ω) = |GEi (jω)|kR =1 = |GEi (jω)|kR =0 (RR + Rs )2 + ω 2 L2 σ .78) The following two extreme values of the above ratio are worth noting: ⎧ ⎨ RR + Rs when ω −→ 0 Gr (ω) = αc Lσ ⎩ 1 when ω −→ ∞ (4. a current control loop bandwidth of 7 p.min equals 0.11. Fig. Gr (ω). For the investigated system. In Fig. the transfer function from the back EMF. corresponding to a rise time of 1 ms at a base frequency of 50 Hz. 4. the minimum bandwidth of the current control loop when using “active resistance” becomes (4. RR +Rs of 7 p. iR .” the damping of low-frequency disturbances has been significantly improved.74) if all model parameters are assumed to be accurate. In order to investigate the performance of the “active resistance” with regards to damping of disturbances.u. is reasonable [40]. 4. we study the ratio between the moduli of the frequency function corresponding to (4. 2 (αc + ω 2 )L2 σ (4. since.u. to the current.76) This means that the above choice of Ra will force a change in the back EMF to be damped with the same bandwidth as the closed-loop current dynamics.77) αc.08 p.min = (RR + Rs )/Lσ . αc. is depicted for a current control loop bandwidth cally.” ⎧ ⎪ ⎨ (4.79) which shows that while the “active resistance” has little impact on high-frequency disturbances.Selection of the “Active Resistance” ˆ ˆ ˆ If the “active resistance” is set to Ra = kR (αc Lσ − RR − Rs ).

81) ˆ Instead of using the actual flux in (4. 4.4. i. as iref Rq Teref =− . 4.. Rq can be determined from the reference torque.42) as Te = 3np Im Ψs i∗ ≈ −3np ψs iRq . Since it is difficult to measure the torque.u.81). iRq .80) For a stator-flux-oriented system the above approximation is actually an equality. The bandwidth of the current control loop is set to 7 p.12 shows a block diagram of the open-loop torque control scheme. the approximation ψs ≈ Eg. should be set much faster than the speed dynamics. with the bandwidth αc . Since the stator flux. is almost fixed to the stator voltage. ψs . of the back EMF.] Fig.4.e. 4.12: Block diagram of the open-loop torque control. the q component reference current.82) . Teref . it is most often controlled in an open-loop manner. Therefore. Teref − 1 ˆ 3np ψs iref Rq Fig.u. 4.2 Torque Control The electromechanical torque can be found from (4. R (4.0 Gr (ω) [dB] −50 −100 0 5 10 15 20 25 ω [p. ˆ 3np ψs (4. iref .3 Speed Control Since the current dynamics. 4. Ratio of the damping improvement when using “active resistance” as a function of the frequency. ω. the torque can be controlled by the q component of the rotor current. The mechanical dynamics are described by J dωr = Te − Ts np dt 50 (4.nom /ω1 can be used.11. the speed can be controlled in cascade with the current. Fig.

Fig. p ωr (p) = ˆ Ts J 2 p + (Ba + kp )p + ki np 51 (4.83) where an “active damping” term. Choosing the “Active Damping” The transfer function from the shaft torque. that can be used to improve the damping of disturbances. as described in Section 4. to the rotational speed can be described by. 4.13. 4.where Te is the electromechanical torque and Ts is the shaft torque. treating the shaft torque. ref (p) J Te p + Ba np (4. Ts . as mentioned earlier.87) . then becomes G(p) = 1 ωr (p) = . is introduced.84) (4.13 shows a block diagram of the speed control system. How to determine the “active damping” will be shown in the next section. Speed control loop. as Te = Teref where the reference torque is set to Teref = Teref − Ba ωr (4. Ts ref ωr + T ref F (p) e + − − Teref + − np Jp ωr Ba Fig. the following PI controller can be found: F (p) = ˆ ki Jαs Ba αs αs −1 + G (p) = kp + = p p np p (4. under the assumption that the current dynamics are much faster than the speed dynamics. an inner feedback loop [41].1. Ts . This is. Ba . The electromechanical torque can be expressed.85) Using IMC.13. The transfer function from Teref to ωr . 4.4.86) where αs is the desired closed-loop bandwidth of the speed-control loop and the notation “ˆ” indicates an estimated quantity. as a disturbance. see Fig.

. b) Rotor current (q component).87).u.14 shows a simulation of the speed control loop with rated driving torque.ˆ if the active damping term is chosen as Ba = αs J/np .25 p.u..] a) 1. is set to 0. After 4 s it is changed back to 1. This causes the rise time of the rotor speed to be longer than the ideal.] b) Time [s] Fig.4 p.u.u. 4.014 p. after 1 s it is changed to 0.4 p.u. since the maximum rotor current has been reached. it can be seen in the simulation that the speed reference step at 1 s forces limitation of the rotor current. Moreover. becomes ωr (p) p = J Ts (p + αs )2 np (4. Rotor Speed [p.14.89) .5 0 0 5 10 15 Rotor Current [p. after 13 s the driving torque is changed to 50% of its rated value.88) all parameters are assumed to be ideal.5 1 0. and the bandwidth of the speed control loop.4 Reactive Power Control The instantaneous apparent power at the stator terminals.u. (4.75 p.u.u. Simulation of the speed-control loop. 4.. a) Rotor speed.u. Initially the speed reference is set to 1. Finally. and after 7 s the reference is ramped down during 3 s to 1 p. Evaluation Fig.5 1 0.5 0 5 10 15 1. corresponds to 0.25 p. The bandwidth of the current control loop is set to 1. αs .4. can now be found as Ss = 3vs i∗ = 3 Rs is + s 52 dΨs + jω1 Ψs i∗ s dt (4. A bandwidth of 1.5 s. corresponds to a rise time of 5 ms and 0. Ss = Ps + jQs .u. In (4. The simulations shows that the speed-control loop behaves as expected. is damped with the same time constant as the bandwidth of the speed-control loop.e. change in the shaft torque.88) i. 4.014 p. Ts .

nom p (4. Closed-Loop Reactive Power Control Since the flux for a DFIG system can be considered as constant. the integration of the controller will compensate for the magnetizing current. since.96) Of course.93) it can be seen that if iref = Rd the DFIG is operated at unity power factor.93) (4. the expression in (4. However. ψs ≈ Eg. i. This means that IMC yields in an I controller.e. the controller reduces to FQ = − or as iref = − Rd αQ 3Eg. For a stator-flux-oriented system.91) For a grid-flux-oriented system. LM ψs ψ2 iRd + 2s LM LM − 3ω1 ψs iRq (4. in the above control law. i. From (4.Then the active and reactive power. GQiRd . ψsd = ψs and ψsq = 0.94) where αQ is the bandwidth of the reactive power control loop. the above is reduced to Ps = 3Rs |is |2 + 3ω1 ψs isq = 3Rs |iR |2 − 2 Qs = 3ω1 ψs isd = 3ω1 ψs ψs − iRd . as FQ = αQ −1 αQ 1 GQiRd = − ˆ p 3ω1 ψs p (4. neglecting the derivative of the stator flux.97) αQ 1 3Eg. Therefore. since ψs /LM is close to constant. can thus be written as Ps = 3Rs |is |2 + 3ω1 (ψsd isq − ψsq isd ) Qs = 3ω1 (ψsd isd + ψsq isq ) . still holds approximately since Rs can be considered as small.. in the steady ˆ state.nom /ω1 .nom Qref − Qs dt. it would be possible to add a feed-forward term in order to compensate for the magnetizing current. where the voltage is aligned with the q axis. 53 .92) (4. Moreover. s (4. ψs /LM .93). there will be a static relationship between the reactive power and the d component of the rotor current.e.95) ˆ ψs ˆ LM (4..92) and (4.90) (4. feed-forward compensation has not been considered for the reactive power control loop.

where the voltage drop across the stator resistance can not be neglected.98) ˆ ˆs and the estimate of the transformation angle. Taking the real part of the above equation and neglecting the flux dynamics yield ˜ vsd = Rs isd − ω1 ψs sin(θ1 ).100) ˜ ˆ where θ1 = θ1 − θ1 is the angular estimation error.1. 56] ˆs Ψs = s ˆ s (vs − Rs is )dt (4. it is possible to form an error signal suitable for the PLL-type estimator. s dt dt (4. and their corresponding angles. or the voltage drop across the stator resisˆ tance is negligible.3. the above equation can be rewritten in synchronous coordis nates as vs = Rs is + dψs j θ1 ˜ ˜ e + jω1 ψs ej θ1 dt (4. For a stator-flux-oriented control of the doubly-fed induction generator. θ1 .98) is an open-loop integration. must be estimated. so ω1 ψs ≈ vs . as ˆ ˆ vsd − Rs isd vsd − Rs isd ˆ ˜ ε = sin(θ1 − θ1 ) = sin(θ1 ) = − ≈− ω1 ψs vs (4. yields s s vs = Rs is + s ˆ ˆ dΨs dψs jθ1 s = Rs is + e + jω1 ψs ejθ1 . can then be found from θ1 = ∠Ψs .3.1. Since the estimator in (4. The purpose of this section is to give an overview of some different estimation techniques that are available in literature. described in Section 4.4.99) s If vs = vs ej θ1 and is = is ej θ1 . 54 . it has to be modified in order to gain stability. It is also possible to estimate the transformation angle in synchronous coordinates. This means that the stator frequency. and the slip frequency. Starting with the stator voltage equation in stator coordinates and taking into account that for a stator-flux-oriented system.5 Sensorless Operation “Sensorless” operation implies in this thesis that neither the rotor position nor the rotor speed is measured. it might be unnecessary to estimate ω1 .101) Now. This could be done by replacing the open-loop integration with a low-pass filter [39]. it is marginally stable. Estimation of Synchronous Frequency Angle For a system which is oriented with the grid flux.36) as [46. the angle θ1 can easily be found by using a PLL. ω2 . the stator flux can be estimated in stator coordinates using (4. θ1 and θ2 .4. Ψs = ψs ejθ1 . on the measured grid (stator) voltage. ω1 .102) where the approximation is due to the fact that the stator is directly connected to the grid. Thus. The notation “ ˆ ” is used for estimated variables and parameters. (4. see Section 4. Note that if no stator variables exist in the control law.

e. In [56] a stator-flux-oriented sensorless control using the rotor voltage circuit equation is proposed. and an outer slower control loop that controls the dc-link voltage. i. This means that the q component of the grid-filter current will control the active power delivered from the converter and the d component of the filter current will. The reference frame of the inner current control loop will be aligned with the grid flux. in synchronous coordinates. The control of the grid-side converter consists of a fast inner current control loop. which. The rotor voltage equation is given by dΨR vR = RR iR + (4.103) and since the stator flux is known. θ2 . the estimate of the slip angle. dt Neglecting the derivative of the flux. 68] it has been done in synchronous coordinates. This implies that the outer dc-link voltage control loop has to act on the q component of the grid-filter current. 55 . is given by Ψs = ψs = LM (is + iR ) (4. can be estimated from the imaginary part of the above equation as ˆ ˆ vRq − RR iRq vRq − RR iRq = . Starting with the stator flux. In the first method.Estimation of Slip-Frequency Angle In the literature there are at least two methods to perform sensorless operation. it is to a great extent determined by the stator voltage. as ˆ ˆ θ2 = ω2 dt. can be found from integration of the estimate of the slip frequency. ω2 .108) 4. (4. ˆ (4. R The second method is based on determining the slip frequency by the rotor circuit equation.5 Control of Grid-Side Converter The main objective of the grid-side converter is to control the dc-link voltage.107) ω2 = ˆ ˆ ψRd ψs + Lσ isd ˆ Then. a set of variables is estimated or measured in one reference frame and then the variables are used in another reference frame to estimate the slip angle θ2 . which controls the current through the grid filter. The magnitude of the stator flux can ˆ be estimated as ψs = vs /ω1 [46].105) θ2 = ∠ir − ∠ˆR . accordingly. the slip frequency. ω2 . if the rotor current is measured in rotor coordinates the estimate of the slip angle can be found as ˆ i (4. it is possible to use the above-mentioned equation to estimate the rotor current as follows: ˆ ˆR = ψs − is (4. control the reactive power.. see previous section for determination of this angle.104) i ˆ LM where the stator current has been measured and transformed with the transformation angle θ1 . In [15] the estimation of the rotor currents has been carried out in stator coordinates. The method will here be described in synchronous coordinates. Estimating the rotor currents from the flux and the stator currents can do this. while in [46. Then.106) + jω2 ΨR .

to the grid-filter current with ideal parameters then becomes p . (4.. Moreover. is chosen as ˆ vf = vf − (Raf − jω1 Lf )if . by using IMC a PI controller can be determined with the bandwidth αf . i.110) This means that the inner closed-loop transfer function. the applied grid-filter voltage. by assuming the current control loop to be fast. dt (4.1. reduced to the following linear system dW 1 Cdc = −Pf − Pr 2 dt (4. assuming ideal parameters.5. By ˆ ˆ choosing the active damping according to Section 4.e. and adding an “active damping” term as fq iref = ifref + Ga W fq q 56 (4.113) ˆ ˆ Raf = αf Lf − Rf . (4. the grid-filter current control law can now be written as vf = where ˆ kpf = αf Lf 2ˆ ˆ kif = αf (Rf + Raf ) = αf Lf kpf + kif p ˆ (iref − if ) − (Raf − jω1 Lf )if f (4. (4.4. The dc-link dynamics (4.48) are.109) In order to introduce “active damping” and decouple the d and the q components of the grid-filter current.e. the power delivered to the grid filter can be approximated as Pf ≈ 3Egq if q . the nonlinear dynamics of the dc link are transformed into an equivalent linear system where linear control 2 techniques can be applied [95].. if q = iref . If the power losses of the grid filter are small and the current control of the grid filter is aligned with the grid flux. One way of simplifying the control of the dc-link voltage is by utilizing feedback linearization.5. Pf is the power delivered to the grid filter and Pr is the power delivered to the rotor circuit of the DFIG.114) 4.44) the dynamics of the grid filter are described: Lf dif = vf − (Rf + jω1 Lf ) if − Eg .5. vf . i.111) and. This can be done by letting W = vdc [50. hence. the transfer function from grid voltage (“back emf”). as mentioned earlier.2 DC-Link Voltage Control The dc-link voltage control in this thesis is essentially following [76]. i. becomes G(p) = if (p) 1 = vf (p) Lf p + Rf + Raf (4. Eg . Raf = αf Lf − Rf .116) . 76..112) GEg if (p) = Lf (p + αf )2 Finally.115) where. thus.1 Current Control of Grid Filter In (4.e. 79].

ξ = 1.e. i.” it is possible to write the dc-link dynamics as 1 dW Cdc = −3Eg ifref − 3Eg Ga W − Pr . 57 . a disturbance. will be damped as GP W (p) = Cdc (p2 −2p 2 + 2αw ξp + αw ξ) (4. Eg .e.15. the following PI controller is obtained F (p) = ˆ αw −1 αw Cdc αw Ga − G (p) = − p 6Eg.120) ˆ where ξ = Egq /Eg.118) (4.. by utilizing IMC.nom . q 2 dt The inner closed-loop transfer function becomes G (p) = −6Eg W (p) = . If the active damping is chosen as ˆ Ga = αw Cdc /(6Eg. Pr . and αw is the bandwidth of the dc-link voltage control loop.. A block diagram of the dc-link voltage controller is depicted in Fig. ref pCdc + 6Eg Ga if q (p) (4.117) Then.119) where the magnitude of the grid voltage. i. Pr W ref + − i F (p) f q + + Ga if q 3Egq − − G (p) 2 pCdc 2 W = vdc Fig.15. 4. DC-link voltage control loop. is put to its nominal value. With Egq = Eg.nom . Eg.nom ).nom p (4.nom and Cdc = Cdc .where Ga is the gain of the “active damping. 4. GP W (p) is reduced to GP W (p) = −2αw p Cdc (p + αw )2 (4.121) which means that a disturbance is damped with the same bandwidth as the dc-link voltage control loop.

58

Chapter 5 Evaluation of the Current Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generators
In this chapter the current control law derived for the DFIG in the previous chapter is analyzed with respect to eliminating the influence of the back EMF, which is dependent on the stator voltage, rotor speed, and stator flux, in the rotor current. Further, stability analysis of the system is performed for different combinations of these terms in both a stator-flux and grid-flux-oriented reference frame, for both correctly known and erroneously parameters.

5.1 Stability Analysis
In order to investigate the influence of the feed-forward compensation of the back EMF and the influence of the “active resistance” on the stability of the system, an analysis is performed in this section. The analysis will be performed both for a stator-flux-oriented system and for a grid-flux-oriented system. In this section a full-order analysis of the system is performed, since one of the objectives is to study the impact of the current control law derived in the previous chapter.

5.1.1 Stator-Flux-Oriented System
Consider the system described by (4.66)–(4.68). Splitting (4.66) into real and imaginary parts, assuming stator-flux orientation, i.e., Ψs = ψs ejθ1 , the stator voltage equals the grid s voltage, i.e., vs = jEg ej(θg −θ1 ) . Making the variable substitution Δθ = θg − θ1 , the system model can be rearranged as dI dt dψs dt dΔθ dt diR dt =e =− Rs ψs − Eg sin(Δθ) + Rs iRd LM dθg dθ1 Eg cos(Δθ) + Rs iRq = − = ωg − dt dt ψs ˆ kp e + ki I + (j ω2 Lσ − Ra )iR + kE E (RR + Rs + jω2 Lσ )iR + E ˆ ˆ − = Lσ Lσ 59 (5.1) (5.2) (5.3) (5.4)

where E = Eg − Rs Rs + jωr Ψs = jEg ejΔθ − ( + jωr )ψs . LM LM (5.5)

In (5.1)–(5.4), the term I is the integration variable of the control error and e = iref −iR is the R control error. Note that (5.1) and (5.4) are complex-valued equations while (5.2) and (5.3) are real-valued equations. In the following analysis, the rotational speed ωr will be assumed to be varying slowly, and is, therefore, treated as a parameter. Throughout this section, the machine model parameters will be assumed to be ideal and known. If, for example, the rotor current is controlled by a high-gain feedback, it is possible to force the system to have both slow and fast time scales, i.e., the system behaves like a singularly perturbed system [57]. This means, that if the bandwidth of the current control loop is high enough, it is sufficient to study the system described by (5.2) and (5.3) in order to analyze the dynamic behavior of the DFIG. A stability analysis, assuming fast current dynamics, can be found in [13, 43]. Later on, analysis not neglecting the current dynamics will be compared to analysis neglecting the current dynamics; therefore a short summary will be presented. By linearization of the nonlinear system described by (5.2) and (5.3), the characteristic polynomial can be found. A first-order Taylor series expansion of the characteristic polynomial around Rs = 0 (as Rs is small, typically less than 0.1 p.u.) yields p2 + Rs iref 2 ωg LM iref Rs Rq Rd 2− p+ 1− ωg LM Eg Eg (5.6)

where iref is the active current reference and iref is the magnetization current supplied from Rq Rd the rotor converter. Since Rs is small (< 0.1 p.u.), iref will only have a minor influence on Rq the dynamics. However, iref will influence the dynamic performance. It is required that Rd iref < Rd 2Eg ωg LM (5.7)

in order to maintain stability. A similar constraint can be found in [13, 43]. In order to operate the DFIG with unity power factor, one should select [99] iref = Rd ψs Eg ≈ LM ωg LM (5.8)

which value is half of the value in the condition in (5.7). For the case when it is not possible to separate the time scales by a high-gain feedback in the current control loop, a full-order analysis should be performed. By linearizing the nonlinear system described by (5.1)–(5.4) in a similar manner as previously, the characteristic polynomial for the complete system can be found. A first-order Taylor series expansion of the characteristic polynomial around Rs = 0 yields (p + αc ) p + kR αc + (1 − kR ) RR (p4 + a3 p3 + a2 p2 + a1 p + a0 ). Lσ 60 (5.9)

The IM is running as a generator at half of the rated torque.1. it is shown how one of the complex-conjugated poles given by the fourth-degree factor move with increasing bandwidth of the current control loop.9). I NVESTIGATED C URRENT C ONTROL M ETHODS . This means that.1.where expressions for the coefficients a3 to a0 become 2Rs Rs ωg iref RR + 2Rs Rd − + (1 − kR ) LM Eg Lσ ref 2 iRq Rs ωg 2 iref ωg 2 2 a2 = αc kR + ωg − + (1 + kR )αc Rs − Rd Eg LM Eg ref 1 − kR i ωg 1 − kR 2 + αc RR + 2Rs + RR Rs − Rd Lσ Lσ LM Eg 2 2 ref 2αc kR Rs 2αc RR Rs αc kR Rs iRd ωg αc iref RR Rs ωg + (1 − kR ) − − (1 − kR ) Rd a1 = LM LM Lσ Eg Lσ Eg ref iRq Rs Rs ωr ωg 2 − (1 − kE ) + (1 + kR )αc ωg 1 − Lσ Eg ref iRq Rs Rs 2 RR 2 1− + (1 − 2kR + kE )ωg + (1 − kR )ωg Lσ Eg Lσ 2 2 αc iref Rs ωg kR iref RR Rs Rq Rq 2 2 2 1 − kR RR + 2Rs − . the characteristic polynomial (5. Method II is unstable for bandwidths of the current control loop between 1.10) (5.1. −RR /LM for Method I and two at −αc for Method II) and four poles given by the fourth-degree factor. In Fig. according to Table 5.11) (5.13) The parameters kE and kR affect the roots of (5. It can be seen in the figure that the poorly damped poles of Method II move with increasing bandwidth of the current control loop from stable to unstable and back to be stable again. while for Method I the poles are stable. 5.9) is investigated for the four different options. TABLE 5. directly and via a0 –a3 . The other complex-conjugated poles given by the fourth-degree factor are well damped and are therefore not shown in the figure. Method I Method II Method III Method IV kE 0 0 1 1 kR 0 1 0 1 Methods I and II Both methods give two real-valued poles (at −αc .0–5. and is magnetized from the rotor circuit. + αc ωg a0 = αc ωg kR − Eg Lσ Eg a3 = αc (1 + kR ) + (5. 5.u. for the above mentioned operating point. The four different combinations of kE and kR available are.12) (5. when approximating fast current dynamics (marked with “x” in the figure). Below. synchronous speed. Moreover.6 p. termed Methods I–IV.1. αc . the real part of the poorly damped pole is very small. even a small error (due to the approximation of a fast current dynamics) may play a significant 61 . as shown in Fig.

1 0.995 0.99

Im

0.985 0.98 0.975 0.97 −0.05

−0.025

0

0.025

0.05

Re
Fig. 5.1. Root loci of one of the poorly damped poles of the doubly-fed induction generator using current control methods without feed forward of the back EMF without “active resistance” (Method I, solid) and with “active resistance” (Method II, dashed). The arrow shows how the poles move with increasing bandwidth (0.5–15 p.u.) of the current control loop. The symbol “x” indicates the pole location when the current dynamics are neglected.

role for the result of the stability analysis. Hence, it is necessary to make a careful stability analysis, at least when using Methods I or II. A similar approach, as will be performed in the next section, with Routh’s table produces very large expressions of which it is difficult to determine any constrains for stability. Therefore, the approach with Routh’s table is not carried out for Methods I and II. Method III When using Method III, i.e., feed forward of the back EMF, the characteristic polynomial in (5.9) is reduced to (p + αc )2 p + RR (p3 + b2 p2 + b1 p + b0 ). Lσ (5.14)

The system has at least three real-valued poles, two located at −αc and one at −RR /Lσ . The coefficients in the third-degree factor become b2 = 2Rs RR + 2Rs iref Rs ωg + − Rd LM Lσ Eg 2 (Eg − iref Rs )ωg RR Rs (2Eg − iref LM ωg ) Rq Rd b1 = + Eg LM Lσ Eg b0 =
2 − iref RR Rs + (RR + 2Rs )Eg ωg Rq

(5.15) (5.16)

Lσ Eg

.

(5.17)

As can be seen, the coefficients are not dependent on αc for Method III. 62

TABLE 5.2. ROUTH ’ S TABLE .

p3 p2 p1 p0

1 b2 b2 b1 − b0 B= b2 Bb0 − 0 = b0 B

b1 b0 0 0

To investigate the stability of the system, Routh’s table can be used [14], see Table 5.2. In order for the system to be stable, the coefficients in the first column must not change sign. Since the first coefficient in Routh’s table is 1, all other coefficients must be positive in order to maintain stability. The expression for the coefficient B becomes quite complex; an approximation is 2 2 Rs 2Eg − ωg LM iref (RR + ωg L2 ) σ Rd (5.18) B≈ LM Lσ RR Eg where a first-order Taylor series expansion of the coefficient B with respect to the stator resistance, Rs (around Rs = 0), has been carried out. The following constraint can be set on iref in order to keep the coefficient b2 positive: Rd iref < Rd Eg 2Rs RR + 2Rs . + Rs ωg LM Lσ 2Eg . ωg LM (5.19)

For keeping the coefficient B positive, the following constraint has to be set iref < Rd (5.20)

Since the term −iref RR Rs in b0 is at least one order of magnitude lower than the term (RR + Rq 2Rs )Eg , b0 can be considered to be positive. The constraint in (5.20) is “harder” than the constraint in (5.19). The constraint in (5.20) is identical to the constraint in (5.7) where the stability analysis was performed assuming fast current dynamics. The system has two poorly damped poles, caused by the flux dynamics, and the constraint on iref relates to the Rd flux dynamics. Therefore, the constraint on iref , which relates to the flux dynamics, can be Rd found more easily assuming fast current dynamics. Generally, a full-order analysis is still valuable, if the current dynamics are not fast, since other parameters also may influence the stability (for stability analysis assuming fast current dynamics). Method IV For Method IV, i.e., with feed forward of the back EMF and “active resistance,” the characteristic polynomial in (5.9) is reduced to (p + αc )4 p2 + Rs iref 2 ωg LM iref Rs Rq Rd 2− p+ 1− ωg . LM Eg Eg (5.21)

The characteristic polynomial has four real roots located at −αc . The second-degree factor is identical to (5.6), where the current dynamics were neglected. Therefore, for Method IV, the same analysis as for the case with the assumption of fast current dynamics can be used. 63

5.1.2 Grid-Flux-Oriented System
The corresponding dynamics for the grid-flux-oriented system become dI =e dt dΨs = Eg − dt (5.22) (5.23) (5.24)

Rs + jωg Ψs + Rs iR LM ˆ diR kp e + ki I + (j ω2 Lσ − Ra )iR + kE E (RR + Rs + jω2 Lσ )iR + E ˆ ˆ = − . dt Lσ Lσ

Note that (5.22)–(5.24) are complex-valued equations. As for the case with stator-flux oriented analysis, the rotational speed ωr will be assumed to be varying slowly and is therefore treated as a parameter. Throughout this section, parameters will exactly as in the previous section be assumed to be ideal and known. If, as for the stator-flux orientation, the rotor current is controlled by a high-gain feedback, it is sufficient to study the dynamics described by (5.23), which have the following equilibrium points: ψsd0 ψqd0
2 LM iref Rs + LM iref Rs + Eg ωg Eg + Rs iref Rq Rq Rd = ≈ 2 + L2 ω 2 Rs ωg M g

(5.25) (5.26)

LM Rs iref Rs + Eg − iref LM ωg Rs (Eg − iref LM ωg ) Rq Rd Rd = ≈ 2 + L2 ω 2 2 Rs LM ωg M g

where the approximation is due to a first-order Taylor series expansion of Rs around Rs = 0. Then, the following characteristic polynomial can be determined: p2 + 2 Rs R2 2 p + ωg + 2s . LM LM (5.27)

In (5.27) it can be seen that the DFIG is poorly damped, and that the damping is only dependent of Rs and LM . Moreover if the PLL-type estimator, described in Section 4.1.3 is used to track the grid voltage, the dynamics of the PLL will be separated from the flux dynamics in (5.27). If the rotor currents cannot be neglected, a full-order analysis has to be performed. As in the previous section, the dynamic systems described by (5.22)–(5.24) consists of two parameters kE and kR that could be either set to zero or unity. This yields, in the same way as for the stator-flux-oriented system, four different options, Method I to Method IV, for the current control law, see Table 5.1. Methods I and II Linearizing of the non-linear system described by (5.22)–(5.24), its characteristic polynomial can be found. A first-order Taylor series expansion of the characteristic polynomial with respect to the stator resistance, Rs (around Rs = 0) yields (p + αc ) p + kR αc + (1 − kR ) RR (p4 + a3 p3 + a2 p2 + a1 p + a0 ). Lσ 64 (5.28)

97 −0.1. The second-complex conjugated poles are well damped and are therefore not shown in the figure.99 Im 0. 5.32) In Fig. 5. for Method II.05 Re Fig. might not be high enough in order to be able to make the assumption of a fast current dynamics (marked with “x” in the figure). 65 . as given by the fourthorder characteristic polynomial.2.985 0.29) (5.05 −0.31) (5. for Method I the poorly damped pole is stable and for Method II the poorly damped pole moves with increasing bandwidth of the current control loop from stable to unstable and back to be stable again. 5. the system is unstable for bandwidths between 1.u.2 it is shown how one of the complex-conjugated poles.u. since the root loci are plotted with numerical values the result are only valid for the given operation conditions and for the investigated machine. αc .u.995 0.5–15 p. The arrow shows how the poles move with increasing bandwidth (0.u.30) (5.where the coefficients a3 to a0 become a3 = 2 Rs RR + 2Rs + αc (1 + kR ) − (kR − 1) LM Lσ 2(1 + kR )αc Rs (kR − 1) (2RR Rs + αc LM (RR + 2Rs )) 2 2 a2 = αc kR + − + ωg Lσ LM Lσ 2 αc kR Rs 2 a1 = 2 + αc (1 + kR )ωg LM 2 2αc RR Rs + (RR + 2Rs )LM ωg Rs ωg ωr − (kR − 1) −2 LM Lσ Lσ 2 (kR − 1)(RR + 2Rs )αc ωg 2 2 a0 = αc kR ωg − .) of the current control loop. For the in the figure investigated case. Root loci of one of the poorly damped poles of the doubly-fed induction generator using current control methods without feed forward of the back EMF without “active resistance” (Method I. It can be seen in the figure that 1 0. As could also be seen for the stator-flux oriented case.025 0 0. The symbol “x” indicates the pole location when the current dynamics are neglected. Lσ (5.8 p. a current control loop bandwidth of approximately 15 p.025 0. move with increasing bandwidth of the current control loop.1 p. dashed). The operating condition is as in Fig. solid) and with “active resistance” (Method II. Of course.975 0.98 0. and 3.

at least for Method I.1. Further. two located at −αc and two at −(RR + Rs )/Lσ .2. feed forward of the back EMF.3 Conclusion It has been shown that by using grid-flux orientation the stability and the damping of the system is independent of the rotor current. LM LM (5.e..4. LM LM (5. the same analysis as for the case with the assumption of fast current dynamics can be used. it is possible to magnetize the DFIG entirely from the rotor circuit without reducing the damping of the system. This implies that for a grid-flux-oriented system. for higher bandwidths of the current control loop.e.. Method IV with both feed-forward compensation and “active resistance” can be assumed to be the best one of the investigated methods.24) as (p + αc ) 2 RR + R s p+ Lσ 2 p2 + 2 Rs R2 2 p + 2s + ωg .22)–(5. The system has at least four real-valued poles. as shown in Section 4. given by (4. By utilizing the feed-forward compensation. given by (4.33) Note that the above characteristic polynomial has not been expanded by a Taylor series. stability of the derived current control law is independent of the bandwidth of the current control loop and the order of the system to analyze is reduced. 5. The second-degree factor is identical to the characteristic polynomial in (5.” the characteristic polynomial becomes (p + αc )4 p2 + 2 Rs R2 2 p + 2s + ωg . Therefore. Therefore. Method III When using Method III. for Method IV.. it is possible to produce as much reactive power as possible and still have a stable system with the same damping from a stability point of view. 5. i. assumed to be much faster than the flux dynamics.73) and the transfer function from a disturbance to the rotor current. the inclusion of the “active resistance” improves significantly the damping of low-frequency disturbances. for the grid-flux-oriented system.e. Gcl (p).34) Note that the above characteristic polynomial has not been expanded by a Taylor series. see Fig.1. 5. The characteristic polynomial has four real roots located at −αc .27) where the current dynamics were neglected. i. with feed forward of the back EMF and “active resistance. in contrast to stator-flux orientation. Method IV For Method IV. i. GEi (p).2 Influence of Erroneous Parameters on Stability We now study how the closed-loop current-control transfer function. the characteristic polynomial can be found from the system (5.74) are 66 . since the error is in the same order of magnitude as the real part of the pole. Moreover.

However.2. In order to study the behavior for larger Lσ . the back EMF will not be totally compensated for due to non-ideal parameters. 5. the error in a parameter is denoted with the symbol ˜. 5.1. From (5. see (4. Since LM is only included in the feed-forward compensation.37) . This means that when using “active resistance. For Methods I and III. 5. For ideal parameters the rotor current is determined by iR = Gcl (p)iref + GEi (p)E. Hence.35) The methods where the back EMF is compensated for using feed forward (Methods III and IV). Rs and RR Since errors in Rs and RR influence the performance in the same way. the rotor speed is set to 1.35) if 2αc Lσ dependent on errors in Rs and RR . we will study the sum ˜ ˜ ˜ of the errors in the resistances: R = Rs + RR . ˆ it is preferable to overestimate Lσ . ˜ In the analysis below. and RR . The parameters to be studied in the following are Lσ . Rs . 5. The operating condition corresponds to that for Method I with three different values of L of Fig.1 Leakage Inductance.3 p. This is shown in Fig.3 that the influence ˆ of errors in Lσ is small for the investigated 2-MW DFIG. it has no impact in the following analysis. It can be seen in Fig. 5.u.72). 5. the difference is larger. so that the effect of the cross coupling between the d and the q components is included. the rotor current.4. This means that the conditions for impact of parameter variations also hold for the methods with feed forward of the back EMF. e.” the system is not (5. even though the effect might be less severe.35) is independent of the field orientation.influenced by non-ideal parameters. A similar analytical expression for larger errors in Lσ is ˜ difficult to derive. the bandwidth of the current control loop is ˆ increased if Lσ is overestimated. Note that (5. it is not included. is given by iR ≈ αc αc ˜ ˜ 1 + j Lσ ω2 GEi (p) iref + 1 − j Lσ ω2 R p + αc p + αc GEi (p)E (5. and. root loci are shown in Fig. the rotor current is found to be iR ≈ ˜ αc (Lσ p + Rs + RR − R) iref 2 + α L p + (R + R − R)α R ˜ c Lσ p c σ s R p − E ˜ Lσ p2 + αc Lσ p + (Rs + RR − R)αc 67 (5. Clearly.35) for ideal parameters. given by (5. for smaller DFIGs such as the 22-kW laboratory DFIG. One reason for this is that the proportional part of the controller will be increased. For Methods II and IV where “active resistance” is used. Lσ = ˆ Lσ − Lσ .2. Lσ ˆ For errors in Lσ . hence.36) it can be seen that small values of Lσ do not significantly ˜ L and Lσ ˆ influence the dynamic performance.3 ˆ σ .g. the rotor current is given by ˜ R.2 Stator and Rotor Resistances. R (5. however.36) ˜ ˜ where the approximation is due to a first-order Taylor series expansion of Lσ around Lσ = 0 ˜ σ .

5.1 −0.5Lσ . dashed Lσ = −0.96 0.u. 5.9 Im 0.” Fig. b) Grid-flux orientation. However.9 0. 68 .025 0 0.37) it can be seen that if the resistances ˜ are overestimated. as for the case with errors in Lσ . ˜ σ = −0.99 0.5–15 p. i.95 −0.e.5–15 p.5Lσ .98 Im 0.97 0.05 −0.05 0. a) 1 b)1 0.95 −0.15 −0.5 shows the root loci for Method I of the investigated 2-MW DFIG. the difference is larger for smaller DFIGs.) of the current control loop. Solid is Lσ = 0.97 0.85 −0. the approximation assuming αc Lσ Rs + RR .98 b)1 0. a) Statorflux orientation. the damping of the current dynamics are actually improved.5Lσ . The arrow shows how the poles move with ˜ dashed L increasing bandwidth (0. This is shown in Fig.85 −0.u. b) Grid-flux orientation.05 Im 0. a) Stator-flux orientation.4. R < 0.99 0. 5.025 Re Re Fig.) of the current control loop. the same phenomenon as using “active resistance. and dotted Lσ = 0.96 0.05 Re Re Fig. such as the 22-kW laboratory DFIG.15 0 0.95 Im 0. Root loci of one of the poorly damped poles of the laboratory 22 kW doubly-fed induction ˜ generator using Method I for three different errors in the leakage inductance parameter Lσ .1 −0. ˜ σ = 0. i.95 0. The arrow shows how the ˜ ˜ Solid is L poles move with increasing bandwidth (0.025 0 0.4. In (5.025 −0.05 −0. 5. Root loci of one of the poorly damped poles of the doubly-fed induction generator using ˜ ˜ Method I for three different errors in the leakage inductance parameter Lσ .a) 1 0.e. In the figure it can be seen that the influence of ˆ errors in the resistance is small...3.05 0 0.5Lσ . and dotted Lσ = 0.

97 −0.995 0.95 Im 0.u. the system can become a) 1 b)1 0.025 0 0. 5.) of the current control loop.5–15 p.) of the current control loop. Root loci of one of the poorly damped poles of the doubly-fed induction generator using ˜ Method I for three different errors in the stator and rotor resistances parameters R.1 −0.995 0. Solid ˜ = 0.85 −0. 5. The arrow shows how the poles ˜ ˜ is R move with increasing bandwidth (0. a) Stator-flux orientation.975 0.5R. the poorly damped poles (corresponding to the flux dynamics) could be unstable for certain operating conditions.9 Im 0.99 b)1 0.985 0. as shown previously when only using “active resistance” (Method II).05 Re Re Fig.5R. 5. and dotted R = 0. Root loci of one of the poorly damped poles of the laboratory 22 kW doubly-fed induction generator using Method I for three different errors in the stator and rotor resistances para˜ ˜ ˜ ˜ meters R.95 0. dashed R = −0. as illustrated in Fig. dashed R = −0.05 0. The arrow shows how the poles move with increasing bandwidth (0.u. It can also be seen in the figures that the grid-flux-oriented system seems.1 −0. especially for Method I and smaller machines.025 Im 0.5R.6.985 0. a) Stator-flux orientation.5–15 p.025 Re Re Fig. b) Grid-flux orientation. even though the difference is small.15 −0. Solid is R = 0.98 0.05 −0.a) 1 0.97 −0.05 −0. b) Grid-flux orientation.05 −0.15 0 0.99 Im 0.05 0 0. unstable if the resistances are overestimated.9 0. to 69 .025 0 0. Moreover.98 0.5R. and dotted R = 0.975 0.6.5.85 −0. Therefore.

u.25 d 0. reaches 0. The DFIG is magnetized entirely from the stator. Data have been sampled with 10 kHz and low-pass filtered with a cut-off frequency set to 5 kHz.25 p. Experiment of the stator-flux oriented current control step responses of the q component of the rotor current. to 0.25 0. and vice versa when the rotor speed reaches 0.u.75 1 Method III 0 0. 5.be less sensitive to overestimated R = Rs + RR in comparison to the stator-flux-oriented system. the system might be degraded..2 for data and parameters of the laboratory setup.25 d 0. depending on the bandwidth of the current control loop. Rd Further.5 q 0.75 1 0 0. A scrutiny investigation of Fig.7 shows that Method II gives a 50-Hz ripple.5 0.5 0 −0. 5.25 p. This has been done by letting iref change from −0.25 d 0.75 1 Method IV 0 0.5 0.u.. iref = 0. 5. a 100-Hz frequency component in the stator voltage. unstable.u.4 p. see Fig. as shown earlier. See Appendix B.5 0 −0.5 Method II 0. which influenced the performances of the current control Methods III and VI. when the rotor speed.5 q d Method I 0 −0. i. However.7.3 Experimental Evaluation The performance of the various current control methods are evaluated by reference step responses. the stator voltage of the DFIG was 230 V.5 q 0.16 p.32 p.5 q 0. 5. since the stator voltage is included in the control law. a notch filter limited the influence of the 100-Hz frequency component. i.5 0 −0.75 1 Time [s] Fig.5 0.. The reason for this is that by using only “active resistance” to damp the back EMF. and is operated under no-load conditions.u. Rq ωr .e.5 0 0. In the measurements the bandwidth of the current control was set to 1. Offsets in the stator voltage measurements caused 0. Even 70 .7.e.

] 1 0.8 shows an experimental case of a stator-flux-oriented and a grid-flux-oriented rotor current control. after 0. that by using grid-flux orientation the stability and the damping of the system is independent of the rotor current. d) Stator-flux magnitude (grid-flux orientation). Experimental comparison between stator-flux-oriented and grid-flux-oriented systems.4 Impact of Stator Voltage Sags on the Current Control Loop Due to the poorly damped poles.2 0.5 p.u.5 q d d) 1.3 p.4 0.1 0. In the figures the d component of the rotor current is increased from 0 p.1 0.2 0.5 c) 2 Current [p.u.7 that Method IV managed best to follow its reference values in this comparison.1.u. it can be seen that the stator-flux-oriented system becomes unstable with an increasing amplitude of the flux oscillations.u.2 0. in contrast to stator-flux orientation In Fig.1 0.32 s the rotor current is put to zero in order to put back the system into a stable operating condition. During this evaluation.u. c) Rotor current (grid-flux orientation). 5. When iRd is a) 2 Current [p.3 0.3 0. After 0. 5. to 1 p.3 0. and the rotor speed.4 0.5 q d b) 1.1 Comparison Between Stator-Flux and Grid-Flux-Oriented System The aim of this section is to experimentally verify the analytical result obtained in Section 5.3. in case of a voltage sag.5 0 0 0.though the difference is fairly small. increased to 1 p.1 s.] 1 0.u.5 Flux [p. the grid-flux-oriented system remains stable throughout the whole experiment.u.4 0. 5.3 0.2 0. 5.u.] 1 0 −1 0 0.1 0.] 1 0 −1 0 0. 5. was controlled by a d.8. The q component of the rotor current is set to 0. machine to be 1 p. b) Stator-flux magnitude (stator-flux orientation). a) Rotor current (stator-flux orientation).5 Flux [p. the bandwidth of the current control loop was set to 2. As expected from the analytical results. it can be seen in Fig.c.4 0.5 Time [s] Time [s] Fig.5 0 0 0. the flux will enter a damped oscillation. ωr .u.u. It is essential that the magnitude of the rotor current is below the rated value of 71 .

This implies that the worst case occurs for ωr > ωg according to (5. It can also be noted that. according to (5. be instantaneously decreased. since it is actually unstable for certain operating conditions as indicated by Fig. For a wind turbine.40) it can be seen that for ωr > ωg . Further. The DFIG is running as a generator at rated torque and is fully magnetized from the rotor circuit. the magnitude of the rotor voltage will be instantaneously increased with ΔEg . Neglecting the current dynamics. implying vR ≈ −j0.u.3 − j0.3 before the voltage sag. at the time instant tsag . 5. is close to the maximum value needed in order to achieve the desired variable-speed range for a wind turbine.1 and Method III due that the results are relatively similar to those of Method IV. the rotor voltage as given in (4.40). This implies that the rotor voltage is approximately 0. the maximum rotor voltage needed due to a symmetrical voltage sag for current control Methods I and IV can be seen. The rotor speed is 1.u. especially for low bandwidths. For higher bandwidths.39) and (5. then the value of the rotor voltage magnitude will. (5.nom to Eg at tsag . In Fig.3 p.the converter in order not to force the crowbar to go into action.3 p.u. Further. since it manages to keep the rotor current unaffected during the voltage sag. then. In Fig. Assuming that the grid voltage (or stator voltage) drops from Eg. Method I requires slightly more rotor voltage than Method IV. 5.39) If the rotor voltage is vR. especially for low bandwidths of the current control loop. Method IV is not shown in the figure. the rotor voltage will be vR (t = tsag ) = vR. the corresponding maximum rotor current needed due to the voltage sag for Method I can be seen.40).9. the rotor voltage will drop ΔvR (t = tsag ) = jEg. if ωr = 1.0 + jΔEg = −j0.40) since the stator flux and the rotor speed will not change instantaneously. For example. From (5.0 − vR . generally. 5. it can be seen that 72 . and thereby lose control of the rotor currents and thus the power production. for higher bandwidths of the current control loop.7 for a grid voltage drop ΔEg =0.4 p. accordingly. It can be seen in the figure that the maximum rotor current increases with the size of the voltage sag. this operating condition is disadvantageous since a rotor voltage of 0. the maximum rotor voltage is relatively independent of the bandwidth of the current control loop for Method IV.38) From this equation it can be noted that (since vs ≈ jωg ψs ) Im[vR ] > 0 if ωr < ωg Im[vR ] < 0 if ωr > ωg Im[vR ] ≈ 0 if ωr = ωg .10. it can be seen that the increase in rotor voltage due to a voltage sag follows (5. then the change in the rotor voltage will be ΔvR = vR. immediately before the voltage sag occurs.39) and (5.u.40). then. It can be seen that the maximum rotor voltage will increase with the size of the voltage sag. Method II is not considered. If ωr < ωg . with known parameters. (5.3 p.0 before the voltage sag.3.nom ejΔθ0 − jEg ejΔθ ≈ j(Eg.67) can be expressed as vR = (Rr + Rs + jω2 Lσ )iR + vs − Rs + jωr ψs LM ≈ vs − jωr ψs = jEg ej(θg −θ1 ) − jωr ψs .nom − Eg ) = jΔEg (5.4 = −j0.

If the current control loop bandwidth is below 2 p. for Method I. thus. due to a symmetrical voltage sag as a function of the sag size. vR .] b) 1.3 ΔEg [p. The reason is that when the bandwidth is increased. independent of the voltage sag magnitude.1 Influence of Erroneous Parameters As mentioned earlier. not only necessary to design the converter according to the desired variablespeed range.u. By using Method IV. ΔEg .] 0 0 0. see (4.3 0. Maximum rotor voltage.74).1 0.u.u.u.u. 5. the methods are mostly sensitive to an underestimated Lσ . in principle. especially for low bandwidths of the current control loop. ΔEg . see Fig.2 0.4 ΔEg [p. the difference in the maximum rotor current 73 .. 5. the influence of an erroneous value of Lσ is.] 1 0. a) Method I (stator-flux-oriented system).] max Fig. 5.] αc [p.] 0 0 0. the maximum rotor current is practically constant. and the current control bandwidth.1 0. due to a symmetrical voltage sag as a function R of the sag size.2 0. Simulations ˜ with Lσ = 0.5 0 10 5 1 0.4.u. 4 imax [p.] R 3 2 1 0. Maximum rotor current.5 0 10 5 αc [p. αc (stator-flux-oriented system).2 0. removed. imax .a) 1. mainly since the bandwidth of the current control loop then becomes lower than the desired. the “need” for compensating the back EMF vanishes.9.4 0 10 5 αc [p.u. αc .10.u.11.u. but also according to a certain voltage sag to withstand.] Fig. and the current control bandwidth.] 0 0 0. 5. It is.1 0. b) Method IV (stator-flux-oriented system).5 max vR [p.u.5Lσ shows that Method I is very sensitive to an underestimated Lσ during voltage sags.5 max vR [p.3 0.4 ΔEg [p.

As mentioned before.5 0 −0. 5.] 0 0 0. when the R ˜ leakage inductance is underestimated. Method IV manages to survive deeper sags than Method I. is below 0.2 Generation Capability During Voltage Sags As an example of this.5 Flux Damping As previously mentioned there are different methods of damping the flux oscillations.2 0. ΔEg .u.u. for higher values of αc ...1 0. RR . as indicated by the figure.08 Δimax [p. Lσ = 0. while for Method I.06 0. a feedback of the derivative of flux was introduced in order to improve the damping of the flux.u.u. for higher bandwidths. 5.4 αc [p. for Method IV produces very similar results as a bandwidth of 1 p.] R 0. αc (stator-flux-oriented system). and the current control bandwidth. A bandwidth of 7 p. This means that when the current controller needs to put out a higher rotor voltage in order to compensate for the sag. Δimax . i.u. an extra degree of freedom is introduced that can be used to actively damp out the flux oscillations.11.2 0.u. as can be seen in Fig.e.u. The maximum rotor voltage is limited to 0. it will lose control of the rotor current.u.02 p.02 0 10 5 0.] 0 0 0. However.] Fig. 5. one method is to reduce the bandwidth of the current control loop [43]. For Method IV and variations in Rs . and is therefore not shown in the figure.25 p. Fig.5Lσ . the difference between the methods vanishes. From the figure it can be seen that for low bandwidths of the current control loop (allowing a lower switching frequency). 74 .04 0.u.u.3 ΔEg [p.1 0. Rs and RR have small impacts for smaller αc . the difference in maximum rotor current is insignificant.4 0. 5. and LM with ±50%.12 shows the minimum remaining grid voltage that can be handled without triggering the crowbar as a function of the power. due to a symmetrical voltage sag as a function of the sag size. and the crowbar may be triggered if the rotor current becomes too high.4.u. and the crowbar short circuits the rotor circuit when the rotor current is above 1.11.a) 1 b) 0.] αc [p. this impact is also insignificant. Increased maximum rotor current.5 10 5 0.] R Δimax [p.4 p. In [107]. However.3 ΔEg [p. Another possibility is to use a converter to substitute the Y point of the stator winding.. [54]. 5. for Method I (a) and Method IV (b).

the flux oscillations will be damped by feedback of the derivative of the flux. and 4) the method with a converter substituting the star point in the stator winding.u.5Lσ ˜ αc = 1.3 0. The reason that this method is chosen is that it has low cost (i..12. the system with the converter in Y point becomes very interesting and is accordingly further investigated. is easy to implement. Minimum remaining voltage without triggering the crowbar of a voltage sag. implying an increase of the losses. and the increased cost for an extra converter this method. The methods are 1) reducing the bandwidth of the current control loop. for Methods I (solid) and IV (dashed) as a function of the power. later on in Chapter 7 where different methods for voltage sag ride-through are discussed and compared. and a rotor current above 1. the cost is also increased. 2) compensation of the transformation angle (to synchronous coordinates). The maximum rotor voltage is set to 0. vanishes..4 p. 5.6 0. is not considered in this section since some of the benefits and reasons for the doubly-fed induction generator. Compensation of the transformation angle method improves the damping only slightly. If we add a 75 . In this section. Lσ = 0 20 40 60 80 100 Power before voltage sag [%] Fig. the disadvantage of this method is that the method cause relatively high rotor currents. Lσ = 0 ˜ αc = 1.25 p. and can damp the flux oscillations well.4 0. triggers the crowbar (stator-flux-oriented system).g.7 0.u. Lσ = 0. Lσ = 0 ˜ αc = 7.9 0.2 0 ˜ αc = 1. 3) feedback of the derivative of the flux.5 0. but the disadvantage of this method is the required addition in hardware and software.8 0. Due to the fact that the method with an extra converter connected to the Y point of the stator winding has to handle the stator current.1 Remaining voltage [p. no extra hardware).u. Kelber made a comparison of different methods of damping the flux oscillations in [55]. It is concluded in [55] that the method of reducing the bandwidth works quite well. although it has the disadvantage of slowly damping of a grid disturbances. e. Feedback of the flux derivative method performs well and has a low cost. The method with a converter in the star point of the stator winding performs very well. smaller (cheaper) converter and lower losses. Since there is a need for another converter.] 0.e. However. but the d component of the current can be used to damp the oscillations and improve stability. The q component of the rotor current is used for controlling the torque.

it is seen that the constraint on the d component rotor current has increased 1 + αd LM /(2Rs ) times.1 for typical parameters. since Rs is small and LM is large. Moreover.41). 76 .42) 5.46) 5. if a flux estimator is used to determine the flux.0 p + αd + 2− LM Eg 2 Eg − iref LM ωg 2 Rs iref Rq Rd. a flux differentiation compensation term has been introduced. the bandwidth of the damper. see Table 2.6) can be rewritten as (with correctly known parameters) ωg LM iref Rs Rd. a high-pass filter is used since a pure differentiation is not implementable.0 < 2 + αd Eg LM Rs ωg LM (5.44) in order to guarantee stability. the characteristic polynomial in (5.7). of the low-pass filter must be set lower than the oscillating frequency in order to be able to damp the oscillation at all.27) is changed to (with correctly known parameters) p2 + αd + 2 Rs LM p+ αd Rs R2 2 + 2s + ωg LM LM (5. αd and αco .5. which we control as Rd Δiref (p) = − Rd p αco αd ψs = − 1 − ˆ p + αco Rs p + αco αd ψ ˆ s Rs (5.43) With the inclusion of a flux damping. so that the flux damper becomes slower than the current dynamics. must be chosen smaller than the bandwidth of the current control loop. the constraint on the d component becomes iRd. αd . αd . + αd Rs 2 Eg Eg LM ωg (5.0 p+ 1− ωg . 5. Of course.2 Grid-Flux Orientation For a grid-flux-oriented system the characteristic polynomial in (5. This means that iref is set to Rd iref = iref + Δiref Rd Rd. must be smaller than the bandwidth of the flux estimator.1 Stator-Flux Orientation Under the assumption that the current dynamics are set much faster than the flux dynamics and αco is small. αco . Rd. that have to be determined. The damping term.component Δiref to the d component of the rotor current reference.5. that will improve the damping of the system. the cut-off frequency.0 (5. the flux damping uses two parameters. (5. αc .41) then. it is possible to approximate the above characteristic polynomial as 2 p2 + αd p + ωg . Obviously. Comparing to (5.0 Rd where iref is used to control the reactive power as discussed in a previous chapter. In the above equation.45) if αco is small.3 Parameter Selection As can be seen in (5.5.

95 0 0. Since it is difficult to see the effect of the flux damper in a measured time series.8 1 Time [s] Fig. The reference frame is aligned with the stator flux. 5. a factor of ten.3 p. Simulation of current control using a stator-flux oriented reference frame with (solid) and without (dashed) damping of the flux oscillations.u.6 0.6 0.u.u. with and without flux damping. and αco is set to 0.5 p. αco . It is assumed that before and directly after the voltage sag.u. and.5. by the flux damper. due to noise. was set to 2.u. was set to 0.3.2 0.1 s changed to Rq 0.2 0.7 p. In the simulation it is assumed that the flux can be determined from measurements of the stator and the rotor currents.u.5.0 changed to 0.. 5.5 Response to Symmetrical Voltage Sags In this section the flux damper’s response will be analyzed with respect to symmetrical voltage sags. The figure shows that the oscillations in the flux has been damped with the flux damper.4. The reference value of iref is initially zero and is at 0. αd . 5. is set to 4..u.4 Evaluation Fig.5 1 0 −1 0 0.1 (kE = 1 and kR = 1).2 0. b) iRq .2.u.6 0.7 p..7 p.] a) 1.4 s Rd.14. a frequency spectra of the flux magnitude has been plotted instead in Fig. a) iRd . In the figure the current control method with feed forward of the back EMF and with “active resistance” has been used. αd is set to 0.05 p. i.8 1 0 0. the damping term.u. while Current [p.4 0.13 shows a simulation of a vector-controlled doubly-fed induction generator..] Current [p.8 1 c) Flux [p. The bandwidth of the current control loop.. was set to 0. c) ψs . αc . with and without flux damping. The reference value iref is initially zero and is at 0. The DFIG is operated as in Section 5.] b) 1.5 p. αc .7 s to −0. according to Section 4. It can be seen in the figure that the 50-Hz component has been to a large extent damped.4 0. 5. The bandwidth of the system.05 1 0. and at 0.5 0 −0. the cut-off frequency term. The frequency spectra is based on a 6 s long measurement on the laboratory DFIG setup described in Appendix B.05 p.u.u. the magnitude of the 77 .4 0.5 1 0.13.5 p.e.5.u.

This means that the term 1 − V /Eg. 5.] 0 1 2 10 −2 10 −3 10 −3 10 −4 10 −4 10 −5 10 −5 10 10 10 10 0 10 1 10 2 Frequency [Hz] Frequency [Hz] Fig.51) t≥0: Δiref (t) ≈ − Δψs (t) = − (ψs (t) − ψs0 ) Rd Rs Rs which can be written as t≥0: Δiref (t) ≈ Rd αd Rs 1− V Eg.u. stator flux can be expressed as t<0: t≥0: ψs (t) = ψs0 ψs (t) ≈ ψs0 V Eg.e.nom + 1− V Eg.u. from (5. The reference frame is aligned with the stator flux. (5.53) . b) With flux damping.nom ψs0 e−αd t/2 cos(ωg t) (5.52) 2 2 The above expression has a local maximum for t = arccos −2ωg / αd + 4ωg /ωg .nom ψs0 1 − e−αd t/2 cos(ωg t) . the low-pass filter αco /(p + αco ) has low bandwidth.47) (5. This means ever. i. (5. Frequency spectra of the flux (data from measurements).] 10 −2 b) 10−1 Flux amplitude [p.nom . Then. if αd that the extreme value of Δiref (t) due to a symmetrical voltage sag can be expressed as Rd Δiref (t = π/ωg ) ≈ Rd αd ψs0 1 + e−αd π/(2ωg ) Rs 78 1− V Eg.nom corresponds to the magnitude of the sag..14. a) Without flux damping.48) where ψs0 is the steady-state stator flux prior the voltage sag and V is the remaining voltage after the voltage sag.49) If αco is considered small. it is possible to describe Δiref (t) after the voltage sag as Rd αd αd (5.a) 10−1 Flux amplitude [p.50) αco p + αco αd L {ψs (t)} Rs (5.41) the response in ΔiRd is estimated as Δiref (t) = L−1 − 1 − Rd or as Δiref (t) = L−1 − Rd αd Rs L {ψs (t)} − αco L {ψs (t)} p + αco . How2 2 4ωg it is possible to approximate t as t ≈ arccos(−1)/ωg = π/ωg . (5.

This value is.u. Δiref [p.u. It was found that the method that combines both the feed-forward compensation of the back EMF and the “active resistance” manages best to suppress the influence of the back EMF on the rotor current. 79 ..3 p.u.85 V = 0.” in order to eliminate the influence of the back EMF on the rotor current.7/0.8 V = 0.2 0.01 p. 5.u.9 p. Rd an unrealistically high value. Maximum of Δiref due to a voltage sag as a function of αd . Solid lines correspond to Rd simulation and dashed lines correspond to results from an analytical expression. 20 Max. then some of the advantage of the flux damper is lost.01 · 1 1 + e−0.u.u.7π/(2·1) (1 − 0..53) is shown. 5.15.9/1) = 9. the stability and the damping of the system is independent of the rotor current. In Fig.4 0. The results in the figure shows that the flux damper is very sensitive to voltage sags. The choice of current control method is of greater importance if the bandwidth of the current control loop is low.95 10 5 0 0 0. However. for a numerical example. in contrast to the stator-flux-oriented system. has been analyzed. The results are presented for four different symmetrical voltage sags between V = 0.Consider the following values: V = 0.u. This means that the maximum value of Δiref due to the voltage Rd sag is Δiref = 0.1 0.7 αd [p.6 0. the bandwidth.8 to V = 0.15 the maximum value of Δiref due to a voltage sag as a function Rd of the bandwidth αd of the flux damper can be seen.95 p.6 Conclusion In this chapter.] Rd 15 V = 0. In the figure both simulated results (using stator-flux orientation) as well as analytically results from (5.. even with erroneous parameters. of course.u. (note that V is the remaining voltage). 5. during a voltage sag. It has been shown that by using grid-flux orientation.7 p. αd = 0. it indicates that the flux damper is very sensitive to voltage sags. αd . this method was found to be the least sensitive one to erroneous parameters and it manages to keep the rotor current close to unaffected.9 V = 0. of the flux damper should be small.3 0. ψs0 = 1 p. although the analytical results are generally slightly higher. the general rotor current control law derived in Chapter 4. Moreover. However. Both methods produce similar results. with the option of including feed-forward compensation of the back EMF and “active resistance. This means that if the flux damper should work during (small) voltage sags.] Fig. and Rs = 0.5 0.

Finally. By utilizing feed-forward compensation. it is shown that the design of the converter for a doubly-fed induction generator should also take into account a certain voltage sag to withstand and not only the desired variable-speed range. stability of the system resulting from the proposed current controller was found independent of the bandwidth of the current control loop. and the order of the system to analyze could be reduced. 80 . The introduction of an “active resistance” in the current control law improves the damping of low-frequency disturbances significantly.This implies that for a grid-flux-oriented system it is possible to magnetize the DFIG entirely from the rotor circuit without reducing the damping of the system.

as described in Section 4. if the frequency of the grid is constant (or at least close to constant).e.. While for a grid-flux oriented system the above equation can be used directly. Either a PLL-estimator. 0) in order for the forward Euler discretization to be stable. the module must be discretizised. it is possible to force the system to have both slow and fast time scales. the rotor current dynamics and the grid-filter current dynamics are controlled by a high-gain feedback.35). care must be taken not to use a too long time step or sampling period. If the current control loop is much faster than the flux dynamics.e. or. i.1. i. the poles must be inside a circle with a radius of 1/Tsample and the center point located at (−1/Tsample .1.. 81 . the system behaves like a singularly perturbed system [57]. However. ω1 = ωg .u. dΨs = Eg − dt Rs + jω1 Ψs + Rs iref R LM (6. The forward Euler discretization is given by (4.. For instance. can be used to track the frequency of the grid voltage. i.1 Reduced-Order Model If.7. where the equation is in polar form. For a stator-flux-oriented system the above equation can be reduced to (5. ω1 . the synchronous frequency. As pointed out in the Introduction. that the rotor and grid-filter current can be assumed to follow their reference values accurately.Chapter 6 Evaluation of Doubly-Fed Induction Generator Systems 6. with an oscillating frequency close to 1 p. As mentioned in Section 4. the flux dynamics of the DFIG are strongly influenced by a pair of poorly damped poles.7. the synchronous frequency can be put equal to the grid frequency.e.2) and (5.e. in PSCAD/EMTDC [66]. see Section 4. 6.3). for example. and this often due to its simplicity results in using the forward Euler method.1. Tsample . close to the line frequency. i.2 Discretization of the Doubly-Fed Induction Generator If the simple-to-use forward Euler method. when writing user-defined modules. is used to simulate the system.3.1) where the stator voltage has been put equal to the grid voltage. must be determined. This means. it is sufficient to study only the flux dynamics and put the rotor current to its reference value.

. 6. the above expression is reduced to Rd Tsample < (6.2. ±ωg LM < 1 Tsample . the above-mentioned poles should be located inside the circle. − which yields ωg LM iref Rs Rd 2− ωg LM iref Rs LM Eg Rd 2− .6) is found as p1.2) ωg LM iref Rs Rd 2− ± jωg .6) In order for the discretization to be stable.It should be pointed out that in some other programs.7) 82 .2 Grid-Flux Orientation The solution to the characteristic polynomial in (5. 6. ±ωg 2LM Eg < 1 Tsample (6.0 − − Rs .1 Stator-Flux Orientation The solution to the characteristic polynomial for a stator-flux oriented system in (5. user-defined modules return expressions for the derivatives and advanced integration algorithms are used.e. < 2 < 2 ωg LM Eg ωg LM iref 2 Rs Rd 2− L2 Eg M 2 + ωg 4 Rs . is found as p1.2 = Rs ± jωg LM (6. corresponding to grid-flux-oriented system.. iref = ψs /LM ≈ Eg /(ω1 LM ).6 µs.e. for instance Simpow [1] and PSS/E [85]. i.0 − − ωg LM iref Rs Rd 2− .3) Tsample (6. 2LM Eg In order for the discretization to be stable.e. In this case. (6. − 1 Tsample .27). 2 ωg LM 1 Tsample . i. the allowed time step can be made longer. i.2 = − ± ≈− ωg LM iref Rs Rd 2− 2LM Eg 2 ωg LM iref Rs Rd 2− 2 4LM Eg 2 Rs iref Rq 2 ωg − 1− Eg (6.4) For unity power factor. the above-mentioned poles should be located inside the circle.2. the sampling period should be Ts < 4.5) For the system investigated later on in this chapter and using the forward Euler method.

. Fig. 6. 6. simulations and experimental results of the response of a DFIG wind turbine to voltage sags are presented. and Li = 0. at t=0. 6.The solution to the above equation becomes Tsample < 1 2Rs 2Rs ≈ 2 2 LM Rs LM ωg 2 + ωg L2 M (6. Comparing the two figures it is seen that the agreement between the experiment and simulation is quite satisfactory. RR = 0. is presented.5 shows a simulation of the response to the same voltage sag as in Fig. similar results from simulations can also be found from a 83 . One reason for this is that the bandwidth of the current control loops (of the machine and grid-side converter) are set to 7 p.. The following parameters were used in the simulations: Rs = 0. 6.u. The WT now produces approximately 10% of its nominal power.. the simulations presented are carried out on a fictitious 850-kW DFIG WT. Before the disturbance the WT is producing approximately half of its rated power. The dc-link capacitance is set to Cdc = 2. caused by the poorly damped poles due to the voltage sag. and Lσ = 0. LM = 4.u.01 p.u. As mentioned earlier.1 s the fault causing the voltage sag on the grid is cleared.1. In this case the disturbance is so large that the over voltage protection short-circuits the rotor and.7.1 s. In Fig.01 p.e.. the simulations shown in this section are carried out for a statorflux-oriented system. since real machine parameters were unknown. for the full-order model and Fig. In Fig. However.6 shows the corresponding simulation for the reduced-order model. 6. it is seen that the agreement is quite satisfactory.u. Fig. Moreover. The grid filter for the grid-side converter Ri = 0.u.3 shows the corresponding simulation with the reduced-order model of the system.1.4.8 p. of the d component of the rotor current.21 p. and after 0. The voltage drops down approximately 25%. 6.4.). and the voltage starts to recover. The wind turbine produces about 20% of the nominal power. as shown in Fig.5). Moreover. is clearly seen.2. which is sufficiently higher than the eigenfrequency of the flux dynamics (close to 1 p. The experiments were made on a VESTAS V-52 850 kW WT and in Appendix B.u. a severe voltage disturbance is presented.u. a 75% sag. experimental results of the response due to an unsymmetrical voltage sag are presented. 6. It can be seen in the figure that the full-order model and the reducedorder model produce almost the same results. shown in Section 5. Fig. An exact agreement is not to be expected.8) which is twice the value obtained by (6. the minimum sample time for the grid-flux-oriented system is independent. in contrast to a stator-flux-oriented system. the breaker disconnects the stator from the grid.u.3 Response to Grid Disturbances In this section. for the full-order model. Again.07 p.0071 p. after 40 ms.u. i..9 p.1 shows experimental results of the response of a DFIG wind turbine to a voltage sag. 6. The simulations have been carried out both with a “full-order” model and a second-order model. In Fig. 6. a simulation of the response to the same voltage sag.3 a short description of the used data acquisition setup is presented. 6. The oscillation close to 50 Hz.

c) Active power.2.1 0.2 0.u.3 0.3 0.2 0. 6. stator-voltage oriented (or grid-flux oriented) system.1 0.7 0 0. b) Grid-current magnitude.3 0.2 0.4 Reactive power [%] c) 30 Power [%] Time [s] d) 10 Time [s] 0 −10 0 0.2 0.] 0.3 0.1 0.u.8 0.4 Current [p.u.8 0.2 0.1 Voltage [p.2 0.1.1 0.3 0. d) Reactive power.3 0.u.2 0.] 0.4 b) 0.] 1 0. b) Grid-current magnitude.2 0.3 0.1 0 0 0.4 20 10 0 0 0.4 Current [p. 84 .4 20 10 0 0 0.4 b) 0.1 0 0 0. a) 1.a) 1.4 Time [s] Time [s] Fig.4 Time [s] Time [s] Fig. d) Reactive power.1 Voltage [p.1 0. c) Active power. 6.3 0.1 0.9 0.1 0.2 0.9 0. Experiment of the response to a voltage sag. Simulation of the response to a voltage sag with the full-order model. a) Grid-voltage magnitude.1 0.4 Reactive power [%] c) 30 Power [%] Time [s] d) 10 Time [s] 0 −10 0 0.7 0 0.2 0. a) Grid-voltage magnitude.] 1 0.3 0.3 0.

6.2 0.1 Voltage [p.4 Time [s] Time [s] Fig.7 0 0. c) Active power.3 0. Simulation of the response to a voltage sag with the reduced-order model.4 b) 0.3 0.3 0. Experiment of the response to a unsymmetrical voltage sag.15 0.25 Current [p. d) Reactive power.2 0. b) Grid-current magnitude.7 0 0.2 0.2 0.] 0.u.1 0.u. a) Grid-voltage magnitude.4 b) 0.3 0.4.4 Reactive power [%] c) 30 Time [s] d) 10 5 0 −5 −10 0 0.1 0.4 Reactive power [%] c) 30 Power [%] Time [s] d) 10 Time [s] 0 −10 0 0.3 0.4 Current [p.4 20 10 0 0 0. d) Reactive power.3 0.1 0.1 0. a) 1.1 0 0 0.1 0. a) Grid-voltage magnitude.4 Power [%] 20 10 0 −10 0 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.8 0.05 0 0 0.1 0.2 0.a) 1. b) Grid-current magnitude.] 0.2 0.3 0.u.1 Time [s] 0.3.9 0.1 Voltage [p.u. 85 .] 1 0.2 0.1 0. c) Active power.4 Time [s] Time [s] Fig.8 0.2 0.3 0.9 0. 6.] 1 0.

6.3 0.3 0. a) 1.4 b) 0.25 Current [p.3 0.1 Time [s] 0.2 0.1 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.u.2 0.05 0 0 0.a) 1.] 1 0.4 Power [%] 20 10 0 −10 0 0.2 0.2 0. c) Active power. d) Reactive power.1 0.2 0.u.u. Simulation of the response to an unsymmetrical voltage sag.1 0.1 0. 6.1 Voltage [p.15 0.2 0.2 0.8 0.15 0.05 0 0 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.5.4 Power [%] 20 10 0 −10 0 0. The simulation has been performed with the full-order model.25 Current [p.9 0.2 0.u.3 0.4 Reactive power [%] c) 30 Time [s] d) 10 5 0 −5 −10 0 0.1 0.4 Time [s] Time [s] Fig. The simulation has been performed with the reduced-order model.1 Voltage [p. b) Grid-current magnitude.7 0 0.7 0 0.4 Reactive power [%] c) 30 Time [s] d) 10 5 0 −5 −10 0 0. a) Grid-voltage magnitude.1 Time [s] 0. Simulation of the response to an unsymmetrical voltage sag.] 1 0. 6.9 0.4 b) 0.1 0.] 0.8 0.] 0. d) Reactive power.1 0.1 0. 86 .4 Time [s] Time [s] Fig. c) Active power. a) Grid-voltage magnitude. b) Grid-current magnitude.

02 0.1 Current (q) [p. an example is PSS/E. Examples are EMTDC and Simpow. This means that if stator flux transients are negligible a steady-state model of the DFIG dynamics are sufficient as long as the rotor circuit is not short-circuited due to a too large grid disturbance. and for these programs. Severe voltage disturbance.06 0.02 0.4 Implementation in Grid Simulation Programs Some grid simulation programs can handle three-phase instantaneous quantities.] b) 0 4 2 0 0 0.] c) 0. it may not be possible to use such a short time step (about 5 µs) as is required in order to simulate the control of the DFIG system. a) Grid voltage.5 1 0. since the time step is often too large for these oscillations. However.] 1.04 0. the machine will act as a standard squirrel-cage induction machine which can be adequately modeled with a fifth-order model of the induction machine [83]. the stator flux transients may be negligible from the power system stability analysis point of view.a) Voltage [p. The suggested approach is to simply ignore the 50-Hz oscillations when the DFIG system is implemented in simulations with long time steps. Other programs are designed to handle the voltages as phasors. b) d component of the grid current.06 0. 50-Hz oscillations in the output quantities cannot be captured. a steady-state model of the DFIG is sufficient.02 0.04 0.06 0. 87 . c) q component of the grid current. as long as the disturbances are small enough not to cause the rotor to be short-circuited.u.7. However. 60]. 6.08 0.04 0. For this case.08 0.1 4 2 0 0 0. when handling simulations of large systems. As pointed out in [84.u.1 Time [s] Fig.5 0 Current (d) [p. if a disturbance is large enough to cause the rotor to be short-circuited.08 0.u. 6.

5 Summary In this chapter. Both models produced acceptable results. 88 . simulations and experimental verification of the dynamic response to voltage sags of a DFIG wind turbine were presented. The response to symmetrical as well as unsymmetrical voltage sags was verified.6. Simulations were carried out using a fullorder model and a reduced-order model. Perfect correspondence with experiments were not expected since the simulations were carried out on a fictitious DFIG wind turbine.

7.e. WTs have to ride through these voltage sags. Proposed regulations from the Swedish national grid company.Chapter 7 Voltage Sag Ride-Through of Variable-Speed Wind Turbines As mentioned in the Introduction.1. simple space vector models will be presented for some common voltage sags that will be used in this chapter. Then.6 0.8 0.6 0.4 0. This investigation will the serve as a basis for the comparison of DFIG ride-through systems. Svenska Kraftn¨ t [96]. First.2 0. This means that new wind turbine installations have to stay connected to the grid for voltage sags above a certain reference sag. the proposed Swedish requirements for voltage sags is depicted. 89 . new grid codes are in progress both in Sweden and other countries.2 0 −0. the voltage sag response of a WT that utilizes a full-power converter is investigated.] 0.u.3–100 MW.2 Time [s] Fig.1. these systems will be compared dynamically as well as for steady-state operation.2 0 0. Solid a line is the requirement for wind parks with a rated power larger than 100 MW. and systems for voltage sag ride-through will be investigated. In Fig.2 1 Voltage [p.4 0.. In the next sections the voltage sag response of the DFIG will be further analyzed.8 1 1. 7. Dashed line is the requirement for wind turbines and wind parks with a rated power between 0. Finally. i. 1.

0.4) .5–30 cycles.1 Voltage Sags With the expression “voltage sag. and the remaining rms voltage can be as low as V = 0 for a direct-to-ground fault. In this section. the impedance of each symmetrical component can be hard to derive.u. 7. it is assumed that the source and feeder impedance are much larger compared to the line-toground impedance. Single-Line-to-Ground Fault After a single-line-to-ground fault (SLGF) in the first phase the grid phase voltages can be expressed as E1 (t = 0+ ) = E2 (t = 0+ ) = E3 (t = 0+ ) = √ √ √ 2V cos(θg + π/2 + φ) 2Eg.” it is normally implied that the grid rms voltage drops from 1 p. e. There are other protection devices. Zero sequences are not critical for a PWM rectifier since such sequences ideally disappear from the phase currents due to the absence of a neutral conductor. negative-.g.” The majority of all “phase-angle jumps” are smaller than 45◦ [9]..2) (7. Directly after a symmetrical voltage sag. and zero-sequence impedance are assumed to be equal. and φ is the “phase-angle jump.1. The fault clearing time for protective relays varies from 50 ms up to 2000 ms [9]. These models are developed in [74] and the aim of the models are to estimate the moduli of the positive. for instance.1 Symmetrical Voltage Sags Symmetrical (or balanced) voltage sags implies an equally reduction of the rms voltage and. a “phase-angle jump” in all three phases [9]. the positive-. that might have a shorter fault clearing time (less than one cycle)..3) (7.u. to 0.9 p.1–0.e.2 Unsymmetrical Voltage Sags Unsymmetrical (or unbalanced) voltage sags are more difficult to model since.1.1) ˜ where V is the remaining rms voltage in the faulted phases. For ground faults.nom cos(θg + π/2 + 2π/3) 90 (7. The origin and classification of voltage sags are well explained in [9]. possibly. θ0 is the initial error angle. current-limiting fuses. in order to simplify the derivation of models suitable for unsymmetrical voltage sags. The impedance between the two faulted lines for a line-to-line fault is neglected. i.7.nom cos(θg + π/2 − 2π/3) 2Eg. simple space vector models will be presented for some common voltage sags. However.and negative-sequence voltage vectors for different types of sags. the grid voltage vector can be expressed in the synchronous reference frame as Eg (t = 0+ ) = jV ej θ0 = jV ejφ ˜ (7. 7. The duration of voltage sags is mainly determined by the clearing time of the protection used in the grid [9]. for a short period of time. Voltage sags caused by these fuses are short and deep if the fault is in the local distribution network but if the fault is in a remote distribution network the sag is short and shallow [9].

i. E2 .5 p. (7. i.. respectively.5) are the stationary parts of the positive. and E3 are the grid phase voltages directly after the sag. Ep becomes real valued and. ideally. such ˜ that.5 · 0. V = 0.5 · 0.71)] ≈ −0.nom 2 jφ + V e .nom cos(θg + π/2 + 2π/3) which correspond to the following space vector in the synchronous reference frame: Eg0 = j Ep0 + En0 e−j2θg where Ep0 = Eg. it is seen that minimal modulus of the positive-sequence voltage vector is Ep = 2Eg.e.nom /3 and that the maximum negative-sequence voltage vector is En = Eg.6).15 rad ≈ −9◦ .. θ ≈ 0.u. the PLL will track the position of the positive-sequence voltage vector. Two-Lines-to-Ground Fault After a two-lines-to-ground fault (TLGF) between the first and second phase. a total loss of voltage in the faulted phase. En0 = E∗ − V e−jφ e−jπ/3 . p0 3 3 91 (7. θ1 = θg .7) Eg0 = j Ep0 + En0 e−j2θg .4) is then found as Es = j Ep0 ejθg + En0 e−jθg g0 where Ep0 = 1 1 2Enom + V ejφ . As expected. For perfect pre-sag field orientation. From (7. The space vector in a stationary reference frame that corresponds to (7. the grid phase voltages can be expressed as √ (7.u.71/(2 + 0. The initial error angle of the positive-sequence voltage vector due to a SLGF is ˜ θ0 = arg(Ep0 ) = arctan V sin φ 2Eg.u. respectively. and φ = −45◦ .e.9) E1 (t = 0+ ) = 2V cos(θg + π/2 + φ) √ (7..e.11) E3 (t = 0+ ) = 2Eg.. hence.12) (7.13) . Consider the following values for a numerical example: Eg. the negative sequence becomes in the synchronous reference frame a component with a frequency of twice the fundamental frequency.5 p. (7.10) E2 (t = 0+ ) = 2V cos(θg + π/2 − 2π/3 + φ) √ (7. and V and φ are the remaining rms voltage and “phase-angle jump” in the first phase. This gives an initial error ˜ angle of θ = arctan[−0.nom /3.where E1 .nom + V cos φ . En0 = Enom − V e−jφ 3 3 (7. The initial error angle ˜ becomes even smaller if V is smaller than 0.and negative-sequence voltage vectors. θ0 = 0 for V = 0.nom = 1 p. i.6) (7.5) can be transformed to the synchronous reference frame by substituting Es = Eg0 ejθg and solving the resulting equation for g0 Eg0 : (7. −2ωg .2)–(7. for instance.8) Eventually. This occurs when V = 0.

5. 7.nom /3 for V = 0. 7. the dc-link voltage dynamics are analyzed for various disturbances and voltage sags. Line-to-Line Fault Directly after a worst-case (no feeder impedance) line-to-line fault (LLF) between phases 2 and 3. The system configuration consists of a generator and two converters connected “back-to-back” as depicted in Fig.2. it can be seen that the minimal modulus for the positive-sequence voltage vector is Ep = Eg. with the exception of Pr = −Pt . designed for the rated WT power. The dc-link voltage controller presented in Section 4. the voltage sag response of PWM rectifiers.nom (7.From (7. the grid phase voltages are found as √ (7. (7. the modulus of the positive. This exception indicates that the rotor power.nom .17) E3 = √ cos(θg + π/2 − π) 2 which correspond to the following space vector in the synchronous reference frame: Eg0 = j 1 − e−j2θg Eg.14) An initial error angle of −23◦ is obtained as a numerical example using the same values as in the previous section. As a result of the analysis. The main focus of this section is put on the PWM rectifier and the achieved results and conclusions are independent of the type of converter at the generator side. accurate estimates of the transient and steady-state response of the grid current and dc-link voltage during voltage sags are provided. the grid-filter current equals the grid current. Pr .2 will be considered. Pt . Note that for this case.nom cos(θg + π/2) Eg.2 Full-Power Converter In this section.15) E1 = 2Eg.and negative-sequence voltage vectors both equal Eg.1 Analysis First.nom /3 and that the maximal modulus for the negative-sequence voltage vector is En = Eg.nom + 2V cos φ .18) Obviously.2.nom (7. 7.13). for the full-power converter analyzed in this section. and the initial error angle moments after the LLF equals zero.nom /2. is analyzed. used for the DFIG is changed to the total turbine power. The initial error angle directly after a TLGF is ˜ θ0 = arg(Ep0 ) = arctan 2V sin φ Eg.16) E2 = √ cos(θg + π/2 − π) 2 Eg. 2 (7.12) and (7. These results can be useful when designing a PWM rectifier for various grid codes and requirements. It is assumed that 92 .

2 · 50) = 490 times smaller than fsw . Then.028) ≈ 0. Wind turbine with a full power rectifier.9 kHz.9 kHz. so (7. will be considered which. The transfer function from ref the turbine power Pt to the error signal. To ensure that this voltage ripple remains below a tolerable value. the grid-filter current dynamics and the switching transients at the dc link are.3. which equals the capacitance of the experimental setup in Section 7. 7. 93 . symmetrical and nominal grid voltage. αw is 4900/(0. these values yield Cdc. ew = Wdc − Wdc . neglected. very high demands [50] are placed on the dc-link voltage control loop when using such small a dc-link capacitance.19) Cdc p2 Since the dc-link dynamics are considered to be much slower than the switching and sampling frequency. steady-state condition. is the nominal q-axis current and vdc is the tolerable peak-to-peak ripple fq p-p for the dc-link voltage. The value vdc = 0.u. is considered. with (4.5 p.u. Henceforth.2 p.20) is mainly a benchmark that can be used for comparison to more realistic operating conditions. of the PWM rectifier. which corresponds to 1 % peak-to-peak ˜ ref a ripple at vdc = 2. and perfect field orientation are assumed to precede the different disturbances.u. Minimal DC-link Capacitance In PWM rectifiers. for a 50-Hz grid. becomes GP e (p) = −GP W (p) = −2p . the dc-link capacitance should be selected no smaller than [59] √ nom 3if q (7.PWM “rectifier” Grid filter Lg Cdc SG Grid Fig. are considered for √numerical example.8 and fsw = 4.u.min = 8fsw vdc ˜p-p ˜p-p where inom = 1 p. Moreover.min = 3 · 1/(8 · 4900/314 · 0. fsw . i. For a base frequency of ωb = 314 rad/s.e.028 pu. if the bandwidth of the dc-link voltage control loop is αw = 0.2. Cdc = Cdc . 2 + 2αw ξp + αw ξ (7.120).5 p. ˆ the dc-link capacitance is accurately modeled. a dc-link capacitance of Cdc = 3.. the current in the dc-link capacitors is heavily distorted which gives rise to a small (compared to diode rectifiers) ripple in the dc-link voltage. thus.20) Cdc. For instance. and the switching and sampling frequency is fsw = 4.2. However.

are considered for a numerical example which yield a local maximum for ew (t) at emax = w ref 0. where Egq (t) changes stepwise at t = 0 and if q (vdc ) is a function of the dc-link voltage (via the vdc control loop). w Response to Symmetrical Voltage Sags As mentioned earlier. Therefore. though.24) by V /Eg. (50 % of nominal power).24) where Pt0 is the pre-sag turbine power. the dynamics in (7. perfect field orientation and steady-state condition. becomes ew (t) = L−1 Gnom (p) Pe ΔP p =− 2ΔP −αw t e t. it is assumed that symmetrical voltage sags are preceded by symmetri˙ cal and nominal grid voltage.nom if q + Pt0 (7. Meanwhile. (7. from Pt (0− ) = 0 to Pt (0+ ) = ΔP . Then. i.5 = (2. it follows from (7. With vdc = 2.e. Cdc (7. ew (t). This means that the net power step is ΔP = (1 − V /Eg. the maximum/minimum value of ˙ ew (t) is 2ΔP −1 0.nom when analyzing the capability of the dc-link voltage control loop to reject disturbances in Pt .u. Pt (t) = Pt0 V /Eg.22) Depending on whether ΔP is positive or negative. However.25) appear to be time-varying. the q-axis grid voltage can considered to be constant at 94 .2 p. αw = 0. (7.nom ..Assessment of Turbine Power Reduction The grid-voltage modulus is normally close to its nominal value.8 p.19) is reduced to Gnom (p) = GP e (p) Pe = Egq =Eg.25) and (7. and Cdc = 3.82 − 1. the error.u.u. this is not the case. (7.26) Then by introducing the “new” turbine power.26) that a symmetrical voltage sag is equivalent to a positive step in Pt .22) has a local minimum or maximum for t = 1/αw (determined by solving ew (t) = 0).u. this corresponds to a minimum dc-link min ref voltage of vdc = ((vdc )2 − emax )0. which changes from Pt (0− ) = Pg0 V /Eg.25) after a sag at t = 0. These assumptions imply the following dynamics for W : t≥0: 1 dW C = −3V if q + Pt0 2 dt (7.5 p.nom )Pt0 . Cdc (p + αw )2 (7.2 · 3.5 p.5) ≈ 1. (7.6)0. Since the power to the grid filter is Pf = 3Egq (t)if q (vdc )..74ΔP e ≈− . Moments after a symmetrical voltage sag occurs. W = 0.5 p.u. Therefore.nom .74 · 1. it is natural to let Egq = Eg.nom : t<0: 0 = −3V if q + Pt0 V Eg.5 = 2. it can be assumed that Egq = V while Pt remains at its pre-sag value.21) For a step in the turbine power.nom to Pt (0+ ) = Pt0 . This implies that: t < 0 : 0 = −3Eg.23) emax/min (t = 1/αw ) = − w αw Cdc αw Cdc The values ΔP = −1.u.nom −2p . which can be deduced by multiplying (7.5/(0.6 p.

1) = 10 p.1 p.1 p. Remedies for avoiding severe overcurrents during symmetrical voltage sags are discussed in Section 7.2 0.6 p.u. The single exception to this power step equivalence is when V = 0. which corresponds to that power cannot be transferred to the utility grid.nom ..4 = −0. Once the equivalence to turbine power steps has been revealed... i. is obtained from the inverse Laplace transform of (7.nom cos[θ(t)] which yields the instantaneous grid˜ filter power as Pf = 3Eg. in order to regain steady-state conditions during a sag. the ˜ q-axis grid voltage varies as Egq (t) = Eg.94 p.28).28) has a local minimum or √ maximum for t = arcsin( 1 − ξ)/ωw . (7. the poles of this transfer function are αw V ± j Eg.u.82 − 0.2/2.u.nom V − V 2 . determined by the dynamics of the error angle.u.29) The values C = 3.2. Depending on the sign of ΔP .6 ≈ 0. ξ = 0. Consider Pt = 3 p. for instance.19) multiplied by the step ΔP /p: ew (t) = L−1 GP e (p) ΔP p =− 2ΔP −αw ξt sin (ωw t) e ωw C (7.u. the dynamics of ew during symmetrical voltage sags are. With w ref min vdc = 2.u. given by (7.19). the extreme value for ew (t) is obtained as ew = − 2ΔP exp − ωw C ξ arcsin 1−ξ 1−ξ 1 − ξ. αw = 0.5 · 0.2. Since Pf is a function of time and vdc .6 and √ ωw = 0.u.” The response of PWM rectifiers to “phase-angle jumps” is.u. This yields a local maximum of emax√≈ 0.27) are well damped for V ≥ Eg..5 p.. is that symmetrical voltage sags may require very large if q in order to counteract the reduction in the grid rms voltage such that Pf = Pg in the steady state.5 p.e.21)..8 · 100 ≈ 7 %.2 = − Eg. V = Eg. By substituting Egq = V .. More troublesome however. i.30) ˜ In the time interval when θ(t) converges exponentially to zero with the rise time 1/ρ. (nominal power) and V = 0.6 p.u. it is assumed that the modulus of the grid voltage vector remains constant at Eg. no voltage sag accompanies the “phase-angle jump.8 p.Egq = V provided that accurate field orientation is maintained.u. the time function of the error angle after a “phase-angle jump” can be modeled as ˜ ˜ θ(t) = θ0 e−ρt . which demands for if q = 3/(3 · 0.nom /2.nom . to a large extent.27) p1.nom if q (vdc ) cos[θ(t)]. Moreover. are considered for a numerical example. the poles of (7. i. By substituting this instant in (7.6 p. (7. the 95 .94 ≈ 2.. Provided that overcurrent is avoided.28) where ωw = αw (1 − ξ)ξ.. after a symmetrical voltage sag.e..u. (7. Response to “Phase-Angle Jumps” For reasons of simplicity and clarity. V = 0. Pt0 = −1.4 · 0. For a PLL tuned assuming a bandwidth of ρ. (7. the dc-link voltage decreases by 0.e.nom For normal operation. the poles are located at −αw . this corresponds to a minimal dc-link voltage of vdc = 2.2 p. This means that ΔP = −1. as seen in (7. ew (t). hence.u.

nom . With vdc = 2. this implies that the dc-link voltage min decreases to vdc = (2. the seemingly daring assumption of nearly constant dc-link voltage during “phase-angle jumps” is adopted. and Cdc = 3.2)0.e. ˙ reasonable.nom if q (vdc ) is a function of vdc only.15 · 1.31) are time-invariant. The time function of the error signal can be derived by taking the inverse Laplace transform of the product of (7.2.5 p. The error signal ew (t) has a local minimum/maximum for t = ln 2/ρ.8 p.2 p. such that 1/ cos θ ≈ 1 + θ2 /2. Therefore. θ0 = −π/4 rad.u. ≈− 2 ρCdc (7. (7..5) ≈ 0. from (7. on the 96 .35) ˜ The values Pt0 = −1.76 p. which is supported by simulations and experiments in Section 7.82 − 0. From this analytic finding.u. For small θ. since the remaining positivesequence voltage of unsymmetrical sags is never as small as that of the worst-case symmetrical sag.3.21) and ΔP (p): ew (t) = L−1 Gnom (p)L{ΔP (t)} = Pe ˜2 2θ0 Pt0 −ρt ρ e + t − 1 e−ρt ρCdc 2 (7.u.dynamics of W . it can be concluded that “phase-angle jumps” are believed not to be critical for PWM rectifiers. since Pf = 3Eg. in the beginning of this section).5 ≈ 2.33).15θ0 Pt0 .2 · 3.31) t ≥ 0 : 0 ≈ −3Eg.2. are considered for a numerical example.30).34) since e−ρt initially decays faster than ρt/2 increases. i.04/2.” ew (t) can be approximated by ew (t) ≈ ˜2 2θ0 Pt0 −ρt e − 1 e−ρt = ew (t) ρCdc (7. are time varying during “phase-angle jumps” in contrast to symmetrical voltage sags.nom if q cos θ + Pt0 = −3Eg.u..32) 2 2 where the latter expression results from (7.31).8 · 100 ≈ 1 %. a decrement by 0. as discussed previously.2 p. the “dynamics” after a “phase-angle jump” at t = 0 simplify to Pt0 ˜ .u. As a remedy for this.nom if q + ˜ cos θ The approximated “dynamics” in (7. Response to Unsymmetrical Voltage Sags The response of PWM rectifiers to unsymmetrical voltage sags is partly similar to the response to symmetrical voltage sags. [76] (this happens to coincide with the selection of αw = 0.u. By substituting this instant in (7. This assumption is validated by simulations and experiments in Section 7. With W ≈ 0.5 · w ref π 2 /(42 · 0.24) and (7. A unique property of unsymmetrical sags is. which gives a local maximum of emax = 0. a “phase-angle jump” is in close correspondence to a time varying Pt which changes from Pt (0− ) = Pt0 to Pt (t) = ˜ ˜ ˜ ˜ Pt0 / cos[θ(t)] at constant Egq = Eg.. the extreme value for ew (t) is found as ew ≈ ˜2 2θ0 Pt0 ρCdc 1 ln 2 + −1 2 2 ˜2 1 0.. although less critical. the net change in Pt is ˜ ˆ θ2 (t) θ2 ΔP (t) = 1 + Pt0 − Pt0 = 0 e−2ρt Pt0 (7.u.u.2 p.3 which show that the approximation is. Within a short time interval after a “phase-angle jump.2 p.5 p. αw = ρ = 0.33) where αw = ρ is assumed since proper rejection of the negative-sequence voltage requires a PLL bandwidth of ρ ≈ 0. indeed.

As for symmetrical sags.8 − (2.e. a q-axis current of iavg = 1 p.nom ) 97 (7. Provided with this expression for Egq and. which can be expressed as if q = iavg + ˜f q .08 p.u. The ref values En = 0.. remedies for avoiding large q-axis currents are to be discussed in Section 7. Pf = 3 fq fq p. where iavg is the average value of if q fq fq and ˜f q is the current ripple. small current |˜f q |...u..36) From (7.u..u. then (7.nom .nom (p2 + 2αw Egq /Eg. i..2.5 p. yields Pf = 3Ep iavg = 1.5 ≈ 0.37) where ξp = Ep /Eg. is determined.nom p + αw Egq /Eg. or a ripple of 0. The ˜w ˜pk corresponding peak value of the vdc ripple is vdc = 2.36).. and Cdc = 3. the dc-link voltage dynamics simplify to ı ripple. ωg Cdc (7.43)0. such that |iavg | fq dW 1 Cdc ≈ −3Ep if q − 3En iavg cos(2θg − ϕ) + Pt . This may be too large a current to be tolerated in a WT fq application. 4. to a large extent. the ripple in ew . such that ωg αw . fq 2 dt (7.e.u. vdc = 2.5 = 2 p. Two simplifications are introduced in order to analyze these ı ripples.2. due to an unsymmetrical voltage sag.82 − 0. smaller 2 2 than 0. whereas nominal power.u.8 p.other hand. the modulus of the positive-sequence voltage vector is the most critical consequence. by the dc-link capacitance. the power ripple during unsymmetrical voltage sags also transfers to the q-axis current.43 p.8·100 ≈ 3 %.. An LLF is considered for a numerical example. the q-axis grid voltage eventually varies as Egq (t) = Ep + En cos(−2θg + ϕ) where ϕ is the angle of the negative-sequence voltage ˜ vector for θ = t = 0. that the negative-sequence voltage vector introduces a ripple in the instantaneous grid power. which adds to the grid current distortion during faults. This indicates that if Ep = 0.5 p.. First shortly after an unsymmetrical sag it is assumed that the PLL recovers the position of the positive-sequence voltage vector.u. 2 3Eg.u.37) can be approximated as |GP e (j2ωg )| ≈ Cdc 4ωg 2 (−4ωg )2 = 1 .e. with constant Egq = Ep .5) = 0. via the dc voltage control system. The dc voltage q ˜ ripple that results from Pt are obtained from the static gain of GP e (p) in (7.15.08/2.3 p. In order to analyze the resulting q current ripple.19) at the relevant frequency 2ωg and Egq = Ep : |GP e (j2ωg )| = Cdc 4ωg 2 2 (αw ξp − 4ωg )2 + (4ωg αw ξp )2 (7. yield a peak ripple fq ˜ of epk ≈ Ptpk /(ωg Cdc ) = 3 · 0. If αw is selected at least three times smaller than ωg . at a frequency of 2ωg . which results in GP i (p) = −2[Ga + F (p)]/(pCdc ) 1 − 6Eq [Ga + F (p)]/(pCdc ) 2αw (p + αw /2) = . denoted by ˜ ˜ Pt = 3En iavg cos(2θg − ϕ) = Ptpk cos(2θg − ϕ).u. As previously discussed.u.5 p. iavg = 1 p.5 · 1/(1 · 3.u. This is a fairly small ripple which is not critical for the proper operation of a PWM rectifier. requires iavg = 1/0. i.u.39) . the transfer function from Pt to if q can be derived from Fig. the power ripple can be treated as a turbine power disturbance.5 p.. i.38) Hence. This power ripple in turn gives rise to ripple in the dc-link voltage and ı in if q . secondly.

40) implies that the resulting ripple in if q is mainly determined by the bandwidth of the dc voltage control system. This yields a peak ˜ ripple of ˜pk ≈ αw Ptpk /(3ωg Eg. Therefore. The relation in (7.40) where the latter approximation holds when αw is selected at least three times smaller than ωg . • Grid codes. it may happen max that the turbine power is larger compared to Pf . Depending on these factors.u. The design of such energy storages depends on several factors of which some are: • Cost. “Braking” Chopper A “braking” chopper.nom ) = 0.2 · 1. 98 . the turbine power is controlled to Pt = Pf by changing the torque reference for the turbine. a less distorted grid current during unsymmetrical voltage sags can be obtained by selecting αw smaller.nom (7. the blades should preferably remain in their pre-sag position.1 p. For such operating conditions.5/3 = 0. acting as a load dump. the dc-link voltage begins to increase. ı assumption on |iavg | fq 7. or possibly a combination. If there is no need for instantaneous power restoration. the static gain of GP i (p) at the relevant frequency 2ωg is obtained as |GP i (j2ωg )| = αw 3Eg. • The remaining modulus of the positive-sequence grid voltage vector and the duration of the voltage sag. during an LLF.u. with identical ıf q values as previously and αw = 0. no more than Pf = 3V imax can be transferred to the fq utility grid.2 p. can be installed at the dc link. The limiting factor of this solution is the heat generated by the “braking” resistor which may be troublesome to remove for long-duration voltage sags or interruptions.2. This is a fairly large ripple although the previous |˜f q | is still reasonable.By substituting Egq = Ep in this expression.nom 2 2 αw + 16ωg αw ≈ 2 2 (αw ξp − 4ωg )2 + (4ωg αw ξp )2 3ωg Eg. the blades can be pitched out of the wind directly. one. Depending on the wind situation when the voltage sag occurs.2 Discussion In general. If the pre-sag grid power must be restored moments after the voltage sag is cleared. unless the WT approaches overspeed. unless the excess energy is somehow stored or dissipated. For a voltage sag max where the modulus reduces to V . of the following four solutions may be applicable: Rotor Energy Storage In this solution. WTs using PWM rectifiers are robust towards voltage sags but large reductions in modulus of the positive-sequence voltage vector appear to be critical.

The grid voltage is recovered at t = 0.u.u. Fig.21 · 2.u.8 rad occurs at t = 0. max if q = 1 p.2 p.3 s. in the steady state. The PWM rectifier uses 4.3.3 s.DC-Link Energy Storage A large dc-link capacitor bank can possibly be used.25 s. Fig. In all other aspects.8 p. characterized by Ep = 0.5 p.1vdc )2 − ref ref (vdc )2 = 0.3 p. This is close to the predicted value vdc = 2. This is a very large value. which gives Cdc = 2 · 0. A pure “phase-angle jump” of φ = −45◦ ≈ −0. i.4 shows the results of an unsymmetrical voltage sag. 7. Eg = 0.e. are considered for a numerical example.21(vdc )2 . The closed-loop grid current and dc-link voltage control loops are tuned for the bandwidths 2. and if q = −0.32 s.2.u. such that energy from the WT is buffered at the dc link during the sag.3 Evaluation This section presents simulated and experimental results of a PWM rectifier which is subjected to various disturbances and voltage sags. which corresponds to Cdc = 3. the simulation and corresponding experiment are carried out under similar conditions as in Fig.41) Cdc = −3V imax + Pt .1.1–0.6 p. then WΔ = (1. at t = 0.6 p. fq ΔW If the dc-link voltage is allowed to increase by no more than 10 %. 7. The required size of the capacitor bank can be calculated ˙ by substituting W = WΔ /tΔ in (7.5 p.9 kHz sampling and switching frequency and the reference for the dc-link voltage is normally 2. so a dc-link energy storage appears to be suitable mainly for small voltage sags that appear for a short period of time.65 p. respectively. which corresponds to a current rise time of 3 ms and a dc-link voltage rise time of 35 ms. The d current reference equals zero.u. and 1.u. 7.2 p. assuming if q = imax . imax > 1 pu. 7.5 p.u.2.” as already concluded.12 s. 50 Hz. which yields an initial error angle of ˜ ˜ θ0.1 s.. 105 V.6 p.u.05 s. Δt = 0. 7.3 shows the results from the first simulation and experiment. which causes the dc-link voltage to drop to vdc = 2.25 · 314 · 3/1. However. and requiring iq to be close to 1 p. eventually.u. and Pt = 3 p. Overcurrent The PWM rectifier can be designed for overcurrent.72 ≈ 1.8 rad. 7. causing the dc-link voltage to increase to vdc = 3 p.8 p. resulting from the numerical example in Section 7. and αw = 0. The sag occurs in the time interval t = 0.2 mF. the grid voltage modulus is Eg ≈ 0.u. Moments after t = 0.3 except 99 . As seen from θ in Fig. V = 0.25).u.5 ≈ 310 p. the thermal fq limit of the utility grid may not be designed for such overcurrent..u.4 p.05 = −0. and solving the resulting fq expression for Cdc : 2Δt (7.. giving.u.u. and En = 0. the PLL recovers accurate field orientation at approximately 40 ms after the “phase-angle jump” so the PWM rectifier is hardly affected by the “jump.3b). especially if several WTs are connected to a common point. the maximum current modulus allowed is 1 pu.u.u.5 pu at vdc = 2.u. The dc-link capacitance is Cdc = 9. The base values are 85 A.2 Ω. The simulated and experimental waveforms are similar to those in Fig. and the PLL bandwidth is ρ = 0.u. The values ΔW = 0. The PWM rectifier is loaded by a dc-link resistor which corresponds to Pt = −1.1–0. A symmetrical voltage sag occurs in the time interval t = 0.5 p.u.

4 Conclusion The voltage sag response of PWM rectifiers has been investigated for a candidate dc-link voltage control system. 15 ms after the load power step.2 0. e) Grid voltage. is superimposed on the dc-link voltage. which showed good agreement between analytical predictions and experimental results.1 0.] 0. the reference for the dc-link voltage changes stepwise from vdc = 2.5 p.u.2 0.u.5 vdc [p.3 0.4 e) Eq [p.u.5 2 0 0.2 0.4 1 0 1 0 g) ˜ θ1 [rad] 1 0 −1 0 0.u. The step response for t > 0.5 0 if q [p. a) DC-link voltage.1 0.1 ref s.1 0. These ripples are in close correspondence to the values predicted by the numerical example in the analysis section.3 0.] 0 0.u. b) DC-link voltage. ˜ ˜ Eq (experiment).8 p.u..4 3 2.2.4 Time [s] Time [s] Fig. and the ripple in the q-axis current is close to 0. The dc-link voltage reduces to 2.1 0.1.a) 3.5 p.u. the candidate dc-link voltage control system can successfully reduce disturbances from both symmetrical and unsymmetrical voltage sags such that nominal power 100 . as predicted in Section 7. d) Grid-filter current.2 0. 7. and 0. if q (experiment).1 0.2 0.] 0 −0.4 0 0.3 0. A method of analysis was derived.5 vdc [p. if q (simulation). θ1 (experiment).12 p. the load power is stepped from Pt = 0 to Pt = −1. Fig.3 0.3 s is well damped and the dc voltage rise time (10–90 % of the final value) appears to equal the intended 35 ms.1 0.3 0.2 0.5 c) 0. vdc (experiment). that a ripple of approximately 0. 7.1 p.2 0.] 0 0. f) Grid voltage. c) Grid-filter current.] 3 2.3.2 s later.3 0.u.] 0 −0.2 0. Eq (simulation). h) PLL error angle.2.u.1 0.u.5 2 d) 0.5 if q [p.5 −1 −1.5 −1 −1.3 0.3 0.4 0 0.5 b) 3.4 f) Eq [p. vdc (simulation). In the last experiment. g) PLL error angle.u.u. θ1 (simulation). Response to “phase-angle jump” and symmetrical voltage sag.5 shows the results. For several types and magnitudes of voltage sags. at t = 0. ref to vdc = 3 p.1 0. 7.4 h) ˜ θ1 [rad] 1 0 −1 0 0.

5 if q [p.] 0 0. e) Grid voltage.3 0. if q (experiment). vdc (experiment).2 0. if q (simulation). g) PLL error angle.5 d) 0.2 vdc [p.5 if q [p.2 vdc [p.4 0.3 0.u.2 0. c) Grid-filter current.2 0.4 b) 3.5 b) 3.4 h) ˜ θ1 [rad] 0.3 0.4 0 0. vdc (experiment).1 0.3 0.] 0 −0.3 0.4 Time [s] Time [s] Fig.2 0.5 0 0.u.3 0.4 c) 0.5 0 if q [p.4 e) 1. a) DC-link voltage. c) Grid-filter current. 101 .8 2.5 if q [p.u. h) PLL error angle.6 2. a) DC-link voltage. d) Grid-filter current.1 0.1 0.5 −1 −1.5 −1 −1.5 d) 0.u. Eq (simulation).5 0 Eq [p.4 0 0.3 0.] 0 −0.u.1 0.4 f) 1.3 0.2 0.5 0 Eq [p.1 0. if q (simulation).5 c) 0.3 0. if q (experiment).1 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.u.4 0 0.6 2. 7.] 3 2.a) 3.4 Time [s] Time [s] ref Fig.3 0.] 0 −0. vdc (simulation).5 1 0 −1 0 0 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.u.5 1 0 −1 0 0.4 0 0.u.] 0 −0.4 g) ˜ θ1 [rad] 0. d) Grid-filter current. θ1 (experiment). Response to “phase-angle jump” and LLF unsymmetrical voltage sag.5 0. f) Grid ˜ ˜ voltage.5 −1 −1. θ1 (simulation). 7.5 vdc [p.4 3 2.2 0.] 3 2.] 1 0. Eq (experiment).5 0 −0.] 3 2.1 0.1 0.8 2. Steps in Ps and vdc .2 0.u.2 0.5 0 −0.4.1 0.5 −1 −1.1 0.u. a) 3. b) DC-link voltage. vdc (simulation).] 1 0.3 0.3 0.5 vdc [p. b) DC-link voltage.5.

large reductions in the positive-sequence voltage were found to be critical. However.6 shows a principle sketch of the DFIG. rotor current control has been lost and the turbine must be disconnected from the grid. Unless suitable actions are taken. Remedies for avoiding overvoltage at the dc link have also been discussed. this means that only the IGBT modules need to be designed for a higher current while the rotor winding and the converter (cooling etc) still can be designed according to the slip power only. The crowbar in DFIG ≈ = = ≈ Grid Crowbar Fig. since the current through the thyristor is a continuous dc current and can only be interrupted if the turbine is disconnected from the grid [72].6. 102 . Assuming such a short over-current time. However. After such an action. Since the relatively low power losses in the power electronic equipment were a major reason for selecting a DFIG.production can be restored once the grid voltage recovers. Fig. 7. 7. one possibility is to still have a rotor converter.3 Doubly-Fed Induction Generator with Shunt Converter Fig. which short-circuits the rotor circuit in case of too large a grid disturbance causing high rotor current. Doubly-fed induction generator system with a crowbar. One disadvantage with this system is that once the crowbar has been triggered. it is accordingly important to study how the ride-through system influences the power losses. the turbine must be disconnected from the grid. This means that the converter shortly can handle a higher current and thereby stay connected to the grid longer without any crowbar action. and thereby protects the rotor converter. Still. we will look further into the dynamics of the DFIG during a voltage sag. Before explaining the candidate DFIG ride-through system. 7. since additional hardware or modifications may reduce the efficiency. such a voltage reduction sag may result in a dc-link overvoltage since the transferable active power reduces with reducing grid voltage. In the figure a crowbar is also depicted. but one that can handle a higher current for a short period of time of some 100s of ms.6 consists of a diode rectifier and a thyristor that is triggered when the rotor circuit should be short circuited. 7. this system will have high fault currents from the stator during the voltage sag.

nom ψs0 e−Rs t/LM e−jωg t (7. 7. no crowbar action. However. the flux will circularly approach the “new” equilibrium point (the circle) very slowly. the flux will again approach circularly the equilibrium point (the cross) indicated with the solid line. the flux dynamics of the DFIG are poorly damped. It can be seen in the figure that directly after the voltage sag has occurred. the voltage returns when the flux is close to the original equilibrium point (the cross). The amplitude of the oscillation will be proportional to the size of the voltage sag. as shown in Fig.7. when the voltage returns. which can be realized from the fact that ψs ≈ Eg /ωg .. i.e. i. the oscillations become even worse when the voltage returns after the sag. if the voltage returns at an unfortunate moment. 7.42) V Eg.nom . with the duration of the sag as the only difference.7a) and c). However.7b) and d). The reason that the amplitude of the stator flux oscillation can almost vary between zero and twice the initial amplitude is that steady-state condition hardly precedes the returning of the voltage. we will assume that the converter is ideal an can supply the desired rotor voltage and current.7b).1 Response to Small Voltage Sags In order to explain what happens to the DFIG during and after a voltage sag. and steady-state conditions are assumed to precede the voltage sag. This is indicated by the dashed lines in the figure.47) and (5. As also previously shown a voltage sag will cause the stator flux to enter a poorly damped oscillation with an oscillating frequency close to the line frequency.43) Eg.7a) and Fig.3. In the figure. two different voltage sags are shown. 7. the duration of the voltage sags in the time series is two periods longer. which leads to that the flux oscillations after the voltage sag are relatively small. If the DFIG system survives the voltage sag. the duration of the sag is important. Note. as indicated by the difference between Fig. when the voltage returns. In order to analyze the response to voltage sags we will assume that the magnitude of the stator flux can be expressed in a similar way as in (5. Symmetrical Voltage Sags In this section. 7. Then.e.2. it will be assumed that the “disturbance” is applied at t = 0 and that steady-state conditions precede the fault causing the voltage sag. In the analysis below.7. when the flux is far away from the original equilibrium point (the cross). we will start by looking at the flux dynamics.nom ωg V + 1− 103 t<0: t≥0: Ψs (t) = ψs0 ≈ Ψs (t) ≈ ψs0 (7. the amplitude of the flux oscillations can. where a phase portrait and corresponding time series of the flux can be seen. 7. As discussed several times before.. First. the dc-link dynamics of the DFIG system will be analyzed in a similar way as for the full-power converter system in Section 7. This can be realized from Fig. vary between zero and close to twice the flux oscillations in the beginning of the sag. In Figs. after the voltage sag. The cross marks the equilibrium point during normal operation and the circle marks the equilibrium point during the voltage sag. that in order to make the figure more lucid.48) as Eg.

7.25 −0.04 0.02 0.5 ms long voltage sag.nom ωg V pk + ψs e−Rs t/LM e−jωg t (7.25 1.nom pk where ψs = (1 − V /Eg.a) 0.5 0.5 0. For clarity of the figure.46) (7. d) Time series of the flux in b). a) 18.75 1 1. The expression for the stator flux in (7. and are governed both by the rotor power Pr and the grid-filter power Pf . which can be approximated as Pr ≈ 3Egq iRq − 3ωr Re[jΨs i∗ ] ≈ 3Egq iRq − 3ψs iRq ωr R Pf ≈ 3Egq if q . the voltage sag duration for the time series is two periods longer.5 0.5 −0.5 1 ψsd d) 2 1.02 0.25 −0.1).06 0.5 0 −0.1 Time [s] Time [s] Fig. ψsq 1 0.08 0.75 1 1.25 b) 0.25 ψsq 0 ψsq 0. ψsq ψsd .47) .nom )ψs0 is the peak value of the stator flux oscillation.5 0 q q −0.5 0 0.48).43) and (7. b) 10 ms long voltage sag.5 d ψsd . c) Time series of the flux in a).45) can be found by solving the differential equation in (6.5 0 −0. Phase portrait and time series of the flux dynamics during a symmetrical voltage sag.06 0. The dynamics of the dc-link are described by (4. or as t<0: t≥0: Ψs (t) = ψs0 ≈ Ψs (t) ≈ ψs0 Eg.7.45) Eg. 104 (7.08 0.5 d 0.5 ψsd c) 1.5 0.25 1.44) (7.1 0 0.5 0.04 0.

with GP e (p) = −GP W (p). yielding Prpk = 3ψs iR ωr = 105 . 1− ωg (7.52) will act as a disturbance to the dc-link. This means pk pk ˜ that ψs = (1 − V /Eg. the second term in (7. This means that the power drop in the first term of (7. (7.53) The dc-link dynamics in (4.120). where the stator voltage has been changed to the grid voltage.nom .25 p.52) (7..53). since steady-state conditions are assumed to precede the sag.u. Then. the above expression can be further reduced as t≥0: t≥0: Pr (t) ≈ 3V Pf (t) ≈ −3V 1− ωr pk iRq − 3ψs iR ωr e−Rs t/LM sin(ωg t + φr ) ωg ωr iRq .75) · 1 = 0.55) ξ)2 αw .49) Moreover.nom )ψs0 = (1 − 0. If ωg 2ωg 2 (αw ξ − 2 ωg )2 + (2ωg αw (7.50) t≥0: Pf (t) ≈ 3V if q ≈ −3V 1− ωr ωg iRq (7. (7.e.nom pk iRq ωr ψs0 + ψs iR ωr e−Rs t/LM sin(ωg t + φr ) (7.75 p. However. vR ≈ Egq − jωr Ψs . at the relevant frequency can be used.48) are governed by the term −Pr − Pf . Pr and Pf equal Pr (t = 0− ) ≈ 3Egq iRq − 3ψs0 iRq ωr Pf (t = 0− ) ≈ 3Egq if q .0 iRq ωr )/Egq ≈ −(1 − ωr /ωg )iRq . giving if q (t = 0− ) = −(Egq iRq − ψs.u. In order to determine the amplitude of the ripple the static gain of (4.The expression for Pr is derived from the fact that Pr = Re[3vR i∗ ] and by using the approxR imation of the rotor voltage given by (5. Cdc ωg (7.56) For example..u.5 p. This means that just before the voltage sag. it is possible to express Pr and Pf as t≥0: Pr (t) ≈ 3V iRq − 3 V Eg. as the stator flux prior to the voltage sag can be approximated as ψs0 ≈ Eg.52) is compensated for by the same drop in Pf as can be seen in (7.54) This disturbance will cause a ripple in the dc-link voltage with the frequency ωg . as pk ˜ ˜ Pr = 3ψs iR ωr e−Rs t/LM sin(ωg t + φr ) = Prpk e−Rs t/LM sin(ωg t + φr ). and Cdc = 3. moments after the sag has occurred.51) where iR = |iR | and φr = ∠iR .. the above expression can be further approximated as |GP e (jωg )| ≈ 2 . This yields |GP e (jωg )| = Cdc where ξ = V /Eg. i. we have that Pr (t = 0− ) = −Pf (t = 0− ). Under the assumption that the rotor current controller and grid-filter controller manage to keep the current at (or at least close to) its reference value.48) (7.nom /ωg . consider a voltage sag with V = 0.38).

98/(3 · 1 · 1) = 0. when ˜pk ref vdc = 2.8 p.u. The corresponding peak value of the ripple in vdc is vdc = 2.u.4 0.3 0.2. Since there is ripple in the dc-link voltage.2 0. d) DC-link voltage.7 2.8. c) Sum of rotor and grid-filter power.5 Time [s] Time [s] Fig.5 b) 1.9 2.8 2. a corresponding simulation is shown. 7. a) Grid voltage.82 − 0.3 = 0.4 0.] 1 0. the amplitude of the stator-flux oscillations can be close to twice the value at the beginning of the sag.25 0 0 0.75 0.] 1 0.] 0.] 1 0.2 0.1 0.5 3 2.u.8 − (2.4 0.2 · 0.u.25 · 1 · 1 · 1. this will also be transferred to if q .1 0.5 · 1) = 0.3 0..5 0.39) the static gain of the ripple in if q can be calculated (note that −GP i is actually used since here Pt = −Pr ). In Fig. b) Stator flux.3 0.5 0 0. that the amplitude in the dc-link voltage ripple will be increased accordingly.98 p. 7.u.u.u.25 0 0 0.a) 1.1 0.75 0. Moreover.nom 2 2 αw + 4ωg 2αw ≈ 2 ξ − ω 2 )2 + (2ω α ξ )2 (αw p 3ωg Eg.5 = 0.nom ) = 2 · 0.u. according to (7. which is according to the analytical result.5 0 −0. of course.75 if q [p. This yields |GP i (jωg )| = αw 3Eg.1 0.25 Eg [p.2 0.4 0.2 0. with pk ˜rpk /(3ωg Eg.2 0. that ˜f q = 2αw P ı 106 .5 q d c) 100 Pr + Pf [%] d) vdc [p. The simulation verifies the finding that the sum of the rotor and grid-filter powers consists of a corresponding oscillating power at a frequency of ωg .] 0 0.u.56). This value αw = 0.5 0. Simulation of the response of the DFIG system to a small symmetrical voltage sag. With the transfer function in (7.nom g w p g (7.1 p. This means. However. 3 · 0.1 0. For the example given above we have. since it is used for controlling the dc-link voltage.13 p.5 Ψs [p. the ripple in the dc-link voltage is 0.25 0 0 0. the peak ripple epk in the error ˜w ref ˜ ˜w signal ew = Wdc − Wdc will be epk = 2Prpk /(Cdc ωg ) = 2 · 0. e) qcomponent rotor current.u.56 p.98/(3.4 0.8.5 0. f) q-component grid-filter current.5 0 −100 e) iRq [p.5 0 0.6 2. as previously discussed.3 0.5 f) 0. at the time when the voltage returns.2 0.u.4 0.1 0.3 0. Then.3 0.57) where the approximation holds if ωg αw .1 p.56)0.

46) and (7.u. LM (7. This means that the power drop in the first term of (7.nom ˜ −ρt Ψs (t) ≈ θ0 e − e−Rs t/LM e−jωg t . with LM = 4.nom 1 + j θ(t) ≈ jEg. ıs “Phase-Angle Jumps” In this section we will study how the DFIG system responds to small “phase-angle jumps.25/4. the rotor and grid filter powers can be determined in a similar way as for the symmetrical voltage sag as Pr (t) ≈ 3Eg. If ωg ρ.65) As for the case with symmetrical voltage sags.64) t≥0: (7.nom ωg (7. iR = iref .05 p.” i.30).nom 1 + j θ0 e−ρt (7. the ripple in the stator current R pk ıs will be ˜pk = ψs /LM .nom 1 − ωr iRq ωg ωr ˜ + 3Eg.62) (7.e.6 p.” Moreover. the dc-link dynamics in (4.8. the stator-flux oscillations will also cause a ripple in the stator current.59) ˜ ˜ where θ(t) is the error angle and the approximation holds if θ(t) is small.64) is compensated 107 .60) 2 2 ˜ ˜ Eg.1) and solving the differential equation. yields ˜pk = 0.58) Then if the rotor current is controlled accurately. it is possible to further approximate the above equation as t<0: t≥0: Ψs (t) = ψs0 ≈ Eg. the grid voltage vector can be expressed as ˜ ˜ ˜ Eg = jEg.59) the error ˜ angle θ(t) is modeled as in (7. +j ωg ωg (7. i. which. Substituting (7. After a pure “phase-angle jump..47). Moreover. without any voltage sag.nom /ωg . In (7.. in the analysis it will be assumed that the magnitude of the grid voltage remains at its nominal value after the “phase-angle jump.6 = 0. the following solution is obtained t<0: t≥0: Ψs (t) = ψs0 ≈ Ψs (t) ≈ Eg.nom Eg.63) Using (7.59) in (6. 7.nom θ0 iRd e−ρt − iR e−Rs t/LM cos(ωg t + φr ) ωg ωr iRq .nom ej θ(t) ≈ jEg.nom 1 − ωg t≥0: (7.” This has been done in order to study the effect of the actual “phase-angle jump” and not the influence of a voltage sag.61) if the stator resistance in the solution is assumed to be zero—except in e−Rs t/LM —and ψs0 ≈ Eg.e. The stator current can be found from (4. Pf (t) ≈ − 3Eg.nom ωg Eg.u.48) are governed by the term −Pr − Pf .nom ωg + ρ2 + (1 + j)ωg ρθ0 e−ρt − ωg ρ + jωg θ0 e−(Rs /LM +jωg )t 2 ωg ωg + ρ2 (7.is also confirmed by the simulation shown in Fig.40) as is = Ψs − iR .

58 p. 7.26 rad.u..u.u.11 = 2. (7.u. In Fig.u.5 p.68) ωg Cdc αw ωg Cdc αw if ρ = αw .67) becomes √ √ ωr 2(−1 + 2)e−2+ 2 0.66) will cause ripple in the dc-link voltage with the static gain according to (7.u.67) αw t ˜0 ωr iRd (αw t − 2)te = 3Eg. and iRd = 0.5 = 0. the second term in (7. 7.5 = 2. the result should be used with care since adding the results will not. pk ı the oscillation in if q becomes ˜f q = 2 · 0.for by the same drop in Pf .u.66) Pr = −3Eg. which will cause a ripple in the dc-link voltage of vdc = 2.nom θ0 iRd ≈ 3Eg.8 − (2.2) = −0.9 shows a simulation of the “phase-angle jump” used in the example.34·0.u.3·0. The extreme value of (7.57) can be used to determine the ˜ amplitude of the oscillation in if q . Eq. It can be seen that the amplitude of the oscillation in the dc-link voltage and the maximum value of the dc-link voltage is close to the predicted values. The ˜ amplitude of the second term in (7.25 p.66). wr = 1.26)·1. as for symmetrical voltage sags and “phase-angle jumps.26)·1. The first term’s impact on the dc-link dynamics can be found from the extreme value of ˜ ωr ew (t) = L−1 GP e (p)L −3Eg.01 · 2/3.2 · 1.65).. One way of estimating the “worst case” impact of a specific “phase-angle jump” is to treat the two terms independently and then add them together.95 p. Therefore. and a “worst case” dc-link voltage of vdc = 3.” for unsymmetrical sags is more difficult to derive.nom θ0 ωg In (7.nom θ0 iRd (7.23 p.01 p.67) occurs for t = (2 − 2)/αw if ρ = αw .nom θ ωg Cdc √ where GP e (p) is given by (7. ˜ (7.3·1 = 1. 7.5 = 0. iR = 1 p.10.nom θ0 ωr /ωg iR = −3·(−0.01 p.66) becomes −3Eg.01/(3 · 1 · 1) = 0.13 p. ˜pk wc This means that the “worst case” dc-link voltage could be vdc = 2...58)0.11 p.56).u. the analysis here will be limited to simulations. However.u..2 p.68) we have that ew = 3·(−0. since the system also will be excited with the negativesequence voltage. However.5·0.64) will act as a disturbance to the dc link. For comparison to larger “phase-angle jumps” a corresponding simulation of a −45◦ “phase-angle jump” can be seen in Fig. see (7..11 108 . generally.46/(3. giving according to (7.34 (corresponding to unity power factor) are used for a numerical max/min example.21). ˜ The values θ0 = −15◦ ≈ −0. Cdc = 3. In Fig. αw = ρ = 0.u.33 p. Of course. the analysis will still give some valuable information of the system.3 p. the disturbance consists of two terms: one that depends on the bandwidth. It is difficult to use the disturbance in (7.46 max/min ˜ ˜ ωr ew = 3Eg. ρ.82 − 0.66) in order to find the extreme value in the error signal ew since it consists of two terms of which one is sinusoidal.nom θ0 iRd e−ρt ωg (7.82 − (−0. The second term in (7. With the same analysis as above will give a wc dc-link voltage ripple of 0. This means that the extreme value of (7. Unsymmetrical Voltage Sags Similar analysis. of the PLL-type estimator and one that depends on the stator flux dynamics.84 + 0.56) a ripple with the amplitude 1. From (7.u. Since the amplitude of the oscillation in Pr is 1.u.u.23))0.84 p.. which corresponds to a dc-link voltage of vdc = (2. as ˜ ωr iRd e−ρt − iR e−Rs t/LM cos(ωg t + φr ) . give mathematically correct results.

The oscillation with the frequency ωg arises from the flux dynamics while the oscillation with the frequency 2ωg arises from the negative-sequence voltage.25 0 0 q b) Ψs [p.2 0. 7.4 0.4 0.1 0.3 0.75 0. b) Stator flux.1 0.1 0.5 if q [p.12 where the sag occurs at t = 0. e) q-component rotor current.1 0.8 −50 0 0. In the figure it can be seen that in.5 0.25 0 0 0. is presented.] 1 0. Summary The response of the DFIG system due to different grid disturbances has been investigated. Simulation of the response of the DFIG system to a small “phase-angle jump” of −15◦ . However.3 0.3 0. for instance.2 0.2 0.3 0. and in the grid-filter current oscillations with both frequencies of ωg and 2ωg .5 f) 0.] 0. all other conditions are as in Fig.2 0. the response to an SLGF occurring at t = 0.4 0. This is indicated in Fig.4 0.1 ms with V = 0. the dc-link voltage. It has been shown that the amplitude of the flux oscillation when the voltage returns after a voltage sag can vary between zero and twice the initial amplitude of the flux oscillations due the sag.u. the flux.u.5 0.] 2 1 0 −1 q d d 0.1 0.5 2. 7. the DFIG system is roughly as sensitive to “phase-angle jumps” as to symmetrical voltage sags.u.4 0.5 c) 50 Pr + Pf [%] d) vdc [p.a) 1.] 1 0.5 Time [s] Time [s] Fig. Moreover. 7.] 0 3 0.6 0 0. depending on the phase angle at the time instance of the sag the oscillation at ωg can in principle be removed for an SLGF.4 0. c) Sum of rotor and grid-filter powers. However.5 e) iRq [p. Moreover.5 0 2. a) Grid voltage. d) DC-link voltage.25 Eg [p.u.3 0.9.3 0.105 ms.2 0.u.75 0. f) q-component grid-filter current. 109 .25 0 0 0.1 0. the response to “phase-angle jumps” and unsymmetrical voltage sags are analytically harder to derive.2 0. the DFIG system has been analyzed for symmetrical voltage sags with good agreement.11.u.75 p.

u.3 0.4 0. this cannot be assumed for larger voltage sags. a) Grid voltage.5 0 0. This has been done in order to study the behavior of the DFIG and not the influence of the converter and the crowbar.5 vdc [p. Still.3 p. anyhow. not causing the rotor converter to fail in controlling the rotor current. the rotor voltage will hit its maximum value and lose control of the rotor current.4 0. i. e) qcomponent rotor current.13.2 0. b) Stator flux. However.5 c) 100 Pr + Pf [%] 0 −100 −200 0 0. limited to ±0. (referred to the stator circuit).1 0.1 0.u.5 e) iRq [p. In Fig.] 1 0.u. with two identical simulations 110 .4 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.10. 7.e.75 0.4 p.25 p. As shown in (5. for larger voltage sags.4 0.3 0.2 0. So.1 0.3 0. 7.2 0. In the figure it can be seen that the rotor voltage will hit its maximum value directly after the voltage sag.5 0.40). The duration of the voltage sag in the simulation is 102 ms and 92 ms.5 0. c) Sum of rotor and grid-filter powers.u.4 0.4 0.3 0.5 0 −0.] 1 0. d) DC-link voltage.75 0.1 the situation might be even worse when the voltage returns.u.. f) q-component grid-filter current.5 −2 0 0. the DFIG system will be analyzed and it is assumed that the converter is large enough to handle excess currents. This is also indicated in Fig. This means that the converter loses control of the rotor current.25 0 0 q b) Ψs [p.1 0.5 Time [s] Time [s] Fig. As shown in Section 7. This limitation of the rotor voltage is a major difference compared to the analysis in the previous section.u.2 0.3 0. Simulation of the response of the DFIG system to a “phase-angle jump” of −45◦ .a) 1.5 d) 3.13 a simulation of a symmetrical voltage sag (at 0.25 0 0 0.] 2 q 0 d d 0.5 f) if q [p. the rotor voltage will change in proportion to the depth of the voltage sag. is presented.5 2 0 0. the rotor voltage in the simulations is. leading to an uncontrolled rotor current.25 Eg [p.] 1 0. since the converter will lose control of the rotor current.u.2 0.3.3.2 Response to Large Voltage Sags In previous section the voltage sags were assumed to be small enough. In this section.u.] 3 2. 7. Before the voltage sag the DFIG is running at rated power and a rotor speed of 1.3 0. 7.05 s) down to 0.

2 0.25 0 0 0. In the figure.] 0 0.1 0.] q d d c) 50 Pr + Pf [%] d) vdc [p. Based on these findings a candidate ride-through system will be presented in the next section. 7.u.3 0.u.3 0.4 0.5 0. the maximum rotor current and the maximum rotor power due to a symmetrical voltage sag for three different operating conditions can be seen. d) DC-link voltage. e) q-component rotor current.4 0. except the duration of the voltage sag.2 0 0 0. It should be kept in mind that for the ordinary DFIG system.] 0.8 2. c) Sum of rotor and grid-filter powers.] 0.3 0.3 0.5 2 1 0 −1 0 0.75 0.2 0.25 0 −0.5 0.25 iRq [p.25 0 q b) Ψs [p. 7. b) Stator flux.5 3 2.4 if q [p. if the machine flux is in the wrong “direction. From the figure it can be seen that the maximum rotor current due to a voltage sag will increase with the magnitude of the sag.5 f) 0.3 0. 7. It can be seen that the maximum rotor current can be much higher when the voltage returns than when the voltage drops at the beginning of the disturbance. However.75 0.” In Fig.3 Candidate Ride-Through System The aim of this section is to present a candidate ride-through DFIG system.5 Eg [p. 7. as indicated in Fig. the effect of returning voltage has not been taken into consideration.13.4 0.1 0.2 0.1 0. This means that there is a huge rotor power that needs to be dealt with.4 0. Moreover. a) Grid voltage. f) q-component grid-filter current.14.4 0. the maximum rotor current actually might be much 111 .5 0 −50 e) 1.3.4 0.11. based on the result in the previous section.1 0. The main idea is to overdimension the valves of the power electronic converter so that they can handle the rotor current occurring at deep voltage sags.u.u.9 2.] 1 0.25 1 0.2 0.2 0. Simulation of the response of the DFIG system to an unsymmetrical (SLGF) voltage sag.2 0. the maximum rotor power that is fed into the dc link can be up to almost 250% of nominal power.a) 1.5 Time [s] Time [s] Fig.3 0.1 0. the converter and dc link are only rated for 30–40% of the nominal power.7 0 0.u.1 0.

Instead of using the 112 .25 0 0 0. In order to avoid these high current when the voltage returns..3 0.1 0. the flux oscillation will also be interrupted.2 0. Moreover.] 0.2 0. higher. when the voltage returns than at the voltage drop. if required.3 0.5 0.25 0 −0.85 2.75 0 0. i. in 10 ms. c) Sum of rotor and grid-filter powers.1 0.1 0. a) Grid voltage.u. anti-parallel thyristors can be connected in series with the stator in order to achieve a quick disconnection of the stator circuit [20]. A third option would be to have anti-parallel IGBTs. As soon as the flux is interrupted it is possible to remagnetize the DFIG quickly through the rotor converter and connect the stator circuit to the grid again. a so-called punch-through IGBT.u.4 0. then.3 0.u. a diode has to be put in series with the IGBT.4 0. Another option would be to have gate-turn-off thyristors. cannot handle reverse voltages as high as the forward blocking voltages.] 0 0. In order remove the excess power that is fed into the dc link.2 0.5 Time [s] Time [s] Fig.] 0.25 0 q b) Ψs [p. a “dc-link breaking chopper” is used to dissipate the excess power.] q d d c) 50 Pr + Pf [%] d) 2.4 0.12. f) q-component grid-filter current. since typically a large negative gate current is required to turn off that device [67].25 iRq [p. up to twice as high. the grid-side converter may provide the grid with reactive power during the sag. However. i.5 0. this means that the valves have to be even more overdimensioned.a) 1.e.4 0.2 0.u.3 0. The anti-parallel thyristor switch can disconnect the stator within a half cycle.35 if q [p. Of course.5 2 1 0 −1 0 0. Since a normal IGBT. By interrupting the stator circuit. Simulation of the response of the DFIG system to an unsymmetrical (SLGF) voltage sag.9 vdc [p.5 2. 20].1 0. a complex driving circuit is needed.5 Eg [p.2 0.75 0. b) Stator flux. The anti-parallel thyristor switch needs to be equipped with a forced commutation unit in case of a dc component in the stator fault current [20].5 0 −50 e) 1..] 1 0. The system with anti-parallel thyristors is illustrated in Fig.3 0. 7.8 2.3 0. The converter needs not to be disconnected from the rotor circuit since the valves of the converter are overdimensioned.2 0.u.75 0. 7.4 0.4 0.15. [9.e.1 0.25 0 0.3 0.5 f) 0. e) q-component rotor current.25 1 0. d) DC-link voltage.1 0. the disconnection time can be lowered.

5 0 0 0.u.] 1 0.1 0. a) Stator voltage.1 0.17 shows the maximum rotor current and rotor power when the stator is not disconnected from the grid and the grid voltage returns at the worst instance around 50 ms.3 f) Pr [p. 7. in order to avoid the possible higher rotor currents when the voltage returns.u.u. 7.3 b) vR [p.2 0. The non-punch through IGBT can handle a reverse voltage as high as the forward blocking voltage.a) 1. the stator circuit can be disconnected less often due to voltage sags. d) Rotor current magnitude. the disconnection time for the contactor will be longer. f) Rotor power.] 2 0 −2 −4 0 0.5 Eg [p. Simulation of the response of a DFIG system to a voltage sag down to 0. However. after a disconnection. the so-called non-punch through IGBT can be used.] 0 0.1 0.1 0. Then.1 0. this device has higher on-state losses [67]. Solid line correspond to a voltage sag of 102 ms and dashed line correspond to a voltage sag of 92 ms. 7.13.2 0. the stator circuit is disconnected from the grid.3 c) 10 is [p.] d) 10 iR [p.2 0.2 0. However.3 Time [s] Time [s] Fig. This means that the duration of the voltage sag is approximately 50 ms. for IGBT modules that can handle higher currents temporarily. and then the DFIG can be synchronized to the grid as soon as the voltage has returned to an acceptable. punch-through IGBT. It can be seen in the figure that for voltage sags down to 113 . in principle. c) Stator current magnitude.3 e) ψs [p. if the stator circuit is disconnected within 10 ms. the IGBT modules of the machine-side converter are designed for a higher current rating. e) Stator flux magnitude. while on the other hand. Fig. in order to withstand voltage sags. without losses. Moreover.5 0 0 0.u.u. For the investigated system.25 p. the maximum rotor current and rotor power due to symmetrical voltage sag is shown in Fig. b) Rotor voltage magnitude. Of course.1 0.] 1 0. Thus.2 0. level. the rotor current controller re-magnetizes the DFIG. predefined.u. One last option would be to have a contactor as a circuit breaker.3 5 5 0 0 0 0.] 3 2 1 0 0 0.2 0.16.u.

] Voltage sag V [p. Switch Δ Y ≈ = = ≈ DFIG Grid-side Machine-side converter converter “Breaking chopper” Fig.4 Evaluation of the Ride-Through System The aim of this section is to make a theoretical case study on the candidate voltage sag ride-through system presented in the previous section.5 1 Voltage sag V [p.14. 7. the maximum rotor power fed to the dc link becomes higher compared to when the stator circuit is disconnected. 0.3.u.15.u.7 p.0 p. b) Maximum rotor power (Note that negative rotor power means that the power is fed into the dc link).] Fig.u. However. 114 . DFIG with anti-parallel thyristors in the stator circuit. This study will focus on the energy production and energy production cost of such a system for a 2-MW DFIG WT.u. the maximum rotor current is approximately as large as the maximum rotor current when the stator is disconnected.u. Case 3 corresponds to 11% of rated power and a rotor speed of 0.] 3 Case 3 Max Pr [%] Case 2 −50 −100 −150 −200 −250 Case 3 Case 2 Case 1 2 1 0 0 0. Maximum rotor current and rotor power for three different operating conditions. Case 2 corresponds to 23% of rated power and a rotor speed of 1.a) 5 Case 1 b) 50 0 4 Max iR [p.u. 7.5 1 0 0.5 p.3 p. 7. Case 1 corresponds to rated power and a rotor speed of 1. a) Maximum rotor current.u.

6 0.u.a) 5 Case 1 b) 50 0 4 Max iR [p. generator and in the semiconductor devices.7 p.16.4 0.e.u.u.u.] 3 Case 3 Max Pr [%] Case 2 −50 −100 −150 −200 −250 Case 3 Case 2 Case 1 2 1 0 0 0. gearbox.] Fig.8 1 0. a) 8 Case 1 b) 0 Max iR [p.15.5 1 0 0. Case 3 corresponds to 11% of rated power and a rotor speed of 0. Case 1 corresponds to rated power and a rotor speed of 1. i.u.5 1 Voltage sag V [p. Case 1 corresponds to rated power and a rotor speed of 1.] Voltage sag V [p. Case 3 corresponds to 11% of rated power and a rotor speed of 0.8 1 Voltage sag V [p. Case 2 corresponds to 23% of rated power and a rotor speed of 1.u.] Fig.0 p. Calculation of Power Losses The losses taken into consideration are the losses in the aerodynamic conversion.. The losses in the anti-parallel thyristor switch used in the stator circuit. 7.17.3 p.4 Case 2 Case 1 0 0.u.] Voltage sag V [p. b) Maximum rotor power (note that negative rotor power means that the power is fed into the dc link). Maximum rotor current and rotor power fed to the dc link for three different operating conditions with returning voltage at the worst instance around 50 ms. The calculation of the will also follow the loss models used in Chapter 3. Maximum rotor current and rotor power for three different operating conditions if the stator circuit is disconnected within 10 ms.u.6 0.u.3 p. 7.7 p. Case 2 corresponds to 23% of rated power and a rotor speed of 1. the same losses as in Chapter 3. a) Maximum rotor current. see Fig. a) Maximum rotor current.u.u. b) Maximum rotor power (note that negative rotor power means that the power is fed into the dc link).0 p.] 6 −100 4 Case 3 Max Pr [%] Case 2 −200 Case 3 2 −300 −400 0. 7. can 115 .u.

8 m/s are due to that the stator of the generator is switch from a Y connection to a Δ connection. Since the switching occurs at zero current and at low frequency (the grid frequency). In Fig.35 Ordinary DFIG 0. hence.18.3. In Fig. the switching losses in the switch will be neglected.18 the losses in the semiconductor devices are shown. as discussed in Section 2. The dashed line shows the losses for the GSC and the dotted line shows the losses in the anti-parallel thyristor switch. it will not influence the energy production.164 mΩ and VThy = 0.25 Losses [%] 0. the energy production cost of the candidate system is higher than for the ordinary DFIG system. The solid lines show the losses in the MSC for ordinary and the candidate DFIG system.05 Grid-side converter 0 5 10 15 20 25 Wind speed [m/s] Fig.18. Energy Cost For the calculation of the energy production cost. The energy production cost 116 .1 for details of calculation of the expected efficiency.u. As could be expected.be described by (3. In the figure it can be seen that the ordinary DFIG system has the highest efficiency. even though the difference towards the candidate DFIG system is relatively small. 0.2 0. The dc-link “chopper” is not used during normal operation. This reduction is only due to that the resistance in the valves decreases with an increasing current rating. The losses in the semiconductor devices used in this work.4. It can be noticed in Fig.05 percentage units at rated operation by increasing the current rating of the valves. The cost of the IGBTs is an estimate based on cost information obtain from some IGBT manufactures. that the losses of the MSC can be reduced by approximately 0.3 0. 7. 7. current. The parameters for the thyristors used here are rThy = 0. it has been assumed that the standard 2-MW DFIG WT costs e1600000 [65] and that one IGBT converter and the anti-parallel thyristor switch costs e6000/p.88 V [93].1. In the figure expected efficiencies of the ordinary DFIG system as well as a system that utilizes a full power electronic converter can also be seen. See Section 2.20. the losses of the thyristor switch are much larger than the reduction of losses due to the increased current rating of the valves. the relative energy production cost of the candidate system normalized with the energy production cost of the ordinary DFIG system can be seen.4). In Fig. The steps in the curves at 7.19 the expected efficiency of the candidate DFIG system as a function of the average wind speed is presented. 7. However.1 0. 7. 7.15 Candidate DFIG Thyristor switch 0.

The increase in energy production cost is due to the lower energy production of the candidate system.e. i. is also shown.01 Candidate DFIG system without thyristor switch 1 5 6 7 8 9 10 Average wind speed [m/s] Fig. 7.02 1.03 Candidate DFIG system 1. and a system with a full-power converter. which handles the total power. the ordinary DFIG system. 117 .96 Ordinary DFIG system 95 Efficiency [%] 94 Candidate DFIG system 93 92 Full power converter system 91 5 6 7 8 9 10 Average wind speed [m/s] Fig. In Fig.19.04 1.05 Full power converter system Relative energy cost [%] 1. has approximately three percentage units higher energy cost than the ordinary DFIG system. but it is mainly due to the increased cost of the valves. 7. of the candidate system is approximately two percentage units higher then for the ordinary DFIG system. A full power electronic conversion.. and the system that utilizes a full-power converter. 1. without anti-parallel thyristor switch in the stator circuit. The energy cost is related to the ordinary DFIG system.20 the normalized energy production cost of a modified candidate system. 7. Energy cost of the candidate DFIG. candidate DFIG without thyristor switch.20. Expected efficiency as a function of the average wind speed for the candidate DFIG system.

Conclusion The influence on the energy production of a DFIG ride-through system has been investigated. This system is based on increased current rating of the converter and anti-parallel thyristors in the stator circuit. It has been found that the increased cost for a ride-through system for a DFIG turbine might be reasonable, in comparison to the cost of full-power converter system connected to a cage-bar induction generator.

7.4

Doubly-Fed Induction Generator with Series Converter

After a voltage sag, the stator flux of the DFIG will start to oscillate. This oscillation often causes very high rotor currents, which necessitates a disconnection of the WT. Today, the grid-side converter is connected to the grid in a shunt configuration, see Fig. 7.21. This means that the converter injects a current into the grid. However, if the converter is instead connected in series with the grid, a voltage is introduced in series with the stator voltage, i.e., the stator voltage of the DFIG is the sum of the grid and converter voltages. Then, the series voltage can be used in order to control the stator flux of the machine and prevent, for instance, high rotor current with resulting disconnection of the turbine. Kelber has shown that such a system can effectively damp the flux oscillations caused by voltage sags [55]. Grid DFIG DFIG Grid

Conv. Shunt connected

Conv. Series connected

Fig. 7.21. Schematic figure showing shunt- and series-connected converters for doubly-fed induction generator systems.

The contribution and purpose of this section is to analyze and present the advantages and drawbacks of a DFIG system for a wind-turbine application with a series converter with the focus on handling voltage sags. In addition, a goal is also to study the energy efficiency, and, in particular, compare it to a system that utilizes a full-power converter. The reason for comparing these two systems is that they are both capable of voltage sag ride-through.

7.4.1 Possible System Configurations
As mentioned in the Introduction, the idea is to have a converter connected in series with the stator circuit and the grid. Fig. 7.21 shows both the ordinary DFIG system where the converter is connected in shunt to the grid, and the system where it is connected in series. The purpose of the series-connected converter is to control the stator flux of the DFIG, and in this way be able to control the DFIG during voltage sags. By having the converter connected 118

in series, the stator voltage vs of the DFIG is, ideally, the sum of grid voltage Eg and the voltage vc from the series converter: v s = E g + vc . Some of the demands on the series converter for a DFIG system may be: • A sufficiently fast stator-flux control in order to damp the oscillations and control the stator flux. • Accurate control of the dc-link voltage. There are at least two methods of accomplishing this series voltage, which are presented below. Series-Injection Transformer In this configuration, the voltage source converter is connected to the grid via a seriesinjection transformer, as depicted in Fig. 7.22. This configuration of a series-injection transformer and a voltage source converter is also used in dynamic voltage restorers (DVRs) [27, 49]. The protection system of such a system is complicated since a simple disconnection does not work [70]. Normally the system is equipped with an LC filter with the objective of reducing voltage and current harmonics generated from the voltage source converter. Note that the LC filter can be placed on either side of the transformer [49]. The series-injection transformer is necessary for galvanic insulation. Moreover, in order to avoid magnetic saturation, the series-injection transformer must be rated to handle twice the nominal flux [27]. Another option, in order to avoid the series-injection transformer, is to have a converter for each phase with separate dc links [63]. For DVRs, there are, at least, three Transformer Grid DFIG (7.69)

Converter
Fig. 7.22. Doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) with the grid-side converter connected in series via a series-injection transformer.

methods of controlling the series voltage: 1) in an open-loop manner [45], 2) directly control the series voltage [71], and 3) by two control loops, i.e., an inner fast current control loop that controls the current through the inductance and an outer cascade loop controlling the capacitor (series) voltage [10]. One advantage of controlling both the inductor current and capacitor voltage is that it is easy to avoid the resonant frequency of the LC filter. However, a drawback for the DFIG is that bandwidth is lost for the stator-flux controller, since the stator flux is then controlled in cascade with both the capacitor (series) voltage and the inductor current. For example, if it is desired to separate the control loops by one decade, 119

the bandwidth of the flux control loop is a factor of hundred lower than the current control loop. This means that a very high bandwidth of the current control loop is necessary and, accordingly, a very high switching frequency is needed. Converter in the Y Point of the DFIG The second method of accomplishing a series voltage for the DFIG is to connect a voltage source converter where the Y point of the stator circuit usually is [54, 55]. Hereafter, this will be referred to as the Y point. In [54, 55], this is accomplished using an additional (third) converter, which is only used to damp the occurring stator flux oscillations. During normal operation, the extra converter voltage is zero. In [54, 55], the converter in the Y point of the DFIG system is only used to damp disturbances, while here it can also be used to control the magnitude of the stator flux and the dc-link voltage. Fig. 7.23 shows a principle sketch of the system when a voltage source converter is connected to the Y point of the stator circuit of the DFIG. For this system, the converter Stator circuit Grid

Rotor circuit

Converter
Fig. 7.23. Doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) with the grid-side converter connected to the Y point of the stator circuit.

voltage is directly used to control the stator flux in the machine, while the rotor current is controlled by the machine-side converter. One disadvantage of this method is that all of the stator current is passed through the Y-point converter, which may cause additional high losses in the power electronic equipment.

7.4.2 System Modeling
As mentioned earlier the stator voltage is ideally the sum of the grid and series voltage. This means that (4.38) and (4.39) become vs = Eg + vc = Rs is + vR = RR iR + dΨs + jω1 Ψs dt (7.70) (7.71)

dΨR + jω2 ΨR dt

where vc is the series voltage. The dc-link dynamics are described by
2 dvdc Cdc dvdc = vdc Cdc = −Pr − Pc 2 dt dt

(7.72)

120

Since the stator flux is low. ωr Eg ωr ω1 − 1 Eg ωr (7.43 p.77) where the approximation is that the stator resistance has been neglected. In the steady state.e.u. causing the flux to be high and thereby also the magnetizing losses to increase.u. i. −0.u. for ωr = 0.75) (7.3 p.81) (7.74) (7.. (7.where Pr is the rotor power and Pc is the power from the grid-side converter.u. Since the magnetizing losses depend on the flux in the machine. vR ≈ 0.78) For example.80) (7.73) (7. Moreover. At low wind speeds (low power).78) becomes vR = (RR + jω2 Lσ ) iref + jω2 R = (RR + jω2 Lσ ) iref + j R ≈j ω1 − 1 Eg .7 p. iRd = ψsd /LM . R R If ψsd = Eg /ωr .e. At high wind speeds (high power). the rotor voltage can be expressed as vR = (RR + jω2 Lσ ) iref + jω2 Ψs = (RR + jω2 Lσ ) iref + jω2 ψsd . controlled to be zero. (7. i.82) .79) (7. the rotor speed is also low.. for ωr = 1.77) indicates that the system will have an undesirable feature. which are given by Pr = 3Re [vR i∗ ] R ∗ Pc = 3Re [vc is ] or as Pr = 3 RR i2 + RR Rq 2 ψsd + ψsd iRq ω2 L2 M Pc = 3 Rs i2 + Eg iRq − ψsd iRq ω1 Rq (7.23 p. with ω1 = Eg = 1 p. 121 (7.u.76) in the steady state if ψsq = 0. we have. This means that ψsd must be used to control the dc-link voltage. Steady-State Operation For a constant dc-link voltage it is required that Pr = −Pc . and in the steady state ψsd approximately becomes ψsd ≈ Eg ωr (7. which means that the stator flux is low. in the above equations the d component of the rotor current is controlled so that the system operates at unity power factor. a higher torque-producing current is needed. the rotor speed is low.

81) and (7. Note that in (7. ψsq = 0.86) which has the following solution: ψsd = ωr iRq L2 M ± 2RR 2 ωr i2 Rq L2 L4 M − M (Rs + RR )i2 + Eg iRq . vR ≈ vc . Then.e. However. (7. For the values M given in the Appendix.85) in order to have a constant dc-link voltage.showing that the rotor voltage is not symmetrically distributed around the synchronous speed.84) (7.84)..0017 p.009/(12 · 4.85) can be rewritten as 2 ψsd − ωr iRq L2 L2 M ψsd + M (Rs + RR )i2 + Eg iRq = 0 Rq RR RR (7.72) equals zero at steady-state operation in order to have a constant dclink voltage.u.. Eq. 2 ωr L2 M (7.85). ωr (7. Close to No-Load Operation It is required that (7. later on when the losses 122 . as for the case with constant stator flux. we have that R R i2 + RR Rq 2 ψsd + ψsd iRq ω2 + Rs i2 + Eg iRq − ψsd iRq ω1 = 0 Rq L2 M (7. which is a small value.62 ) = 0. as ψsq = 0 and Eg = jEg .83) As seen in (7.88) ≈ (7. we have vc ≈ jω1 ψsd − jEg = jω1 Eg − jEg = j ωr ω1 − 1 Eg . implying that L2 M iRq RR or |iRq | ≥ Eg 2 ωr L2 M 2 ωr L2 M − (Rs + RR ) iRq − Eg ≥ 0 4RR 4Eg RR . It might be possible to use either a diode rectifier (depending on the power flow) or an IGBT converter as the extra converter.87) The expression under the square root cannot be negative. the rotor voltage will approximately equal the converter voltage. the constraint becomes |iRq | < 4 · 1 · 0. If the rotor current and stator flux are controlled with high-gain feedback. In order to handle this problem an extra converter that controls the dc-link voltage is added. The series voltage vc of the grid-side converter is given by vc = Rs is + jω1 Ψs − Eg ≈ jω1 Ψs − Eg in steady state. Rq 2 4RR RR (7. ψsd cannot keep the dc-link voltage constant.89) 4RR − (Rs + RR ) 2 If |iRq | < 4Eg RR /(ωr L2 ). i.

an IGBT converter has been used. 7. when designing the control laws it will be assumed that an additional power electronic device keeps the dc-link voltage constant when iRq is small. 55].70) can be rewritten as Eg + vc = −Rs iref + R dΨs + dt Rs + jω1 Ψs LM (7. 55]. is used to control the reactive power while the q component of the rotor current. that for this option the flux does not follow (7. This means as the extra converter controls the dc-link voltage. Kelber et al. the stator flux is controlled using the grid-side converter. to be able to control the dc-link voltage with the stator flux there is a minimum rotor current.” The above equation then reduces to vc = −Rs iref + R dΨs + dt 123 Rs + Ωa Ψs . used this option [54. ψsd is not used to control the dc-link voltage anymore. For this case. Then.90) where the rotor current has been put to its reference value. Therefore. However. the stator flux can be controlled “arbitrarily. For this option the extra converter is designed so that it is used in the whole operating region. Then. Option 2. In this case.3 Control The basic idea of the control system is to have an inner fast rotor current controller. Note. Stator-Flux Control The stator voltage equation (7. finally. However.4. iRd . controls the active power or the torque. the stator-flux reference value is set to minimize the losses of the generator. This means that for this option the stator flux is not used for controlling the dc-link voltage. the dc-link voltage is controlled in cascade with the stator flux in order to keep the dc-link voltage constant. the stator flux is here controlled to reduce the magnetizing losses. LM (7.77). vc = vc −Eg +(jω1 −Ωa )Ψs is chosen where Ωa is the “active damping.91) .and efficiency are calculated. This means that when iRq is below a certain value. As mentioned in the previous section. Here two different sizes of this extra converter will be investigated: Option 1. iRq . in contrast to [54. Rotor Current Control The d component of the rotor current. The rotor current is controlled with the machine-side converter. for details see Chapter 4. the extra converter is designed to be as small as possible. Then. The stator-flux control loop is about a decade slower than the current control loop. and thereby make the third converter unnecessary.” meaning that the stator flux can be controlled so that the losses are reduced. since this converter would be small and only used at very low powers another way could be to increase energy storage on the dc-link. With the rotor current it is possible to control the active and reactive powers.

e. becomes W (p) 3 G(p) = = .93) p p If the “active damping” is set to Ωa = αf − Rs /LM a disturbance is damped with the same bandwidth as the closed-loop stator-flux control loop. D(p). If the resistive losses are treated as a disturbance. 124 .96) = 3iref ψsd ωr − Eg + D.98) = 3ψsd − 3Ga W + D. (7. the dc-link dynamics in (7.5. 2 dt In (7.72) can be written as 2 Cdc dvdc (7.101) Cdc D(p) 1 + FG 2 (p + αdc ) 2 This means that a disturbance is damped with the same bandwidth as the dc-link voltage control loop. Rq 2 dt where iRq and ψsd are put to their reference values.95) = 3iRq (ψsd ωr − Eg ) + D 2 dt 2 where D is the disturbance. the transfer function. treating D as a disturbance.97) ψsd = sd ref ωr iRq ωr Ψs (p) p . = D(p) (p + αf )2 (7. Ga is the “active damping. (7.92) = G(p) = vc (p) p + Rs /LM + Ωa IMC yields the following PI controller tuned for a closed-loop bandwidth αf αf −1 Rs /LM + Ωa G (p) = αf + αf . to Ψs is F (p) = GDΨs (p) = DC-Link Voltage Control For a dc-link voltage controller with a shunt converter. if the variable substitution W = vdc is made. the transfer function from D to W becomes G p W (p) = = . see Section 4. the transfer function from a disturbance.. (7. (7. if Ga = Cdc αdc /6. (7.99) ref Cdc /2p + 3Ga ψsd By using IMC.97).The term Rs iref is treated as a disturbance and the transfer function from vc to Ψs is found R as 1 Ψs (p) . Moreover.” Then.2. the following system is obtained Cdc dW ref (7.94) the dc-link dynamics are reduced to Cdc dW ref (7. we obtain the following PI controller αdc −1 Cdc αdc Ga αdc F (p) = G (p) = + .100) p 6 p Then. i. By choosing the reference value of the flux as ψ ref − Ga W Eg ref + (7.

1 p.u. the pitch angle of the turbine is fixed and the DFIG is operated in speed control operation. if desired.9 p.5 1 1.5 1 1.4.5 Time [s] Time [s] Fig.8 2. it is assumed that the rotor speed can by the pitch mechanism of the wind turbine.5 d q vc [p. After 50 ms.5 0 0.5 d) 1.2 p. 7. b) Stator flux.u. Moreover.5 0 0. a) Rotor current.5 vR [p.] 0 f) 0.] 0 0.5 −0. to −0.5 1 1. using pitch control. be controlled with a bandwidth of αs . the simulation verifies the result previously presented in Section 7.Simulation of Electromechanical Torque Steps In the simulation shown here. There is a small difference in the d component due to the fact that the rotor converter also supplies the magnetizing current. at 1. down to 0. to control iRd .24. The 125 .. In this section.5 1 1.u. a rotor speed control law will be derived using IMC. f) Series voltage. e) Rotor voltage.u.u.5 1 1.8 p.u.0 s the rotor speed is ramped from 1. It can be seen in the figure that the control system manages a) 0.] 2 1 0 −1 iR [p.u.] d q 0 0.2.24 shows a simulation of the investigated system during current (or torque) control mode.5 d 0 b) Ψs [p.25 s. Fig. iRq is stepped back to −0.5 1 0.4. 7. and between 0. iRq is stepped from −0.5 q −0.2 2. Finally.5 e) 0.4 Speed Control Operation At low wind speeds.5 −1 c) vdc [p. which indicated that the q component of the rotor voltage and converter voltage are close to identical.6 0 0.5 1 1. 7. d) Rotor speed. and vdc well. iRq .u.9 p. c) DC-link voltage.u.] 0 3 0.u.5 s and 1. Simulation of the system when the DFIG is in current control (or torque) mode.u.8 ωr [p.] 0 d q −0.

we choose iref = Rq ωr i ref + Ba ωr 3np Eg Rq (7.” This means that the mechanical dynamics can be rewritten as J dωr ref = −iRq − Ba ωr − Ts . the DFIG is operated at iRq = −1 p.mechanical dynamics are given by J dωr = Te − Ts np dt (7.103) where Ba is the “active damping. It can be seen in the figure that the control system manages to control iRd . These torque steps are much faster than what would be the case in reality and they are performed for verification purposes only. The rotor 126 . The voltage drops after 0. J is the inertia and. the stator flux is controlled by the series-connected converter to be close to zero.104) (7. during the whole simulation. αs . it manages the Swedish transmission system operator’s demands for large production facilities [96].5 Response to Voltage Sags Fig..106) (7. This is an extreme voltage sag and if the system manages this sag. The rotor speed is controlled by the DFIG to be 0.u.102) where Te is the electromechanical torque.102) can be expressed as J dωr Eg = −3np iref − Ts np dt ωr Rq where iRq has been changed to its reference value. the rotor speed is controlled by the pitch mechanism to 1.1 s and the sag has a duration of 250 ms. with IMC.e. ωr .105) and if Ba = αs J/np . the electromechanical torque can be expressed as Te = −3np ψsd iRq . In this case.u. since ψsd ≈ Eg /ωr .107) Fig. which corresponds to generator operation at rated current (full power).25 shows an example of the proposed DFIG series system with the DFIG operated in speed-control mode.u.8 p. 7. the remaining voltage is 0 p. 7. Now. In order to validate the performance. np is the number of pole pairs.4. Assuming ψsq = 0.26 shows the response to a 0% voltage sag. (7. a change in Ts is damped with the same bandwidth.2 p. np dt Then. as the speed control loop: GT ω (p) = P J (p + αs )2 np (7. Ts is the shaft torque. During the sag. the following controller is obtained F (p) = kp + J Ba ki = −αs − αs p np p (7.u. and vdc well. 7. During the simulation. the machine is exposed to shaft torque steps of 30% to 100% of rated torque. Then. i.

a) 0. Therefore. the main reasons for choosing a DFIG system are cost and efficiency.5 1 1. 7. Otherwise.] 2. The main reason for this is that both the rotor and converter voltages have been limited to their maximum values. in this case at a voltage level of 0 p. In this section. However. Simulation of the system when the DFIG is in speed-control mode. Some minor current transients can be observed at the instant of the sag and at the instant where the voltage returns.u. Moreover.] 1 0.u. This means that the pitch mechanism must reduce the incoming torque accordingly. In Chapter 3. a) Rotor current. 7.82 vdc [p.5 0 −0. The system then returns to a steady-state operating condition.5 2 d) ωr [p. d) Rotor speed. This can be realized from the fact that the stator flux is controlled down to an appropriate level.25. Details of the calculations methods used here are described in Chapter 3.5 Ψs [p.5 1 1.81 2. when modifying the DFIG system it is necessary to evaluate how the modifications affects both cost and efficiency.5 2 0 0 0.25 q 0.] 1 0. the system can stay connected to the grid for indefinitely long voltage sags.5 2 Time [s] Time [s] Fig.4.5 iR [p. the systems are compared to an ordinary DFIG system and a system that utilizes a full-power converter. the dynamic performance of the system is promising. the average efficiency of the ordinary DFIG WT system has been calculated and compared to other electrical configurations used in wind turbine systems. current is practically constant during the sag.u.] q d b) 1.5 2 c) 2. 127 .5 0 0. as otherwise overspeed occurs and the overspeed protection trips the turbine. Although the sag in the simulation is only 250 ms.u.5 1 1. one issue that must be kept in mind is that. b) Stator flux.4.5 1 1.5 0 d 0.6 Steady-State Performance As mentioned in the Introduction.8 2.2. the efficiency will be calculated for the two options presented in the last part of Section 7. the maximum torque that can be handled by the generator is reduced in proportion to the voltage sag. This study serves as a basis for the efficiency calculations and comparisons in this section.79 0 0.u. c) DC-link voltage.75 0. since the stator flux is reduced according to the voltage sag.

c) DC-link voltage.a) iR [p.3 0. As seen in Fig.u. Accordingly.u.27 shows the converter losses for the ordinary DFIG system.28.] d 2 1 0 −1 d q 0 0. d) Rotor speed.3 0. The efficiency of the DFIG series system with Option 2 is between the ordinary DFIG system and the fullpower converter system. 7. 7.5 0 0.2 1.2 0. e) Rotor voltage.5 d) 1. the average efficiencies of the ordinary DFIG system. 128 .3 0.5 q c) vdc [p.4 0. Series-Injection Transformer Fig. this is the most energy efficient system with voltage sag ride-through facility. 7.] 1.4 0.5 e) 0. f) Series voltage. In Fig. b) Stator flux.3 0. and a system with a full-power converter are shown as functions of the average wind speed. the efficiency of the standard DFIG system is highest.26.1 0. 7. and in addition it presents the losses of the series-injection transformer for the two options of the DFIG series system presented earlier.29 shows the magnetizing and resistive losses of the generator and the converter losses for the ordinary DFIG system and for the two options of the DFIG series system. a) Rotor current.u.5 vR [p.u. the efficiencies of the ordinary DFIG system.1 0.u.5 0 0. 7.28.5 0 0. Converter in the Y Point of the DFIG Fig.u.5 3 2.1 0.3 ωr [p.5 d q vc [p.] 1 0 −1 −2 0 0.] 0 d q −0.2 0.30.1 0. 7.4 0. although the efficiency is slightly lower at low average wind speeds and slightly higher at higher average wind speeds.2 0. Response to a 0% symmetrical voltage sag. full-power converter system. In Fig. The efficiency of the DFIG series system with Option 1 is roughly same as the system that utilizes a full-power converter.5 Time [s] Time [s] Fig.4 0.1 0.2 0.1 1 0 0.] 4 3.5 −0.2 0.2 0.3 0. the series system with the two options.4 0.3 0.4 0.5 b) Ψs [p.1 0.] 0 f) 0.

d) Transformer losses. 7. it can be seen that the results are almost identical when connecting the converter to the Y point of the stator circuit.5 0 5 10 15 20 10 15 20 Transformer losses [%] Resistive losses [%] a) b) 2 1.27.5 1 0. and dotted line to the ordinary DFIG system.28. and the two different options for the series DFIG system are shown as functions of the average wind speed. 7.5 0 5 10 15 20 25 25 Wind speed [m/s] Wind speed [m/s] Fig.5 1 0.Converter losses [%] Magnetizing losses [%] 1. solid line to the DFIG series system. Dashed lines correspond to the series DFIG system with Option 1.30 is compared to Fig. b) Resistive losses of the generator.28. If Fig. solid line to the series DFIG with Option 2. c) Converter losses.5 1 0. 7. 7. Dashed line corresponds to the ordinary DFIG system. and dotted line to a system with a full-power converter. Expected efficiency as a function of the average wind speed for the system with a seriesinjection transformer. a) Magnetizing loses of the generator. 96 Option 2 95 Efficiency [%] 94 93 92 91 Option 1 90 5 6 7 8 9 10 Average wind speed [m/s] Fig.5 0 5 1. Losses of the system with a series-injection transformer with the same turns ratio as the stator-to-rotor turns ratio.5 0 5 1 10 15 20 25 25 c) d) 0. One reason for this is that the increased losses in the converter are almost the same as the losses of 129 .

Expected efficiency as a function of the average wind speed.31 shows the relative energy cost of the DFIG series system in comparison to the ordinary DFIG system. and dotted line is the ordinary DFIG system. 7. solid line is the series DFIG with Option 2. 7.27. Energy Production Cost Fig. 7. solid line to the DFIG series system. However. The generator losses are identical to that of Fig. from the 130 . Dashed line is the series DFIG system with Option 1.2 Converter losses [%] 1.29. Dashed line corresponds to the ordinary DFIG system. 96 Option 2 95 Efficiency [%] 94 93 92 91 Option 1 90 5 6 7 8 9 10 Average wind speed [m/s] Fig.30. an extra converter for the DFIG series system seems to be disadvantageous. 7. Converter losses when the converter is connected to the Y point of the stator circuit of the DFIG. 7. From an initial cost perspective. The converter is connected to the Y point of the stator circuit of the DFIG.5 1 0. the series-injection transformer. as indicated in Fig.5 0 5 10 15 20 25 Wind speed [m/s] Fig. and dotted line to a system with a full-power converter.31.

131 . The rotor current (torque and power factor). two different options using an additional converter to solve this problem have been proposed and investigated. Two different methods of connecting the series converter resulted in almost the same efficiency.02 1. a cage-bar induction generator equipped with a back-to-back converter. It was found that the best option was to use an additional converter for controlling the dc-link voltage in the whole operating area. as seen in the figure.u. energy cost point of view it is beneficial to use the extra (third) converter to control the dclink voltage.4. and dc-link voltage are controlled.01 Option 2 1 5 6 7 8 9 10 Average wind speed [m/s] Fig. the series-connected converter can be used to control the flux to an optimal value from an overall efficiency point of view. Simulations showed that the dynamic performance of the system is promising both during normal operation and during conditions when voltage sags are present in the grid.5 percentage units. In the figure it is shown that the increased energy cost for this series system using Option 2 is approximately 1. 7.05 Relative energy cost [p.1. The derived control law is not capable of controlling the dc-link voltage at very low loads.7 Discussion and Conclusion A control law for the doubly-fed induction generator with the grid side converter connected in series with the stator circuit has been derived. for the system with a full-power converter the corresponding energy cost is approximately 1. dashed lines are with the converter connected to the Y point.31. and dashed-dotted line is the system that utilize a full-power converter. The efficiency of the DFIG series system with the best performance was found to be between the ordinary DFIG system and a system that utilizes a full-power converter system.e.] Option 1 1. The energy cost is related to the ordinary DFIG system. Then. i. 7. stator flux. As a remedy for this.04 1.03 1.. Moreover. Energy cost of the DFIG series system. Solid lines are with the series-injection transformer.5 percentage unit higher than for the series system with Option 2.

5 Conclusion In this chapter. Two candidate methods. However.. while the series-connected DFIG system seems to have similar dynamic performance as the full-power converter system. The shunt connected DFIG system with ride-through capabilities still suffers. can successfully reduce disturbances from both symmetrical and unsymmetrical voltage sags. of improving the voltage sag ride-through of DFIG variable-speed wind turbines have also been investigated. e. Another drawback of the series-connected DFIG system in comparison to the full-power converter system is that the maximum torque that can be handled by the generator is reduced in proportion to the voltage sag.5 percentage unit higher compared to the ordinary DFIG system. The shunt DFIG system and the series system have approximately the same energy production cost. 132 . at least initially. voltage sag ride-through of variable-speed wind turbines has been investigated. from high fault currents.7. the control of the DFIG series system is much more complicated than that of the full-power converter system. with one shunt-connected and one series-connected grid-side converter respectively.g. a cage-bar induction generator with a back-to-back converter. The energy production cost of the full-power converter system was found to be three percentage units higher than that of the ordinary DFIG system. It has been shown that a variable-speed wind turbine with a full-power converter system. which is approximately 1.

8. One possibility to reduce flicker from a stall-controlled WT with an induction generator (IG) directly connected to the grid could be to introduce a variable rotor resistance. i. it is assumed to be ideal. of WTs is an important concern for grid owners. It is possible to control the slip of the IG with the external rotor resistances. Worth pointing out is that fixed-speed WTs have the same energy production given a certain rotor diameter as variable-speed WTs (see Chapter 3). have been developed successfully using the fixed-speed stall-regulated concept. and external rotor resistances. However. For individual installations of these types of WTs. Small WTs.. One way of representing the IG dynamically is to the use the so called Γ model as de133 . gearbox. is presented. 1 MW and below. for a stall-controlled WT. The purpose of this chapter is to derive a rotor resistance control law. generator. 8.e. Therefore. In other words. in this way. and will probably dominate the small-turbine market also in the near future. the rotor resistance could be used to control the rotor speed in a limited range and. with the objective of minimizing torque fluctuations and flicker. for instance the flicker (or voltage fluctuations) contribution. in this chapter the power electronic equipment is not included in the model. The value of the external rotor resistances is adjusted with the power electronic equipment. absorb torque fluctuations and thereby reduce the flicker emission. the system with turbine. the installations of small-scale wind turbines (WTs) will most likely proceed. the flicker contribution can be the limiting factor from a power quality point of view.Chapter 8 Flicker Reduction of Stalled-Controlled Wind Turbines using Variable Rotor Resistances Although there will be very large wind power installations. the external rotor resistances can be treated as a continuous variable. The power quality impact.1. especially in weak grids [64].1 Modeling In Fig.

simulations of the induction machine are presented.05 p. and Ψs ≈ ψsd ≈ ω1 reduces to Lσ vs diRq = −RR iRq − (ω1 − ωg )Lσ iRd − (ω1 − ωg ) dt ω1 J dωg Tt = −kT iRq − np dt gr (8. RR =0. J=32000 p.u.2.u.. the shaft torque is increased from half of the rated torque to rated.). The drive train (soft axis) is not included in the model. RR =0. vs .4) where kT = 3vs np /ω1 . Note that in this simulation. In Fig. LM =5 p. and.u. RR =0. This has been done in order to get a quicker 134 .u. 8. the rotor resistance is increased by 40% after 50 ms and. Tt is the torque produced by the turbine. the dynamic system if iRd can be assumed constant or at least small..1) where Tg is the electromechanical torque produced by the generator. one electrical and one mechanical equation. the stator-flux dynamics have also been neglected.01 p. and gr is the gear ratio of the gearbox. after 250 ms.. np =2. i.2 p... both with the fifth-order and the second-order model of the system. Wind turbine with variable-rotor-resistance induction generator. dt (8. For the 1-MW IG considered in this chapter.39). 8.2) Note that in the above equation.3) (8. Eliminating ψR from (4. gr =61.e.007 p.39) yields 0 = (RR + jω2 Lσ )iR + Lσ diR + jω2 Ψs .39) is to neglect the stator-flux dynamics.u..1. scribed in Section 4. only the inertia of the generator has been taken into account and not the inertia of the turbine.u.1.03 p. The mechanical dynamics are described by Tt J dωg = Tg − np dt gr (8. the electrical dynamics of the induction machine dynamics are described by (4. Lσ =0.1. In the simulations. 8. absolute flicker values are of minor importance.u. operated at 690 V and 50 Hz the following avg max min parameters are used: Rs =0.2. on the low-speed side of the gearbox.38) and (4. Further. This means that the model has been reduced to the second order.Gearbox IG Grid External rotor resistances Fig. (without turbine J=3000 p. since the objective is to investigate the relative performance of the derived control law and. for instance.1 Reduced-Order Model A common way to reduce the order of the induction machine model in (4. Then..u.

Solid lines correspond to the fifth-order model while dashed lines correspond to the second-order model.3 0.4 Time [s] d) Stator flux [p.a) Rotor current [p.] 1 q b) Torque [× Tnom ] 0.6 −0.4 Time [s] Time [s] Fig.1 0.4 −0.2 0. 8.2 0.4 Time [s] c) Rotor speed [p.5) where RRa is an “active damping.1 0.05 1 0.2. in (8.05 1.u.2 0.06 1. we will introduce the following non-linear control law ref RR = iRq RR + RRa iRq iRq =0 (8.2 0. b) Torque. i.95 0 0.” which can be used damp disturbances as described earlier. Example of the response of the induction machine due to a step in the rotor resistance. response of the rotor speed and thereby a more lucid figure.01 0 0.u. the term RR iRq .4 −0. Substitution of the above control 135 . a) Rotor current.] 1.04 1. The rotor resistance is increased 40% after 50 ms and after 250 ms the shaft torque is increased to the rated torque.3). 8. The figure shows that both models produce approximately the same results. However.3 0.03 1.2 Current Control In order to remove the multiplication between the RR and iRq ..1 0.02 1. c) Rotor speed and d) Stator flux.e. there is a small deviation in the d component of the rotor current.3 0.1 0. This reduced-order model will be used to derive the control law.] 1. How to chose RRa will be described in the next section.8 −1 −1.2 0.u.3 0.5 0 d −0.5 0 0 0.

By treating the term D as a disturbance the following open-loop transfer function can be found Gol (p) = iRq (p) −1 . by using IMC. 8. + (RRa + Lσ αc )p + RRa αc (8.iRq (p) = −p . the following current controller is obtained Fc (p) = kpc + kic RRa αc = −Lσ αc − p p (8.6) (8. A block diagram of the current control loop is shown in Fig.9) where αc is the closed-loop bandwidth of the current control loop.3.3.11) This choice of RRa causes a disturbance to be damped with the same time constant as the current control loop.4 for three different values of the current control loop bandwidth αc . = RR (p) Lσ p + RRa (8. Determination of the Active Damping The transfer function. Current Control Block Diagram.7) where a term D has been introduced. the above transfer function is reduced to GD. iref + Rq − + + RRa ref RR Fc (p) 1/iRq iRq Gol (p) Fig. is found as GD. Lσ (p + αc )2 (8.10) Lσ If RRa = Lσ αc . 8. 136 .11) can be seen in Fig.3) yields Lσ diRq = −RR − RRa iRq + D dt vs D = −(ω1 − ωt )iRd Lσ − (ω1 − ωt ) ω1 vs = −ω2 iRd Lσ + ω1 (8.law in (8.iRq (p) = p2 −p . 8.8) Then. A Bode diagram of (8. from a disturbance D to the current iRq .

Bode diagram. a) iRq [p.3 0.65 0 0.1 0.45 −0. c) Rotor resistance (dashed line is the minimum.4.55 −0.15 0.6 0.04 0.u.15 0.05 0. average and maximum value of the available rotor resistance). a) q component of the rotor current (dashed line is the reference value). dashed αc =220 rad/s and dotted αc =2200 rad/s.1 0.] 0.05 0.2 0.15 0.u.] 0.05 0. Solid αc =22 rad/s. 8.3 Time [s] Fig.2 0.1 0.06 0.25 0. 137 . 8.25 0.5.5 −0.5 0.6 −0. Ts [× Tnom ] 0 −0.4 b) Tg . Example of current control of an IG with external rotor resistances.02 0 0 0.10 10 10 2 1 0 Gain 10 10 −1 −2 10 −3 0 50 100 150 200 250 Frequency [Hz] Fig.2 0. b) Torque (dashed line is the shaft torque).25 0.3 c) RR [p.

the current controller will not manage to keep the rotor current and thereby the generator torque. as seen in the figure.13) can be rewritten as ref RR ≈ − vs ω1 iref Rq np ΔTt dt Jgr (8. iref . the Rq generator speed becomes according to (8.e. the setting of the current reference will be of great importance for the over-all performance of the system.13).3) can be expressed as Lσ vs diRq ref = −RR iRq − ω2 Lσ iRd + dt ω1 = 0.14) if the system initially was in the steady state and the electromechanical torque. The integral can be evaluated easily since ΔTt is constant. it is seen that the current controller manages to control the rotor current with the desired bandwidth.16) . np vs ΔTt 138 (8.5 shows a simulation with the above derived rotor current control law. This means that (8.12) This implies that the rotor-resistance reference value varies as ref RR = − ω2 iref Rq Lσ iRd + vs ω1 ≈− ω2 vs iref ω1 Rq (8. 8. ω2 . How to set the rotor current reference will be further addressed in the next section. is kept constant.1) ΔTt J dωg =− np dt gr (8. First. the rotor resistance varies over its entire range even for small current variations and shaft torque steps. In the figure. however. In the simulation the bandwidth of the current control loop is set to 220 rad/s which corresponds to a (10–90%) rise time of 10 ms. and the operating condition. (8. This means that rotor resistance has changed ΔRR over the time Δt = − Jgr ω1 iref Rq ΔRR . However.8.2. the rotor resistance is constantly increased (or decreased for opposite sign of the torque difference). the rotor-current dynamics in (8. i. if the generator is exposed to a shaft-torque step. From (8.1 Evaluation Fig. If the rotor resistance has to be limited. a brief analytical investigation of how the rotor resistance varies due to a shaft torque step is made. It is also seen that when the shaft and generator torques differ (between 150–250 ms). in this section. Because of the limited range in which the rotor resistance can vary.15) iref Rq =0 since ωg = ω1 − ω2 and dω1 /dt = 0. By controlling the rotor current with a high-gain feedback. it is seen that the rotor resistance is depending on the slip. ΔTt .13) iref Rq = 0. the controller manages to keep the generator torque at the shaft torque step (at 150 ms) until the current reference is adjusted according to the new shaft torque (at 250 ms). Tg . Moreover. Moreover.

024) would. dt (8. it can be assumed that RR = RR . ref ω kR I − Ba ω2 ω1 iRq 1 (8. One idea is to set iref as Rq iref = kR Rq (RR0 − RR )dt − Ba ω2 (8. Moreover.19) (8. Therefore.13). the system becomes Tt Tt J dω2 = kT (kR I − Ba ω2 ) + = kT iref + Rq np dt gr gr dI = RR0 − RR . smaller values of iref imply a shorter time until the rotor Rq Rq resistance must be limited. i. according to the above formula. I0 = gr kR kT vs 139 (8. ωg = ω1 − ω2 and dω1 /dt = 0. according to (8. iRq = iref = kR I − Ba ω2 .5.0 = RR0 Tt0 ω1 gr kT vs Tt0 (ω1 RR0 Ba − vs ) . Δtlim . the increase in rotor resistance (ΔRR = 0. the time.22) (8.17) This means that for a given step in the shaft torque. If the current control loop is fast.23) . = RR0 + dt kR I − Ba ω2 ω1 The above system has an equilibrium point at ω2.2 s.3 Reference Value Selection In the steady state. That is. if ±ΔRR is the maximum available rotor resistance. ref since the bandwidth of the current control loop is fast. 8. finally.18) where only an integration term of the error in the rotor resistance is used in order to avoid an algebraic loop.25) (8. RR0 .. This nonlinearity makes the setting of the rotor current reference iref more difficult. to reach maximum or minimum value of the rotor resistance becomes Δtlim = Jgr ω1 iref Rq max ΔRR .21) This means. where I is Rq the integration of the error in the rotor resistance.24) (8.For the shaft torque step at 150 ms in Fig. the time until the rotor resistance must be limited depends on iref . the rotor resistance should be (or at least close to) its desired value.1).e. that the following system must be analyzed J dω2 Tt = kT (kR I − Ba ω2 ) + np dt gr ω2 dI vs . which also can be seen in the figure. np vs ΔTt (8. Rq 8. take 0.20) Note that the slip dynamics are found from (8. max Moreover. RR equals to ref RR = RR ≈ − vs ω2 vs ω2 =− .

26) (8. This means that GTt e = p GTt I (p) (8.e.Linearization and insertion around the equilibrium point yields ⎡ ⎤ np kR kT np /J −Ba kT np /J Δx = ⎣ gr kT (ω1 RR0 Ba − vs ) −gr kR kT RR0 ⎦ Δx + gr J Δu ˙ 0 Tt0 ω1 Tt0 where Δx = Δω2 ΔI Δu = ΔTt . the rotor resistance returns to its desired value RR0 .30) where αR is a parameter that can be set “freely.” the above transfer function GTt e (p) becomes GTt e (p) = − (kT np vs − αR JRR0 ω1 )2 p JkT np vs ω1 Tt0 (p + αR )2 (8.27) Now.28) where GTt I (p) is the transfer function from Tt to I which can be found from the system in (8. the damping of the above transfer function and the parameter kR is dependent on the operating condition.32) where K is a constant that depends on the operating condition. it is possible to use the derivative of I.. e cannot be found directly from the state variables but since I is the integration of e. If kR and Ba are chosen as 2 αR JTt0 ω1 2 gr kT np vs α2 J 2 RR0 ω1 − 2aR JkT np vs Ba = − R 2 kT n2 vs p kR = (8. e = RR0 − RR .33) where L is the Laplace transformation symbol. Tt0 . one option is to study the error in the rotor resistance. it is interesting to see how a change in the incoming torque influences the rotor resistance. However. Moreover. we will get e(t) = L−1 1 GT e (p) = Kte−αR t p t (8. i. If the system is exposed to a step.29) (8.26). From the above equation. 8. it is seen that after a torque step. i.1 Evaluation For a given operating condition it possible to express (8.31) as GTt e (p) = K p (p + αR )2 (8. 140 . Therefore. e(t → ∞) = 0. (8.3.e.31) which is a band-pass filter centered at αR ..

by looking at the derivative of the above function it is possible to determine that the function has a maximum at t max(RR ) = 1 . it is described how this value is determined [51].02 0 0 5 10 15 20 Time [s] Fig. Example of outer reference selection control loop.6 shows a simulation of the system with the reference selection control loop. 8.34).a) iRq [p.2 −0.2 0 5 10 15 20 b) Tg .u.6. b) Torque (dashed line is the shaft torque). a) q component of the rotor current (dashed line is the reference value). the flicker emission is compared to a similar system with uncontrolled rotor resistances.] 1 0. Flicker emission or rapid voltage fluctuations can be described with the dimensionless quantity Pst : the short-term severity index. Ts [× Tnom ] −0. In the standard IEC 61000-21. It is seen in the figure that after the torque step (at t = 1 s) the rotor resistance has its maximum value after 1 s (at t = 2 s). average and maximum value of the available rotor resistance).. Moreover.4 Evaluation In order to evaluate the derived control law.8 −1 0 0. Moreover. RR is fixed. which is also verified by the expression (8.4 −0.] 0.6 0.8 0.e.4 0. The bandwidth of the current control loop is set to a high value (2200 rad/s) and the parameter αR is set to 1 rad/s. 8. after the torque step the rotor resistance is returning to its desired value.6 −0. αR (8.04 0. The 141 .06 5 10 15 20 c) RR [p.u. i.34) Fig. c) Rotor resistance (dashed line is the minimum. 8.

has been avg set to the average value of the available rotor resistance RR .5 −1 −1. b) Slip and c) Rotor resistance. a) Torque (generator torque is solid and turbine torque is dashed). The bandwidth Torque [× rated] a) 0 −0. Fig. The set point value for the rotor resistance.7. 8. The average wind speed in the 10 minute simulation was 14 m/s and the turbulence intensity was 25%. corresponding to the average wind speed.5 rad/s. 8.04 0. Naturally. However. since this should be done on a much slower time scale than the bandwidths of the control loops. they can be adjusted according to a changing operating condition. since the 10 minute Pst -value is used.] Time [s] Fig. The average torque.5. kR .5 0 0 −1 −2 −3 −4 0 0. The applied shaft torque has been precalculated using blade element momentum theory with different average wind speeds and turbulence intensities. for each 10 minute period is used to set the parameters that are dependent on the operating condition. it has been ignored in the simulation presented here. of the current control loop.system is simulated for 10 minutes.. i.e. 142 . RR0 . αc .7 shows an example of how the derived rotor resistance control law operates for a short piece of one of the above mentioned 10-minute simulation. Then the Pst value has been calculated on a fictive grid with a short-circuit power of 50 times the nominal power of the WT and with an X/R ratio of 0. of the reference value selection control loop is 0. is 2200 rad/s and the parameter αR .u.02 0 0 5 10 15 20 5 10 15 20 5 10 15 20 b) Slip [%] c) Rotor resistance [p.06 0. Example of the behaviour of the derived control law. in a real system.

1 0. that the higher the rotor resistance is. The control parameter is as in Fig. 8. the average value of the rotor resistance RR is very close to RR .8.1 0.05 0 b) Flicker Pst 5 0. the average value. it suffers from a drawback. These higher losses imply that it will be necessary to increase the cooling of the generator. during the avg simulation.1 Flicker Contribution In Fig. Flicker as a function of the turbulence intensity. 8. RR . RR . It can be seen that the derived control law produces lower Pst values than the system with fixed rotor resistance.15 0. In the a) Flicker Pst 0. Solid line is WT with controlled rotor avg resistance. figure.15 0. RR = RR .7.4. dashed line is with fixed rotor resistance. RR = RR and dotted line is with max fixed rotor resistance. 143 .05 0 5 10 15 20 25 10 15 20 25 Turbulence intenisity [%] Fig.05 0 10 15 20 25 c) Flicker Pst 5 0. and the maximum value (in continuous max operation). The average wind speed is a) 6 m/s. b) 14 m/s and c) 20 m/s.e.8. i.. namely. except for the parameter αR that is 1 rad/s. 8.15 0. the system with fixed rotor resistance has been simulated with two different values avg of the rotor resistance.1 0.8. the Pst value is seen for a system with fixed rotor resistance and with the derived control law as a function of the turbulence intensity and for different average wind speeds. Finally. of the available rotor resistance. Even though max the Pst value for the fixed rotor resistance system with RR = RR is close to the system with controlled rotor resistances. the higher the losses in the rotor resistance will be.

higher average torques). It is seen that when the turbulence intensity becomes higher. the number of times the rotor resistance has to be limited is rapidly increased from a turbulence intensity of 7% and upwards. for low values of αR . This is also verified by the simulation since it is possible to reduce more of the flicker at higher average wind speeds (i. Reduction in flicker for different bandwidths of αR .11 the corresponding diagrams for an average wind speed of 14 and 20 m/s are shown. with the derived control law. In general. for the case with αR put to 0. 8.2 0 5 10 15 20 25 Turbulence intensity [%] Fig. from the figures it can be seen that in order to have an “optimal” reduction in flicker. The relative flicker is given as a function of turbulence intensities for an average wind speed of 6 m/s. the more reduction in the Pst value is achieved. As mentioned earlier. lower the parameter αR is.6 0.2 0. 8. The average wind speed is 6 m/s. A relative flicker of 1 corresponds to a flicker contribution equal to that of the fixed rotor resistance system.. The rotor resistance of this system is set to the average value of the available avg rotor resistance. For example. the Pst value is actually worse for this case than for the case with fixed rotor resistance. This will have a negative impact on the performance.e.25 rad/s the rotor resistance has been limited to its maximum or minimum value between 20–70% of the total simulation time depending on the turbulence intensity.9. if the frequency is too low or the turbulence intensity is too high..8 0. Due to this fact.25 rad/s 0.5 rad/s 2 rad/s Relative flicker 1 0. the same phenomena as in Fig.e. 8. In Figs. the damping of the flicker (or the torque fluctuation) is dependent on the operating condition.8. the rotor resistance will hit its maximum or minimum value to a high extent which will make the result worse.4. i. it can be seen that the 1. the rotor resistance can not follow its reference value and has to be limited to a higher and higher degree (i. The flicker in the comparison is related to a system with a fixed rotor resistance. 8.9 the relative flicker contribution for the proposed controller for five different values of aR is shown.4 0.. On the other hand. For the case with αR equal 0. RR = RR . the parameter αR should be a function of 144 .e.10 and 8.6 1. Lower values of the relative flicker imply a lower flicker contribution and vice versa. However. Moreover.4 1.2 Flicker Reduction In Fig.5 rad/s in the figure. over the whole operating area. the flicker contribution is lower at lower average wind speeds.5 rad/s 1 rad/s 1.9).

the reduction in the flicker contribution will be dependent on the operating condition. However.6 0.4 1.4 1.2 0.2 0.6 1.5 rad/s 1 rad/s 1. 145 . The average wind speed is 14 m/s. difficult.11.5 rad/s 2 rad/s Relative flicker 1 0. Reduction in flicker for different bandwidths of αR .2 0 5 10 15 20 25 Turbulence intensity [%] Fig. It was shown that it is possible to reduce the flicker contribution by utilizing the derived rotor resistance control law with 40–80% depending on the operating condition.6 1.5 rad/s 1 rad/s 1. The average wind speed is 20 m/s. Reduction in flicker for different bandwidths of αR .8 0. the non-linearity of the system will make an “optimal” reduction in flicker. 1.10.5 rad/s 2 rad/s Relative flicker 1 0.4 0.4 0.8 0.5 Conclusion A non-linear rotor resistance control law has been derived with the objective of minimizing the flicker contribution of a stall-controlled fixed-speed wind turbine to the grid. Moreover.25 rad/s 0. 8. both the average torque and turbulence intensity. 8.2 0 5 10 15 20 25 Turbulence intensity [%] Fig. 8. over the whole operating area.6 0.1. since the rotor resistance can be varied only within a limited range.25 rad/s 0.

146

Chapter 9 Conclusion
The electrical energy efficiency of wind turbine systems equipped with doubly-fed induction generators in comparison to other wind turbine generator systems has been investigated. It was found that the energy efficiency of a doubly-fed induction generator system is a few percentage units higher compared to a system using a cage-bar induction generator, controlled by a full-power converter. In comparison to a direct-driven permanent-magnet synchronous generator, controlled by a converter or a two-speed generator system the difference in energy efficiency was found to be small. Moreover, the converter losses of the doubly-fed induction generator can be reduced if the available rotor-speed range is made smaller. However, the aerodynamic capture of the wind turbine is reduced with a smaller rotor-speed range. This means that the increased aerodynamic capture that can be achieved by a larger converter has, thus, a greater impact than the increased converter losses. Finally, two methods to reduce the magnetizing losses of the doubly-fed induction generator system, have been investigated. It was found that the method, utilizing a Y-Δ switch in the stator circuit had the largest gain in energy, of the two investigated methods. In order to evaluate different methods of reducing the influence of the back EMF on the rotor current control loop, a general rotor current control law has been derived with the option of having feed-forward compensation of the back EMF and “active resistance.” It was found that the method that combines both the feed-forward compensation of the back EMF and the “active resistance” manages to suppress the influence of the back EMF on the rotor current best and was found to be the least sensitive to erroneous parameters. The choice of current control method is of greater importance if the bandwidth of the current control loop is low. Moreover, it has been shown that by using grid-flux orientation, the stability and the damping of the system is independent of the rotor current, in contrast to the stator-flux oriented system. Dynamic models of the DFIG wind turbines have been experimentally verified, with a 850-kW wind turbine. Simulations and experimental results of the dynamic response to symmetrical as well as unsymmetrical voltage sags of a DFIG wind turbine were presented. Simulations were carried out both with a full-order model, and also with a reduced-order (second-order) model. Both models produced acceptable results. Voltage sag ride-through capabilities of some different variable-speed wind turbines have been investigated and compared. A variable-speed wind turbine with a full-power converter 147

system can handle voltage sags very well. Two candidate methods for improving the voltage sag ride-through capability of DFIG variable-speed wind turbines have been investigated. One of the methods still suffers, at least initially, from high fault currents, while the other method seems to have similar dynamical performance as the full-power converter system. However, the control of the latter method is much more complicated than that of the fullpower converter system. In addition, the maximum torque that can be handled by the generator is reduced in proportion to the voltage sag. The energy production cost of the full-power converter system was found to be three percentage units higher than that of the ordinary DFIG system without ride through capability. The two DFIG candidate methods have approximately the same energy production cost, which is approximately 1.5 percentage units higher in comparison to the ordinary DFIG system. Finally, a non-linear rotor resistance control law has been derived with the objective of minimizing the flicker contribution of a stall-controlled fixed-speed wind turbine to the grid. It has been found that the flicker contribution can be reduced with 40–80%, depending on the operating condition, with the derived control law.

9.1

Future Research

The following candidate topics are proposed for future research: • Development of a unified estimator for both stator-flux and grid-flux field orientation. Since the flux dynamics are poorly damped, a desired property would be a relatively good damping of the flux dynamics. • More thorough dynamic, steady-state, and experimental analysis of the voltage sag ride-through systems for the DFIG wind turbine. In addition, it is essential to study the hardware configuration of the voltage sag ride-through systems. • Development of mathematical models of wind turbines with voltage sag ride-through properties. Experimental evaluation of the developed models with commercial wind turbines with voltage sag ride-through properties. • Derivation of analytical expressions for the response of the DFIG to unsymmetrical voltage sags.

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158 .

Ts Tsample V V v.Appendix A Nomenclature Symbols Ar C Cp E Eg . v swept area capacitor power coefficient back EMF grid-voltage modulus and space vector controller probability density function transfer function gearbox ratio steady-state complex-valued current current modulus and space vector inertia √ −1 coefficients in the rotor current control law proportional and integral gain inductance Laplace transform inverse Laplace transform number of pole pairs stator-to-rotor turns ratio active power d/dt reactive power resistance apparent power slip electromechanical and shaft torque sample time steady-state complex-valued voltage remaining voltage voltage modulus and space vector 159 . E g F f (w) G gr I i. ki L L L−1 np ns /nr P p Q R S s Te . i J j kE . kR kp .

α β λ ρ Ψ ψ ω1 . θ1 ω2 ωg . θg ωr ˜ ˆ closed loop bandwidth pitch angle tip-speed ratio density of air or bandwidth of PLL flux space vector or steady-state complex-valued flux flux modulus synchronous frequency and angle slip frequency grid frequency and angle (electrical) rotor speed of generator error estimated Superscripts avg max min s pk ref average maximum minimum stator-oriented reference frame peak reference Subscripts cl co d f g GB m M mech n nom R r s sw t q p λ σ closed loop cut off real part of synchronous-frame space vector (grid-) filter or flux grid gearbox mutual mutual (Γ representation) mechanical negative sequence nominal rotor (Γ representation) rotor stator switch turbine imaginary part of synchronous-frame space vector positive sequence leakage leakage (Γ-representation) 160 .

u.Abbreviations DFIG EMF FSIG G GSC IG IGBT IMC LLF MSC PLL PMSG p. PWM RMS SG SLGF TLGF VSIG WT doubly-fed induction generator electromotive force fixed-speed wind turbine with an induction generator generator grid-side converter induction generator insulated gate bipolar transistor internal model control line-to-line fault machine-side converter phase-locked loop permanent-magnet synchronous generator per unit pulse width modulation root mean square synchronous generator single-line-to-ground fault two-lines-to-ground fault variable-speed wind turbine with an induction generator and a full-power converter wind turbine 161 .

162 .

is used.3. TABLE B.21 Ω TABLE B. Base voltage (phase-neutral) Base current Base frequency Base impedance Vb Ib ωb Zb = Vb /Ib 400 V 1900 A 2π · 50 Hz 0. 198 p.009 p.0022 Ω 0.u.1 mH ⇔ ⇔ ⇔ ⇔ ⇔ ⇔ ⇔ ⇔ ⇔ 0.p−p In fn Pn np 690 V 1900 A 50 Hz 2 MW 2 TABLE B.u. Stator resistance Rotor resistance Rotor resistance (Γ equivalent) Stator leakage inductance Rotor leakage inductance Leakage inductance (Γ equivalent) Magnetizing resistance Magnetizing inductance Magnetizing inductance (Γ equivalent) Rs Rr RR Lsλ Lrλ Lσ Rm Lm LM 0.05 mH 0.4 p.1.07 p.27 p. 4. base values.u.9 mH 3.1.0018 Ω 0.18 mH 42 Ω 2.5 p.3 the nominal values. PARAMETERS OF THE INDUCTION MACHINE .18 p.u.0093 p.01 p.6 p.2.u. 0. 0.12 mH 0. 0. and the parameters of the DFIG are shown respectively.u.u. 163 . 0.2. A dc-link capacitor of Cdc = 53 mH = 3.u. Table B. 0. N OMINAL VALUES OF THE DFIG. and in Table B. BASE VALUES . Rated voltage (Y) Rated current Rated frequency Rated power Number of pole pairs Vn. In Table B.Appendix B Data and Experimental Setup B.u.u.0019 Ω 0.1 Data of the DFIG These data and parameters of the DFIG are used throughout the thesis if not otherwise stated. 4.

two measurement boxes. B. the converter operates as a back-to-back converter..5.1. Laboratory setup. Fig. base values. The measurement system consists of one filter box and one computer equipped with the LabView software. The control laws were all written in the C-language and downloaded to the DSP-unit (Texas TMS320c30). i.1 Data of the Induction Generator In Table B. B. In the measurement boxes voltages and dc mach. of the induction machine.2. IM v. Normally.2.6 the nominal values. for signals that is desired to be fed to the measurement computer. for measurement signals. 164 . and 8 analog output channels. There is also a resolver that measure the rotor position.4. The loading dc machine is fed through a thyristor inverter and could be both speed or torque controlled. B. The DSP-unit has 16 analog input channels.1.B. Table B. The voltage references to the converter are modulated digitally and via optic fibers sent to the converter.1 shows a principle sketch of the laboratory setup. One measurement box is attached to the stator circuit while the other measure the rotor circuit. one voltage source converter.e. and in Table B.2 Laboratory Setup The laboratory setup consists of one slip-ringed wound rotor induction machine. computer Fig. A more thorough description of the laboratory set up can be found in [75]. but during the experiments the converter was directly fed by a dc source of 450 V dc. and the parameters of the laboratory DFIG are shown respectively. Thick lines indicates cables with power while dashed lines implies measurements signals. Data of the induction machine is given in Section B. θr . When running the machine as doubly-fed the stator circuit is directly connected to the grid (during the experiments in this thesis the stator circuit was connected to a 230-V. currents are measured. Although the converter here is fed directly from a dc source. With this system it is possible to measure up to 16 channels. i θr ac supply dc supply Converter DSP Meas. from the measurements boxes or from the DSP unit. note that the nominal voltage of the induction machine is 380 V). 50-Hz source. it is possible to run it as a back-to-back converter. i v. one digital signal processing (DSP) system and one measurement computer.

65 mH 1. 165 . 0. located at the inland (≈ 100 km from the west coast) in the southern part of Sweden.9 p. 2.6.0–31.u. The wind turbine is located in a flat surroundings and is connected to the 10-kV distribution grid via a transformer. The currents and voltages are measured using transformers. BASE VALUES .68 mH 224 Ω 46. 178 p.2 for a picture of the turbine and the data acquisition computer.89 TABLE B. DATA OF VESTAS V-52 850 K W WT [104].u.115 Ω 0.6 mH 0.93 p. 0.184 Ω 1.0369 p. Rated voltage (Y) Rated current Rated frequency Rated rotor speed Rated power Rated torque Power factor Vn.0230 p. which transforms the voltage to the wind-turbine voltage of 690 V.u.u. In Table B. Stator resistance Rotor resistance Stator leakage inductance Rotor leakage inductance Magnetizing resistance Magnetizing inductance Inertia Rs Rr Lsλ Lrλ Rm Lm J 0.p−p In fn nn Pn Tn 380 V 44 A 50 Hz 1440 rpm 22 kW 145 Nm 0. See Fig.7.TABLE B.104 p.u.3 Jung Data Acquisition Setup The experiments were made on a VESTAS V-52 850 kW WT.5. the stator currents are also measured directly using LEM modules. Base voltage (phase-neutral) Base current Base frequency Base impedance Vb Ib ωb Zb = Vb /Ib 220 V 44 A 2π · 50 Hz 5Ω TABLE B.u. B. PARAMETERS OF THE INDUCTION MACHINE . B. 44. which transform TABLE B. 0.106 p. N OMINAL VALUES OF THE INDUCTION GENERATOR .4.7 some data of VESTAS V-52 850 kW WT is given.u.334 kgm2 ⇔ ⇔ ⇔ ⇔ ⇔ ⇔ ⇔ 0. Rated voltage (Y) Rated power Rotor diameter Rotor speed Cut-in wind speed Nominal wind speed Maximum wind speed 690 V 850 kW 52 m 14.0 rpm (26 rpm) 4 m/s 16 m/s 25 m/s the current to 5 A and the voltage to 110 V. In addition.

2. Jung wind turbine and the data acquisition computer.Fig. B. 166 .

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