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AHA Journal 2009

AHA Journal 2009

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C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T

Welcome to the 10th Anniversary
of the Go Red For Women Luncheon
years later. And their efforts helped lead to
the national Go Red For Women move-
ment, which is now hundreds of thousands
of women strong.
The more than $4 Million raised through
the NYC Luncheon over the past decade
has helped locally:

support important research specific to
women and heart disease

disseminate women-specific healthcare
guidelines and physician tool kits

host legislative receptions and continu-
ing professional education seminars

engage more than 400 churches in the
SearchYour Heart program and Go Red
Sundays

enroll over 10,000 women in the Go Red
For Women Movement

distribute 10,000 Wear Red Day kits and
150,000 red dress pins

generate over 1 billion media impres-
sions
Thank you for your ongoing support, for
joining us today in celebrating the 10th
Anniversary of the luncheon, and for hon-
oring two admirable Women With Heart,
Jane Chesnutt and Dr. Nieca Goldberg.
In 1999, two visionary
women, Jane Chesnutt
and Dr. Nieca Goldberg,
joined forces with the
American Heart Associa-
tion to start the annual
Women With Heart Lunch out of their mu-
tual concern that, while heart disease
killed more women than any other cause
of death, most people still considered
heart disease largely a man’s problem.
They wanted to raise both awareness and
money to help bring this issue to the fore-
front among their fellow NewYorkers.The
luncheon that Dr. Goldberg and Ms. Ches-
nutt founded now celebrates its 10th an-
niversary. Over the years, the luncheon has
celebrated 25 distinguished Women With
Heart honorees, given voice to the spirit
and passion of women throughout New
York who live with heart disease and paid
tribute to those who’ve been lost.
The initiative that Dr. Goldberg and Ms.
Chesnutt began influenced not only the
NewYork City community to make women
and heart disease a critical cause but
helped put the issue on the national
agenda.The first luncheon helped spawn
a national network of 220 events just ten
Jane Chesnutt
Editor-in-Chief, Woman’s Day
NYC Go Red For Women Luncheon Founder
Jane Chesnutt is editor-in-chief of Woman’s Day magazine and senior
vice president of Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S. She has been
Woman’s Day editor-in-chief since 1991 and was promoted to her
corporate position in 2002.
Under her leadership, Woman’s Day has developed continuing
collaborations between the magazine and various associa-
tions, most notably the American Heart Association, the Ameri-
can Library Association, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute and the Armed Services YMCA.
Her particular passion is women’s heart health. In 1999, sev-
eral years before any major organization or publication
took on this cause in a significant way, Woman’s Day
adopted women’s heart health as its mission, publishing
several articles a year and helping push the issue onto
the national agenda. Ms. Chesnutt was an inaugural
member of the American Heart Association’s
Commission of the Leadership Advisory Group on
Women and Heart Disease and has served on the
boards of directors of both the Heritage Affiliate of
the American Heart Association and the NewYork
City Affiliate, where she was chair for two years. Cur-
rently, she is a member of the NYU Women’s Heart Center
Advisory Board. In 2004 she established the Woman’s Day Red
Dress Awards, which are given annually to those individu-
als and groups who have had a significant impact on
improving women’s heart health.
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Woman With Heart Honoree
Nieca Goldberg, MD
Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine, NYU Women’s Heart Program
NYC Go Red For Women Luncheon Founder
Dr. Nieca Goldberg is a cardiologist and a nationally recognized
pioneer in women’s heart health. Dr. Goldberg is Clinical Associate
Professor of Medicine and Medical Director of NYU Women’s Heart
Program, the Co-Medical Director of the 92nd Street Y’s Cardiac
Rehabilitation Center, a national spokesperson for the American
Heart Association’s Go Red For Women campaign – an
association for which she has volunteered for over 15 years and
been a board member in NYC. Her NewYork City practice Total
Heart Care focuses primarily on caring for women.
Dr. Goldberg is the author of Dr. Nieca Goldberg’s Complete
Guide to Women’s Health. She has also authored the award
winning and highly acclaimed book Women Are Not Small Men
which was updated and entitled The Women’s Healthy Heart
Program – Lifesaving Strategies for Preventing and Healing Heart
Disease published by Ballantine Books. Dr. Goldberg is host of
BeyondThe Heart on NYU Langone Medical
Center’s, Doctor Radio on Sirius Satellite 114 and
XM 119.
A graduate of Barnard College and SUNY
Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, she
completed her medical residency at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt
Hospital Center and a cardiology fellowship at SUNY
Downstate. Dr. Goldberg’s research and medical
publications focus on cardiovascular disease in
women, exercise imaging and exercise. She is often
asked by the media for her expert interpretation of current
studies and medical news.
In 2008, Dr. Goldberg was celebrated on New York Magazine’s “Best
Doctors” list, a recognition she also received in 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004,
2001 and 2000. In 1999, she was the only woman in their top ten “Hall
of Fame of Physicians.” She is also the recipient of numerous awards for
her advocacy for women’s heart health.
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Woman With Heart Honoree
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS
Presented locally and sponsored nationally by

NewYork City Goes Red Sponsor

Local Media Sponsors

Heart of Platinum Sponsor

Heart of Gold Sponsors

Heart of Silver Sponsors
The Bank of NewYork Mellon
Cargill, Inc.
Syms Corporation

10th Anniversary Sponsors
The Baltimore Sun
BC International Group
Coach
Estée Lauder Companies
KPMG
Patti Kenner
Merck Schering-Plough
Nautica
The NewYork Daily News
The NewYork Post
The NewYork Times
The Washington Post
Total Heart Care
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
2009 WOMAN WITH HEART HONOREES AND LUNCHEON FOUNDERS
Jane Chesnutt Nieca Goldberg, MD
Editor-in-Chief, Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine,
Woman’s Day NYU Women’s Heart Program

MASTER OF CEREMONIES
Darlene Rodriguez
Co-Anchor
Today in NewYork, WNBC

GUEST SPEAKER
Hoda Kotb
Co-Host, Fourth Hour of Today

SURVIVOR STORY
Stephanie Oster

LUNCHEON CO-CHAIRS
Nicole Fischelis Nancy Ruiz, MD, FACP
Vice President, Fashion Director Vice President, Anti-Infectives
Macy’s Senior Project Leader,
Global Project Management
Schering-Plough Research Institute

CORPORATE CHAIR MEDICAL COMMITTEE CHAIR
Martine Reardon Mary Ann McLaughlin, MD, MPH
Executive Vice President, Corporate Marketing Associate Professor of Medicine
Macy’s Mount Sinai Medical Center

SILENT AUCTION CHAIR CIRCLE OF RED CHAIR
Patti Kenner Newsha Ghodsi, MD, FACC
President Marathon Medical, PC
Campus Coach Lines

EXECUTIVE AND MEDICAL LEADERSHIP TEAM
Holly S. Andersen, MD
Roslynn Aquino, ANP-C
Michelle Bergman
Gail Blanke
Carolyn Brockington, MD
Nevber Cemaletin, MD
Michelle Copeland, DMD, MD
Lori Croft, MD
Mary Jo DiMilia, MD
Kristen Esposito
Orli Etingin, MD
Erica Ferry
Joy Gelbman, MD
Jane Hand
Erica Jones, MD
Maureen Kiernan, RN
Anu Kini, MD
Alexandra Lansky, MD
Nina McLemore
Roxana Mehran, MD
Lori Mosca, MD
Beth Oliver, MSN, BSN
Suzanne Steinbaum, MD
Jacqueline Tamis-Holland, MD
CynthiaTaub, MD
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
From Paris’ Rue St. Honoré to New York’s famed 34th Street, Nicole
Fischelis is one of fashion’s foremost faces. Joining Macy’s in November
2004 as Vice President Fashion Director, Fischelis has brought a global
perspective toAmerica’s department store. She is a
true fashion force, dictating the trends to the World’s
Largest Store.
In her role as VP/Women’s Fashion Director, she
works closely with the merchants in selecting
merchandise for the company’s catalogues, and
translating the season’s trends to in-store special
events, such as trunk shows and fashion concepts.
In addition, she is the voice of the company in
communicating what is hot, what is selling and
what is next, as well as finding the right fashion mix
for the Macy’s customer. She is an integral resource
in reinforcing private label and sportswear brands
to meet the lifestyle needs of our shoppers.
From a family of furriers in France, Nicole was born
with fashion in her blood. She began her career in the early eighties on
the Right Bank of Paris where she was a buyer for Gimbel Saks, a buying
office that represented America’s and Canada’s prestigious specialty
stores such as Saks Fifth Avenue, Marshall Field’s, Neiman Marcus and
Holt Renfrew. As European Fashion Director for Saks Fifth Avenue, she
collaborated with then Chairman and CEO Phillip Miller to recreate the
spirit of that cult store with collections essential for its renaissance.
Then, in 1991 she crossed the Atlantic for a ten year run at Saks Ffith
Avenue when Mr. Miller asked her to join his new team as VP Corporate
Fashion Director, reporting directly to Rose Marie Bravo, President. Her
keen sense of style was not just relegated to the stores’ merchandise
offerings, but it also played an integral role in the overall image of the
store from visual design and windows to the company’s seasonal
catalogues and special events.As the store’s arbiter of style, Ms. Fischelis
attended the shows in Paris, London, Milan and New York and
championed such designers as Alexander McQueen.
In 1999, Ms. Fischelis was approached by the family-run fashion house
of Ferragamo to join the venerable Italian label. Leaving the US for
Europe, Ms. Fischelis joined Ferragamo as Senior Vice President of
Fashion Worldwide in September of that year. Following her stint at
Ferragamo, Nicole did fashion consulting abroad. Now, as RTW Fashion
Director for Macy’s, Nicole once again returns to America bringing her
global style to the most cosmopolitan city in the world, NewYork.
Nicole Fischelis
Luncheon Co-Chair
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Dear Friends,
Welcome to the 2009 Go Red For Women NewYork City luncheon!
I am proud to be involved with this luncheon on its 10th anniversary,
as heart disease continues to lace itself into the lives of women we
all know and love. I am also proud to be here on behalf of the
Macy’s community who during the past six years as a national
sponsor has raised millions of dollars for the movement. Furthermore,
we have increased awareness of the devastating truth that heart
disease remains the number one killer of women in this country.
Together, we have come a long way. Before the American Heart
Association founded the Go Red For Women movement in 2003, an
ambitious group of women bonded their energy, passion, and
power to take-on heart disease in the Big Apple. With the dream of
today’s two honorees – Jane Chesnutt and Dr. Nieca Goldberg, over
250 women attended the first Women With Heart Lunch and raised
over $125,000. This NewYork City luncheon was one of the first
events to help change the perception that heart disease is only
about men. We applaud Jane and Nieca for their efforts that began
ten years ago!
At today’s magnificent event we see how far we have come since the
first luncheon. Our luncheon has grown in the number of attendees
and has raised over $3 million for research, education and
community outreach. While we have come a long way, our work is
not done.This year’s theme is “Our Hearts. Our Choices” and I
encourage you to think about the choices you can make to help your
heart.You may choose to visit www.goredforwomen.org to take the
Heart Check-Up to assess your risk of heart disease. Or choose to get
exercise everyday and eat your fruits and vegetables. Above all, I
hope you choose to share your commitment with the women in your
life in hopes that the message reaches them before the disease.
On behalf of Macy’s, the American Heart Association and the
hundreds of thousands of individuals who are touched by Go Red For
Women, I thank you for being a part of this meaningful occasion.
Nicole Fischelis
NYC Go Red For Women Luncheon Co-Chair
Co-Chair Greeting
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Passion and the desire to cure and prevent diseases when possible
and always improve quality of life for patients have driven Dr. Nancy
M. Ruiz throughout her life and career.
As Vice President and Senior Project Leader at
Schering Plough Research Institute, she leads
several clinical research projects aimed at filling
important unmet medical needs. With patients
always at the top of her mind, Nancy leads her
teams toward the goal of advancing science and
healthcare by developing medicines that can
prolong or improve lives.
For more than 25 years, Nancy has dedicated
herself to healthcare as a practicing physician
and she has been involved with worldwide clinical
research for more than a decade. Her quest
began with research for an AIDS vaccine, which,
while unsuccessful, culminated in the
achievement of several medications that are
currently the cornerstone for HIV treatment. Additionally, Nancy has
been involved with the development of medicines for the treatment of
hepatitis B, hepatitis C and fungal infections. She has also been
involved with the development of medicines for rheumatoid arthritis
and for organ transplantation.
Nancy was born in Germany to Puerto Rican parents, and was raised
in Spain until her teenage years. Guided by her scientific vocation,
she studied Medicine, Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases in
Puerto Rico and the United States. She has received multiple awards
and recognitions, including being named among the‘100 Most
Influential Hispanics in America’ by Hispanic Business Magazine in
1999 and one of the‘Top 10 Latinas’ by Latina Magazine in 2000.
Nancy’s passion to reach out to women to help them understand the
threat of cardiovascular disease stems from a deep appreciation
that, unless empowered, women remain vulnerable to the ravages of
preventable diseases. She continues to be driven by her passion for
science and medicine and the desire to cure and prevent diseases
when possible and always improve quality of life for patients.
Nancy Ruiz, MD, FACP
Luncheon Co-Chair
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Welcome and thank you for joining us today at the 10th anniversary
Go Red For Women Luncheon. It is my honor to be serving as today’s
co-chair along with Nicole Fischelis from Macy’s.
I Go Red for daughters and mothers, for sisters and cousins, for aunts
and nieces, for grandmothers and granddaughters… for all women
with and without current risks for caridiovascular diseases…because
we all have ticking hearts that we need to protect.
It may surprise you to learn that, while I am a physician, my back-
ground is not in cardiology but rather infectious diseases.You may
wonder how that is relevant. However I believe that our enthusiasm
about prevention and awareness should be infectious because these
are the keys in fighting cardiovascular disease in our communities. As
a woman, I recognize the importance of empowering all women to
believe that they owe it to themselves and their loved ones to take
care of their health…As a Latina, I also know that we must make extra
efforts to reach those communities that are even more at risk—Latinas
and African-Americans.These women may be twice as likely to suffer
from cardiovascular diseases, yet, because of cultural and social cir-
cumstances, the message may not be reaching them as clearly.
The American Heart Association is working feverishly to stop this trend.
Through innovative programs targeted specifically to multicultural
communities and the outreach taking place in churches in the Harlem
community, the American Heart Association is making sure that the
messages are heard and actions are being taken by women in at-risk
communities.These programs would not exist without the generosity of
those of you in the room today, as well as the national and local part-
ners of the Go Red For Women movement.
I am particularly inspired by some of the special guests we have in the
room today – the women who are the Heart of Go Red in NewYork
City.These women have chosen to share their stories with all of us
today in the hopes that it will motivate each of us to make a choice to
live a healthier life and spread the Go Red For Women message.
But I am also inspired by the many of you who have not yet been af-
flicted by cardiovascular disease yet recognize that awareness and
prevention are important messages that need to be conveyed, loud
and clear, to people of all walks of life, young and old.Thank you.
Together we can wipe out heart disease in women and help the Amer-
ican Heart Association succeed in achieving their mission to build
healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke.
Nancy Ruiz, MD, FACP
NYC Go Red For Women Luncheon Co-Chair
Co-Chair Greeting
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Born in NewYork City and raised in the retail capital of the world,
Martine Reardon, as Executive Vice President of Macy’s National
Marketing Strategy, Events and Public Relations, presides over the
marketing and promotion of a national retail icon
renowned for its fashion and world famous events.
From fashion and fireworks to accessories and
America’s Parade, Martine oversees the multi-
faceted world of marketing, including advertising,
public relations, promotions, and special events
for Macy’s stores nationwide. Glamorous fashion
shows, celebrity and designer launches, and
innovative ad campaigns are all a part of the
marketing mix for Macy’s.
Graduating from Brooklyn’s St. Francis College with
a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business
Management, Martine began her retailing career
in the Special Events department at Federated’s
Abraham & Strauss division in 1984. After a brief
stint as Merchandise Director in 1989 at Condé Nast’s Mademoiselle,
Martine returned to A&S as Director of Special Events to spearhead
the successful opening of the chain’s first Manhattan location.
She quickly rose up the retail ranks when in 1991 she was promoted to
Operating Vice President, Director of Media for A&S. After the merger
of Federated Department Stores and R.H. Macy & Co. in 1994, she was
named Vice President of Media overseeing the Macy’s/Federated
marketing effort.
In 1997, she assumed the position of Senior Vice President Marketing
and Sales Promotion for Macy’s East, the largest retail brand of Macy’s,
Inc. In addition to her many responsibilities of creating advertising
campaigns, media buying, direct mail marketing and in-store
promotions, she took the helm of producing and marketing the
internationally acclaimed Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade
®
, Macy’s
4th of July Fireworks
®
, Macy’s Flower Show
®
, and Macy’s Santaland
®
,
the home of the one-and-only Santa Claus. In July 2000, she was
elevated to Executive Vice President and in 2004, assumed Home
Store responsibilities. In 2007, Martine left her position as Executive
Vice President at Macy’s East to spearhead the marketing strategy for
the over 800 Macy’s stores nationally, as Executive Vice President,
National Marketing Strategy, Events and Public Relations for Macy’s
Corporate Marketing.
Martine Reardon
Lunch Corporate Chair
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Dr. McLaughlin received her medical degree from Georgetown
University School of Medicine and completed her internship and
residency at The NewYork Hospital/Cornell Medical Center. She
completed her fellowship in Cardiovascular
Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and
concomitantly completed her Master’s in Public
Health degree at Columbia University School of
Public Health. Currently, she is an Associate
Professor in the Departments of Medicine (Division
of Cardiology), Health Policy and Geriatrics and
Adult Development. She is the Medical Director of
the Cardiac Health Program, and the WorldTrade
Center Law Enforcement Cardiac Screening
Program at Mount Sinai Medical Center.
Dr. McLaughlin is the recipient of grants from the
American Heart Association, Agency for Health
Care Quality and Research, the National Institutes
of Health, the American College of Cardiology,
and the NewYork Academy of Medicine. Her
research focuses on improving the cardiovascular care for vulnerable
populations. She has published numerous articles in peer-reviewed
journals, is the author of several book chapters, and is on the Editorial
board of the publication,“Focus on Healthy Aging.”
In addition to conducting research, and teaching medical students,
Dr. McLaughlin has an active clinical practice at the Mount Sinai
Faculty Practice Associates. She is the recipient of numerous awards,
including: Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society member, the C. Richard
Bowman Award of the Cornell Medical Center, the American College
of Cardiology/Merck Fellowship Award, the Mary and David Hoar
Fellowship of the NewYork Academy of Medicine, the SmithKline
Beecham Development Partners Junior Faculty Award in Cardiology,
and the Arthur Ross Foundation Award.
For the last five years, Dr. McLaughlin has participated as a member
of the Executive Committee for the American Heart Association Go
Red For Women Luncheon. Currently, she is a member of the
American Heart Association NewYork City Board of Directors,
Founders Affiliate. Dr. McLaughlin is committed to improving
cardiovascular health through education, research and outreach.
Mary Ann McLaughlin, MD, MPH
Medical Committee Chair
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Darlene Rodriguez is co-anchor of the award-winning“Today in New
York,” WNBC’s popular early morning newscast that airs from 5-7 a.m.
She also files reports for the station’s various newscasts.
Rodriguez was promoted to that position in July
2003 after briefly serving as the co-anchor of
NewsChannel 4’s weekend editions of “Today in
NewYork.”
Since joining Channel 4, Rodriquez has covered
numerous breaking stories throughout the city, in-
cluding multiple reports on the police shooting of
Amadou Diallo and coverage of the crash of
Flight 587 en route to the Dominican Republic. She
was the first television reporter in NewYork on the
scene in Vieques, Puerto Rico, when news broke
about the clashes between the residents and the
U.S. Navy, returning four times to cover the resulting
developments. In addition, Rodriquez traveled to
Rome to cover Pope John Paul II’s meeting with
U.S. Cardinals regarding the Catholic Church’s sex abuse scandal.
Rodriquez came to WNBC from WCBS NewsRadio 88 where she was a
general assignment reporter for four years. Prior to that, she worked as
a reporter for Bronxnet cable television for one year where she cov-
ered some of the most compelling stories about that borough’s poli-
tics, growth and renaissance.
As a result of her work, Rodriguez was honored by Hispanic magazine
with a“Latina Excellence”Award and in 2000 received a NewYork City
Proclamation for her coverage of the Hispanic community. She is also
the recipient of a 1998 Silurian Award for Best Spot News Coverage for
her report on a Queens Subway Crash.
Rodriguez graduated from the University of Miami with a B.A. in broad-
cast journalism and political science.
Darlene Rodriguez
Master of Ceremonies
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Hoda Kotb was named co-host of the fourth hour of “Today” in August
2007. She has also been a“Dateline NBC” correspondent since April
1998 and the host of the weekly syndicated series “Your Total Health”
since September 2004.
Kotb has covered a wide variety of domestic and
international stories across all NBC News platforms
as well as numerous human-interest stories and
features. She covered in-depth, the aftermath and
one year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, a story
personal to Kotb who lived in New Orleans for six
years. She has reported on the war in Iraq, the con-
flict between the Israelis and Palestinians in the
West Bank and Gaza, and the War onTerror in
Afghanistan. Kotb conducted an exclusive inter-
view with Aung San Suu Kyi, an internationally rec-
ognized leader of Burma, marking the first time in
11 years that Suu Kyi was interviewed by an Ameri-
can television network.
Kotb traveled to Southeast Asia to cover the devastating effects of the
2004 Tsunami, and she traveled to war-torn Burma, led secretly by rebel
soldiers, to report the complete story on 12-year-old twin warriors who
were said to have magical powers. Kotb also co-anchored an MSNBC
special on race,“Shades of Hope . . . Shadows of Hate,” which was re-
ported from Birmingham, Ala. at the former site of a Klan bombing.
Kotb has received numerous awards including the 2008 Gracie Award
for Individual Achievement, the 2008 Alfred I. duPont –Columbia Univer-
sity award and the prestigious Peabody in 2006 for her “Dateline NBC”
report “The Education of Ms. Groves.”The four-time Emmy nominee also
won the 2004 Headliner Award, the 2003 Gracie Award and the 2002
Edward R. MurrowAward.
Prior to joining NBC News, Kotb worked at WWL-TV, the CBS affiliate in
New Orleans, La. where she served as an anchor and reporter for the
10 p.m. news broadcast (1992-98). She was a weekend anchor and re-
porter for WINK-TV in Fort Myers, Fla. (1989-91). Prior to that, Kotb was a
morning anchor and general assignment reporter for WQAD-TV, the
ABC affiliate in Moline, Ill., and an anchor for WXVT-TV, the CBS affiliate
in Greenville, Miss., (1986-89). Kotb began her broadcast career with
CBS News as a news assistant in Cairo, Egypt (1986).
Kotb graduated fromVirginiaTech University with a Bachelor of Arts in
broadcast journalism. She resides in NewYork City.
Hoda Kotb
Special Guest
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Stephanie Oster is currently the Major Gifts Officer at Doctors Without
Borders, a medical humanitarian aid organization. She was inspired
to transition from her career in fashion to the non-profit, public health
sector after being diagnosed with cardiovascular
disease seven years ago.
In 2002 at the age of 39, she suffered a heart
attack while studying in Spain. Four years later,
she had the symptoms of a second heart attack
and was diagnosed with a 99% blockage
resulting in three stents. Having little success with
the stents she required bypass surgery in the fall
of 2007.
Stephanie has been an advocate for the
American Heart Association since 2002 and
shares her message in an effort to make women
and the medical community at large better
aware of the risks for women and heart disease.
She has appeared in numerous media outlets
including Woman’s Day, Family Circle, Ladies Home Journal, CNN, The
Today Show, NY1 and many other local news affiliates. She has
spoken at the American Heart Association Heart Ball and was a Red
Cap Survivor for the Start! Wall Street Run & Heart Walk. In addition,
she gave testimonies to NewYork City, Suffolk County and Nassau
County legislations to promote the passing of the smoking ban in
NewYork State.
She currently resides in Manhattan and still enjoys an active life of
running, biking, yoga and lots of travel.
Stephanie Oster
Heart Attack Survivor
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Go Red For Women Community Impact Grants
In conjunction with the Go Red For Women movement
in NewYork City, a portion of the luncheon proceeds will
benefit the Community Impact Grants which will provide
seed money for projects of community-based organiza-
tions located in and serving the NewYork City area.
A total of $125,000 was granted for 2008- 2009
projects focusing on women and cardiovascular
disease and addressing topics such as community
education, risk factor awareness, public health
promotion and cardiovascular disease prevention.
2008 - 2009 Grant Awardees:
Organization: Mentoring in Medicine, Inc.
Project Name: Healthy Heart Ambassador Program
Population Served: All women ages 18-35, specifically African American and Latina
Area Served: All NYC
Mentoring in Medicine, Inc. seeks to recruit and train approximately 200 pre-health and health
professional students to become Healthy Heart Ambassadors.The estimated reach of this project is
20,000 individuals.The student’s knowledge will be measured with pre- and post-training surveys.
Organization: NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
Project Name: Enhanced Volunteer Blood Pressure Monitoring Program (EVBPM)
Population Served: Women ages 45-64
Area Served: Harlem, Bronx, Brooklyn
EVBPM will build on the organization’s existing blood pressure monitoring program,“Keep on Track,” which
currently operates in faith- and community-based organizations in low-income communities in East and
Central Harlem, the South Bronx, and North and Central Brooklyn.
Organization: Saint Vincent’s Hospital Manhattan
Project Name: Education Awareness Campaign at Fulton Housing Projects
Population Served: African American and Hispanic families
Area Served: Chelsea/Clinton Housing Project in Manhattan
The St. Vincent’s Hospital Manhattan cardiovascular education program will target women from an
underserved community within the hospital’s service area: Robert Fulton Housing in the Chelsea/Clinton
neighborhood.
Organization: The Latino Education Project, Inc.
Project Name: Beauty Secrets of the Heart
Population Served: Latina women
Area Served: Northern Manhattan (Harlem, Washington Heights, Inwood)
This project aims to raise awareness about cardiovascular disease among Latino women in the hair
salons of Northern Manhattan.
Organization: VIP Community Services
Project Name: Heart-to-Heart Project
Population Served: Women
Area Served: Bronx
The project is designed to reduce the negative impact of poor nutrition, smoking, excessive stress, and
lack of exercise on the cardiovascular health of clients from VIP’s Women’s Center.
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Search Your Heart
Statistics show that African-Americans and
Hispanics/Latinos have a higher risk for
cardiovascular disease than Caucasians
and are less aware of their cardiovascular
risk factors. Research studies reveal that
cardiovascular disease is the leading
cause of death for African-American
males and females age 20 and older.
SearchYour Heart is a community-based
educational program/tool to reach high-
risk audiences. It delivers knowledge and
action steps to encourage people to act
upon this knowledge and reduce their risk
for heart disease and
stroke.
Multicultural At Heart
Conozca Su Corazón
Las estadísticas demuestran que los
latinos tienen mayor incidencia de
muchos de los factores de riesgo para las
enfermedades cardiovasculares en
comparación con los caucásicos.
También tienen un menor nivel de
conocimiento de los factores de riesgo. Las
enfermedades cardiovasculares son la
primera causa de muerte en los adultos
hispanos. Conozca Su Corazón es un
programa comunitario que tiene
información y consejos sobre las medidas
que deben tomarse para reducir el riesgo
de enfermedades del corazón y ataques
cerebrales.
Go Red For Women Multicultural
Scholarship
Macy’s and the NewYork City
American Heart Association
proudly announce the first
college scholarship program
to encourage diversity in the
health professions. The Go
Red For Women
Multicultural Scholarship will
invest in the careers of eight
Hispanic college students who
wish to pursue careers in
health. Winners will be
announced in June 2009.
For more information on our multicultural programs,
please contact damaris.lasa@heart.org
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
NewYork City is unique and so are the
stories of the many women who are at the
Heart of Go Red. Some are survivors of
heart disease and some of stroke, some
are young and some are young at heart,
some Go Red for their families and some
for their communities. At the heart of it all,
these women are bonded together for a
common cause – to save the lives of
hundreds of thousands of women
throughout our great city.
This past December we were lucky enough
to bring together a number of women for
an inspirational photo shoot to capture the
Heart of Go Red in NewYork City.These
women embody the strength, spirit and
energy of the Go Red For Women
movement right here in our own backyard.
In the following pages you will learn their
stories as they share why they Go Red.
Special thanks go to the following
individuals and companies who donated
their time, talent and resources to the
photo shoot. Without their generosity the
Heart of Go Red NYC could not have
happened.
Photography – Jerry Jack
Location – On the Scene Studios
Make-up Artistry – Andy Paige, Cents of
Style
Make-up – Make Up For Ever
Styling – Katy Robbins
Clothing – Donna Morgan and Ali Ro
Jewelry – Helen Ficalora and Satya Jewelry
Thank you to the Maxim Group for
underwriting our Heart of Go Red table at
today’s luncheon.
Heart of Go Red Women
I've never considered myself any luckier than the Aver-
age Jane. In fact, I MIGHT even go as far to say that I
was slightly UNLUCKIER than normal. I never won
door prizes, it took me exactly 43 seconds to lose the
$10 I played at a Vegas black jack table, and I am
clumsy to the point of being absurd.Yet even though
these qualities about myself have remained the same,
my outlook on just how close my relationship with
Lady Luck is changed.
At age 24, I became a heart disease survivor. I was
extremely overweight at 220 pounds and after leaving
a diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes, a sky high blood pres-
sure of 230 over 160, and high cholesterol unman-
aged for eight years, I had done some real damage to
my body that all came to a head in April of 2005. I
went to the hospital
for chronic chest
pain and accompa-
nying fatigue and
five days later
emerged with three
stents heavy in three
major arteries.
Becoming involved
with the Go Red For
Women campaign
has really opened
my eyes to what a
miracle it is that I
am standing here
today. With 90%
blockages in two ar-
teries and a 75%
blockage in the
third, I now realize
that with my history,
it could have very
easily gone in a
much more fatal di-
rection. With every
positive lifestyle
change, every
healthy choice I
make, and every chance that Go Red For Women has
given me to share my story with others, I pay tribute to
the incredible second chance I received that year. I
am grateful for my life, incredibly blessed because of
what I can do with it.
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Every eight to ten years, I treat myself to a year off ded-
icated to reinvent myself. In 2007, while my year of
discovery began with a great deal of physical activity,
it ended with a stroke and months of recovery from
dissecting both carotid arteries. After my body re-
jected both the stent and the prescribed medication,
which was approved stroke protocol at the time, I lay in
the hospital with
much more pro-
nounced stroke
symptoms, including
difficulty speaking,
word recall, and loss
of ability on my right
side. Eventually, my
doctor recom-
mended a proce-
dure called a
cerebral bypass,
something that had
typically been re-
served for brain
aneurysms.
Though recovery
from the successful
bypass was quite
the long haul, it was
and continues to be
the most splendid
time of my life. I
have survived the
experience more ap-
preciative of the love
of others, seeing the
best in all situations,
and with a profound
realization of what is
important to me. I
continue on my road of discovery and am honored to
share my story in hopes that it will help others on their
journey as well.
Sharon Gruenhut
Manhattan
I Go Red for those
who do everything
they can to stay
healthy and don't
even consider
heart disease or
stroke as a
possibility for them.
Stephanie Chan
Brooklyn
I Go Red for the
young women who
don’t think heart
disease can
happen to them.
In 2001 as a high-powered business owner, having
built one of the largest corporate travel consulting
firms in the U.S., I was a picture of health. Although I
had lost my father from a heart attack at 67 and a
brother at 59, I had not thought that I could face the
same fate. I had hosted a cocktail party and attended
a business dinner before the symptoms started. I was-
n’t gripping my chest or having shortness of breath – I
was nauseated and blamed it on food poisoning. I
went home and waited over three hours until finally
when my arm started to go numb, I realized it may be
something more serious.
I was lucky. I survived my heart attack and with the
help of bypass surgery have not had a repeat incident
since. I know now I should have been aware of the
symptoms or real-
ized that women
have different symp-
toms than men or
thought more about
my family history
and how it could af-
fect me.This is the
reason I feel it is im-
perative to share my
story with other
women. We need to
band together to
raise awareness that
heart disease is the
#1 killer of women.
I have worn red on
every major sales
call since I started
my travel business
over 27 years ago.
Today it takes on a
new meaning
thanks to Go Red For
Women. It is my
power color, the one
that reminds me
that I am a survivor
and while I may not
be invincible, I can
fight back and be
empowered to take charge not only of my business
but also my heart health.
I am a dancer. I love to tango, to swing, to salsa, and
mambo. But I never thought that I would come to rely
on dancing to keep me physically active and strong
enough to battle hypertension. A year ago, I was
under the impression that despite a junk food diet, I
was relatively
healthy. But after a
bout of severe dizzi-
ness, loss of bal-
ance, and blurred
vision, I went to the
doctor who told me
that my blood pres-
sure was 190 over
120. I learned
about my family's
history with both hy-
pertension and
heart disease and I
decided to take con-
trol.
I have taken the
power back from my
high blood pressure
by staying active,
taking my medica-
tion, and controlling
what I put into my
body. I have be-
come an advocate
of health, founding
and presiding over
my church's health
ministry,T.E.M.P.L.E
(Teaching Each
Member to Physically Live Exceptionally), a program
dedicated to educate my community on health and
wellness.
I am an ordinary woman, but through this experience
as well as Go Red For Women, I have been given the
opportunity to do extraordinary things and my hope is
that someone will be better off just because I lived
through this. With Go Red For Women, there is some-
one to pick you up, a sister survivor who will under-
stand. I am privileged to be that sister to someone
else.
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Tisha Dixon-Williams
Brooklyn
I Go Red for all the
women in the
African-American
community who
don't know that this
disease is a silent
killer.
Valerie Wilson
Bronxville
I Go Red because it
is a color that
demonstrates the
power and strength
we have as women
to change the face
of heart disease.
Heart disease has reared its ugly head in our commu-
nity in a catastrophic way, sometimes without warning.
We’ve lost too many longtime customers or friends at
the hands of cardiovascular disease to not take a stand.
Sylvia Woods, the
Queen of Soulfood,
is one of the
strongest women we
know. We would
watch her in action
on any given day,
awake early and on
her treadmill, arm
weights to keep at
bay those unsightly
underarm-wings, the
first at the restaurant,
the last to leave.
How did she do it all
so well into her sev-
enty’s? We never
heard her complain
until “this toe.”
One wouldn’t think to
connect the toe to
the heart but after
watching our nor-
mally stalwart Sylvia
complain for months
about “this toe,” we fi-
nally were referred to
a vascular surgeon
who surprised us all by
saying“this toe” had alerted us to a blockage that was
the root of the pain - heart disease. Angioplasty gave
Sylvia her life back and gave her back to us.
“This toe” has inspired us to become advocates for a
healthier lifestyle and that’s why we Go Red. As indi-
viduals, we work with various health organizations to
strategize on ways to combat disease that plague our
community, and we have also made health a top prior-
ity for our company. Sylvia’s Restaurant removed trans
fat from our menu before it was mandated in the city
and for more than ten years has replaced unhealthy
fats with alternatives to make traditional items more
heart-healthy. We aim to prove that soul food can be
good for the soul AND the heart!
It was the summer of 2002. I was 32 years old and
had developed a sore throat accompanied with a
raspy voice and general feeling of malaise that I
couldn't put my finger on. After seeing an array of spe-
cialists -- Internal Medicine doctors, Ear Nose Throat
doctors, Gastroenteroligists -- I was mis-diagnosed
with acid reflux, "anxiety attacks", heat stroke among
other things. One morning, while meeting with my con-
tractor, I collapsed and woke up in the cardiac critical
unit.
Until that moment no one had checked my heart.
Once properly diagnosed, I underwent a catheter abla-
tion procedure to treat my atrial flutter and later brady-
cardia that had been accompanied by markedly
prolonged pauses.
I learned the hard
way that heart dis-
ease in women is
regularly mis-diag-
nosed or undiag-
nosed altogether
with at times cata-
strophic outcomes.
To date, with the
proper medical
treatment I've had
two healthy children
and have become a
causal advocate for
heart disease, a
vocal survivor help-
ing raise awareness
so that women are
better informed and
know what ques-
tions to ask should
such unexplained
symptoms occur.
At some point I will
need a pace maker
but now with the
right information I'm empowered to make all the deci-
sions based on sound medical facts and advice.
I'm back in the driver’s seat. I'm a survivor.
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Lucinda Martinez-Desir
Manhattan
I Go Red for Latinas
in my community
who may not know
they are at a higher
risk for heart
disease.
Bedelia Woods
and Tren’ness
Woods-Black
Manhattan
We Go Red for our
mother/grand-
mother, Sylvia
Woods, and for a
healthier Harlem.
My family is the most important thing in my life. When
my father, who ultimately lost both his legs because of
complications due to his unmanaged diabetes, had
his first toe amputated, I made a vow to get healthier
so that I would be there to take care of not only my
children, but also my children's children.
My father's tragedy inspired me to get healthy, get ac-
tive. I have since lost 15 pounds and every day I strive
to take that extra step and make the healthier choice,
maintain that healthy lifestyle. I want my children to
know that they can achieve anything, but they aren't
invincible.
I Go Red for my father because while his passing was
indeed a tragic experience, I am able to commemo-
rate him through the
work I do with the
American Heart As-
sociation's Go Red
For Women move-
ment. I am honored
to be able to share
my experience and
hopefully influence
someone to take
control of his or her
heart health.
There's nothing
more empowering
than getting healthy,
and I encourage
everyone to treat
their body like the
temple it is.
I come from a family with a long history of heart dis-
ease, yet for some reason I didn’t think it could hap-
pen to me. I lost my mother and father to a heart
attack both at 62, and then lost two brothers, one at
age 46 and one at 51.Yet I still didn’t think it could
happen to me. But
then in August of
2005, I realized it
COULD happen to
me. I was 46 and
suffering my first
heart attack. I
thought it was just
heartburn but when
I couldn’t respond to
my frightened
daughter she called
911. She may have
saved my life.
After a heart attack
everything changes.
I try to reduce my
stress and eat
healthier, I try to stay
active and look for
signs of another
heart attack. But
most of all, I work
hard to make others
realize this could
happen to them. I
don’t want my other
family members to
be unaware of their
own risks. I have
three sisters who
now go to the doctor regularly to keep their heart
health in check. My daughters are also well aware of
their risks and work to ensure they don’t suffer the
same fate as me.
I feel lucky to have caught the heart attack soon
enough that I am still here. My outlook is that being
here gives me a chance to tell others my story. I Go
Red for women with family history in the hopes that
the Go Red message may help save their lives.
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Miriam Berrios
Bronx
I Go Red for women
with a family history
of heart disease.
Loraine Morgan
Manhattan
I Go Red for my
father and for
others who don’t
want to lose their
family members too
soon.
I was 30 when I had a stroke.Yet I stand here today
looking pretty normal. For many, stroke is just a word;
for 3.3 million women in the United States it's a reality.
It's the reality that I lived.The reality that I continue to
live. I am fortunate in so many ways; physically
unscathed but I
possess an eternal
emotional
connection. Stroke is
a life long journey; a
journey I choose
never to end. My
mission is to
increase awareness
among all: men,
women, and
children, but
particularly among
the young. We think
of stroke as an
affliction of the
elderly, but I stand
here today as a
testament that
stroke does not
discriminate.
I am fortunate to be
a part of the Young
Professionals of the
American Heart/
American Stroke
Association. As a
group we share a
passion for
supporting the
mission of the
AHA/ASA. We recognize that we are not impervious to
the fate of heart disease and stroke. As a group we
have united to raise awareness and to raise the
crucial funds to support research to find cures. But
when it really comes down to it we have united to fight
a killer that takes more than 870,000 Americans each
year.Thank you for being here today and Going Red
for me.
I am 31 years old with a pacemaker, but that is not
what defines me. Yes, I was born with Tricuspid Atresia,
a condition in which there is no tricuspid valve and
insufficient oxygen circulation. Yes, my childhood was
difficult because of chronic fatigue and I was in and
out of the hospital several times throughout high
school to have my heart rhythm shocked back to
normal. And yes, I have had three open-heart
surgeries in my short 31 years.
What defines me, however, are all the things that I
believe in because of this experience. I believe that life
is a gift and should be treated as precious. And, I
believe that there is a reason and a plan for everyone.
I do have a pacemaker, but I am a woman with talent,
drive and courage. I can count on the people who love
and support me and
while I am not sure
of what my future
will bring, for now all
I can do is focus on
my dreams and
bringing inspiration
to others.
Life is such a gift
and if you don’t treat
it as a special jewel
that was given to
you, it will go to
waste. My advice -
never stop believing
in miracles, but
more importantly,
never stop believing
in yourself.
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Jennifer Costantino
Manhattan
I Go Red to inspire
people to believe
that miracles can
happen.
Dina Pagnotta
Manhattan
I Go Red because it
saves lives . . . it
saved my life.
I Go Red to raise awareness of the warning signs of
heart disease and stroke, the number one and three
causes of death in our nation.They don't just afflict the
elderly-I am living proof.
When I was 29 I was strong, ate healthfully, exercised
regularly, saw the doctor annually for checkups and
thought I was invincible. What I thought was perhaps a
crippling migraine that wouldn't abate was instead a
stroke. I had four of the five classic signs of stroke, but I
like many others, had no idea I'd had a stroke. I am
beyond fortunate with minimal damage and as a
result, there is not a day of my life that I take my health
for granted.
I am passionate, I am driven and I am relentless in
generating
awareness on
behalf of AHA/ASA.
Today I am the
President of the
American Heart
Association Young
Professionals, I lobby
before congress for
funding of
significant research
and I am a citizen
advocate here in
NewYork City. Just
when I think that I
am too busy to
speak or volunteer
on behalf of the
cause, I stop myself
and think I might
perhaps save a life.
Your presence today
is saving precious
lives-thank you.
My name is Jennifer Butler, and I am a stoke survivor. I
Go Red because I am living proof that it can strike at
random and impact anyone. I became a one armed
wonder at the age of five after suffering an
unexplained stroke which left me with a right sided
paralysis. While that
is the only thing that
you see today, I had
to learn how to walk,
talk and write again.
I spent a great deal
of my childhood in
and out of hospitals
having intensive
speech,
occupational and
physical therapy. In
junior high school, I
underwent major
reconstructive leg
surgery and spent
an entire summer in
a wheelchair with a
full leg cast.
Even though I’ve
had problems to
deal with, I haven’t
let it stop me from
being who I am
today. After
attending college, I
moved to NYC and
have built a
successful career in
public relations. Also,
thanks to the Young
Professionals Group at the American Heart Association
I’ve been able to tell my story and educate people on
the warning signs of stroke to ensure that they know it
can strike at anytime. Although I do not look like the
typical poster person for stroke, I’m living proof that it
does not discriminate.
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Jennifer Butler
Manhattan
I Go Red because I
am living proof that
stroke can strike at
random and im-
pact anyone.
Faye Rogaski
Manhattan
I Go Red to raise
awareness of the
warning signs of
heart disease and
stroke.
What is the Circle of Red?
The Circle of Red is an exclusive group of
women and men who have the passion
and resources to significantly impact the
community by providing a personal contri-
bution to help fight the No. 1 and No. 3
killers of women, heart disease and stroke.
A Circle of Red member is an individual
who can make a personal donation of
$1,000 or more.
Circle of Red members are recognized
and celebrated at all NewYork City Go
Red For Women events year-round. Each
gathering is hosted at a different locale
and boasts a fun and educational com-
ponent.
What are the benefits of a Circle of Red
Member?

Help fund research grants needed to
find a cure for heart disease and stroke
in women.

Help the continuation of community
programs and outreach in NewYork
City.

Attend exclusive“Members Only” events
and expand your knowledge of cardio-
vascular diseases and stroke.

Receive special recognition at the Go
Red For Women Luncheon and other
events throughout the year.
To learn more about the Circle of Red or to
become a member, contact
melissa.clough@heart.org
or 212-878-5943.
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Circle of Red
We would like to recognize the
founding members of the NewYork
City Circle of Red:
Newsha Ghodsi, MD – Chair
Tamilla Ghodsi
Drs. Michael C. Kim and Susan Park
Sharmin Mossavar-Rahmani
Harriet Squire
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
jill Kalman, MD, %JSFDUPS, $BSEJPNZPQBUIZ 1SPHSBN
Deborah Ascheim, MD, "TTPDJBUF 1SPGFTTPS )FBMUI 1PMJDZ
Hina Chaudry, MD, "TTPDJBUF 1SPGFTTPS PG .FEJDJOF
Iori CroII, MD, AssociaIe, %JSFDUPS &DIPDBSEJPHSBQIZ
Milena Henzlova, MD, DirecIor, /VDMFBS $BSEJPMPHZ
Annapoorna Kini, MD, DirecIor, $BSEJBD $BUIFUFSJ[BUJPO
Mary Ann McIaughlin, MD, .FEJDBM %JSFDUPS )&"35
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www.mounIsinai.org
CongesIive hearI Iailure aIßicIs b.3
million Americans and is Ihe mosI
common cause oI hospiIalizaIions
Ior people over age 6b. HearI Iailure
can be Ihe resulI oI a weak hearI,
damaged by a hearI aIIack, leaky
hearI valve or viral inIecIion.
In women wiIh hearI Iailure, oIIen Ihe
hearI muscle is sIrong, buI has become
sIiII, due Io age or Ihe eIIecIs oI high
blood pressure.
SympIoms oI hearI Iailure
include swollen legs, IaIigue and
breaIhlessness. Imaging Iechniques
such as nuclear sIress IesIs,
echocardiography and MRI can
evaluaIe Ihe hearI muscle and aid
in Ihe diagnosis. Opening blocked
arIeries in Ihe cardiac caIheIerizaIion
laboraIory may cure Ihe condiIion
in some people.
You can manage Ihis condiIion by
reducing your inIake oI sodium Io
less Ihan 2,000 mg|day, mainIaining
a healIhy weighI and exercising in
a Cardiac RehabiliIaIion Program.
Our research shows IhaI nurse
managemenI programs are eIIecIive
in improving IuncIion and reducing
hospiIalizaIions. In addiIion Io
medicaIions, special pacemakers may
reduce sympIoms and deLbrillaIors
may prolong liIe. Mechanical hearI
assisI devices are used in paIienIs
wiIh very weak hearIs such as Ihose
awaiIing hearI IransplanI. AI MounI
Sinai HearI we are invesIigaIing Ihe
nexI IronIier oI IreaImenI, which
includes gene Iherapy.
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Worldwide, cardiovascular
disease (CVD) is our
nation’s single cause of
death amongst men and
women. Moreover, in
many countries, more
women die every year of
CVD than men, a fact
largely unknown by physicians. The public health
impact of CVD in women is not related solely to the
mortality rate, given that advances in science and
medicine allow many women to survive heart disease
but to the extending women population at risk.
Coronary and Peripheral Revascularization therapies
(angioplasty and Stents, PCI) have improved quality
of life and even mortality when heart attacks are
recognized and treated early by prompt
revascularization.
Women undergoing contemporary PCI have been
reported to have more bleeding and vascular
complications; and, despite similar procedural
success rates, higher in-hospital mortality. These
poorer outcomes are mostly due to inherent gender
differences at baseline, and the remainder is perhaps
due to our inability to accurately and completely
account for biological factors specific to women. At
Columbia University Medical Center/NY
Presbyterian Hospital researchers and clinician
scientists are evaluating outcomes of men and women
after PCI and seeking therapies to minimize gender
specific risks. Through their comprehensive in-patient
and out-patient follow-up they seek to explore the
biological and patho-physiological basis for the
difference in the extent of disease in relation to the
degree of symptoms and risk factors in women in
comparison to men, as well as the impact of this
difference on morbidity and mortality in women after
revascularization.
Minimizing
Gender-Specific
Risks through
Research
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Stroke
Know the signs.
• Trouble speaking
• Trouble walking
• Trouble seeing
• Weakness on one side
• Call 911
The Stroke Center
Roosevelt: (212) 636-3236 • St. Luke’s: (212) 523-3144
Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Program
(212) 492-5550 • www.wehealnewyork.org/heartdiseaseprevention
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
New York City is now not only known for
the Empire State Building, the Statue of
Liberty, Broadway and the multi-cultural
neighborhoods, but also the first city in the
country to ban trans-fats and one of the first
to institute the smoking ban. In the world of
prevention, New York City clearly has made
groundbreaking advances.
In 2006, New York became the first
location in the nation to institute the policy
that trans-fats be removed from restaurant
menus and prepared foods. These trans-fats
increase LDL “bad” cholesterol and increase
the risk of heart disease and stroke. All the
margarines and shortenings known to New
Yorkers in the famous black and white
cookies and multiple other traditional New
York delicacies were legally banned. The ban
potentially decreased the incidence of heart
disease as much as 30% in those people
whose diet has been filled with these
dangerous trans-fats.
Then, in 2007, Bloomberg instituted the
smoking ban. Within one year, cigarette sales
plummeted by 50%, adult smoking de-
creased by 19% and 240,000 young people
quit smoking, preventing an estimated
80,000 smoke related deaths. In our younger
population, ages 18-25, there was the largest
drop, with a 35% decrease in smoking within
one year from the beginning of the ban.
Heart disease may often manifest itself
later in life, with women commonly being
afflicted in their 60’s, about 10 years after
men. We must understand that it takes
decades for there to be a buildup of plaque,
with the development of blockages in the
arteries possibly beginning in the teens and
twenties. This is the group we need to target.
We need to prevent heart disease before it
ever begins.
Despite an overall decrease in the
incidence of cardiovascular mortality, there
is an increasing trend in the death rates of
younger women, ages 35 to 44 from heart
disease. We are seeing a trend of our
younger women developing this preventable
disease.
Knowing your risk of heart disease is the
first step, including your family history.
Diagnosing the beginning stages of heart
disease is sometimes all it takes to prevent
the potential life-threatening outcomes of a
heart attack or a stroke.
At The Heart and Vascular Institute of
Lenox Hill Hospital, we take prevention very
seriously. It’s not only about what you eat,
quitting smoking and exercise. It is also
about knowing your own personal risk so
you can take the appropriate steps to do
something about it. Sometimes information
is all you need.
The Heart of New York City
Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, Lenox Hill Hospital
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
The Disparity of Care
Today, a woman in the United States who is having a heart attack will
wait longer before presenting to the emergency room. She will be less
likely to have the classic symptom of crushing chest pain, she will be
less likely to have a diagnostic electrocardiogramand not surprisingly,
she will be less likely to be diagnosed correctly. Even if she is
diagnosed correctly, she will be less likely to receive all the life saving
therapies we have to treat heart attacks today and even if the decision
is made to give her these therapies, they will be given at a significant
time delay compared to a man – and for those of us who treat heart
attacks – we have a saying, “time is muscle.” And even if you control
for all of these variables, a woman will still be more likely to die of
her attack than a man, and it is the youngest women who have the
greatest death discrepancy rates compared to the youngest men and
we don't know why.
If this woman is fortunate enough to survive her heart attack, when
discharged, she will be less likely to receive a referral to a
cardiologist, she will be less likely to attend cardiac rehabilitation,
she again, will be less likely to receive all the life-extending
medications available today, and if given these medications, she will
be more likely to receive sub-optimal dosages.
We have made progress in our fight against heart disease in women
– we should celebrate today. But we have a lot left to do.
We look forward to partnering with the American Heart Association
and the Go Red For Women campaign to overcome these disparities.
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Building Stronger
Communities
and a Brighter Future
Schering-Plough is an innovation-driven, science-centered global health care
company. Through its own biopharmaceutical research and collaborations
with partners, Schering-Plough creates therapies that help save and improve
lives around the world. The company applies its research-and-development
platform to human prescription, animal health and consumer health care
products. Schering-Plough’s vision is to “Earn Trust, Every Day” with the
doctors, patients, customers and other stakeholders served by its colleagues
around the world. The company is based in Kenilworth, N.J., and its Web site
is www.schering-plough.com.
Schering-Plough applauds
the noble work of the
American Heart Association
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Congratulations
Jane Chesnutt
&
Dr. Nieca Goldberg
for all you’ve done
to improve the health
of women. Brava!
With Love and admiration,
Manhattan Long Island Westchester Connecticut New Jersey
SYMS
syms.com
AN EDUCATED CONSUMER IS OUR BEST CUSTOMER®
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Marcy Syms
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
THIS LEGENDARY DESIGNER BRAND
MEASURES SUCCESS
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All net profits from GEOFFREY BEENE, LLC
fund causes that count
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Heart Disease
SCHOLARSHIPS
Protection of:
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$140 MILLION AND COUNTING
www.geoffreybeene.com
Andrew Eccles/JBG Photo
®
THIS LEGENDARY DESIGNER BRAND
MEASURES SUCCESS
BY HOW MUCH IT GIVES AWAY
All net profits from GEOFFREY BEENE, LLC
fund causes that count
Cancer
Alzheimer’s
Heart Disease
Scholarships
Protection of:
Women & Children
Family
Animals
$140 MILLIONAND COUNTING
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
WE ARE PROUD TO SUPPORT
GO RED FOR WOMEN.
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
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Women’s Leadership Exchange Supports GO RED!
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
We are proud to support
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The American Heart Association
CoroWise

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CoroWise and the CoroWise logo are trademarks of Cargill, Incorporated. All other trademarks are
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CoroWise™ is pleased to sponsor the
American Heart Association -
GOREDFOR WOMEN
2009 Luncheon
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C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
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At The Bank of New York Mellon, we believe
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C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Jane and Nieca,
From our heart to yours –
thank you for all
that you have done
over the last ten years.
Love,
Your friends at the
American Heart Association
The Baltimore Sun
Media Group
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C E L E B R A T I N G T E N Y E A R S O F W O M E N W I T H H E A R T
Thank you for supporting Go Red For Women!
Beating heart disease is more than a message. It’s a nationwide
movement that celebrates the energy, passion and power we have
as women to band together and wipe out this No. 1 killer of women.
The good news is that heart disease is largely preventable. And,
thanks to the participation of millions of people like you across the
country, the color red has become linked with the ability all women
have to choose heart health and live stronger, longer lives.
Using the American Heart Association’s research and resources, Go
Red For Women educates and connects hundreds of thousands of
women with knowledge, and offers tools to help women make life sav-
ing choices—choices to protect their health and take positive action
to reduce their risk of heart disease and stroke.
Help the American Heart Association spread the Go Red For Women
message: Our Hearts. Our Choices.You’ll help raise awareness of
heart disease and encourage women to make the right choices to
reduce their risk.
Your choice to join us here today shows your commitment to your
own heart health and making a true difference in the lives of women
you may never meet.Together, we will conquer this killer.Together we
will Go Red.Thank you for your support!
Choose to be active
Choose to eat healthy.
Choose to be a role model.
Choose to inspire change.
Choose to Go Red For Women!
©2007, American Heart Association. Also known as the Heart Fund.
Go Red and Go Red For Women
®
are trademarks of AHA.The Red Dress Design is a trademark of U.S. DHHS.

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