P. 1
Building Media Influence & Shaping Public Opinion

Building Media Influence & Shaping Public Opinion

Views: 1,309|Likes:
Published by tjprograms
2009

Tips on how to engage the media.
2009

Tips on how to engage the media.

More info:

Published by: tjprograms on Jul 07, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/20/2014

pdf

Building Media Influence &  Shaping Public Opinion 

  
 

The media helps shape public opinion and can be one of the most influential advocacy tools for  drawing attention to and getting information into the hands of policy and decision‐makers.   Developing relationships with the media takes time. Here are a few ways to engage the media and  participate in shaping public opinion through the media in your community.     Engage the Media: Develop a Media Press Kit    One of the first ways you can begin building relationships with the media is to send a media press  kit to your media contact list. A press kit should be sent, along with an introductory cover letter to  all local media contacts. Press kits are a standard education packet on your issue. They may include:   Fact sheets;    Key concerns and local impacts;   Success stories from local TJ participants:   Recent publications;   Summaries of key legislation;    Press clippings showing favorable press received in recent months; and    Contact names for more information.       Participate in Shaping Public Opinion: Letters to the Editor & Op‐Eds    A letter to the editor is one of the simplest ways to communicate an opinion to the general public.  Depending on the size of your local newspaper, your chances of having your letter printed may  vary. Here are some points to consider when writing  letters:     Be brief and focused. Focus your letter on just one idea or concept. Limit yourself to 250‐ 300 words. If the article is too long, the newspaper may edit out some important facts.     Refer to a recent event or article. Refer to other articles, editorials, or letters the  newspaper has recently published. This will increase its chances of being printed.     Include contact information. Include your name, address, and phone number so the paper  can contact you with any questions and verify authorship.     Send your letter to your members of Congress. Clip your published letter and mail or fax it  to your Congress members. This will ensure that they are informed of your opinion on the  issues.   

National Transitional Jobs Network  November, 2009 

1

Op‐eds are usually longer than letters to the editor, offering an opportunity to present an extended  argument. Here are some other tips to think about when writing an op‐ed:     Get guidelines. Call and ask the editorial page editor or op‐ed editor for the newspaper’s  op‐ed policies. Be sure to find out about the submission guidelines, accepted length, and  the approval process.     Talk to the editor. Try to arrange an appointment with the editorial staff to discuss your  unique qualifications for writing an op‐ed and the issue’s urgency. Some newspapers will  not take the time to meet with you and will make a decision based solely on the article. But  it doesn’t hurt to try. At the very least, the editor might have some useful suggestions on  how to write your article and improve its chances of being published.     Localize your letter. Adopt a local angle. You will likely be competing for space and a local  angle can make your article more appealing.                                           

A Project of Heartland Alliance

F or More information visit ww w.transitionaljobs.net or email ntjn@heartlandalliance.org 33 West Gr and Avenu e, Su ite 500. C hicago , IL 60654. P 312-870-4949. F 312-870-4950

 
National Transitional Jobs Network  November, 2009 

2

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->