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Cannes Panel Transcript

Cannes Panel Transcript

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Led by McCann Worldgroup CEO Nick Brien, MRM Worldwide CEO Marc Landsberg joined fellow panelists Will.i.am, Tod Machover, and Johan Jervøe at the Cannes Lions Festival on June 23rd in a discussion on how technology is transforming creativity.
Led by McCann Worldgroup CEO Nick Brien, MRM Worldwide CEO Marc Landsberg joined fellow panelists Will.i.am, Tod Machover, and Johan Jervøe at the Cannes Lions Festival on June 23rd in a discussion on how technology is transforming creativity.

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McCann Worldgroup 45 McCann Worldgroup July 7, 2011 Transcript by TransPerfect

EVERYTHING IS AN IDEA TECHNOLOGY DRIVES CREATIVITY PUSHING US AND THE BOUNDS OF OUR IMAGINATION TECHNOLOGY INSPIRES COMPOSERS CHILDREN CLOSET ROCK STARS AND EVEN NATIONS OPENING UP BROADER, RICHER FRONTIERS CHALLENGING WHAT CAN BE THIS IS THE BEAUTY OF TECHNOLOGY EVOLVING HOW WE CREATE ONE IDEA AT A TIME TECHNOLOGY TRANSFORMING CREATIVITY [audience applause] MODERATOR: Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome Nick Brien, Chairman and CEO of McCann Worldgroup. NICK BRIEN: Hello, and thank you for coming to our panel today, How Technology is Transforming Creativity. We¶ve got an exciting group of people to talk, and I¶m proud to actually introduce and welcome my first guest, Johan Jervøe who is our client from Intel. He is Director of Creative Services and Digital Marceting. Welcome, Johan. [audience applause] NICK BRIEN: Our second guest, Johan¶s partner at McCann Worldgroup, my colleague and friend Marc Landsberg, the CEO of MRM. [audience applause] 1

McCann Worldgroup 45 McCann Worldgroup July 7, 2011 Transcript by TransPerfect

NICK BRIEN: Hi, Marc. Another one of Intel¶s partners, will.i.am, who earlier this year became Director of Creative Innovation Services for Intel. In this unique world, he collaborates with Intel scientists, programmers and Marceters, team members on a worldwide basis regarding content, strategy and hardware strategies. will.i.am has also won seven Grammys, sold 30 million albums, had 21 million singles downloaded from iTunes. His Yes We Can video marshaled the support of the people across America in the 2008 elections, and he won an Emmy in the process. will is redefining the role of technology and creativity. Please welcome will.i.am. [audience applause] NICK BRIEN: Finally we have composer, inventor Tod Machover of the MIT Media Lab, which is another innovation partner of Intel. If you have ever played Guitar Hero or Rock Band, then you¶re very familiar with Tod¶s work. Both of these games were developed by his former students, and he has a new invention, the hyperinstruments, allowing everyone to participate in the joy of making music. Tod has been called America¶s most wired composer, and one of the most significant music innovators of his generation, collaborating with everyone from Prince to Yo-Yo Ma. Please welcome Tod. [audience applause] NICK BRIEN: So, let¶s start. Johan, we¶ve had some great conversations about your thoughts of the relationship between technology and creativity. Do you want to elaborate for us? JOHAN JERØE: Yeah, well, so first of all, thank you for having us. It¶s exciting to be here. I¶ve really always enjoyed coming to Cannes in particular because of the, just that creative jealousy you go home with when you¶re in Marceting and you¶ve seen really good work, and that really is like going to Olympics and not making the cut for the medals. So it¶s very similar here. I think what really got us to get excited, together with will was that innovation that enables, you know, creativitism, enables will to go and create his music and his videos and all of that. It¶s a very similar innovation kind of mindset that an engineer needs when they start developing process or technology. And when you take, you know, go into the nanometer area. So, you know, the first time we brought will in and, and it¶s early January to talk to engineers, about five minutes into the meeting you could just see how the engineering world and the entertainment, creative world sort of collaborated to just really try to figure out how to get to the next big thing, and how, you know, knowing what will thinks when he wants to drive his creative, enables our engineer to sort of take back and start thinking about how do I do things differently. And you know I think that¶s where it all comes together. And that¶s due to the foundation of what I think technology and creativity gets together, and often it¶s the technology informing the creative half, and there¶s the creative, uh, informing technology. And that¶s where this is going. 2

McCann Worldgroup 45 McCann Worldgroup July 7, 2011 Transcript by TransPerfect

NICK BRIEN: And will, what about you, what made you choose Intel as your technology partner? will.i.am: Well, I was working with Intel way before I was working with Intel. Um, my tool that I use to make music is the computer, so I can¶t see myself using any other processes, that¶s the best processors are process, you know, my ideas and turn µem into reality. So, it would, it¶s a natural, you know, relationship. But now how, you know, with the expansion of technology and how fast it¶s grown, um, I remember making music in 2000 on tour. It was a big huge case. Now it¶s just a laptop. And when I was making music in 2000 with that big, huge case and SCSI drives, right, I remember that. I had to make it on the computer, then I would send it to the record company, then they would distribute it to TV or radio. That¶s not the case nowadays. Now, the thing that I created the music on is what I send it out with and people view it on. So it¶s the same device, the same chip that makes the music, sends the music and people experience the music and the video on the same thing. So that¶s why that partnership is a perfect marriage. NICK BRIEN: What about you, Tod? The fusion of creativity and technology, how did it first apply itself in your field? TOD MACHOVER: Well, I sort of grew up with it in a funny way. I¶m from New York and, um, my mom is a pianist and piano teacher, and actually a very creative piano teacher. And my dad¶s one of the people who started the field of computer graphics, so I sort of grew up with music and technology in the house, and I¶m one of those kids who was obsessed with putting both things together. But it actually wasn¶t until I was in music school ± I went to Julliard, very traditional place with study and composition. And for me, um, I just started imagining things in my mind ± sounds and pieces that, um, really were not easy to play. You, you just couldn¶t make them on the instruments that existed. You couldn¶t make them in an orchestra. You couldn¶t make µem with rock instruments, nothing. And I kind of remembered back to growing up and seeing my dad¶s company make all this µcuz he made the first graphic machines. And the intuition that came to me was that the great thing about technology is that it's, it¶s the most malleable, it¶s the most open, shapeable medium that we have. So I started thinking if I ± no matter how crazy it is what I might imagine, you can make it real. You can bring it out into the world. So I¶ve always looked at technology as a way to take a dream and get it out there and create it. So I always like to tell people that the tools that exist now, with technology, are fantastic. But if you know how to get behind the tools and tweak µem and push µem further and imagine the next ones, then you¶ve got real power in your hands. So that¶s what I¶ve always thought about. NICK BRIEN: Now Marc, to build on that, you ± I¶ve often heard you say that technology is a new creativity. What do you mean by that? 3

McCann Worldgroup 45 McCann Worldgroup July 7, 2011 Transcript by TransPerfect

MARC LANDSBERG: Yeah, absolutely. We say technology¶s the new creativity quite a bit at MRM. We love partnering with clients like Intel around the world. We¶ve got 600-plus technologists all over our global network to really try to partner with our clients. If you think about it, we kind of say almost every interaction from a Marceting perspective, uh, between a brand and a consumer is in some way, shape or form impacted by technology. Technology amplifies creativity and expands what it can mean. We like to think of that in three buckets. One is content creation. You think about the content types, long-form, short-form, now mobile and app. Just even what is a definition of creativity and content outputs, QR codes. And who can create that content is now evolving dramatically. The second bucket is content distribution. I mean, you know you¶re walking along the crosette, everything is wi-fi enabled. Smart phones, smart cars, smart TVs, smart appliances. And if you think about the ability to distribute those content types everywhere, which leads to the third point, which is content experience ± the way consumers can now engage and experience that creativity and those content types in a funny way. Technology almost makes it that much more human. Key fundamental human needs to connect, to share, to belong, to feel a part of something bigger now. Technology really enables creativity and brands to intersect in a way that¶s really very human. NICK BRIEN: Yeah, but if a technology is enabling tools and capabilities for everyone today to leverage their creativity, what defines an artist? will, I¶m curious. As you see an artist today, what is, what is that person? will.i.am: Well, an artist, that's, that¶s relative you know. It¶s ± someone¶s interpretation of an artist could be someone¶s thing they hate. So. For me, an artist is someone who is open minded, that to be inspired, and then able to regurgitate that and let it out. That¶s an artist, whether you¶re, you know, a scientist, you¶re a painter, you¶re a musician, a ballerina, right? A designer. It doesn¶t, right? It all depends on how you let out how you¶ve been inspired, or your frustrations, your dreams. Takin¶ an idea and turn it into reality. That takes art. NICK BRIEN: You talk a lot, we talked earlier, about the power of social media. And you¶ve used the social media. The network is your community. And you have a word for that. You talk about communicating and ± will.i.am: Yeah, communiting. I liked ± Marceting is a cool word. I like that word. But I like, but sometimes you could Marcet so much that you mess up communities. Um, but communiting is when you¶re trying, when you enable communities, when you go into a community, and whether it¶s a bad one and you fix it ± that¶s communiting, right? When you care about the people that live in that community and you see yourself not as a brand, but a part of a community. So, and the social, social media ± that¶s the word we want to use to describe the internet and Facebook and Twitter. TV was social media back in the 80s. You watch media, you socialize about it, right. You saw a magazine or a newspaper and you talked about it, at work, or at a coffee table. 4

McCann Worldgroup 45 McCann Worldgroup July 7, 2011 Transcript by TransPerfect

Now that¶s times a billion. And communities are growing, right? Whether you¶re from Watts or from Monge do in Brazil, the commonality between Monge do and Detroit and Brooklyn and Harlem and Louisiana ± there¶s a commonality between them all. As well as Beverly Hills and Santa, and all the different versions of people that are all gravitating to an idea. And that¶s amazing to see that happening right now, and the shift, and the void getting bigger, and people trying to fill that void and calling it youth. ³We want to get involved with the youth,´ right. Really what they¶re saying, ³We want to get involved with the pulse,´ the thing that moves culture, which so happens to be a youth. JOHAN JERØE: Yeah. That¶s an interesting answer, [INDISCERNIBLE] Nick, since as we see a lot of research that just suggest that, you know, the classical youth is, whether you¶re in Helsinki or in Beijing, or in Sao Paolo, they are closer in their attitude and their interest as they are with maybe their grandparents or their parents that are living just around the corner. And it, you know, it¶s definitely enabled through technology to a certain extent to have generate that same experience level and level of excitement. And I think that¶s powerful. NICK BRIEN: Well, Tod, I¶m curious. Because you spend a lot of your time imagining how music ± in fact, you¶ve talked about the transformative effect of music, even defining music as medicine. This is a first generation that's really growing up with technology in every way. What is that going to do for creativity? How do you imagine the creative development? TOD MACHOVER: I think like everything there¶s good news and some cautionary thinking. The good news is that um, and we were talking about it backstage with will.i.am ± the kind of tools that are available for really anybody to sit down and make their own piece of music and send it around, and, or manipulate images. I mean, to, to really make personal things is, it changes so fast it¶s absolutely extraordinary, and so I think every kid grows up now feeling each year more comfortable with technology as their medium than we did. I mean, it¶s unbelievable. And so kids expect to be making things and they ex-, they, just creativity is part of what they do. Um, I think the two, the two dangers are that um I think what you want young people to understand is how to shape the technology. You want to have an idea first. You want to have something you really care about as a person, you know, something you love, something you¶re passionate about, somebody you really want to communicate with. Um, I like, I like to encourage people to have those ideas while they¶re outside taking a walk maybe, or um reading a book, or ± not at the computer. Because the tools actually are so powerful that, um, you can kind of have your ideas shaped by what the tool at a particular moment allows you to do or doesn¶t allow you to do. So, I think you can ± NICK BRIEN: But could your, could your students have imagined Guitar Hero without being fundamentally connected with the technology? No. TOD MACHOVER: Well, I¶ll tell ya, I personally believe ± it¶s kind of like what I said before. Technology is an explosive, revolutionary, radical medium, and you want people to dream big 5

McCann Worldgroup 45 McCann Worldgroup July 7, 2011 Transcript by TransPerfect

things in it. We never ± we didn¶t invent Guitar Hero by trying to invent Guitar Hero. Really, really quickly, we actually started by working with Yo-Yo Ma, you know, to do a very high-end project for this great cellist, and we were measuring, um, everything he did while he was playing ± the vibration of the cello, and where his fingers were on the strings, and especially the bow and how the bow moved on the strings. And that was the vision. The vision was to take a great classical musician and to give them a tool so through the emotion of playing, the cello would turn into a whole orchestra, or into a voice, or into something. And it turned out that the technique ± we actually had a mistake in the lab, because nobody ever tried anything like this. And the mistake was, the technique that we measured, used to measure the bow, had electricity running in the air, and a little antenna measuring it. It turned out when his body, his hand, got close to the antenna, the measurement was all wrong. It was, we were like, ³Oh, geez, Yo-yo¶s got to go to Carnegie Hall in a week, what are we going to do?´ So we went back to the drawing board and found out that his body was absorbing electricity. Anybody¶s body would absorb electricity. So we had to change the circuit. Oh, it wasn¶t supposed to happen. And then I started thinking, ³Well, you know, you could actually do the same measurement of electricity just with a body, so you could throw away the cello and maybe throw away Yo-yo Ma, I don¶t know, and make something that would measure everybody¶s gesture.´ So that led to a bunch of things. It led to NEC, Nippon Electric Company, coming in, seeing this electricity measurement and saying, ³Oh, bodies, objects, ah.´ They licensed that technology to make a way to measure whether a child seat in a car is installed correctly, is about to fall off, if your child is sitting properly there. So every child se-, every car in the world, the child seats are measured with this technology that was developed for Yo-yo Ma¶s bow. But then we also said, ³Well, if you develop that you can measure gesture. Anybody¶s movement.´ It doesn¶t have to be an expert musician. NICK BRIEN: Sure. TOD MACHOVER: That led to thinking about, well, let¶s make a game where anybody can pick up something like an instrument. You don¶t have to be an expert, and you¶re in the music experience. So I think you¶d want to think big, take big risks, and it will lead you somewhere unusual. MARC LANDSBERG: And one interesting thing about that. We were talking backstage, and the young creators in the world, people that are creating content, can link their ideas with the execution of those ideas. And that¶s what technology enables. will was saying to me back stage, ³I had an idea for a car, and I built that car. I got the parts and the chasses.´ And the implications for agencies now I think are, all of the young creators in the world really understand digital and technology, and they have creative ideas, and they can execute those ideas themselves. Left and right brains are converging like never before, which means modern, smart 6

McCann Worldgroup 45 McCann Worldgroup July 7, 2011 Transcript by TransPerfect

Marceting agencies have got to be able to link creation and conception in ways that they never did before to move faster, and to link thinking and doing like ways we never had. And that¶s what technology enables. NICK BRIEN: Well that¶s to a certain extent the power of collaboration. I mean, will, it¶s early days and the partner with Intel, as you said, for a very long time. You talked backstage, we were talking about the power of collaboration, the opportunity for the unexpected to become. How do you imagine that? In the partnership with Intel? will.i.am: Well, you see, uh, first off, you know, radio. People make songs for radio. Well, they make songs in the studio and then it goes to radio. Well, radio is technology. You know, it¶s not that old. It¶s pretty new. Right? It¶s like, it wasn¶t around in 1800. It¶s like 1920 something. But today¶s technology is superior to that. MAN: Yeah. will.i.am: Now you can make music on the internet and then it¶s heard on the internet. You didn¶t make music on the, using the radio. You made music, and then it went to radio. Now you¶re making music on the internet, and it¶s heard on the internet, right? If you think about that for a second ± so what you¶re making, you¶re actually experiencing it on. Yesterday, he told you that you made something and then you send it there and that¶s the disruption that¶s happening. So collaboration, you couldn¶t really ± you collaborate in the studio and then people heard what you collaborated on on the radio. On the internet and computers you¶re making it, you can make it on it, collaborate on it and people experience the collaboration on it. So it¶s, it¶s at the beginning because no one¶s really truly creating like that right now. I¶ve got a film that was made on the internet. David Guetta sent me the beat on my e±mail, I recorded, sent him my vocals on the e-mail. Now what if people saw that and experienced that collaboration as it happened, right? That song was made via e-mail on the internet, right? Now maybe 10 years from now, less than that, five years from now people are going to experience the inception, the birth of ideas being exchanged on the internet. That¶s what I¶m excited. I can¶t wait for that to happen. Real time collaboration, people experiencing that. NICK BRIEN: And do you see that Johan? JOHAN JERØE: Well, you know, so you know, remember our first meeting? We got will into sit down uh sit down with some of our engineers and will brought his you know his staff in and yeah and it was really about, you know, will had a couple of ideas that he wanted to sort of share with us and I um, I disinvited him a couple of days beforehand because obviously he¶s a celebrity and I didn¶t want anybody to sort of feel like it¶s all cotton and covered up and that's a great idea, Mr. will.i.am and so I said µI don¶t think you should come. I¶ll have your engineers talking to our engineers and they can be frank and direct with each other.¶ And the night before I get a call on my cell phone from will.i.am and will said to me µno fucking way, I¶m showing up. 7

McCann Worldgroup 45 McCann Worldgroup July 7, 2011 Transcript by TransPerfect

I want to understand this and I want to drive this as heavy as I can.¶ And so obviously he overruled my disinvite and showed up and, and we were very clear from the beginning that this collaboration of here¶s what I would like to do with the technology. will.i.am: Yeah. JOHAN JERØE: Here¶s what I want my art to be. It¶s going to enable our engineers to sort of look at innovation in a very different way and I think that¶s the power of this. This is not a, it¶s not an endorsement deal, if you want to. will.i.am: Because I get to see it first hand, right? So, you know it hit me. One day I was on stage, getting ready to step out. There¶s 100,000 people out there in the audience in Brazil. Like wow, right? 100,000 people, that¶s crazy. And I¶m on the phone tweeting right before I go on stage, two minutes before we go on stage, right. Think about it because I remember five years ago we didn¶t do that. We were just backstage waiting, fiddling thumbs as if I knew one day I was going to tweet with these thumbs right. Doodle-do, doodle-do right. So now I¶ve got something to do with this. Let me just do this. So now I¶m tweeting, getting ready to go out, taking pictures of people¶s wardrobes and keeping the people in the audience, give them closer, bring them closer to what we¶re about to do. So I get off, get ready to step on stage and I hand them my microphone. No I hand them my cell phone and they give me a microphone. I was like what¶s wrong with that picture? What¶s wrong with the picture is I just handed them my cell phone and they give me a device that only does one thing. Something¶s wrong here. Me sitting here with a microphone on my shirt is old school. I should just have my phone with me recording it and my phone should be broadcast to that system there and I¶m recording it and then I have all my thoughts on me. That¶s what it should be but this is old school. But no one is ever going to think that unless you put me with some people like Intel who would be like µhey, maybe we should do it different, right. It¶s 2011 isn¶t it?¶ Why are we still rocking it like it¶s 1990? It¶s not 1990. [Audience Applause] NICK BRIEN: There¶s other plans. There¶s other Marceters and large organizations you¶re working with in partnership in creative expression: Intel, Coca Cola we¶ve talked about, I think McDonalds. I mean, how, we¶re here at the Cannes Festival. It changed its name. It¶s no longer the Festival of Advertisers. It¶s now the Festival of Creativity. How do you see brands? How do you see Marceting going forward with all of these developments we¶re talking about? Does the business model of brands change fundamentally? will.i.am: Um, right now it¶s a unique time because TV¶s not what it used to be. Once again it¶s old technology, television, when you compare it to that guy¶s tablet. He took a picture with a big old tablet just two seconds ago. That thing is huge and it¶s cool because he¶s like what, I¶ve got my tablet, take a picture, right. Imagine if it was 1980 and he came here with his big ass TV, taking, you can¶t take a picture with a big ass TV. But « 8

McCann Worldgroup 45 McCann Worldgroup July 7, 2011 Transcript by TransPerfect

NICK BRIEN: He probably did. will.i.am: «that thing is probably just as powerful as, more powerful than his TV, right, that smart tablet that he has. Your smart phone, it¶s more powerful than TV. It¶s more powerful than any magazine, all magazines at once. So what you¶re experiencing, what we are all experiencing is a big major shift ± what ad agencies used to do, Marceters used to do. What brands want to continue to have that interaction and engagement with you know a bunch of people to put their brand in front of it. And then bands are in front of them all the time because that¶s escape three minutes at a time, right, a song at a time. So you know, ad agencies are so important but they¶re trying to figure out how to ad and be agents for brands in this new culture that we are experiencing right now, right. How do you take the consumer and turn them into agents that add value to your brand and add value to communities. That¶s the puzzle. Ad agencies were yesterday but ad agencies that turned consumers into agents that add value to community and life, voom voom, that¶s what it¶s about right now. MARC LANDSBERG: And Nick, on that point exactly will, as that business model changes a lot of our clients are asking the question how do we make money while we Marcet. So right, we all talk about [INDISCERNIBLE] and that¶s fine. We¶ve got a set of assets. How do we think about those assets in a way that¶s enormously relevant for our consumers and how do we create value exchanges relevant for them and relevant for us? We¶d love to be able to monetize those assets and do it in a way that really makes a lot of value and is enormously relevant for our consumers. So the questions being asked are completely, completely different. NICK BRIEN: So Tod you¶re saying, to pick up on what will was saying, we're at the beginning of this journey. What¶s on the horizon from your perspective? TOD MACHOVER: What¶s what? NICK BRIEN: On the horizon in terms of how technology really transforms creativity. TOD MACHOVER: Yeah, well one of the most powerful experiences for for my team and I over the last few years um, we¶ve been very inspired to make special technologies to allow anyone to make music. To try to connect the best musicians in the world with anybody who wants to make music and make everybody¶s ability more sophisticated. We started working in, we started realizing that music, everybody loves music, we all spend a lot of time with it. We all know that, um, but music has many, many special properties that you know gets under your skin before you realize it. Research shows more and more that, um, it looks like music probably uses more different parts of your brain than anything else. You know, it actually calls on different parts of your brain. It seems to synchronize different parts of your brain. It changes your physiology. I mean it literally changes your heartbeat and your sweat and all kinds of things. 9

McCann Worldgroup 45 McCann Worldgroup July 7, 2011 Transcript by TransPerfect

So that¶s kind of cool but what¶s really interesting is that we could be designing music and making musical environments that actually help us regulate our well-being. I mean, help in extreme cases like with illness but in general just help us day-to-day. So we¶re doing a lot of work right now in music and health. We almost ± you mentioned it before, we think of music as medicine. It¶s all over the place. Music is the last thing that almost any Alzheimer¶s patient will still respond to. You can find somebody who¶s lost their memory. They can¶t recognize themselves in a mirror. They can¶t recognize their family. Almost always you can find some bit of music that that person will not only recognize, you¶ll find somebody who hasn¶t had a facial expression for years all of a sudden wake up, jump out of their chair, sing the music with the words and with that bring back all kinds of memories because music is connected to our memories in really deep ways. So we work with music and memory, music and aging. The same kind of instrument that we just designed for Yo-Yo Ma or Prince, for instance, to measure a great performer, if you think about it, it led to Guitar Hero but it can also lead to measuring the way somebody expresses themselves who may be, may have a lot of talent but may have things that he or she can¶t do. So that might be a child who has huge enthusiasm and imagination but not a lot of fine motor control. But it might also be, for instance, somebody with Cerebral Palsy. We had one of our good close collaborators is a young man in Boston who was born with Cerebral Palsy. He can¶t speak. He can¶t move very well. But it turns out he loves music and we only found that out because we gave him a few of our tools and he ran with them. Well he couldn¶t run but he made fantastic music and we said well let¶s work with you to make this better. So we made special head tracking devices that lets him now conduct his own music. He composes and this is just the tip of the iceberg. So in a word, if you want to know where I think things are going, what working with music and medicine said to me is that you know if I make an instrument for Yo-Yo Ma or Prince or even Guitar Hero they¶re all instruments, however cool they are, that are meant to work for everybody. Anybody, anybody picks up the same Guitar Hero environment and makes music with it. But when you work with people with illnesses or any of us, if you really think about each of us as individuals, we¶re not all the same. We¶re incredibly different. We all have things that we like or don¶t like. We have things we¶re good at and not good at. We have problems and we have things and I think we¶re going to find ways to customize not just the instruments but the music itself so that little by little we¶ll see a whole field designed, which you might think of as medicine but I think of as really personalized music. Music that you can shape yourself to make it something you like or maybe there¶s a new you know, maybe the will.i.am in 50 years will be partly composer, partly performer and partly your doctor, your psychiatrist, somebody who can actually« NICK BRIEN: That¶s a good thought. TOD MACHOVER: I¶d, I¶d, I¶d work with that have them tune my music. Come on. NICK BRIEN: That¶s the future. 10

McCann Worldgroup 45 McCann Worldgroup July 7, 2011 Transcript by TransPerfect

MARC LANDSBERG: He¶d use his phone for the diagnosis. NICK BRIEN: No, it challenges conventions. It disrupts the orthodoxy. I mean, will, you were talking about how technology is redefining the way you¶re going to be doing your tours. Why don¶t you share that with us? It might, the idea that someone might say to you only have one concert in a Marcet and you¶re completely upending that orthodox thinking. will.i.am: Yeah, we, you know, the concept of µcollective consciousness¶ is now, it exists now. Twitter to me is the concept of collective consciousness to the point where once you would perform and you had no way to judge people how they were experiencing it. Now you can. So I keep my phone backstage dressing room all the time seeing what people are saying at the show. I mean because there¶s a thin, there¶s a B different from boo and ooh because boo can sounds like ooh and you don¶t even know are they booing right now or they oohing. Ooh, is that a boo? No, they say ooh. So now you gotta check to see if that was an ooh or boo. [Laughter and Applause] will.i.am: Ooh, boo, it sounds the same. TOD MACHOVER: In a way it¶s an extension of the same thing. You have just as I¶m dreaming of music which you can customize so it reaches a sweet spot for a particular person, will is saying that you can customize your knowledge of who your audience is and what they care about and you can do it maybe between songs but why not do it while you¶re on stage and um absolutely that¶s coming and I think it¶ll be really powerful. Everything we CAN do to build a connection between each other period and between people on stage and people in the audience and people in the audience and each other, that¶s what we want to do and the tools are getting better and better and it¶s a huge frontier, really exciting. NICK BRIEN: Uh do you think, I mean let¶s think about the audience we have here today at the festival. Everyone¶s here to improve their skills and become more effective IN the way they¶re developing creativity. What advice would you give to so many of the people who are watching today, who are attending Cannes to learn and get better? What advice would you say about your own experiences and the way you¶ve lent into the power of technology to create? will.i.am: Now you can, um, my advice to people, creators, lovers of music, Marceting, philanthropy, politics, whatever your passion is don¶t wait for people to come solve your problems. Figure out a way to solve your own whether it¶s in your community or personally. You have to take the first step and if we all take first steps together that¶s real movement. Anything else you¶re just waiting, right. So you, we, my advice is to take personal risks for yourself and your community and your business. Business, community, your personal, it¶s all the same if you¶re really passionate about it. Do it because you love it and take risks. NICK BRIEN: Tod what about you? Is it all about taking risks? 11

McCann Worldgroup 45 McCann Worldgroup July 7, 2011 Transcript by TransPerfect

TOD MACHOVER: I was going to say exactly the same thing and maybe in a slightly different area but I think that¶s absolutely right. You know the, the world is changing so fast, there¶s so many demands for our attention. I mean will talked about passion, which of course is the most important thing. You do something that you truly believe in and care about and I think a few of us have kids and we were talking backstage about our kids and I think with Johan we were saying, you know, what do you want for your kids. I mean I have a 17 year old who¶s going to college in a year. We¶re looking at colleges. All you want for your kids is for them to find their passion, what they really care about. And, and not always so easy to help somebody do that but that¶s what you do in life. So that¶s really important. I think as advertising people and creative people and Marceters, people with messages, I think the thing to keep in mind is just that the world is changing so fast and there¶s so many demands, there¶s so many, um, people competing for our attention that you just can¶t be um uh conservative about what your message is, how you get it out there. I think especially for, for, for maybe this audience I think people are bombarded so, so much it¶s interesting thing about music as a time span of you want to keep people¶s attention for longer because there¶s so much flying at you and one thing that the advertising community does better than anybody else is to find the one image and the one idea that gets you to the heart of something, lodges in your memory and changes the way you think. But it¶s not always the best way of keeping you with that idea. Music¶s not a bad model for, um, how to draw you in, immerse you in an experience, keep you there, make you want to come back and um I think we have to think boldly about how we get these messages out um, how astonishing and different they are and then how to keep people inside a message for longer because you can¶t take it for granted. One more thing, you have to get people out of the house because, um, one of the things that¶s so great about the internet now is you can do anything from home but, um, I think we can¶t take for granted that people want to go to concerts but you know even people making concerts have to think. Going to stores, going to public places, um, we have to reinvent that pretty boldly. will.i.am: Yeah, we, I just came from, we played at Stade de France last night, um, and then you know it¶s 80,000 people there and then after that I DJ¶d for 200 people and then had an hour of sleep and came here and then DJ tonight in Corsica. My point, at that concert you're seeing, I¶m seeing a 60 year old with their 40 year old daughter and their 40 year old has their 20 year old and it¶s like wow, check this out, this is amazing. It¶s families, right. Party people, that, you know 20 year olds that are in college and a 15 year old and everybody¶s having a great good old time. And that¶s the internet. That¶s because you too can play this Stade de France but that demographic is specific, which I think what you¶re about, what we¶re about to witness is more of that you know for the family because there¶s not much of that. It doesn¶t really exist, that type of entertainment where the family can go out and experience things. And brands enabling that is I think that¶s where it¶s going to come from because the brand that enabled Black Eyed Peas is we sold discs and that was our product, plastic discs. And now that 12

McCann Worldgroup 45 McCann Worldgroup July 7, 2011 Transcript by TransPerfect

that¶s gone, there¶s no record stores selling those discs but look at what, how, look how it brings families together. So brands that develop that, I think that¶s the future that we, that¶s going to bring, take people out of their homes, bring demographics together that wouldn¶t kick it or hang out. Allowing you know, seeing your 60 year old mom saying words like µthat¶s just dope.¶ That¶s fresh. [Laughter] will.i.am: Sorry. MARC LANDSBERG: One bit, Nick to the question, one bit of just practical advice. Three quick things. You know, Tod said passion. Find those people around you, mentors that are passionate. Using technologies, find a mentor and get as close to them as you can. The second is don¶t hover above it and talk about it, just do it. Everybody in this room should be a creative technologist. Download the apps, the tools, experiment and try. And the third thing, register for CES. You want to see what¶s happening in technology and its application and consumer interactions with brands, you gotta go around CES next January. It¶s fantastic. NICK BRIEN: And then you¶ll see Intel there in fall so last word there from Johan, last word from Johan. Any advice for everyone here? JOHAN JERØE: Well I think innovation is everything, right, and I in particular to my agency partners keep pushing us. Don¶t take a no for, for a no. Come back with great ideas. Keep pushing. I think, you know, you¶re the guarantee for, for that inspiration and that passion and this is why, this is why we¶re here. NICK BRIEN: Fantastic. Well ladies and gentlemen I hope there¶s some learnings here. I¶d like, round of applause will.i.am, Tod, Johan and Marc. Thank you very much. [Applause]

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