P. 1
MARINE NEWS July 2008

MARINE NEWS July 2008

4.42

|Views: 2,155|Likes:
Published by Capt.Seithu Htun
Homeland
Security
Homeland
Security

More info:

Published by: Capt.Seithu Htun on Sep 14, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/06/2012

pdf

text

original

M

arine
T H E I N F O R M AT I O N A U T H O R I T Y F O R T H E WO R K B OAT • O F F S H O R E • I N L A N D • C OA S T A L M A R I N E M A R K E T S
Inland
Report
Room to
Grow
Waterjets
Flexible
Propulsion
Pick
News
J U LY 2 0 0 8
WWW. M A R I N E L I N K . C O M
Homeland
Security
Recognizing the Terrorist Threat
MN#7 Cover.qxd 7/2/2008 4:34 PM Page 1
MN#7 C2 C3 & C4.qxd 7/7/2008 11:57 AM Page 1
Koike Aronson, Inc./Ransome Arcade, NY USA 800-252-5232 Houston, TX 800-868-0640
www.koike.com
Faster.
Higher quality.
Extremely durable.
Koike Aronson/Ransome
calls it “Zero downside.”
Automating any part of your welding with the Wel-Handy
Multi welding carriage can deliver immediate payback.
Get faster welding of fillet, butt, and lap welds. One shipbuilder
whose welders used to produce 110 ft. of weld a day now
produce nearly 300 ft. a day with the Wel-Handy Multi.
Get x-ray quality welds while reducing wire, gas and fumes
by up to 54%, with reduced heat and less spatter. And get
a compact, durable unit that has the on-site portability you
need. Give Koike Aronson/Ransome a call to find out how the
Wel-Handy Multi welding carriage can maximize your upside.
Faster.
Higher quality.
Extremely durable.
Koike Aronson/Ransome
calls it “Zero downside.”
MN#1 (17-32).qxd 11/9/2007 11:20 AM Page 27
2 MN July 2008
8 Tech File WaterWATCH Homeland Security Program
10 Insights Peter Stephaich, Blue Danube Inc.
12 Boat of the Month Patrol Boat from SeaArk
18 Offshore: With Pain at the Pump, it’s Finger-Pointing Time
Drop the blame game and find a plausible solution • by Don G. Briggs
20 Legal: Limitation of Liability
Maritime law includes a valuable limation of liability • by Lawrence R. DeMarcay, III
22 Finance: Looking at Alternative Resources for Capital
New business opportunities often need new capital. • by Bob Douglas
contents
pg
8




18




24







44


Briefs
Departments
Features
Columns
24 The Road Less Traveled
A new study touts the economic and environmental benefits, plus the growth potential, of the U.S.
inland waterway system • by Greg Trauthwein
30 K-Sea Acquires Roehrig
A network of unplanned parallels leads to an acquisition • by Don Sutherland
35 Terrorist Recognition
A new book overviews visible components of terrorist action and the ten-phase sequence.
44 People & Companies
50 By the Numbers
51 Diesel Engine Directory
54 Technology Bits: Tools
July 2008 • Number 7 • Volume 17
12
30
48
MN#7 (1-16).qxd 7/2/2008 4:44 PM Page 2
www.marinelink.com MN 3
®
FOAM. Get that safety blanket.
The only 2.5 Gallon AFFF
USCG Approved Foam
Fire Extinguisher in USA
USCG: Type A Size II / Type B Size II
■ ■ Easily recharged by the end user.
■ ■ Minimal cleanup, as opposed to
dry chemical.
■ ■ Liquid based, with effective
penetration on deep seated
Class A fires.
■ ■ Prevents flashback, while
coating surface with film
forming chemical. Class B fires.
■ ■ COMPLETE APPROVED FIREMAN’S
OUTFIT/SCBA ALWAYS IN STOCK.
Contact your local Fire Equipment Company or for
more information contact:
Western Fire & Safety Co., Inc.
sales@westernfireandsafety.com • www.westernfireandsafety.com
Ph: (206) 782-7825 • Fax: (206) 783-5748
250CG/AFFF FOAM EXTINGUISHER
810CG EXTINGUISHER BRACKET
Includes FREE (FOAM) decal.
Government buyers, please inquire by identifiable Fax/E.mail for special Govt Pricing.
SEATTLE, WA.
J
U
L
Y

0
8
O
N
LY

A
U
T
H
O
R
IZ
E
D
P
R
O
M
O
T
IO
N
2
0
%
O
F
F

E
X
T
IN
G
U
IS
H
E
R
/
B
R
A
C
K
E
T

P
A
C
K
A
G
E

C
O
N
T
A
C
T
Y
O
U
R
L
O
C
A
L

F
IR
E
E
Q
P
T
D
E
A
L
E
R
MN#7 (1-16).qxd 7/2/2008 11:41 AM Page 3
POSTMASTER Time Value Expedite
MarineNews is published monthly, 12 times a year by Maritime Activity Reports, Inc.,
118 East 25th Street, New York, N.Y. 10160-1062. The publisher assumes no responsibil-
ity for any misprints or claims and actions taken by advertisers. The publisher reserves the
right to refuse any advertising. Contents of this publication either in whole or in part may
not be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MarineNews,118 East 25th Street,
New York, N.Y. 10160-1062.
MarineNews is published monthly by Maritime Activity Reports Inc. Periodicals
Postage paid at New York, NY and additional mailing offices. Canada Post International
Publications Mail Product (Canadian Distribution) Sales Agreement No. 0970700.
Printed in U.S.A.
ISSN#1087-3864 USPS#013-952
Florida: 215 NW 3rd St., Boynton Beach, FL 33435
tel: (561) 732-4368; fax: (561) 732-6984
New York: 118 E. 25th St., New York, NY 10010
tel: (212) 477-6700; fax: (212) 254-6271
www.marinelink.com
TO SUBSCRIBE:
Subscriptions to Marine News (12 issues per year) for one year are available for $29.00;
Two years (24 issues) for $44.00.
Send your check payable to:
MarineNews, 118 E. 25th St., New York, NY 10010.
For more information call Rhoda Morgan at:
(212) 477-6700; fax: (212) 254-6271; morgan@marinelink.com
Publisher John C. O’Malley • jomalley@marinelink.com
Associate Publisher & Editor Greg Trauthwein• trauthwein@marinelink.com
Managing Editor Jennifer Rabulan • rabulan@marinelink.com
Contributing Writers Don Sutherland • Matt Gresham • Raina O. Clark
Frederick B. Goldsmith • Richard Paine • Ken Wells
Randy O’Neill • Lawrence R. DeMarcay, III
Don G. Briggs
ADVERTISING
Director of Sales Rob Howard • howard@marinelink.com
Vice President of Sales Lucia Annunziata • annunziata@marinelink.com
Tel: 212-477-6700 Fax: 212-254-6271
Advertising Sales Managers
Scott Good • sgood@marinelink.com Patrick Haley • haley@marinelink.com
Tel: 561-733-2477 Fax: 561-732-8063 Tel: 561-732-1185 Fax: 561-732-8414
Dawn Trauthwein • dtrauthwein@marinelink.com Karen Harding • harding@marinelink.com
Tel/Fax: 631-868-3575 Tel: 561-732-1659 Fax: 561-732-9670
Managing Director, Intl. Sales Tony Stein • tony.r.stein@btinternet.com
Tel/Fax: +44-1506-822240
Classified Advertising Sales
Marine Marketplace Dale Barnett • barnett@marinelink.com
Tel: 212-477-6700 Fax: 212-254-6271
Advertising Sales Administration
Sales Administration Manager Tina Veselov • veselov@marinelink.com
Marketing Administration Kami Accursio • accursio@marinelink.com
PRODUCTION
Production Manager Irina Tabakina • tabakina@marinelink.com
Manager, Information Technology Vladimir Bibik • bibik@marinelink.com
Manager, Accounting Services Esther Rothenberger • rothenberger@marinelink.com
Manager, Public Relations Mark O’Malley • momalley@marinelink.com
Circulation Manager Kathleen Hickey • mncirc@marinelink.com
Pictured on this
month’s cover is a
JMEC boat fitted with
Twin UJ340 UltraJets.
On the Cover
4 MN July 2008
MarineNews
Coming in Future Editions
August 2008
Offshore Energy
• Marine Communications
• Offshore Service Contractors
September 2008
U.S. Navy Edition
• Salvage Report
• Insulation, Pipes, Pumps & Valves
October 2008
Vessel & Offshore Rig Design
• Megayachts
• Marine Environmental Products
Novemer 2008
WORKBOAT SHOW EDITION
• Maritime Security
• Monitoring & Control Systems
• Ribs & Patrol Craft
MN#7 (1-16).qxd 7/2/2008 4:45 PM Page 4
We're making waves by reducing
maintenance time and costs
Keep your vessels working and more proftable with
Texaco Extended Life (XL|) Corrosion |nhibitors
Face it. |f your vessels are not in service, you're not making money. And that's
where Texaco XL| comes in. Unlike conventional corrosion inhibitors that must
be replenished on a regular basis, Texaco XL| eliminates the need for regular
inhibitor additions due to the extended life properties of our patented corrosion
inhibitors. The inhibitors in Texaco XL| have a service life of 32,000 hours or
eight years and have been shown to improve heat transfer up to 12x and water
pump life up to 40x when compared to silicate-containing inhibitors.
So, if you're spending too much time and money maintaining your cooling
system and not getting the kind of hardware life you want, give us a call.
Find out more about our Texaco XL| and XL|-N Corrosion |nhibitors for water-based
systems by calling 1-800-533-6571. And keep making waves.
Texaco. Protection for Life."
© 2007 Chevron Products Company, San Ramon, CA. All rights reserved.
All trademarks are the property of Chevron Intellectual Property LLC.
Corrosion
damaged
hange
Texaco XL|
protected
hange
A Chevron company product.
www.marinelink.com MN 5
MN#7 (1-16).qxd 7/2/2008 11:45 AM Page 5
editorial
B
arge transportation is — by far — the most
fuel efficient, economically and environmen-
tally sound means to move bulk material from
point A to point B, in comparison to rail, road and
air options.
Before you say "duh", realize that I know this; I
know that you know this; but the general population
of the United States does not know this, or for that
matter, really care.
I contend that the public needs to know more
about our industry and, in particular, the environ-
mental advantages of moving cargo on the water-
ways, because only through a thorough, grass roots
information campaign can the inland waterway
industry gather the popular, political and financial
support to reach its full potential. The maritime
industry does many things well, but communicating
its successes to the population in general is not one of
them. Doing so just got easier, but your assistance is
required.
Last month I had a meeting in New York with rep-
resentatives of the National Waterways Foundation
(NWF), a group that holds a strong interest in pro-
ducing and disseminating timely, accurate informa-
tion on the U.S. inland waterways system. The initial
report — "A Modal Comparison of Domestic
Freight Transportation Effects on the General
Public" — was independently produced by the Texas
Transportation Institute, commissioned by NWF
and the U.S. Maritime Administration. The numbers
are predictably pro-waterway (the full report starts on
page 24), with numerous charts, graphs and statistics
comparing barge, truck and rail transport. But great
care was taken in the creation of this report and the
resultant statistics to ensure an unbiased, even-hand-
ed approach.
Instead of simply presenting these results to the
industry to be self-congratulatory on a job well done,
NWF is intent on dissemi-
nating these numbers far and
wide, with your help.
In addition to offering a
full-version of the report,
NWF has created a profes-
sional presentation, com-
plete with a customizable PowerPoint presentation
and ancillary marketing brochures and materials,
with the intent of making them available to you —
individual members of the maritime industry — to
use in presentations both inside the industry, but
more importantly for presentations to non-maritime
groups.
To download a copy of the full report, visit
www.nationalwaterwaysfoundation.org
If you require additional information on receiving
professional-quality materials for your next presenta-
tion, Email
bpalmer@vesselalliance.com
SUBSCRIBE
Subscribe to the print or electronic edition of MarineNews at
www.marinelink.com/renewsubscr/Renew04/subscribe.html or e-
mail Kathleen Hickey at mrcirc@marinelink.com
DAILY NEWS via E-MAIL
Twice every business day we provide breaking news, tailored to
your specification, delivered FREE directly to your e-mail. To sub-
scribe visit http://maritimetoday.com/login.aspx
POST & SEARCH JOBS
Job listings are updated daily and help match employers with quali-
fied employees. Post a position or keep abreast of new employ-
ment opportunities at http://www.maritimejobs.com
ADVERTISE
MN offers a number of print and electronic advertising packages.
To see our editorial
calendar and advertising rates, visit
www.marinelink.com/AdvRates/Rates.asp
6 MN July 2008
MN#7 (1-16).qxd 7/3/2008 12:41 PM Page 6
www.marinelink.com MN 7
TIDEWATER
For Information on Tidewater Refit Vessels
Contact Richard Heausler: 504.568.1010
rheausler@tdw.com
A Tidewater Marine, LLC Product
B U I L T T O A B S C L A S S & U S C G S T A N D A R D S
It’s Your HEADQUARTERS
It’s Your WAREHOUSE
It’s Your COMMAND CENTER
...TO GO
Tidewater Can Refit These Vessels For Uses Including:
• Coastal Container & Cargo
• Short-Sea Shipping
• Fishing & Fish Processing
• General Cargo - Non-Oilfield
• Salvage Assist
• Dive Support
• Construction Assist
• Mobile Warehouse
• Mobile Command Center
• Expedition Boat
• Yacht Tenders and
Shadow Vessels
MN#7 (1-16).qxd 7/2/2008 4:46 PM Page 7
tech file
Please submit your ‘tech file’ nominations to Jennifer Rabulan at
jrabulan@marinelink.com
Ducommun Incorporated's Miltec Corporation sub-
sidiary was awarded a long term contract to develop,
demonstrate and provide security solutions for facilities
located on U.S. waterways. The WaterWATCH Program
is a continuation of previous waterway security develop-
ment efforts at Miltec and has a five year total duration.
WaterWATCH is a multi-sensor shallow water surveil-
lance system designed to integrate multiple layers of auto-
mated surveillance into a single user station. The system
quickly allows users to identify, classify and track intrud-
ers reducing the time to notification of first responders.
The contract is valued at approximately $21m, if fully
funded. Miltec was awarded this task by the Army
Aviation and Missile Research, Development &
Engineering Center under its Applied Technology
Initiatives Directorate, which focuses on bringing various
technologies to bear on national issues such as Homeland
Security.
Joseph C. Berenato chairman and chief executive officer
of Ducommun, said, "The WaterWATCH Program is at
the forefront of our efforts to expand into the homeland
security arena.
Homeland Security has the responsibility to protect this
nation's critical infrastructure located on over 25,000
miles of waterways. By applying our technological expert-
ise to this program, we hope to achieve a model for effec-
tive and affordable protection of critical U.S. assets. We
intend to continue to seek other applications for Miltec's
technology and products with both the Departments of
Defense and Homeland Security."
The WaterWATCH system is designed to be adaptable
to any existing capability, with sensor selection designed
for each particular user. This approach, the company says,
also makes the system easy to upgrade as technology
advances in sensors, recording systems or processing. The
WaterWATCH system uses an open architecture, inter-
net-type approach that makes maximum use of existing
hardware and software while upgrading and automating
your current security system.
Email jberenato@ducommun.com
Miltec Awarded $21m Contract for
WaterWATCH Homeland Security Program
8 MN July 2008
MN#7 (1-16).qxd 7/2/2008 4:47 PM Page 8
The challenge to balance the needs of the environment with the performance marine operators
expect has been met by Cummins Quantum System engines. Certified to Tier 2 emissions standards
in the U.S. and Europe, the QSK engine family features proven technology with improved
durability and reliability, plus full-authority electronics. Today QSK19, QSK38 and
QSK50 Tier 2 engines are powering tugs, barges, crewboats and passenger vessels
across North America and Europe. For more information, visit marine.cummins.com
or contact your local Cummins professional.
©2008 Cummins Inc., 4500 Leeds Avenue – Suite 301, Charleston, South Carolina 29405 U.S.A.
DESIGNED. CERTIFIED. IN SERVICE.
MET.
EVERY CHALLENGE.
TM
MN#7 (1-16).qxd 7/2/2008 11:32 AM Page 9
10 MN July 2008
insights
To put it mildly, Peter H. Stephaich is a busy man.
Stephaich is currently Chairman, CEO and President of
Blue Danube Inc., a private holding company based in
Pittsburgh that is engaged in the river transportation
industry on the Upper Ohio River. Blue Danube compa-
nies - including two wholly owned operating subsidiaries
Campbell Transportation Co. and C&C Marine
Maintenance - employ 450, and own and operate 35
boats and approximately 460 barges.
MN recently met with Stephaich to discuss another of
his roles, as chairman of the National Waterways
Foundation (NWF).
NWF is making headlines with the release of a new
report -- "A Modal Comparison of Domestic Freight
Transportation Effects on the General Public," — a report
that was produced by the Texas Transportation Institute,
commissioned by NWF and the U.S. Maritime
Administration. The report (which is covered in great
detail starting on page 24) was produced to clearly and
objectively discuss the differences between the three major
modes of bulk cargo transportation in the U.S.: barge, rail
and truck.
"If you accept the premise that these tons are going to
have to be moved — food, coal, grain - and you ask 'what
is the best way, from an environmental point of view, to
move them,' there is no better way than on the inland
waterway system," Stephaich said.
The report, as would be expected, illustrates the envi-
ronmental, fuel efficiency and worker safety benefits of
barge transport over the other modes. While this conclu-
sion could be reasonably assumed by anyone with a basic
knowledge of the cost and process of moving bulk mate-
rials, NWF and MarAd went to great lengths to assure
objectivity, in fact bringing onboard three 'PhD types'
from all three transport modes to peer review the study
from the start. "When we started this, we didn't know
how it would turn out," said Stephaich. "But we figured
that we were the safer, more efficient and environmental-
ly sound transportation mode.
There is a lack of quality, timely information which doc-
uments the statistical portion of this industry," said
Stephaich. "This study, hopefully, is the first of many to
come." The report, which can be downloaded at
www.nationalwaterwaysfoundation.org, is intended as a
tool to educate consumers and people outside of the
marine business as to the value and growth potential of
inland barge transportation.
"We are the only under-utilized transportation mode in
this country," said Stephaich.
Stephaich is on the Board and Executive Committee of
the American Waterways Operators, serves on the Board
and Executive Committee of Waterways Council, Inc.,
and is a Commissioner and Vice Chairman of the Port of
Pittsburgh. He is also Chairman of the Allegheny
Institute for Public Policy and a Trustee of the Landmarks
Financial Corporation.
A native of New York City, Mr. Stephaich earned his
bachelor's degree from Middlebury College and his
M.B.A., with a major in finance, from New York
University.
Peter Stephaich, Blue Danube Inc.
Please submit your ‘insights’ nominations to Jennifer Rabulan at
jrabulan@marinelink.com
Peter Stephaich, NWF Chairman and Chairman of Campbell
Transportation in Pittsburgh.
MN#7 (1-16).qxd 7/2/2008 4:47 PM Page 10
MN#7 (1-16).qxd 7/2/2008 11:33 AM Page 11
12 MN July 2008
SeaArk Marine, Inc. has completed
a 4816-V Dauntless Patrol boat for
the Royal Bahamas Defence Force.
This is the first of a two boat contract
with The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, in Nassau, Bahamas.
The vessel and her crew are tasked
with drug interdiction, combating
illegal immigration, search and rescue
and securing the Bahamian borders
and outer islands. The SeaArk
Dauntless Class vessel is based on a
proven hull designed by C. Raymond
Hunt & Associates, of Boston, MA,
and is constructed of all-welded
marine grade aluminum. The vessel
features a deep-vee variable deadrise
hull that produces a smooth, dry and
stable ride. The vessel is powered by
twin Caterpillar C-12 engines at 660
hp each coupled to Twin Disc gears.
This patrol boat can attain a top
speed of 30 knots with a range of 300
miles and operates at a service speed
of approximately 26 knots.
Pilot house accommodations
include hydraulic/suspension seating
for a crew of six plus a dinette settee.
Forward cabin accommodations
include an enclosed berthing area for
four, marine head/shower, full galley,
weapons lockers and hanging storage
lockers. All interior spaces on the
vessel are climate controlled. The
electronics suite includes military
communications equipment and
radar/NavNet with GPS, plotter with
color sounder and SAT NAV equip-
ment. For onboard electrical service,
a 16.0kW Northern Lights generator
and 50 amp shore power are provid-
ed, supplying 110 and 220 volt auxil-
iary power to the boat. SeaArk
Marine is also constructing two
4014-V Dauntless RAM Patrol Boats
for the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force. These boats complement an
existing fleet, which includes two pre-
viously purchased SeaArk patrol
boats.
LOA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 ft.
LWL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 ft.
Beam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 ft.
Draft Hull/Max . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.5 ft.
Dead Rise . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 degrees
Displacement lbs. . . . . . . . . . . . .37,000
Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800 gallons
Max Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 knots
Service Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 knots
Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .300 miles
Main Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . Caterpillar
Marine Gears . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Twin Disc
Navigation Equipment . . . . . . . . . .Furuno
Radios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ICOM
boat month
Please submit your BOM nominations to Jennifer Rabulan at
jrabulan@marinelink.com
Bahamas Patrol Boat from SeaArk
o
f

t
h
e
MN#7 (1-16).qxd 7/2/2008 4:47 PM Page 12
www.marinelink.com MN 13
Update Penn Maritime ATBs
With delays in getting parts for the assembly
there was a hold up in the delivery of the first of
Penn Maritime's new tugs from Thoma-Sea
Boatbuilders. Now the first of five, M/V
Skipjack, is nearing completion and will deliver
in May. In a near assembly-line production
process the second vessel, M/V Coho, will
launch sometime in May and deliver in August.
The other tugs are already taking shape and will
follow on a regular schedule.
Following its delivery the Skipjack will travel
to New Orleans to meet up with a 90,000-bar-
rel barge that will come down from its builders
at Corn Island Shipyard on the Ohio River in
Indiana.
Cummins QSK60 engines turning 104 by
112-inch skewed props in Nautican Nozzles
with shutter rudders power the 4000 hp Penn
tugs. The coupling system is a JAK-400.
Liability 101.
Don’t miss a thing with a state-of-the-art NVTi Vision System.
Lost cargo and flotsam – expensive realities
for those who work on the water. Chances
are you either want it back or want a course
that bears safely away: Thermal, low lux,
and daylight cameras combined with radar
tracking, AIS tracking, object tracking, and
2-axis stabilization provide the situational
awareness you need to reduce costs and
save lives. The difference in safety is night
and day.
www.nvti-usa.com/mn +1 972.554.3944
The JAK coupler is fitted to the hull of the third Penn
boat at Thoma-Sea Boatbuilders.
Intracoastal Builds Another Lugger
Intracoastal Iron Works, Inc. of Bourg, La., will deliver another of
their popular 72.5 x 28-ft. lugger-type boats this June with one
more to follow in September. The boats are powered by a pair of
600 hp Cummins KTA19 main engines turning into Twindisc
5170 gears. Owners of the handy inshore vessel will be G.O.L.
(Gulf Offshore Logistics). The 1,200 hp tug will have 28 x 32-ft.
of clear deck space forward. The model bow is set with a pair of
push knees.
Intracoastal Iron Works project manager Perry LaFont
with the new Lugger tug for GOL.
Alan Haig-Brown photo courtesy of Cummins Marine
MN#7 (1-16).qxd 7/2/2008 4:48 PM Page 13
Cummins Auxiliaries for Anchor Handler
(Photo Credit: Sarawak Slipways)
Sarawak Slipways of Miri, Sarawak East
Malaysia has delivered the 1179 gross
ton FPSO support vessel OMS Terra Nova.
A pair of Niigata mains engines each gen-
erating 1838 kW (2518 hp) at 750 rpm
power the Niigata Z-Drives on the ABS-
classed dynamic positioning vessel. In the
focsle area a 700 hp Cummins KTA19-M4
engine powers a retractable HRP
azimuthing bow thruster as an essential
component of the vessel's dynamic posi-
tioning system.
For electrical requirements, the 50 by
13.8-m vessel has a pair of Cummins
QSM11-powered 250 kW Stamford genera-
tor sets.
Aft of the main house a double drum
MacGregor Plimsoll double drum anchor
handling winch is completely enclosed. A
closed circuit television system allows the
wheelhouse to monitor action around the
winch. The boat has a designed bollard
pull of 55 tons forward and 42 tons aft
with the mains at 100% MCR.
Accommodation on the vessel is provided
for up 23 crewmembers plus an additional
sick by berth. The OMS Terra Nova, regis-
tered in Port Klang, Malaysia, is the first
of two being built at the Sarawak
Slipways Sdn. Bhd.
14 MN July 2008
briefs
Bollinger Marine Fabricators,
L.L.C., (BMF), Amelia, La., a
Bollinger Shipyards, Inc. company,
has delivered B. No. 233, the second
of two double hull, 35,000 BBL oil
tank barge units built to meet the
requirements of the Oil Pollution Act
of 1990 (OPA'90), to Bouchard
Ocean Services, Melville, N.Y.
The B. No. 233 is a manned, clean
oil, oceans tank barge measuring 300-
ft. long, with a 64-ft. beam and a
depth of 21-ft. The barge has ten
cargo tanks, with Byron Jackson
cargo pumps, driven by John Deere
engines. The barge has accommoda-
tions with full galley for four, and is
classed ABS, +A1 Oil Tank Barge,
Manned Oceans.
BMF delivered the sister ship, B.
No. 231 in July of 2007. BMF is
building the B. No. 262 and the B.
No. 264, both 60,000 BBL OPA'90
tank barges that are scheduled for
delivery during the first quarter of
2009 and first quarter of 2010.
Bollinger will also deliver the B. No.
260, a 60,000 BBL OPA'90 tank
barge, in the third quarter 2008, and
the B. No. 284, an 80,000 BBL
OPA'90 tank barge, during the sec-
ond quarter of 2009 from the
Bollinger Gretna facility for
Bouchard.
vessels
Bollinger Delivers for Bouchard
Superior Energy Services Liftboat to be Christened Superior Energy
Services' Marine Services Division will christened a 175-ft class liftboat, the
Superior Future, on June 27 at Marine Industrial Fabrication. Connie Babin,
Superior's Marine Services Division traffic coordinator, performed the chris-
tening. The Superior Future touts modern features, technology and design
unique to its class including a 100-ton, 100-ft boom crane more commonly
seen on larger vessels and a larger working deck and deckload. In addition,
the vessel's accommodations were designed and built with maximum com-
fort and efficiency for customer representatives. Two 265-ft liftboats will
join Superior's fleet in late 2008 to early 2009.
MN#7 (1-16).qxd 7/2/2008 4:48 PM Page 14
www.marinelink.com MN 15
MN#7 (1-16).qxd 7/2/2008 11:34 AM Page 15
Guido Perla & Associates, Inc.
announced that Bollinger Shipyard
has launched the Knockout, the last
of ten GPA 654 Platform Support
Vessels owned by Rigdon Marine.
The launch of the last vessel, which is
expected to be delivered in August of
2008, comes about a year after
launching the first of the series, the
First & Ten.
With the near completion of this
multi-vessel order, Rigdon's GPA-
designed fleet has increased to 20
PSVs, including 10 GPA 640 PSVs,
which were launched in 2005 and are
now serving the Gulf of Mexico shelf
and deepwater production markets.
The design of the DP2- and FFV1-
certified GPA 654s, measuring 58m
in length, incorporates greater operat-
ing efficiency compared to similar
sized vessels, increased cargo capaci-
ties resulting from locating propul-
sion generators to above main deck,
as well as reduced construction cost
due to simplified construction meth-
ods. Destined to serve deepwater off-
shore operations, the GPA 654s are
capable of carrying 144 cu. m. of
bulk material and 652 cu. m. of liq-
uid mud in self-cleaning oval tanks.
As a result of the vessel's diesel-elec-
tric propulsion configuration, the
standard for GPA Offshore vessels,
fuel efficiency is increased, thus
resulting in cost savings, lower emis-
sions and higher reliability.
The GPA 654 PSV is currently the
smallest of the GPA Platform
Support Vessel series, which ranges in
size from 58 meters to 100 min over-
all length.
With 30 of GPA's PSV designs cur-
rently serving the offshore industry
and an additional 107 vessels enter-
ing service within the next few years,
GPA has established its position as
the worldwide leader in naval archi-
tectural design of Next Generation
Platform Support Vessels.
briefs
16 MN July 2008
Knockout Launched for Rigdon
Bisso Adds DSV Joseph Bisso to Fleet
Bisso Marine, a pipeline, offshore con-
struction, salvage and diving contractor
headquartered in Houston, has added the
DSV Joseph Bisso to its fleet.
The vessel is 180 x 44 x 15 ft. and is
powered by two EMD 12-645-E2 main
engines generating 3,000 bhp with a
cruising speed of 12 knots. The vessel is
equipped with a GM 8V71, 300 bhp bow
thruster and three GenSets providing
450Kw of electrical power.
The dive support vessel is equipped with
a 22-ton retractable boom hydraulic crane
and two-drum Manitowoc 390 winches
which provide a four point station keep-
ing system.
The vessel was completely upgraded in
2007, and is USCG Inspected and ABS
Classed. Bisso Marine is currently imple-
menting an ISO 9001:2000 program for
the vessel. Accommodations are for 36
persons and the vessel is equipped with
satellite television, voice and data com-
munications.
Bisso will use the DSV Joseph Bisso to
support its offshore construction, pipeline
and salvage projects.
Classification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ABS
Built/Convert . . . . . . . . . . . . .1978/2007
Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . 180 x 44 x 15 ft.
GRT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .329 Tons
Main Engines . . . . . . . . . .EMD 12-645-E2
Bow Thruster . . . . . . . . GM 8V71 (300 bhp)
Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 knots
Crane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Tons
Clear Deck . . . . . 107 x 33 ft., 3531 sq. ft.
Mooring . . . . . . MANITOWOC 390 Winches
4,500 ft. x 1 in. per drum, 8,000 lbs. Anchors
Electronics: . . . . . . . 96mi Radars, Plotter,
GPS, GMDSS, VHFs, Petrocom, Fax, TRACVI-
SION, SAT COMMS
Berthing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Bunks
Endurance . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Days Towing
Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111,624Gal
Fresh water . . 135,300Gal + water makers
vessels
Pilot Boat Launched by Kvichak Guido Perla and Associates, Inc. (GPA)
said that Kvichak Marine, a Seattle-Based designer and builder of aluminum
vessels, has launched a fast pilot boat for which GPA provided total produc-
tion engineering for the construction of the hull, piping, propulsion, outfit-
ting and electrical systems. The pilot boat, measuring 73 ft. long, is an all
welded aluminum monohull of significant deadrise with a double chine. The
vessel is designed as an all-weather pilot launch and boasts good performance
in the planing regime, where sea and weather conditions allow. The vessel is
self-righting and is equipped with
twin-engine propulsion with excellent
all round visibility, an aft mounted
wheelhouse, an energy absorbing fend-
er system and a large clear deck layout.
The vessel is owned and operated by
the Columbia River Bar Pilots, a group
of twenty pilots providing pilotage
services for vessels in the lower
Columbia River.
MN#7 (1-16).qxd 7/2/2008 4:49 PM Page 16
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 11:35 AM Page 17
18 MN July 2008
Record high prices at the pump are causing consumers
across the country to tighten their belts and change their
spending habits. It's apparent $4 gasoline is the breaking
point and consumers are wanting someone to blame.
Congress is quick to come to the aid of their con-
stituents and point their fingers at OPEC and is still work-
ing to pass the NOPEC bill out of the Senate which
would allow the Justice Department to sue OPEC mem-
bers for price fixing in U.S. courts under the Sherman Act,
and to seize foreign owned assets to pay for damages.
OPEC says demand and supply are much in balance and
points its finger at the "speculators."
According to the testimony of Michael W. Masters
before the Committee on Homeland Security and
Governmental Affairs: "You have asked the question 'Are
Institutional Investors contributing to food and energy
price inflation?' And my unequivocal answer is 'yes.''
Masters says, "Index Speculators are pouring billions of
dollars into the commodities futures markets, speculating
that commodity prices will increase." Commodity Index
Investment has risen from $13 billion in late 2003 to
$160 billion in March 2008. The 25 commodities that
compose the index have risen by an average of 183 per-
cent.
Fereidun Fesharaki of FACTS Global Energy Group
thinks the market has been more irrational than it has ever
been in its history. "It is absolutely unprecedented and
simply cannot stand ... since the price hit $105, every-
thing above $105 is speculation. Something like $50 to
$100 billion has poured into the market the last two
months," Fesharaki says.
Possibly the biggest contributor to the rise in oil, is the
devaluation of the dollar. Since the beginning of 2002,
the value of the US dollar has been dwindling, especially
in comparison to the Euro. Currently oil is traded in US
Currency, and even amidst pressure from European
nations to make the change over to the Euro, OPEC
remains loyal to US interests and continues to trade in the
dollar. As the value of the dollar slides, the price of oil in
US $$ must rise in order to stay in equilibrium with the
Euro and other currencies. Throw in the current credit
crisis and the collapse of the US housing market, and you
are left with a value-less dollar, and a surge in oil prices.
Not everyone is in agreement with the "speculator" the-
ory. U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson said he did
not think speculators were playing a major role in driving
up prices. "My position, and I've looked at this very care-
fully, is I don't believe financial investors are responsible
to any significant degree for the price movement."
Paulson went on to say, "This is supply-demand, financial
investors are on both sides of the market ...They don't set
trends, they follow the trends." Tan Sri Mohd Hassan
Marican, the CEO of Malaysia's Petronas told CNBC he
thinks there's only about a $15 element in the price of oil
columns
With Pain at the Pump, it's Finger-Pointing Time
Don G. Briggs, President of the
Louisiana Oil & Gas Association (LOGA),
an independent oil and gas association
representing exploration, producing and
service sector companies operating in
Louisiana. Email: don@loga.la
Production from OPEC is just one factor in the quickly escalating
price per barrel.
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 11:57 AM Page 18
www.marinelink.com MN 19
that's due to speculation.
Why not point to the obvious and that's "supply and
demand?" If there were a sufficient supply of oil to meet
the worlds demand we would not have $4 gasoline.
Currently, oil demand stands at 86.4 million barrels per
day, and supply is at 85 million barrels per day. Demand
is already outpacing supply. As India and China contin-
ue on their path of industrialization, the
gap between supply and demand will
continue to grow. In the past, the sur-
plus production capacity of OPEC
acted as a hedge against rising oil prices,
but now as demand has caught and
passed supply, the surplus capacity has
not been able to slow down prices and
many people feel, that OPEC has no
substantial production capacity remain-
ing. In summary, if you follow the basic
principles of supply and demand eco-
nomics, it is easy to see that we are just
beginning to see the future: increasing
demand surpasses demand — supply
continues to decrease year over year =
serious energy crisis.
Five dollar gasoline is around the cor-
ner, so how long will it take before we
stop playing the blame game and devel-
op a responsible energy plan. In actuali-
ty, everyone is correct. Some economic
principles say that an item should only
be priced as high as the most expensive
production cost - that being about
$100/bbl based off of offshore Gulf of
Mexico figures. Supply and demand
states that prices will equalize when the
demand and the supply are in harmony
— at $140/bbl, demand is slowing
down, but is still increasing world wide.
There is a reason that economic prin-
ciples do not function well with oil
prices. Oil is both a finite resource and
a necessary fact of life, much like the air
we breathe. We race to create automo-
biles that get more mpg. Will that even-
tually slow consumption? Or will we
just become more efficient users, and
thereby, increasing total consumption.
Think about this: if gasoline dropped
to $2.00/gallon, would we applaud our conservation and
continue our efforts, or rush home, pack our bags and
head out on a family vacation…I think the latter….It is time
we get serious. We cannot drill our way out of our ener-
gy crisis, but we can slow it down, and hopefully give our-
selves enough time to come up with a solution that will
really work.
360.
At Hayata, we offer stainless steel cable ties
and banding with 360º of coating, for ultimate
corrosion resistance. It’s just another reason
why Hayata is the strongest around.
214-360-7708
877-785-8437
hayata.com
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 11:58 AM Page 19
20 MN July 2008
Everyone knows that operating vessels can be a very
risky business. Your vessels are being operated by crews
that you can not directly supervise, in a constantly chang-
ing environment, under serious time constraints, and, if
not operated correctly, could cause a great deal of destruc-
tion. Vessel owners have developed numerous strategies to
try to minimize this risk. Various options include placing
the ownership of each vessel in a separate corporate enti-
ty, having a vessel operator charter the vessel from the
owner, and purchasing insurance.
Although these modern remedies do a lot to protect ves-
sel owners from liability, maritime law includes a very
valuable, but often misunderstood, limitation of liability.
Specifically, congress has codified the Limitation of
Liability of Shipowners Act in 46 USC §183 et seq.
Under the Act, a vessel owner, upon an event that may
present a liability situation, may ask the court to limit its
liability to the value of the vessel, and the cargo on it, as
of the end of that voyage. As one would expect, depend-
ing on the scope of the incident, the value of the vessel
and her cargo, may be limited. Section 183(a) of the Act
states as follows: "The liability of the owner of any vessel,
whether American or foreign, for any embezzlement loss
or destruction by any person of any property, goods or
merchandise shipped or put on board of such vessel, or for
any loss, damage or injury by collision, or for any act,
matter, or thing, loss damage or forfeiture, done, occa-
sioned or incurred, without the privity of knowledge of
such owner or owners, shall not, except in cases provided
for in subsection (b) of this section, exceed the amount or
value of the interest of such owner in such vessel, and her
freight then pending."
Although the Limitation Act includes numerous situa-
tional provisions, essentially, the statute allows a vessel
owner to limit its liability for any incident to the value of
the vessel, and its cargo, regardless of the amount of dam-
ages claimed or the vessel owners liability as long as there
is no "privity or knowledge" by the vessel owner.
From our experience, most limitation of liability cases
hinge upon this "privity or knowledge" provision of the
rule. In fact, the courts have expanded the scope of this
definition to include many areas that were probably not
within the simple definition as conceived by the drafters.
A review of the early United States cases, as well as its
English precedent, show that early shipowners, prior to
the development of current corporate and insurance laws,
could easily take advantage of this limitation of liability.
However, over the years, the courts have restricted the
Act's applicability and been much more reluctant to allow
a shipowner to avail itself of this privilege. The Courts
have used the "privity" provision to chip away at the Act's
usefulness by expanding the number of potential viola-
tions that will nullify a vessel owner's request to limit its
liability. Courts have expanded this definition of privity to
include incidents where a vessel owner allowed an under-
manned or incompetently crewed vessel to operate a ves-
sel, operated without adequate navigational equipment
and/or charts, where management has notice of a poten-
tial hazard and does nothing to notify its crew of its exis-
tence, improper training of crew members, maintaining
an unseaworthy vessel or the improper control of the ves-
sel's crew. Unfortunately, this is a very fluid area of the
law and the Court's have wide discretion in determining
whether a certain fact, if proved, falls within the privity
exclusion. Although the defense is available, it gets more
difficult to use as time wears on.
In the event of an incident where limitation may play a
significant factor, it is important to move quickly. In fact,
the Act provides that a vessel owner must file its limitation
action within six months of the incident. It is important
to note that this time period is significantly shorter than
those applied to other admiralty claims. Thus, if a vessel
owner does not move quickly, he may not be able to insu-
late himself from excessive liability. Filing quickly also
provides vessel owners with a single venue to litigate all
claims related to an incident. Without the filing of a lia-
bility action, a vessel owner may subject itself to litigating
several claims in different forums. In many cases, even if
limitation is not granted, the consolidation of all claims in
a single forum may be worth the cost of asserting the
defense early.The process is started by the filing of a
Limitation of Liability Complaint. This pleading will
state that the vessel owner owns a vessel that was involved
in an incident and that it intends to take advantage of the
demarcay
Limitation Of Liability - A Good Deal If You Can Get It
Lawrence R. DeMarcay, III is a partner
at Fowler Rodriguez Valdes-Fauli in the
firm's New Orleans, Louisiana office.
He can be reached at 504-595-5122
or ldemarcay@frvf-law.com.
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 11:59 AM Page 20
www.marinelink.com MN 21
Limitation Act. All potential claimants are invited to file
claims within this limitation proceeding. Once all poten-
tial claimants have filed claims in the limitation proceed-
ing, the court will then allow discovery and conduct a trial
on whether the vessel owner is entitled to avail itself of the
limitation defense. If the court finds that limitation is
appropriate, all of the claimants will be limited to collec-
tively recovering the value of the vessel and the freight
pending at the end of the voyage.
Payment of these claims is guaranteed by
a bond that must be filed with the court
upon the filing of limitation action.
Once the limitation fund is gone, the
vessel owner has no further liability. If
the court finds that limitation does not
apply, all of the claimants are free to pur-
sue their claims as if the limitation pro-
ceeding was never filed. Thus, there will
be no limitation on the amount that
these plaintiffs can recover from the ves-
sel owner. At that point, the vessel
owner will have to rely upon its insur-
ance and corporate formalities to insu-
late itself from liability for these claims.
To understand the importance of assert-
ing this limitation of liability defense, we
can look at a simple, but very possible,
event. Assume that you are operating a
vessel in the Gulf of Mexico and, while
underway, your vessel allides with an oil
production well. After the allision, the
well ruptures and begins spewing oil
into the environment. As a result of the
collision, the vessel is badly damaged
and sinks. It would be appropriate to
file a limitation proceeding arguing that
the vessel owner's loss is limited to that
of the value of the vessel at the end of its
voyage. In this case, the potential dam-
age for the personal injuries on the ves-
sel, loss of oil product, lost production,
damage to the well, damage to the oil
company, clean up costs, civil and crim-
inal penalties, etc. will likely far out-
weigh the value of most vessels operating
in those waters. In fact, this is the type
of claim that could easily put a company
out of business. However, if the accident
occurred without the "privity or knowl-
edge" of management, even if the accident is clearly
caused by the negligence of the crew, a shipowner may be
able to avail itself of the limitation of liability and save
itself from significant damages. Thus, although the courts
have become reluctant to allow vessel owners from taking
advantage of the limitation defense, it is not dead yet and
is something that every vessel owner and their attorney
should look into in the event of a serious incident.
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 11:59 AM Page 21
22 MN July 2008
douglas
Looking at Alternative Resources for Capital
It is not a mystery that businesses of all sizes are cur-
rently faced with an ensuing credit crunch. During this
time, businesses are challenged to not only grow, but to
also be able to sustain their current level of operation,
which can be difficult.
With a need to remain competitive, the number of com-
panies seeking capital is staggering. Capital is a commod-
ity that is bought and sold. A bank or financial company
may buy capital from its own internal sources such as a
savings account or CD, or it may go out to the market-
place to borrow funds to loan to your business. Yet, today,
sources of capital are on the decline, making much-need-
ed funds difficult to obtain. This then begs the question:
How do you still raise cash and maintain your cash flow
when capital is scarce?
The answer: look at the cash management tools that are
available to you. No financial discipline is more impor-
tant, and more misunderstood than cash management.
There are tools available to help businesses understand
and implement cash management strategies, including
how to maximize cash flow, assess their current cash posi-
tion, improve cash forecasting and evaluate investment
options.
Today's cash management tools are more user-friendly,
with automated processes designed to compound efficien-
cies, provide added convenience and reduce risk. These
tools save businesses time and money when managers take
into consideration the gains from advances in sweeps,
earnings credit rate (ECR) and term investment deals.
The Solutions
Liquidity, the ability of an asset to be converted into
cash quickly and without any price discount, presents the
most opportunity for businesses to maintain their cash
flow.
For businesses looking to effectively manage short-term
cash, liquidity solutions - ECR, sweeps, savings accounts
and term investment vehicles - are their best options.
Liquidity solutions offer competitive returns to compara-
ble investment solutions and afford bankers the ability to
create portfolios with respect to a business' liquidity
needs, investment objectives, risk tolerance and invest-
ment horizon.
Minimizing or offsetting banking fees is one way for
companies to maximize returns. To reduce these fees,
organizations should consider a managed ECR as a com-
ponent of a balanced compensation program. ECR allows
companies to offset some banking fees by allowing them
to maintain a balance on their accounts.
Another option is the utilization of what are known as
sweep accounts. Sweep accounts are designed to invest the
excess money from an account once all payments have
been made, enhancing a company's earnings potential.
Sweep account investment options are available based on
a company's needs. Some are designed for companies
seeking maximum return on investment, and others are
focused on providing maximum security.
Other liquidity options include savings accounts, CDs,
money market mutual funds and fixed-income securities.
These term investment vehicles are structured to preserve
principal, limit risk and provide additional sources of
interest income.
While the market is experiencing a scarcity of capital, it
is increasingly important to look at different ways to
maintain your company's cash flow. By utilizing liquidity
solutions, your business will be able to stay afloat as it
rides the most recent economic wave.
Bob Douglas is the national director, liquidity and working
capital management for KeyBank's Global Treasury
Management group. He can be reached at 312.765.8804 or
Robert_B_Douglas@KeyBank.com.
Bob Douglas is the national director, liq-
uidity and working capital management
for KeyBank's Global Treasury
Management group. He can be reached
at 312.765.8804 or
Robert_B_Douglas@KeyBank.com.
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 12:00 PM Page 22
www.marinelink.com MN 23
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 11:35 AM Page 23
24 MN July 2008
Anyone who has spent much time in the marine trans-
portation industry likely is familiar with the various charts
and graphs that tout the superior cargo carrying capacity
and efficiency of barges versus trains and trucks.
Executives who make up the National Waterways
Foundation were enamored, too. The problem was, when
they went to search for the details behind the familiar
stacks of barges, trucks and trains, they were unable to
find the original studies from which they eminated.
"There is a lack of quality, timely information which
documents the statistical portion of this industry," said
Peter Stephaich, NWF Chairman and Chairman of
Campbell Transportation in Pittsburgh. "This study,
hopefully, is the first of many to come."
The study to which he refers is called "A Modal
Comparison of Domestic Freight Transportation Effects
on the General Public," a report which was independent-
ly produced by the Texas Transportation Institute, com-
U.S. Inland Waterways
The Road Less Traveled
New study touts the economic and environmental benefits, plus the growth
potential, of barge traffic on U.S. inland waterways. — by Greg Trauthwein
One 15-Barge Tow Equal ...
... 216 Rail Cars + 6 Locomotives ...
... 1,050 Large Semi Tractor-Trailers
Shown here are the charts which quantify the energy efficiency of
barge transport, as well as the common comparison of a 15-tow
barge comparison to the equivalent carriage capabilities of road
and rail.
(Source: A Modal Comparison of Domestic Freight Transportation Effects on
the General Public)
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 12:00 PM Page 24
www.marinelink.com MN 25
missioned by NWF and the U.S. Maritime
Administration and released late last year.
The report, though, is much more than a statistical
compendium that shines the marine industry in a positive
light versus other cargo transport modes.
"When we started this, we didn't know how it would
turn out," said Stephaich. "But we figured that we were
the safer, more efficient and environmentally sound trans-
portation mode."
While the report is of interest to anyone in the marine
industry, it was produced with a higher goal in mind: for
the education of the general public to the advantages that
maritime transport offers.
"We are the only under-utilized transportation mode in
this country," said Stephaich. While difficult to exactly
define, there are broad estimates that the inland waterway
system is running at perhaps 40% capacity.
NWF History
The National Waterways Foundation was founded
almost three decades ago by a small group of wealthy indi-
St. Johns Ship Building, Inc. is a full service shipbuilding and marine repair
company specializing in commercial steel and aluminum vessel repair as well
as new construction. St. Johns also provides industrial steel fabrication.
560 Stokes Landing Road • Palatka, Florida 32177
Email: info@stjohnsshipbuilding.com • Phone: 386-328-6054 • www.stjohnsshipbuilding.com
Looking for a Full
Service Yard for Repair
or New Construction?
Look No Further...
Looking for a Full
Service Yard for Repair
or New Construction?
Look No Further...
IF...
Waterways were closed on the Mississippi and Illinois
Rivers, the Texas Transportation Institute found that if
barge traffic was diverted to interstates, in St. Louis
alone:
• Highway Costs Skyrocket from $345 to $721m over
10 years
• Truck Traffic would increase 200%
• Traffic Delays would increae 500%
• Injuries and Fatalities would increase 36 to 45%
• Maintenance costs would increase 80 to 93%
(Source: A Modal Comparison of Domestic Freight Transportation
Effects on the General Public)
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 12:02 PM Page 25
26 MN July 2008
viduals - inside and out of the marine industry - who had
profited from the marine industry, and wanted to give
something back. The stated mission of NWF is "to devel-
op the intellectual and factual arguments for an efficient,
well-funded and secure inland waterway system."
Through the years, as is not unusual in foundations of
this type, the founders grew older, retired and passed
away, leaving a void at the top. Around the turn of the
century, the inland waterways industry in the U.S. was in
a state of wholesale change, and there was an apparent
need for the reinvigoration of an economic and statistical
component to quantify the industry's value to the public,
said R. Barry Palmer, Secretary of NWF and President
and CEO of the Waterways Council Inc.
While there were many corporate leaders that took up
the challenge to reinvigorate NWF, the primary push
came from C. Berdon Lawrence, Chairman of the Board
of Kirby Corp. and Joseph Pyne, the ubiquitous President
and CEO of Kirby Corp.
NWF today is an educational research organization, a
charitable organization that exists to prepare and dissemi-
nate information, and which is completely independent
and separate from any marine association or special inter-
est group.
The recent report is intended, as previously stated, to
serve as more than a static report which is presented by the
marine industry, to the marine industry, as an exercise of
self-adulation. NWF is embarked on a concerted effort to
enable anyone in the marine industry - anyone reading
this magazine article either in print or online at
MarineLink.com - anyone with the notion to build a
stronger marine industry and to spread the word beyond
traditional channels, to quickly and easily assemble the
Moving energy with integrity
OSG America is currently recruiting for the following positions
on our Tug/Barges and/or Tankships:
• Licensed Mates with PIC/DL Endorsement
• Licensed Engineers, experience with heavy fuel a plus
• AB Tankerman, current PIC/DL endorsement required
• OS Cooks, experience on Tugs preferred
We offer regular rotations, excellent compensation and benefits,
including paid travel. Apply online at www.osgcareers.com
"If you accept the premise that these tons
are going to have to be moved — food, coal,
grain — and you ask 'what is the best way,
from an environmental point of view, to
move them,' there is no better way than on
the inland waterway system."
Peter Stephaich, NWF Chairman
and Chairman of Campbell Transportation
U.S. Inland Marine Highway
• 12,000 miles of navigable channels
• 240 lock sets
• Ideal Cargo: Bulk (coal, petroleum, iron
& steel, project/oversized cargos, grain,
chemicals, aggregates, intermodal con-
tainers)
• 624 million: the number of tons of
waterborne cargo that transits the U.S.
inland waterways yearly.
• $70 billion: The value of the freight,
yearly.
• One loaded covered hopper barge = 16
rail cars = 70 trucks
• One 27,500 barrel liquid barge = 46 rail
cars = 144 trucks
• One 15-barge tow = 216 rail cars =
1,050 trucks
• Fuel Efficiency: Barges move one ton of
cargo 576 miles per gallon of fuel; Rail
= 413 miles; Truck = 155 miles
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 12:03 PM Page 26
data, information, presentation and collateral printed
materials for a comprehensive, professional presentation.
"We are just finishing putting together a complete, pro-
fessional presentation, including all of the background
information, PowerPoint presentation, brochures, etc.,
that can quickly and easily be picked up and used by any-
one for presentations to non-waterways group," said Matt
Woodruff, director government affairs, Kirby Corp.
The Study
To ensure the integrity of the information in the study,
the Texas Transportation Institute was chosen for the proj-
ect, ironically an institute that is better known for its stud-
ies on truck transport and roadway issues, according to
Woodruff. From the beginning, in the creation of the
methodology for the report, down to the end findings, the
report was peer-reviewed by three "PhD-types" represent-
ing marine, road and rail: Dr. Denver D. Tolliver, Upper
Great Plains Transportation Institute, North Dakota State
University; Dr. Arun Chatterjee, Civil & Environmental
Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville; and Dr.
Michael Bronzini, Civil, Environmental and
Infrastructure Engineering, George Mason University.
The report is not aimed at disparaging one particular
mode of cargo transport over another, rather it is a means
for the marine industry to clearly and objectively illustrate
From Left:
Peter Stephaich,
Matt Woodruff, and
Barry Palmer.
www.marinelink.com MN 27
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 12:04 PM Page 27
28 MN July 2008
to the general public the many tangible benefits of barge
transport over road and rail, including: environmental,
fuel efficiency, and safety to name a few; while highlight-
ing the value and the untapped potential capacity growth
of the U.S. inland waterway system.
"Barges will not replace trucks or trains," Woodruff said,
"as I've never seen a barge back up to a grocery store. We
want to highlight, though, that the waterway system is
well positioned to pick up future cargo volume, strategi-
cally positioned along projected traffic growth corridors."
End Note
The National Waterway Foundation is offering an
invaluable tool - current, independently generated and
authoritative information — bundled in a 'take-home
package' for any marine industry personnel to utilize in
your next presentation. If you are interested to tap this
resource, visit the NWF website to download the report.
For the full report, visit
www.nationalwaterwaysfoundation.org
If you require additional information on receiving pro-
fessional-quality materials for your next presentation,
contact Barry Palmer at tel: 703-373-2261; or
Email: bpalmer@vesselalliance.com
Shown here (and on the previous page) are the charts that illus-
trate the comparison of waterways, truck and rail in terms of:
Injuries, Fatalities, Oil spills and emissions.
(Source: A Modal Comparison of Domestic Freight Transportation Effects on
the General Public)
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 12:05 PM Page 28
www.marinelink.com MN 29
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 11:36 AM Page 29
30 MN July 2008
Known as the Pete to her many friends in Portland, the
recently-acquired brute, near-sister to Donjon's Atlantic
Salvor, Barents Sea sports her new colors underway to a
new homeport on the West Coast. (Photo: Don Sutherland)
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 12:06 PM Page 30
www.marinelink.com MN 31
K-Sea
Acquires
Roehrig
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 12:06 PM Page 31
32 MN July 2008
By Don Sutherland
An intricate, although unplanned, network of parallels
have existed practically since the beginning, between K-
Sea Transportation Partners, LLC, and the former Roehrig
Maritime. For beginners, they started at close to the same
time, K-Sea having regrouped from the Eklof enterprise in
1999, while Capt. Roehrig began steering the first CR tug,
the DPC Tilly, in 1991. There was a discrepancy in size
between the two companies, one always having more
boats than the other, but a further link is that both com-
panies' fleets increased spectacularly in a short time.
Chris Roehrig eventually sold the single-screw Tilly, but
otherwise has kept his core fleet and expanded his opera-
tions with larger, heavier equipment that opened-up new
ventures. The first were three of the classic Equitable tugs
— built in larger numbers than even the DPCs, Capt.
Roehrig told us — in the form of the Brandon Roehrig,
Vivian L. Roehrig, and Francis Roehrig. They're efficient
but flat-decked as we so often see in southern-built tugs,
practical tugs on the harbor and tributaries around town
— and no small amount of coastal work as well. They
were followed by first big departure in the fleet, the Emma
M. Roehrig — all bow and jutting upper works, a thing of
fierce beauty in a redefined tug. The Eileen Roehrig joined
the fleet in 2000, followed by the Heidi Roehrig, the
much-admired ex-Matthew Weeks, ex-Texaco Avjet, an
early Jakobson expression of the extra-tall tug. The John
H. Malik and Annabelle V. Roehrig joined the fleet as its
ocean-going powerhouses.
Where Roehrig bought boats, K-Sea, as it developed,
bought fleets. The first was quite unexpected — not long
after the new company adopted Eklof's harbor and
bunkering activities, Maritrans decided to sell several large
coastal tugs and barges. K-Sea bought, and found itself in
the new business of long-haul transport between Maine
and the Gulf of Mexico. Norfolk being along the way, the
company soon acquired a facility there, with its seven tug-
boats. A small facility in Philadelphia also followed on the
east coast, while on the west, surprise as it may seem, the
company acquired Sea Coast Transportation and its 15
tugs (plus 15 barges).
Just a few heartbeats later, the company was serving the
Hawaiian islands following acquisition of Smith Maritime
of Honolulu, as well as Sirius Maritime of Seattle (eleven
more barges and ten more tugs). The total number of tug-
boats, according to K-Sea's Rick Falcinelli, stood recently
at 72. Then it became 80, as K-Sea acquired the Roehrig
fleet.
The Emma Roehrig as she appeared one
June morning in 2005. The first of
Roehrig's big tugs to work New York
Harbor, she is now the Greenland Sea.
(Photo: Don Sutherland.)
MN#7 (17-32).qxd 7/2/2008 12:06 PM Page 32
www.marinelink.com MN 33
Invisible Reweaving?
The assimilation would be relatively seamless. Where
Moran kept the Turecamo name, the name Roehrig dis-
appears from the harbor. Members of the old company
have been invited to resign from the old, and sign-on with
the new owners.
There's always a culture shock when a company from
one port takes-over companies in other ports, as we've
seen K-Sea, McAllister and Moran do in recent times. The
shock is bigger when it all takes place in one port, the
buyer's home port. It's not like the Roehrig tugs were all
available by the hour, as the company had
plenty of contracts and charters. Still, that's
eight tugboats that effectively disappear from
New York Harbor. Capt. Falcinelli men-
tioned six of the ex-Roehrigs would be candi-
dates for pin couplers, joining an ITB fleet
employing JAK 200, 400, and 700 systems,
set up for barges in 28,000 bbl, 50,000BBL
(newbuilds scheduled to arrive soon from
Jeffboat), and 100,000+BBL capacities.
Whatever the Roehrig tugs did before, they
probably won't do much of hereafter.
Roehrig had already done a lot of charter
work for K-Sea, so some changes will be less
profound than others. Still, consensus seems
to be there are ripples ahead for the harbor as
a whole, but exactly what is mostly guess-
work. Already the scuttlebutt circulates
around how one tug went to some other
company, does anyone have barges for sale,
are contracts scheduled to end? In days of
high fuel, proximity alone influences who
does what in a slowly, but maybe largely,
restructuring harbor.
In about a dozen years, K-Sea has expanded
from a modest harbor operation based on the
Staten Island shore, to an enterprises with
bases across nearly half the world. Yet some
interesting new relationships are to be found
on their home waters as well.
Ladies with a Past
Another parallel between Roehrig Maritime
and K-Sea is that their respective successes
were built upon previously used tugboats.
Roehrig never commissioned a newbuild,
and K-Sea will be taking delivery of their first
new tug -- a 131-foot, 11,000 hp ATB under
construction at Manitowoc, originally commissioned by
one of the previously-acquired firms. K-Sea in effect is
more in the barge business than tugs, and their newbuilds
along those lines have been numerous. The new tug will
be mated to a 185,000BBL barge, also under construction
at Manitowoc. Their collective capacity appears to top the
charts at 4.3 to 4.4 million barrels.
Barges may be the backbone of many oil transporters'
economies, and bargemen are sure to have opinions about
one unit or another. Still, when people project personali-
ties into vessels, they do so more emphatically to the tugs.
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 12:14 PM Page 33
34 MN July 2008
And a lot of old friends have been redone in K-Sea colors
across the past year or so.
The Heidi E. Roehrig, trading as the Siberian Sea,
strongly resembles a king-size version of K-Sea's existing
Houma, with the tall, steeple-like wheelhouse common to
both. Skippers who've steered both boats speak highly of
them, but leave no doubt that they're very different vessels
to handle. Still, as far as the eye can see, the pair of them
working the same job might appear as almost mother and
child tending their charge, a double-vision first on New
York waters.
Meanwhile, although they entered the K-Sea fleet
through other recent acquisitions, additional K-Sea tugs
have their visual echoes on the water. K-Sea's Barents Sea
for example, acquired from McAllister's Portland branch
around the beginning of the year, is a near sister to
Donjon's mighty Atlantic Salvor. It would have been fun
to watch these two brutes in the head-to-head push-offs
during the New York Tug Races next September.
However, as this is written, the Barents is transiting the
Panama Canal to take-up residence in the new West Coast
operations.
Two tugs that were originally built for the same cus-
tomer, near sisters at that, will finally, for the first time, be
united in the same colors. Capt. Paul Mahoney's plans for
the first of these were scuttled by events surrounding 9/11,
and the partially-completed vessel was acquired by
Modern Continental, as the Ludwig E. She is now K-Sea's
Nathan E. Stewart.
Capt. Mahoney found himself on the rebound in due
time, and outfitted his Normandy, mechanically almost
the same vessel down to their Cummins KTA50-M2
engines, with a number of luxurious touches. Earlier this
year, she became the Ross Sea. From a distance — and
probably not a very long distance at that — a lot of
mariners may soon wonder if they're seeing double.
So there are sure to be some double-takes as the new
regime sets-in on New York Harbor. General sentiment
around the local industry is that Chris Roehrig and his
energetic drive will be missed in New York. But what he
built continues under new ownership that has shown its
stunning expertise and growth in one of the most impor-
tant tasks maritime faces today — delivering fuel reliably,
uninterruptedly, and with the maximum economy.
George seems to won-
der if he brought too
large a bottle of
cleaner, considering
the size of the
Cummins KTA50-M2
driving the Normandy
(shown here) and the
Ludwig E in years
past, and the Ross Sea
and the Nathan E.
Stewart in years to
come. (Photo: Don
Sutherland)
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 12:15 PM Page 34
www.marinelink.com MN 35
An excerpt from Terrorist Recognition Handbook, Second
Edition available now from CRC Press (www.crcpress.com):
Many past studies have simplified the stages of terrorist
action into three or five stages. When broken down fur-
ther, however, virtually all terrorist events are actually
comprised of ten distinct phases. These phases are made
up of the logical actions inherent in any group's decision-
making process. All terrorist operations have a predictable
sequence. No matter how many members of a terrorist
organization are involved, the operation will eventually
include some visible component of the following phases:
Phase 1: Decision-Making Period
Phase 2: Intelligence Collection Cell Deployment and
Infiltration
Phase 3: Final Target Selection and Planning
Phase 4: Tactical Operations and Logistic Cell
Deployment
Phase 5: Tactical Operations Go-No Go Decision
Phase 6: Tactical Operations Movement to Target
Phase 7: Tactical Action Phase
Phase 8: Withdrawal and Extraction Phase
Phase 9: Regroup, Rearm, and Exfiltration
Phase 10: Negotiation / Credit/ Debriefing and Lessons
Learned
Real people are making real decisions that may eventu-
ally manifest into real action-which should motivate you
to try to predict the events that will occur. If any part of
this ten-phase sequence is observed, then you are fore-
armed with the knowledge of what should occur next.
Special Mission Tactics and Techniques:
Defeating Maritime Security
Maritime security requires a multidimensional posture.
Terrorist threats can emerge from land, on the sea, under
the sea, and the air. In October 2000, the guided missile
destroyer USS Cole (DDG-67) was attached by two ter-
rorists using a small boat and the ruse that they had been
assigned by the port to tie the ship up to a fuel point.
They performed this task and then exploded alongside of
the destroyer. Terrorists have learned to adapt to changes
in security, especially in the post-9/11 environment. They
have carried out dynamic attacks in a range of spectrums,
from infantry-style raids on harbors to suicide combat
swimmers who blew themselves up against their targets.
Detection of each event is a s simple as being aware that
these attacks could occur. Each visitor, high-speed vessel,
or sighting of bubbles surfacing nearby should be imme-
diately evaluated as to a potential terrorist threat. Due to
the high risks of disaster in a maritime attack, it is imper-
ative that everyone be aware of the potential of terrorist.
Infiltration of Harbors
Terrorist teams could enter harbors through various
methods. The methods of penetrating a harbor or facility
that have been used by terrorists in the past include:
1. Infiltration by sea:
The terrorist penetrates and attacks using:
• Rowed boats, skiffs, canoes, or sea kayaks.
• Inflatable rubber raiding craft, dinghies (Zodiac types
were used in the USS Cole attack).
• Commercial or military high-speed boats (HSBs).
• Deceptive fishing vessels.
• Floating debris.
• Vessels disguised as Coast Guard, pilot, police, or the
like.
• Large commercial vessels marjacked by terrorists
• Commercial vessels or mother ships. Another tactic is
a mother ship on which Zodiac-style rubber raiding craft
are carried with a commando team and launched as they
near an enemy's shore. Israel routinely stopped ships and
attacks such as these from the 1970s through the 1990s.
Libyan intelligence used the roll-on/roll-off merchant ship
Ghat in 1984 to lay mines in the Red Sea.
• Mini submarines or electric-powered human-guided
torpedoes. The Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE)
operate home-made, human-guided torpedoes; the PLO
trained in Lebanon on mini subs.
Homeland Security
Terrorist Recognition
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 3:04 PM Page 35
36 MN July 2008
• Purpose-built Stealth-design sui-
cide craft. The LTTE build high-
speed suicide boats that incorporate
low radar observability or stealth
designs. Video of one such craft was
featured in the Jane's Intelligence
Review of March 7, 2001.
Small submersibles as weapons are
known to be in the hands of national
intelligence agencies such as Iranian,
Libyan, and North Korean intelli-
gence and the LTTE. Groups such as
Hezbollah and al-Qaeda could easily
gain this capability. The FARC and
the drug lords of Colombia have tried
to build, modify, or use both full-sized
surplus and newly built diesel-elec-
tronic-powered submarines to smug-
gle drugs into the United States.
These could easily move agents or
supplies.
2. Infiltration by swimmer or
scuba diver
Terrorists could swim in towing or
wearing explosives and weapons or
dive underwater using scuba gear.
These profiles include:
• Recon swimmer: Swimmer with-
out weapons (with gear or without)
• Combat swimmer: Swimmer with
goggles, fins, and weapons
• Combat diver: Scuba diver with
open-circuit breathing system (creates
bubbles) and weapons.
• Special mission combat diver:
Scuba diver with a closed-circuit
breaking system (Drager or other bub-
bleless rebreathing system) and
weapons.
3. Infiltration by land
Terrorists may infiltrate the mar-
itime facility through legal or illegal
means. They have demonstrated the
ability to infiltrate via the following
methods:
Valid identification: The marjackers
of the cruise ship Achille Lauro pur-
New Orleans
(504) 780-8100
Fax (504) 780-8200
Norfolk
(757) 545-0100
Fax (757) 545-8004
Houston
(281) 452-5887
Fax (281) 452-9682
www.mcdonoughmarine.com www.mcdonoughmarine.com
LARGEST RENTAL FLEET OF SPUD,
DECK AND MATERIAL BARGES
LARGEST RENTAL FLEET OF SPUD,
DECK AND MATERIAL BARGES
• 16 Fleeting locations inland rivers,
Gulf, East and West Coast
• Inland and Ocean towing services
BARGES 60’ TO 400’ LENGTH
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 12:16 PM Page 36
www.marinelink.com MN 37
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 12:16 PM Page 37
chased valid tickets for their sea cabin. Others have used
valid ID cards and passes. Authorized access: The terrorist
could be an authorized person or crewmember (trusted
agent) who has infiltrated the facility or vessel. Illegal
identification: False identity cards. These can be sold by
criminal elements of the illegal immigrant community
and are often used to gain employment on the seafront.
4. Infiltration by air
Aircraft and helicopters can be used to insert terrorists
into a maritime facility. Parasails, hang gliders, ultralights,
and parachutists are potential infiltration or attack meth-
ods.
About the Author
Malcolm W. Nance is a 20-year veteran of the U.S. intel-
ligence community. He is a combat
veteran who has served as an intelli-
gence collections operator, cryptolo-
gist and interrogator. He has spent
17 years deploying on anti-terrorism
and counter-terrorism intelligence
operations in the Balkans, Middle
East and sub-Saharan Africa in direct
support to the Special Operations
Command as well as assignments at
the principle agencies of the Intelligence Community. Mr.
Nance previously served as Master Instructor and Chief of
Training at the US Navy Survival, Evasion, Resistance and
Escape School (SERE). In the Global War on Terrorism,
he served in Afghanistan where he conducted intelligence
operations in Nangahar province and served 14 months in
Iraq as a security director at the headquarters of the
Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad.
Author: Malcolm Nance
Publisher: CRC Press
Pages: 448
Trim Size: 6-1/2" x 9-1/4"
ISBN: 1-4200-7183-1
Publication Date:
April 14, 2008
List Price: $59.95
L-3 Klein Wins Harbor
Security Contract
L-3 Communications announced that its Klein
Associates, Inc. division (L-3 Klein) has received an order
from the Los Angeles Harbor Department for multiple L-
3 Klein System 5500 dynamically focused Multi-Beam
Side Scan Sonar Systems. Harbor and Port Security pro-
fessionals with the use of dual L-3 Klein Side Scan Sonar
Systems are able to identify potential underwater threats,
such as Improvised Explosive Devices (IED), to commer-
cial shipping. Use of Klein's side scan sonar's on a con-
tinual basis in harbors is one more tool that is available in
keeping our water ways and ports open.
Captain Michael Graychik of the Los Angeles Port
Police Said, "We are excited to be one of the first civilian
Law Enforcement agencies to use this technology. This
capability will help us to mitigate threats to the port in a
very timely manner as well the integration of data sharing
with military Mine Counter Measure operations."
L-3 Klein Introduces Model 4000 Multi-Beam Side
Scan Sonar system
L-3 Communications Klein Associates, Inc. announced
the release of the Model 4000 Multi-Beam Side Scan
Sonar system. The system is a high performance, 5 beam
dynamically focused, economical system designed specif-
ically to address the requirements of Port & Harbor
Security applications. This system is also ideally suited for
small object detection in open boat operations.
Performance of the Klein Model 4000 is close to the
specifications and performance of the Klein System 5000
technology but at a much lower cost. The system is
38 MN July 2008
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 12:17 PM Page 38
www.marinelink.com MN 39
designed with a single hull configuration which reduces
the length and weight of the towfish enabling use on
smaller boats with various configurations.
The Model 4000 is focused on Port and Harbor
Security. Cities, States and Governments are concerned
about the security of their ports and harbors. Movement
of goods by sea is key and critical to every country's econ-
omy.
All governments have realized that their ports and har-
bors must always remain open to receiving and shipping
goods around the world if they want to maintain a viable
economy. Any underwater danger whether real or per-
ceived can close a harbor.
The new Klein System 4000 will assure port and harbor
integrity when utilized.
For more information visit www.L-3Com.com
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 3:16 PM Page 39
40 MN July 2008
UltraJet 410
The UltraJet 410 was introduced to the
UltraJet range in 2007 and all its bench-
marks were met when it was put through
sea trials. The company said that the steer-
ing system resulted in increased speeds dur-
ing hard turns and lower noise levels.
All of the hydraulic control system ele-
ments are mounted on the jet keeping
installation time and cost for the boat
builder to a minimum. These include the
integral oil cooler which requires no exter-
nal water connections, the complete
hydraulic pump system and the steering
cylinder. On electro-hydraulic control sys-
tem options, all electrical cables are includ-
ed allowing plug and play installation —
All boats are available on
GSA Contract: GS-07F-0507M
No Nonsense Serious Boats
Visit us at www.mooseboats.com or call 1-866- GO MOOSE
JMEC boat fitted with twin
UJ340 Ultrajets.
waterjets
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 12:19 PM Page 40
www.marinelink.com MN 41
requiring minimum skill levels. The UltraJet 410 is avail-
able in either zero or five degree installation options to
suit different engine alignments and is compatible with a
variety of engine models, driven either direct or via a gear-
box.
As with all UltraJets the UJ410 can be fitted with their
new JetMaster Joystick Control system driven by a PLC
(Programmable Logic controller), which will offer their
customers unparalleled manuvering power at a budget
price. The PLC converts the joystick commands to boat
movements harnessing the full benefits of waterjets.
Easy and logical to use, even inexperienced boat users
can operate JetMaster making close quarter manoeuvring
simple.
Other JetMaster options include vessel steering by use
of proportional interceptors; remote tether control; Auto-
steer (Autopilot) interface; steering and reverse position
indicators; helm mounted display for set-up and diagnos-
tics.
For more information visit www.ultradynamics.com
HamiltonJet HT1000
The largest marine waterjet propulsion units ever built
by HamiltonJet left from its New Zealand factory recent-
ly for South Korea, as part of a multi-vessel high speed
patrol boat project. The first pair of HamiltonJet model
HT1000 waterjets, each with an inlet diameter of 3.2ft.,
is the culmination of two years of design and construc-
tion. HamiltonJet Technical Manager Phil Rae says the
design of the HT1000 waterjet is different to the compa-
ny's other waterjet models and those manufactured by
European competitors, but its innovative design offers
many performance and operational benefits. "These
units provide high performance across a wide vessel speed
range and excellent manoeuvrability. They have been
designed with on-board hydraulics and a fully electronic
control interface, ensuring installation and maintenance
is very easy for the shipbuilder".
The HT1000 has been designed and built specifically
for a new fleet of 58m patrol vessels operated by the
Korean Coast Guard.
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 12:19 PM Page 41
Each of the 300 tonne-class steel patrol vessels will have
two HT1000 waterjets plus a central pair of smaller
HM811 boost waterjets, driven by four 2.7 MW
(3650hp) diesel engines to give a top speed of 35 knots.
The new HT1000 unit features a high efficiency "mixed
flow" pump that is more compact than competing water-
jet models, and advanced computa-
tional fluid dynamics (CFD) soft-
ware was used extensively in its
design. Thrust vectoring is achieved
by a unique internal pivoting nozzle
arrangement that deflects the entire
water flow of each jet to port or star-
board for steering, and a split-duct
deflector for reversing the water flow
for ahead / astern thrust control.
The vessels diesel engines, gearbox-
es and waterjets are controlled using
a integrated networked digital elec-
tronic control system. The thrust
vectoring capabilities of the waterjets
allow a vessel to stop very quickly
(within 1-2 boat lengths), turn on
the spot and move sideways, which
is not possible with conventional
propellers.
www.hamiltonjet.com
Doen Waterjets
Doen Waterjets develops and man-
ufactures waterjet propulsion sys-
tems. Doen's first commercial appli-
cation was successfully completed in
1970. A customer oriented global
42 MN July 2008
TUTOR-SALIBA CORPORATION
Contact: James Foster 818-362-8391
EM1022 - 2001 Blount 55'x 17'3"x 10' Model
Bow Tug Boat. S/N 1110974 c/w Twin Cat 3412
w/615hp, twin disc trans MG5170DC, ratio
4.50:1, Northern Lights 984 gen set w/M32C/32
kw, La Marche A224012VA1 constavolt, 110 cfm
elec comp, (5) bitts, (2) stern mtd pullmaster,
hyd facing winches, (4) VHF, Furuno radar,
Northstar 951X plotter, jog steering, facing
winch controls, datamarine depth sounder, (2)
14' push knees, full perimeter tire bumper.
$625,000.00.
EM1068 Official # 534891 - 1021 net/Gross
Tons - Built 1928 in Oakland CA. LOA 258.5' -
Beam 38' - Depth 12'. Flat Deck Barge, riveted
steel construction, raked bow and stern. 6"
asphalt wear deck with 3' steel fenced sides run-
ning port and starboard. Barge is also outfitted
with 2 Clyde two drum waterfall winches.
$300,000.00.
EM1163 - 125' x 34' x 9' Flat Deck Barge s/n
1065170 c/w 12 hatches, 4 bitts, 6 kevels, 25
degree raked bow/stern, stern w/skaggs.
$125,000.00.
HamiltonJet fitter Neil Harrison tightens the Astern Deflector
bracket on one of the first two HT1000 waterjets to leave the
company's Christchurch factory.
DJ100G 10 waterjet
with integral gearbox.
waterjets
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 12:21 PM Page 42
distribution network, including newly revised U.S. net-
work, provides technical application and aftermarket serv-
ice support. Doen's expertise in waterjet propulsion and
close consultation with customers and designers ensures
vessels always exceed performance and efficiency expecta-
tions. Doen's policy of continuous improvement through
ongoing research and development has ensured they
remain at the cutting edge of waterjet and control tech-
nology. Its product range, covering power inputs up to
5000shp, is one of the widest in the sector.
www.doen.com
Austal Installs 250th Water Jet
Austal has been congratulated by Rolls-Royce Australia
following the installation of its 250th Rolls-Royce/
Kamewa water jet. The Kamewa 63 SII water jet, one of
the most popular in the Rolls-Royce, was installed on
Austal's latest 156-ft. passenger catamaran ferry being
built for Hong Kong — the 46th fast ferry Austal has
built for the region.
More than 200 Austal vessels currently operate world-
wide, many of which have incorporated the Kamewa 63
SII unit. Hong Kong's Venetian Marketing Services
Limited (VMSL) ordered a total fleet of fourteen 47.5 m
passenger ferries, each driven by four Kamewa water jets.
The passenger catamarans will capitalise on the rapidly
growing demand for the Hong Kong to Macao service,
currently the world's largest route in terms of passenger
numbers. Seven of the vessels have already begun opera-
tion between Hong Kong and Macau, where their per-
formance has stood
out during commer-
cial service.
www.austal.com
Managing Director of
Rolls-Royce Marine
Australia Doug Brice and
Austal Commercial Sales
Manager James Bennett
with the 250th water jet.
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 12:22 PM Page 43
44 MN July 2008
departments
Coast Guard Yard Under New
Command
Captain John Kaplan recently
assumed command of the U.S. Coast
Guard Yard in Baltimore, Md. He is
the 39th Commanding Officer in the
109-year history of the Yard, the only
shipbuilding and ship repair facility
of the United States Coast Guard.
Captain Kaplan took charge of the
Coast Guard Yard from Captain
Stephen Duca who had served as the
shipyard's Commanding Officer,
May 2005 — May 2008. Captain
Duca retired from the U.S. Coast
Guard with 27 years active duty serv-
ice. Captain Kaplan assumed com-
mand of the shipyard from his assign-
ment as Yard Industrial Manager, a
position held since 2005.
Captain Kaplan is an active partici-
pant and strong supporter of the
American Society of Naval Engineers
(ASNE) and is currently serving on
the ASNE National Ways and Means
Committee.
Northrop Grumman Appoints
Three VPs
Northrop Grumman Corporation
recently announced the appointment
of three vice presidents at its
Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding
Gulf Coast Operations. Northrop
Grumman Shipbuilding, the newly-
formed sector of Northrop
Grumman Corporation, is made up
of the former Northrop Grumman
Ship Systems and Newport News
shipbuilding sectors. Kevin Amis has
been appointed vice president of
operations, Dennis Gallimore has
been named vice president of engi-
neering and integrated logistics sup-
port, and Rick Spaulding has been
appointed vice president of planning.
Commandant Presents Rear Adm.
William M. Benkert Awards
Coast Guard Commandant Adm.
Thad Allen will honor the recipients
of the 2008 Biennial, Rear Adm.
William M. Benkert, Marine
Environmental Award for Excellence
by presenting the awards during an
American Petroleum Institute lunch-
eon scheduled to begin at 11:45 a.m.,
Monday, at the Rancho Bernardo
Inn, 17550 Bernardo Oaks Dr., San
Diego. Recipients of the awards
include:
• Osprey Award: Dow Chemical
Company of Freeport, Texas
• Gold Award: Alaska Chadux
Corporation, Anchorage, Alaska, and
Foss Maritime Company, Seattle
• Silver Award: U.S. Shipping
Partners L.P., Edison, N.J., American
Commercial Lines Inc.,
Jeffersonville, Ind., and Marathon
Petroleum, Ashland, Ky., and
Marathon Petroleum company LLC,
Nashville, Tenn.
• Bronze Award: APL Maritime,
Ltd., Bethesda, Md., APL Maritime,
Ltd., Oakland, Calif., and Marathon
Petroleum, Ashland, Ky.
• Honorable Mention: Todd Pacific
Shipyards Corporation, Seattle, and
SeaRiver Maritime Inc., Houston.
The award recognizes maritime
industry businesses and corporations
involved in marine facility or vessel
operations that have demonstrated
sustained excellence and outstanding
achievement in protecting the marine
environment. The award program
also encourages innovations in opera-
tions, maintenance, cargo handling,
refueling, training and the sharing of
best practices throughout the indus-
try.
WETA Names New Executive
Director
The San Francisco Bay Area Water
Emergency Transportation Authority
(WETA) Board of Directors
announced the appointment of a new
Executive Director - Jonathan
Stanley. His first day of work will be
July 21, 2008. The Executive
Amis Gallimore Adm. Allen Kaplan Spaulding
Connaughton
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 3:06 PM Page 44
www.marinelink.com MN 45
Director position was previously held by Steve
Castleberry, who resigned last month. Stanley
is currently the CEO of the Aircraft Carrier
Hornet Foundation, which operates a naval
ship museum located in the retired U.S. Navy
aircraft carrier USS Hornet in the City of
Alameda. He has lived in the Bay Area for the
last 30 years.
EBDG Staff Becomes LEED Accredited
Professional
Elliott Bay Design Group (EBDG)
announced that Joe Payne, P.E. and senior elec-
trical engineer, has earned his certification in
Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design (LEED) from the U.S. Green Building
Council. LEED Accredited Professionals (AP)
are building industry practitioners who have
demonstrated their knowledge of green build-
ing practices and are able to facilitate the certi-
fication process through their familiarity with
LEED requirements and resources. While the
LEED certification process has applied only to
the land-based building environment, EBDG is
introducing these practices to the marine
industry.
Horizon Names Senior VP and General
Manager, Puerto Rico Division
Horizon Lines, Inc., named Jacob M.
Wegrzyn Senior Vice President and General
Manager of its Puerto Rico services division.
The position reports to John V. Keenan,
President and Chief Operating Officer of
Horizon Lines, LLC. Wegrzyn will join the
company effective June 23, 2008.
Wegrzyn will have primary responsibility for
operational, sales and strategic activities related
to the Puerto Rico market. He joins Horizon
Lines with over 18 years experience in the
transportation and distribution industry in
Puerto Rico.
New Training Agreement Opens Maritime
Job Opportunities
Maritime Administrator Sean T.
Connaughton and Gunther Keitel, Executive
Vice President of Great American Lines, Inc.,
signed an agreement for cadets from the U.S.
A.C. MARINE
& INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY CO.
AN AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE OF
ANCHOR MARINE, HOUSTON, TEXAS.
ATLANTIC CORDAGE CORPORATION,
AVENEL, NEW JERSEY
Maximum protection for Ships Wharves and Piers
Construction complies with United States Navy and
Coast Guard Specifications. Core consists of closed-cell,
resilient, energy absorbing foam, covered with protective,
seamless polyurethane elastomer skin.
Will not mark or scratch vessel hulls.
P.O. BOX 6277
Freehold, NJ 07728
TEL: (732) 577-8877
FAX: (732) 577-8881
A.C. MARINE
& INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY CO.
email: acanchor@aol.com
EXCLUSI VE DI STRI BUTORS
FENDERS
FOAM-FILLED FENDERS
WITH CHAIN & TIRES
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 12:23 PM Page 45
46 MN July 2008
Merchant Marine Academy and state
maritime academies to take their
training voyages on Great American
Lines ships.
Maritime cadets must have sailing
time on working vessels in order to
qualify as licensed mariners. There is
currently a worldwide shortage of
licensed mariners, and U.S. maritime
academies have geared up to train
more students.
The agreement was signed on grad-
uation day at Kings Point. Keitel and
Connaughton are both graduates of
the academy, and Connaughton
pointed out how different the
employment situation is for today's
graduates than it was for him and his
classmates. "Sixty-five percent of
today's graduates already have jobs
sailing in the U.S. maritime indus-
try," he said. "When my class gradu-
ated there were almost no jobs for us
in the U.S. industry."
MarAd Names Director of
Marine Highways
The Maritime Administration has
named James D. Pugh to head its
Office of Marine Highways and
Passenger Services in Washington,
D.C. Jim will focus on expanding the
use of America's coastal, intracoastal
and inland waterways to reduce land-
side congestion, reduce energy con-
sumption and increase opportunities
for American mariners, shipbuilding
and the overall economy. He will also
oversee the office of Passenger Vessel
Services, which was established to
support the passenger and cruise
industry and its multi-billion dollar
contribution to the economy as well
as the congestion relief that passenger
ferries offer nationwide.
Eighteen Foss Vessels Receive
Safety Awards
The Chamber of Shipping of
America (CSA) presented the Foss
vessels with Jones F. Devlin Awards at
the Annual Safety Awards Luncheon
in Houston, Texas. Jones F. Devlin
Awards are awarded to self-propelled
merchant vessels that have operated
for two full years or more without a
crewmember losing a full turn at
watch because of an occupational
injury. Altogether, the winning Foss
people & companies
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 12:24 PM Page 46
www.marinelink.com MN 47
D I V E R S I F I E D
Engine Exhaust Systems
HARCO MANUFACTURING CO.
1000 Industrial Pkwy • Newberg OR 97132
800-394-7571 • Fax: 503-537-0601
www.harcomanufacturing.com
email: sales@harcomanufacturing.com
ENGINE AND
ENVIRONMENTAL
PRODUCTS
ABS Certified • Bureau Veritas Qualified
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 12:25 PM Page 47
48 MN July 2008
ships have achieved the equivalent
total of 82 years without a lost-time
injury. Foss Devlin Award winning
vessels honored by the CSA (and the
number of years the ships have been
injury free) were: America (three
years); Anna Foss (four years); Arrow
2 (seven years); Betsy L (two years);
Campbell Foss (two years); Caribe
Alliance (four years); Dorothy L.
Sylvester (eight years); Drew Foss
(two years); Howard Olsen (two
years); Jim Moore (nine years);
Noydena (three years); Pacific Queen
(two years); Pacific Viking (two
years); Peggy Foss (two years); Phillip
W (four years); Point Fermin (nine
years); Point Vincente (nine
years);Sam Foss (eight years).
We are extremely proud of Foss'
safety achievement," said Gary Faber,
Foss president and COO. "Safety is
the keystone of our company's cul-
ture and the Chamber of Shipping of
America awards certainly recognize
that."
Horizon Lines Recognized With
Safety Awards
Horizon Lines, Inc., has been rec-
ognized for outstanding achieve-
ments in ship safety by the Chamber
of Shipping of America (CSA) at the
Annual Safety Awards.
The CSA-sponsored Ship Safety
Achievement Award program recog-
nizes outstanding feats of safety that
contribute to saving a life, a ship or
other property. This year, the Highest
Honors award went to the Horizon
people & companies
Due to rising flood waters, the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers closed nine locks and dams on the upper
Mississippi River. The Upper Mississippi River (UMR)
runs for 1,200 miles or 10 percent of the Inland Waterway
System, and serves a five-state region.
Since the system is stable in terms of traffic volumes and
commodity type, in order to evaluate any potential impact
for the proposed closure, the Maritime Administration
analyzed last year's traffic that passed through these locks
from June 12, 2007 until June 26, 2007. According to
Corps of Engineers' estimates, some of these locks service
millions of tons of cargo a year. For example, in 2007,
volume at Lock and Dam 19 totaled 26.3 million tons.
Major commodities carried included grain, aggregates,
petroleum, coal, and chemicals. Growth in traffic in this
stretch of the river is expected to reach 31.5 million tons
in 2010. More than 1,900 commercial towboats and
16,773 loaded barges transited Lock 19 in 2007.
Below is the total tonnage and vessels passing through
each lock marked for closure on the system. These esti-
mates are based on June 12, 2007 through July 1 2007
traffic. (See Graphic to the Right)
The nine locks slated for closure lie north of where the
Illinois River meets the Mississippi.
Some local barge operators say that means they should-
n't be hurt by the closure. Barges generally carry grain
from the upper Midwest down-river to New Orleans,
where they are unloaded for export. Those barges would
then be filled with cargo like coal, steel, concrete, etcetera
and sent up to Chicago and Minneapolis. A lengthy clo-
sure could add millions of dollars to the costs of trans-
porting grain and other commodities carried on the sys-
tem and reduce the real incomes of farmers, other pro-
ducers and consumers. However, this closure is expected
to last only two weeks during a slow shipping season,
therefore, no significant economic impact is foreseen for
the region. For more information o the economic impact
of lock closures visit MarAd's site.
www.marad.dot.gov/pdf/UMR%20Lock%20Closure%20and%
20Economic%20June%2012%202008.pdf
MarAd Assesses Economic Impact of Closures
Upper Mississippi River Locks and Dams
MN#7 (33-48).qxd 7/2/2008 3:06 PM Page 48
www.marinelink.com MN 49
Falcon in recognition of the crew's
extraordinary courage and superior
seamanship, without regard to their
personal safety in adverse weather
conditions, when they successfully
rescued Chinese crewmembers of the
capsized vessel HAI TONG 7 north-
west of Guam last July. Three addi-
tional Horizon Lines vessels were pre-
sented Devlin Awards, which signify
two or more years of injury-free oper-
ations. The vessels honored are the
Horizon Spirit (5 years injury-free);
the USNS Bruce Heezen (3 years
injury-free); and the Horizon Pacific
(2 years injury-free).
Harrison Brothers Transform
Offshore Deck Barge
Harrison Brothers Dry Dock &
Repair Yard, Inc. has begun the prepa-
rations to begin the transformation of
a 260 ft. offshore deck barge into a
120 berth accommodations flotel.
The project’s final destination is off
the coast of Nigeria for an undisclosed
oil & gas exploration company.
Harrison Brothers is planning to work
around the clock to expedite the proj-
ect ahead of schedule. A task often
achieved by this can do company.
MN#7 (49-55).qxd 7/2/2008 3:33 PM Page 49
50 MN July 2008
by the numbers
Offshore Rig Day Rates
Floating Rigs
Rig Type Rigs Working Total Rig Fleet Average Day Rate
Drillship < 4000' WD 8 rigs 11 rigs $284,200.00
Drillship 4000'+ WD 23 rigs 28 rigs $319,926.09
Semisub < 1500' WD 15 rigs 23 rigs $279,870.00
Semisub 1500'+ WD 78 rigs 88 rigs $294,737.68
Semisub 4000'+ WD 51 rigs 60 rigs $336,229.63
Jackup Rigs
Rig Type Rigs Working Total Rig Fleet Average Day Rate
Jackup IC < 250' WD 38 rigs 48 rigs $113,916.67
Jackup IC 250' WD 53 rigs 63 rigs $127,842.33
Jackup IC 300' WD 110 rigs 121 rigs $148,073.81
Jackup IC 300'+ WD 89 rigs 97 rigs $183,419.22
Jackup IS < 250' WD 6 rigs 7 rigs $74,500.00
Jackup IS 250' WD 9 rigs 11 rigs $98,500.00
Jackup IS 300' WD 5 rigs 5 rigs $82,666.67
Jackup IS 300'+ WD 3 rigs 3 rigs $90,333.33
Jackup MC < 200' WD 6 rigs 16 rigs $52,333.33
Jackup MC 200'+ WD 25 rigs 29 rigs $77,200.00
Jackup MS < 200' WD 2 rigs 3 rigs —
Jackup MS 200'+ WD 18 rigs 22 rigs $69,333.75
Other Offshore Rigs
Rig Type Rigs Working Total Rig Fleet Average Day Rate
Rig Type Rigs Working Total Rig Fleet Average Day Rate
Drill Barge < 150' WD 22 rigs 38 rigs $43,000.00
Drill Barge 150'+ WD 8 rigs 10 rigs $77,000.00
Inland Barge 59 rigs 90 rigs $41,618.06
Platform Rig 167 rigs 253 rigs $35,565.00
Submersible 4 rigs 7 rigs $57,000.00
Tender 22 rigs 28 rigs $96,150.00
Source: Rigzone
Recent GOM Drilling Permits
These are the most recent Gulf of Mexico drilling plans filed
with the MMS.
Date/ Water
Operator Block Depth
6/12/2008
Apache Corporation SM 281 41 ft
6/11/2008
El Paso E&P Company, L.P. EI 327 262 ft
6/11/2008
Bois d'Arc Offshore Ltd. SS 117 59 ft
6/11/2008
Marathon Oil Company GB 515 3,287 ft
6/10/2008
Samson Contour Energy E&P, LLC SM 102 172 ft
6/10/2008
Devon Energy Production Co., L.P. WR 758 6,964 ft
6/6/2008
Walter Oil & Gas Corporation EI 383 368 ft
6/5/2008
Chevron U.S.A. Inc. ST 23 50 ft
6/5/2008
Murphy Exploration & Production GC 338 3,325 ft
6/5/2008
Anadarko Petroleum Corporation GC 561 4,144 ft
Source: Rigzone
Offshore Rig Utilization by Type
Drill Barge 90.9% (10/11)
Drillship 80.6% (29/36)
Jackup 90.6% (338/373)
Semisub 85.4% (134/157)
Submersible 66.7% (4/6)
Tender 84.6% (22/26)
Source: Rigzone
6/12/2008
Maritech Resources, Inc. DOCD 283 ft
6/11/2008
BP E&P EP KC 102 4,533 ft
6/10/2008
Marlin Coastal, L.L.C. EP SS 86 30 ft
6/5/2008
Newfield Exploration Co. EP SM 260 27 ft
6/5/2008
BP Exploration & Production EP MC 727 5,465 ft
6/5/2008
W & T Offshore, Inc. DOCD VR 225 122 ft
6/2/2008
W & T Offshore, Inc. EP MP 95 30 ft
5/30/2008
Mariner Energy, Inc. EP GB 334 2,083 ft
5/27/2008
LLOG Exploration Offshore EP ST 231 246 ft
5/27/2008
Apache Corporation DOCD 345 ft
Source: Rigzone
Most Recent GOM Exploration & Construction Plans
These are the most recent Gulf of Mexico exploration and construction plans filed with the MMS.
Date/ Plan Water
Operator Type Block Depth
Date/ Plan Water
Operator Type Block Depth
MN#7 (49-55).qxd 7/2/2008 3:34 PM Page 50
www.marinelink.com MN 51
Akasaka
T26 260.0 440.0 6 104.2 350 - 400 13.4 -15.3
Moteurs Baudouin
S108 108.0 120.0 4 - 6 16.0 - 50.3 2100 - 2500 7.9 - 26.2
S111 111.0 145.0 6 34.3 2000 14.7
R120 120.0 145.0 6 29.5 - 41.7 1800 - 2000 12.0 - 15.2
R123 123.0 156.0 6 43.0 1800 - 2000 15.5
Beta Marine
120 104.0 132.0 6 14.9 2600 6.1
Boni Marine
BF425 93.7 90.5 4 14.8 - 25.8 3800 - 4000 7.1 - 13.0
BV4404 108.0 120.0 4 14.3 - 33 2000 - 2400 7.8 - 15
BV6606 108.0 120.0 6 10.8 - 40.3 2000 - 2400 5.9 - 13.4
BV7406 108.0 134.0 6 10.9 - 42.8 1800 - 2400 5.9 - 17.4
BV8406 111.0 145.0 6 11.3 - 49 1660 - 2100 5.8 - 19.9
BD1260 130.0 158.0 6 15.9 - 58.8 1520 - 2000 6.0 - 16.8
Caterpillar
3000 100.0 127.0 6 15.5 - 25.5 2100 - 2600 7.2 - 13.2
3126 110.0 127.0 6 52.2 2800 18.5
C7 / ACERT 110.0 127.0 6 31.2 - 56.5 2400 - 2800 12.9 - 20.1
C9 ACERT 112.0 149.0 6 62.5 - 70.5 2500 20.4 - 23.0
C12 / ACERT 130.0 150.0 6 42.2 - 87.7 1800 - 2300 14.2 - 23.0
C15 ACERT 137.0 165.0 6 99.5 - 106 2300 21.3 - 22.7
3412D 145.0 162.0 12 33.7 - 54.3 1800 - 2100 8.4 - 13.1
C18 / ACERT 145.0 183.0 6 56.5 - 124.3 1800 - 2300 12.5 - 21.5
Cummins Marine
N14-M 139.7 152.4 6 54.7 - 65.3 1800 - 2100 15.6 - 17.0
KTA19/M 159.0 159.0 6 52.8 - 87 1800 - 2100 11.2 - 16.8
QSK19-M 159.0 159.0 6 82.0 - 99.5 1800 - 2100 17.1 - 18.0
Cummins MerCruiser
B 102.0 120.0 4 - 6 24.3 - 39.2 2500 - 2800 10.6 - 17.1
QSB5.9 102.0 120.0 6 28.2 - 58.8 2600 - 3000 13.3 - 24.0
C 114.0 135.0 6 31.7 - 53.5 1800 - 2600 15.3 - 17.9
QSC8.3 114.0 135.0 6 58.8 - 60.2 2500 - 3000 17.1 - 21.0
QSL 114.0 145.0 6 17.7 - 49.7 1400 - 2100 10.2 - 19.2
QSM11 125.0 147.0 6 36.7 - 87.7 1800 - 2300 13.5 - 25.3
N14 139.7 152.4 6 24.2 - 49.7 1800 - 2100 6.9 - 13.5
Daewoo Doosan
102/100 102.0 100.0 4 22 - 26.8 3000 - 3600 10.8 - 11.3
102/118 102.0 118.0 6 16 - 24.7 1500 - 2700 9.6 - 13.3
111/139 111.0 139.0 6 19.5 - 44.2 2100 - 2500 7.9 - 15.8
123/155 123.0 155.0 6 39.2 - 49 2000 - 2100 12.8 - 15.5
V 158TI 128.0 142.0 8 44.1 - 73.5 1800 - 2300 16.4 - 21.0
V 180TI 128.0 142.0 10 44.1 - 60.3 1800 - 2300 15.3 - 18.6
DEUTZ
FM 1013 108.0 130.0 4 - 6 20.5 - 42.5 2300 - 2600 9 - 19.4
FM 1015 132.0 145.0 6 - 8 43.5 - 70.8 2100 - 2300 12.5 - 18.6
FNM 82.55/90 82.6 90.0 4 - 5 22.3 - 36.8 4000 - 4200
16.9 - 23.1
FPT/ Iveco
NEF 102.0 120.0 4 - 6 15.3 - 58.8 2500 - 3000 5.9 - 24.0
CURSOR 115.0 125.0 6 36.7 - 61.3 2000 - 2600 16.9 - 21.8
CURSOR 550 115.0 125.0 6 49 - 67.5 2600 17.4 - 24.0
CURSOR 600 135.0 150.0 6 61.3 - 73.5 2000 17.1 - 20.5
CURSOR 770 135.0 150.0 6 66.2 - 94.5 2300 16.1 - 23.0
CURSOR 825 135.0 150.0 6 73.7 - 101.2 2400 17.2 - 23.5
Grenna
FS24 240.0 300.0 3 - 6 55 - 123 750 6.5 - 14.5
Guangzhou
300 300.0 380.0 6 49 - 54 400 5.5 - 6
Guascor
F180 152.0 165.0 6 30.7 - 79.4 1800 - 2000 6.8 - 17.2
F240 152.0 165.0 8 55.2 - 79.5 1800 12.3 - 17.7
Hangzhou
WD615 126.0 130.0 6 15.2 - 34.3 1500 - 2575 6.5 - 14.8
Hanshin
6L24GSH 240.0 400.0 6 79.7 400 13.2
LC26 260.0 440.0 6 104.2 400 13.4
Hino
W04C 104.0 113.0 4 23.3 - 39.3 3000 9.7 - 16.3
W04D 104.0 118.0 4 17.3 - 20.5 3000 6.9 - 8.2
HS Marine
90/90 90.0 90.0 4 27.5 3300 17.5
FM 1011 91.0 112.0 4 18.8 3000 10.3
FM 1012 94.0 115.0 4 - 6 20.8 - 25 2500 - 2650 12.6 - 14.2
101/126 101.0 126.0 4 - 6 18.8 - 25.8 2500 8.9 - 12.3
FM 1013 108.0 130.0 6 28.3 - 39.2 2300 12.4 - 17.2
Isuzu
JBT 93.0 102.0 4 20.3 - 21 3100 - 3200 11.3 - 11.4
JGT 95.4 107.0 4 23.5 - 26.8 3100 - 3200 11.9 - 13.1
BGM 101.5 125.0 6 18.3 2800 7.8
BDT 102.0 118.0 4 24 - 26.8 2700 - 2800 11.1 - 11.9
BG1 105.0 125.0 4 - 6 25.7 - 36.8 2600 - 2800 10.9 - 14.5
HE1 110.0 125.0 6 39.2 - 42.8 2700 - 2800 14.6 - 15.4
RB1 132.9 160.0 6 53.8 - 59.3 1940 - 2000 15 - 16
John Deere
POWERTECH 4.5L 106.0 127.0 4 14.0 - 28.0 2400 - 2600 6.2 - 11.5
POWERTECH 6.8L 106.0 127.0 6 19.2 - 49.7 2300 - 2800 8.8 - 19.0
POWERTECH 8.1L 116.0 129.0 6 29.2 - 46.7 2100 - 2400 12.2 - 17.1
POWERTECH12.5L 127.0 165.0 6 42.3 - 75.8 1800 - 2100 13.5 - 20.7
Kelvin
KEL140-6M 140.0 165.0 6 59.0 1800 15.1
TA 165.0 184.0 6 - 8 28.0 - 41.7 1200 7.2 - 10.8
TBSC8 165.0 184.0 8 49.9 1350 11.5
KEL170-6M 170.0 170.0 6 93.3 1800 15.2
Kolomna
V13/14 130.0 140.0 6 - 12 19.2 - 27.5 2000 - 3600 5.9 - 7.8
N14/14 140.0 140.0 8 - 12 38.0 - 45.8 2100 - 2350 10.1 - 10.6
Komatsu
91 91.9 115.0 6 25.5 3000 13.4
95 95.0 115.0 6 17.3 - 30.7 3000 - 3100 8.5 - 14.5
105A1 105.0 125.0 6 22.7 - 38.6 2520 - 2600 9.7 - 16.5
105A2 105.9 130.0 6 40.7 - 49.7 2520 - 2600 16.9 - 20
108 108.0 130.0 6 42.3 - 51.5 2520 - 2700 16.9 - 19.2
117 117.9 150.0 6 55.2 - 50.3 2130 - 2200 17.3 - 18.4
117 117.9 150.0 6 58.2 - 64.4 2200 - 2300 19.4 - 20.5
122 121.9 150.0 6 67.4 - 74.6 2200 - 2300 21 - 23.0
125 125.0 150.0 6 61.3 - 68.4 2200 - 2300 18.2 - 19.4
132 132.9 165.0 6 70.5 - 85.8 2100 - 2200 17.6 - 20.4
137 137.9 165.0 6 83.4 - 94.4 2100 - 2200 19.3 - 20.9
170 170.0 170.0 6 111.6 - 122.6 2000 17.3 - 19.1
Lombardini Marine
LDW 82.0 90.4 4 - 5 23.5 - 29.4 4000 14.8 - 18.5
Alaska Diesel Electric - Lugger / Northern Lights
1064 106.0 127.0 4 21.3 - 26 2000 - 2400 11.4 - 11.6
1066 106.0 127.0 6 16.7 - 33.8 2200 - 2500 8.1 - 15.1
6140 140.0 165.0 6 62.2 - 87 1800 - 2100 16.3 - 19.6
6170 170.0 170.0 6 87 - 112 1800 - 2100 15.0 - 16.6
MAN Nutzfahrzeuge AG
D0836CR 108.0 125.0 6 67.3 2600 27.1
Marinediesel
GEP6.5 103.0 97.0 8 15.6 - 38.6 3500 - 4200 6.6 - 13.6
Matsui Diesel
MU323 230.0 380.0 3 24.5 - 99.4 420 9.1 - 19.7
ML624 240.0 400.0 6 42.9 - 61.3 420 6.9 - 13.1
ML624G/A/H/S/C 240.0 400.0 6 42.9 - 110.3 420 - 420 6.9 - 17.7
2008 Diesel Engine Directory: 100 to 1,000 HP
BRAND NAME
Model Series Bore Stroke Cyl# kW/cyl RPM BMEP
BRAND NAME
Model Series Bore Stroke Cyl# kW/cyl RPM BMEP
MN#7 (49-55).qxd 7/2/2008 3:34 PM Page 51
52 MN July 2008
2008 Diesel Engine Directory: 100 to 1,000 HP
BRAND NAME
Model Series Bore Stroke Cyl# kW/cyl RPM BMEP
BRAND NAME
Model Series Bore Stroke Cyl# kW/cyl RPM BMEP
Megatech
MWM 93.0 103.0 4 - 6 29.2 - 35.4 3200 - 3900 13.9 - 19
OM364/6 97.5 133.0 4 - 6 15.9 - 49.0 2600 - 2900 7.4 - 20.4
OM906 LA EUI 102.5 130.0 6 53.9 2600 23.2
OM926 LA EUI 106.0 136.0 6 61.3 2900 21.1
MB 447LA 128.0 155.0 6 46.6 - 73.6 1800 - 2300 15.6 - 19.2
MB 447PE 128.0 155.0 6 88.3 2400 22.1
MB 457PE 132.5 155.0 6 98.1 2400 22.9
Mermaid
FSD425 93.7 90.5 4 24.3 - 25.5 4000 11.7 - 12.3
J444TA 102.0 132.0 4 23.3 2200 11.8
2726 105.0 115.0 6 20.8 - 37.3 2500 - 2600 10 - 18
2725 107.2 114.9 6 15.2 - 17.4 2600 6.7 - 7.7
GENESIS 112.0 127.0 6 18 - 40.4 2100 - 2500 8 - 14
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd.
S6M 117.0 135.0 6 61.3 2550 19.9
S6B 135.0 150.0 6 38.5 - 53.5 2000 - 2200 10.8 - 13.6
S6N 160.0 180.0 6 36.8 1430 8.5
SA3 150.0 175.0 6 60 - 81.7 1800 - 1960 12.6 - 16.2
SR2 170.0 220.0 6 74.2 - 94.2 1350 - 1500 13.2 - 15.1
MTU
MD700 94.0 100.0 4 - 6 24.5 - 39.2 3800 11.1 - 17.8
SERIES 60 133.0 168.0 6 46.6 - 102.5 1800 - 2300 13.3 - 22.9
MWM Brasil
229 102.0 120.0 6 13.5 - 20.8 2500 - 3000 6.6 - 15
Nanni Diesel
90/110 90.0 110.0 4 21.2 - 24 2600 11.8 - 15.8
94/100 94.0 100.0 6 39.3 3600 18.8
N4.100 94.0 110.0 4 18.4 2800 10.3
T4.155 96.0 103.0 4 28.5 3600 12.8
T4.165 96.0 103.0 4 30.4 3400 14.4
T4.180 96.0 103.0 4 33.1 3400 15.7
4.380 TDI 96.0 103.0 4 32.2 - 36.8 3600 14.4 - 16.4
T4.200 96.0 103.0 4 36.8 3400 17.4
N4.115 100.0 120.0 4 21.2 2600 10.4
Niigata Engineering Co.
NSE 150.0 165.0 6 67.3 - 76 1950 - 2100 14.2 - 14.9
NSD 150.0 210.0 6 79.7 - 88.2 1450 - 1500 17.8 - 19
NSDL 160.0 235.0 6 91.8 - 101.7 1400 - 1450 16.7 - 17.8
MG17 165.0 215.0 6 92 - 101 1650 - 1700 34.3 - 36.6
MG19 190.0 260.0 6 122.5 1000 19.9
OMD
811 93.0 92.0 4 18.7 - 24 3600 9.9 - 12.8
94.4 100.0 4 16.8 - 30 3800 7.6 - 13.5
115.0 130.0 6 17 - 42.2 2200 - 2400 6.9 - 17
Optimizer
6500 103.0 97.0 8 14.9 - 32.6 3400 - 3600 6.5 - 13.5
Penninsular Diesel
103.0 97.0 8 14.9 - 37.3 3400 - 3600 6.5 - 15.4
Perkins
1000 100.0 127.0 4 - 6 16.5 - 36.8 2100 - 2600 7.4 - 17.7
1100 105.0 127.0 4 23.5 - 24.3 2200 11.7 - 12
Scania
DI 9M 115.0 144.0 6 25.8 - 55.2 1900 - 2200 10.9 - 20.1
DI 12M 127.0 154.0 6 49 - 79.7 1800 - 2200 15.4 - 23.3
DI 16M 127.0 154.0 8 48.3 - 73.6 1800 - 2200 15.5 - 20.1
620 PLUS 127.0 135.0 6 76.0 2600 20.5
660 PLUS 127.0 135.0 6 80.8 3100 18.3
725 PLUS 127.0 135.0 6 88.8 3100 20.1
820 PLUS 127.0 135.0 6 100.5 3100 22.7
800+ ELETTRONICO127.0 135.0 6 104.2 3100 23.6
950+ BiTurbo 127.0 135.0 6 93.3 - 116.3 2800 - 3200 23.4 - 25.5
Sisu Diesel
420/620 108.0 120.0 4 - 6 16.0 - 36.7 2200 - 2400 7.9 - 16.7
645 111.0 145.0 6 34.3 - 50.0 2000 - 2100 14.7 - 20.4
Sole
99.2 102.0 4 19.0 3600 8
SDZ
108.0 130.0 4 - 6 22.1 - 29.5 2300 9.7 - 12.9
Steyr
M1 85.1 94.0 4 - 6 15.0 - 31.8 2600 - 4500 12.2 - 17.7
Transmash
3D23 150.0 150.0 6 37.3 2200 7.7
3D20 150.0 160.0 6 28.8 - 29.2 2200 5.6
150/180 150.0 180.0 4 - 12 18.3 - 55.2 1500 4.6 - 13.9
VF4 82.0 90.4 4 25.8 - 31.1 4000 16.2 - 19.6
Vetus
DT 101.0 126.0 4 - 6 18.8 - 21.0 2500 8.9 - 10.0
DTA 101.0 126.0 4 - 6 23.0 - 25.8 2500 10.9 - 12.3
FM 1013 108.0 130.0 6 28.3 - 35.0 2600 11.0 - 13.6
VM
83/92 83.0 92.0 4 21.3 - 23.8 4000 12.8 - 14.3
94/100 94.0 100.0 4 - 6 11.0 - 42.8 3200 - 3800 6.3 - 19.2
Volkswagen Marine
79.5 / 95.5 79.5 95.5 4 21.3 - 24.0 4000 13.4 - 15.2
81.5 / 95.5 81.5 95.5 5 - 10 14.8 - 24.2 2600 - 4000 11.5 - 14.6
91.4 / 83 91.4 83.0 6 27.5 4200 14.4
Volvo Penta
D3 81.0 93.2 5 16.2 - 28.0 3000 - 4000 12 - 17.5
D4 103.0 110.0 4 33.0 - 55.3 2800 - 3500 15.4 - 20.7
D6 103.0 110.0 6 34.3 - 53.3 3500 12.8 - 19.9
D5 108.0 130.0 4 18.0 - 29.5 1900 - 2300 8.9 - 12.9
D7 108.0 130.0 6 18.0 - 32.5 1900 - 2300 9.0 - 14.5
D9 120.0 138.0 6 36.8 - 61.3 1800 - 2600 15.7 - 18.1
D9 120.0 138.0 6 61.3 - 70.9 2600 18.1 - 20.9
D11 123.0 152.0 6 82.2 2300 23.7
D12 131.0 150.0 6 49 - 95 1800 - 2300 16.2 - 24.5
D25 170.0 180.0 6 64.2 - 100.8 1300 - 1800 14.4 - 16.4
D30 170.0 220.0 6 64 - 116.8 1000 - 2000 13.1 - 15.4
Weichai
226 105.0 120.0 4 - 6 18.4 - 22.6 1500 - 2100 10.3 - 14.1
WD615 126.0 130.0 6 14.7 - 34.5 1500 - 2350 7.2 - 12.8
Westerbeke
108C-6 91.9 101.6 6 13.3 3600 6.6
Century 105.0 125.0 6 15.5 - 21.5 2200 - 2400 7.2 - 10.8
Yamaha
ME420 94.0 100.0 6 31.1 3700 14.5
ME580 104.0 113.0 6 26.7 3000 11.1
JH3 84.0 90.0 4 17.5 - 23.0 3400 - 3800 12.4 - 14.5
Yanmar
BY 84.0 90.0 4 - 6 20.7 - 33.0 3600 - 4000 13.8 - 19.8
6LP 94.0 100.0 6 31.1 - 37.3 3800 14.1 - 17
4LH 100.0 110.0 4 20.5 - 42.9 3100 - 3300 11.0 - 18.1
6LY 100.0 110.0 6 35.5 - 45.4 3100 - 3300 15.9 - 19.1
6CH 105.0 125.0 6 16.2 - 34.8 2600 6.9 - 14.8
6LY 106.0 110.0 6 42.8 - 58.9 3100 - 3300 17.1 - 22
6CX 110.0 130.0 6 53.9 - 61.3 2750 - 2900 17.9 - 20.5
6GH 117.9 140.0 6 46.7 - 54.7 2300 15.9 - 18.7
SY 127.0 154.0 6 - 8 82.8 - 88.3 2300 22.1 - 23.6
6HA 130.0 150.0 6 25.6 - 44.7 2100 7.3 - 12.8
N 160.0 200.0 6 55.2 1350 12.2
S 165.0 210.0 6 24.5 - 55.2 1200 - 1300 5.5 - 11.3
Zichai
17/20 170.0 200.0 6 36.7 - 58.3 1000 - 1200 9.2 - 14.5
• This table lists marine propulsion engine series in the power segment 100 - 1,000 HP
• This table of diesel engines was created from the World Marine Engine Database and reflects the engine
series in current production / available worldwide.
• Output ratings vary according to emission requirements.
• Every care has been taken in the preparation of this data, however the publisher and Worldmarine Ltd. is not
responsible for any errors or omissions.
MN#7 (49-55).qxd 7/2/2008 3:35 PM Page 52
2008 Diesel Engine Directory: 100 to 1,000 HP
Brand Name
Company Name, Address, Phone, Fax, Email,
URL & U.S. Office
Akasaka
Akasaka Diesels Ltd., 4-3-1- Nakaminato, Yaizu,
Shizuoka, Japan, +81 5462 72121, +81 5462
96933, http://www.akasaka.co.jp (japanese)
U.S. Office
TES (USA) Corporation, c/o Global Link Associates,
New York, NY 10028, +1 212 661 8806, +1 212
661 8808, kubo@tscoin.co.jp
Alaska Diesel Electric - Lugger/Northern Lights
Alaska Diesel Electric Inc., 4420-14th Avenue NW,
PO Box 70543, Seattle, 98107, WA, U.S.A., +1
206 789 3880, +1 206 782 5455, info@northern-
lights.com, http://www.northern-lights.com
Caterpillar
Caterpillar Inc., Marine Engine Division, P.O.Box 610,
Mossville, 61552-0610, IL, U.S.A., +1 309 578
6369, +1 309 578 6466, cat_power@cat.com,
http://www.cat-engines.com
Cummins Marine
Cummins Engine Company Inc, Cummins Marine
Division, 4500 Leeds Avenue - Suite 102,
Charleston, 29405, South Carolina, U.S.A., +1 803
554 6700, +1 803 745 1603, wavemaster@cum-
mins.com, http://www.cummins.com/marine
Cummins MerCruiser
Cummins MerCruiser Diesel Marine LLC, 4500
Leeds Avenue - Suite 102, Charleston, 29405,
South Carolina, U.S.A., +1 803 554 6700, +1 803
745 1603, wavemaster@cummins.com,
http://www.cmdmarine.com
Daewoo Doosan
Doosan Infracore Co.Ltd, 7-11 Hwasu-dong, Dong-
gu, Incheon, , Republic of Korea, +82 32 760
1114, +82 32 762 1546,
infracore_master@doosan.com, http://www.doosan-
infracore.co.kr
DEUTZ
Deutz AG, Deutz-Muelheimer Str 147, Köln, 51057,
Germany, +49 (0)221 822 2510, +49 (0)221 822
2529, info@deutz.de, http://www.deutz.de
U.S. Office
Deutz Corporation, Norcross, GA 30093, +1 770
564 7100, engines@deutzusa.com,
www.deutzusa.com
FPT/ Iveco
Fiat Powertrain Technologies / Iveco SpA, Via della
Industria 13/15, Pregnana Milanese, 20010, Italy,
+39 02 935101, +39 02 93590029,
luciano.caprotti@iveco.com, http://www.ivecomo-
tors.com
Grenaa
Grenaa Motorfabrik AS, Sdr.Kajgade 3-5, Grenaa,
8500, Denmark, +45 (0)8632 0666, +45 (0)8632
6390, info@grmo.dk, http://www.grmo.dk
Guangzhou
Guangzhou Diesel Engine Factory, 73 Fangcun Road
Eastern, Guangzhou, 510371, China, +86 20 818
91619, +86 20 815 84154, gdefsd@21cn.com,
http://www.gdfdiesel.com
Guascor
Guascor S.A., Barrio Oikia 44, P.O.Box 30, Zumaia,
20759, Gipuzkoa, Spain, +34 943 865200, +34
943 865210, guascor@guascor.com,
http://www.guascor.com
Hanshin
The Hanshin Diesel Works Ltd., Overseas Business
Office, Mitsubishi Building 751, 2-5-2 chome,
Marunouchi, , Tokyo, 100-0005, Chiyoda-ku, Japan,
+81 (0)3 3216 3601, +81 (0)3 3201 7675, over-
seas-section@hanshin-dw.co.jp, http://www.hanshin-
dw.co.jp
Isotta Fraschini
Isotta Fraschini SpA, Vale Francesco de Blasio, Zona
Industiale, Bari, 70123, Italy, +39 080 534 5253,
+39 080 531 1095, com@isottafraschini.it,
http://www.isottafraschini.it
U.S. Office
FDGM Inc., Chesapeake, VA 23320, +1 757 548
6000, +1 757 548 6012, joelle@fdgm.com
John Deere
Deere Power Systems, 3801 W.Ridgeway Ave.,
P.O.Box 5100, Waterloo, 50704-5100, Iowa, U.S.A.,
+1 319 292 6060, +1 319 292 5075,
jdpower@johndeere.com,
http://www.johndeere.com/marine
Kelvin
Kelvin Diesels, 133 Helen Street, Glasgow, G51
3HD, Scotland, UK, +44 (0)1698 810666, +44
(0)1698 810999, sales@polareng.sagehost.co.uk,
http://www.britishpolarengines.co.uk
Kolomna
Kolomensky Zavod JSC, Partizan str 42, Kolomna,
140408, Moscow Region, Russia, +7 0966
138585, +7 0966 154793,
kolomzavod@kolomna.ru, http://www.dieselkolom-
na.com
Komatsu
Komatsu Diesel Co. Ltd., International Department,
2-3-6 Akasaka, Minato-ky, Tokyo, 107, Japan, +81 3
5561 3473, +81 3 5561 3477,
http://komatsy.co.jp/product/compocat/
Megatech
Megatech-Dumon, Av. Nacoes Unidas, Sao Vicente,
1683, SP, Brazil, +55 13 3463 4128, +55 13
3463 1415, megatech@megatechpower.com.br,
http://www.megatechpower.com.br
U.S. Office
Megatech Marine LLC, Oakland Park, FL 33334, +1
954 462 2800, +1 954 462 2801, sales@megate-
chmarine.com, www.megatechmarine.com
MAN
MAN Nutzfahrzeuge AG, Marine Diesel Engines
Dept., Postfach 44 0100, Nürnberg, 90206,
Germany, +49 (0)911 4206238, +49 (0)911
4211915, brigitte-moehler@mn.man.de,
http://www.man-nutzfahrzeuge.de
Matsui Diesel
Matsui Iron Works Co.Ltd., 70 Takenohana-machi,
Ise-City, 516-0005, Japan, +81 (0)5963 62222,
+81 (0)5963 63598, sawada@matsui-j.co.jp,
http://www.matsui-j.co.jp (japanese)
Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., 5-1, Marunouchi 2-
chome, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 100, Japan., +81 (0)3
3212 9080, +81 (0)3 3212 9779,
Q07676@hq.mhi.co.jp,
http://www.mhi.co.jp/index.html
U.S. Office
Mitsubishi International, Pittsburg, PA 15219-6401,
+1 412 355 0525, +1 412 355 0164, sugimo-
to@mitsubishicorp.com
MTU
MTU Friedrichshafen GmbH, P.O.Box 2040,
Friedrichshafen, 88040, Germany, +49 (0)7541 90-
3381, +49 (0)7541 90-3945, marine@mtu-
online.com, http://www.mtu-online.com
U.S. Office
Detroit Diesel Corporation, Detroit, MI 48239-4001,
+1 313 592 5000, +1 313 592 5137,
ddcinfo@detroitdiesel.com
Niigata
Niigata Power Systems Co.Ltd, 9-7 Yaesu 2-chome,
Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-0028, Japan, +81 3 6214
2800, +81 3 6214 2809, webmstr@niigata-
eng.co.jp, http://www.nigata-eng.co.jp
Scania
Scania, Industrial & Marine Engines, Sodertalje,
15187, Sweden, +46 (0)855 381 000, +46 (0)855
382 993, industrial.marine@scania.com,
http://www.scania.com
U.S. Office
Scania U.S.A. Inc., San Antonio, TX 78216, +1 210
403 0007, +1 210 403 0211, www.scania.com
Seatek
Seatek S.p.A., Via Provinciale 71, Annone Brianza,
22040, Co, Italy, +39 0341-579335, 39 0341-
579317, sales@seatek-spa.com, http://www.seatek-
spa.com
U.S. Office
Innovation Marine Corp., Sarasora, FL 34243, +1
813 756 4337, +1 813 751 5398
Volvo Penta
Volvo Penta AB., , Goteborg, 40508, Sweden, +46
(0)31 668163, +46 (0)31 510595,
http://www.penta.volvo.se
Yanmar
Yanmar Co.Ltd., Overseas Operations Division, 1-1,
2-chome, Yaesu, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104, Japan, +81 3
3275 4941, +81 3 3275 4969, http://www.yan-
mar.com
U.S. Office
Yanmar Diesel America Corp., Buffalo Grove, IL
60089-4508, +1 708 541 1900, +1 708 541
2161
www.marinelink.com MN 53
MN#7 (49-55).qxd 7/2/2008 3:35 PM Page 53
54 MN July 2008
technology bits • tools
Miller Electric
Miller Electric Mfg. Co.'s Pipe
Welding Technique videos are now
available for free downloading on the
Miller Website at
MillerWelds.com/education/arti-
cles/article125.html. These videos
explain techniques and technology
that increase pipe-welding productiv-
ity. On-line video topics include new
advances in pipe welding techniques,
preparation of the pipe joint, RMD™
on carbon steel pipe, RMD on stain-
less steel pipe and cap and fill passes
with Pro-Pulse™. A free CD contain-
ing these videos can also be ordered
by visiting MillerWelds.com/prod-
ucts/multiprocess/pipepro_welding_s
ystem/
SPS Technologies
SPS Technologies, a manufacturer
of fasteners, offers a large selection of
self-aligning nuts. These nuts, which
have a 6 to 8 degree maximum float,
are used in applications where there
are no flat surfaces. Available in sizes
ESAB
ESAB Welding & Cutting
Products has launched two new
models in its PowerCut line of
Plasmarc manual cutting pack-
ages designed to pack big cutting
power into a lightweight portable
package. The new PowerCut
1600 and 1300 make cutting eas-
ier and more economical with design features to simplify operation, reduce
set-up time and enhance consumable life.
PowerCut 1300 and 1600 offers the highest speeds and thickness capabil-
ities in their class, as well as high duty cycles. Through a combination of
long parts life, high speeds and simple torch design, the PowerCut series
offers the lowest cost per foot of cut of any machine in its price class. This
power is contained within a durable external housing designed to be dam-
age resistant, corrosion resistant and weather resistant while remaining light-
weight for portability. Sensitive internal electronics are suspended from the
aluminum frame, insulating them from shock and vibration. Silicone sealed
switches are immune to corrosion and dust and dirt infiltration.
New on the PowerCut 1300 and 1600 is a Tool-less Quick Disconnect
Torch that disconnects from the machine without the use of wrenches or
special tools, allowing easy disassembly for storage, repairs or replacement or
to attach a mechanized torch for mechanized applications. A new Digital
Readout Display is easy to read and shows the exact pressure or amperage,
allowing users to operate with confidence.
www.esabna.com
MN#7 (49-55).qxd 7/2/2008 3:36 PM Page 54
from #10
through 1.5
in., these self-
aligning nuts
are typically
manufactured
from alloy
steel, A286,
Alloy 718,
MP159, and MP35N. Ultimate ten-
sile strength levels range from 125
through 260 ksi, depending on size
and materials.
Additional sizes and materials are
available on request. Finishes of cad-
mium, cadmium and molybdenum,
nickel-cadmium and silver can be
applied in the SPS computer-con-
trolled plating facilities. Locking fea-
tures are available in nylon and all-
metal. SPS product engineers, sup-
ported by an experienced technical
staff, are available to assist in product
design and material selection. For
more information, e-mail: btochter-
man@spstech.com
Doncasters Group
Doncasters Group Ltd., a manu-
facturer of precision components and
assemblies announced the availability
of Nelweld N1500i, a full power,
portable and light-weight stud
welder. Manufactured at Nelson Stud
Welding, one of Doncasters' Fastener
Systems facili
ties in North America, the inverter
stud welder offers robustness, reliabil-
ity and increased production, weigh-
ing only 77lbs.
An all-digital system with a 50 per-
cent more output power than compa-
rable products in the market, the
Nelweld N1500i is the first portable
system utilizing inverter stud welding
resulting in larger studs and more
studs per minute.
With applications in the shipbuild-
ing, industrial, machine fabrication
and transportation industries, the
Nelweld N1500i is used for an array
of products such as cable hangers,
insulation pins, threaded studs, and
auto-feed handgun applications.
Precision control at 60,000 Hz fre-
quency ensure the most stable arc,
accurate heat input and highest qual-
ity process.
www.marinelink.com MN 55
Variable-volume10HP
HYDRAULIC
POWER
UNITS
Buy our product advancements at
Manufacturer-Direct-to-You prices!
Adjusts flow & pressure to your needs!
Adjusts flow & pressure to your needs!
Variable-volume GPM and pressure-compensation give hydraulic circuits
100% operational efficiency! Simply set flow with easy handwheel control
from 0 to maximum (8.5 or 17 GPM} . Our Power Units automatically increase
and decrease pressure, maintaining maximum PSI at minimal flow! No over-
flows! No energy waste! Mounted upon the 30 gal. JIC type reservoir is an ex-
traordinary aircraft-style hydraulic pump which is coupled to a 10HP (or 15HP}
electric motor rated at 230/460V, 60Hz, 3 ph. AC. The reservoir also houses a
suction filter, oil level gauge, filler breather, 3/4” NPT fittings, and clean-out cover.
Size 36”x24”x34”H. Wt. 350 lbs. Order now and you’ll join firms such as NASA
who have been saving at Roberts for a half century. Buy direct on our money-
back guarantee. Our experts help with circuit creation at no charge. Fob Chicago
Stock No. HP RPM GPM PSI Price
AVPU108-AY 10 1750 0-8.5 3000 $1800
AVPU1517-AY 15 3450 0-17 3000 $1800
1-YEAR GUARANTEE
FULL purchase price BACK less trans-
portation cost if unsuitable in ANY way!
Order Now! Call (312) 829-1365 or Fax (312) 829-9679
or order on secured website www.hydraulicbargains.com
ROBERTS ELECTRIC CO.
311 N. MORGAN ST. DEPT. 6937
CHICAGO, IL 60607-1381
S
p
e
c
i
a
l
!
S
a
v
e
$
$
$
$
S
p
e
c
i
a
l
!
S
a
v
e
$
$
$
$
Increases productivity & operational abilities of heavy
duty Marine equipment as winches, hoists,
pumps, thrusters, dredgers, more!
MN#7 (49-55).qxd 7/2/2008 3:36 PM Page 55
Find Your Missing Piece
www.MaritimeJobs.com
The Industry's Essential Recruitment Tool
TARGETED
For nearly 70 years New Wave Media, producers of Mar-
itimeJobs.com, has commanded the marine marketplace
with its lead titles: Maritime Reporter & Engineering News,
MarineNews and Marine Technology Reporter
COST EFFECTIVE
Job postings start for just $150, with many different job
posting & resume search packages to fit most any need.
The more jobs you post, the more money you save
EFFICIENT
Post a Job today, get results today. In addition to traffic to
www.MaritimeJobs.com, new positions are promoted Elec-
tronically, Daily via www.MarineLink.com and to more than
25,000 subscribers of our daily e-mail news service from
www.MaritimeToday.com
EXPOSURE
MaritimeJobs.com generates results, recording 46,164 Vis-
its and 159,825 Pageviews per month.* The two biggest
hubs for visitors: Houston and Singapore
*March 2007 Report
To find out how you can harness the power of all that Mar-
itimeJobs.com has to offer, contact:
Dawn Trauthwein in the U.S. at +1.631.868.3575 or
Email: dtrauthwein@marinelink.com
MN#1 (49-64).qxd 1/8/2008 2:48 PM Page 55
Discover the Benefits of Become a FEATURED EMPLOYER at
MaritimeJobs.com
The Maritime Industry’s EXCLUSIVE • EFFICIENT • EFFECTIVE Recruitment Tool
For details contact: Dawn Trauthwein at dtrauthwein@marinelink.com
www.marinelink.com Marine News 57
MaritimeJobs Powered by www.maritimejobs.com
MARITIME INJURIES
Schechter, McElwee , Shaffer & Harris’s attorneys have over 70 years of com-
bined experience representing injured seamen, offshore workers and long-
shoremen in cases nationwide. Our services are on a contingent fee basis -
there is no bill or fee for our services unless we recover for you.
Schechter, McElwee, Shaffer & Harris, L.L.P.
Houston & Galveston, Texas
Nationwide 24-hour help line
1- 800 282- 2122
( 713) 524- 3500
Website - www.smslegal.com
ABs, CAPTAINS, ENGINEERS,
MATES, QMEDS, TANKERMAN
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A BETTER JOB?
LET US MAKE THE CONNECTION FOR YOU!!
EMPLOYERS LOOKING FOR A CREW?
PROGRESSIVE MARINE PERSONNEL SERVICE
TEXAS
(281) 689-7400 • FAX (281) 689-7711
LOUISIANA
(504) 834-1114 • FAX (504) 834-1181
E-mail: seamanconnection@aol.com
Qualified candidates should submit their resume
in confidence to:
Human Resource Dept.
Eastern Shipbuilding Group, Inc.
13300 Allanton Road
Panama City, Florida 32404
Phone: 850-522-7414
hr@easternshipbuilding.com
www.easternshipbuilding.com
EOE/DFWP
Eastern Shipbuilding Group, Inc.
An aggressive leader in the Shipbuilding Industry,
located in beautiful Panama City, Florida, has
immediate openings for the following positions:
Planner/Scheduler- Ship Construction experience
Estimator- Ship construction experience
Painter/Sandblaster Supervisor- Marine
Experience
Naval Architect
Eastern Shipbuilding Group offers a competitive
salary and Company Paid Health, Dental,
and Life Insurance
Lecturer (12)
SUNY Maritime College, located on the Throggs
Neck peninsula in the Bronx a short distance from
midtown Manhattan and Westchester, seeks bright
and enthusiastic individuals to help support the
mission of our college. We currently seek a Lecturer
to work in the Marine Transportation Department.
This is a twelve-month teaching position and the
ideal candidate will be assigned courses ranging
from Basic Safety Training to navigation as the
needs of the department dictate. S/he must also be
ready to teach deck license courses and Marine
Transportation electives as assigned by the
Chairman and consistent with their background
and expertise. Participation in two out of three
summer sea terms will be required. When not on
the summer sea term the incumbent will be
assigned teaching duties in the Professional
Education and Training Department or an
appropriate project.
Requirements: Minimum Bachelor’s degree with
management level license (Chief or Master) with
current sea time and STCW Certificate is preferred.
Candidates should have graduated from a maritime
college or have extensive commercial experience in
either the deep-sea or coastal towing industries.
Salary: $45,000 - $60,000
Application procedure: Letters with a CV
containing teaching and research plans, copies of
selected publications and a list of three or more
professional references should be sent
to hr@sunymaritime.edu, subject
heading “Lecturer - Marine
Transportation Dept”.
Position is open until filled.
www.sunymaritime.edu EEO/AA/ADA
THE VANE BROTHERS COMPANY is recruiting
qualified candidates for positions on our brand
new state-of-the-art marine transport vessels
operating along the Northeastern Atlantic
Seaboard. We offer highly favorable work
schedules – 2 weeks on – 2 weeks off, as well as
excellent opportunities for career advancement.
Tug Masters and Mates
Must possess a valid Master of Towing Vessels
near coastal or greater endorsement. Exper|ence
w|th petro|eum barges necessary. New York
Harbor experience preferred.
Mar|ne Eng|neers
Chief engineers for Coastal and Inland tugboats.
Must possess a valid DDE (Designated Duty
Engineers) license or greater. Valid MMD (Merchant
Marine Document) required. Two years engine
room experience required.
Tankermen
Current MMD and PIC endorsement required;
experience preferred.
If you have the skills and experience for any of our
open positions, please contact our F|eet Recru|ter
at 410-735-8212, or fax your resumé to 410-735-8280.
www.vanebrothers.com
VANE BROTHERS
Over a Century of Maritime Excellence
Baltimore Norfolk Philadelphia / /
Class MN July08.qxd 7/3/2008 10:33 AM Page 57
58 MN July 2008
Post Your Resume for Free • Energize Your Job Search @ MaritimeJobs.com
MaritimeJobs Powered by www.maritimejobs.com
Marine Superintendent
Job Location: USA, Miami
Join our team as a Marine Superintendent
!!
SUMMARY:
The qualified candidate will have continu-
ous contact and provide technical support
to the assigned ships as assigned by the
Director, Fleet Management. The alter-
nate Marine Superintendent, Electrical
(appointed by Director, Fleet Management)
will serve as deputy for this position.
ESSENTIAL DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:
• Keep the specified (or) assigned Marine
Superintendents, Technical updated of his
activities in the respective ships and coor-
dinate all major projects through that posi-
tion.
• Motivate ships personnel and encourage
teamwork and improvement.
• Maintain direct communication, including
frequent visits, with senior management
and the Marine Superintendent, Technical
to assist in the selection and installation of
machinery, equipment, and safety appli-
ances to ensure compliance with applica-
ble regulations, company safety, and envi-
ronmental policy.
• Support the repair and maintenance of
all RCI ships' electrical systems and over-
see drydock planning and technical budg-
ets of the Deck, Engine, and Hotel
Departments, in coordination with Marine
Superintendent, Technical.
• Work closely with the representatives
from various classification societies and
governing agencies which regulate the
operation of our ships.
• With the Marine Superintendent,
Technical, coordinate and ensure (well
within the time frame) from the flag state,
class association, or other government
bodies for any change to the construction
or equipment onboard.
• Study the efficiency of the ships' electri-
cal plants in cooperation with the ships'
Chief Electrician and propose long-term
investment plans for improvement of the
operation.
• Recommend equipment and designs for
future projects.
• Recommend and approve electrical
equipment for use onboard the ships.
• Be informed about available technical
research and projects, seek information
and evaluate new technology for use
onboard RCI ships, as well as institute test
programs on such equipment together
with ships' personnel.
• Give support to ensure all electrical
equipment and onboard procedures are in
compliance with applicable regulations,
class requirements and company policy.
• Support ships' Chief Electrician on elec-
trical maintenance.
• Advise on follow-up projects.
• Ensure in cooperation with the Marine
Superintendent, Technical, that technically
related incidents, failures and damages
are properly investigated and reported.
• Inspect and advise passenger entertain-
ment and communication systems.
• Give recommendations to Human
Resources Department regarding educa-
tion and training of ship electricians.
• Assist Marine Superintendents, Technical
with electrical guarantee matters.
AUTHORITY:
• Initiate action to prevent the occurrence
of any non-conformities relating to prod-
uct, process, and quality system in the
Marine Electrical area of responsibility.
• Identify and record any problems relating
to the product, process, and quality sys-
tem in the Marine Electrical area of
responsibility.
• Initiate, recommend or provide solutions
through designated channels in the Marine
Electrical area of responsibility.
• Verify the implementation of solutions in
the Marine Electrical area of responsibility.
• Control further processing, delivery, or
installation of nonconforming product until
the deficiency or unsatisfactory condition
has been corrected in the Marine Electrical
area of responsibility.
EDUCATION/SKILLS/EXPERIENCE:
• Bachelor Degree in Marine Engineering,
Mechanical Engineer or related field.
• Some Maritime experience preferred.
• May be required to Travel approximately
10 to 25% of the time or as directed.
Interested candidates should apply online
at http://royalcaribbean.hire.com.
Fairfield is known the world over for its development/use of advanced technology for both
acquisition and processing of seismic data utilized for Oil & Gas exploration. Our Seismic
crews work in the GOM out of Lafayette, LA.
Fairfield is Seeking experienced MARINE/SEISMIC Personnel
EQUAL TIME schedule ~ ACCRUED PAID TIME OFF
Fairfield pays a Generous Travel Allowance (up to $700/round trip) AND Monthly
Production/Safety Bonus (up to $500/month/person). Medical, Dental, Vision, Life & Disability
Benefits start DAY ONE. 401(k) savings plan & Company Match available after 90 days.
Other Positions we recruit for & will accept resumes
Master/Mate 28/28 USCG Lic/STCW-95/MMD/500+ Ton NC/O
A/B Seaman 28/28 MMD/STCW-95/A/B(Spec./Lim./Unlim.)
Accepting applications for following positions
QMED/Oiler 28/28 MMD/Oiler/STCW-95
Marine Eng. 28/28 USCG Lic./STCW-95/MMD/6000HP+
Compressor Mech. Air/Gas Comp./Diesel Motor Exp.
Marine Diesel Mech. Diesel/Hydraulic/Pneumatic Mech. Exp.
Successful candidates complete criminal background checks, drug tests, medical physicals
& agility testing. Must possess or qualify to obtain T.W.I.C. Document.
Forward resume, salary history, & marine documents to Jeff Hodge for consideration.
E-mail: jhodge@fairfield.com Fax: 337.232.2313
Questions? Call 281.615.8499 for Jeff Hodge. Toll free @ 800.231.9809 Ext. 7642
Fairfield Careers: http://www.fairfield.com/careers/
Fleet: http://www.fairfield.com/services/data%20acquisition/fleet/
Fairfield is an EOE
Class MN July08.qxd 7/3/2008 1:34 PM Page 58
www.marinelink.com Marine News 59
Vessels for Sale
Southern
Recycling
We buy barges, ships, and other marine vessels
and structures for scrap.
We adhere to the highest ES&H standards.
Serving the rivers and coasts of the U.S.
MOBILE • MORGAN CITY • NEW ORLEANS
Call 800-GO SCRAP ext.506
usa
Post Your Resume for Free • Energize Your Job Search @ MaritimeJobs.com
MaritimeJobs Powered by www.maritimejobs.com
Royal Caribbean International is an Equal
Opportunity Employer. Employment may
be subject to criminal background check,
physical examinations, drug testing, and
reference checks.
Recruiter
Royal Caribbean Cruises, Ltd
Miami FL USA
Email: MEspin-Sanchez@rccl.com
Web: http://royalcaribbean.hire.com
FERRY BOAT CAPTAIN
Job Location: USA, Long Island City, NY
Water's Edge Restaurant
The East River at 44th Drive
Long Island City, NY 11101
Looking for Experienced Ferry Boat
Captain
for Shuttle Service.
50 Ton Inland License Required
Wed Through Sat. Evenings
Please call Kathleen Thelian 718 482-
0033
Kathleen Thelian
Water's Edge Restaurant
The East River at 44th Drive
Long Island City NY 11101 USA
Phone: 718 482-0033
Fax: 718 937 8817
Email: watersedge11@netzero.com
RELIEF CREW
Job Location: USA, Fort Pierce, Florida
Ship & Submersible Support Harbor
Branch Oceanographic @ Florida Atlantic
University
Relief Crew - All Positions - Job #600000
RC
Go to www.fau.edu > Administration >
Human Resources > Job Opportunities >
Search Postings.
Ship information at www.hboi.edu.
Florida Atlantic University
Harbor Branch Oceanographic @ FAU
5600 US 1 North
Fort Pierce FL 34946 USA
Email: DMonday@hboi.fau.edu
Class MN July08.qxd 7/3/2008 2:32 PM Page 59
Sizes 15 lbs. to the NEW 4,000 lbs.
Designed to dig into the bottom and achieve
holding power 10 times its weight at 3:1 scope
To hold boats, docks, nav. aids, nets, cables,
aquaculture pens. One lb. of Dor-Mor can
replace 10 lbs. of concrete.
SI NCE 1988
DOR-MOR
®
Pyramid Mooring Anchors
Dor-Mor, Inc.
P. O. Box 461, Claremont, NH 03743
PHONE/FAX 603-542-7696
www.Dor-Mor.com
info@Dor-Mor.Com
60 MN July 2008
US Coast Guard Approved
(STCW-95) Basic Safety Training
• Basic Safety Training
• Medical PIC
• Proficiency in Survival
Craft
• Tankerman PIC
• Advance Firefighter
• All Modules available
at one location
El Camino College
Workplace Learning Resource Center
13430 Hawthorne Blvd. · Hawthorne, CA 90250
Ten (10) minutes from LAX · Twenty (20) minutes from LA Harbor
Call for Information & Registration
(310) 973-3171/47 • www.businessassist.org
• Hazmat Dangerous Cargo Transportation
Marine Marketplace
SEA WOLF MARINE
TRANSPORTATION, LLC
Contact:
Ph: (201) 852-2276
Fax: (201) 339-0177
E-Mail: seawolfmarine6@aol.com
Website: www.seawolfmarine.net
Barges for Lease or Charter
• 4000 Ton Cap Hopper Barge
• 900 Ton Cap Deck Barge
• 30 Ton Cap Derrick Barge/Dredge (3 Spuds)
• 400-1400 HP Tugs
Complete Marine Transportation Problems Solved
DO YOU OPERATE DETROIT DIESELS?
8V92 12V71 12V92 16V149
This is a MUST HAVE for Each Engine!
Raw Water Flow
Coolant Pressure
Coolant Temp
Oil Pressure
Crankcase Pressure RPM
Flight Systems Model
551 Marine Engine Saver
Specifically Designed for
DETROIT DIESELS
$1599 Factory Direct
Details at www.flightsystems.com
PAYS FOR ITSELF AGAIN AND AGAIN
Monitors:
Vessels for Sale
MARITIME M.A.D, Inc.
Mergers, Acquisitions & Divestures
www.maritimemad.com
Are you ready to sell your business or are you
ready to expand your business through a
merger or acquisition?
We focus on the maritime industry worldwide.
Contact : Capt. Johan Schild, M.Mar./MBA
7226 Bridgewood Lane
Spanish Fort, 36527
Ph: 251-626-0713
Cell: 504-650-5000
Fax: 251-447-0423
E-mail: info@maritimemad.com
Class MN July08.qxd 7/3/2008 10:34 AM Page 60
www.marinelink.com MN 61
NEW PRODUCTS
Marine Marketplace
PORTABLE
DIESEL EMERGENCY EMERGENCY PUMP PUMP
DIESEL AMERICA WEST with over 25 years of experi-
ence offers a QUALITY ocean service, emergency de-watering -
transfer - trash pump that is portable - rugged - & light weight.
A Serious, Portable, Saltwater Service Emergency Pump
Diesel America West Inc.
P.O. Box 968, Friday Harbor, WA 98250
Phone (800) 343-7351 or (360) 378-4182
Fax (360) 378-3315 (24hr line)
www.dawest.com
● #304 Stainless Steel Frame (1” welded sq. tube)
● Heavy Duty “Non-Metalic” Trash Pump End
● Seal is Severe Service s/Steel & Viton Shaft Seal
● YANMAR 5 & 7 H.P. Diesels, Aircooled
● 2” x 2” or 3” x 3” N.P.T. ● 42 P.S.I. Max
● Heavy Duty Vibration Isolators
● Long Life Marine Components Throughout
Sea water intake filters,
strainers and screens
888-526-7795
Yankee Wire Cloth Products, Inc.
221 W. Main St.,
West Lafayette OH 43845
Fax: 740-545-6323
www.yankeewire.com
The Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation is conducting
a sealed bid surplus sale for one (1) derrickboat, Simonsen. Former
Navy YD type, 60 ton floating crane, length - 142 ft 0 in; beam - 58 ft
0 in; draft - approximately 12 ft; Cummins diesel 200KW/600 Amp
main generator; AC generator through rectifier for DC power; 2 aux-
iliary generators; John Deere 4.5L fire pump; 3 spud wells; wildcats
fore and a ft; galley equipment includes microwave, coffee pot, DC
stove, refrigerator, 4 sinks, tables and chairs; machine shop with belt
driven DC motor lathe, drill press & grinders; running lights on crane;
1,000 gallon holding tanks; air operated clutch, 30 HP, 240 V DC drive
winches. Public bid opening will be conducted on Wednesday, July
23, 2008.
A bid package may be obtained at the Corporation’s reception desk,
180 Andrews Street, Massena, NY or requested by telephone to
315-764-3236, facsmile to 315-764-3268 or email to
Patricia.White@sls.dot.gov.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
** MINIMUM BID $450,000.00 (US FUNDS) **
Marine Digital Measurements
Laser Hull Scanning
3D Modelling
3D Measure Inc.
info@3dmeasure.com • www.3dmeasure.com
Tel: 401-848-4575 • Fax: 401-848-4574
SUBSALVE USA
P.O. Box 2030
North Kingstown, RI 02852 USA
Ph: (401) 884-8801 Toll Free: (800) 466-6962
Fx: (401) 884-8868
www.SUBSALVE.com
Richard@Subsalve.com
UNDERWATER LIFT BAGS
ENGINEERED FROM THE BOTTOM UP!
Available in lift capacities
from 25 lbs. to 77,000 lbs.
in open bottom and
enclosed models.
Large inventory, ABS
approved, IMCA Compliant.
The World’s Leading Manufacturer of Underwater Lift Bags
WWW.ATLASSINSURANCE.COM
ESTABLI SHED 1981
MARINE
INSURANCE
QUOTE LINES
FT. LAUDERDALE 800.330.3370
COCOA, FL 800.959.3313
NEWPORT, RI 866.669.0344
YACHTS
POWER
& SAIL
Value $25,000 to $100,000,000
Worldwide including Florida
& Caribbean coverage
“A” rated security
MARINAS
& BOAT
DEALERS
All Liabilities & Property
Includes Piers & Docks
“A” rated security
CHARTER
BOATS
Insuring crewed and
bareboat charters
“A” rated security
USCG License Software
Affordable - Merchant Marine Exam Training
http://hawsepipe.net
Freelance Software, 39 Peckham Place, Bristol RI 02809
(401)556-1955 – sales@hawsepipe.net
Complete Potable Water Treatment
FDA Approved Systems In Stock
Purification/Filtration
731-645-3222
Controlled Water Systems, Inc.
This 12" Direct Drive Electric Blower Delivers 2450 CFM Of Air
Movement. Comes With Industrial Grade Grounded Cord, Easy to
Carry Handle, Cord Storage Wrap and On/Off Switch. Excellent
For Confined Space Applications Throughout Your Hull. Popular
for Man Cooling Supply Air, and Fume Exhausting During
Construction or Maintenance of Your Vessel, Flexible Ducting
Available for Both Air Supply and Fume Extraction Applications
Regular Price: $308.00 Sale Price: $228.00
Standard Equipment Company, Inc
P.O. Box 2108, Mobile, Al 36652
Toll Free 800-239-3442 • Fax 251-438-3642
Email: blowers@standardequipmentco.com
www.standardequipmentco.com
SECO Air Hog 12" Economy Blower
Class MN July08.qxd 7/3/2008 10:35 AM Page 61
PROFESSIONALS
62 MN July 2008
Marine Marketplace
NEW PRODUCTS
PORTABLE
DIESEL FIRE FIRE PUMP PUMP
DIESEL AMERICA WEST with over 25 years of experi-
ence offers a QUALITY ocean service, lightweight, porable
diesel fire pump that exeeds U.S.C.G. specifications!
A Serious, Portable, Saltwater Service Fire Pump
Diesel America West Inc.
P.O. Box 968, Friday Harbor, WA 98250
Phone (800) 343-7351 or (360) 378-4182
Fax (360) 378-3315 (24hr line)
www.dawest.com
● #304 Stainless Steel Frame (1” welded sq. tube)
● Pump End w/Bronze Impeller
● Severe Service s/Steel & Viton Shaft Seal
● YANMAR 7 H.P. Diesel Aircooled Engine
● 2” x 2” N.P.T. ● 150 G.P.M. ● 90 P.S.I.
● Heavy Duty Vibration Isolators
● Long Life Marine Components Throughout
PANEL SPECIALISTS, INC.
John C.G. Hutchison, Marine Sales Manager
www.panelspec.com
B-15, C, A-60 INTERIOR JOINER PANEL SYSTEMS
CERTIFIED by SOLAS, IMO, FTP CODE, EU MED, USCG, TRANSPORT CANADA
METAL CORE
by
&
Sales
Toll Free: (800) 540-5503
Tel: (813) 340-3940
Fax: (813) 264-2507
sales@ThermaxMarine.com
Sales & Production
3115 Range Road
Temple, Texas 76504
Tel: (254) 774-9800
www.ThermaxMarine.com
THERMAX PANELS
Non-Combustible, Non-Toxic
TRAIN AT MPT
USCG Courses
All Deck Modules available,
including:
• S.M.A.R.T.
®
Simulation
• All STCW requirements
• RFPNW / AB
• OICNW (Mate)
• Upgrades to Master 200/500/3000
• Unlimited tonnage licenses
• Oceans Endorsements
• Towing Programs
• License Renewal Courses
• Practical Assessments
All Engineer Modules available,
including:
• QMED
• Assistant Engineer & DDE
• Chief Engineer
STCW & ISPS
Internationally Recognized
All Modules available, including:
• STCW Basic Safety Training
• Radar & ARPA
• GMDSS
• ECDIS
• Advanced Firefighting
• PSC/Lifeboatman
• Bridge Resource Management
• Crowd & Crisis Management
• Tankerman
• Fast Rescue Boat
• Medical First Aid
• Medical PIC Care at Sea
• ISPS SSO/CSO/PFSO
• Onboard Courses
• And Many More!
Maritime Professional Training
Masters, Mates and Engineers, Inc.
1915 South Andrews Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316
Ph: +1.954.525.1014
Toll Free: 1.888.839.5025
Email: info@MPTusa.com
Website: www.MPTusa.com
Son of a Sea-Cook
Workboat Cooking School
Offered through Sea School
1-800-BEST-ONE 237-8663
Chef Bilgepump Says:
28-day hands-on course preparing onboard
cooks or supply boats, tow boats and oil rigs.
Tuition includes room and board at coed cam-
pus in Mobile Alabama.
Job placement assis-
tance provided.
“We Train Cooks for
Oil Field and Tug Boats.
We Ain’t No Culinary
Arts School.”
Professional series marine bolsters.
New shock-mitigated seats available.
Visit www.bolsters.com for more info
One and two-man seats in tall or standard heights
Standing Leaning Sitting
Seat changes easily between three positions
All stainless steel frames.
Three positions for safety
and comfort
Security Structures LLC
5188 Chesapeake Ave
Shady Side, MD, 20764
410-867-3516
email - edick@erols.com
Class MN July08.qxd 7/3/2008 10:35 AM Page 62
www.marienlink.com MN 63
TUGS/BARGES FOR RENT
BARGES SIZED FROM 8’x18’ TO
45’x120’ ALSO “SHUGART”
SECTIONAL BARGES
“TRUCKABLE TUGS” HERE
S mi t h B r o t h e r s I n c . , S mi t h B r o t h e r s I n c . ,
Ga l e s v i l l e , MD 2 0 7 6 5 Ga l e s v i l l e , MD 2 0 7 6 5
( 4 1 0 ) 8 6 7 - 1 8 1 8 ( 4 1 0 ) 8 6 7 - 1 8 1 8
www www . s mi t h b a r g e . c o m . s mi t h b a r g e . c o m
BARGES FOR RENT
PROFESSIONALS
Business Buyouts • Buyer Searches • Valuations
18 years experience and always confidential
The Moran Group at BTI
Tony Moran
(925) 609-9100 ext 333
tony@btigroupma.com www.btigroupma.com
Marine Mergers & Acquisitions (973) 984-2295 • Fax: (973) 984-5181
E-mail: mowbraytug@aol.com
Equipment Sales
MOWBRAY’S
Marine Surveyor Course and Training
Standards based training for all vessels.
1-800-245-4425
www.navsurvey.com
NAVAL ARCHITECTS,
MARINE, MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
701 Fifth Avenue, Suite 1200 Phone: 206-768-1515
Seattle, WA 98104 http://www.gpai.com
Ideas Engineered Into Reality
GUIDO PERLA & ASSOCIATES, INC.
Total Ship Design
• Naval Architecture/
Marine Engineering
• Ship and Boat Design
• Pre-Contract Support
• Plan Review
• Construction Management
An employee-owned company providing expert services
to Ship Owners, Operators and Builders worldwide.
4300 King Street, Suite 101
Alexandria,VA 22302
703.933.6761 or 843.342.5922
dmcmullen@alionscience.com
www.alionscience.com/maritime
JJMA MARITIME SECTOR
Aligned with your needs.
• In-Service Surveys
and Engineering
• Special Projects
• Program and
Acquisition Management
• Modeling and Simulation
Specializing in the shipping of aggregates and
construction materials in the Caribbean, U.S.
East Coast, Bahamas, Gulf of Mexico, as well as
ocean crossings and salvage. All barges have
steel bin walls and hydraulic stern ramps
Average vessel age….4 years. Barge capaci-
ties….2000 tons to 8800 tons. Barge sizes 180ft.
to 300ft. Tugs to 2400hp. Vessels are ABS in
class, not Jones act, and foreign flagged in
Antigua. They are able to call on all U.S. ports.
Contact owner Ship7 Maritime, LTD
Captain Paul Carpenter
(203) 374-5779 • Email: pcarpenter@ship7.com
www.ship7.com
TUG AND BARGE SERVICES
Marine Marketplace
Class MN July08.qxd 7/3/2008 10:36 AM Page 63
64 MN July 2008
The listings above are an editorial service provided for the convenience of our readers.
If you are an advertiser and would like to update or modify any of the above information, please contact: productionmanager@marinelink.com
ADVERTISER INDEX
Page# Advertiser Website Phone#
Page# Advertiser Website Phone#
45 A.C. MARINE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Please call us at (732) 577-8877
C2 ALL TECHNOLOGIES INTEGRATED . . www.alltechnologiesintegrated.com (504) 324-8686
5 CHEVRON GLOBAL LUBRICANTS . . . . . . . . . www.chevron.com (800) 533-6571
9 CUMMINS, INC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.marine.cummins.com please visit our website
43 CWF HAMILTON & Co LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.hamiltonjet.co.nz please visit our website
11 DAVID CLARK CO. INC, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.davidclark.com (800) 298-6235
36 DEFELSKO CORP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.defelsko.com (315) 393-4450
45 GLADDING HEARN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.gladdinghearn.com (508) 676-8596
15,37 GLOBAL MARINE POWER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.globalmarinepower.com (713) 640-9300
46 GREAT AMERICAN INSURANCE www.GreatAmericanInsurance.com (212) 510-0135
47 HARCO MANUFACTURING CO. www.harcomanufacturing.com (800) 394-7571
19 HAYATA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.hayata.com (877) 785-8437
42 INTERNATIONAL BOAT & MARINE www.MarineAuctionServices.com (605) 510-1888
39 JEPPESEN MARINE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.jeppesen.com (888) 272-6217
47 JMS NAVAL ARCHITECTS & SALVAGE ENGINEERS www.jmsnet.com (860) 448-4850
1 KOIKE ARONSON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.koike.com (800) 252-5232
33 LLEBROC INDUSTRIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.helm-chair.com (800) 284-5771
49 M&L ENGINE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.mlengine.com (985) 857-8000
49 MARINERS HOUSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.marinershouse.org (617) 227-3979
36 MCDONOUGH MARINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.McDonoughmarine.com (504) 780-8100
40 MOOSE BOATS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.mooseboats.com (866) 466-6673
13 NIGHT VISION TECHNOLOGIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.nvti-usa.com/mn (972) 554-3944
21 NORTH RIVER BOATS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.northriverboats.com (800) 413-6351
17 NORTHERN LIGHTS/LUGGER . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.northern-lights.com (800) 762-0165
26 OSG. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.osgcareers.com please visit our website
C3 OceanTechExpo 2008. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.oceantechexpo.com (561) 732-4368
11 PROTECH ARMORED PRODUCTS, INC. . . . . www.protecharmored.com (413) 445-4000
47 PSI MARINE, INC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.tideslide.com (800) 780-6094
C4 R.W. FERNSTRUM & C0. INC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.fernstrum.com (906) 863-5553
55 ROBERTS ELECTRIC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.hydraulicbargains.com (312) 829-1365
42 SKOOKUM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.skookumco.com (503) 651-3175
15 Smi GROUP LIMITED. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.smii-online.co.uk 44 (0) 207 827 6162
29 SNAME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.snameexpo.com (561) 732-4368
25 ST. JOHN’s SHIPBUILDING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.stjohnsshipbuilding.com (386) 328-6054
47 SUNY MARITIME COLLEGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.sunymaritime.edu/ce (718) 409-7341
7 TIDEWATER INC.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Please call us at (504) 568-1010
42 TUTOR-SALIBA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Please call us at (818) 362-8391
41 ULTRADYNAMICS LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.ultradynamics.com (614) 759-9000
23 WATERMAN SUPPLY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.watermansupply.com (310) 522-9698
3 WESTERN FIRE & SAFETY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.westernfireandsafety.com (206) 782-7825
39 WING INFLATABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.wing.com (707) 826-2887
Index page MN July08.qxd 7/7/2008 10:42 AM Page 1
C2 C3 & C4.qxd 6/11/2008 3:33 PM Page 3
MN#4 C2 C3 & C4.qxd 4/4/2008 11:18 AM Page 3

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->