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Wednesday, July 20, 2011

DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Cameron, Murdoch grilled by
Parliament, p11
NFL closer to labor
agreement, p6
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Business 8
Classifieds 9
TV 10
World News 11
Index
Sunny and
excessively
hot and humid
Thursday with
high in upper
90s. See page 2.
www.delphosherald.com
1
Putnam County Dog
Warden Mike Schroth reminds
residents of Fort Jennings,
Ottoville, Kalida, Rimer and
Rushmore that he will begin
inspecting for dog tags in those
communities on Monday.
Dog owners are required to
have dogs older than three
months registered if owned for
more than 30 days. The state
requires all dogs to have cur-
rent tags and for those tags to
be on the canine. Charges can
be filed for failure to register
your dog. Tags are available
at the county auditor’s office
on the second floor of the
courthouse between 8:30 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.
For information, call the dog
warden at 419-523-8617 or
the auditor at 419-523-6686.
Dog warden to
check for tags
Delphos City Schools will
hold a mandatory OHSAA par-
ent meeting at 7 p.m. July 27 in
the Middle School auditorium.
This meeting is for all parents
of Jefferson athletes, in grades
7-12, who are also required to
attend as well. All sports are
asked to attend — not just fall
sports. Items to be covered
include eligibility, rules and
regulations, conduct and more.
Mandatory
meeting for
athletes, parents
BY STACY TAFF
staff@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS—The Elida Local Schools
Board of Education convened Tuesday eve-
ning for its monthly meeting in the commu-
nity meeting room of the new high school
building.
“We’ve been having a lot of tours and I
really think we’re going to continue to have
people coming through here pretty regu-
larly over at least the next couple of years,”
Superintendent Don Diglia said. “The build-
ing is a really good structural example for the
contractors we used on the project as well, so I
think we can expect them to have some people
come through and check things out.”
Treasurer Joel Parker recently led a tour
through the building and said so far there has
been nothing but positive feedback.
“I really think they were all impressed,” he
said. “They really enjoyed the auditorium and
the science classrooms and the greenhouses
and seemed to appreciate the amount of plan-
ning that went into a lot of the things we did
with the building.”
The new high school will be open for class-
es this fall. Meanwhile, the old high school is
in the process of being demolished to make
way for extended Fieldhouse parking.
In other business, the board approved
the following personnel for employment:
Certified— Kristy Lehmkuhl, special edu-
cation teacher, effective August 26, 2011,
Vickie Schafer, first grade teacher, effec-
tive August 26, 2011; Non-Certified— Paula
Frankhouser, bus driver, effective August
30, 2011; Supplemental — Perry Luhn, high
school drama advisor.
The following substitute teachers were
approved for employment: Ann Bercaw,
Debra Berg-Simon, Randy Boratko, Tammy
First school board meeting held
at new Elida high school
BY SANDY LANGHALS
FORT JENNINGS —
At the Fort Jennings regu-
lar council meeting Tuesday
night, a park board represen-
tative informed council that a
group of 16 volunteers helped
to retrieve 10 picnic tables
that were washed downstream
during the spring floods.
He stated that an Eagle
Scout, Logan Sickles, and a
Girl Scout, Katie Schnipke,
are going to refurbish all 18
of the picnic tables at the
park. They will remove the
wood boards, sand and paint
the metal frames and replace
boards with new wood. He
was told that they would have
them ready for the FJ Park
Party that will be held this
weekend.
He added that everything
will be ready for the party
this weekend, noting that
the canoe race will happen
regardless of the Auglaize
River water level.
Separately, the council
approved the 2012 budget and
discussed some maintenance
issues around town. Mayor
Jim Smith advised council
that he was told there was a
tile by the softball diamond
that is in need of repair and
the building by the IGA needs
to be repainted. Even further,
there were concerns about
weeds growing up on Water
and Main streets that need to
be taken care of before Motor
Madness weekend. Smith
would like to make the town
look nice before that event in
a few weeks.
Council agreed to help
the Bluffton Lion’s Club sell
tickets for a Corvette dur-
ing Motor Madness weekend.
Half of the money from the
ticket sales during the event
will be donated by Bluffton
to the town. Council decided
the proceeds would be given
to the park board.
It was decided that coun-
cil would purchase a 48-inch,
4,000-pound capacity, green
fork attachment for the trac-
tor. This is a piece of equip-
ment that will benefit the
town and be useful in many
ways.
Council member, Jeff
Swick informed council
that a community member
approached him about a prop-
erty in the middle of town
that is an eye sore. Swick was
wondering if there wasn’t
something that could be done
about possibly having the
owner donate the property to
the town or purchasing the
property and turn it into a
much-needed parking lot.
They discussed the possibly
Scouts chip in to
repair park tables
Stacy Taff photo
From left, Superintendent Don Diglia gives his report as board members Brian
Anders, Dennis Fricke and board President Brenda Stocker listen.
Fort Jennings Council
Elida School Board
By TAMMY WEBBER
Associated Press
CHICAGO — For mil-
lions of people enduring this
week’s extreme heat and
humidity, it feels like they’re
living in a pressure cooker.
And in a sense, they are.
Much of the United States
is trapped under a heat “dome”
caused by a huge area of high
pressure that’s compressing
hot, moist air beneath it, lead-
ing to miserable temperatures
in the mid-90s to low 100s and
heat-index levels well above
100 degrees. The oppres-
sive conditions extend from
the northern Plains states to
Texas and from Nebraska to
the Ohio Valley. And they’re
expanding eastward.
“It’s hot no matter what
you’re doing or where you
are,” said Tim Prader, a
50-year-old construction
worker who was taking a
break Tuesday at a job site
in St. Louis. Although his
huge Caterpillar excava-
tor has air conditioning, he
couldn’t entirely escape.
“When you’re done for the
day, you’re ready to eat, drink
and hit the couch.”
When a high pressure sys-
tem develops in the upper
atmosphere, the air below it
sinks and compresses because
there’s more weight on top,
causing temperatures in the
lower atmosphere to heat up,
said Eli Jacks, a meteorologist
with the National Weather
Service in Silver Springs,
Md.
The dome of high pressure
also pushes the jet stream and
its drier, cooler air, farther
north — it’s now well into
Canada — while hot, humid
air from the Gulf of Mexico
circulates clockwise around
the dome, traveling farther
inland than normal.
Combined with generally
clear skies and the sun’s high-
er summertime angle, “it gets
really hot,” Jacks said.
That also explains why
temperatures in, say, North
Dakota this week aren’t all
that different from tempera-
tures in Houston, he said. The
big difference is that people
in Houston are accustomed
to hot weather, while those in
the north are not.
“In places where the high-
est temperature you ever
expect is in the 80s and you’re
at 102, there are big health
concerns,” because fewer
people have air conditioning
or fans, Jacks said. “Heat is
the No. 1 killer out of all
weather hazards.”
What’s more, because of
the humidity, even nighttime
brings little relief.
“It’s been 100 degrees at
11 o’clock, lately, at night,”
said Curtis Mark, who was
servicing air conditioners
Tuesday at the Greer County
Courthouse in Mangum,
Okla., where the tempera-
ture was 106 degrees at noon.
“Stay indoors is about all I
do.”
Fellow Oklahoman Norma
Lauer of Granite said she puts
cold water on her hands and
arms before going to bed and
Heat ‘dome’ traps much
of US in pressure cooker
Ford Lima Engine Plant retirees work on a wheelchair ramp at 1229 N. Main Street
Tuesday morning. The Ford UAW ramp crew volunteers have built around 600 ramps
in the area in twelve years. To make a donation to the crew, send to the Lima facility
in care of Mark Ammon.
Stacy Taff photo
See FT. JENNINGS page 2
See HEAT page 2
See ELIDA page 2
Delphos midget
football sign-ups planned
Sign-ups for the 2011
Delphos midget football
season will run from 6-7
p.m. Aug. 1 at the Stadium
Park shelterhouse.
This is for anyone-
between ages 9-12 not
currently on a team.
You must be 9 by or on
Sept. 1 and no older than 12.
Try-outs will be from
6-7 p.m. Aug. 8-9 near
Stadium Park Diamond 4.
Contact Ron Ebbeskotte
at (419) 692-7191 with
any questions.
Retirees pitch in to help resident
Due to air conditioning
issues, the Interfaith Thrift
Shop will only be open
from 5-6 p.m. Thursday,
1-2 p.m. Thursday and
9-11 a.m. Saturday.
Thrift shop
hours change
for this weekend
2
Packard Grille’s Tribute To Lazarus Café
Elida Road, Lima Next to WENDY’S
Ph. 419-225-PACK
Available on lunch and dinner combinations, seven days a week.
*Subject to availability.
• Broccoli Raisin Salad
• Famous Chicken Salad
• Broccoli Mushroom Chowder
• Bread Pudding with Whiskey Sauce
Featuring 4 Lazarus Favorites
SUMMER SEALERS
419-238-2266
DRIVEWAYS
COMMERCIAL LOTS
PROFESSIONAL STRIPING
HOT RUBBER CRACK FILLER
Take home...
BBQ BEEF
for quick meals, sandwiches...
Only
$
3
00
Lb.
Available anytime
SHREDDED CHICKEN...
$
3.00 lb.
Balyeat’s Coffee Shop
133 E. Main St. Van Wert Ph. 419-238-1580
Closed Mondays
THE PROFESSIONALS
WINDOWS • ROOFING • SIDING • FENCING
• Garage Doors & Operators • Entrance & Storm Doors
• Wood • Steel • Painting Available • Insulation • Aluminum Railing
• Awnings • Rubber Roofing • Decks • Fence
1034 Westwood Dr.
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
Phone: (419) 238-9795
Fax: (419) 238-9893
Toll Free: (800) 216-0041
YOUR HOME IMPROVEMENT STORE
419-238-9795
S
i
n
c
e

1
9
6
0
The Quality Door Place
Across from Delphos Swimming Pool
333 North St., Delphos, OH
FIT CAMP
FOR KIDS
August 1
st
-5
th
Kids Camp 10am-noon
Kids ages 9-12 will learn about fitness
and nutrition in a fun way.
T-shirt and snacks provided.
Pre-register 419-695-7325
Kids Camp run by:
Kelbi
personal trainer
2 – The Herald Wednesday, July 20, 2011
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARY
FUNERAL
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
TODAY
IN HISTORY
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 31
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $2.09
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Tony Rahrig
brings his wealth
management
experience to US
We are pleased to welcome Tony Rahrig to our team
of fnancial experts in the Delphos and Wapakoneta
communities. As a Financial Advisor with U.S. Bancorp
Investments, Inc., Tony will use his expertise to help
individuals and families build, preserve and transfer
their wealth.
Learn how Tony or our other local Financial
Advisors can help you achieve your fnancial dreams.
Tony Rahrig, CFP
®

Financial Advisor
901 Elida Ave
Delphos, OH 45833
419.692.1171
Investment products and services are offered through U.S. Bancorp
Investments, Inc. member FINRA and SIPC, an investment adviser and
brokerage subsidiary of U.S. Bancorp. U.S. Bancorp Investments, Inc. is
not a tax advisor. When it is appropriate you are encouraged to seek
professional tax or legal advice. 0311200
NOT A DEPOSIT NOT FDIC INSURED NOT GUARANTEED BY THE BANK
NOT INSURED BY ANY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AGENCY MAY LOSE VALUE
Maxine R. Hanjora
Delphos weather
Corn: $7.63
Wheat: $6.78
Beans: $13.87
Maxine R. Hanjora, 82,
of Kemp, died at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday at her residence.
Services will begin at 10:30
a.m. Saturday at Thomas
E. Bayliff Funeral Home in
Spencerville, where friends
may call after 2 p.m. Friday
and other arrangements are
incomplete.
The high temperature
Tuesday in Delphos was 93
and the low was 77. A year
ago today, the high was 83
and the low was 71. The
record high for today is 102,
set in 1934 and the record low
of 47 was set in 1944.
CRoft, Robert W. ser-
vices will begin at 11 a.m.
Thursday at Thomas E. Bayliff
Funeral Home, the Rev. David
W. Howell will officiate.
Burial will be in Spencerville
Cemetery, with military rites
by Spencerville Veterans.
Friends may call from 2-4
and 6-8 p.m. Wednesday at
the funeral home.
Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to the
Spencerville Veterans
Memorial Park Fund.
WEAtHER foRECASt
tri-county
Associated Press
Excessive Heat Warning
in effect until 8 a.m. friday.
toNIGHt: Mostly
clear. Lows in the mid 70s.
Southwest winds 5 to 10
mph.
tHURSDAY: Very hot and
humid. Mostly sunny. Highs
in the upper 90s. Southwest
winds 5 to 15 mph.
tHURSDAY NIGHt:
Mostly clear. Lows in the mid
70s. West winds around 10
mph.
fRIDAY: Partly cloudy
with a 20 percent chance of
showers and storms. Highs in
the mid 90s.
fRIDAY NIGHt: Mostly
clear. Lows in the mid 70s.
SAtURDAY: Partly
cloudy. Highs in the mid 90s.
SAtURDAY NIGHt:
Mostly clear. Lows in the mid
70s.
SUNDAY, SUNDAY
NIGHt: Partly cloudy with
a 30 percent chance of show-
ers and thunderstorms. Highs
in the lower 90s. Lows in the
lower 70s.
MoNDAY: Partly cloudy.
Highs in the upper 80s.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Tuesday:
Mega Millions
02-09-10-16-35, Mega
Ball: 40
Estimated jackpot: $43
million
Megaplier
4
Pick 3 Evening
8-0-6
Pick 4 Evening
8-3-8-4
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $76
million
Rolling Cash 5
03-12-25-27-37
Estimated jackpot:
$130,000
ten oH Evening
06-10-11-14-15-21-28-32-
40-41-47-51-53-60-61-64-68-
71-77-79
then lies down “without cover-
ing up on the bed, under the
fan” and with the air conditioner
running.
Thunderstorms can develop
around the perimeter of the
dome — called the “ring of fire”
— bringing temporary relief to
some areas, said Kevin Birk,
a National Weather Service
meteorologist in Illinois. But this
dome is so large that the heat
rebuilds quickly, Birk said.
While heat domes aren’t
uncommon, this one is unusu-
al because of its size and dura-
tion. It began three days ago
and may last seven to 10 days
in some locations. And it’s
moving eastward, with tem-
peratures expected to reach
100 degrees in Washington by
Thursday.
National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
records show that the United
States broke 25 local high
records for the date on Monday,
including 103 degrees in both
Edgemont S.D., and Victoria,
Texas.
On Tuesday, it was 102 in
Manhattan, Kan., and Valentine,
Neb. The mercury rose to 100 in
Joplin, Mo., and Rockford, Ill.
— which tied that city’s record
for the date set in 1930. And
in some cities it will be even
hotter today: Chicago reached
93 degrees Tuesday, with 97
forecast for today.
But relief is on the way.
Cooler air should begin moving
into the Plains states this week-
end, as a strong pool of air from
the jet stream begins to push hot
air out of the way in the Dakotas
and into Minnesota before mak-
ing its way east. By Monday,
temperatures will drop into the
mid-80s in the north, while they
still could be sweltering in the
East, he said.
“This is really an exceptional
event, I think it’s fair to say ...
in terms of scope and duration,”
he said.
Sweet corn grower Ron
Deardorff of Adel, Iowa, is ready
for a break in the weather.
The 64-year-old spent
Tuesday morning helping his
crew of 24 pick corn in the field
and by noon was driving the
harvest to a grocery store in Des
Moines — with a temperature of
95 degrees, a heat index of 105
and no air conditioning.
“Sometimes I have to change
shirts in the middle of the day
or middle of the afternoon and
get a dry one, “ said Deardoff,
who kept his truck vents wide
open and the windows rolled
down. “It’s no fun and nobody
likes it, but the season is only so
long and when the corn’s ready,
it’s ready. You just have to go
after it and do what you’ve got
to do.”
of talking with township offi-
cials to see if they would be
interested in a joint effort to
address the issue.
Smith told council he
would approach the owner but
he wasn’t sure about spend-
ing the money to turn it into a
parking lot.
Lastly, Smith brought up
Christmas lights and asked
council if it wanted the stars
and bells put up this year. He
stated that they would have
the expense of rewrapping
them and they would need to
purchase smaller led lights.
He also threw out the idea
of the town paying for part
of new Christmas decorations
and asking for donations for
the rest. After much discus-
sion, it was decided not to do
anything with them this year
and next year they will look at
their options.
The next Fort Jennings
Council meeting will be held
at 7:30 p.m. on Aug. 16.
fort Jennings
(Continued from page 1)
Elida
Heat
(Continued from page 1)
By SEBAStIAN ABBot
Associated Press
ISLAMABAD —
Desperate to win hearts and
minds in Pakistan, the U.S. has
begun pushing aid organiza-
tions working in the country’s
most dangerous region along
the Afghan border to adver-
tise that they receive American
assistance.
The new requirement has
disturbed aid groups, which
fear their workers providing
food, water, shelter and other
basic needs to Pakistanis will
come under militant attack
if they proclaim their U.S.
connection. This fear exists
throughout Pakistan but is
especially acute in the tribal
region, which is the main sanc-
tuary for Taliban and al-Qaida
fighters in the country.
But U.S. officials in Pakistan
are under increasing pressure
from Washington to increase
the visibility of the country’s
aid effort to counter rampant
anti-American sentiment that
can feed support for militants
targeting the West.
The focus on branding has
become even more intense in
the wake of the U.S. Navy
SEAL raid that killed Osama
bin Laden in a Pakistani garri-
son town on May 2. The covert
operation infuriated Pakistanis
and strained the relationship so
much that the U.S. decided to
suspend $800 million in mili-
tary aid to Pakistan.
The decision does not affect
civilian aid and makes the effort
to win hearts and minds through
that assistance even more
important. The U.S. has ear-
marked $7.5 billion in civilian
aid for Pakistan over five years,
but it will do little to sway
public opinion if Pakistanis
don’t know where the money
is coming from. And there are
growing questions in Congress
about what U.S. aid in Pakistan
is achieving.
“Our mandate is to make
sure people here know that
they are receiving American
assistance,” said one U.S. offi-
cial in Pakistan. “It’s always a
struggle, especially in a coun-
try like this with security con-
siderations.”
Previously, because of the
militant threat, groups working
in the semiautonomous tribal
region were exempted from
having to brand their projects,
a requirement for groups dis-
tributing American aid else-
where in the country.
The U.S. quietly changed
its policy toward the tribal
region in the fall, and now
evaluates each project on a
case by case basis, said U.S.
officials in Pakistan. The U.S.
has also become less willing
to grant waivers to the require-
ment that it often gave in other
parts of the country that have
experienced militant violence,
such as northwest Khyber
Pakhtunkhwa province and
central Punjab province, said
the officials, speaking on con-
dition of anonymity because of
the sensitivity of the issue.
Militants have targeted aid
groups in the past. The Pakistani
Taliban killed five U.N. staff-
ers in a suicide attack in 2009
at the office of the World Food
Program in Islamabad. In
2010, militants attacked World
Vision, a U.S.-based Christian
aid group helping survivors
from the 2005 earthquake in
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, killing
six Pakistani employees.
Eleven prominent chari-
ties signed a letter last fall
asking the U.S. Agency for
International Development not
to require aid in Pakistan to be
branded with the group’s red,
white and blue logo. The letter
was sent by InterAction, an
alliance of U.S.-based NGOs.
Joel Charny, vice president
for humanitarian policy and
practice at InterAction, said it
has been frustrating to have U.S.
officials sitting in a fortified
embassy in Islamabad argue
that NGO concerns about safety
in Pakistan are overblown.
US steps up push for
‘hearts, minds’ in Pakistan
(Continued from page 1)
Boughan, Deb Converse, John
Desenberg, Judith Hauenstein,
Karen Hartman, James Maley,
Linda Mann, John Mummert,
Jane Myers, James Oberhaus,
Debra Oberhaus, Philip Schey,
Keith Schroeder, Richard
Sherrick, Angela Siefker,
Richard Weems, Susan
Yocum, April Rex, Steven
Jackson, Amy Knight, Robin
Sonstegard, Carlo Nees, Ann
Bonito, Matthew Rumer,
Linda Fox-Miller, Susan
Stocks, Anthony Singian,
Alyson Reese, Logan Smith,
Sherry Graham, Jill Rauch,
Sandra Suever, Kayode Azeez,
Mark Daley, Therese Kearns,
Stephanie Evans, Zachery
Durnell, Paul Woehlke,
Rachel Powell, Rachel
Warrington, Catherine Heitz,
Paul Risner, Mary Anthony,
Amy Hopkins, Dallie Thomas,
Carol Gramm, Lvera Sprague,
Carol McKinney, James
Benfield, Elise Jenkins, Karen
Reidenback-Dew, Jodi Jesko,
Kristina Fleischman, Denise
Sheipline, Judy Garrison, Brian
Wical, Rita Van Nederveen,
Nancy Bilen, Joyce Utendorf,
Lawrence Utendorf, Virginia
Kirtland, Christine Miller,
Kelly Shadley, Jay Melton,
Allison Jones, Kristin Gable,
Megan Koch, Matthew Rau,
Kirk Fosnaugh, Emily Theil,
Amy Vorst, Joyce Klein,
Michael Liles, Brian Mears,
James Bevilockway, Brandin
Neibel, Kristin Bonifas,
Danille Schmidt, Teresa
Pietrzyk, Heather Davis-
Kohli, Sandy Dackin, Angela
Terrill, Angela Reif, Cosette
Ridenour, Travis Unterbrink,
Cherie Fairburn, Deborah
Huber, Jacob Suter, Megan
Parker, Christopher Laue,
Rebecca Uphaus, Kari Wicker
and Jessica Anderson.
Also approved were the
following class 1 volunteers:
Cheryl Fraley, Jim Line,
Diane Koch, Mark Smith,
Heather Northup, Terry
Kirkendall, Tammy Fisher,
Pete Fisher, Renee Smith,
Charlie Kirtland, Mary Lu
Anthony, Dave Baxter, Carol
Blymyer, Gary Blosser,
Joanne Thomas, Andrew
Bowman, Dolores Meyer,
Taylor Anthony, Jennifer
Fox, Doug Anthony, Lori
Schenowerth, Bob Line, Julie
Jackson, Mike Freed, Becky
Cressman, Gary Broshes,
Lindsay Fraley, Cindi
Troyer, Marcia Koch, John
Stetler, Darrell Bryan, Tim
Scampford, Blake Selover,
Tiffany Cotson and Beth
Keehn.
The board approved
Prairie Farms as the dairy
vendor and Nickles Bakery
as the bread vendor for the
2011-2012 school year.
The following school
lunch prices were approved
as well: Grades 9-12 $2.35
and $2.50; Grades 6-8 $2.35;
Grades K-5 $2.20; Breakfast
K-5 $1.10; Breakfast 6-12
$1.25; Reduced Lunch $.40;
Reduced Breakfast $.30;
Adults $2.80.
The board also approved
ten extended days for the K-12
District/School Improvement
Coach, currently Rhonda
Jicha, beginning in the 2011-
12 school year. It was also
approved that the old risers
from Elida Middle School be
donated to the Allen County
Fairgrounds.
By the Associated Press
Today is Wednesday, July
20, the 201st day of 2011.
There are 164 days left in the
year.
today’s Highlight in
History:
On July 20, 1969, Apollo
11 astronauts Neil Armstrong
and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin
became the first men to walk
on the moon after landing
their lunar module.
on this date:
In 1861, the Congress of
the Confederate States con-
vened in Richmond, Va.
1
DEALER NAME
ADDRESS • CITY
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Wednesday, July 20, 2011 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
Relocating August 1!
DEWITT CHIROPRACTIC
Spine & Sports
150 W. Fifth St.
419-692-BACK (2225)
(corner of Fifth and Canal in Delphos)
MENDON — Organizers
of Tabfest announced today
the line-up of bands that
will play this year’s charity
event on July 22 and 23 in
Mendon.
Shooter Jennings will bring
his country flavored rock to
this year’s lineup along with
blues jammer, Devon Allman
and his band, Honeytribe
and Cincinnati funk legend
Freekbass. Other performers
include Saint Marys own,
The One-Eyed Show as well
as Scotty Bratcher Band,
The Spikedrivers, Mike
Perkins, Water Band, Spaz
and the Spazmasters, Lady
Bird and the Vultures, Aliver
Hall, Petey and the Diners,
Tyrohill, Mike Switzer,
Purple Overcoat, and others
to be announced.
Headliners Shooter
Jennings and Devon Allman
share one thing in common
- they are both descendants
of music royalty. Shooter’s
father is one of country
Music’s original outlaws,
Waylon Jennings. Devon
Allman is the son of leg-
endary Allman Brothers
Band founder, Greg Allman.
Add to that Freekbass, long-
time protégé of funk legend
Bootsy Collins, and you get a
lineup that with deep roots in
rock, country and funk.
Proceeds from the event
go to charity, and attendees
are encouraged to save their
aluminum can tabs, which
will be recycled to support
Ronald McDonald House
Charities. During the 13-year
partnership between Tabfest,
Ronald McDonald House
Charities, and other local
charities, Tabfest is pleased
to have donated $32,000.00
and nearly 8,840 pounds
of aluminum can tabs. The
tab amount alone weighs as
much as an elephant!
“We’re ready to rock with
another great Tabfest lineup
which is sure to help us raise
a lot of money and alumi-
num tabs to support Ronald
McDonald House and other
local charities,” said Curt
Albers, founder of Tabfest.
“We’ve got another high
quality, eclectic mix of rock,
blues, country, funk, and jam
bands, and fans can expect
the usual friendly Tabfest
atmosphere.”
Tabfest will once again
take place at the Mendon
Speedway (Grand Lake
Motorcycle Club), 8619
Deepcut Road in Mendon.
Presale weekend passes are
available for $45 through
www.tabfest.com until July
17. Tickets can also be pur-
chased at the gate: $60 for
weekend pass; Friday day
passes are $35; Saturday day
passes are $40; Thursday
early bird camping passes
cost $20. Thursday camp-
ers are required to purchase
of a weekend pass. Tickets
include primitive camping
and live music.
Tabfest is an annual char-
ity concert campout that has
become one of the largest
and best-known music festi-
vals of its kind in the region.
Members of The One-Eyed
Show and Grasshopper Pie
(disbanded) partner with
event founder Curt Albers
(Minster) and other local vol-
unteers in a non-profit orga-
nization called the Harmony
for Ohio Foundation to orga-
nize the annual festival.
Visit tabfest.com for
more information on Tabfest
and the Harmony for Ohio
Foundation. Visitors can pur-
chase tickets, get directions
and details about the event.
Shooter Jennings
to headlineTabfest
Shooter Jennings
Devon Allman
School enrolment
case goes to
parole board
School board
holds meeting
Mental eval.
ordered in sex
case involving
ex-teacher
COLUMBUS (AP) — The
Ohio Parole Board will hear
today from an Akron mom
who was jailed for records
tampering after she used her
father’s address to enroll her
daughters in a nearby subur-
ban school.
Kelley Williams-Bolar says
she switched districts over con-
cern for her daughters’ safety
after her home was broken
into. She served nine days in
jail. Her attorney says the con-
viction threatens her efforts to
earn a teacher’s license.
Gov. John Kasich requested
the parole board proceeding.
He’s used the case to highlight
efforts to expand access to
schooling alternatives.
Based on the hearing and
other evidence, the panel will
recommend to the governor
whether to pardon Williams-
Bolar. Kasich will have the
final say.
FORT JENNINGS —
During its regular monthly
meeting Tuesday, the school
board here transferred $20,000
from the general fund to the
EMIS fund and decided to
stick with Arps Dairy for milk
and Nickles Bakery for bread
in its cafeteria. The elementary
handbook was approved and
Sharon Sealts was hired for
summer intervention.
It also approved league ath-
letic prices. Fall and all-season
passes will be sold from 9
a.m.-1 p.m. Aug. 17 and 18
and first home game for boys
and girls soccer but basketball
season tickets will be sold at a
later date.
The coaches meeting will
be 7 p.m. Tuesday; seventh
grade orientation will be 9
a.m. Aug. 16; and class sched-
ules can be picked up from 9
a.m.-1 p.m. Aug. 17 and 18.
The teacher work day will be
Aug. 22 and the academic year
will begin the following day.
LEBANON (AP) — A
judge has ordered a mental
evaluation of a former high
school teacher charged with
16 counts of sexual battery
involving male students in
southwest Ohio.
The court on Tuesday
approved 33-year-old Stacy
Schuler’s plea of not guilty by
reason of insanity with a note
on the order saying that attor-
neys also intend to maintain her
initial straight not guilty plea.
Prosecutor David Fornshell
declined comment.
Schuler resigned as health
and gym teacher at Mason
High School in February after
her arrest earlier this year. She
was charged with sexual bat-
tery counts allegedly involving
several teenage boys and three
counts of providing alcohol to
minors.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
It’s time for both sides to
make closing arguments
in the Ohio trial of a man
accused of killing 11 women
and dumping their remains
around his property.
Closings in the Anthony
Sowell case were to begin
this morning in Cleveland,
after defense attorneys rested
their case Tuesday without
calling any witnesses.
The 51-year-old Sowell
has pleaded not guilty in
the deaths of the women,
who disappeared starting in
October 2007. He could face
the death penalty if convict-
ed.
Prosecutors say the women
were lured with liquor and
crack cocaine. The defense
has said there’s no DNA or
other scientific evidence link-
ing Sowell to the killings.
Multiple media outlets
report the judge told jurors
while instructing them on
Tuesday that they should pre-
pare to be sequestered during
deliberations.
Cleveland bodies case nearing end
In keeping with Ohio’s
restoration strategy for Grand
Lake St. Marys, the Ohio EPA
and the Ohio Department of
Natural Resources installed
electronic water-quality moni-
tors in the lake that will help
keep Ohioans informed of its
condition. The monitors were
supplied by Yellow Springs-
based YSI Incorporated. Alum
treatments to reduce phospho-
rus are complete, harmful algae
levels continue to remain low
and an analysis of the entire
project is ongoing.
Algae in Grand
Lake still a
state concern
BRIEFS
TOLEDO (AP) — One of
Ohio’s major cities may end
a decades-old policy of free
lunchtime parking at down-
town meters.
They don’t have to be fed
between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
in Toledo, in a program that’s
been around since the 1970s
as an incentive for downtown
customers. But a city council
proposal to do away with the
free hours says employees of
downtown businesses are the
ones taking advantage of the
offer.
General manager Floyd
Hunter of a central Toledo
Jimmy John’s restaurant tells
The Blade newspaper that
changing the policy is a “hor-
rible” idea. He says it’s hard
to get people to come down-
town to eat.
He also acknowledges that
his employees stay parked
at metered spaces during the
free period.
Free parking for lunch may end Court rules that
judge was wrong
to toss lawsuit
ATHENS (AP) — A state
appeals court has revived a
defamation lawsuit against
Ohio University brought by a
former professor blamed in a
plagiarism investigation.
A university report had
said Bhavin Mehta and other
mechanical engineering pro-
fessors failed to be alert to stu-
dent copying or even ignored
plagiarism.
An Ohio Court of Claims
judge threw out Mehta’s law-
suit in 2009 when he ruled the
report amounted to opinions
that were protected speech
under the Ohio Constitution.
The Athens Messenger reports
the appeals court disagreed
this week and overturned the
earlier decision, saying the
report’s findings were present-
ed as fact and not opinion.
The case has been sent back
to the Court of Claims.
The university says in a
statement it’s reviewing the
appeals court ruling with law-
yers.
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Ohioans will get the chance
to express their views on the
redrawing of the state’s con-
gressional districts at a series
of public hearings scheduled
to kick off today.
The first hearing takes
place at the Ohio Statehouse.
An additional hearing will
be held later Wednesday in
Zanesville. Due to shrink-
ing population, Ohio has lost
two congressional seats head-
ing into the once-per-decade
redrawing of lines. The state
Legislature faces a Dec. 7
deadline for creating the new
map.
A 6-member task force will
provide demographics and
research help to Democrats
and Republicans during the
process. It will provide simi-
lar help to the state appor-
tionment board, which must
redraw state legislative dis-
tricts by Oct. 1.
Ohioans can
speak out on
congressional
redistricting
Story idea...
Comments...
News release...
email Nancy Spencer
editor...
nspencer@delphosherald.com
“We may well go to the moon, but that’s not very far. The greatest distance we have
to cover still lies within us.”
— Charles de Gaulle, French statesman (1890-1970)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Wednesday, July 20, 2011
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year Ago
• Rolling Thunder will again have a presence at the annual
Canal Days celebration in September. The group is planning
two programs on Sept. 18 at the Veterans Memorial Park at
Fifth and North Main streets. Jeff McDougle represented the
group at Monday’s meeting and outlined the “POW retrieval”
skit the group is working on.
25 Years Ago — 1986
(Unavailable)
50 Years Ago — 1961
• In spite of intermittent showers and weather a little on
the windy side more than 100 women enjoyed the ladies day
program held Tuesday at the Delphos Country Club. Delphos
winners were Dorothy Whitaker, medalist, and Marjorie
Stallkamp, low net. Low medalist for the day was Ginny
Conrad from Willow Bend. Dorothy Whitaker had the most
pars.
• Philip Bryan, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Bryan of Delphos,
and David L. Starr, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth R. Starr,
Spencerville, are two of the twenty outstanding high school
students who have completed a five-week program of study,
from June 12 to July 18, in chemistry at Bowling Green
State University in cooperation with the National Science
Foundation.
• Four boys and five girls are still in the running to become
king and queen of the Allen County Junior Fair. The four boys
are Denny Foust, Delphos; Darrell Risser, Lima; Gary Staley,
Lafayette; and Larry Kaser, Bath Township. The five girls are
Virginia Osting, Delphos; Myrna Bradshaw, Elida; Josephine
Wallace, Lima; Janet Louise Brown, Bath Township; and
Barbara Philpott, Elida.
75 Years Ago — 1936
• The Delphos city baseball team broke into the winning
column Sunday in a game played against Hicksville. The game
was played at city field. The 14 to 7 victory was Delphos’
first Northwestern Ohio Amateur League win. Lang and Jones
worked on the mound for Delphos and Fuller held forth behind
the bat.
• Officers will be chosen this evening when the members
of the Queen Esther Circle of the Methodist Church convene.
The meeting will be held at the home of Vera McClure with
Dorothy Parrott as assistant hostess.
• Celina, failing to appear for their scheduled game with
the Delphos Eagles at Waterworks Park Sunday afternoon,
the Eagles played the Van Wert Montgomery Ward team after
that team was through playing the Miller’s Opticians. Just to
make it unanimous, the Van Werters took this game as well as
that which preceded it. To do this, however, they were forced
to play three extra innings; winning out in the tenth by a score
of 11 to 7.
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) —
An end to Minnesota’s nearly
three-week-long state govern-
ment shutdown came into view
Tuesday, when Gov. Mark
Dayton called the Legislature
into a special session to vote
on a budget deal.
The 19-day government stop-
page has sullied Minnesota’s
good-government reputation,
while disrupting lives and busi-
nesses around the state. It will be
over only after both chambers
of the Republican-controlled
Legislature approve nine budget
bills and Dayton, a Democrat,
signs them into law.
Debate on those measures
was expected to stretch into
today with lawmakers work-
ing overnight.
Legislative leaders and
Dayton agreed before the
votes began to limit the scope
of the special session and law-
makers’ ability to tinker with
the bills in an effort to keep
the budget pact from unravel-
ing once 200 legislators get
involved.
Both chambers came to
order shortly after 3 p.m.,
immediately broke for several
hours, then started passing
budget bills around dinner-
time. Within two hours, both
the House and Senate had sent
five of nine budget bills to
Dayton: spending for courts
and public safety; colleges and
universities; environment and
energy programs; transporta-
tion; and jobs and economic
development programs.
“This is an agreement that
will get Minnesota back to
work and will get it back to
work as quickly as possible,”
House Speaker Kurt Zellers
said. He said lawmakers would
likely work through the night
to finish, with more conten-
tious debates on tax policy,
K-12 education funding and
social service programs just
starting up as midnight drew
closer.
Dayton’s chief of staff
said the governor would
wait to sign the budget bills
until all nine are on his desk.
Administration officials said
laid-off state workers would
likely be called back to work
the day after Dayton signs the
bills.
The government stoppage
idled 22,000 state employees,
halted road work at the height
of a short construction season,
suspended lottery ticket sales
and some services to the vul-
nerable and even interrupted
the flow of alcohol to some
bars. It was softened by court
rulings requiring the state to
keep paying schools, local
governments and health care
program costs. As the closure
wore on, the court restored
funding for services ranging
from child care aid to meal
delivery for the elderly.
The shutdown resulted
from a months-long stand-
off between Dayton and
Republicans legislative leaders
over taxes and spending. They
left most of state government
without the authority to spend
money when they failed to
enact a new two-year budget
by the end of June.
The final budget bills
don’t contain the income tax
increases Dayton sought, after
Republicans refused to budge
on that front. But they spend
more than the GOP wanted to
and rely on borrowed money
from school districts and a
stream of tobacco settlement
payments to help close a $5
billion deficit.
The Delphos Herald welcomes letters to the editor. Letters
should be no more than 400 words. The newspaper reserves
the right to edit content for length, clarity and grammar. Letters
concerning private matters will not be published.
Failure to supply a full name, home address and daytime
phone number will slow the verifcation process and delay pub-
lication.
Letters can be mailed to The Delphos Herald, 405 N. Main
St., Delphos, Ohio 45833, faxed to 419-692-7704 or e-mailed
to nspencer@delphosherald.com. Authors should clearly state
they want the message published as a letter to the editor. Anon-
ymous letters will not be printed.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
By ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
bipartisan “Gang of Six” sen-
ators on Tuesday offered a
major plan to cut the deficit
by almost $4 trillion over the
coming decade, but wheth-
er it can break through the
budget debate will depend
on whether Republican law-
makers can find a way to
endorse well over $1 trillion
in new tax revenues reaped as
Congress overhauls the loop-
hole-choked U.S. tax code.
The plan would also repeal
a new long-term care program
established under last year’s
health overhaul and force
an additional $500 billion in
cuts from federal health care
programs over the upcoming
decade, according to docu-
ments provided to senators
but not publicly released.
It also appears that the
revenue increases are signifi-
cantly higher than advertised
by plan proponents because
the measure assumes that the
more than $1 trillion cost of
repealing the alternative min-
imum tax over the coming
decade will be offset by curb-
ing tax breaks as tax reform
is debated. The minimum tax
was enacted in 1969 to make
sure taxpayers pay at least
some income tax, but it was
never indexed for inflation it
and now threatens more than
20 million tax filers with big
tax increases unless extended
next year.
The Gang of Six plan is
separate from a politically
freighted effort to lift the
nation’s borrowing cap and
avoid a first-ever default on
U.S. obligations. President
Barack Obama and Capitol
Hill Republicans, however,
have failed to reach an accord
on what kind of spending cuts
to pair with any increase in
the borrowing cap.
The six senators are Tom
Coburn, R-Okla., Mike Crapo,
R-Idaho, Saxby Chambliss,
R-Ga., Kent Conrad, D-N.D.,
Mark Warner, D-Va., and
Dick Durbin, D-Ill.
Their plan calls for an
immediate $500 billion
“down payment” on cutting
the deficit as the starting
point toward cuts of more
than $4 trillion over the com-
ing decade that would be
finalized in a second piece
of legislation. Most of those
savings would come from
four years of caps imposed
on the day-to-day budgets of
Cabinet agencies set by the
annual appropriations bills.
It would also curb the
growth of Social Security
benefits by moving to a lower
inflation adjustment for annu-
al cost-of-living updates.
Depending on how one
keeps score, the measure
would save $3.7 trillion to
$4.7 trillion over the com-
ing decade. The lower figure
is measured against a lower
spending “baseline” based
on a fiscal 2011 budget law
enacted earlier this year. But
if measured against Obama’s
request for the current 2011
budget year — the standard
used by Obama’s deficit com-
mission last year — the plan
would save the higher figure.
The tax reform outline
would set up three income
tax rates — a bottom rate of
8-12 percent; a middle rate of
14-22 percent; and a top rate
of 23-29 percent — to replace
the current system that has
a bottom rate of 10 percent
with five additional rates,
topping out at 35 percent.
It would reduce but not
eliminate tax breaks on
mortgage interest, higher-
cost health plans, charitable
deductions, retirement sav-
ings like individual retire-
ment accounts and tax-free
savings accounts known as
401(k)s and tax credits for
families with children.
Like the president’s defi-
cit commission, the Senate
group’s plan calls for a fun-
damental overhaul of the tax
code that would slash special
tax preferences and deduc-
tions as a way to lower tax
rates — along the lines of
the 1986 tax reform measure
signed into law by President
Ronald Reagan. It would
skim more than $1 trillion
of the revenue to reduce the
deficit and, advocates say,
spur the economy and further
fill federal coffers because of
growth.
By MATT APUZZO
and ZARAR KHAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — For
years, the Pakistani spy agen-
cy funneled millions of dol-
lars to a Washington non-
profit group in a secret effort
to influence Congress and
the White House, the Justice
Department said Tuesday
in court documents that are
certain to complicate already
strained relations between the
U.S. and Pakistan.
FBI agents arrested Syed
Ghulam Nabi Fai, the execu-
tive director of the Kashmiri
American Council, on Tuesday
and charged him with being
an unregistered agent of a for-
eign government. Under the
supervision of a senior mem-
ber of Pakistan’s spy agency,
Inter-Services Intelligence,
Fai donated money to political
campaigns, wrote newspaper
op-eds, organized congressio-
nal trips and met with White
House and State Department
officials.
“I believe that Fai has
received approximately
$500,000 to $700,000 per
year from the government of
Pakistan,” FBI agent Sarah
Webb Linden said in docu-
ments filed in federal court in
Alexandria, Va.
Officially, the Kashmiri
American Council had a
much smaller budget and told
the U.S. government that it
received no foreign grants,
according to Internal Revenue
Service documents. Pakistan
was financing similar opera-
tions in London and Brussels,
the Justice Department said.
The Pakistani Embassy
quickly issued a statement
saying the government had
no knowledge of such an
arrangement.
A second man, Zaheer
Ahmad, was charged.
Prosecutors said he recruited
people to act as straw donors
who would give money to the
Kashmiri American Council
that really was coming from
the Pakistani government.
Ahmad is not under arrest and
is in Pakistan, prosecutors said.
Both men are U.S. citizens.
Prosecutors said the
Kashmiri American Council
was being run in secret by
the Pakistani government.
Fai coordinated his activi-
ties with his ISI handlers and
often communicated in coded
emails, the FBI said. Pakistani
officials reviewed Fai’s bud-
get and told him what to do
and with whom to meet.
“You are aware that we
have been working togeth-
er for the cause for over a
decade now,” Fai wrote in an
email to a senior ISI official in
1995. “All these years, I have
closely worked with you and
others who came before you.
It has taken us much time,
energy, dedication, strategy
and planning to achieve our
common cause.”
Fai, 62, appeared before
a federal magistrate judge,
who ordered him jailed until
a detention hearing Thursday.
Prosecutor Gordon Kromberg
said Fai faces up to five years
in prison if convicted.
A soft-spoken father of
two, Fai is a leading voice
in the debate over the future
of Kashmir, the mountainous
border area India and Pakistan
have fought over for years.
He supports the pro-Pakistan
viewpoint that Kashmiris
should vote to be part of
Pakistan or India. India claims
the territory as its own.
He is perhaps best known
in Washington for organiz-
ing the annual Kashmir
Peace Conference on Capitol
Hill. The event is billed as
an independent forum for
Indian and Pakistani voices,
but the Justice Department
said the Pakistani govern-
ment approved the speakers
and gave Fai talking points
to highlight. Photo galler-
ies on the group’s website
include images of him along-
side Pakistani Prime Minister
Yousuf Raza Gilani.
By RAVI NESSMAN
and MATTHEW LEE
Associated Press
NEW DELHI — U.S.
Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton on Tuesday
pledged robust counterterror-
ism cooperation with India
while assuring Indian offi-
cials that the Obama adminis-
tration won’t ease pressure on
Pakistan to combat extremists
or allow the Taliban to regain
power in Afghanistan with
a precipitous withdrawal of
American troops.
While hailing improved
U.S.-Indian ties, Clinton also
called on New Delhi to ease
trade restrictions keeping
American firms out of India’s
massive market and urged the
government to quickly resolve
a dispute over investments in
the nuclear energy.
But her meetings with top
Indian officials focused largely
on fighting terror, improving
ties between nuclear-armed
rivals India and Pakistan and
the withdrawal of U.S. troops
from Afghanistan. Her second
visit to India as America’s
top diplomat came less than
a week after a triple bombing
killed 20 people in India’s
financial capital of Mumbai,
the country’s worst terror
strike since Pakistan-based
gunmen rampaged through
the city in 2008.
S.M. Krishna, India’s
foreign minister, expressed
concerns that the planned
U.S. troop withdrawal from
Afghanistan that began this
month could lead to a resur-
gence in Islamic extremism.
“It is in the larger interests
of the region that it is nec-
essary for the United States
to work very closely with
(Afghan) President (Hamid)
Karzai and the government of
Afghanistan and thereby create
conditions where terrorists do
not take any more advantage
in Afghanistan,” Krishna told
a joint news conference after 2
1/2 hours of talks with Clinton.
Clinton said she had out-
lined the drawdown strategy
and stressed that the United
States will not support Afghan
reconciliation with insurgents
unless it is inclusive and pro-
tects the rights of minority
groups, religions and women.
Clinton also assured India
of U.S. support in the fight
against terror.
“We are allies in the fight
against violent extremist net-
works. And homeland secu-
rity is a high priority and a
source of increasing partner-
ship,” Clinton said.
While the U.S. and India
have already signed agree-
ments to cooperate in counter-
terrorism efforts, “the events
in Mumbai have driven home
how important it is that we get
results,” she said.
Though India has not blamed
Pakistan for last week’s attack,
it has accused its neighbor of
harboring violent extremist
groups responsible for other
attacks in India and of not
doing enough to crack down
on those responsible for the
2008 Mumbai siege.
For its part, U.S. officials
fear Pakistan is not fully com-
mitted to combatting radical
plots, such as the Mumbai
attacks and the failed 2010
Times Square bombing in
New York.
“In the aftermath of the
attacks of 2008 in Mumbai,
we made it very clear that there
was an absolute international
responsibility to cooperate to
bring the perpetrators to justice.
We have made that equally
forcefully clear to Pakistan that
it has a special obligation to
do so transparently, fully and
urgently,” she said. “We have
made it clear to the Pakistani
government that confronting
violent extremists of all sorts is
in its interest.”
India recently resumed
peace talks with Pakistan that
broke off following the 2008
Mumbai siege, and the two
countries’ foreign ministers
are expected to meet next
week.
Lawmakers to
vote on ending
state shutdown
6 senators push for
bipartisan deficit cuts
US vows counterterrorism support for India
FBI says Pakistani spies spent millions lobbying US
1
We’ve moved to
a new location.
Eric Stallkamp, MD • Christine Gaynier, MD • Mark T. Mueller, MD
Tom Judy, PA • Jamie Reindel, CNP
Family Medicine Associates.
Family Medicine Associates is now located on Cable Road in Lima.
For more information or to schedule an appointment call:
582 N. Cable Road, Lima, Ohio 45805 • Fax: 419-996-2509
419-996-2500
LINCOLN HIGHWAY YARD SALE
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August 4-6, 2011
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email: sspears@delphosherald.com
Wednesday, July 20, 2011 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
Happy
Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Middle Point
Welcome Sign
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. John’s Chapel.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Kiwanis Club, Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St. John’s
Little Theatre.
7:30 p.m. — Hope Lodge
214 Free and Accepted Masons,
Masonic Temple, North Main
Street.
Sons of the American
Legion meet at the Delphos
Legion hall.
The Ottoville Board of
Education meets in the elemen-
tary building.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Annex
Museum, 241 N. Main St., is
open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at
Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff Street.
5:30 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission meets at the
museum, 241 N. Main St.
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
7 p.m. — Spencerville Local
Schools Board of Education
meets.
St. John’s Athletic Boosters
meet in the Little Theatre.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos
Chapter 26 Order of the Eastern
Star meets at the Masonic
Temple on North Main Street.
Delphos VFW Auxiliary
meets at the VFW Hall, 213 W.
Fourth St.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-In,
924 E. Fifth St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at
Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
Please notify the Delphos
Herald at 419-695-0015 if
there are any corrections
or additions to the Coming
Events column.
Summer garden, family
events keep Eichers busy
BY LOVINA EICHER
This is Friday, July 15th
around 4:30 p.m. Today is
our 18th anniversary. It is
also brother Albert’s birth-
day. Daughters Elizabeth,
17, and Susan, 15, are still not
home from detasseling corn.
They leave at 6 a.m. every
morning and work 6 days a
week. It makes for
some tired girls at
night. Verena, 13,
and Loretta, 11, have
been helping me with
my work. Today we
did the laundry and
the weekly cleaning.
The clothes are
dry and folded and
put away.
Joe and the three
boys left to take two
of our horses, Ginger and
Diamond, to be reshod. He
had one horse pulling the
buggy and the other hitched
behind. The ride was prob-
ably about 4 miles.
It seems pretty quiet
around here now. I thought
I’d take this time now to
write the column while I try
to decide what to fix for sup-
per. We have sweet corn that
is ready so I think that might
be on the menu. We are hav-
ing cucumbers, zucchini,
green beans, and red potatoes
as our garden goodies now.
Also we are still having peas,
onions, and lettuce. My green
peppers and hot peppers are
ready to use. Our tomatoes
are coming along and are a
little slow in getting ready. It
seems that first tomato takes
forever to get ripe enough
to pick.
Yesterday was son
Benjamin’s 12th birthday.
We still need to celebrate his
birthday as I was gone from
6 a.m. to 8:15 p.m. Daughter
Verena had several appoint-
ments at Mott’s Children’s
Hospital in Ann Arbor. The
doctors decided to do an MRI
on her foot. In order to do
this in the same day we just
waited in between
the appointments,
it was a long day.
We also took
Verena to Ann
Arbor on Tuesday
where she saw
the neurologist.
Her effects from
the brain concus-
sion seems to
have healed and
the effects of her
post-concussion have been
gone for six weeks now. She
did lose the past year of her
memory, though. She has
problems with her right foot
now. She has no feeling from
her knee on down in her foot
and leg. The MRI results will
let the doctors know what
the next step to do is. She
has been going to physical
therapy twice a week for the
last month.
Joe and the boys have been
doing some fishing since Joe
has not been working at the
factory this week. Every time
they come home with around
25-30 bluegill. I fix them for
supper. I’ve made a couple of
meals for us.
We received the news of
Aunt Catherine’s death, age
75. She was my Dad’s sister.
There are now 3 of Dad’s
13 siblings that have passed
away. God has a plan for
each one of us. May we put
our trust in him and accept
the plan he has. Our sympa-
thy goes to the family. We
will attend the funeral tomor-
row which is around 60 miles
from here.
We are unpacked from
our recent Florida trip but
not caught up with the gar-
den. The weeds have taken
over and I need to can green
beans next week. And right
behind that, pickles should
be next on the list. The dill I
planted is growing very well
which will be nice for making
the dill pickles. We still talk
about the ocean and how we
enjoyed it all. It was some-
thing we will remember all of
our lives.
The girls just came home,
so I should get supper start-
ed. Zucchinis are starting
to become abundant in the
garden, this is sort of my
own made up recipe for zuc-
chini casserole, but everyone
seemed to like it. I hope you
do too!
Zucchini casserole
1 pound hamburger,
browned
1 medium onion, diced
(add to hamburger)
1 package of taco season-
ing (add to hamburger)
1 green pepper, diced
6 cups shredded zucchini
1 can cream of mushroom
soup
Shredded cheese of your
choice (16 ounces)
Layer everything in a 9 x
13 inch baking dish. Bake at
350 for 45 minutes.
July 21
Mick Pohl
Chris Britt
Cheryl Sickels
The Herald...
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Hometown
News Source
To Subscribe
Phone
(419) 695-0015
The Allen County Museum,
620 W. Market St., Lima, will
offer “The Greatest Electric
Success Ever Known” at 2
p.m. July 24.
Presenter Todd McGraw
was born and raised in
Middletown. He became inter-
ested in antique cars when he
and his father restored a 1928
Dodge Brothers Standard Six
and a Custer Electric. He has
been an antique and elec-
tric car enthusiast for over
30 years. He owns a 1921
Milburn Light Electric model
27L, which is similar to the
Allen County Historical
Society’s 1923 model 27L.
Mr. McGraw’s presentation
will include a brief history of
the pre-war electric car; the
innovative development of
the Milburn Electric, manu-
factured in Toledo, and will
discuss the many unique fea-
tures of the Milburn Electric
that separated it from its more
conventional competitors.
McGraw holds a
Bachelor’s degree in Pre-
Architecture and a Master’s
degree in Architecture from
Clemson University, and is
a partner in the Healthcare
Architecture firm of Wright
McGraw Beyer Architects in
Charlotte, North Carolina. He
and his wife and two daugh-
ters live in Matthews, N.C.
The Allen County
Historical Society’s Milburn
electric car will be on display
in the lower level of the Allen
County Museum.
This program is free and
open to the public.
McGraw to speak on
electricity at museum
CAMPUS NOTES
Alexandria M. Brown
graduated cum laude from
the University of Toledo
with a Bachelor of Science in
Nursing. She is a Registered
Nurse in the State of Ohio.
She has accepted a position
with Lima Memorial Hospital
in the Critical Care Nursing
Residency.
Brown is the daughter of
Lawrence S. and Beth Brown
of Delphos and a 2007 gradu-
ate of Jefferson High School.
She is the granddaughter of
Herold and Elisabeth Brown
of Delphos and Robert and
the late Jean Hower of Elida. Brown
6 – The Herald Wednesday, July 20, 2011
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
McDonald’s Junior Series
Lima Ford Open - Shelby Oaks Golf Club
Thursday’s Tee Times
Notes: This is the final “regular-season” tournament. The Tournament of
Champions Invitational will be next Monday at Shawnee Country Club. Tee
times start at 8:30 a.m.
Hole Tee Time Team Number Age Division Names
Not on any team
01 8:00 a.m. Team #1 Boys 16-18 Aaron Johnson, Connor Bornhorst, Calvin Milligan
01 8:08 a.m. Team #2 Boys 16-18 Adam Bornhorst, Reed Bok, Ben Thieman
01 8:16 a.m. Team #3 Boys 16-18 Jacob Brake, Brian Schatzer, Luke Kindelin
01 8:24 a.m. Team #4 Boys 16-18 Josh Klaus, Ian Haidle, Kyle Karhoff,
Bobby Crow
01 8:32 a.m. Team #5 Boys 16-18 Corey Bremigan, Cody Kundert, Tyler Bergman,
Brad Shaffer
01 8:40 a.m. Team #6 Boys 16-18 Max Pulfer, Matt Holt, William Greer, Eric Bergfeld
01 8:48 a.m. Team #7
01 8:56 a.m. Team #8 Boys 14-15 Xavier Francis, Michael Omlor, Jacob Judy
01 9:04 a.m. Team #9 Boys 14-15 Cole Cartwright, Taylor Fickel, Freddie Purdy
01 9:12 a.m. Team #10 Boys 14-15 Alex Britton, Westin Young, Ryan Miller, John Burke
01 9:20 a.m. Team #11
01 9:28 a.m. Team #12 Girls 16-18 Nicole Joseph, Annie Burke, Heather Comer
01 9:36 a.m. Team #13 Girls 16-18 Margo Slonkosky, Jordin Moots, Kelly Mueller,
Lesli Stolly
01 9:44 a.m. Team #14 Girls 16-18 Morgan VanMeter, Emily Crow, Jenna Moots,
Ashley Saylor
01 9:52 a.m. Team #15
10 8:00 a.m. Team #16 Boys 12-13 Ross Pulfer, Spencer Stubbs, James Riepenhoff
10 8:08 a.m. Team #17 Boys 12-13 Spencer Stubbs, Joshah Rager, Ryan Smelewski
10 8:16 a.m. Team #18 Boys 12-13 Brad Gottemoeller, Adam Vieira, Daniel Eustache
10 8:24 a.m. Team #19
10 8:32 a.m. Team #20 Girls 15 & Under Maddison Stallkamp, Emily Knouff
10 8:40 a.m. Team #21 Girls 15 & Under Morgan Barnett, Zoe Rayburn
10 8:48 a.m. Team #22 Girls 15 & Under Rebecca Patterson, Mackenzie Howell,
Sydney Holdren
10 8:56 a.m. Team #23
10 9:04 a.m. Team #24
10 9:12 a.m. Team #25
LIMA JUNIOR GOLF
ASSOCIATION
By HOWARD
FENDRICH and
BARRY WILNER
The Associated Press
An end to the NFL lock-
out appears close, with both
sides preparing to vote on a
proposed deal once it is final-
ized.
When that might
be remained uncertain
as players gathered in
Washington and league
executives and owners
headed for Atlanta.
The NFL Players
Association’s executive com-
mittee reviewed only por-
tions of a potential new col-
lective bargaining agreement
Tuesday, with not enough
information to warrant a vote
Tuesday, two people familiar
with the league’s labor nego-
tiations told The Associated
Press.
A full agreement in princi-
ple wasn’t completed Tuesday
night, as some had hoped it
would be, and another person
familiar with the talks said
there was no guarantee a full
document would be finished
today, either.
Still, player represen-
tatives from each of the 32
teams were scheduled to be
at NFLPA headquarters today
and could vote on a new con-
tract once it is ready.
The people spoke to the
AP on condition of anonymity
because the process is sup-
posed to remain confidential.
Members of the league’s
labor committee planned to
meet in Atlanta today and also
were in position to recom-
mend a finalized proposal to
the club owners as soon as the
documents are completed. The
owners would vote Thursday,
then team officials would be
schooled in the guidelines of
the CBA and how to apply
them. Clubs were told top-
ics would include the 2011
NFL calendar, rookie sal-
ary system and guidelines
for player transactions.
While lawyers from
both sides worked Tuesday
on contract language in New
York with court-appointed
mediator Judge Arthur Boylan
for the second consecutive
day, the NFLPA’s leadership
met for about nine hours at
the group’s headquarters in
Washington.
“Every day the last two
years has been a long day,”
NFLPA head DeMaurice
Smith said as he left, know-
ing each side ≠faced anoth-
er lengthy day of meetings
today.
If the 4-month lockout —
the NFL’s first work stoppage
since 1987 — is going to end
this week, in time to keep the
preseason completely intact,
the owners and players almost
certainly must ratify a new
deal in the next two days. The
St. Louis Rams and Chicago
Bears, who open the pre-
season on Aug. 7 in the Hall
of Fame game, are supposed
to open their training camps
this weekend.
One of the people who
spoke to the AP said law-
yers for owners and players
planned to continue discus-
sions today via telephone,
instead of the in-person talks
that produced so much prog-
ress last week.
There still were unresolved
issues Tuesday, including
what it would take to get
the 10 plaintiffs — includ-
ing quarterbacks Tom Brady,
Peyton Manning and Drew
Brees, Chargers receiver
Vincent Jackson and Patriots
guard Logan Mankins — to
sign off on a settlement to
their antitrust lawsuit against
the NFL that is pending in
federal court in Minnesota.
Another pending dispute has
been the TV networks case, in which
players accused owners of setting up
$4 billion in “lockout insurance.”
After joining the talks in New York
for about seven hours, Hall of Fame
defensive end Carl Eller thought an
agreement would be reached this
week. He added retired players won’t
stand in the way.
After leaving negotiations, Eller
headed to a meeting with NFL
Commissioner Roger Goodell.
A proposal under consideration
would set up nearly $1 billion over the
next 10 years in additional benefits
for retired players. That would include
$620 million in pension increases,
long-term care insurance and disability
programs.
Retired players complained to the
court in Minnesota recently that they
had been excluded from negotiations,
making Eller’s presence Tuesday sig-
nificant.
Lawyers for the NFL and the play-
ers suing the league submitted a joint
filing to the court Tuesday, asking for
an extra week to file written arguments
“to allow them to focus on the continu-
ing mediation.” The request, which
was granted in the afternoon, noted
that “the parties have also been meet-
ing regularly since April 11, 2011, in an
effort to resolve their disputes.”
The country’s most popular pro-
fessional sports league has been in
limbo since the old collective bargain-
ing agreement expired March 11. The
lockout began hours later.
The lockout has resulted in pay
cuts for non-playing employees around
the league and economic hardship for
cities, like Cortland, N.Y., that hosted
training camps in the past but won’t
this year. On Tuesday, the lower-
level UFL — which had been hoping
to start its season in the void created
by a lack of NFL preseason games —
announced it is delaying its season
start to mid-September, a blow for a
league that has lost $100 million in
only two years.
Bears not reporting to camp
this week: Two people familiar with
the situation say the Chicago Bears
won’t report to training camp this week
even if there is a new labor agree-
ment because they need more time
to prepare.
The people spoke on condition
of anonymity because they were not
authorized to comment publicly.
The Bears planned to report to
camp at Olivet Nazarene University
in Bourbonnais, Ill., on Friday and
hold their first practice the following
day. That’s about a week earlier than
most teams.
The Bears must give Olivet
Nazarene 24 hours’ notice and need
a few days to fill out rosters and sign
draft picks, along with undrafted rook-
ies and conventional free agents.
One person said if owners ratify a
deal at their special meeting in Atlanta
on Thursday, the Bears could report
the following Tuesday or Wednesday,
if the Hall of Fame game is still on.
If the deal is ratified and the game
is canceled, they would start camp
around the 29th.
Former 49ers C Blue dies:
Forrest Blue, a 4-time Pro Bowl
center who helped the San Francisco
49ers win three straight division
titles in the early 1970s, has died. He
was 65.
The 49ers announced Tuesday
that Blue died Saturday at an assisted
living facility in Carmichael, Calif. No
cause of death was given.
Blue was selected in the first round
of the 1967 draft by the 49ers, 15th
overall. He played on both the football
and baseball teams at Auburn after
going to high school in Marfa, Texas.
He didn’t miss a game for the
49ers from 1969-74 and finished his
career with four seasons with the
Baltimore Colts.
AP Sources: NFL players
review parts of deal
Sometimes, good guys DO win.
Take Darren Clarke.
He finally won his first major on the
Professional Golf Association Tour,
the British Open, on his 20th try at the
venerable Claret Jug.
The Northern Irelander was Steady
Eddie as the typically brutal weather
in jolly Old England — especially on
the historic Royal St. George’s course
— took its toll on the other contenders,
like Phil Mickelson and the snake-
bitten Dustin Johnson.
The ESPN commentators were talk-
ing all weekend about what he had been
through — with the death of his wife 5
years ago due to breast cancer and how
it almost made him stop golfing — and
how he had become one of the most
popular guys on the Tour.
Sort of like when you go to a
Daytona 500 party — or you root an
entire season — and you want either
Mark Martin or Dale Earnhardt Jr. to
win it if your driver cannot.
For sure, Clarke was not the pre-
tournament favorite to win it — or
even be the best Northern Irelander in
the field.
Good for him.
It’s also great to see the Old Guy,
Tom Watson, still being competitive
at The British, carding a 286 to end up
tied for 22nd.
He even still had a little magic at the
age of 61 when some of the top pros
there couldn’t make the cut.
Maybe it gives me hope to try out
for the Seniors Tour in three years!!!
And pigs will fly soon!!!
Poor Dustin Johnson.
He is becoming as known for his
final-round collapses as he is for his
first-three-rounds-brilliance at the
majors.
Honestly, that is sad because he is
putting himself in position to win the
majors — every other pro would drool
for that situation every time — but just
cannot seem to “get it done.”
When will they tag him the lat-
est “best-golfer-never-to-win-a-major”
line?
I want to apologize for my mis-
take in last week’s Musings.
I was wrong about the USA-Brazil
shootout the day before. The referee
did call the Brazilian goalkeeper for
being off her line on the first PK and
called for a rekick.
However, she did subsequently
come off her line for not only the
rekick but the next four, while Hope
Solo stayed put.
I have no complaints about the
Women’s World Cup final Sunday.
I managed to watch most of the title
match and the only “complaint” is the
Americans not winning.
They missed out on numerous
chances to get an early lead and per-
haps put the match away or at least
force the Japanese more out of their
ball-control style.
As is typically the case, those golden
chances that are not taken advantage of
come back and bite you in the end and
they did in spades.
The United States, clearly the supe-
rior team athletically, “allowed” the
very technically-sound and dangerous-
in-their-own-way Japanese to stay in
the game and gain more and more
confidence.
You almost feel good for the
Japanese winning because of all the
troubles the island nation has gone
through this year.
If your driver can’t win ...
Speaking of soccer, I was looking
at YouTube when I making sure of
something I wrote above and saw some
other interesting videos.
One was the crazy penalty kick taken
by Theywa Awana of the United Arab
Emirates in a match versus Lebanon
Sunday.
He started in normally but as he
approached the orb, he turned around
and kicked it backwards off his heel;
of course, it went in because the goalie
seemed frozen.
The UAE won the match 7-2 and it
was their last goal.
He was replaced immediately by
team manager Esmaeel Rashed. The
coach — I like him for this move —
later called it a disrespectful act and his
player would be disciplined.
Of course, the Lebanese players were
none too happy, either, and Awana did
apologize to his team for it.
Another player, Finnish Under-16
player Joonas Jokinen, did a backflip
after a penalty kick against Swiss club
team FC Baar.
He kicked the ball and continued
into his flip as he scored.
I imagine that the Baar team did
not appreciate the “creativity” of Mr.
Jokinen and may have found “creative”
ways to pound him into oblivion.
I also looked at some other videos:
an English goalkeeper (Paul Robinson)
who received a pass back from a team-
mate and completely whiffed, allowing
a goal for Croatia; a match between
Morocco and Maghreb Rabat in which
the keeper deflected a PK but did not
grab it - he celebrated while the ball
spun into the goal; Khalid Askri, a GK
who gave up a goal because he didn’t
clear the ball and then took off his shirt
and went into the locker room during
a match; and another (World’s Most
Stupid Goalkeeper) who took a PK and
was successful but took his time get-
ting back, high-fiving his teammates
and raising his hands. Apparently, the
referee thought he was signalling he
was ready and started play; before he
could get back into his goal, the ball
was already there.
Then there is the very flamboy-
ant referee — a riot! — and some of
the stupidest and luckiest/unluckiest
goals.
Just type in Top 5 Most Stupid
Goals, The Most Stupid Goalkeeper,
Most Strange Penalty Kick Ever, Crazy
Soccer Referees and that will get you
started on your voyage to some hilari-
ous, amazing and strange stuff.
Nice guys don’t always finish last
JIM METCALFE
Metcalfe’s
Musings
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
The Associated Press
National League
SAN FRANCISCO — Brandon Belt hit
a tie-breaking 2-run double in the seventh
inning in his first game back in the majors
and the San Francisco Giants finally gave
Madison Bumgarner some run support at home
while beating the Los Angeles Dodgers 5-3 on
Tuesday night.
Belt, called up from Triple-A Fresno ear-
lier in the day to give slumping first baseman
Aubrey Huff a rest, homered in his first at-bat.
He was retired in his next two trips to the plate,
then lined a bases-loaded double down the left-
field line off Hong-Chih Kuo (0-1).
Rafael Furcal singled in two runs for the
Dodgers.
Bumgarner (5-9) struck out seven in eight
innings, yielding three runs and four hits. It’s
the first time in 18 starts at AT&T Park that
Bumgarner has received more than three runs
of support. Brian Wilson pitched the ninth for his
29th save in 33 chances.
In addition to bringing up Belt, the Giants
acquired second baseman Jeff Keppinger from
the Houston Astros for a pair of minor-league
pitchers and placed infielder Miguel Tejada on
the DL with a lower abdominal strain.
Rockies 12, Braves 3
DENVER — Ubaldo Jimenez brushed
aside Atlanta’s powerful bats along with all
that trade talk and Troy Tulowitzki and Carlos
Gonzalez homered for the Rockies.
Jimenez (6-8), who has won five of his last
six decisions, allowed two runs and seven hits
in 6 2/3 innings. Jimenez has been mentioned
in trade talk but GM Dan O’Dowd has said he
would have to be overwhelmed to part with his
ace, who is signed for the next three years at
just under $18 million.
Dan Uggla homered twice for Atlanta.
Brandon Beachy (3-2) allowed six earned runs
and nine hits while struggling through 4 2/3
innings.
Brewers 11, Diamondbacks 3
PHOENIX — Ryan Braun returned to the
lineup and hit the second of the Brewers’ three
first-inning home runs.
Corey Hart and Yuniesky Betancourt also
homered in the first inning for Milwaukee.
Betancourt added a 2-run homer in the ninth for
his first career 2-homer game and Rickie Weeks
had a solo shot in the third.
Milwaukee’s Yovani Gallardo (11-6)
allowed three runs, one earned, and four hits
over six innings.
Braun was back after missing 10 of
Milwaukee’s past 13 games with nagging left
calf and hamstring injuries.
Pirates 1, Reds 0
PITTSBURGH — James McDonald and
three relievers combined on a 6-hitter to help
the Pirates shut out the Reds for the second
straight night.
McDonald (6-4) won for the first time in five
starts, pitching effectively into the seventh inning
before getting bailed out of a bases-loaded jam
by Joe Beimel and Chris Resop. Joel Hanrahan
worked the ninth for his 28th save.
Mike Leake (8-5) yielded one run in six
innings but couldn’t stop the Reds (47-50) from
dropping three games below .500 for the first
time this season.
All-Star Andrew McCutchen drove in Josh
Harrison with a groundout in the first inning.
Phillies 4, Cubs 2
CHICAGO — Michael Martinez hit a tie-
breaking 2-run double with two out in the ninth
inning, leading the Phillies to the victory.
Starlin Castro’s 2-run homer off Cliff Lee in
the first inning held up until Philadelphia chased
Matt Garza in the eighth and Chase Utley tied it
with a 2-run double against Sean Marshall.
The winning rally started when Marshall
(5-4) yielded a 2-out single by pinch-hitter Ben
Francisco. Jimmy Rollins then hit a hard smash
off third baseman Aramis Ramirez’s glove, put-
ting runners on first and second, and Martinez
drove them in with a bloop double down the
right-field line.
Mets 4, Cardinals 2
NEW YORK — Mets shortstop Jose Reyes
made a huge impact in the field in his return
from a hamstring injury, turning a difficult double
play with the bases loaded in the eighth inning
after making a diving stop that saved a run.
Fellow All-Star Carlos Beltran also was
back in the Mets’ lineup after missing three
games with a high fever. He hit two doubles,
singled, walked twice and scored a run for
New York Angel Pagan and Daniel Murphy
hit 2-run doubles and Dillon Gee (9-3) pitched
seven sharp innings in the Mets’ second win
in five games.
Lance Berkman hit a mammoth homer
and starter Kyle Lohse (8-7) had an RBI single
for St. Louis.
Padres 4, Marlins 0
MIAMI — Tim Stauffer pitched six innings
and four relievers completed a 6-hitter for San
Diego.
Ryan Ludwick and Orlando Hudson hit
consecutive 2-out RBI doubles in the first inning
for the Padres. Cameron Maybin had two hits,
an RBI and a run scored against his former
team.
Stauffer (6-6) won for the fourth time in his
past five starts and lowered his ERA to 2.83.
He allowed four hits and walked two. Heath
Bell entered with two on and two outs in the
ninth and retired John Buck for his 27th save
in 29 chances.
The Marlins, playing in their third city in
as many days, looked jet-lagged as they went
0-for-6 with runners in scoring position. Anibal
Sanchez (6-3) got the loss.
Astros 7, Nationals 6
HOUSTON — Clint Barmes homered and
drove in three runs for Houston and J.A. Happ
picked up his first win in two months.
Happ (4-11) yielded five runs and seven
hits in 5 2/3 innings. Mark Melancon hit Morse
with a pitch with two outs in the ninth before
walking Jayson Werth but struck out Wilson
Ramos to get his eighth save.
Michael Morse and Jerry Hairston Jr. both
homered and had three hits and two RBIs
for the Nationals. Jordan Zimmermann (6-8)
allowed a season-high six runs and seven
hits in five innings in his shortest outing of the
season.
American League
ANAHEIM, Calif. — Alexi Ogando extend-
ed an extraordinary run by Texas pitchers
with eight innings of 4-hit ball and the streak-
ing Rangers beat the sputtering Los Angeles
Angels 7-0 Tuesday night for their 12 straight
victory.
The winning streak is the second-longest in
club history behind a 14-game run in 1991 and it
has put the Rangers (56-41) a season-high 15
games over .500. They have outscored oppo-
nents 77-24 during this stretch and the pitching
staff has yielded two earned runs over the last
six games — including four shutouts.
Ogando (10-3) won his third straight start
and first since July 6, lowering his ERA to 2.72.
Tyler Chatwood (5-6) gave up three runs,
seven hits and four walks in five innings. Endy
Chavez, the No. 9 batter, hit a 2-run homer in
the eighth against reliever Michael Kohn. The
rookie also gave up solo shots to Josh Hamilton
and Adrian Beltre in the ninth.
Orioles 6, Red Sox 2
BALTIMORE — Jeremy Guthrie allowed
two runs over seven innings in an effort that
belied his title as the losingest pitcher in the
majors and Baltimore beat Boston to end a
7-game losing streak against the Red Sox.
Derrek Lee and Mark Reynolds hit succes-
sive homers in the eighth off Alfredo Aceves
to turn a 1-run lead into a more comfortable
cushion for the Orioles. Guthrie (4-13) gave up
eight hits and walked one. Jim Johnson worked
two innings for his first save.
The Red Sox lost for only the third time
in 16 games despite getting a home run from
Jarrod Saltalamacchia.
Rays 3, Yankees 2
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Jeremy
Hellickson pitched seven strong innings and
Tampa Bay took advantage of sloppy New York
defense to rally past the Yankees.
Hellickson (9-7) retired 13-of-15 batters
after giving up a 2-run homer to Robinson
Cano in the third, helping his team stay close
until the sputtering Rays offense could finally
break through against Bartolo Colon (6-6) in
the seventh.
With two on, center fielder Curtis
Granderson lost pinch-hitter Justin Ruggiano’s
MLB CAPSULES
See MLB, page 7
The Associated Press
Boys U.S. Junior Amateur Championship Scores
Tuesday’s Second Round At Gold Mountain
Olympic Course, Bremerton, Wash.
Yardage: 7,111; Par: 72 (x-advance in playoffs)
Beau Hossler, Mission Viejo, Calif., 68-67—135;
William Starke, Chapin, S.C., 68-71—139; Yi Keun
Chang, Walnut, Calif., 70-70—140; Jordan Spieth,
Dallas, 72-68—140; Taylor Moore, Edmond, Okla.,
69-73—142; A.J. McInerney, Henderson, Nev.,
70-72—142; Chelso Barrett, Keene, N.H., 69-74—143;
Adam Ball, Richmond, Va., 73-71—144; Juan Yumar,
Venezuela, 72-72—144; Grant Daugherty, Alcoa, Tenn.,
73-72—145; Jonathan De Los Reyes, Antioch, Calif.,
73-72—145; Christopher Petefish, Scottsdale, Ariz.,
74-71—145; Cameron Smith, Australia, 72-73—145;
Emilio Maurer, Mexico, 75-70—145; Matthew Nesmith,
North Augusta, S.C., 73-72—145; Connor Black, Katy,
Texas, 74-72—146; Jonah Texeira, Calif., 76-70—146;
Cody Proveaux, Leesville, S.C., 71-75—146; Jordan
Niebrugge, Mequon, Wis., 76-70—146; Stuart Thomas,
Knoxville, Tenn., 78-69—147; Andrew Whalen,
Ephrata, Wash., 77-70—147; Ross Thornton, Leawood,
Kan., 72-75—147; William Zalatoris, Plano, Texas,
72-75—147; Anthony Vecchiarelli, Agawam, Mass.,
72-76—148; James Park, South Korea, 71-77—148;
Jim Liu, N.Y., 78-70—148; Hank Lebioda, Winter
Springs, Fla., 74-74—148; Robby Shelton, Wilmer,
Ala., 72-76—148; Wesley Gosselin, Knoxville, Tenn.,
71-77—148; Grayson Murray, Raleigh, N.C., 73-76—
149; Adam Wood, Zionsville, Ind., 76-73—149; Sulman
Raza, Eugene, Ore., 74-75—149; Austin Smotherman,
Loomis, Calif., 77-72—149; Matt Gilchrest, Southlake,
Texas, 77-72—149; Nicolas Echavarria, Colombia,
76-73—149; Andy Shim, Duluth, Ga., 72-78—150; Nick
Heinen, Edmond, Okla., 75-75—150; Michael Davis,
Newtown Square, Pa., 75-75—150; Nicolo Galletti,
Calif., 75-75—150; Robert Deng,, Calif., 76-74—150;
Derek Bard, New Hartford, N.Y., 79-71—150; Zachary
Coats, Ark., 72-78—150; Ryan Benton, Dothan, Ala.,
73-77—150; Justin Suh, San Jose, Calif., 73-77—150;
Hunter O’Mahony, Tequesta, Fla., 74-76—150; Jeffrey
Swegle, West Des Moines, Iowa, 76-74—150; Zachary
Herr, New Hope, Pa., 75-76—151; Scottie Scheffler,
Dallas, 77-74—151; Joshua Martin, Pinehurst, N.C.,
74-77—151; Aaron Kunitomo, Hawaii, 78-73—151;
Stratton Nolen, Austin, Texas, 76-75—151; Wilson
Bateman, Canada, 75-76—151; James Feutz, University
Place, Wash., 76-75—151; Andrej Bevins, Calif.,
75-76—151; x-Andy Olsen, San Antonio, 74-78—152
(3); x-Hayden Shieh, Fremont, Calif., 76-76—152 (3);
x-George Cunningham, Litchfield Park, Ariz., 78-74—
152 (3); x-Andrew Bonner, Ripon, Calif., 78-74—152 (3);
x-Christopher Hickman, Centreville, Md., 74-78—152
(3); x-Sean Busch, West Lafayette, Ind., 73-79—152
(4, 4); x-Blake Toolan, Phoenix, 76-76—152 (4, 4);
x-Matthew Lowe, Farmingdale, N.Y., 75-77—152 (4,
4); x-Brian Bullington, Frankfort, Ill., 76-760—152 (4, 5);
x-Miller Capps, Denver, N.C., 77-75—152 (4, 5)
Failed to qualify: Rylee Reinertson, Gibbon,
Neb., 80-72—152 (4, 6); Seth Sweet, Madison, Maine,
77-75—152 (5); Davis Bateman, Charlotte, N.C.,
77-76—153; Dominic Kieffer, Byron, Minn., 76-77—153;
Carr Vernon, Poplar Bluff, Mo., 73-80—153; Lorens
Chan, Honolulu, 79-74—153; Max Carter, Lake
Oswego, Ore., 80-73—153; Keegan Boone, Bethesda,
Md., 77-76—153; Chris Tedesco, Gig Harbor, Wash.,
82-71—153; Connor Nelson, Roscoe, Ill., 79-74—153;
Rigel Fernandes, Bradenton, Fla., 77-76—153; Luke
Sheehan, Texas, 78-75—153; J.J. Lindsey, Adkins,
Texas, 76-77—153; Geoff Vartelas, Cromwell, Conn.,
76-77—153; Wade Chen, Orlando, Fla., 80-74—154;
Craig Hornberger, Lancaster, Pa., 80-74—154; Daniel
Schwarz, Cincinnati, Ohio, 76-78—154; Kamrin
Allen, Sheridan, Wyo., 78-77—155; Victor Fox, Delmar,
N.Y., 81-74—155; Grady Meyer, West Fargo, N.D.,
79-76—155; Preston Heyward, Duluth, Ga., 79-76—
155; Forrest Gamble, Birmingham, Ala., 78-77—155;
Eric Bae, Cary, N.C., 77-78—155; Patrick Sanchez,
Mexico, 78-77—155; Ki Taek Lee, Bermuda Dunes,
Calif., 77-78—155; Jake McBride, Hartville, Ohio,
79-76—155; Jordan Sweet, Bowie, Md., 83-72—155;
David Sargent, Davidson, N.C., 75-80—155; Trey
Kidd, Honolulu, 76-79—155; Trevor Smith, Newnan,
Ga., 83-73—156; Johnny Ruiz,, Calif., 79-77—156;
Woody Woodward, W.Va., 83-73—156; Greyson Sigg,
Augusta, Ga., 80-76—156; Will Blalock, Gastonia, N.C.,
76-80—156; Jake Marriott, Springfield, Ill., 79-77—
156; Christian De La Cruz, San Antonio, 81-75—156;
Michael Hines, Ga., 81-75—156; Andrew McCain,
Australia, 82-74—156; Bobby Gojuangco, San Diego,
76-80—156; Cameron Davison, Canada, 81-75—156;
Reed Hrynewich, Muskegon, Mich., 80-76—156; Trent
McPherson, Venetia, Pa., 79-77—156; Zachary Tate,
Leawood, Kan., 81-76—157; Jeremy Wall, Brielle, N.J.,
77-80—157; Zachary Wright, Phoenix, 78-79—157; Matt
Rachey, Waconia, Minn., 82-75—157; Aaron Crawford,
Canada, 79-78—157; Hayden Wood, Edmond, Okla.,
79-78—157; Brett Wilson, Mesa, Ariz., 77-80—157;
Justin Pagila, Dublin, Calif., 78-80—158; Cody Neal
Calif., 77-81—158; Trevor Times, Williamsburg, Va.,
79-79—158; Max Greyserman, Boca Raton, Fla.,
76-82—158; Noah West, Belden, Miss., 77-82—159;
Cody Cox, Milford, Pa., 78-81—159; Jona Scott, New
Haven, Vt., 78-81—159; Keegan Vea, Evansville, Ind.,
82-77—159; Ryan Medhaug, Veblen, S.D., 80-79—159;
Will Cannon, Birmingham, Ala., 78-81—159; Alberto
Sanchez, Ariz., 82-77—159; Nicholas Robert, McKinney,
Texas, 75-84—159; Taewon Kim, Canada, 79-81—160;
Daniel Maier, Irwin, Pa., 74-86—160; Connor Klein,
Lone Tree, Colo., 82-78—160; Thayer White, Santa
Barbara, Calif., 84-76—160; Matt Williams, Canada,
81-79—160; Andrew Bieber, Shaker Heights, Ohio,
82-79—161; Wes Artac, Kingwood, Texas, 78-83—161;
Robert Geibel, Pembroke Pines, Fla., 79-82—161;
John Yu, Fresh Meadows, N.Y., 82-79—161; Nick
Popely, Painesville, Ohio, 83-78—161; Austin Duhon,
Orange, Texas, 78-83—161; Matthew Drake, Sioux
Falls, S.D., 76-85—161; Taylor Rittman, Ankeny, Iowa,
80-81—161; Andrew Levitt, Calif., 81-80—161; John
Wirth III, Waterloo, Ill., 86-75—161; Preston French,
Lexington, Ky., 74-88—162; Joe Walp, Portland, Maine,
77-85—162; Ethan Wagner, Port Orange, Fla., 77-86—
163; Nathan Wunderli, Sandy, Utah, 79-84—163; Austin
Banz, Salt Lake City, 84-79—163; Brandon Barrows,
Mich., 79-85—164; Will Seger, Jasper, Ind., 84-80—
164; Michael Colgate, Sarasota, Fla., 89-75—164;
Brian K. Song, Beverly Hills, Calif., 82-83—165; Connor
Dudley, Fremont, Ohio, 85-80—165; Chase Taylor,
Miss., 79-87—166; Joshua Keating, Noblesville, Ind.,
85-83—168; Alex Church, Md., 90-79—169; Sean
Bozuk, Canada, 91-81—172; John-Michael Larson,
Spokane, Wash., 91-87—178; Carlos Briones, San
Lorenzo, Calif., 77-WD.
USGA-U.S. Girls Junior Amateur
Championship Scores
Tuesday’s Second Round At Olympia Fields
Country Club South Course, Olympia Fields, Ill.
Yardage: 6,403; Par: 72 (p-won playoff to advance)
Ariya Jutanugarn, Thailand, 68-72—140; Casie
Cathrea, Livermore, Calif., 74-70—144; Eimi Koga,
Honolulu, 76-69—145; Nicole Morales, South Salem,
N.Y., 75-71—146; Mariah Stackhouse, Riverdale, Ga.,
73-73—146; Emma Talley, Princeton, Ky., 75-71—146;
Yu Liu, China, 73-74—147; Gabriella Then, Calif.,
73-74—147; Lindsey Weaver, Scottsdale, Ariz., 73-74—
147; Megan Khang, Rockland, Mass., 74-73—147;
Mariko Tumangan, San Jose, 72-75—147; Sophia
Schubert, Oak Ridge, Tenn., 73-74—147; Lydia Choi,
Beverly Hills, Calif., 76-71—147; Summar Roachell,
Conway, Ark., 77-71—148; Paige Lee, Folsom, Calif.,
74-74—148; Mariel Galdiano, Pearl City, Hawaii,
73-75—148; Jisoo Keel, Canada, 72-76—148; Karen
Chung, Livingston, N.J., 77-71—148; Manuela Carbajo
Re, Argentina, 76-72—148; Amy Lee, Brea, Calif.,
76-73—149; Casey Danielson, Osceola, Wis., 74-75—
149; Kaitlin Park, Tustin, Calif., 72-77—149; Lauren
Kim, Los Altos, Calif., 77-72—149; Irene Jung, Canada,
69-80—149; Marguerite Swearingen, Livermore, Calif.,
75-74—149; Kacie Komoto, Honolulu, 74-75—149;
Katelyn Reynolds, Los Angeles, 72-77—149; Caroline
Inglis, Eugene, Ore., 73-77—150; Allisen Corpuz,
Honolulu, 77-73—150; Stephanie Liu, St. Albans,
Mo., 73-77—150; Ashlan Ramsey, Milledgeville, Ga.,
77-73—150; Sarah Schmelzel, Phoenix, 77-73—150;
Suchaya Tangkamolprasert, Thailand, 76-75—151; Irina
Paulin Gabasa, Philippines, 78-73—151; Aurora Kan,
Boothwyn, Pa., 75-76—151; Alison Lee, Valencia, Calif.,
74-77—151; Annie Park, Levittown, N.Y., 75-76—151;
Dottie Ardina, Philippines, 75-76—151; Kristine Odaiyar,
Ocala, Fla., 78-73—151; Maria Fernanda Torres, Puerto
Rico, 74-77—151; Caroline Araskog, Locust Valley,
N.Y., 76-75—151; Anne Cheng, Torrance, Calif.,
76-76—152; Hee Wook Choi, Korea, 74-78—152;
Lilia Khatu Vu, Fountain Valley, Calif., 74-78—152;
Mikayla Harmon, Gilbert, Ariz., 77-75—152; Thanya
Pattamakijsakul, Thailand, 74-78—152; Marijosse
Navarro, Mexico, 74-78—152; Kayli Quinton, Houston,
Texas, 73-79—152; Katelyn Dambaugh, Goose Creek,
S.C., 78-74—152; Sarah Harris, Hermitage, Tenn.,
79-74—153; Brooke Henderson, Canada, 75-78—153;
Isabel Southard, Sharon, Mass., 78-75—153; Talia
Campbell, Dallas, 78-75—153; Yueer Cindy Feng,
Orlando, Fla., 80-73—153; Katherine Gravel-Coursol,
Canada, 73-80—153; Janie Jackson, Huntsville, Ala.,
77-76—153; Lou Daniela Uy, Philippines, 77-76—153;
Angel Yin, Arcadia, Calif., 78-75—153; Andrea Unson,
Philippines, 81-72—153; Rachel Dai, Suwanee, Ga.,
78-75—153; Bryana Nguyen, Columbia, Md., 78-75—
153; p-Lakareber Abe, Angleton, Texas, 79-75—154;
p-Marissa Chow, Honolulu, 74-80—154; p-Megan
Blonien, Altus, Okla., 78-76—154.
Failed to Qualify: Julie Yang, Mesa, Ariz.,
79-75—154; Hanna Lee, Cincinnati, Ohio, 73-81—
154; Hana Ku, Basking Ridge, N.J., 81-73—154; Carly
Childs, Alameda, Calif., 77-78—155; Jackie Rogowicz,
Yardley, Pa., 79-76—155; Shawnee Martinez,
Modesto, Calif., 79-76—155; Collins Bradshaw,
Columbia, S.C., 78-77—155; Mariana Sims, Austin,
Texas, 74-81—155; Jennifer Dilger, Palmdale, Calif.,
80-75—155; Marissa Decola, Butler, Pa., 74-81—
155; Cassandra Deeg, Hugo, Minn., 76-79—155;
Courtney Dow, Frisco, Texas, 79-76—15; Bethany
Wu, Diamond Bar, Calif., 78-77—155; Allie Johnston,
Castle Rock, Colo., 76-79—155; Chi Wang, Taiwan,
77-79—156; Cindy Ha, Demarest, N.J., 77-79—156;
Wanasa Zhou, China, 80-76—156; Deanna Song,
Granger, Ind., 77-79—156; Sydney Kersten, Spokane,
Wash., 81-75—156; Maggie Neece, Colleyville, Texas,
80-76—156; Kelsey Ulep, Rocklin, Calif., 77-79—156;
Tiffany Lim, San Jose, 79-77—156; Jordan Lippetz,
Piedmont, Calif., 77-79—156; Christina Ocampo,
Delray Beach, Fla., 81-76—157; Alexandria Harrell,
Phenix City, Ala., 78-79—157; Alexandra Kaui, Las
Vegas, 75-82—157; Madison Lellyo, Windermere, Fla.,
78-79—157; Ayaka Nakayama, Hilton Head Island,
S.C., 80-77—157; Danielle Lemek, Doniphan, Neb.,
80-77—157; Maddie Szeryk, Allen, Texas, 76-81—
157; Mika Liu, Beverly Hills, Calif., 79-78—157; Celia
Kuenster, Minn., 78-80—158; Gabi Oubre’, Mobile,
Ala., 80-78—158; Lauren Stephenson, Lexington,
S.C., 77-81—158; Yu-Hsin Chang, Taiwan, 80-78—
158; Katy Harris, Ga., 80-78—158; Jocelyn Chia, La
Crescenta, Calif., 79-79—158; Alana Uriell, Carlsbad,
Calif., 81-77—158; Katie Barrand, Beverly, Mass.,
80-78—158; Tezira Abe, Angleton, Texas, 79-79—
158; Megan Furnish, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 79-80—159;
Lyberty Anderson, Va., 80-79—159; Madison Opfer,
Plant City, Fla., 78-81—159; Emily Kurey, Alpharetta,
Ga., 80-79—159; Megan Haase, Spokane, Wash.,
78-81—159; Hsin-En Tsai, Taiwan, 78-81—159;
Harley Dubsky, Valparaiso, Ind., 78-81—159; Abbey
Carlson, Lake Mary, Fla., 78-81—159; Lauren Salazar,
Santa Clara, Calif., 83-76—159; Christina Foster,
Canada, 78-81—159; Yvonne Zheng, China, 79-80—
159; Dominique Galloway, Rio Rancho, N.M., 79-81—
160; Alice Chen, Princeton, N.J., 84-76—160; Briana
Midkiff, Carmel, Ind., 76-85—161; Laura Hendee,
Tampa, Fla., 81-80—161; Alexandra Rossi, Austin,
Texas, 82-79—161; Becky Sharpe, Williamsburg, Ky.,
80-81—161; Julia Calbi, South Barrington, Ill., 84-79—
163; Jacqueline Chulya, Thailand, 78-85—163; Lea
Garner, Washington Terrace, Utah, 83-80—163; Anica
Yoo, Canada, 80-83—163; Avery George, Cleveland,
Tenn., 85-78—163; Monica Vaughn, Reedsport, Ore.,
80-83—163; Isabelle Kane, Winnetka, Ill., 81-82—163;
Ally Shin, Canada, 85-79—164; Sydney Legacy,
Lexington, S.C., 78-86—164; Abby Newton, Katy,
Texas, 81-83—164; Alexandra Harkins, Crystal Lake,
Ill., 81-83—164; Kelsey Badmaev, Blythewood, S.C.,
81-84—165; Jessica Rouillard, Auburn, Ala., 84-81—
165; Nathalie Filler, Bloomfield, Conn., 84-81—165;
Molly Ward, Fishers, Ind., 80-86—166; Annie Swords,
Newnan, Ga., 86-80—166; Alexandra Farnsworth,
Nashville, Tenn., 86-81—167; Sarah Kolodzik,
Bellbrook, Ohio, 85-82—167; Mary Chandler Bryan,
Chapin, S.C., 81-87—168; Ashlee Pickerell, Salem,
Ore., 84-84—168; Abigail Luchtenburg, Geneva, Ill.,
81-88—169; Vinh-Hop Ngo, Newton, Mass., 85-84—
169; Anne Willman, Prairie Village, Kan., 85-85—170;
Angela Codian, Massillon, Ohio, 84-86—170;
Landrie Grace, Canton, Ohio, 86-84—170; Alexis
Sadeghy, Edmond, Okla., 86-85—171; Jacqueline
LeMarr, Scottsdale, Ariz., 86-85—171; Gabby Bautista,
Phoenix, 86-89—175.
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Wednesday, July 20, 2011 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
The Associated Press
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 60 36 .625 —
Atlanta 57 40 .588 3 1/2
New York 48 48 .500 12
Washington 48 49 .495 12 1/2
Florida 47 50 .485 13 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 51 44 .537 —
Milwaukee 52 46 .531 1/2
St. Louis 50 46 .521 1 1/2
Cincinnati 47 50 .485 5
Chicago 39 59 .398 13 1/2
Houston 32 65 .330 20
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 57 41 .582 —
Arizona 52 45 .536 4 1/2
Colorado 46 51 .474 10 1/2
Los Angeles 42 55 .433 14 1/2
San Diego 42 55 .433 14 1/2
———
Tuesday’s Results
Pittsburgh 1, Cincinnati 0
San Diego 4, Florida 0
N.Y. Mets 4, St. Louis 2
Philadelphia 4, Chicago Cubs 2
Houston 7, Washington 6
Colorado 12, Atlanta 3
Milwaukee 11, Arizona 3
San Francisco 5, L.A. Dodgers 3
Today’s Games
Cincinnati (Cueto 5-3) at Pittsburgh (Karstens
8-4), 12:35 p.m.
Washington (L.Hernandez 5-9) at Houston
(Myers 3-10), 2:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Worley 5-1) at Chicago Cubs
(Dempster 7-6), 2:20 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 10-4) at San Francisco
(Lincecum 8-7), 3:45 p.m.
San Diego (Harang 7-2) at Florida (Nolasco
6-6), 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (McClellan 6-6) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey
4-8), 7:10 p.m.
Atlanta (T.Hudson 9-6) at Colorado (Nicasio
4-2), 8:40 p.m.
Milwaukee (Narveson 6-6) at Arizona
(J.Saunders 6-8), 9:40 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
San Diego (Moseley 2-9) at Florida (Vazquez
6-8), 12:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 7-4) at N.Y. Mets (Niese
9-7), 12:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Hanson 10-5) at Colorado (Chacin
8-7), 3:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Greinke 7-3) at Arizona (I.Kennedy
10-3), 9:40 p.m.
-----
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 58 37 .611 —
New York 56 38 .596 1 1/2
Tampa Bay 51 44 .537 7
Toronto 48 49 .495 11
Baltimore 39 55 .415 18 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 51 45 .531 —
Detroit 51 45 .531 —
Chicago 47 50 .485 4 1/2
Minnesota 45 51 .469 6
Kansas City 39 58 .402 12 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 56 41 .577 —
Los Angeles 51 46 .526 5
Seattle 43 53 .448 12 1/2
Oakland 42 55 .433 14
———
Tuesday’s Results
Baltimore 6, Boston 2
Detroit 8, Oakland 3
Toronto 6, Seattle 5, 14 innings
Tampa Bay 3, N.Y. Yankees 2
Kansas City 4, Chicago White Sox 2
Minnesota 2, Cleveland 1
Texas 7, L.A. Angels 0
Today’s Games
Boston (A.Miller 3-1) at Baltimore (Arrieta 9-6),
12:35 p.m.
Cleveland (Tomlin 11-4) at Minnesota
(Blackburn 7-6), 1:10 p.m.
Oakland (McCarthy 2-5) at Detroit (Below 0-0),
7:05 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 6-7) at Toronto (Morrow 6-4),
7:07 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 7-7) at Tampa Bay
(Price 9-7), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Danks 3-8) at Kansas City
(Chen 5-3), 8:10 p.m.
Texas (D.Holland 8-4) at L.A. Angels (Haren
10-6), 10:05 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Seattle (Fister 3-11) at Toronto (R.Romero
7-9), 12:37 p.m.
Texas (C.Wilson 10-3) at L.A. Angels (Weaver
12-4), 3:35 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 14-4) at Tampa Bay
(Shields 8-8), 7:10 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 12-5) at Minnesota (Pavano
6-6), 8:10 p.m.
MLB
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Philadelphia 8 4 7 31 24 16
New York 6 4 11 29 34 24
Columbus 7 5 7 28 21 19
Houston 5 6 9 24 24 23
Spor. Kansas City 5 6 8 23 24 25
D.C. 5 5 8 23 24 29
Chicago 2 6 12 18 20 25
Toronto FC 3 9 9 18 17 36
New England 3 9 7 16 16 27
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Los Angeles 10 2 9 39 27 16
Seattle 10 4 8 38 32 23
FC Dallas 10 5 5 35 26 19
Real Salt Lake 8 3 6 30 23 12
Colorado 6 6 9 27 25 27
Chivas USA 5 7 8 23 24 23
San Jose 5 6 8 23 22 21
Portland 6 9 3 21 22 31
Vancouver 2 10 8 14 19 28
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point
for tie.
———
Today’s Games
New England at D.C. United, 7:30 p.m.
FC Dallas at Toronto FC, 8 p.m.
New York at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.
Columbus at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
FC Dallas at New York, 6 p.m.
Portland at Columbus, 8 p.m.
Toronto FC at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
New England at Colorado, 9 p.m.
San Jose at Real Salt Lake, 10 p.m.
Houston at Chivas USA, 10:30 p.m.
The Associated Press
W L T Pts GF GA
Philadelphia 8 2 3 27 26 13
Wes. New York 7 2 2 23 23 12
Boston 4 5 3 15 14 13
magicJack 5 4 1 15 16 19
Sky Blue FC 3 5 4 13 16 18
Atlanta 1 10 3 6 7 27
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
———
Today’s Game
magicJack at Western New York, 7:30
p.m.
Saturday’s Game
Philadelphia at Sky Blue FC, 7 p.m.
magicJack at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Sunday’s Game
Western New York at Boston, 6 p.m.
MLS
WOMEN’S
PRO SOCCER
The Associated Press
PGA TOUR
CANADIAN OPEN
Site: Vancouver, British
Columbia.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Shaughnessy Golf
and Country Club (7,212 yards,
par 71).
Purse: $5.2 million. Winner’s
share: $918,000.
Television: Golf Channel
(Thursday-Friday, 3-6 p.m.) and
CBS (Saturday-Sunday, 3-6 p.m.).
Last year: Carl Pettersson rallied
to win at St. George’s in Toronto,
following his tournament-record 60
with a 67 for a one-stroke victory
over Dean Wilson. Pettersson was
six strokes behind with 11 to play.
Last week: Northern Ireland’s
Darren Clarke won the British Open
for his first major title, finishing at
5 under for a 3-stroke victory over
Phil Mickelson and Dustin Johnson.
The 42-year-old Clarke shot 68-68-
69-70 at Royal St. George’s. ...
Chris Kirk won the Viking Classic
in Madison, Miss., for his first PGA
Tour title, beating Tom Pernice Jr.
and George McNeill by a stroke.
Notes: Top-ranked Luke
Donald is in the field along with
Jim Furyk, the 2006 and 2007 win-
ner, and Masters champion Charl
Schwartzel, Rickie Fowler, Lucas
Glover, Ernie Els, Geoff Ogilvy,
Louis Oosthuizen and Anthony Kim.
... Mark Calcavecchia won in 2005
at Shaughnessy. He’s skipping the
tournament to play in the Senior
British Open. ... Canadian Mike
Weir, the 2003 Masters champion,
won the last of his eight PGA Tour
titles in 2007. In 14 starts this year,
he has missed 11 cuts, withdrew
from an event and has broken 70
only once. ... Pat Fletcher, born in
England, was the last Canadian
winner, taking the 1954 event at
Point Grey in Vancouver. Carl
Keffer is the only Canadian-born
champion, winning in 1909 and
1914. Albert Murray, a Canadian
also born in England, won in 1908
and 1913. ... The 2012 tournament
will be played at Hamilton Golf and
Country Club in Ancaster, Ontario.
... The Greenbrier Classic is next
week in West Virginia.
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
Golf Canada site: http://www.
golfcanada.ca
———
LPGA TOUR/ LADI ES
EUROPEAN TOUR
EVIAN MASTERS
Site: Evian-Les-Bains, France.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Evian Masters Golf
Club (6,345 yards, par 72).
Purse: $3.25 million. Winner’s
share: $487,500.
Television: Golf Channel
(Thursday-Friday, 6:30-8:30 p.m.;
Saturday-Sunday, 1-4 p.m.).
Last year: South Korea’s Jiyai
Shin won the first of her two 2010
LPGA Tour titles, finishing with a
5-under 67 for a 1-stroke victory
over Morgan Pressel, Na Yeon
Choi and Alexis Thompson.
Last event: So Yeon Ryu won
the rain-delayed U.S. Women’s
Open in a Monday finish July 11,
beating South Korean rival Hee
Kyung Seo by three shots in a
3-hole playoff at the Broadmoor in
Colorado Springs. Ryu birdied the
final hole of regulation to tie Seo
at 3 under.
Notes: The Women’s British
Open is next week at Carnoustie,
followed by the Imperial Springs
LPGA in China. ... Golfweek
magazine reported last week
that the event will become the
LPGA Tour’s fifth major and likely
move to the fall. The tournament
became an official LPGA Tour
event in 2000. ... Natalie Gulbis
won the 2007 tournament for her
lone LPGA Tour title. ... Sweden’s
Helen Alfredsson won in 1994,
1998 and 2008. ... Top-ranked
Yani Tseng leads the tour with
three victories.
LPGA Tour site: http://www.
lpga.com
Ladies European Tour site:
http://www.ladieseuropeantour.com
———
CHAMPI ONS TOUR/
EUROPEAN SENIORS TOUR
SENIOR BRITISH OPEN
Site: Surrey, England.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Walton Heath Golf
Club, Old Course (7,394 yards,
par 72).
Purse: $2 million. Winner’s
share: $315,000.
Television: ESPN2 (Thursday-
Sunday, noon-2 p.m.).
Last year: Germany’s Bernhard
Langer won his first senior major
title, holding off Corey Pavin by a
stroke at Carnoustie. Langer won
the U.S. Senior Open the following
week.
Last event: Jeff Sluman won the
First Tee Open at Pebble Beach
for the third time, finishing with a
2-under 70 on July 10 for a 2-stroke
victory. He also won in 2008 and
2009.
Notes: Tom Watson won in
2003, ‘05 and ‘07. The 5-time British
Open champion tied for 22nd last
week at Royal St. George’s. ... Tom
Lehman, tied with John Cook for
the Champions Tour lead with three
victories, also tied for 22nd in the
British Open. ... Langer is making
his first Champions Your start since
having surgery on his left thumb.
He missed the cut last week in the
British Open. ... Walton Heath was
the site of the 1981 Ryder Cup. ...
The U.S. Senior Open is next week
at Inverness in Toldeo, Ohio.
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
European Seniors Tour: http://
www.europeantour.com
———
EUROPEAN TOUR (equals)
NORDEA MASTERS
Site: Stockholm.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Bro Hof Slott Golf Club
(7,603 yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.11 million. Winner’s
share: $351,110.
Television: Golf Channel
(Thursday-Friday, 9 a.m.-noon;
Saturday-Sunday, 7:30-10:30
a.m.).
Last year: Sweden’s Richard
S. Johnson made a 30-foot birdie
putt on the final hole for a 1-stroke
victory over Argentina’s Rafa
Echenique.
Last week: Northern Ireland’s
Darren Clarke won the British Open
for his first major title, finishing at
5 under for a 3-stroke victory over
Phil Mickelson and Dustin Johnson.
The 42-year-old Clarke shot 68-68-
69-70 at Royal St. George’s.
Notes: Johnson is in the field
along with fellow Americans Bubba
Watson and Todd Hamilton. ...
Former Arizona State star Scott
Pinckney is making his pro debut.
... Jesper Parnevik won in 1995
at Barseback to become the first
Swede to win a European tour
event in Sweden. He also won in
1998 at Kungsangen. ... The course
is the longest on the European
Tour. ... The Irish Open is next
week at Killarney Golf and Fishing
Club.
Online: http://www.european-
tour.com
———
NATIONWIDE TOUR
NATIONWIDE CHILDREN’S
HOSPITAL INVITATIONAL
Site: Columbus, Ohio.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Ohio State University
Golf Club, Scarlet Course (7,455
yards, par 71).
Purse: $800,0000. Winner’s
share: $144,000.
Television: Golf Channel
(Thursday-Friday, 12:30-2:30 p.m.;
Saturday, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Sunday,
7-9:30 p.m.).
Last year: D.J. Brigman won
his second career Nationwide Tour
title, finishing with a 7-under 64
for a 1-stroke victory over Jamie
Lovemark.
Last week: Scotland’s Russell
Knox won the Chiquita Classic
in Maineville, Ohio, for his first
Nationwide Tour title, beating Billy
Hurley by three strokes. Knox fin-
ished at 25 under.
Notes: In 2007, Daniel
Summerhays won the inaugural
event to become the first ama-
teur champion in tour history. In
2009, Derek Lamely beat amateur
Rickie Fowler with a par on the
second hole of a playoff. ... The
Utah Championship is next week,
followed by the Cox Classic in
Omaha, Neb.
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
———
OTHER TOURNAMENTS
MEN
U.S. GOLF ASSOCIATION:
U.S. Junior Amateur, through
Saturday, Gold Mountain Golf Club,
Olympic Course, Bremerton, Wash.
Online: http://www.usga.org
eGOLF PROFESSIONAL
TOUR: Scratch Golf Championship,
today-Saturday, Woodsi de
Plantation, Jones Course, Cupp
Course, Aiken, S.C. Online: http://
www.egolfprofessionaltour.com
NGA HOOTERS TOUR: Heart
of North Carolina Golf Classic,
Thursday-Sunday, Pinewood
Country Club, Asheboro, N.C.
Online: http://www.ngahooterstour.
com
JAPAN GOLF TOUR:
Nagashima Shigeo Invitational
Sega Sammy Cup, Thursday-
Sunday, The North Country Golf
Club, Hokkaido, Japan. Online:
http://www.jgto.org
ASIAN TOUR: Selangor
Masters, today-Saturday, Kota
Permai Golf and Country Club,
Shah Alam, Malaysia. Online: http://
www.asiantour.com
EUROPEAN CHALLENGE
TOUR: English Challenge,
Thursday-Sunday, The Stoke
By Nayland Hotel Golf and Spa,
Colchester, England. Online: http://
www.europeantour.com
WOMEN
U.S. GOLF ASSOCIATION:
U.S. Girls’ Junior, through Saturday,
Olympia Fields Country Club, South
Course, Olympia Fields, Ill. Online:
http://www.usga.org
LPGA FUTURES TOUR: The
International at Concord, Beaver
Meadow Golf Course, Friday-
Sunday, Concord, N.H. Online:
http://www.lpgafuturestour.com
GOLF GLANCE
By DENNIS PASSA
The Associated Press
SHANGHAI — The
NBA’s version of the Ming
Dynasty is done. After help-
ing pro basketball gain a foot-
hold in the world’s
most populous mar-
ket, Chinese star Yao
Ming has retired.
Yao made it offi-
cial today, telling a
packed news confer-
ence in his hometown
that a series of foot
and leg injuries forced
him to end his play-
ing career at the age
of 30.
“I will formally end
my career,” said Yao, the 7-6
center who became a house-
hold name in China before
starting his NBA career with
the Houston Rockets as the
top draft pick in 2002.
Yao played eight seasons
in the NBA, but missed 250
regular-season games over
the past six years.
“Today is an important
day for me and holds a special
meaning for both my basket-
ball career and my future,”
Yao said in comments trans-
lated into English. “I had to
leave the court since I suf-
fered a stress fracture in my
left foot for the third time at
the end of last year. My past
six months were an agoniz-
ing wait. I had been thinking
(about my future) over and
over. Today I am announc-
ing a personal decision, end-
ing my career as a basketball
player and officially retire.
But one door is closing and
another one is opening.”
Yao reported he will
return to work with his for-
mer Chinese team, the
Shanghai Sharks, with
the possibility of becom-
ing general manager.
He plans to continue his
philanthropic work with
his Yao Foundation.
NBA Commissioner
David Stern sent a mes-
sage via video link.
“Yao Ming has
been a transformational
player and a testament
to the globalization of
our game,” Stern stated. “His
dominant play and endear-
ing demeanor along with
his extensive humanitarian
efforts have made him an
international fan favorite and
provided an extraordinary
bridge between basketball
fans in the United States and
China.”
Houston general manager
Daryl Morey attended the
farewell conference after get-
ting permission from the NBA
because the lockout prohibits
contact with players.
He said he was tired from
the long trip but “I would be
sorry if I wasn’t here. It’s a
big moment. Yao had a sense
of humor, a great attitude and
sense of working together.
I hope we can continue his
culture in the NBA.”
Yao’s wife, Ye Li, and
their 14-month-old daugh-
ter, Yao Qinlei, and his par-
ents, Yao Zhiyuan and Fang
Fengdi, were in the room.
Yao thanked his family,
friends, coaches in China and
in Houston and fellow com-
petitors such as Shaquille
O’Neal “for making me a
better player.”
“I will be always with
you,” Yao added. “Thank
you.”
Despite news of Yao’s
pending retirement being out
for several weeks, the actual
announcement was treated
with the pomp that Yao’s
appearances in China bring.
Media were asked to sign
up weeks in advance for the
conference and show up two
hours early to pass through
airport-style security checks.
The Grand Shanghai
Ballroom was crammed at the
back with dozens of televi-
sion cameras and black-suit-
ed security men outnumbered
the hundreds of media. China
Central Television showed
five continuous hours of Yao
coverage beginning at 1 p.m.
local time, including 90 min-
utes live from the media con-
ference.
Yao’s contract expired
after last season and the
Rockets said they were inter-
ested in re-signing him if he
came back healthy. Yao said
in April in China that his
professional future depended
on his recovery from a stress
fracture in his left ankle.
Selected to the NBA All-
Star team eight times, Yao
averaged 19 points and 9.2
rebounds. More important-
ly, his impact expanded the
NBA’s influence in Asia into
lucrative merchandise sales
and TV ratings.
After his rookie season,
Yao helped the Rockets reach
the playoffs in the next two
seasons.
Yao played in 77 games
in the 2008-09 season, when
Houston reach the second
round of the playoffs for the
first time since 1997.
But Yao broke his left foot
in a playoff game against
the Los Angeles Lakers and
underwent complex surgery
that sidelined him for the
entire 2009-10 season. He
lasted only five games at the
start of the 2010-11 season,
before breaking his left ankle.
He had surgery in January
and was lost again for the
season.
Yao had played six years
with the Chinese nation-
al team before joining the
Rockets and was already a
star in his home country. He
carried the Olympic torch
through Tiananmen Square
and his country’s flag during
the opening ceremonies at the
Beijing Olympics in 2008.
He also donated $2 million
and set up a foundation to
rebuild schools in the wake
of the 2008 earthquake in
Sichuan.
Chinese great Yao Ming
retires from basketball
By GREG KELLER
The Associated Press
GAP, France — Three-
time champion Alberto
Contador mixed up the Tour
de France overall standings
with a powerful move on the
Col de Manse.
While the same seven con-
tenders topped the standings
after the 17th stage Tuesday,
Contador moved up a spot to
sixth. Thor Hushovd won the
stage in a breakaway.
Contador, baring his teeth
as his tires sizzled on the rain-
slick roads, surged out of the
pack on the mid-grade Col
de Magne climb and held on
through a treacherous down-
hill finish in the 101-mile
ride from Saint-Paul-Trois-
Chateaux to Gap.
The unexpected surge by
the Spaniard shook up the lea-
derboard at cycling’s greatest
race, which ends Sunday in
Paris after a jaunt today into
Italy, then two days in the
Alps and a time-trial Saturday
in Grenoble.
Among the contenders,
only Cadel Evans kept up.
The Australian actually out-
paced Contador by 3 seconds
at the end. But Contador, who
lost time with crash trouble
earlier in the race — trimmed
18 seconds off his deficit to
overall race leader Thomas
Voeckler of France, cutting it
to 3 minutes, 42 seconds.
More importantly, the
Spaniard recovered more than
a minute on his runner-up
at the last two Tours, Andy
Schleck, a top climber who
almost inexplicably didn’t
keep up on the relatively easy
final ascent.
Aside from the aggressive
Contador, the other standout
was Evans, a 2-time runner-
up who has so far had a nearly
flawless race — and showed
he’s not giving up to the
Spaniard without a fight.
Hushovd, a Garmin-
Cervelo rider who wore yel-
low for six days in the first
week and also won Stage 13,
led a 3-man breakaway —
edging Norwegian compa-
triot, Edvald Boassen Hagen
and teammate Ryder Hesjedal
of Canada.
Evans finished 4:23 back
in 11th place. Voeckler and
Frank Schleck crossed 21
seconds later. Andy Schleck
was 1:09 slower than the
Australian — and 1:06 behind
Contador.
Overall, Evans climbed
to second, 1:45 behind
Voeckler. Frank Schleck, now
third, was 1:49 back. Andy
Schleck remained fourth,
3:03 back.
Contador shuffles deck at Tour de France
fly ball in the Tropicana Field roof for a single off
Boone Logan that loaded the bases. It looked as
though the Yankees might escape the jam when
the next batter — pinch-hitter Elliot Johnson —
hit a tailor-made, double-play grounder back to
the mound, but the ball glanced off Logan’s glove
for an error that enabled the Rays to tie it at 2.
Rodriguez raced home from third for the
go-ahead run on Johnny Damon’s sacrifice fly to
shallow center. Granderson charged in to make
a sliding catch, scrambled to his feet but threw
wildly to the plate.
Joel Peralta worked a perfect ninth for his
first save.
Twins 2, Indians 1
MINNEAPOLIS — Danny Valencia hit a
2-run single off All-Star closer Chris Perez in
the ninth inning, sending Minnesota to a victory
over Cleveland.
Perez (2-5) walked Joe Mauer and gave
up a double to Michael Cuddyer. Jim Thome
was intentionally walked to load the bases and
Valencia followed with a bloop single.
Glen Perkins (2-1) picked up the win in relief
of Francisco Liriano, who gave up one run and
four hits in six innings.
The Twins were dominated for most of
Tuesday’s game by Justin Masterson, who
allowed four hits in 7 2/3 innings.
Tigers 8, Athletics 3
DETROIT — Miguel Cabrera and Carlos
Guillen each hit a 2-run homer in Detroit’s 6-run
fifth inning against Oakland.
The Tigers trailed 3-1 before they grabbed
control in the fifth against Guillermo Moscoso
(3-5). After Magglio Ordonez brought Detroit
within a run on a sacrifice fly, Cabrera hit his 20th
homer of the season, putting the Tigers ahead to
stay. It was his 600th career extra-base hit.
Detroit starter Rick Porcello (9-6) allowed
three runs and eight hits in six innings.
Moscoso allowed six earned runs in 4 2/3
innings.
Royals 4, White Sox 2
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Danny Duffy
returned from the minors to toss seven sharp
innings, Matt Treanor delivered a go-ahead,
2-run single and the light-hitting Royals hung on
to beat Chicago.
Melky Cabrera homered and Alcides
Escobar drove in the other run for Kansas City.
Duffy (2-4) settled down after a shaky start
to outpitch Jake Peavy (4-4), mowing down a
lineup that White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen
stacked with right-handed hitters. Joakim Soria
earned his 10th consecutive save and 17th of
the season.
Blue Jays 6, Mariners 5, 14 innings
TORONTO — Rajai Davis stole two bases
before scoring on John McDonald’s sacrifice fly
in the 14th inning and Toronto extended Seattle’s
losing streak to 10 games.
It is the Mariners’ longest slide since a
12-game skid in 2008. Greg Halman hit a 3-run
homer and Brendan Ryan added a solo shot for
the Mariners.
Davis hit a 1-out single off Jamey Wright
(2-3) in the 14th and stole second and third
before scoring on McDonald’s fly to center.
Activated from the disabled list before the game,
Casey Janssen (3-0) pitched a scoreless inning
for the win.
MLB
(Continued from Page 6)
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ago. I am wondering
what I should do with my
401(k). I am 60 years old,
and my husband will be
62 in December. He lost
his job about two years
ago. I was collecting
unemployment, but since
I am now receiving a small pension from my previous employer,
this has stopped. I still owe $5,000 on my car loan and was
wondering whether I should take money out of my 401(k) to pay
this off. Right now I have just over $112,000, which is all invested
in intermediate and short bonds. We also have the usual bills,
mortgage, etc., which is $1,000 a month in utilities, charge card
bills and a loan. I also own some stock, which I have taken a huge
loss on over the years. I have been applying for jobs but not having
any luck. Any advice would be appreciated. -- A.P., via email
DEAR A.P.: It is clear that age discrimination is alive and
well, and folks your age will have a difficult time finding jobs at
your previous income levels. You can, of course, withdraw money
from your 401(k) without penalty; you’ll have to pay taxes. Given
your job situation, it’s possible you won’t have to pay taxes. Your
investments in bonds as of now likely produce a very modest return.
You mentioned that you’ve taken a huge loss in your stock, but if
you have invested in relatively secure companies (even though the
market sunk considerably a few years ago), most of those stocks
recovered nicely. I hope that is true in your case.
Regarding you car payment, it’s likely that the interest you
are paying on that loan is substantially greater than the 401(k) is
earning. If that is the case, consider taking the $5,000 and paying
off that loan.
DEAR BRUCE: The company I work for offers a lump sum
and an annuity as options for retirement payment. There is a rumor
that the company is going to do away with the lump-sum option.
How is the lump-sum option determined, and do they have to give
notice if they change the way they offer pension payments? -- A.B.,
via email
DEAR A.B.: The human resources department of your company
is the place to start your investigation. Rumors are a nickel each.
Because each situation is unique, I have no idea how the lump-sum
option is determined and whether it is to your advantage. Further,
they might have no obligation to tell you that the pensions are
being changed, particularly if you make no contribution.
Your first stop is human resources. Ask the questions you’ve
asked me. If they start to finesse, you may want to talk to some
of your colleagues and collectively have an attorney make the
inquiry.
DEAR BRUCE: I am a widower with two granddaughters. I
have all of my assets in our three names as power of attorney. Am
I doing this correctly? I would like to escape probate if possible.
Do we each own a third? This has been in place for 10 years. —
F.R., via email
DEAR F.R.: The problem is that you have your granddaughters’
names on everything. If they get into some financial difficulty, the
assets that you worked very hard for may be attached. I understand
the desire to avoid probate, but frankly, probate is not the terrible
thing that it has been made out to be. I don’t know how your affairs
have been stated, but I might assume that you each own a third. I
would be uncomfortable making that statement. It would seem to
me that you are far better off talking to your attorney and having
the property put back in your name. I do realize that means if you
require substantial medical attention or nursing home care, your
granddaughters’ equity might be exhausted. Would your interest
be jeopardized if something were to enter their lives, like legal
liability, tax issues, etc?
Finally, at the risk of repetition, I don’t find that going through
probate is such a horrible experience.
COPYRIGHT 2011 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
BRUCE WILLIAMS
Smart
Money
Should I tap my 401(k)?

Description Last Price Change
DJINDUAVERAGE 12,587.42 +202.26
NAS/NMS COMPSITE 2,826.52 +61.41
S&P 500 INDEX 1,326.73 +21.29
AUTOZONE INC. 298.33 +2.97
BUNGE LTD 70.36 +1.75
EATON CORP. 51.45 +0.86
BP PLC ADR 44.96 +0.65
DOMINION RES INC 48.69 +0.69
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 37.39 +0.28
CVS CAREMARK CRP 37.12 +0.38
CITIGROUP INC 38.02 +0.28
FIRST DEFIANCE 14.67 +0.71
FST FIN BNCP 16.55 +0.54
FORD MOTOR CO 13.09 +0.19
GENERAL DYNAMICS 69.93 +0.47
GENERAL MOTORS 29.33 +0.23
GOODYEAR TIRE 17.50 +0.21
HEALTHCARE REIT 53.33 +0.84
HOME DEPOT INC. 36.11 +0.42
HONDA MOTOR CO 39.98 -0.03
HUNTGTN BKSHR 6.26 +0.17
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 66.72 -0.37
JPMORGAN CHASE 40.39 +0.56
KOHLS CORP. 56.58 +0.77
LOWES COMPANIES 22.96 +0.46
MCDONALDS CORP. 86.21 +0.81
MICROSOFT CP 27.54 +0.95
PEPSICO INC. 68.54 +0.54
PROCTER & GAMBLE 64.61 +0.06
RITE AID CORP. 1.35 +0.11
SPRINT NEXTEL 5.26 +0.07
TIME WARNER INC. 35.45 +0.65
US BANCORP 25.03 +0.60
UTD BANKSHARES 9.29 0
VERIZON COMMS 36.97 +0.26
WAL-MART STORES 53.97 +0.65
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business July 19, 2011
By JORDAN ROBERTSON
AP Technology Writer
SANTA CLARA, Calif. —
The personal computer indus-
try needs a jumpstart — and
it’s counting on a rescue from
emerging markets and a late-
to-the-party push into tablet
computers.
The U.S. and European
PC markets have entered a
dangerous new phase: Fewer
people are buying new PCs
because of economic anxiety,
market saturation and the rise
of seductive new gadgets such
as Apple’s iPad. More signs
of strain are expected as PC
makers and their component
suppliers begin to disclose
quarterly earnings this week.
Make no mistake: The
PC is still the backbone of
the digital world, powering
e-commerce, social network-
ing and more. It is a fixture
in homes and businesses in
industrialized countries. More
than 1 million PCs are sold
every day, and the industry is
bigger than ever.
But worldwide sales have
slowed in recent years. The
U.S. and European markets
have fared the worst, suffer-
ing from declines compared
with the previous year. Market
research firms IDC and
Gartner Inc. said last week
that PC shipments worldwide
grew at just over 2 percent in
the second quarter.
One of the most urgent
concerns is that the PC has
become ubiquitous in many
markets. That has presented
the industry with a classic
business problem: how to find
new ways to sell an estab-
lished product.
Although it’s true comput-
ers need to be upgraded regu-
larly, businesses are only start-
ing to spend money again as
the economy slowly recovers.
Consumers are updating their
machines less often, spending
their money instead on the lat-
est handheld gadgets.
Apple CEO Steve Jobs has
promoted the changes as a
sign we’ve entered the “post-
PC era.” Technologists have
thrown around that term for a
decade in what turned out to
be premature predictions, but
the characterization may be
coming true now.
“This is a time of intense
change,” said Sarah Rotman
Epps, a Forrester Research
analyst who has studied the
evolution of consumer tech-
nology. “New competition for
PC manufacturers makes it
just really, really hard to make
a profit.”
As a result, PC makers are
looking to emerging markets
to boost sales.
The new strategy was evi-
dent at Intel’s recent investors’
conference, where the com-
pany’s CEO, Paul Otellini,
unveiled a map that identified
where PC growth is expected to
be strongest in coming years.
The U.S. and Europe were
conspicuously not highlight-
ed. Otellini gestured instead
toward places such as Brazil,
Russia, India, China — the so-
called “BRIC” countries — as
well as Mexico, Venezuela, the
Czech Republic, South Africa
and Turkey. All are expected
to experience double-digit per-
centage growth.
The message: The world’s
leading computer chip-maker
and its industry allies have no
choice but to launch a market-
ing attack on foreign shores.
PC sales are decelerat-
ing in the U.S. because the
same technological advances
that fueled the PC industry’s
rise — faster processors and
lower costs every couple of
years — are now benefiting
the devices that are usurping
it. Consumers can now use
smaller gadgets to do many of
the same things they once did
with PCs, such as surfing the
Internet, storing photos and
sending e-mail. Apple even
boasts that users can edit home
movies on an iPad.
Indeed, consumers’
increasing demand for tablets
is a looming threat. Some 50
million tablets are expected to
be sold worldwide this year,
and that could double to as
many as 100 million next year,
according to various estimates.
Although that’s still small
compared with sales of 362
million PCs this year, as esti-
mated by IDC, the PC industry
has reason to worry because
of how quickly the tablet has
been able to claimed such a
large corner of the market.
Goldman Sachs calls tab-
lets “one of the most disruptive
forces in computing in nearly
three decades.” It predicts that
as many as 21 million people
will buy tablets instead of lap-
tops this year, jumping to 26.5
million next year.
In recent quarters, corpora-
tions have buoyed much of the
spending on PCs. That likely
continued in the April-June peri-
od, but the drag from consum-
ers is expected to be substantial.
Intel Corp., which makes 80
percent of the world’s micro-
processor chips, issues financial
results today. Advanced Micro
Devices Inc., its smaller rival,
and Microsoft Corp., whose
Windows software runs on
most of the world’s PCs, report
on Thursday.
Intel and its PC manufac-
turing customers are hustling
to adapt.
Intel, for example, is work-
ing on chips that are less power-
hungry so they’re more useful
in battery-dependent mobile
devices. The company says it
signed deals for some 35 differ-
ent tablet and tablet-PC hybrids
to use its chips. Intel is pursuing
the smartphone market, which
until now has been controlled
by a competing chip design
developed by U.K.-based ARM
Holdings PLC.
Intel, a linchpin in the cre-
ation of the PC market, has
experimented with putting
its chips into non-PC devices
before, only to retreat under
pressure to focus on its core
business. Now investors’
interest has flipped, and Intel
finds itself under pressure to
move faster into smartphone
and tablets.
The message isn’t lost on
the company: The bulk of
Otellini’s recent sales pitch to
investors centered on Intel’s
efforts to expand into the new
technologies.
The consequences for not
failing to act have already been
severe. AMD’s board forced out
CEO Dirk Meyer in January,
largely because the chipmaker
lacked a defined mobile strat-
egy. The company is still with-
out a permanent CEO.
The corporate hand-wring-
ing, analysts say, shows the
magnitude of the industry’s
transformation.
“These changes are a fun-
damental shift in computing
behavior,” said Forrester’s
Epps, noting that computing
is now an always-on activity.
“The main shift for PC com-
panies that will survive is they
need to shift their focus from
computers (as) the device to
computing (as) the behavior.”
Many PC makers such as
Hewlett-Packard Co., Dell
Inc. and Lenovo Group Ltd.
have responded by designing
tablets of their own.
None of the new tablets
have become a sensation like
the iPad, which has sold near-
ly 29 million units since it
went on sale in April 2010. On
Tuesday, Apple said that in
the latest quarter, it sold about
five times as many iPhones
as it does Mac computers. It
sold more than twice as many
iPads as Macs.
“If you have a tablet,
you don’t turn on the PC as
much,” said Brian White, a
Ticonderoga Securities ana-
lyst who covers the PC indus-
try. “If you have a tablet, you
may not bring your notebook
on a trip. It’s only going to
get stronger, and tablets are
going to get better and better.
This is a legitimate threat to a
PC maker. They have to have
both, and unfortunately most
are behind in the game.”
Even if current market
projections become a reality,
there still would be a wide gulf
between the $35 billion tablet
market and the $250 billion PC
market. The PC won’t become
obsolete any time soon because
it’s still the device of choice
for creating the content that
consumers increasingly access
with their smartphones and tab-
lets. At least for now, PCs are
also needed to store data and to
load information onto smaller
devices.
Rebooting the PC industry: Tablets force shift
“This is a time of
intense change.
New competition
for PC manu-
facturers makes
it just really,
really hard to
make a profit.”
— Sarah Rotman Epps,
Forrester Research analyst
Wednesday, July 20, 2011 The Herald - 9
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JOHN
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Stop i n at
& see how I can put
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419-223-3673
1360 Greely Chapel Rd.
Lima, Ohio
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TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS
FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
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These are just a few of our listings, call us we have more!
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$99,500-Delphos SD
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$99,900-Van Wert SD
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$47,000-Delphos SD
A Fine Fix- up Find
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$74,900-Delphos SD
Two-story That Needs Some TLC
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692-SOLD
Jim Langhals Realty
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OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900
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1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
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12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
415
S.
Cass
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Monday, March 10
at the Delphos Public Library
6 PM
648 S. Jefferson St.,
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
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2007
CHRYSLER
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Place your Ad Today Place your Ad Today
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close to park and schools. Fireplace, 22x22 great room, large open
kitchen, new roof and furnace, appliances stay. Move in ready.
Available immediately.
Call for showing 419-863-9480. OPEN SUNDAYS 2-4
MLS SERVICE
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TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS
FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
1109 S. Clay St., Delphos
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928 N. Franklin St., Delphos
These are just a few of our listings, call us we have more!
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
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$99,500-Delphos SD
Ideal Opportunity
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$99,900-Van Wert SD
Add Finishing To This Home!
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$47,000-Delphos SD
A Fine Fix- up Find
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$74,900-Delphos SD
Two-story That Needs Some TLC
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Exquisite Sense Of Luxury
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Large & Luxurious 1- 1/ 2 Story
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A Charming Personality
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Peace And Privacy
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Enticing Two-story
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692-SOLD
Jim Langhals Realty
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OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900
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Call for showing ...
1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
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12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
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Cass
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Monday, March 10
at the Delphos Public Library
6 PM
648 S. Jefferson St.,
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
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MOTORCRAFT
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BATTERIES
TESTED
TOUGH
®
MAX
with 100-month warranty
$
99
95
Some vehicles slightly higher
Installation extra.
Price valid with exchange.
See Service Advisor for
limited-warranty details. Taxes extra.
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Classifieds Sells Classifieds Sells
Place your Ad Today Place your Ad Today
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See me,
BILL HOFFMAN
for the best buy on your
new or used vehicle.
TOM AHL
617 KING AVE., LIMA, OH 45805
419-228-3413 CELL 419-296-7188
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
Delphos Trading Post
528 N. Washington St.
DELPHOS, OHIO
FLEA MALL
NOW OPEN
Every Saturday
7am to 4pm
Come See Variety
VENDORS
WANTED
Call
601-347-7525
or Stop By
for Information -
Setup
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
CAR DETAILER for local
dealership
Must be 18 years of age.
Apply at Knippen Chrysler
800 W. 5th St.
Delphos, Oh. 45833
DIESEL TRUCK/
Automotive Technician
for local car dealership
Competative Pay, Paid
Vacation, and we
offer a medical
insurance plan.
Apply at Knippen Chrysler
800 W. 5th St.
Delphos, Oh. 45833
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+ years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42cents per mile & higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with re-
spect!
PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
MOM SEEKING help.
Cleaning, cooking etc. 6
hours a day. Send resume
to 2825 Southworth Rd.,
Delphos, OH 45833
COMPUTER OFFI CE
Specialist -Classes begin-
ning August 8, 2011.
Openings available. Fi-
nancial Aid available for
those qualifying. Call
Vantage Career Center
1- 800- 686- 3944 or
419-238-5411
Sara Ricker ext 121.
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
- Cl asses begi nni ng
August 8, 2011. Become
the most versatile member
of the allied health team.
Openings available. Fi-
nancial Aid available for
those qualifying. Call
Vantage Career Center
1/ 800- 686- 3944 or
419-238-5411
Sara Ricker ext 121.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
GRANDFATHERS
CLOCK a “Herschede”,
over 40 years old. In very
good condition. $500.
Roll top desk over 30
years old. Like new $350.
Old fashioned stereo-con-
sole, still works-over 30
years old! $295.
I f i nt er est ed cal l
419- 236- 6400 af t er
4:00pm during the week
NEW, QUEEN pillow-top
mattress, never used, still
sealed in original wrapper.
$75. Call (260)749-6100.
340

Garage Sales
12412 S. Clay
Thursday & Friday
9am - 5pm
Lawn mower, camping
gear, BMX/bikes, Ameri-
can Girl Doll Nellie, Bar-
bies, Boyds Bears, saxo-
phone, books, snowmo-
bile, girls clothes 5-14,
adult clothes Lost of misc.
23573 JENNINGS-
Delphos Rd. west of
Delphos off of 697
Friday Only 8am to 7pm
Girls and Boys clothes up
to size 8. Booster seats,
Little Tyke work bench,
girls bikes, shoes, soccer
cleats and toys. Also have
adult clothes and misc.
560

Lawn & Garden
TOPSOIL
CLEAN, black, pulverized
for easy use. Load you or
del i ver ed. CALL
(419)968-2940
600

Apts. for Rent
1 BDRM downstairs apt.
in Van Wert. Includes
range, refrigerator. Land-
lord mows lawn. 638 N.
Cherry St. $325/mo. $325
securi ty deposi t. Ph.
419-453-3956.
1 BDRM upstairs apt. in
Ottoville. Includes refrig-
erator & range. Landlord
pays water, sewer and
garbage pickup. Mows
lawn. 387 W. Third St.
$375/mo. $375 security
deposit. 419-453-3956.
TRIPLEX UPSTAIRS apt.
1 BR w/appliances, quiet
neighborhood. $300/mo.
and $300 security deposit,
Utilities not included. No
pets. 419-234-2847
800

House For Sale
LAND CONTRACT or
Short term Rent to own
homes. Several available.
Addresses and pictures at
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com.
419-586-8220
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
BATH-SHOWER DOOR
Call 419-230-6190 $50
like new!
FREE 3 yr. old Himalayan
Rabbit W/Winterized hutch
and outdoor playpen. Is lit-
terbox trained. Won best
of opposite at Van Wert
Co. Fair. 419-516-7165
FREE- WHI TE, long
haired male cat, with blue
eyes, very affectionate.
Needs a forever home.
Call 419-692-7397 or
419-302-2083
999

Legals
LEGAL NOTICE
Legal Notice is hereby
given that under Section
1137 of the Codified Ordi-
nance of the City of Del-
phos that an appeal has
been filed by:
1. Erin & Christopher
Kemper, 432 Harmon St.,
have requested to con -
struct a fence on the prop-
erty line.
The city of Delphos Zon-
ing Board of Appeals has
set forth a public hearing
on this appeal. This hear-
ing shall be held at
6: 30pm on Monday,
August 1, 2011 in the
council chambers at the
Municipal Building, located
at 608 North Canal St.
Delphos, OH 45833.
This meeting is open the
public and all contiguous
property owners are wel-
come to attend.
Gregory C. Berquist,
Zoning Inspector
7/20/11
LEGAL
THE unaudited financial
statements for the year
ended 12/31/10 for the
City of Delphos are avail-
able for public inspection.
The statements may be
viewed at the Municipal
Building, 608 N. Canal St.,
Delphos OH during busi-
ness hours of 8:00am to
4:00pm
110

School & Instruction
300

Household Goods
Place Your Ad
Today
G I S T K I N D S
P I G L E T F A R O U T
A L E U T S O N I O N Y
H A R M P A N S R S
B E S I D E
A S N E R R A N C I D
T I A R A L U N A R
M A N E S I T C H Y
M O D E S T S T A L E
D E A R T H
U H S I D O R A M S
B L I N T Z A D O R E S
E N T I R E D R A G O N
T A S T Y S T O W
Answer
to Puzzle
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Sum and substance
5 Varieties
10 Farm baby
12 Cool!
13 Walrus hunters
14 Pungent
15 Cause injury to
16 Kitchen utensil
18 Almost grads
19 Next to
22 Emmy-winning Ed
25 Spoiled
29 Jeweled ornament
30 Of the moon
32 Horses have them
33 Like a bug bite
34 Humble
37 Unimaginative
38 Shortage
40 Speech stumbles
43 Witness’s vow (2 wds.)
44 Plays bumper-cars
48 Thin pancake
50 Loves dearly
52 Whole
53 Knight’s foe
54 Delicious
55 Pack away
DOWN
1 Arizona river
2 Disney CEO Bob
3 Lay dormant
4 New Year in Hanoi
5 Jayhawker st.
6 Pupil’s place
7 Hussein’s queen
8 Grayish horses
9 Dirty place
10 Oompah- —
11 Sugar amts.
12 Turner ex
17 Mammal’s need
20 Wiped out a fle
21 Join up
22 PIN prompter
23 Where Anna met a king
24 Prefx for second
26 Large trout
27 Cuzco founder
28 Arlene of old flms
31 Reuben bread
35 Confscate
36 Little kid
39 Pothole locale
40 Bone below the elbow
41 Top 10 songs
42 Temperamental tizzy
45 Jason’s ship
46 Feeding time cry
47 FICA number
48 Vegas transaction
49 Hear a case
51 JAMA readers
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12
13 14
15 16 17 18
19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
32 33
34 35 36 37
38 39
40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47
48 49 50 51
52 53
54 55
DEAR DR. GOTT: First, I
want to say that I’ve been a fan of
yours for a long time. Then I want
to tell you it makes me furious
to have everyone assume that a
person who has herpes has been
promiscuous.
I, too, have herpes outbreaks at
a spot on my buttocks, and there
is no doubt in my mind where
I got it -- at the hospital. Having
been monogamous for at least
12 years at the time, I had to
have emergency surgery, and the
herpes popped up within a week
of discharge. The outbreak was
exactly where I got all my pain
shots. The location migrates just
a bit every time it crops up, but
it’s never been anywhere close to
my genital area, thank heavens. A
friend of mine also says she got
herpes in the same hospital, years
earlier. We’ve been friends for 30
years, and I just found that out last
year. Her outbreaks are on her inner
thigh, much closer to her knee than
to her genitals.
I hope this makes some of your
readers feel better.
That said, I want to recommend
nail polish to your readers. The
dermatologist I went to (because I
did not know what the “rash” was)
gave me pills and cream that upset
my digestive system, so I tried
what I use on anything that itches
-- clear nail polish! Applied three
or four times a day, the outbreak
will usually be gone by the third
day.
DEAR READER: Thank you
for sharing your experience. There
are a number of different forms of
herpes (80, to be exact), referred to
as herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1)
and herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-
2).
HSV-1 can cause genital herpes
but more commonly causes
infection around the mouth and lips,
as in fever blisters. Other areas of
the body can be affected, but that’s
uncommon. HSV-1 is caused by
the herpes simplex virus, and is
estimated to be present in up to 80
percent of the entire American adult
population. Both HSV-1 and -2 can
be released from the sores the virus
causes but is also released between
outbreaks from clear skin that
doesn’t appear to be affected at all.
Genital herpes most commonly
results from HSV-2. It is estimated
to be present in up to 20 percent
of the American adult population.
Oddly enough, many people are
completely unaware they even have
this sexually transmitted disease
because it can remain dormant in
the system for years. Transmission
of HSV-2 occurs during sexual
contact with someone who has
the infection, who may not have a
visible outbreak and who may be
completely unaware he or she is
infected.
You are correct in that the
herpes virus can be contracted in a
hospital setting. The most common
site is the delivery room, where an
infected mother may transmit the
virus to her infant at the time of
delivery.
Treatment, as you were likely
prescribed, consists of antiviral
medication. I must admit that
you have opened up another
avenue with the use of clear nail
polish. My guess is, it acts as an
occlusive dressing and keeps the
air and moisture from reaching the
open-wound site. I have never had
anyone else tell me that HSV can
be controlled through this method,
but if it works for you without
unwanted side effects, I guess you
should stick with it! Thank you for
sharing the information.
Copyright 2011, United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Clear nail polish to the rescue - again!
DR. PETER J. GOTT
On
Health
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
Putnam County
D. Dale Jostpille TR and
Elaine K. Jostpille TR, S 11 Q NE
.407 acre, Jennings Township, to
Brian D. Jostpille and Sarah L.
Jostpille.
Donald W. Newland, S 34 Q
SW 1.0 acre, Ottawa Township,
to Robert J. Nichols.
John C. Fortman and Bonita J.
Fortman, Lot 248, Glandorf, to
Forty Three Limited.
Michael L. Roethlisberger and
Donna M. Roethlisberger, Lot 57
and Lot 59, Columbus Grove, to
Huggins Auto Parts Inc.
Dennis Hanefeld and Kim
Hanefeld, Lot 206, Continental,
to Donald L. Hanefeld, Ruth
Ann Everett and Douglas
Hanefeld.
Donald L. Hanefeld, Douglas
S. Hanefeld and Debra Hanefeld,
S 30 Q NE 11.787, Palmer
Township to Donald L. Hanefeld
and Douglas S. Hanefeld.
Donald L. Hanefeld, S 30
Q NE 23.149 acres, Palmer
Township, to Donald L. Hanefeld
and Douglas S. Hanefeld.
Byrnes Excavating Inc., Lot
168 .069 acre, Ottawa, to Scott
M. Crossgrove and Ashley W.
Crossgrove.
HUGE GARAGE Sale
Day-Aregood. 6543
Peltier Rd. Many teacher
materials, household,
boy’s clothing infant-size
4T, Nitro gas powered
R-C truck, entertainment
center. Thurs. July 21,
9am-8pm. Fri. July 22,
9am-2pm.
Thursday 8-6pm Friday
9-5pm 1350 Marsh
Ave, Delphos “TONS”
of baby boy clothes
and boy clothes sizes
0-3 to 12mo., 3T to 12.
Baby items, Bumbo
seat, walker, Play mat
ext: TV’s, computer,
keyboard, household
items. All out huge sale
must see!
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Wednesday Evening July 20, 2011
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Middle Family Family Happy Primetime Nightline Local Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live
WHIO/CBS Big Brother Criminal Minds CSI: Crime Scene Local Late Show Letterman Late
WLIO/NBC Minute to Win It America's Got Talent Love in the Wild Local Tonight Show w/Leno Late
WOHL/FOX So You Think Local
ION Without a Trace Without a Trace Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Without a Trace
Cable Channels
A & E Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Family Jewels Storage Storage
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ANIM I Shouldn't Be Alive I Shouldn't Be Alive I Shouldn't Be Alive I Shouldn't Be Alive I Shouldn't Be Alive
BET Romeo Must Die Toya: A F The Mo'Nique Show Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Housewives/NJ Flipping Out Rocco's Dinner Party Rocco's Dinner Party Housewives/NYC
CMT Ron White's Celebrity Ron White's Celebrity Blue/TV Blue/TV Smarter Smarter
CNN In the Arena Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight
COMEDY Chappelle Chappelle South Pk South Pk South Pk Jon Daily Colbert South Pk Jon
DISC Sons of Guns Sons of Guns One Man Army Sons of Guns One Man Army
DISN Good Luck Shake It Ratatouille ANT Farm Good Luck Wizards Wizards
E! Sex and t Sex and t Epic TV Mmnts Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN MLB Baseball Baseball Tonight SportsCenter Baseball NFL Live
ESPN2 World, Poker Soccer
FAM Melissa Georgia Cyberbully The 700 Club Whose? Whose?
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FX The Proposal Rescue Me Rescue Me Rescue Me
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HIST Third Reich Third Reich Third Reich
LIFE Pawn Pawn Roseanne Roseanne Dance Moms How I Met How I Met Chris How I Met
MTV Pregnant Awkward. Teen Mom The Challenge The Challenge Teen Mom
NICK Family My Wife Lopez Lopez '70s Show '70s Show Married Married Married Married
SCI Ghost Hunters Ghost Hunters Inter. Legend Quest Ghost Hunters Inter. Legend Quest
SPIKE Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior Ways Die Ways Die
TBS Browns Browns Payne Payne Payne Payne Conan Lopez Tonight
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TLC Hoard-Buried Pregnant Pregnant Toddlers & Tiaras Pregnant Pregnant Toddlers & Tiaras
TNT The Mentalist Franklin & Bash Bones Franklin & Bash Leverage
TOON Dude Destroy King-Hill King-Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Aqua Teen
TRAV Man, Food Man, Food Man v Fd Man v Fd Conqueror Conqueror Man, Food Man, Food Man v Fd Man v Fd
TV LAND AllFamily AllFamily Raymond Raymond Cleveland Divorced Divorced Cleveland Retired a Retired a
USA NCIS Royal Pains Necessary Roughness Burn Notice Royal Pains
VH1 The Brothers Behind the Music Behind the Music Celebrity Rehab
WGN Chris Chris How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine Scrubs Scrubs South Pk South Pk
Premium Channels
HBO The Wolfman True Blood Real Time/Bill Maher Wall Street: Money
MAX Bones The Final Destination Sex and the City 2 Co-Ed
SHOW Green Teller NASCAR Weeds Franchise NASCAR Franchise Green National-Van Wilder
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
10 - The Herald Wednesday, July 20, 2011
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Sister free-loading
off parents
Dear Annie: My parents
are in their early 80s. They’ve
had some health problems
and are slowing down, but
they are still able to care for
themselves. They make ends
meet because they carefully
saved over the years.
The problem is my young-
er sister, who went through a
difficult divorce several years
ago. “Donna” hasn’t worked
much since then, and Mom
and Dad are paying nearly
all of her expenses. If my
parents were to need assisted
living, I worry it
could be a major
hardship.
Donna shows
no signs of look-
ing for full-time
work. When Mom
recently told me
that vacuuming
hurts her arms, I
asked Donna to
pitch in with the
heavy housework.
She agreed to do
so, but when I
later asked Mom about it,
she said Donna told her she
didn’t have time because
she was so busy applying
for jobs and was afraid she
might miss a phone call if she
left home. (As if cell phones
don’t travel.)
I understand that jobs
aren’t easy to come by, but
couldn’t Donna spend one
day a week doing housework
and running errands for my
parents? I would do it myself,
but there have been layoffs
and pay cuts at work, and
my hours have increased sub-
stantially. I get home late,
and I’m exhausted. It annoys
me that Donna is living a
life of leisure at my parents’
expense, and when I say any-
thing, they make excuses for
her. Any advice for me? --
Emma in Texas
Dear Texas: You cannot
force Donna to be a better
daughter, nor are your par-
ents likely to insist on it.
Since they could use some
extra assistance, however,
it wouldn’t hurt to talk to
Donna again and remind her
gently that she currently is
the one with the most flex-
ible schedule. Ask her how
she thinks she can be of help.
Then suggest to your par-
ents that they discuss their
future financial needs with
their banker, lawyer or other
impartial intermediary.
Dear Annie: I belong to
an organization that supports
women who wish to go to col-
lege. We recently presented
a sizable scholarship check,
in person, to a very needy
young high school graduate.
We have had no response
from her.
We would like to send
her a note about this. There
is a possibility she could
get additional grants in the
future, but we feel a response
is both courteous and neces-
sary. Is there proper word-
ing for such a letter from
us? It seems shameful that
our young generation is not
taught this proper etiquette.
-- Midge
Dear Midge: When you
presented the scholarship, did
the girl thank you in per-
son? If so, she may not real-
ize that it is good form to
also express her appreciation
in writing. Send her a note
saying, “We were delighted
to award you the Women’s
Scholarship last spring. We
would very much like to be
kept informed of your prog-
ress, so please let us know
how you are doing.”
Dear Annie: I
read the letter from
“Wondering,” who
was asked to return
her parents’ nativity
set to her brother.
Both of my par-
ents have passed,
and we adult chil-
dren all enjoy
the memories of
Christmases with
Mom and Dad. We,
too, have a special
nativity set that has
sentimental value to all of us.
Our solution is to share it.
Each year, a different sibling
gets to use the set as part of
their Christmas decorations.
When it comes time to take
down the tree, we pack up
the nativity set and send it
along to the next person, and
so on.
This is a nice way for
each of us to have the special
display in our own homes
and then share the memories
when we visit each other. --
Remembering in New York
Dear New York: This is
a lovely idea. Thank you for
suggesting it.
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie’s Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777
W. Century Blvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2011
There is a good chance that Lady
Luck could intervene on your behalf
in the year ahead, and help you
finally achieve something you failed
at numerous times in the past. Thus,
it is important you keep on plugging
toward your goals.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
Trying to help out another while at the
same time attempting to do your own
job is likely to turn out to be a bummer
for both of you, as you lose track of
which project you’re working on.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- You’re
not likely to take kindly to those who
oppose your opinions or ideas. If this
is the case, you’re apt to turn your
back on some really good thinking
that could help you out a lot.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Be
very careful about who you team up
with. If you link up with someone
who doesn’t operate with the same
high standards as you, this person
could create trouble.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Owing to an inclination to negatively
judge people in advance, you could
easily begin a relationship thinking
the worst of someone. It’s a sure way
to cut your own throat and turn your
back on a nice person.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Adopting the wrong attitude will
defeat you right off the bat. All you’ll
do is unjustly jaundice your view of
everyone and everything.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Just because a friend of yours
is in a mood that makes him or her
difficult to get along with at this point
in time, there’s no reason to shun this
person altogether. Let him or her be
human.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Once you establish an objective,
you’re apt be quite headstrong when
going after it, which is well and good,
as long as you don’t carry it too far. Be
moderate, above all things.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- If you’re looking for some
encouragement, don’t seek out the
opinions of someone who seldom
endorses another person’s ideas. All
you’ll get is a negative assessment
that’ll discourage you.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
Be careful about borrowing money
that you could have trouble paying
back, and avoid loaning out what you
can’t afford to lose. In either case, it is
likely to be problematical for you.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
Your self-sufficient qualities might
desert you and, as a result, you could
wrongfully depend on others to
accomplish your aims. You won’t like
what they do, nor will you relish the
results.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Although you’re usually pretty
efficient, this could be one of those
days when everything you do seems
harder or comes out all wrong. If this
is the case, put off these jobs until
another time.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Trying too hard to please someone will
result in no one having a good time.
Relax and let the chips fall where they
may. Even if things still don’t go well,
you’ll be able to laugh.
COPYRIGHT2011 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Wednesday, July 20, 2011 The Herald — 11
www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Tuesday’s questions:
The most popular street name in the United States
is Park, because there are more Park streets, avenues,
boulevards, places, etc. Than any other street name.
A snake never closes its eyes. It has no eyelids, only
a hard lens over each eye.
Today’s questions:
What item, which will fit down the pipes, is nearly
impossible, if not entirely possible to flush down a
toilet?
What country has the most frontiers?
Answers in Thursday’s Herald.
Today’s words:
Ecdemomania: compulsive origin
Oviparous: producing eggs that hatch outside the
body
Today’s joke:
A college student challenged a senior citizen, say-
ing it was impossible for their generation to under-
stand his. “You grew up in a different world,” the
student said. “Today we have television, jet planes,
space travel, nuclear energy, computers…”
Taking advantage of a pause in the student’s lita-
ny, the old geezer said, “You’re right. We didn’t have
those things when we were young; so we invented
them! What are you doing for the next generation?”
Cameron, Murdoch grilled by British Parliament
By PAISLEY DODDS
Associated Press
LONDON — Prime Minister David Cameron
emphatically denied claims that his staff tried to
stop an inquiry into a phone hacking and police
bribery at the News of the World and defended
his decision to hire one of the tabloid’s editors
as his communications chief.
In a raucous emergency session today in
Parliament, Cameron admitted, however, that
both the ruling Conservatives and the opposition
Labour parties had failed to pursue key develop-
ments in the hacking case over the years.
Cameron cut short his Africa trip to appear
before the House of Commons, which delayed
its summer break to debate issues engulfing
Britain’s political and media elite and Rupert
Murdoch’s global communications empire,
News Corp., which owned the troubled News
of the World.
Though apologetic during a three-hour
appearance on Tuesday, Murdoch insisted he
was at fault only for trusting the wrong people
at the News of the World, which he described as
a tiny portion of his vast media empire.
Murdoch said he had known nothing of alle-
gations that staff at his News of the World tab-
loid hacked into cell phones and bribed police
to get information on celebrities, politicians and
crime victims, and that he never would have
approved such “horrible invasions” of privacy.
Despite lawmakers’ suggestions that his orga-
nization encouraged such behavior, Murdoch
was unflappable — even after a protester rushed
to throw a foam pie at him during the hearing.
A News Corp. attorney partially blocked the
attack and Murdoch’s 42-year-old wife, Wendi
Deng, slapped the prankster. After the protester
was arrested, the billionaire simply shed his
splattered suit jacket and continued answering
questions.
Cameron’s former communications chief
Andy Coulson — a former editor at the tabloid
— is among 10 people who have been arrested
in the scandal. One person has been cleared by
police.
Lawmakers want to know why Cameron
insisted on hiring Coulson despite warnings
and how much the prime minister knew about
the phone hacking investigation. Some have
alleged that some of Cameron’s staff may have
met with police in an attempt to pressure them
to drop the investigation.
“To risk any perception that No 10 (Downing
Street) was seeking to influence a sensitive
police investigation in any way would have
been completely wrong,” he said.
Cameron did, however, meet with News Corp.
executives more than two dozen times from May
2010 to this month — meetings that were criti-
cized in Parliament by Labour Party leader Ed
Miliband, who said Cameron made a “catastrophic
error of judgment” in hiring Coulson.
Cameron defended Coulson’s work in gov-
ernment and said if it emerged that Coulson had
lied to him about his role in the hacking case he
would take it seriously.
“You don’t make decisions in hindsight,”
Cameron said.
Britain’s Conservative Party said Tuesday
it had learned that another recently arrested
phone-hacking suspect, former News of the
World executive editor Neil Wallis, may have
advised Coulson before the 2010 national elec-
tion that put Cameron into power. It said Wallis
was not paid for the advice, however.
Cameron also said the hacking affair raises
questions over the ethics and values of London’s
police force. He told lawmakers today that he
would look at ways to bring in new leadership
to Britain’s police force and named six people
who will assistant Lord Justice Brian Leveson’s
inquiry into the culture, practices, and ethics of
the press.
The scandal has captivated audiences from
America to Murdoch’s native Australia, and
there’s more to come; only a fraction of some
3,870 people whose names and telephone num-
bers were found in News of the World files
have been contacted by police so far. It remains
unknown how many of those names were tar-
geted for hacking.
On today, a judge awarded “Notting Hill”
actor Hugh Grant — one of the most prominent
celebrity critics of the Murdoch empire — the
right to see whether he was one of them.
Meanwhile, a House of Commons commit-
tee on today blasted both News International,
the News Corp. unit which operates the British
papers, and London Metropolitan Police for
their performance on the scandal.
“We deplore the response of News
International to the original investigation into
hacking. It is almost impossible to escape the
conclusion ... that they were deliberately try-
ing to thwart a criminal investigation,” said
the Home Affairs committee, which has been
grilling past and present Metropolitan Police
officials about their decision not to reopen the
hacking investigation in 2009.
However, the panel said it was astounded
that police would blame the newspaper’s tactics
for their failure to mount a robust investigation.
“The difficulties were offered to us as justi-
fying a failure to investigate further and we saw
nothing that suggested there was a real will to
tackle and overcome those obstacles,” the com-
mittee said.
The committee said it was “appalled” by
testimony on Tuesday from Dick Fedorcio,
director of public affairs for the Metropolitan
Police press office, about a short-term contract
given to Wallis to advise the department on
press and publicity. Fedorcio testified that he
couldn’t remember who recommended Wallis
and “attempt to deflect all blame” to Assistant
Commissioner John Yates, who has resigned as
head of the anti-terrorist command.
The revelation of the Wallis contract led to
the resignation on Sunday of the police chief,
Paul Stephenson.
Buckingham Palace reacted sharply to a
claim by legislator Chris Bryant that the palace
had raised concerns with Cameron’s office over
his decision to hire Coulson.
“It is outrageous to suggest this,” said a
palace spokesman, speaking on condition of
anonymity in line with royal practice.
Today, police said they had charged Jonathan
May-Bowles, 26, with behavior causing harass-
ment, alarm or distress in a public place.
As the scandal exploded this month, Murdoch
shut down the 168-year-old News of the World,
gave up on buying full control of British Sky
Broadcasting, Britain’s biggest commercial
television company, and accepted the resigna-
tions of two top executives.
Gov’t advisers: No
copays for contraceptives
Over 65 and not worried
about heat? You should be
Atlantis checked for last landing
Researchers may be close to fnding Alzheimer’s screening
By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
and LAURAN NEERGAARD
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Millions of women stand to gain free
access to a broad menu of birth control methods, thanks to a
recommendation issued Tuesday by health experts advising the
government.
An Institute of Medicine panel recommended that the govern-
ment require health insurance companies to cover birth control for
women as preventive care, without copayments. Contraception
— along with such care as diabetes tests during pregnancy and
screening for the virus that causes cervical cancer — was one of
eight recommended preventive services for women.
“Unintended pregnancies carry health consequences for the
mother — psychological, emotional and physical — and also
consequences for the newborn,” said Dr. Linda Rosenstock,
panel chairwoman and dean of public health at the University
of California, Los Angeles. “The overwhelming evidence was
strongly supportive of the health benefit” of contraception.
A half century after the introduction of the birth control pill, the
panel’s recommendations may help to usher in another revolution.
Medical experts say easier access could start a shift to more reli-
able forms of long-acting birth control, such as implants or IUDs,
which are gaining acceptance in other economically developed
countries.
Birth control use is “virtually universal” in the United States,
according to a government report last year. Generic versions of the
pill are available for as little as $9 a month at big drug store chains.
Yet about half of all pregnancies are unplanned. Many occur
among women using some form of contraception, and forgetting
to use it is a major reason. Experts say a shift to longer acting
forms of birth control would help.
Contraception is about more than simply preventing pregnancy
— it can help make a woman’s next pregnancy healthier by spac-
ing births far enough apart, generally 18 months to two years.
Research links closely spaced births to a risk of such problems as
prematurity, low birth weight, even autism.
Other preventive services recommended by the IOM panel
include:
—At least one “well-woman” preventive care visit annually.
—Annual HIV counseling and screening for sexually active
women.
—Screening for and counseling about domestic violence.
—Annual counseling on sexually transmitted infections for
sexually active women.
—Support for breast feeding mothers, including the cost of
renting pumps.
The screening for the virus that causes cervical cancer is for
women starting at age 30, no more frequently than every three
years. As for the pregnancy diabetes check, it should come at the
first prenatal visit for high-risk women, and between 24 and 28
weeks for all others.
Although the services will be free of any additional charge
to patients, somebody has to pay. The cost is likely to be spread
among other people with health insurance, resulting in slightly
higher premiums.
It’s unclear how easy it will be to take advantage of the no-copay
rule in the doctor’s office. Consider: A woman sees the doctor about
pain in her hip — paying the required copay — but during the same
visit, receives her overdue screening for cervical cancer.
The Health and Human Services Department should require
that the woman not be charged lab fees for that cervical test even
though it wasn’t scheduled separately as a preventive-care visit,
said Cynthia Pearson of the National Women’s Health Network.
By LINDSEY TANNER
AP Medical Writer
CHICAGO — This week’s heat wave may be uncomfortable,
but you’re healthy, active and feel just fine. So what if you’re over
65? Think again. Feeling good doesn’t mean you’re safe.
There are changes in an older person that raise the risk for heat
stroke and other problems. An older body contains far less water
than a younger one. Older brains can’t sense temperature changes
as well, and they don’t recognize thirst as easily.
Blistering summer heat is an underappreciated killer, claiming
by some estimates as many as 1,000 U.S. lives each year — more
than any other type of weather.
One federal study found 40 percent of heat-related deaths were
in people 65 and older. Those numbers could be lower if more
heeded heat warnings aimed at seniors. Yet research has shown
many people over 65 don’t think the warnings apply to them —
because they don’t think they’re “old.”
Scott Sheridan, who studies the effects of heat and climate on
health at Kent State University, researched how people over 65
view heat warnings. In his 2006 study of more than 900 people, he
found about 70 percent knew about advice to drink plenty of water
on very hot days, avoid outdoor activities and stay inside with air
conditioning. But only about half said they followed the advice.
“People well into their 70s would say old people should watch
out but not them,” he said. “People just didn’t want to be thought
of in that same category.”
Dr. David Zich, an emergency medicine specialist at
Northwestern Memorial Hospital, said he has colleagues in medi-
cine that age who shun being thought of as “elderly.” But those
heat warnings apply to them, too.
As Dr. William Dale, geriatrics chief at the University of
Chicago Medical Center explains it, “Any older adult has less
reserve and is more likely to become dehydrated than others, just
because their overall body water goes down with age no matter
how healthy you are.”
The amount of water in the body declines with aging, from
about 80 percent in young adulthood to about 55 to 60 percent for
people in their 80s, Dale said.
Temperature sensors in the brain become less sensitive as
people age, so the body doesn’t get the same signals to drink water
in hot weather, and older people often don’t feel thirsty even when
they need to replenish, Dale said.
They also may not feel the typical symptoms of dehydration,
such as headache or dizziness. Some complain of just feeling
“bad” and think they’re getting sick, he said.
Conditions were ripe for those types of complaints Tuesday
as a dense dome of hot air remained parked over much of the
nation’s midsection, raising temperatures into the mid- to upper-
90s from the Texas Gulf Coast to the Rockies and the northern
Plains. Tropical-level humidity raised the heat index in many
places to nearly 120 degrees.
In South Dakota, up to 1,500 head of cattle died across the
state from the heat. And in eastern Iowa, the scorching sun caused
a portion of Interstate 380 to buckle. The weather also sent doz-
ens of people to hospitals, canceled outdoor sporting events and
caused sporadic power outages.
In such conditions, dehydration can lead to heat exhaustion
and potentially deadly heat stroke. During a heat wave, that can
happen in a matter of hours in older people if they over-exert
themselves, don’t drink enough water or are frail and don’t get
out of uncooled homes, said Dr. Chris Carpenter, an emergency
medicine physician at Washington University School of Medicine
in St. Louis.
By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — On the eve of NASA’s
historic, wheel-stopping end to the shuttle program, the four
astronauts making the final journey said Wednesday they’re
starting to feel a rush of emotions.
“You know what? I really do feel like it’s coming near
the end,” said the commander of the homeward-bound space
shuttle Atlantis, Christopher Ferguson.
“It’s going to be tough,” Ferguson said in a series of TV
interviews 24 hours before Thursday’s planned touchdown.
“It’s going to be an emotional moment for a lot of people who
have dedicated their lives to the shuttle program for 30 years.
But we’re going to try to keep it upbeat. We’re going to try to
keep it light, and we’re going to try to make it a celebration
of the tremendous crowning achievements that have occurred
over the last 30 years.”
Among the highlights noted Wednesday by the four-member
crew as well as flight controllers: the 180 satellites deployed
into orbit by the space shuttle fleet and the construction of the
International Space Station, a nearly 1 million-pound science
outpost that took 12 1/2 years and 37 shuttle flights to build.
Atlantis departed the space station Tuesday, after restocking
it with a year’s worth of supplies.
The very last satellite to be released from a space shuttle
popped out of a can Wednesday: a little 8-pound box covered
with experimental solar cells.
By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
AP Medical Writer
PARIS — Scientists are closing in on a long-sought goal: A
blood test to screen people for Alzheimer’s disease.
An experimental test did a good job of indicating how
much of the telltale Alzheimer’s plaque lurks in people’s
brains, Australian researchers reported today. If the test proves
accurate in larger studies, it could offer a way to check people
having memory problems to see who needs more definitive
testing for the disease.
Many blood tests are being developed and a few are used
in research settings now, but only the Australian one has been
validated against brain scans and other accepted diagnostic
tests with good accuracy in large groups of people, said Maria
Carrillo, senior director of medical and scientific relations for
the Alzheimer’s Association.
The results, reported today at the Alzheimer’s Association
International Conference in France, “give us hope that we may
be able to use a blood test in the near future,” although that
doesn’t mean next year, she said.
More than 5.4 million Americans and 35 million people
worldwide have Alzheimer’s, the most common form of
dementia. It has no cure and drugs only temporarily ease
symptoms. Finding it early allows patients and their families
to prepare, and ruling it out could lead to diagnosing a more
treatable cause of symptoms, such as sleep problems.
Brain scans can show signs of Alzheimer’s — sticky
clumps of a protein called beta amyloid — a decade or more
before it causes memory and thinking problems, but scans are
too expensive and impractical for routine use. Doctors and
patients need simple ways to screen people for the disease.
Samantha Burnham and others at Australia’s national sci-
ence agency, CSIRO, working with several universities, used
a long-running study of more than 1,100 people — some
healthy, some impaired — to develop the blood test.
They started with blood samples from 273 study partici-
pants and identified nine hormones and proteins that seemed
most predictive of amyloid levels in the brain. A cutoff level
was set for what was considered high.
“The belief is that people above that point will go on to
get Alzheimer’s disease, and the lag is about 8 to 10 years,”
Burnham explained.
When researchers used the nine-marker blood test on these
same participants, they found that it separated healthy people
from those with mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s as
verified by their brain scans. The test correctly identified 83
percent of people with high amyloid levels and correctly ruled
out 85 percent of people without this condition.
“That’s pretty high,” the Alzheimer’s Association’s Carrillo
said of the test’s accuracy.
More importantly, she said, the Australian researchers
validated the test’s accuracy in two additional groups: the
other 817 folks in the Australian study and 74 people in a big
U.S.-led study aimed at finding novel Alzheimer’s disease
biomarkers.
The test performed well in those situations, too, Burnham said.
CSIRO has patented the test and is talking with major com-
panies about making it commercially available.
“It sounds like the Australians do have good clinical data”
and that the markers they are testing for track with cases of the
disease, said Creighton Phelps, a neuroscientist with the U.S.
National Institute on Aging.
The next step is wider validation work and ensuring it can
be standardized to give reliable results regardless of what lab
or doctor would use it, he said.
Only US copy of Magna Carta
being treated at US Archives
BRETT ZONGKER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — A painstaking conservation effort to
remove old patches and repair weak spots in a 714-year-old
copy of the Magna Carta has revealed that the full text of that
English declaration of human rights remains intact even though
some words are faded and illegible to the eye, the National
Archives said Tuesday.
Texas billionaire H. Ross Perot first purchased this docu-
ment from a British family for $1.5 million in 1984 when it was
last conserved at a Virginia lab. For 20 years, it was lent to the
National Archives and was on public view much of that time.
The Magna Carta bears the seal of King Edward I and is
dated 1297. It is one of 17 known handwritten copies of the text
that established a tradition for the rule of law that even kings
would honor. It is the only original version in the Americas,
while 15 are held by British institutions and one is held by
Australia’s Parliament.
The first version of the Magna Carta dates to 1215 when King
John agreed to have the rights of “all freemen” documented and
read throughout the country. It evolved and was reissued several
times until 1297 when it was entered into official English law.
A $13.5 million gift from philanthropist David Rubenstein —
owner of the handwritten document — is funding the conserva-
tion effort as well preparations for an upcoming exhibit.
Thanks to the gift, the largest cash donation to the National
Archives, the copy of the Magna Carta eventually will be shown
as a forerunner to the freedoms imagined in the U.S. Declaration
of Independence, Constitution and Bill of Rights. Plans call for
exhibiting it along with documents showing the struggle for
rights of African Americans, women, immigrants and others.
2
Wedding Planner 2011
B r i d a l d i r e c t o r y
Findlay Inn
& Conference Center
200 East Main Cross
Findlay, OH 45840
800-825-1455 • 419-422-5682
www.findlayinn.com
Thin & Healthy’s
Total Solution
333 North Street • Delphos
419-692-3488
The Bridal Emporium
29 E. Auglaize St., Wapakoneta
419-738-8565
www.thebridalemporium.net
Kivimaki Studios
419-303-8119
www.KiviStudios.com
Comfort Inn & Suites
117 Commerce Lane
Bluffton, OH (off I-75)
419-358-6000
Knights of Columbus
1011 Elida Ave., Delphos
419-692-0701
Fort Jennings
American Legion
Post 715
State Route 189 West
Fort Jennings, Ohio
419-286-2192
Metabolic Weightloss
Clinic
7531 Patriot Drive
Findlay, Ohio
(in front of Menards)
419-423-6879 • 1-866-351-8794
ohiohegelinic.com
Alliance
for Women’s Health
310 S. Cable Rd.
Lima
510 E. Spring St.
St. Marys
419-228-1000
Phil Austins’s
Incredible
Music Machine
Mobile DJ Service
419-516-3670
email phil@incrediblemusicmachine.com
www.incrediblemusicmachine.com
Mengerink’s
Tuxedo Source
148 E. Main St.
Van Wert
419-238-6065
Emmy’s Bridal
www.emmysbridal.com
336 N. Main St.
Eagle Plaza
Minster, Ohio 45865
419-628-7555
Laudick’s Jewelry
Coldwater
215 W. Main St.
419-678-2929
Van Wert
1244 S. Shannon St.
419-238-2266
laudick@laudicks.com
Dick’s Steak House
Restaurant & Lounge
206 S. Broad St.
Kalida, OH 45853
419-532-3029
Aero Printing
710 Elida Ave.
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-2931
Fax 419-695-9930
Email: info@aeroprinting,com
www.aeroprinting.com
Visual Image
Photography
212 N. Main St.
Delphos, OH 45833
419-741-7022
www.visualimagephoto.com
Slusher’s
Bridal Concepts
10276 State Route 118
Van Wert
across from Wendy’s
419-232-3700
Willow Bend
579 Hospital Drive
Van Wert, OH 45891
419-238-0111 or 419-238-2417
Simply Elegant
Formals
708 N. Dixie Highway
Wapakoneta, OH 45895
419-738-7722
Celebrations
237 W. Second St.
Delphos, OH
www.CelebrationsOhio.com
419-695-4455
Advantage
Cleaners
903 E. Fifth St.
Delphos
419-695-8964
702 N. Cable Road
Lima
419-229-7406
Town & Country
Flowers, Inc.
201 Fourth St. PO Box 456
Ottoville, Ohio
419-453-6506
201 E. Main St., Ottawa, Ohio
419-523-6506
310 W. High St., Lima
419-228-9883
621 W. Sycamore St.
Columbus Grove
419-659-2106
121 S. Main St., Bluffton
419-358-4040
Keith’s
Landeck Tavern
& Catering
14620 Landeck Rd
419-692-0833
www.keithslandecktavern.com
Lasting Memories
Wedding Photography
by Shutterbugg Studio
103 West Main St.
Van Wert
419-238-2844
The Trophy Center
1175 W. North St.
Lima, OH 45805
www.trophycenter.net
419-222-0841
Neighborhood Cleaners
Clock Tower Plaza
927 N. Cable Rd.
Lima, OH 45805
419-222-6003
Island Dress Shoppe
132 W. Spring St.
St. Marys
419-394-5116
Fortman’s Linen Service
419-238-3520
Microtel
480 Moxie Lane
Delphos, OH 45833
567-765-1500
Email gm.delphosoh@microtelinn.com
www.microtelinn.com
Mattress Mart
2151 Elida Rd.
Lima (across from Toys-R-Us)
419-224-7117
Open 7 days a week
Van Wert County
Fairgrounds
Van Wert Co. Agricultural Society
1055 S. Washington St.
Van Wert
419-238-9270
Elegant Cakes
4611 Road 177
Grover Hill, OH
www.elegantcakes.net
e-mail:
elegantcakes@mchsi.com
Flower Fort
280 N. Water St.
Ft. Jennings, OH 45844
419-286-2844
One Hour Cleaners
114 N. Washington St.
Van Wert, OH
419-238-2133
Howard Johnson
At I-75 & SR 309
Lima
www.howardjohnson.com
419-222-0004
Courtyard
Marriott
936 Greely Chapel Road
Lima, OH 45804
phone 419-222-9000
fax 419-222-9003
www.courtyard.com/daycl
12 – The Herald Wednesday, July 20, 2011 www.delphosherald.com

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