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River Cities' Reader - Issue 783 - July 21, 2011

River Cities' Reader - Issue 783 - July 21, 2011

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No.

783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 2 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 3 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
uniforms. A landscaping firm would have
to list its checks to a liberal third-party
group before applying to maintain a
national park.
Clearly, such rules could foster political
discrimination. Obama would enable his
administration to deliver literally billions
of dollars in government contracts to pro-
Democrat businesses while denying billions
to pro-Republican firms.
And when the GOP takes the White
House again, that administration could
turn around and practice the exact same
kind of discrimination against Democrat-
friendly contractors.
And the favoritism would not necessarily
be confined to contracting work. The entire
federal government would be made aware
of private firms’ political affiliations. Other
agencies could use that information to
determine where and how to award billions
of dollars.
Even the appearance of political
favoritism would be a problem.
The Agriculture Department, for
example, might hire a company to upgrade
30 regional offices. That firm may have
backed Obama’s campaign and other
Democratic causes. It also could finish
its work on time, under budget, and with
elegant results. Nonetheless, a losing, pro-
Republican bidder might cry foul – even
though it lost to a truly superior bidder,
picked by honest public servants with no
partisan axes to grind.
When awarding contracts, federal
decision-makers should consider only
one issue: the bidders’ merits. Officials
should evaluate the price and quality of
the products and services on offer, the
supplier’s performance under previous
contracts, and how closely each bid follows
federal contract rules.
This proposal is generating bipartisan
opposition. Connecticut independent
Senator Joe Lieberman, who caucuses with
Democrats, and Missouri Democratic
Senator Claire McCaskill, who chairs the
Government Contracting Subcommittee,
have both publicly opposed the executive
order. Twenty-seven Republicans senators
signed a letter urging the president to scrap
this plan.
Imposing campaign-disclosure
requirements on government contractors
sets the table for a feast of patronage based
not on the content of each contractor’s
character, but on the color of his PAC
money.
Thomas A. Schatz is president of Citizens
Against Government Waste.
Transparency Measure Is Ripe for Abuse
by Thomas A. Schatz
7
he lowest qualified bid by the most
competent contestant traditionally
wins the government contract.
Unfortunately, the “Change” gang now
wants to fiddle with this decades-old,
generally reliable formula.
President Obama hopes to throw another
item onto the scale as bureaucrats weigh
bids: political donations. A draft executive
order would instruct federal officials to
consider the political contributions of
prospective government contractors. While
this move is being portrayed as a matter of
increased transparency, it will actually fuel
unintended consequences and indirectly
overturn an important Supreme Court
decision on free speech.
Forcing companies to disclose political
gifts supposedly will expose covert “pay
to play” schemes and ensure that private
industry does not unduly influence
Washington’s decisions when awarding
lucrative contracts. Rather than depoliticize
procurement, this practice would empower
public officials to scrutinize a particular
company’s political philanthropy. The
Obama administration’s supporters could
score government deals while opponents
leave with empty pockets and a simple
message: “If you want our checks, show us
yours.”
The executive order could transport
such old-fashioned, Chicago-style wheeling
and dealing from Lake Michigan to the
Potomac.
This executive order – drafted in April
– requires contractors to disclose annual
donations of more than $5,000 that were
made in the past two years and paid to
political candidates, parties, or independent
political groups. Directors, officers, and
other top managers would have to declare
their personal political contributions from
the past two years – even if they were made
without their employers’ knowledge or
consent.
This order is in part designed to thwart
last year’s Citizens United Supreme Court
decision, which lifted certain restrictions
on the donations corporations and labor
unions can make to campaigns and
independent organizations.
Congressional Democrats quickly tried
to counteract that ruling by re-limiting
the third-party donations. But a House-
approved bill sputtered in the Senate.
Because the legislation will not be passed,
Obama is trying to accomplish that same
goal through the executive order. A clothing
company would have to reveal its donations
to a conservative advocacy not-for-profit
before bidding to manufacture military
GUEST COMMENTARY
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 4 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
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Located at: 219 21st St.
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Call 309-788-7940
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Certain Income
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ILLINOIS POLITICS
$
tand for Children national director
Jonah Edelman spoke a little too freely
at an Aspen Institute event this month.
Edelman openly bragged about how his
group had outfoxed the teacher unions and
the Illinois media, and had taken advantage
of an opening with House Speaker Michael
Madigan to pass his sweeping education-
reform proposal, which is now state law. His
remarks created a huge stir, and Edelman has
since apologized for his candor, but most of
what he said about Illinois politics was quite
fascinating and definitely worth a look.
Edelman told the Aspen Institute’s confer-
ence participants that wealthy investor Bruce
Rauner had approached him about expanding
his group’s school-reform efforts to Illinois.
Rauner has long been a major supporter of
Republican candidates, and many believed
early on that his
involvement with
Edelman meant
that Stand for Chil-
dren would lean
heavily toward the
the House Repub-
licans and against
Democratic House
Speaker Michael
Madigan.
But Edelman
said he noticed a
political opening
that Rauner didn’t.
The teacher unions
were so upset by the passage of a pension-
reform bill that they were refusing to contrib-
ute to House Democrats who had voted for
the reform, even though the legislators had
long supported the unions.
Edelman said he then looked at the
landscape and determined that no matter
what happened in individual races, “Madigan
would still be Speaker.” So, he said, the “raw
politics” dictated that “we should tilt toward
him.”
“The press never picked up on it,” Edelman
said about how his group had endorsed twice
as many Democratic candidates as Repub-
licans. Those endorsements were a strong
indication to Madigan, however, that they
were clearly favoring him.
“Luckily, it never got covered that way,”
Edelman explained. “That wouldn’t work well
in Illinois. Madigan’s not particularly well
liked.”
I extensively covered Stand for Children’s
jump into Illinois politics, but few others
did. The group flew almost totally under the
media’s radar for months, even after it made
the largest legislative campaign contribution
in Illinois history by a political action com-
mittee. It’s still a mystery to me why the group
was able to operate so free from scrutiny.
Edelman said he met with Madigan after
the election to review his group’s reform pro-
posals. Madigan said he was supportive.
“The next day,” Edelman claimed, Madigan
“created an education-reform committee, and
his political director called to ask for our sug-
gestions of who should be on it.”
Edelman also raised $3 million for his po-
litical action committee between the election
and the end of the year, just before campaign
contributions were officially capped by a new
state law. “That’s more money than any of the
unions had in their political action commit-
tees,” Edelman noted – a fact that was also
mostly ignored by the media.
Stand’s Edelman claimed he had managed
to “shift the balance of power” in a “very
short amount of time,” and said there was
a “palpable sense of concern if not shock”
among union
leaders that with
Madigan’s new
alliance, he and his
group now had a
“clear political capa-
bility to potentially
jam this proposal
down their throats
the same way pen-
sion reform was
jammed down their
throats six months
earlier.”
Because the
deck appeared so
stacked against them, Edelman claimed the
unions were “thrilled to come to the table and
discuss things that nine months earlier they
would have not been willing to discuss,” such
as making it easier to fire teachers or lengthen
school days.
And because teacher-union leaders here
have heaped praise on the new law, “it makes
it hard for folks leading unions in other states
to say that these types of reforms are terrible,”
Edelman said. (He has since apologized to the
teacher unions.)
“Our approach,” Edleman said, “is to build
as much political clout in the most unassum-
ing, diplomatic way.”
He wasn’t exactly “diplomatic” in Aspen,
but Edelman most certainly provided us with
some major insights into how his group won,
even though some of it just wasn’t accurate.
For instance, officials at the Illinois Federa-
tion of Teachers say they foresaw Madigan
coming at them early last year. That’s a big
reason why they didn’t contribute to his
members’ campaigns, they said. To them, Ma-
digan got lucky – yet again – when Edelman
showed up with his big checkbook.
Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily
political newsletter) and CapitolFax.com.
by Rich Miller
An Honest Look at
lIIinois PoIitics
Edelman bragged about
how his group had outfoxed
the teacher unions and the
Illinois media, and had taken
advantage of an opening
with House Speaker Michael
Madigan.
RiverCitiesReader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 5 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 6 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
a sense of its origins, goals, and methods;
what it is and isn’t; and its strengths and
weaknesses. While it was developed by a
panel of scientists without the input of the
food industry and takes into account roughly
30 nutritional factors, NuVal has its quirks,
it’s still being refined, and its reductive
nature means that it can’t replace careful
consideration of a food’s nutrition-fact panel.
So while the tool is easily grasped, its
nuances are many and worth exploring. “It
only takes one minute to explain NuVal to
a customer who has never heard about it,”
wrote Hy-Vee dietitian Chrissy Mitzel in
an e-mail. “Of course, I can also spend a
one-hour presentation explaining the details
of NuVal to a group. It is very versatile in the
amount a customer can learn about it.”
The Need for NuVal
The reference manual for ONQI – the
engine that powers NuVal – sketches out
the case for NuVal: “There are two ways to
close the gap between how we eat at present
and how we should eat for optimal health.
One involves a fundamental shift in the
pattern of the diet, as reflected in such advice
as ‘eat more fruits and vegetables.’ Such
advice is valid, and important, but subject to
considerable resistance.
“There is another way to improve dietary
patterns, and that is one food choice at
a time. The range in nutritional quality
for every food category represented on
supermarket shelves – from greens to granola
bars, sandwich meat to salad dressing,
cookies to cooking oils, and even the
proverbial soup to nuts – is vast. Choosing
the most nutritious offerings in each
category offers a powerful means to reduce
intake of calories, sodium, added sugar, and
harmful fats, while increasing intake of fiber,
beneficial nutrients, vitamins, and minerals.”
In other words, we know we need to
eat more fruits and vegetables, but most
of us don’t heed that advice. NuVal, Katz
summarized, offers as an alternative a
“simple, elegant power. Improve your diet,
improve your health – one easy, well-
informed choice at a time. You want bread,
buy a bread; just buy a better bread.”
Or snacks. Look at the dried-fruit section
of Hy-Vee, and you’ll see a massive gulf
between products that score in the 90s
(raisins, dried peaches, dried apricots) and
those coming in below 10 (dried cranberries
and blueberries) – a function of whether they
have added sugar.
Comer said that she used to buy reduced-
fat peanut butter. And when saw the NuVal
scores – with some reduced-fat products
scoring significantly lower than their full-fat
equivalents – she thought: “This doesn’t
make sense to me.” But after she investigated
and understood the scores, she changed
what she bought. “I buy the regular peanut
butter again,” she said. “I’m not sacrificing
nutritionally.”
In this way, NuVal helps consumers
understand that certain foods aren’t by
definition healthy – dried fruit, for instance
– and claims by manufacturers are often not
meaningful in terms of nutrition. Lower-fat
foods often compensate for the lost fat with
sugar, typically more than negating any
nutritional gain. A vast majority of breakfast
cereals are almost depressingly low-scoring,
regardless of whether they’re aimed at kids
(Cap’n Crunch, which scores a 10) or pitched
as wholesome (Wheaties, a 28).
“It’s easy in a world where nobody knew
what better nutrition actually meant for
manufacturers to just make it up,” Katz said.
“With NuVal you can tell at a glance.”
And NuVal helps overturn some long-held
beliefs. “I scratched my head when iceberg
lettuce received a score of 82, as did some
of my customers,” wrote Hy-Vee dietitian
Janet Macon. “Iceberg has a reputation as
a leaf with little to offer; 82 seemed like an
unlikely high score. When looking into the
score, I realized that the nutrients it provides,
including potassium, folate, and carotenoids,
come at a very low caloric cost (less than 10
calories per cup), which explains the high
NuVal score.”
The scoring system offers other benefits,
too, as Hy-Vee dietitian Dawn Blocklinger
listed in an e-mail:
“NuVal is very helpful for those individuals
with language barriers or who are illiterate.
“NuVal is definitely kid-friendly. What kid
doesn’t want to score a 100?
“NuVal is available free and on most items
in the store.”
And it’s even helpful to people who know
their nutrition. Hy-Vee dietitian Kristen
Decker wrote: “It has reinforced facts I know
about nutrition but makes it easier to assess
on a glance when comparing options.”
“It Needed to Be Fixed;
We Fixed It”
Katz says a 2003 event represents the
obvious genesis of NuVal. But “the origins in
my head go back much longer than that. As
a preventive-medicine specialist who focuses
on lifestyle in particular – food as medicine,
if you will – I’ve really been wrestling with
my patients’ challenges in this area for many,
many years, and recognizing that patients
can get perfectly good advice about eating
better and yet find it almost impossible to
Blue Bunny Vs. Blueberries: What’s the Deal?
Hy-Vee’s dried blueberries score a 4, while Blue Bunny Sweet Freedom Fudge Lites get a 100 – a result that defies
common sense. But this contrast highlights how certain ingredients can dramatically affect NuVal scores. The second
ingredient in the dried blueberries is sugar, which drives their score down. The first ingredient of the fudge bars is skim
milk – which scores a 91 on its own – and the treat is sweetened with Splenda. Because NuVal doesn’t penalize artificially
sweetened products the way it penalizes sugared products, the score is higher.
Looking Under the Hood at Hy-Vee’s NuVal System
A GPS for Better Nutrition?
$
ince the NuVal food-scoring system
was introduced at all Hy-Vee stores
in January 2009, my family – both
consciously and subconsciously – has
changed the way it buys and eats.
There are times when we’ve discussed
whether to buy this yogurt or that yogurt,
and the decision was based on nothing more
than the higher NuVal score. (Sometimes, we
look at the nutrition panel to try to figure out
why a certain score was higher. Sometimes,
we succeed.) And I’m certain there have been
times when, without thinking about it, we’ve
grabbed one food item instead of the lower-
scoring version right next to it.
The funny thing is that until I began
researching this article, we took it on
faith that NuVal scores meaningfully and
accurately reflected the nutritional content of
the food we were buying.
Conceptually, the system is intuitively
understood. It’s a number from 1 to 100 (on
top of NuVal’s joined-hexagon logo) on the
shelf tags of a vast majority of edible items in
Hy-Vee. The higher the score, the better the
food is nutritionally. Fresh blueberries get a
100, and nearly all fresh fruits and vegetables
score in the 90s. Scores for hot dogs generally
range from 6 to 16, while sugared sodas get
a 1.
Of course, you already know that fresh
fruits and vegetables are good for you, and
hot dogs and sugared sodas aren’t. Where
NuVal is most instructive – and fascinating
– is within a given food group. In its simplest
form, NuVal is about deciding between two
or three or 10 products jostling for your
attention on the same supermarket shelf.
As Dr. David L. Katz – the chief architect
of NuVal and director of the Yale-Griffin
Prevention Research Center – said in an
interview last month: “Any aisle of the
supermarket where you were already going
to buy something, go ahead, but try to buy
the most nutritious version that satisfies your
wallet and your palate.”
Hy-Vee still has work to do in terms of
educating consumers about NuVal. Ruth
Comer, an assistant vice president for
media relations at Hy-Vee, said that in the
company’s most recent customer survey,
a little more than half of those questioned
knew about the system. That’s a long way
from universal.
And being aware that NuVal exists is
different from using it, and using it is
different from understanding it. Blindly
trusting NuVal can be satisfying on a gut
level, but the scoring system is most powerful
if you take a look under the hood and get
COVER STORY
100 4
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 7 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
implement when the rubber hits the road
– when they get out there and have to make
food choices. ... They trip over all of the
confusing marketing messages that stand
between them and better health. ... The
public at large – patients – needed better
guidance in this area. ...
“It would be bad enough to miss out on
the power of nutrition as medicine ... if it was
because people didn’t care,” Katz added. “But
you know what? People do care. ... They just
don’t feel empowered to do anything about it.
And even the people who are really trying are
getting lost on the way. And that’s just wrong.
It needed to be fixed; we fixed it.”
Eight years ago, Katz said, he was among
15 researchers invited to speak to the
Working Group on Obesity, under the federal
Food & Drug Administration (FDA). He and
his fellow scientists were given three minutes
apiece to offer one idea that the FDA could
implement.
Katz said he told a story about bread and
his wife, who has Ph.D. in neuroscience
from Princeton and shops for the family.
(They’ve been married more than 20
years and have five kids.) “Even my wife
... – extremely intelligent, highly educated,
lives with somebody whose nutrition bona
fides are good enough to get him a seat at
this table, takes care of all seven of us on a
daily basis – even she comes home from the
supermarket with smoke coming out of her
ears at times.
“She’s shopping for a loaf of bread, and
one bread has the most fiber, but that’s the
one with the most sodium. And one, the
fiber’s good and the sodium’s better, but
that’s the one with added sugar in the form
of high-fructose corn syrup. And another
one, the fiber’s good, the sodium’s not bad,
it doesn’t have added sugar, and it says zero
grams trans fat on the front of the pack, but
that’s the one with partially hydrogenated
oil in the ingredient list. And another one
says ‘multigrain’ and looks like it’s the most
wholesome choice but actually has the least
fiber of all and as far as she can tell doesn’t
contain any whole grain. And so she brings
home all four, looks at me, and says, ‘If you
want the most nutritious one of these, you
figure out which one it is.’”
He concluded his presentation by
addressing Health & Human Services
Secretary Tommy Thompson: “And I said,
‘Mr. Secretary, with all due respect, if a Ph.D.
in neuroscience from Princeton is not good
enough to pick out a loaf of bread, I think we
set the bar a little high.’”
He suggested that the FDA convene a
panel to create “a tool that everybody can use,
so that at a glance everybody can tell what’s
the most nutritious choice. ... Essentially like
a GPS for the food supply: ‘You want better
nutrition, turn here now.’ And let’s make it
completely simple.”
Katz said the idea was dismissed.
(The working group in 2004 made
recommendations on changes to foods’
nutrition labels that could charitably called
minor: “increasing the font size for calories,
including a percent-daily-value column for
total calories, and eliminating the listing
for calories from fat,” and “encourag[ing]”
manufacturers to stop the practice of
dividing packages of food that most people
consume in one sitting into unrealistically
small serving sizes for nutrition-panel
purposes – 20-ounce sodas, for
example, claiming 2.5 servings per
bottle.)
But in late 2005, Katz said, Griffin
Hospital said it would financially
support the development of the
system he proposed. Katz and a
team of scientists crafted the Overall
Nutritional Quality Index (ONQI)
algorithm. Katz then took that back
to the FDA, but one official there
advised him to pursue the project
through the private sector rather
than the federal government: “If you
turn it over to our bureaucracy, I’m
not sure you’ll live long enough to
see this in the hands of consumers
... .”
So Griffin Hospital partnered
with grocery-chain co-op Topco
Associates (of which Hy-Vee is a
member/owner) to form the for-
profit NuVal LLC. That company licenses the
NuVal system, and Griffin and Topco share
in the profits. NuVal is now in more than
1,100 stores nationwide.
While NuVal LLC is a for-profit venture,
Katz said there’s a clear separation between
the algorithm and the marketing of its
application. Griffin Hospital retains sole
ownership of ONQI, “and the business side
has nothing to say about it,” Katz said. “We’re
at liberty to just keep this all about pure
public-health science and then rely on NuVal
LLC to get it out there where it can do some
good.”
Hy-Vee’s Comer said NuVal was
attractive to the chain for several reasons. It’s
“completely independent” and developed by
scientists rather than the food industry, she
said. “And it’s also very simple to use and easy
to understand.”
Comer said Hy-Vee explored other
nutrition-rating systems – such as those that
break foods down into broader groupings –
but thought they were “somewhat subjective.”
She gave the example of a stoplight system
– with green, yellow, and red – and said there
wasn’t enough nuance; one product might
be a high yellow and another a low green,
and there was no way for consumers to know
that they were more similar than different
nutritionally.
The NuVal Algorithm
While NuVal is a proprietary rating
system, its Web site (at NuVal.com/science)
offers a basic breakdown of what’s measured
and how it affects the score.
Bread, Eggs, and Milk
Bread. NuVal scores in the 20s are typical for bread.
Pepperidge Farm Ancient Grains gets a 47.
Eggs. Eggs score a 33. Unflavored egg substitutes generally score from 53 to 59.
Milk. Whole milk gets a 52, 2 percent a 55, 1 percent an 81, and skim a 91.
20s-
33
Continued On Page 20
40s
52-
91
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 8 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 9 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Playcrafters’ offering is sad from the
very moment Desmond Grasker’s Jefferson
walks onto the stage, which is several min-
utes into the production. Before he even
speaks a word, Grasker’s dejected, utterly
defeated stance as he stands shackled is a
powerful image, and both his presence and
his performance grow more powerful as
the play progresses. Grasker manages to
mature his Jefferson, making his charac-
ter’s personal growth quite clear in a way
that pierces your heart. From his insolent
rage when feeling contempt for the world
to his calm, brave demeanor as his execu-
tion day approaches, Grasker fully shapes
his Jefferson from beginning to end.
Though he has impressive moments of
passion, Curtis Wyatt’s efforts as Grant are
much more subdued; for the most part,
his portrayal is even-keeled, but without
being flat. It’s obvious that his Grant, with
his frequently controlled frustration, is
a thinker more than a feeler, but when
he does feel something, Wyatt lets lose
with powerful anger. Meanwhile, Wyatt is
matched by Teresa Babers as Grant’s love
interest, Vivian. Also fairly low-key in her
approach, Babers interjects forceful mo-
l
’ve been moved
by several pro-
ductions this
year, but by none
so deeply as the
Playcrafters Barn
Theatre’s A Lesson
Before Dying. In
fact, I was in tears
several times dur-
ing Friday night’s
performance, in-
cluding throughout
most of the second
act.
Based on the
novel by Ernest J.
Gaines, playwright
Romulus Linney’s
script focuses on a
formally educated
African-American
teacher, Grant
Wiggins, called on
to meet daily with Jefferson, a young black
man sentenced to death for a murder he
did not commit. Linney’s drama looks at
African-American existence in the South
prior to the Civil Rights movement, and
explores how the societal structure of the
period landed the inmate on death row
for fear of telling the truth at his trial, as a
black man accusing a white man of com-
mitting murder was its own kind of crime
at the time.
Director Shellie Moore Guy’s take on the
material has an appropriately unhurried,
Southern-feeling tempo to it, allowing
the melancholy of Jefferson’s fate and the
weight of the black experience to sink
in effectively. And while the pacing is
leisurely, it’s never boring, because Linney’s
work is so engaging. Forgetting the title
(which gives away the ending), I hoped for
a reprieve for Jefferson throughout Act I.
But when it was made apparent that the
inevitable is, indeed, inevitable, I could
barely choke back the tears; my throat
tightened and the sobs made an effort
to escape, because I was so taken with
Linney’s treatment of an innocent man
hopelessly condemned to die.
ments into her character-
ization, holding her own
in arguments with Wyatt.
As Paul Bonin, the
police officer who chap-
erones Grant’s meetings
with Jefferson, Mike Kelly
offers the most subtle
take I’ve yet seen from
him on a local stage.
His Paul has a quiet,
friendly demeanor, with
an obviously amicable
attitude toward the black
community atypical to
the time period. Joseph
Obleton, fittingly, shapes
a much less likable char-
acter in Reverend Moses
Ambrose. Vehemently
insistent that Jefferson
needs God, not lessons
in manhood, Obleton
brings angry condescen-
sion and moral superiority to his preacher.
Sam Splear shows great skill at display-
ing different aspects of a character with
his Sheriff Sam Guidry; first appearing
as a gruff, no-nonsense man, Splear later
plays him with insincere smiles and overly
friendly airs, signifying the sheriff ’s shift
for the sake of public appearance, being
that he’s up for re-election. And more than
anyone, Betty Cosey impressed me with
her stage talents. Portraying Emma Glen,
Jefferson’s godmother, Cosey brings an
amusing moxie to the role, while also ex-
pertly controlling the flow for every scene
in which she appears.
Friday night’s audience was not as full as
it usually is at the Barn Theatre, which is a
shame. A Lesson Before Dying is the strongest,
most emotional script Playcrafters has yet
staged this year.
For tickets and information, call (309)762-
0330 or visit Playcrafters.com.
For reviews of the Clinton Area Showboat
Theatre’s The Drowsy Chaperone and the
Timber Lake Playhouse’s Red Herring, visit
RiverCitiesReader.com.
7riaI in £rror
A Lesson Before Dying, at the Playcrafters Barn Theatre through July 24
by Thom White
VoI. 18 · No. 783
1uIy 21 - August 3, 2011
River Cities’ Reader
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A Lesson Before Dying.
THEATRE
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 10 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 11 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
Daniel Radcliffe and Ralph Fiennes in Harry Potter & the
Deathly Hallows: Part 2
Listen to Mike every Friday at 9am on R0CK 104-9 FM with 0ave & 0arren
Movie Reviews
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
HARRY POTTER & THE
DEATHLY HALLOWS:
PART 2
As the end credits began rolling at
my screening of Harry Potter & the
Deathly Hallows: Part 2, the (need I say
it?) final installment in the film series
adapted from J.K. Rowling’s beloved
novels, I’ll admit that I anticipated
more applause than I actually heard.
Then again, it’s awfully hard to clap
while simultaneously wiping tears from
your cheeks.
Bigger than the surprise of the respect-
ful silence, however, was the shock of
my own reaction to the finale, as I was
one of those viewers whose weeping at
the movie’s final image left him in no
state to applaud. For nearly 10 years,
my interest in this cinematic universe
has rarely risen above middling (2004’s
Harry Potter & the Prisoner of Azkaban
is the only entry of the first seven that
I legitimately adored), and for all of its
technical proficiency and on-screen tal-
ent, I found last fall’s first half of Deathly
Hallows a mostly tough sit. Yet from its
first images, I was absolutely knocked
out by the epic grandeur and unabashed
emotionalism of director David Yates’
Harry Potter closer, a culminating adven-
ture so thrillingly wrought and deeply,
unexpectedly moving that it left me a
little shaken. Shaken, and after roughly a
half-dozen miniature crying jags, a little
dehydrated.
As I’ll mention for the last time until
some enterprising Hollywood hacks
(inevitably) decide to reboot the fran-
chise, I’ve yet to read Rowling’s literary
serial, and as the movie adaptations have
always been designed specifically for the
books’ devoted, there were some elements
to this latest, last entry that would no
doubt make more sense had I a keener
knowledge of Potter lore. Why is it, for
instance, that the nefarious Valdemort
(Ralph Fiennes) appears psychically
linked to Harry (Daniel Radcliffe) and
ever-cognizant of his activities, yet has no
awareness of his presence when the young
man is crouching outside a window 10
feet away from him? How is Valdemort
– the most dreaded, most powerful of all
über-villains – so easily fooled by a game
of possum? (Would it have pained him to
check for a pulse or hold a mirror under
his victim’s mouth?) And if Hogwarts is
indeed populated by students practicing
the arts of wizardry and witchcraft, why,
when their school is under siege, do all
but a handful shriek and race about as
if looking for the nearest escape hatch?
Were none of them given
magic wands for their
birthdays?
Still, as I’ll happily
attest, Deathly Hallows:
Part 2 is the rare on-
screen Potter adventure
that requires neither
CliffsNotes nor an
accompanying Rowling
fan for you to be wholly,
rapturously taken with
its delicate interweav-
ing of mournful sadness
and unbridled exhilara-
tion. (It should go without saying that
frequent sparks of wit are also on display,
beginning with a honey of a funny/nervy
scene in which Helena Bonham Carter
acts the role of Emma Watson’s Herm-
ione acting the role of Carter’s Bellatrix
LeStrange.) With the visuals having
steadily – and, over the last few releases,
vastly – improved from movie to movie,
there are breathtaking images galore,
among them a vault where metallic
objects multiply like shiny Tribbles when
touched, and a stunning pair of dragons,
one of them fire-breathing, and one
literally made of fire. Yet what you might
find yourself responding to most is the
wrenching finality of Yates’ offering. The
crumbling edifices and Dementor attacks
and gargantuan tarantulas are amaz-
ing, but it might not take more than a
late-film reunion with Michael Gambon’s
deceased Dumbledore – or a quick
flashback to the cherubic faces of Harry,
Hermione, and Ron (Rupert Grint) in
Harry Potter & the Sorcerer’s Stone – to
turn you into a blubbery wreck.
Because even if, like me, you haven’t
been in thrall to the Harry Potter movies,
it’s borderline-impossible not to be awed
the singular achievement of this series,
and Yates’ final endeavor in particu-
lar. Seriously, how did filmmakers and
audiences get this lucky? How is it that
Radcliffe, Watson, and Grint blossomed
so fully from adorable (if mannered)
tykes into such committed, nuanced
actors? How did so many ridiculously
gifted performers not only sign up for
roles, but continue, in film after film, to
explore them with a depth of feeling that
even Rowling couldn’t have anticipated?
(Oscar nominations here for Fiennes and
Alan Rickman – Severus Snape, now and
forever – wouldn’t be at all unearned.)
How have the human and supernatural
elements been so carefully balanced that
an impromptu, impassioned kiss carries
as much dramatic weight as an effects-
heavy battle royale? And how did it take
77 years for Maggie Smith to finally
emerge as a butt-kicking action star?
Harry Potter & the Deathly Hallows: Part
2 is the end of a rather remarkable saga
in the realm of Hollywood-blockbuster
movie-making. I couldn’t be more grate-
ful to David Yates and company for en-
suring that it’s also a remarkable movie.
For a review of Winnie the Pooh, visit
RiverCitiesReader.com.
Follow Mike on Twitter at Twitter.com/
MikeSchulzNow.
Listen to Mike every Friday at 9am on R0CK 104-9 FM with 0ave & 0arren
CIosing the ßook
Movie Reviews
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 12 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
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THEATRE
didn’t feel like (almost) three hours. Only the first
scene felt like three hours.
Actors, I’d argue, are rather like vampires:
They tend to be less lively in light than in
darkness. So aside from the understandably
stagnant stage composition in the protracted
intro – in which Lear divvies
up his estate between the
two daughters who feign
to love him and disinherits
the daughter who does
– maybe we can chalk up
Saturday’s underwhelming
opener to the sun (and the
heat). Still, beyond Flaherty’s
Lear, Schwartz’s focused
and direct Kent, and Lauren
VanSpeybrock’s inspiringly
naturalistic Cordelia, there
was too little going on in the faces of the other
dozen-plus amassed on stage. Those who spoke
appeared to briefly wake up for their dialogue,
but when their lines ended, they receded to a
state of near-complete disengagement, making
the paucity of stage movement in this lengthy
passage even more apparent. Deadpan expres-
sions are perfectly fitting for Lear’s first scene
– we should discover the characters’ allegiances,
or lack thereof, gradually – but there’s a huge
difference between blank looks with obvious
thought and intent behind them and looks that
are just blank. (If only Shakespeare had written
the king’s Fool, played here by James Alt, into the
opener; cajoling, riffing, tumbling, and, at one
point, mooning the audience, Alt is a magnifi-
cently inventive, happy presence.)
But stick with the show, because after its
prelude ends – and, coincidentally or not, the sun
begins to set – you’ll realize you’re in very good
hands, and not just those belonging to Flaherty
and King. Both Schwartz and VanSpeybroeck
are exceedingly fine throughout, and they’re
eventually matched by Kitty Israel’s Goneril, with
her smashingly vindictive wickedness, and Tyler
Henning’s Edgar, whose nearly naked, twitchy-
madman guise is a robust piece of physical
acting. There are touching, gracefully elocuted
portrayals by Earl Strupp and Bryan Woods, and
enjoyably outsize, untrustworthy ones by David
Cabassa and Alaina Pascarella, and several confi-
dent turns and bits of outré business that Lincoln
Park’s crowd was alive to. (Michael Callahan’s
blinding of Strupp was memorably vicious, and
Andy Curtiss, obviously having a blast as the
steward Oswald, reaffirmed that swishy stereo-
types, for better and worse, are comedic money
in the bank.) Pat Flaherty makes Genesius
Guild’s King Lear unmissable, but it’s still won-
derful to know that whenever he’s off-stage, there
are plenty of reasons not to miss him.
For information, visit Genesius.org.
7
here may be some of you who hear the
title King Lear and, knowing only of the
play’s reputation as the mack daddy of all
Shakespeare tragedies, immediately presume that
any evening production of the piece will last well
into the next morning. Allow me, then, to quell
your fears: Saturday’s Genesius
Guild staging of the Bard’s opus
began promptly at eight o’clock,
and after the night’s presenta-
tion had concluded, I was back
in my car by 10:55.
As most will admit, however,
a show’s actual length doesn’t
matter nearly as much as how
long a show feels. Yet thanks
to smart pacing and judicious
script editing, director Michael
King’s King Lear moves along
at a terrifically agreeable clip. The stage action is
impressively timed but rarely feels rushed – leap-
ing on their entrance cues, actors appear for new
scenes before castmates from the previous scenes
have fully exited the stage – and most of the
performers’ readings on Saturday were delivered
speedily but without losing the meaning of
Shakespeare’s words, which can’t be the easiest
of tasks.
I doubt it’ll offend the other 26 members of
Lear’s ensemble to say that no one proves more
adept at maintaining both speed and meaning
than Lear himself, as Pat Flaherty gives one of
those beautifully expansive, achingly soulful
performances that might be the reason God
invented theatre. With Flaherty’s vocal timbre
rising to higher and higher peaks of anguish, and
his collapsing physicality mirroring the deterio-
ration of his monarch’s mind, Lear’s emotional
arc from wrathful anger to full-scale madness
is harrowing in the most exciting way. Flaherty,
however, is also savvy enough (and, blessedly,
enough of a natural comedian) to know when a
lighter touch is required.
During those occasions when he’s allowed to
be funny, Flaherty earns deserved laughs with
his childlike innocence – in a wonderfully quick
aside, the barefooted Lear asks for assistance in
removing his boots – and the actor demonstrates
the proper faith in Shakespeare’s text to know
that he doesn’t have to push for his effects. Even
the king’s most recognizably Great of great lines
(“How sharper than a serpent’s tooth it is to have
an ungrateful child,” “Never, never, never, never,
never”) are delivered with masterful simplicity.
In short, Flaherty is a wholly satisfying evening
of entertainment unto himself. And when you
throw in co-star Todd Schwartz’s topnotch sound
design, Ellen Dixon’s stellar costumes, a handful
of additionally excellent portrayals, a bunch
of nicely committed ones, and, for an opening
night, a noticeable absence of dialogue flubs, the
total experience of Genesius Guild’s Lear, for me,
This Way Madness Lies
King Lear, at Lincoln Park through July 24
James Alt and Pat Flaherty
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 13 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
his beautiful melodies mixed with strongly
sentimental and laugh-worthy lyrics.
Tapscott, meanwhile, had me holding
back tears almost from the start of my
personal favorite song in the musical, “The
Next 10 Minutes.” Completely in tune
with the deep love expressed in the piece,
Tapscott’s take is subtly passionate and be-
lievable – as is his performance all through-
out the Hilltop’s offering. I can’t remember
when I last heard the actor
in such good voice, as he
delivers rich tones backed
by a thoughtful connection
to each lyric’s meaning.
It’s during “The Next 10
Minutes” that the actors,
for the first and only time,
directly interact – a moment
I’m especially eager to see
take place, in terms of its
stage treatment, each time
I see the show. And while
I won’t give away exactly
how Turley presents the
midpoint criss-crossing of
the characters’ timelines,
I will say that it’s beautifully executed in a
clear, touching manner that’s kind of sur-
prising and yet, in hindsight, not altogether
unexpected.
This musical is a perfect fit for the
Hilltop’s new District Theatre space, which,
while grander than the company’s Dav-
enport venue, still feels intimate from an
audience’s perspective. Brown’s work begs
for that intimacy, calling for a closeness to
the characters as they wear their hearts on
their sleeves. The piece also allows musical
director Danny White to shine as he ac-
companies the actors on piano. With almost
nothing but solos throughout the show,
White’s skills at the keyboard are clearly
heard, and the musicality that pours forth
from his fingers – with generous employ-
ment of small glissandos – is remarkable
and impassioned.
With the exception of its poor lighting
(and, on Wednesday, an almost-always-late
spotlight), Turley’s The Last Five Years, as
a whole, is quite lovely, and marked with
exceptional moments. By not over-direct-
ing his actors, and seemingly allowing
them to interpret each song as they see fit,
both Turley’s minimalist approach and the
show itself work, making Harrison Hilltop’s
production a charming, beautifully sung
performance.
For tickets and information, call (309)235-
1654 or visit HarrisonHilltop.com.
l
will admit that I had serious reser-
vations prior to Wednesday night’s
performance of the Harrison Hilltop
Theatre’s The Last Five Years. As much as I
enjoy Cari Downing’s comedic stage work
– I described how sensational she was in
the Hilltop’s I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now
Change earlier this year, and it’s worth
repeating – I wasn’t so sure she was up to
composer Jason Robert Brown’s romantic
musical. And the same went
for Tristan Layne Tapscott,
who I think is fantastically
funny in comedy roles, but
hit-or-miss in his more
serious efforts. Under the
direction of David Turley,
though, they present a
unique take on this criss-
crossed storyline that has its
own sweetness.
The piece is loved by many
a die-hard musical-theatre
fan, and Brown is considered
by some to be a god of a com-
poser, second only to Stephen
Sondheim. This work of
Brown’s is particularly clever, in that its story
of a man and woman meeting and falling in
(and then out of) love while furthering their
careers is told from each person’s perspec-
tive, but in opposite directions in time. From
Jamie’s standpoint, we hear their love story
from beginning to end. Cathy, however,
starts at the end and reverses back to the
beginning, with the characters’ two timelines
meeting in the middle.
As Cathy, Downing had me in tears dur-
ing the first song in the show, which is no
small feat; I know this musical backward
and forward, so there are no surprises in the
lyrics for me. Still, Downing’s connection
to the feeling behind “Still Hurting” is truly
moving. She starts with an almost emotion-
less stance and expression, with little inflec-
tion in her voice. It’s quickly clear, though,
that her Cathy is numbing herself to the
pain of losing Jamie. Bits of anger then start
to crack their way through that numbness,
as Downing runs the gamut from deep
sadness to accusatory anger, and everything
in between. It’s a stunning scene... and that’s
just the show’s first number.
Downing continues to impress with
equally effective displays of feeling through
the end of the show, and thankfully also gets
to showcase her skills in comedic delivery
with her delightfully exaggerated facial
expressions and humorous inflections.
Downing’s artistry and vocal quality seem to
fit hand-in-glove with Brown’s music, with
Musical Romance / ecnamoR lacisuM
The Last Five Years, at the District Theatre through July 30
By Thom White
THEATRE
Tristan Layne Tapscott and
Cari Downing
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 14
What’s Happenin’
Music
Blackberry Smoke
The Redstone Room
Monday, July 25, 7:30 p.m.
T
he Atlanta-based musicians
of Blackberry Smoke play
Davenport’s Redstone Room on
July 25, and the band’s appeal
is perhaps best summed up in
this quote in
Cincinnati’s City
Beat magazine: “If
you’ve been miss-
ing what us old
hippies remember
as Southern Rock,
tip a Shiner, pack
a bowl, and take
a good long hit
of Blackberry
Smoke.”
For legal rea-
sons, I’m obliged
to say that the Reader does not
condone tipping a Shiner, packing
a bowl, and taking a good long hit
of Blackberry Smoke.
Since its debut in 2000, the
ensemble has been composed of
the same five performing friends:
guitarists/vocalists Charlie Starr
and Paul Jackson, bassist/vocal-
ist Richard Turner, drummer Brit
Turner, and keyboardist Brandon
Still. And for more than a decade,
Blackberry Smoke has wowed con-
cert-goers with their impassioned
Southern-rock stylings, heard in
such popular and energizing an-
thems as “Freedom Song,” “Good
One Coming on,” “Up in Smoke,”
and “Yesterday’s Wine,” the latter
recorded with country artists
Jamey Johnson and the legendary
George Jones.
Over the past few years, Black-
berry Smoke has seen its exposure
and popularity increase sig-
nificantly, the result of the group’s
successful Little Piece of Dixie CD,
its national headlining tours, and
opening for such
noted musical acts as
ZZ Top, Lynyrd Sky-
nyrd, and the Zac
Brown Band. Yet it’s
refreshing to know
that even given all
this success, the
members of Black-
berry Smoke remain
steadfastly down-to-
earth. Describing his
fellow musicians in
GotCountryOnline.com, Charlie
Starr revealed, “My bandmates are
insane. They refer to their bunk
blankets as ‘woobies’ or ‘binkies.’
Paul cries on planes.”
If these are the last What’s Hap-
penin’ pages you read from me, it’s
because, having finally found my
soulmates, I’ve quit the paper and
am now touring with the band.
Local musician Derek Frank
opens for Blackberry Smoke,
and for more information on the
concert, call (563)326-1333 or visit
RedstoneRoom.com.
Event
Train Festival 2011
Schwiebert Riverfront Park
Thursday, July 21, through Sunday, July 24
L
ooking
for a
unique
and playful
reason
to escape
the house
and spend
a summer day outdoors with your kids?
Consider taking the family to the 2011 Train
Festival in Rock Island’s Schwiebert Riverfront
Park. How’s that for a loco motive?
Ha ha ha ha ha! Get it?! “Loco motive?”
“Loco” as in “nutty,” and “motive” as in, like ... !
Fine. No more terrible train gags for the
remainder of the piece. Happy?
It’s a safe bet that, from July 21 through 24,
railroad enthusiasts certainly will be. Nearly
a dozen steam and diesel locomotives from
around the country will be on site, and the
festival will allow visitors to tour the cabs,
watch demonstrations, and even take all-day
or two-hour excursions behind various vintage
trains.
As it also boasts numerous model-train
layouts on display, a railroad-themed children’s
activity and play area, twice-daily performances
by recording artist James Coffey, vendors
selling one-of-a-kind mementos, park rides
on trains built to one-eighth scale, and more,
the 2011 Train Festival is sure to tickle to train
lover in everyone. And to help whet your appe-
tite for this special summertime event, try your
hand at this quick railway quiz, courtesy of our
friends at FunTrivia.com.
Music
Corrosion of Conformity
Rock Island Brewing Company
Friday, July 29, 8 p.m.
O
n July 29, the Rock Island Brewing Company will
host a special concert with the acclaimed heavy-met-
al band Corrosion of Conformity. Which, ironically, is also
our office’s name for “weekly Reader staff meeting.”
Formed in Raleigh, North Carolina, in 1982, the group
made its first splash on the national music scene with
1984’s Eye for an Eye, a 20-track punk-rock release featur-
ing band founders Mike Dean on bass and vocals, Woody
Weatherman on guitar, and Reed Mullin on drums. Nearly
three decades later, all three men are still with the outfit,
although Corrosion of Conformity has certainly under-
gone a number of personnel changes since the early ’80s,
with no fewer
than nine other
musicians
and vocalists,
at one point
or another,
touring with
the founding
members. (Vis-
it the C.O.C.
Wikipedia page
for a helpful, if rather complex, timeline of just who played
when.)
Yet through all its lineup changes, Corrosion of
Conformity has maintained an ardent fan base, and can
certainly lay claim to some impressive career highlights.
C.O.C.’s Deliverance CD – which boasted the top-20 hits
“Albatross” and “Clean My Wounds”– spent four months
on Billboard’s Top 200 chart in 1994, the same year that the
group’s single “Big Problems” was heard on the soundtrack
to Kevin Smith’s Clerks. In 1998, the band was nominated
for a “Best Metal Performance” Grammy Award for the
single “Drowning in a Daydream.” In 2005, Corrosion of
Conformity toured alongside Motörhead and Disturbed,
and earned critical and commercial success for its CD In
the Arms of God.
And now, 29 years after its inception, the group is
returning to its roots; after years of touring as a four-piece
ensemble, the metal rockers will play RIBCO with a lineup
composed solely of Dean, Weatherman, and Mullin, whose
blend as a trio was last heard, in album form, on the 1985
release Animosity. Which, ironically, is also our office’s
name for “weekly Reader staff meeting.” I tell you, that joke
never gets old. [Publisher’s note: Oh yes it does.]
Corrosion of Conformity performs with openers The
Horde and Lord Green, and more information on the night
is available by calling (309)793-4060 or visiting RIBCO.
com.
A n s w e r s : 1 – A , 2 – A , 3 – B , 4 – C , 5 – C . T h a t C h i n e s e b r i d g e , b y t h e w a y , i s m o r e t h a n
s i x m i l e s l o n g . W o w . T h a t ’ s s o m e t h i n g t o c h o o - c h o o o n . ( O h , c o m e o n , I s a i d n o t e r r i b l e
t r a i n g a g s ! T h a t o n e ’ s j u s t . . . b o r d e r l i n e - t e r r i b l e . )
1) In what year was the first steam locomo-
tive built?
A) 1804
B) 1806
C) 1808
2) In railway parlance, what is a round-
house?
A) A building for service and repair of
engines
B) A location for passengers to buy tickets
C) A place where train tracks cross
3) What type of railway car is used to trans-
port liquid or gaseous cargo?
A) Box car
B) Tank car
C) Hopper
4) Which train’s route runs between Paris
and Venice?
A) Thalys
B) Eurostar
C) Orient Express
5) What country boasts the world’s longest
railroad bridge?
A) Russia
B) Brazil
C) China
For more information, event tickets,
and a schedule of daily activities, visit
TrainFestival2011.com.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 15
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
What £Ise
ls Happenin’
MUSIC
Thursday, July 28, and Friday, July
29 – Branson on the Road. Country
music and comedy with the Missouri-
based touring performers. Circa ’21
Dinner Playhouse (1828 Third Avenue,
Rock Island). Thursday 6 p.m. dinner,
7:15 p.m. show; Friday noon plated
lunch, 1 p.m. show. $41.28-47.55. For
tickets and information, call (309)786-
7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com.
Friday, July 29 – Ernie Haase &
Signature Sound. Grammy Award-
nominated gospel performers in their
Cathedrals-Influenced tour. Adler
Theatre (136 East Third Street, Daven-
port). 7:30 p.m. $22-30. For tickets, call
(800)745-3000 or visit AdlerTheatre.
com.
Friday, July 29 – Sister Sledge
featuring Kathy Sledge. 1970s
music icon performs such hits as “We
Are Family” and “Take Me Back to
Love Again.” Quad-Cities Waterfront
Convention Center (1777 Isle Parkway,
Bettendorf ). 7:30 p.m. $20-40. For
information, call (800)724-5825 or visit
Bettendorf.IsleOfCapriCasinos.com.
Saturday, July 30 – Xtreme Muzik
Tour with Big & Rich and Gretchen
Wilson. Country-music stars in con-
cert, with opening sets by Cowboy
Troy and Two Foot Fred. Riverside
Casino & Golf Resort (3184 Highway
Continued On Page 21
Theatre
The Wasps
Lincoln Park
Saturday, July 30, through Sunday, August 7
“H
ey there, Jeff!”
“Hi, Mi – . Oh, lord. You
really have to stop doing this.”
“You like the outfit? Diggin’ the
wings?”
“Let me guess. You’re
auditioning for the
Genesius Guild show,
aren’t you?”
“Absolutely! It’s the
Aristophanes comedy
The Wasps, the Guild’s
annual season-end-
ing farce that Don
Wooten adapts from a
classic work of Greek
literature!”
“And you want to play a wasp.”
“Well, duh! They’re only the title
characters! I mean, there are defi-
nitely more prominent characters in
the play, since The Wasps is actually
about a father who’s obsessed with
lawsuits and trials, and a son who
wants to keep his crazy old man
locked inside the house ... .”
“Uh huh.”
“But seriously, any role in this
show would be a great one! The
Wasps features all sorts of nutty com-
ic scenarios, like that father trying to
escape the house by pretending he’s
chimney smoke, and an out-of-con-
trol drunk disrupting a fancy dinner
party, and a courtroom dispute over a
stolen slab of cheese ... !”
“Right.”
“And you just know that Wooten’s
going to come up with situations
even more outrageous than those!
His updated season-enders, after all,
always take a few jabs at figures of
local and national interest, and he
really likes going after politicians,
so you can just imagine the fun that
he’s going to have at the expense of
nightly-news fixtures from
the past few months!”
“I’m sure.”
“Plus, of course, there’ll
be satiric songs, and
dances, and a wacky chase
at the end, and creative and
colorful costumes by Ellen
Dixon ... !”
“But if the costumes are
provided for you, why are
you going to the audition
dressed as a wasp?”
“I just want to show them how
right for the role I am!”
“But you realize that Aristophanes’
wasps aren’t actual wasps, right?
They’re elderly jurors who try to
help the father escape from his house
arrest. They’re not going to be literal
wasps.”
“Oh, Jeff. You’ve never seen a Don
Wooten comedy, have you?”
The Wasps will be performed on Sat-
urdays and Sundays July 30 through
August 7 at 8 p.m. Admission is free,
donations are appreciated, and more
information is available by visiting
Genesius.org.
Event
Train Festival 2011
Schwiebert Riverfront Park
Thursday, July 21, through Sunday, July 24
L
ooking
for a
unique
and playful
reason
to escape
the house
and spend
a summer day outdoors with your kids?
Consider taking the family to the 2011 Train
Festival in Rock Island’s Schwiebert Riverfront
Park. How’s that for a loco motive?
Ha ha ha ha ha! Get it?! “Loco motive?”
“Loco” as in “nutty,” and “motive” as in, like ... !
Fine. No more terrible train gags for the
remainder of the piece. Happy?
It’s a safe bet that, from July 21 through 24,
railroad enthusiasts certainly will be. Nearly
a dozen steam and diesel locomotives from
around the country will be on site, and the
festival will allow visitors to tour the cabs,
watch demonstrations, and even take all-day
or two-hour excursions behind various vintage
trains.
As it also boasts numerous model-train
layouts on display, a railroad-themed children’s
activity and play area, twice-daily performances
by recording artist James Coffey, vendors
selling one-of-a-kind mementos, park rides
on trains built to one-eighth scale, and more,
the 2011 Train Festival is sure to tickle to train
lover in everyone. And to help whet your appe-
tite for this special summertime event, try your
hand at this quick railway quiz, courtesy of our
friends at FunTrivia.com.
Music
Corrosion of Conformity
Rock Island Brewing Company
Friday, July 29, 8 p.m.
O
n July 29, the Rock Island Brewing Company will
host a special concert with the acclaimed heavy-met-
al band Corrosion of Conformity. Which, ironically, is also
our office’s name for “weekly Reader staff meeting.”
Formed in Raleigh, North Carolina, in 1982, the group
made its first splash on the national music scene with
1984’s Eye for an Eye, a 20-track punk-rock release featur-
ing band founders Mike Dean on bass and vocals, Woody
Weatherman on guitar, and Reed Mullin on drums. Nearly
three decades later, all three men are still with the outfit,
although Corrosion of Conformity has certainly under-
gone a number of personnel changes since the early ’80s,
with no fewer
than nine other
musicians
and vocalists,
at one point
or another,
touring with
the founding
members. (Vis-
it the C.O.C.
Wikipedia page
for a helpful, if rather complex, timeline of just who played
when.)
Yet through all its lineup changes, Corrosion of
Conformity has maintained an ardent fan base, and can
certainly lay claim to some impressive career highlights.
C.O.C.’s Deliverance CD – which boasted the top-20 hits
“Albatross” and “Clean My Wounds”– spent four months
on Billboard’s Top 200 chart in 1994, the same year that the
group’s single “Big Problems” was heard on the soundtrack
to Kevin Smith’s Clerks. In 1998, the band was nominated
for a “Best Metal Performance” Grammy Award for the
single “Drowning in a Daydream.” In 2005, Corrosion of
Conformity toured alongside Motörhead and Disturbed,
and earned critical and commercial success for its CD In
the Arms of God.
And now, 29 years after its inception, the group is
returning to its roots; after years of touring as a four-piece
ensemble, the metal rockers will play RIBCO with a lineup
composed solely of Dean, Weatherman, and Mullin, whose
blend as a trio was last heard, in album form, on the 1985
release Animosity. Which, ironically, is also our office’s
name for “weekly Reader staff meeting.” I tell you, that joke
never gets old. [Publisher’s note: Oh yes it does.]
Corrosion of Conformity performs with openers The
Horde and Lord Green, and more information on the night
is available by calling (309)793-4060 or visiting RIBCO.
com.
A n s w e r s : 1 – A , 2 – A , 3 – B , 4 – C , 5 – C . T h a t C h i n e s e b r i d g e , b y t h e w a y , i s m o r e t h a n
s i x m i l e s l o n g . W o w . T h a t ’ s s o m e t h i n g t o c h o o - c h o o o n . ( O h , c o m e o n , I s a i d n o t e r r i b l e
t r a i n g a g s ! T h a t o n e ’ s j u s t . . . b o r d e r l i n e - t e r r i b l e . )
1) In what year was the first steam locomo-
tive built?
A) 1804
B) 1806
C) 1808
2) In railway parlance, what is a round-
house?
A) A building for service and repair of
engines
B) A location for passengers to buy tickets
C) A place where train tracks cross
3) What type of railway car is used to trans-
port liquid or gaseous cargo?
A) Box car
B) Tank car
C) Hopper
4) Which train’s route runs between Paris
and Venice?
A) Thalys
B) Eurostar
C) Orient Express
5) What country boasts the world’s longest
railroad bridge?
A) Russia
B) Brazil
C) China
For more information, event tickets,
and a schedule of daily activities, visit
TrainFestival2011.com.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 16 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Steve Banks and Aaron Tinder, Through August at the Quad City International Airport
Modern Relics
L
ittering the bottoms of the display
cases at the gallery inside the Quad
City International Airport is a
landfill-like carpeting – a mat of appar-
ent cultural detritus under Steve Banks’
sculptures. It initially appears ancient,
like scattered pottery shards, but a closer
inspection reveals pizza slices, pie crusts,
bullets, masks, and chunks of carvings, all
out of earthenware clay.
We see this fascination with objects
across this exhibit, among the work of both
Banks and mixed-media artist Aaron Tin-
der. The Quad City Arts show – running
through August – consists of three large
sculptures and four mixed-media canvases
by Banks, and eight mixed-media works
on paper by Tinder. Their use of familiar
objects makes this exhibit accessible, but
their mysterious and metaphorical treat-
ment provides depth.
Banks’ main sculptures are large and
commanding, yet a vast amount of their
content can be found in the aforemen-
tioned base of “debris.” Included are
various scraps of low-relief works created
in the style of broken parts of Egyptian,
Hindu, or pre-Columbian temples. Despite
their aged style and appearance, many of
these fragments depict modern imagery,
such as fast-food cups or skyscrapers. This
juxtaposition of ancient and contemporary
“relics” seems to reflect on how, through
the lens of history, societies are interpreted
based on the imagery of their artifacts.
The sculptures – Hydra (Seven Headed),
Trojan Horse, and Tower of Babel – share
a similar form: a five- to seven-foot-tall
subject centered in the display case with
this base of assorted objects, appearing as
a monolith emerging (or remaining) from
rubble. The individual elements of the
sculptures are mostly ceramics, with matte
under-glazes in shades of brown. Banks
also utilizes mixed-media components,
such as driftwood, blue-jean scraps, and a
metallic gold material.
Trojan Horse primarily consists of hand-
built ceramic. The sheer volume of this
form – around seven feet tall and two and
a half feet wide – is impressive, considering
it was built from clay. This technical skill,
and the accompanying elements of detail,
make this sculpture the standout of the
three.
Also impressive is the way Banks has
depicted this story. The horse was left as
a false gift to the besieged city of Troy,
with Greek soldiers hiding inside. Banks’
horse visualizes this narrative through the
human feet and hands emerging from the
vessel – the schematized, flat feet support-
ing the bottom of the sculpture, and the
hands clawing out from the front.
Beyond that, the likeness to a wooden
horse full of soldiers ends. The sculpture
balloons out in the middle, with a swoop-
ing, hook-like coil rising out to form the
top half of the piece. On top of this “hook”
are four chunky, mask-like heads mounted
on sticks. Inside the negative-space curve
of the hook are latticed, hieroglyphic-like
markings, formed from thin slabs of clay.
These glyphs include images repeated
in other Banks pieces – human figures,
fast-food containers, schematized dragon
heads, and abstract shapes. Emerging
from the “body” of the horse are a factory
whistle and a gauge.
Trojan Horse is a fascinating hybrid of
cute, common, and threatening. The hands
in the center look cartoonish – they have
only four, sausage-like fingers – but are
reaching and clawing. The whistle and
gauge would look at home in a factory but
seem disturbing as part of
this haphazard war engine.
The bulbous “body” and
swooping “neck” are
rounded, pleasant shapes,
but the grimacing, hollow
faces mounted on top are
fearful.
Hydra (Seven Headed)
refers to the reptilian mon-
ster with many heads, slain
by Hercules in Greek my-
thology. The true terror of
this monster lay not in its
numerous heads but in its
ability to grow two heads
to replace any that were cut
off. This makes the hydra
a metaphor for a problem
that can be made worse if
not handled properly.
In Banks’ sculpture, the
hydra’s contour is loosely
constructed from bro-
ken pieces of driftwood,
tethered together with torn scraps of blue
jeans. It is a loose framework, or skeleton,
of the beast, rather than a solid form. This
makes it seem as though the subject is
not the hydra itself, but more of a fossil or
effigy. The implied creature bears seven
heads that, instead of appearing dragon-
like, feature masks of simplified human
faces sculpted from chunky, melting
material. Some faces appear friendly and
cartoon-like, some vacant, and others like
tormented skulls. Included in the cultural
wreckage at the hydra’s feet are a handful
of other mask-like faces, in addition to the
hydra’s seven. Are these the cut-off heads
of the hydra, re-grown in duplicate, or the
disembodied heads of its victims?
Like Trojan Horse, Tower of Babel is a
hefty ceramic undertaking. The subject of
this work is a slender, schematized house-
ART
LEFT: The carpeting of debris under a
Steve Banks sculpture.
ABOVE: Steve Banks - Trojan Horse.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 17 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
to fill in the blanks. While the tone and
implied narrative of this piece are effec-
tive, the composition would have benefited
from a greater variety of sizes of collaged
media to help clarify focal points.
Devil Music, on the other hand, is strik-
ing and complex because of its large sub-
jects – taking up most of the background
space – and Tinder’s use of drawn render-
ing to create forms and emphasis. We look
first at the biggest and most detailed object,
which effectively leads the viewer through
the image.
In this work, a box, covered with a
draped cloth, takes up half of the com-
position. We see that one side of the box
is covered in what appears to by Egyp-
tian hieroglyphics, and another features
stripes of collaged images including a flag,
birds, flames, and flowers. Another bird
is seen in flight in a left-hand corner. In
the foreground, on the right, is a jumble
of collaged photographs of cords, over a
tower of repeated photos of a car’s grill.
Also resting on this collage is a large photo
of an old-fashioned radio, a headlight, and
a spiral-print umbrella.
In Devil Music, Tinder explores how
including diverse yet visually related ob-
jects can open the work conceptually while
still exhibiting unity. He also employs his
collaged photos as parts of other design
elements – such as the tower, or stripes
– rather than allowing them to float on the
background, creating mysterious hybrid
objects. And by controlling color through
the use of drawn rendering on the draped
cloth, in warm brown tones that contrast
with the blue background, he guides us
through his work.
Michelle Garrison is a mixed-media artist
who teaches art and design at Geneseo
Middle School and J.D. Darnell High School.
by Michelle Garrison
michelle_m_garrison@hotmail.com
like building, with a pitched roof. The form
is divided into four different sections, with
their seams left rough and obvious, giving
it a fragile and unstable appearance. The
surface of the building bears a haphazard
overlapping of the same texture from the
ceramic waffles on the ground.
Tower of Babel is based on the biblical
story in which the people of Shinar teamed
up to construct a tower to heaven, against
God’s will, resulting in God punishing
mankind by creating different languages.
Banks has decontextualized this story, pre-
senting just the structure itself. The tower
standing alone among the debris creates a
sense of isolation, and the dwelling-like ap-
pearance of the building makes it seem less
mythological and more personal. The pre-
carious appearance of the tower makes us
wonder if this represents the dilapidation
of the building following the inability of its
builders to communicate, or the perilous
nature of the tower from its inception.
All of these sculptures work in a similar
fashion. The large, central subjects contrast
with the assortment of scraps covering
the display cases’ bases, creating a push
and pull between dominating shapes and
absorbing details. Their origins in well-
known ancient stories are communica-
tive, giving the viewer a starting point for
contemplation, but the pieces don’t merely
regurgitate the tales. The modern imagery
is enhanced through the aged, somewhat
foreboding appearance; these are not
simple reflections of pop culture.
Banks’ mixed-media canvases feature
images of hot dogs, hamburgers, and
fast-food drink cups. These canvases are
approximately four by three and a half feet,
with the composition dominated by the
food-based subject. In each, the food item
is rendered in a mosaic style, composed
of colored tiles. The background has been
washed over with white, leaving it in
grayscale. We can make out faint, cartoon-
styled iconography in the background
– pancakes, telephones, and classical
architecture. This creates an interplay
between the seemingly banal foreground
food objects and the more complex but
obscured background.
Aaron Tinder’s mixed-media collages
share this tendency to juxtapose objects
and tone. Both artists’ works heavily
reference everyday items but force viewers
to reconsider them by placing them in
atypical contexts. Tinder’s work shows
strong promise, with engaging imagery
and a unified and appealing style, but it is
somewhat dwarfed by the more ambitious
and visually hefty work of Banks.
Tinder’s common imagery includes
American flags, wires and cords, mysteri-
ous boxes, and plants. Often, these images
are collaged from what appear to be old
newspapers and wallpaper. The worn
appearance of the collage elements is con-
trasted with cheerful pastel backgrounds,
and the elements are often arranged to
imply a sense of space or horizon through
object sizing and use of blue as sky. All
of his works are on illustration board,
displayed without mat or frame, roughly
four by two feet in size. The overall effect is
a surreal landscape.
Tinder uses this dreamlike space to
create a sense of narrative in Roads &
Schemes. The background consists of
several thin layers of white, blue gray, and
yellow paint. The largest object in the
composition is a plain, white box with no
lid and a photograph of the back of a train
cargo car on the side. Emerging from the
box are collaged wires and cords. Toward
the top of the composition is a photo of
an American flag, with the field of stars
removed. To the right of this flag we see an
apparently distant line of men, facing away
from the viewer. Larger and lower, and
thus appearing closer, is a photograph of
a man, seemingly looking at something in
his hands. The use of the word “schemes”
in the title, as well as the men looking
away, gives this work a quietly sinister feel,
yet the lack of context allows the viewer
Aaron Tinder - Roads and Schemes
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 18 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 19 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
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What £Ise ls Happenin’
22, Riverside). 8 p.m. $35-65. For tickets
and information, call (877)677-3456 or
visit RiversideCasinoAndResort.com.
THEATRE
Friday, July 22, through Sunday,
July 31 – The Wizard of Oz. Country-
side Community Theatre’s musical stage
version of the storybook classic. North
Scott High School Fine Arts Auditorium
(200 South First Street, Eldridge). Thurs-
day-Saturday 7:30 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m.
$11-14. For tickets and information, call
(563)285-6228 or visit CCTOnStage.org.
Saturday, July 23 – Be Not Un-
Equally Yoked. Stage play focusing on
domestic violence and other issues,
presented by True Gospel Enterprises,
Inc. Nighswander Theatre (2822 Eastern
Avenue, Davenport). 6 p.m. $25. For
tickets and information, call (563)726-
2665 or (563)468-9955.
Thursday, July 28, through Sun-
day, August 7 – A Midsummer Night’s
Dream. Davenport Junior Theatre’s
“Shakespeare in the parks” touring
production of the Bard’s comedy. Dav-
enport’s LeClaire Park Bandshell (July
28), Davenport Public Library Eastern
Avenue Branch (July 30), Bettendorf’s
Veterans Memorial Park Bandshell
(July 31), Rock Island’s Lincoln Park
(August 4), Davenport’s Vander Veer
Botanical Park (August 6), Davenport
Junior Theatre (August 7). All perfor-
mances 7 p.m. Free admission. For
information, call (563)326-7862 or visit
DavenportJuniorTheatre.com.
Thursday, July 28, through Sunday,
August 7 – Annie. The Tony Award-
winning musical-comedy smash.
Clinton Area Showboat Theatre (311
Riverview Drive, Clinton). Thurs-
day-Saturday 7:30 p.m., Sunday and
Wednesday 3 p.m. $16-20. For tickets
and information, call (563)242-6760 or
visit ClintonShowboat.org.
Thursday, July 28, through Sun-
day, August 7 – Children of Eden.
Beloved Biblical musical by com-
poser Stephen Schwartz. Timber Lake
Playhouse (8215 Black Oak Road, Mt.
Carroll). Tuesday-Saturday 7:30 p.m.,
Sunday and Wednesday 2 p.m., July
31 at 6:30 p.m. $15-23. For tickets and
information, call (815)244-2035 or visit
TimberLakePlayhouse.org.
Saturday, July 30, and Sunday,
July 31 – Love, Loss, & What I Wore. A
reader’s theatre performance of Nora
& Delia Ephron’s comedy, in a New
Ground Theatre benefit performance
for Dress for Success Quad Cities. Village
Theatre (2113 East 11th Street, Village
of East Davenport). Saturday 7:30 p.m.,
Sunday 2 p.m. $25. For information
and tickets, call (563)326-7529 or visit
NewGroundTheatre.org.
EVENTS
Friday, July 29 – Bucktown Birth-
day Bash. Sixth-annual celebration of
the arts venue, with exhibits, demon-
strations, vendors, screenings of the
locally produced science-fiction film
Falling Up, live music by Lock & Dam,
Ragaman, and Rock Island Rhythm,
and more. Bucktown Center for the
Arts (225 East Second Street, Dav-
enport). 6 p.m. Free admission. For
information, call (309)230-1594 or visit
BucktownArts.com.
Friday, July 29, and Saturday, July
30 – 40th Annual Street Fest. Sum-
mertime event featuring live music,
arts and crafts, family activities, food
and art vendors, and more. Down-
town Davenport, on Second Street
between Brady and Ripley Streets.
Friday 10 a.m.-midnight, Saturday 9
a.m.-midnight. Free admission. For
information, call (563)823-2667 or visit
DowntownDavenport.com.
Friday, July 29 – Quad-City Times
Junior Bix Road Race. Annual event
with a seven-tenths-mile race for ages
8 to 12, a half-mile race for ages 6 and
7, and a 70-yard race for ages 5 and
under. Quad-City Times building. (500
East Third Street, Davenport). 6 p.m.
$12-15 registration. For information and
to register, call (563)383-2489 or visit
Bix7.com.
Saturday, July 30 – Quad-City
Times Bix 7 Road Race & QuickBix.
The 37th-annual competition featuring
the seven-mile Bix race, the two-mile
QuickBix, and street entertainment.
Downtown Davenport, at the foot of
Brady Street. 8 a.m. $32-40 registration.
For information and to register, call
(563)383-2489 or visit Bix7.com.
Tuesday, August 2, through Sun-
day, August 7 – Great Mississippi
Valley Fair. Annual festival featuring
rides, activities, and food and merchan-
dise vendors, with grandstand concerts
by Joe Nichols, Blake Shelton, Darius
Rucker, The Steve Miller Band, The Char-
lie Daniels Band, and Miranda Lambert.
Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds (2815
West Locust Street, Davenport). $3-10
daily admission, $40-45 six-day FunCard
(needed for grandstand entry). For in-
formation, tickets, and daily schedules,
visit MVFair.com.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 20 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Continued From Page 7
COVER STORY
The system includes a calculation for
“numerator nutrients,” which are “considered
to have generally favorable effects on health.”
These include fiber, folate, Vitamin A,
Vitamin C, Vitamin D, Vitamin E, Vitamin
B
12
, Vitamin B
6
, potassium, calcium, zinc,
Omega-3 fatty acids, total bioflavonoids, total
carotenoids, magnesium, and iron.
That number is then divided by the
calculation for “denominator nutrients,”
considered to have “generally unfavorable
effects on health”: saturated fat, trans fat,
sodium, sugar, and cholesterol.
Other factors considered in determining
the final 1-to-100 score are protein quality,
fat quality, glycemic load, and energy density.
The algorithm was built on and tested
against “face validity,” which Katz explained
by way of a few questions: “What are the
foods the most expert people think are most
nutritious? What are the foods the most
expert people think are less nutritious? You
start there, and you build around that.”
He admitted that face validity is “not a
very high standard. But frankly we don’t have
a gold standard for measuring nutritional
quality of an individual food. In some ways
it’s perfectly obvious; everybody agrees
that spinach is a really nutritious food, and
everybody agrees that marshmallows are not.
But based on what? ... You really have to beat
up on that to get people to figure out what’s
going on.”
Since the algorithm was finalized, 90,000
foods have been scored – including more
than 20,000 carried by Hy-Vee. This is
done through the method of “imputation”
– which involves analyzing data about the
food rather than the physical food itself.
“If you have the ingredients, and you have
nutrition facts, there’s only basically a very
narrow, fixed way those ingredients can
come together to produce those nutrition
facts,” Katz explained. “So you can reverse-
engineer the rest ... .” Through that process,
he added, one could generate as many as 150
nutrient entries for a food, but NuVal uses
approximately 30.
It’s also worth noting that the factors that
determine a food’s NuVal score are not all
available on the nutrition panel – such as the
biological quality of protein.
And there are labeling practices and
regulations (and loopholes) that NuVal is
designed to get around. Omega-3 fatty acids
– considered good for your health – are not
universally declared by manufacturers, for
instance, but NuVal calculates them. On
the negative side, there are rounding rules
through which manufacturers claim foods
have no trans fat because they’ve made the
serving size small enough that trans fat is less
than half a gram; NuVal includes that trans
fat in its calculations.
“We have to go beyond the nutrition-fact
panel ... ,” Katz said.
“We’re Not Telling You
What to Eat”
NuVal isn’t the only nutrition-rating
system.
The Guiding Stars system (GuidingStars.
com) is more widely used – in place at more
than 1,600 grocery stores – and is more
reductive, giving foods zero, one, two, or
three stars based on nutritional content.
Jewel (with three stores on the Illinois
side of the river) uses the Nutrition iQ
system (JewelOsco.com/nutritioniq), which
is less reductive and uses colored labels to
denote foods that have, for example, good
fiber, good protein, low sodium, vitamins,
minerals, or 100-percent juice.
And stores generally are focusing more on
nutrition. Walmart earlier this year unveiled
a new nutrition initiative – including
reformulating products and “developing
strong criteria for a simple front-of-package
seal that will help consumers instantly
identify truly healthier food options such as
whole-grain cereal, whole-wheat pasta, or
unsweetened canned fruit,” according to a
press release.
But because Hy-Vee dominates the Quad
Cities market – and because no other local
grocer outside of Jewel has a nutrition-rating
system – NuVal is the focus here. (I visited
Aldi, Fareway, Save-a-Lot, Schnucks, Target,
and Walmart.)
The nature of NuVal makes it ideal for
side-to-side comparisons of similar foods.
Katz said NuVal allows consumers to make
informed decisions about not just nutrition
but also value. While many people think
“better” foods cost significantly more,
that’s typically not the case. “There’s the
opportunity to trade up nutritionally”
without paying much (if any) more, Katz
said.
A longer-term goal, he said, is to get
people to compare products across categories
and not just within them. “NuVal is
universal,” Katz said. “It’s the same scoring
system from soup to nuts. So it also is
pointing out: You probably should spend a
little more time in the produce aisle, and you
should maybe spend a little less time in the
cookie aisle. ... We do hope that it will not
only empower people to make better choices
within a given aisle, but over time will also
nudge them to spend more time in aisles that
have the most nutritious choices.”
If the gentleness of that statement isn’t
clear enough, part of the marketing genius
of NuVal is that it doesn’t impose itself. The
shelf tags themselves are unobtrusive and
easy to ignore when you’re buying Chips
Ahoy! (a 6, by the way), and Katz was careful
to say that there’s no number below which
one shouldn’t buy. (Anything below 10, he
said, should be a “rare and occasional thing.”)
He stressed that “people who use a GPS
system don’t want to be told where to go.
They just want to be told how to get there.
NuVal was really designed with that concept
in mind. We’re not the boss of you, and we’re
not telling you what to eat.”
The aim, he said, is to choose a more
nutritious food whenever possible – even
if you’re still buying candy and cookies: “In
every category and whatever the range, you
have the opportunity to trade up, even when
you’re indulging yourself.”
This was echoed by Hy-Vee’s Comer, who
said the store doesn’t want to prevent people
from buying low-scoring foods. “We wanted
to give our customers an easy way to evaluate
products and make healthier choices,” she
said. “We think it’s working.”
Dietitian Macon gave some examples
of how she uses NuVal: “I ... create cut-off
points when I am shopping with my kids. It
takes the pressure off of Mom; I’m not the
bad guy for saying ‘no’ to a low-scoring food.
My kids know that scores below a certain
number are treats in our house, not everyday
foods.
“NuVal makes it easier to see the value
in making healthy choices for my family,
even if those choices have a higher price
tag. The food we eat is probably the biggest
investment we make in our health most
days. I divide the price by the NuVal score
as I shop and realize that even if the price is
higher, often I pay less for each nutrient in
that food than I would if I chose a lower-
scoring, lower-priced product.”
What NuVal Can’t Do
While NuVal is a godsend to many of us,
it’s important to understand what it can’t do.
Much of this is obvious, but the intentionally
simple presentation of NuVal might make
us lazy – we could use it instead of common
sense.
For one thing, NuVal doesn’t address
portion sizes and Americans’ tendency to
overeat. Macon suggested that consumers use
the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Choose
My Plate system (ChooseMyPlate.gov) in
concert with NuVal.
And NuVal shouldn’t take the place of
reading ingredient lists and nutrition panels.
Comer said that consumers can (and should)
consult the nutrition panel, but “NuVal’s an
acknowledgment of our human foibles and
human nature, in that we don’t always take
the time ... to do all the research about all the
products we’re buying.”
NutritionOverEasy.com found two related
problems with NuVal and other nutrition-
rating systems: “First, they set the nutritional
priorities, not you.” So if your sense of what
you should and shouldn’t eat diverges from
conventional wisdom on nutrition, NuVal
won’t be of much use to you.
The Web site continued: “The other
disadvantage is that crunching all the data
into a single number obscures the various
‘pluses’ and ‘minuses.’ For example, a food
that’s high in sodium but low in sugar could
end up with the same rating as a food that’s
just the opposite: low in sodium but high
in sugar. But depending on whether I have
diabetes or high blood pressure, the two
choices are hardly comparable.”
In other words, NuVal can’t consider your
particular health situation or dietary goals.
As Macon wrote: “A customer concerned
about heart health may consider NuVal
when choosing a salad dressing, but still
choose to look for saturated fat and sodium
information on the nutrition-facts panel
before making a decision. Similarly, NuVal
may help a diabetic customer to narrow his
search for a breakfast cereal; then he may
make his choice based on the fiber content.”
And NuVal doesn’t address factors other
than nutrition.
For instance, it gives no advantage to
organic foods, even though that’s important
to many people. NuVal explains this on its
Web site: “As yet, there is no widely validated
evidence that organic foods have a higher
nutritional value or greater nutrient density
than food not grown organically. Obviously,
consumers who choose organic foods may
be doing so for reasons other than nutrition –
the fact that it is grown without using certain
chemical controls, for example.”
Similarly, Hy-Vee dietitian Blocklinger
noted that “foods that may be processed and
then enriched may score equally to a product
that has the same nutrient profile but that is
in its natural/original state.”
The Wall Street Journal provided another
example of how NuVal’s system doesn’t
account for all the factors that go into
consumer choice: “Kellogg Company’s Kashi
brand in a statement said it tries to provide
minimally processed, organic-certified food
free of artificial flavors and other additives.
‘Many of the current nutrient-profiling
systems don’t take these values into account,
which results in an incomplete picture,’ it
said.”
A personal example: I’m hesitant to buy
products with artificial sweeteners for my
three-year-old daughter. My bias against
them is admittedly based in ignorance rather
than research – I fear that some of them
A GPS for Better Nutrition?
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 21 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
might have adverse long-term health effects
– but it’s there nonetheless. (For the record:
The National Cancer Institute says “there is
no clear evidence that the artificial sweeteners
available commercially in the United States
are associated with cancer risk in humans.”)
The problem for me is that because of the
penalty NuVal assigns to sugar, artificially
sweetened products inevitably score higher
than their sugared (or high-fructose-corn-
syrup-ed) counterparts. (This can most easily
be seen in soda: Coke gets gets a 1, and Diet
Coke gets a 15. And that’s an illustration,
not an admission that we buy soda for our
daughter.) So when it comes to special
treats, do I buy ice cream (typically scoring
in the teens and 20s) or Blue Bunny’s Sweet
Freedom Fudge Lites (artificially sweetened
and scoring a miraculous 100)? NuVal’s
values are at odds with my own.
Hy-Vee dietitian Mitzel explained the
fudge-bar score this way: “It made sense
when I considered the ingredients – basically
skim milk (which scores a 91 alone) and fiber
(which drives scores up).”
And Macon expanded in an e-mail on
why products with artificial sweeteners
score higher: “NuVal incorporates into its
complex algorithm only those nutrients and
ingredients that have clear, current, high-
quality data demonstrating their relationship
– positive or negative – to human health.”
She continued: “At this time, our extensive
body of research on the safety of non-
nutritive sweeteners demonstrates that
they are safe and effective tools for weight-
management. Excessive added sugar intake,
on the other hand, contributes to a variety
of health problems. In this example, the
presence of non-nutritive sweeteners does not
raise the score (non-nutritive sweeteners are
neutral); the lack of added sugar prevents the
score from dropping.”
Katz and I discussed artificial sweeteners,
and he gave insight into some of the
challenges of developing the algorithm.
While he doesn’t like artificial sweeteners for
taste reasons, he also said he has “a concern
about them for which the science isn’t
fully developed. It’s kind of an unanswered
question in the world of science.” (He
mentioned how artificial sweeteners increase
one’s craving for sweetness.)
But, he said, ONQI and NuVal aren’t
reflections of his own beliefs. “Although I’m
the chief engineer and the principal inventor,
this level of sophistication took ... a village
of experts,” he said. “We really had to work
by consensus.” Some people involved in the
development of ONQI thought artificial
sweeteners helped people reduce calories and
sugar in their diets, while others though the
downside was greater than the upside. As a
result, he said, “what we wound up doing is
splitting the difference.”
Katz said an adjustment to the algorithm
“puts back” the calories that would have been
present with sugar – a change that reduces
the product’s considered nutrient density.
Products with artificial sweeteners, however,
still score higher than sugared counterparts
because of their energy density, and because
they don’t incur a penalty for added sugar. So
the difference between their scores is smaller
because of the algorithm adjustment. “NuVal
essentially neutralizes that advantage,” Katz
said.
He added that ONQI’s handling of artificial
sweeteners might be adjusted in the next
incarnation of the algorithm – which is
currently in development.
ONQI 2.0, Katz said, will take into
consideration new food ingredients (such
as the sweetener Stevia) and new federal
dietary guidelines – such as an increased
recommendation for Vitamin D and
recognition that different types of saturated
fat have different health impacts. “We don’t
ever want to be at odds in any way with
federal guidance,” he said. “It’s based on and
perfectly consistent with dietary guidelines
... .”
But don’t expect radical scoring changes.
“The original engineering was pretty damned
good,” Katz said. “More will stay the same
than change.”
Still, it’s worth emphasizing that NuVal isn’t
the be-all and end-all; it will evolve and be
refined just like nutrition science and dietary
guidelines. And as Katz readily admitted
about artificial sweeteners, the science isn’t
always an exact science.
Does NuVal “Work”?
Shoppers might use NuVal to make buying
decisions, and anecdotal evidence certainly
suggests that they like it. NuVal, for me,
almost makes shopping a game between my
family and the manufacturers, to see if I can
outsmart their marketing; I genuinely feel
empowered by it.
That’s great for shoppers’ confidence, but
if NuVal truly “works,” three different but
interrelated things should happen.
First, consumer buying patterns should
change, and people should be buying
healthier foods – both within and across
categories. So customers would choose
higher-scoring bread, but they’d also be
buying more fresh fruit and fewer cookies.
Second, consumer health should improve.
NuVal is premised on the idea that a single
score is a valid basis on which one can make
healthier food choices. Ultimately, Katz said,
the test of NuVal is straightforward: “Do these
scores actually predict health outcomes when
you study large populations?” If health doesn’t
improve among people who use NuVal, then
the system is built on false assumptions – or
people aren’t using it correctly.
Third, manufacturers should make their
foods healthier. If people buy based at least
in part on NuVal scores, the food industry
has an incentive to improve its products
nutritionally in the interest of maintaining or
increasing sales.
While it’s probably too early to say with
certainty that all three of those things are
happening, there’s some evidence for each.
Consumer habits. Katz said stores that
use NuVal are seeing changes in buying
patterns. While NuVal hasn’t published these
findings yet, company spokesperson Robert
Keane shared sales data from two grocery
chains and three categories of food: cold
cereal, fresh bread and rolls, and yogurt.
In one retailer from 2008 to 2009, “scores
ranked 50 or greater outperformed products
with NuVal Scores from 1 to 49. Those
products with better overall nutrition grew
more than lower-scoring products or all
products (which includes products not yet
rated). In cold cereal, products ranked 1-49
saw decreases in sales volume.”
At the same retailer, “sales of cereals
scoring 50 to 100 grew 5.2 percent, [while]
the ROM [rest of market] volume sales
change was negative 13.0 percent. These
data show that the retailer with NuVal scores
published on their shelf tags had stronger
growth of more nutritious products.”
Results from the second retailer – which
compared pre-NuVal sales to post-NuVal
sales – demonstrated a similar advantage for
higher-scoring products.
“People are trading up their choices
within categories,” Katz summarized, but
he hasn’t yet seen data showing shifts from
less-healthy categories to more-healthy ones.
“That would be one of the next things we’d
like to see.”
Comer said Hy-Vee hasn’t tracked sales
by NuVal score to see if consumer behavior
is changing. “We have not in a scientific
way. [But] we have anecdotal evidence of
that from dietitians ... . There’s still a lot of
opportunity for us there in the future to do
more statistically valid or scientifically based
surveys.”
All the Hy-Vee dietitians contacted for
this article said they have heard stories from
customers about how they’ve changed what
they buy.
Consumer health. A study in the May
issue of the American Journal of Preventive
Medicine concluded: “Consumption of foods
that lead to a higher score for the ONQI
scoring system is associated with modestly
lower risk of chronic disease and all-cause
mortality.”
It’s only one study, but it appears to
confirm the basic scientific validity of ONQI
and NuVal.
Yet it doesn’t prove that NuVal shoppers
are healthier. To do that, you’d need evidence
that the overall diets of shoppers improve
when they use NuVal, as well as evidence
that they’re actually healthier.
Healthier products. This is primarily
anecdotal, but Katz said he’s seeing food
manufacturers change their products in
response to NuVal. “It’s forcing manufacturers
to compete in a fishbowl,” he said.
Citing the example of reduced-fat peanut
butter, he said: “Either that product’s going to
go away, or manufacturers will have to make
fat-reduced [peanut] butter that doesn’t have
significant additions of sugar and salt.
“And we’re starting to see innumerable
examples of reformulation to improve
nutrition. And that requires nothing
whatsoever of the consumer; NuVal [just]
needs to be there, and consumers need to be
interested in nutrition ... .”
This, he said, is a triumph of nutrition
over marketing.
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
Cold Cereal
Unlike many food categories – where there’s a relatively narrow range
of scores – cold cereal runs the nutritional gamut from nearly worthless to
the equivalent of fruits and vegetables. A small sampling:
Cap’n Crunch: 10
Wheaties: 28
Total: 29
Cheerios: 37
Post Shredded Wheat: 91
?
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 22 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Got A Problem? Ask Amy Alkon.
171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405
or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (AdviceGoddess.com)
©2011, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.
7he FuII-of-lt Monty
My boyfriend of two years isn’t overtly
weird; he’s actually a really nice, normal guy,
but he has this “hobby” of going for walks
totally naked. We live in Vermont, where
this is actually legal. I tell him that women
find this upsetting, but he is really turned
on by being seen naked by them and has
no intention of stopping. Also, he can’t get
aroused with me unless he’s been on one of
his walks. He says that when he doesn’t have
a girlfriend, he masturbates while walking,
but because he has me, he doesn’t. Should
his nudism bother me? It really doesn’t, but I
wonder if it should.
– Naked Dude’s Girlfriend
I’m always kind of amazed when people
write me about how their partner’s “really
great” – except for this one little thing. Your
boyfriend, for instance, is “a really nice,
normal guy,” except for how he’s a sex offender.
“Dinner’s almost ready, hon,” you call to him.
“I won’t be long,” he calls back. “Just taking a
quick walk around the block to go scare a few
little girls with my wang.”
Sure, people should do what pleases
them sexually – if they’re doing it with other
consenting adults. Leaving the house without
a blindfold shouldn’t be considered a form of
consent. Most of Vermont is clothing-optional.
(One town passed a law against it, and I’m
guessing there are signs reading “no pants,
no shoes, no service.”) But because it’s legal to
take your meat out for a bobble in front of the
ice cream store doesn’t mean it’s right to force
other people to look at it. On a lesser note, the
same goes for nose-picking, which is legal in
Canada, the 50 states, Puerto Rico, and Guam.
Also, what’s legal in Vermont is nudism (going
naked), not lewdism (going naked with a
sexual intent), which is why the latter comes
with a maximum of five fully clothed years in a
Vermont prison.
A sexual oddity becomes a psychiatric disor-
der called paraphilia when somebody can’t get
off without it and is intensely compelled to en-
gage in it ... say, to the point where he’s risking
jail time. Sex researchers Masters, Johnson, and
Kolodny write in Heterosexuality that though
paraphilias play out sexually, the preoccupation
isn’t the pursuit of pleasure but fleeing from
psychic pain, as with “compulsive hand-wash-
ing or the person who must constantly line up
all the jars and boxes in the pantry into neat,
perfect rows.” Unfortunately, though there’s
been some success in treatment with therapy
and antidepressants, they find that getting
somebody to give up “what he or she deems to
be a source of his or her most intense pleasure
is likely to be fraught with problems.”
The question isn’t should you be bothered,
but why aren’t you? Your boyfriend isn’t play-
ing nude volleyball on weekends. He’s playing
stroke the salami while strolling the neighbor-
hood. Oh, right, he doesn’t do that while in a
relationship – because his compulsion is fitted
with a handy on/off switch? Ask yourself what
compels you to stay with a guy who commits
sex crimes every time he takes a walk. How
much of your life is twisted around enabling
him and convincing yourself you have a great
boyfriend – even as you hear the faint screams
of the little old lady down the street? Every
relationship has its issues, and many women
complain that their man isn’t that present dur-
ing sex. Then again, that’s usually because they
suspect he’s fantasizing about his hot co-work-
er, not because they’re waiting for him to come
back from traumatizing the coffee klatsch.
0on’t 0o $eiko
on Her
How long should a guy wait to call a girl
after the first date? One friend waits a week.
A female friend said this annoys girls and a
guy should call the next day. This contradicts
the old “three-day rule.” What is the right
timing?
– Confused
I like the 30-year rule: “Hello, Tammy, you
might not remember me, but I took you out
for drinks in 1981.” Nothing tells a woman you
aren’t desperate for her company like taking
three decades to call her. That’s the point of all
of these rules – for a guy to not seem desperate.
A guy who isn’t probably doesn’t call at 9:01 the
next morning, but he doesn’t sit on his phone
for three days like he’s waiting for it to hatch.
He might text the woman the next afternoon,
saying he had a great time and he’ll call soon.
Curb your desperation by asking lots of women
out (so you won’t fixate on one) and just hope
some stick. Convey confidence by letting your
interest guide when you call. Develop confi-
dence and you could charm a woman by break-
ing the three-second rule – calling her before
she’s even had a chance to get into her car.
Ask
the
Advice
0oddess
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 23 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
will be to feast your eyes on vast panoramas and
expansive natural scenes. Doing so will invigorate
your thinking about the design and contours of
your own destiny, and that would be in sweet
alignment with the astrological omens. So catch
regular views of the big picture, Sagittarius. Treat
clouds and birds and stars as if they were restor-
ative messages from the wide-open future. Gaze
lovingly at the big sky.

CAPRICORN (December 22-January
19): A Facebook friend posted a quote
by seminal psychoanalyst Sigmund
Freud: “Being entirely honest with oneself is a
worthwhile exercise.” In response, another Face-
booker named Dean Robinson disagreed: “Oh, I
say let yourself have a little denial, and touch base
with reality on a need-to-know basis.” Another
respondent named Paulie Cerra took that senti-
ment one step further: “Reality and I have an
understanding. I don’t mess with it and it doesn’t
mess with me.” Which of those three approaches
are you inclined to pursue, Capricorn? In light of
the current astrological omens, I suggest you try
the first one for at least the next two weeks.

AQUARIUS (January 20-Febru-
ary 18): You really need to tell your
stories. It’s not just a good idea; it’s downright
urgent. There’s a backlog of unexpressed narra-
tives clogging up your depths. It’s like you have
become too big of a secret to the world. The
unvented pressure is building up, threatening to
implode. So please find a graceful way to share
the narratives that are smoldering inside you
– with the emphasis on the word “graceful.” I
don’t want your tales to suddenly erupt like a
volcano all over everything at the wrong time
and place. You need a receptive audience and the
proper setting.

PISCES (February 19-March 20):
Piscean actor Javier Bardem said this to
Parade magazine: “I don’t know if I’ll get
to heaven. I’m a bad boy. Heaven must be nice,
but is it too boring? Maybe you can get an apart-
ment there and then go to hell for the weekends.”
I caution all you other Pisceans against pursuing
this line of thought in the coming weeks. You
may imagine that you can get away with sneaking
away to hell for just a couple of days a week, but
I don’t share that optimism. My advice is to rack
your brains to drum up as much adventure as
possible in safety zones and sanctuaries where
you know for sure you’ll stay healthy and sane.


Homework: Don’t get back to where you once
belonged. Go forward to where you’ve got to belong
in the future. Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.
FR££ WlLL A$7R0L00Y by Rob Brezsny
Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's
EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES
& DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES
The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at
1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700
LEO (July 23-August 22): As I ponder
your immediate future, I’m reminded
of a scene from the animated TV show
The Simpsons. Here’s the situation: While visiting
the home of a colleague, the superintendent of
schools is surprised to witness an anomalous
outbreak of spectacular light. “Aurora Borealis?”
he exclaims. “At this time of year? At this time
of day? In this part of the country? Localized
entirely within your kitchen?” “Yes,” replies the
colleague. I suspect that you will soon enjoy a
metaphorically comparable visitation, Leo.

VIRGO (August 23-September 22):
My astrological colleague Antero Alli
praises the value of anxiety. He says
that when you feel that unsettling emotion, it’s
because you’re experiencing more uncertainty
than you like to – and that can be a good thing. It
could mean you’re about to experience the fertil-
ity that comes from wading into the unknown.
An outbreak of novelty may be imminent, giving
you the chance to welcome interesting surprises
into your life. In fact, says Alli, the anxiety that
comes from unpredictable mysteries may herald
the arrival of an influx of creativity.

LIBRA (September 23-October
22): “The I Ching counsels that if we
are associating with others who are not our true
peers,” says astrologer Caroline Casey, “our real
allies cannot find us.” Please apply this test to
yourself, Libra. If, after taking inventory, you find
that your circle is largely composed of cohorts
and comrades who match your levels of vitality
and intelligence, that will be excellent news; it
will signal an opportunity to begin working on
an upgraded version of your social life that will
increase your access to synergy and symbiosis
even further. But if your survey reveals that
you’re hanging out too much with people whose
energy doesn’t match yours, it will be time for a
metamorphosis.

SCORPIO (October 23-November
21): There’s a lot of graffiti scrawled
in a variety of languages on St. Peter’s
Basilica in Vatican City. A fairly recent arrival
is a plea, in English, to resuscitate a defunct
American TV sitcom. “God, Bring back Arrested
Development,” the guerrilla prayer reads. Ac-
cording to my reading of the astrological omens,
Scorpio, now would be a good time for you to
be equally cheeky in promoting one of your pet
causes. Consider the possibility of taking your
case to a higher authority. To fight for what’s
right, you may have to make your mark in a place
whose sphere of influence is bigger than yours.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22-
December 21): Do you stare for
hours every day into little screens like
those on smart phones, computer monitors, and
TVs? If so, I recommend that you tear your gaze
away from them more than usual in the coming
week. A change in your brain chemistry needs
to happen, and one good way to accomplish it
ARIES (March 21-April 19): I
dreamed you were in a cake store.
Every delicious kind of cake you
could imagine was there: carrot cake,
strawberry cheesecake, gooey butter cake, rich
chocolate cake with four layers of cherries and
whipped cream, birthday cakes that must have
been baked in paradise. Sadly, there was a prob-
lem: You weren’t allowed to buy anything, even
though you had enough money. A big sign on the
wall said, simply, “Absolutely no cakes available
for Aries.” What do you think my dream means?
More importantly, what are you going to do
about the situation? I suggest that in my next
dream, you get a friend to buy a cake for you.
Either that, or go to a different cake store. One
way or another, the astrological omens say it’s
high time for you get the cake you want.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Fill in
the blanks, Taurus. Don’t let the blanks
remain vacant and barren any longer.
Don’t allow them to keep screaming at you with
their accusatory silence. Just fill in the freaking
blanks with whatever you’ve got to fill them
with – with your best guesses, with borrowed
mojo, with any miscellaneous material you have
at hand. I realize you may be tempted to wait
around for a supposedly more ideal moment. But
I’m here to tell you that this is as ideal as it gets.
So please express the hell out of yourself in the
empty spaces, my dear; create yourself anew in
the void – however improvisational or inexact it
might feel.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Do you
know how to resolve an unresolvable
paradox?” asked a Facebook friend
named Pi. He answered his own question: “You
figure out the ‘error’ in the initial premise or
assumption.” And that’s my prescription for you
this week, Gemini. Do not be tempted to bang
your head against the wall so as to shake loose
a non-existent answer to the wrong question.
Instead, stop yourself in the middle of your angst
and think: “What would be a more productive
way to formulate the riddle I need to untangle?”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): An
innovative job-seeker named Travis
Broyles put an ad on Craigslist in At-
lanta. Among the tasks he said he would perform
for money were the following: draw your face on
a balloon; email you a list of 250 things he likes
about you; build you a cardboard car and make
vroom-vroom sounds while you drive it; change
his political leanings; rename your Pokemon;
or provide you with star treatment for a month,
hiding in the bushes like a paparazzi and taking
candid photos of you. I recommend that you
come up with your own version of a list like this,
Cancerian. It will help stimulate your imagina-
tion about what gifts you have to offer the world,
which is exactly what the astrological omens are
suggesting.

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 24 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
1uIy 7 Crossword Answers
July 7 Answers: Right
ACROSS
1. Hydros
5. Role for Valentino
10. Gripping device
15. Bursts
19. Revolver name
20. Workforce
21. Plantain lily
22. Servant
23. On the fritz: 3 wds.
25. Unsuitable: 3 wds.
27. Possessions
28. Stuffy
30. Anticipated, in a way
31. Occupation
32. The ones there
33. Earthy fuel
34. Table items
37. The Pine Tree State
38. Glassy
42. Word on a coin
43. Donnybrook
44. Kind of recall
45. Org. for GIs
46. Phooey!
47. Unattainable: 3 wds.
49. Getz or Laurel
50. Hubbub
51. Arthur _ Doyle
52. Some flop, some hit
54. Ceremonial garment
55. A flower
57. Cave dweller
59. Favor
61. Shed’s contents
62. Sycophant
63. Speak hoarsely
64. Mate
66. Beau _
67. Danced a certain way
70. Cut down
71. Bumbling agent
73. Most populous place
74. XCV minus XXXIX
75. Grammatical gaffe
76. Like some books: 3 wds.
79. Move
80. Compass pt.
81. Mrs. Grundy, e.g.
83. Checks
84. Cookout fare
85. “Harry Potter” girl
87. Goods
88. Determines
89. Thanks _ _!
90. Like a wallflower
91. Old “disease of kings”
92. Spa attractions
95. City in Switzerland
96. Deletions
100. Unaware: 3 wds.
102. Unavailable for sale: 3 wds.
104. Nova
105. Tennessee _ Ford
106. Loosen
107. Diminutive suffix
108. _ and aahs
109. Naps
110. In good shape
111. Spectacle
DOWN
1. Old English poet
2. Rain
3. Choir member
4. Kind of stock order: hyph.
5. Rejects
6. Francis Bret _
7. Whirlpool
8. Hibernia: abbr.
9. Babushka
10. Pick
11. Lowdown fellow
12. Punta del _
13. From _ _ Z
14. Lustrous fabric
15. Sense of taste
16. Gen. Bradley
17. Walk
18. Cast off
24. Distracting maneuver
26. Kind of onion
29. Hermit
32. Tonal anagram
33. Concise
34. Stringed instrument: abbr.
35. “The Devil Wears _”
36. Tourist: hyph.
37. Element type
38. Outspoken
39. Gone haywire: 3 wds.
40. Application
41. Aid to navigation
43. Investment vehicles
44. Count
47. Tons and tons
48. Lyric poem
49. Vapor
51. Speaks lovingly
53. Fast run
56. Source
57. Jay Silverheels role
58. Half diam.
60. Italia’s capital
62. Cake
63. Talks idly
64. Strike
65. Charm-school result
66. Bea Arthur television role
67. Climbs
68. Water brand
69. Daggers
72. Vernon or Vesuvius
73. Exclaimed
77. Supporting structure
78. Unsafe
79. Federal laws
81. Rice dish
82. Farm denizen
84. Kids’-book Doctor
86. Landedestates
87. Genie’s offering
88. Lazed
90. Unspoken
91. Vaulted ceiling part
92. Middling: hyph.
93. _ -da-fe
94. Where Ogden is
95. Rolls
96. “_ _, Brute?”
97. IRA name
98. Outer: prefix
99. Slanting
101. Cinnabar, e.g.
103. Numero _
$0M£7HlN0’$ LACKlN0 · 1ULY 21, 2011
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 25 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
2011/07/21 (Thu)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Boothill Ridge -Rock Island County
Fairgrounds, Archer Drive & Avenue
of the Cities East Moline, IL
Buddy Olson -Applebee’s Neighborhood
Grill - Davenport, 3005 W. Kimberly
Rd. Davenport, IA
DJ Jeff & Karaoke -Greenbriar Restaurant
and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
Four Play Cabaret -The Circa ‘21 Speak-
easy, 1818 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Gong Show Karaoke w/ Rock ‘N the
House Karaoke -Uptown Neighbor-
hood Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills
Dr. Bettendorf, IA
Jam Sessions with John O’Meara &
Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Jesse Kobra Unplugged -Studio Pub,
1465 19th St. East Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Applebee’s Neighbor-
hood Gri l l - Davenpor t, 3005 W.
Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -The Gallery Lounge,
3727 Esplanade Ave. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -The Lucky Frog Bar and
Grill, 313 N Salina St McCausland, IA
Live Lunch w/ Keith Soko (noon) -Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Lynne Hart Jazz Quartet -Cabana’s, 2120
4th Ave. Rock Island, IL
Open Mi c Ni ght w/ Kung Fu Tofu
-Sti ckman’s, 1510 N. Harri son St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate -Sa-
lute, 1814 7th St Moline, IL
Open Mic Night w/ The Dukes of Hag-
gard -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th
St Moline, IL
Speaks Like Silence -Mojo’s (River Music
Experience), 130 W 2nd St Daven-
port, IA
Toby Brown -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse,
1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL
Tony Hamilton Orchestra -Bass Street
Landing Plaza, Moline, IL
Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) -Red Crow
Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA
Twin Cats - Strange Arrangement
-Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St
Iowa City, IA
We Funk -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Yamn - UV Hippo -Gabe’s, 330 E. Wash-
ington St. Iowa City, IA
2011/07/22 (Fri)
Angela Meyer -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse,
1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL
Armed and Hammerd -Village Pub &
Grill, 426 W 1st Ave Milan, IL
Barl owe & James (6pm) -Toucan’s
Cantina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st
Street Milan, IL
Bettendorf Park Band Summer Con-
cert -Bill Bowe Memorial Bandshell,
Middle Park Bettendorf, IA
“Blues Plate Special” Lunch with Ren
Estrand (noon) -Mojo’s (River Music
Experience), 130 W 2nd St Daven-
port, IA
Buddy Olson (5pm) -Missippi Brew, River
Dr Muscatine, IA
David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront
Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL
Dubtonic Kru - Firesale -The Redstone
Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Friday Live at 5: Douglas & Tucker -RME
(River Music Experience) Courtyard,
Davenport, IA
Funk Syndicate -Riverside Casino and
Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riv-
erside, IA
Grand Larsony -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
High Cotton Blues Band -Rhythm
City Casino, 101 W. River Dr. Dav-
enport, IA
Item 9 & the Mad Hatters -Del ’s in
the Di stri ct, 1829 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Karaoke Night (members only) -Moose
Lodge - Davenport, 2333 Rockingham
Rd Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust
St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Paddlewheel Sports Bar
& Grill, 221 15th St Bettendorf, IA
Karaoke Night -Rivals Sports Bar & Grill,
1720 E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Stickman’s, 1510 N. Har-
rison St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night w/ Stevie J. -Roadrun-
ner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham
Rd. Davenport, IA
Kim & Jim Lansford -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
Lynn Allen -River House, 1510 River Dr.
Moline, IL
Mid-Life Crysys -Martini’s on the Rock,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Night People -Cabana’s, 2120 4th Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate -Sa-
lute, 1814 7th St Moline, IL
Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Salute to Our Soldiers: Funktastic Five
(7pm) - Smooth Groove (8:30pm)
-Fitness First Plus, 849 Avenue of the
Cities East Moline, IL
Shame Train - Shipbuilding Co. (9:30pm)-
Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa
City, IA
Shame Trai n - Ggl i tch’d (6: 30pm)
-Weather Dance Fountai n Stage,
outside the Sheraton Hotel, 210 S.
Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -
Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St
Moline, IL
Terry Quiett Band -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
The Goddamn Gallows - Viva Le Fox
-RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Tri-Polar XXXpress - Just Chords -Up-
town Neighborhood Bar and Grill,
2340 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA
Troy Harris, pianist (6pm) -Phoenix, 111
West 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Who Cares? -Rock Island County Fair-
grounds, Archer Drive & Avenue of
the Cities East Moline, IL
2011/07/23 (Sat)
Back Track Band with Hollywood Dave
-Ducky’s Lagoon, 13515 78th Ave
Andalusia, IL
Bacon - Tasty Trigger -The Redstone
Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Cody Beebe & the Crooks -RIBCO, 1815
2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Cosmic -Mound Street Landing, 1029
Mound St. Davenport, IA
David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront
Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL
DJ Scott & Karaoke -Greenbriar Res-
taurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St
Moline, IL
Emily Jawoisz -Studio Pub, 1465 19th St.
East Moline, IL
Funk Syndicate -Riverside Casino and
Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riv-
erside, IA
Gray Wolf Band -River House, 1510 River
Dr. Moline, IL
High Cotton Blues Band -Rhythm
City Casino, 101 W. River Dr. Dav-
enport, IA
Jason Carl Band -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Moe’s Pizza, 1312 Ca-
manche Ave Clinton, IA
Karaoke Night -Paddlewheel Sports Bar
& Grill, 221 15th St Bettendorf, IA
Karaoke Night w/ Stevie J. -Roadrun-
ner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham
Rd. Davenport, IA
Kieth Heinrich & Friends -Cool Beanz
Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock
Island, IL
Lynn Allen - The Hooks -Uptown Neigh-
borhood Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce
Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA
Night People -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619
34th St Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate -Sa-
lute, 1814 7th St Moline, IL
Orion Community Band (5:30pm) -
Boothill Ridge (6:45pm) - June’s Got
the Ca$h (8:30pm) -Orion’s Historic
Central Park Bandshell, corner of 4th
St & 12th Ave Orion, IL
Sabado Caliente (6pm) -Fargo Dance
& Sports, 4204 Avenue of the Cities
Moline, IL
Secret Squirrel -Hawkeye Tap, 4646
Cheyenne Ave. Davenport, IA
Slip-n-Slide Music Festival: Jim the Mule
- The Candymakers - Orangadang!
- Milltown - Rude Punch - Ragaman
- Stoneheart - Gossimer & The Hairy
Pineapples - The Harris Collection
(noon) -Belshause Family Farm, 3612
85th Ave W. Milan, IL
Smooth Groove -Gil’s Bar & Grille, 2750
S. 27th St. Clinton, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -
Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St
Moline, IL
Superfly Samurai -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
The Blow -The Mill, 120 E Burlington
Iowa City, IA
Continued On Page 26
22 FRIDAY
23 SATURDAY
21 THURSDAY
Grand Larsony @ The Rusty Nail – July 22
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 26 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
The Fry Daddies (6pm) -Toucan’s Can-
tina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st
Street Milan, IL
The G’glitch’d CD Release Party - Pre-
Apocalyptic Junkyard Orchestra
-Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St
Iowa City, IA
The Tailfins -Rock Island County Fair-
grounds, Archer Drive & Avenue of
the Cities East Moline, IL
uneXpected -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State
St Bettendorf, IA
Widetrack -Generations Bar & Grill, 4100
4th Ave. Moline, IL
Zi ther Ensembl e (10am) -German
American Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
2011/07/24 (Sun)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Anthony Catalfano Quartet (10:30am)
-Brady Street Chop House, Radisson
QC Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA
Buddy Olson (3pm) -Ducky’s Lagoon,
13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL
Dave Ellis hosts Funday Sunday Live
Music on the Patio (6pm) -The
Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bet-
tendorf, IA
Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’ Mel i a’s
Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd.
Rock Island, IL
Jim Ryan (2pm) -Len Brown’s North
Shore Inn, 7th Street and the Rock
River Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -11th Street Precinct,
2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA
Keep Off the Grass (4pm) -The Captain’s
Table, 4801 River Dr. Moline, IL
Music on the Levee: River City 6 -
LeClaire Park, River Dr & Ripley St
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate -Sa-
lute, 1814 7th St Moline, IL
Polyester Blend (5pm) -Riverside Casino
and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22
Riverside, IA
2011/07/25 (Mon)
Blackberry Smoke - Derek Frank -The
Redstone Room, 129 Main St Dav-
enport, IA
Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -Phoenix, 111
West 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke with Jeff Peiler -Bier Stube
Moline, 417 15th St Moline, IL
Live Lunch w/ Randy Arcenas (noon)
-Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130
W 2nd St Davenport, IA
One Night Stand Open Mic -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate -Sa-
lute, 1814 7th St Moline, IL
Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
2011/07/26 (Tue)
ABC Karaoke Contest Night -The Rusty
Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’ Mel i a’s
Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd.
Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night @ Fairmount (4pm)
-Fairmount Street Library, 3000 N.
Fairmount St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Sharky’s Bar & Grill, 2902
E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Steve Couch (noon)
-Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130
W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Netherfriends - Pennyhawk & Safe
Words -The Mill, 120 E Burlington
Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night -Cool Beanz Coffee-
house, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410
2nd St Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate -Sa-
lute, 1814 7th St Moline, IL
Open Mic w/ Jordan Danielsen -Bier
Stube Davenport, 2228 E 11th St
Davenport, IA
Starlight Revue Concert: Main Ave. Jazz
Band -Lincoln Park, 11th Ave & 38th
St Rock Island, IL
2011/07/27 (Wed)
Armed and Hammerd -Purgatory’s Pub,
2104 State St Bettendorf, IA
Buddy Olson (6pm) -Ducky’s Lagoon,
13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL
Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S
Linn St Iowa City, IA
Jeff Miller (6pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102
S Main St Port Byron, IL
Karaoke Night -Applebee’s Neighbor-
hood Gri l l - Davenpor t, 3005 W.
Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -Sharky’s Bar & Grill, 2902
E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Alan Sweet and Siri
Mason -Mojo’s (River Music Experi-
ence), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Karl, Mike, & Doug
-Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Luis Ochoa -Uptown
Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 2340
Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate -Sa-
lute, 1814 7th St Moline, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s Bar
and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Burlington Street Bluegrass Band
-The Mi l l, 120 E Burl i ngton I owa
City, IA
Yes, Inferno - Avian Swarm-Rozz-Tox,
2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
2011/07/28 (Thu)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Almost Heros -Mojo’s (River Music Experi-
ence), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Austin Villejo -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse,
1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL
Branson on the Road (7:15pm) -Circa
‘21 Dinner Playhouse, 1828 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Buddy Olson -Applebee’s Neighborhood
Grill - Davenport, 3005 W. Kimberly
Rd. Davenport, IA
Colourmusic - Morning Teleportation
-The Mi l l, 120 E Burl i ngton I owa
City, IA
DJ Jonny O -Greenbriar Restaurant and
Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
Gong Show Karaoke w/ Rock ‘N the
House Karaoke -Uptown Neighbor-
hood Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills
Dr. Bettendorf, IA
Gray Wolf Band -Modern Woodmen Park,
209 S Gaines St Davenport, IA
Jam Sessions with John O’Meara &
Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Jimmy Valentine Quintet -Bass Street
Landing Plaza, Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Applebee’s Neighbor-
hood Gri l l - Davenpor t, 3005 W.
Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -The Gallery Lounge,
3727 Esplanade Ave. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -The Lucky Frog Bar and
Grill, 313 N Salina St McCausland, IA
Kevin Carton -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse,
1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL
Live Lunch w/ Dave Maxwell (noon)
-Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130
W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Lynne Hart Jazz Quartet -Cabana’s, 2120
4th Ave. Rock Island, IL
Monos Eimi Aneu Seu -Mojo’s (River
Musi c Experi ence), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Open Mi c Ni ght w/ Kung Fu Tofu
-Sti ckman’s, 1510 N. Harri son St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate -Sa-
lute, 1814 7th St Moline, IL
Open Mic Night w/ The Dukes of Hag-
gard -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th
St Moline, IL
The Uniphonics -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) -Red Crow
Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA
2011/07/29 (Fri)
40th Annual Street Fest: Whoozdads
(11am) - Chuck Star (1:30pm) - The
Candymakers (4pm) - Ellis Kell Band
(6pm) - Wild Oatz (8pm) - Cal Stage
Band (10pm) -Downtown Davenport,
Davenport, IA
Alan Sweet and the Candymakers
-The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St.
Bettendorf, IA
Austin Villejo -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse,
1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL
Back Home Boys -Ri versi de Casi no
and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22
Riverside, IA
Bettendorf Park Band Favorites Con-
cert -Bill Bowe Memorial Bandshell,
Middle Park Bettendorf, IA
“Blues Plate Special” Lunch with Tony
Hoeppner (noon) -Moj o’s ( Ri ver
Musi c Experi ence), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Branson on the Road (1pm) -Circa ‘21
Dinner Playhouse, 1828 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Bucktown Birthday Bash: Lock & Dam
- Ragaman - Rock Island Rhythm
-Bucktown Center for the Arts, 225 E.
2nd St. Davenport, IA
Corporate Rock -Uptown Neighborhood
Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr.
Bettendorf, IA
Corrosion of Conformity - The Horde
- Lord Green -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront
Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL
Elysion Fields - Dividing the Masses
- Searching for Security - From Gar-
dens to Graveyards -River Music Ex-
perience, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Ernie Haase & Signature Sound -Adler
Theatre, 136 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Gray Wolf Band -Martini’s on the Rock,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night (members only) -Moose
Lodge - Davenport, 2333 Rockingham
Rd Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust
St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Paddlewheel Sports Bar
& Grill, 221 15th St Bettendorf, IA
Karaoke Night -Stickman’s, 1510 N. Har-
rison St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night w/ Stevie J. -Roadrun-
ner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham
Rd. Davenport, IA
Kevi n BF Bur t & the I nsti gators
(6:30pm) -Weather Dance Fountain
Stage, outside the Sheraton Hotel, 210
S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
29 FRIDAY
27 WEDNESDAY
28 THURSDAY
Continued From Page 25
26 TUESDAY
25 MONDAY
24 SUNDAY
RiverCitiesReader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 27 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Back Home Boys -Ri versi de Casi no
and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22
Riverside, IA
Big & Rich - Gretchen Wilson - Cowboy
Troy - Two Foot Fred -Riverside Ca-
sino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway
22 Riverside, IA
Bix 7 Party: Bob Dorr & the Blue Band
-Tourist Park, 400 Center St. Cedar
Falls, IA
Bluegrass at Beanz (6:30pm) -Cool
Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St.
Rock Island, IL
Caught In The Act -Uptown Neighbor-
hood Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills
Dr. Bettendorf, IA
Cheese Pizza - Holding Mercury -RIBCO,
1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Community Drum Circle (10:30am)
-Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130
W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Corporate Rock -The Torchlight Lounge,
1800 18th Ave East Moline, IL
David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront
Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL
How Far To Austin -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Just Cuz -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St
Bettendorf, IA
Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Generations Bar & Grill,
4100 4th Ave. Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Moe’s Pizza, 1312 Ca-
manche Ave Clinton, IA
Karaoke Night -Paddlewheel Sports Bar
& Grill, 221 15th St Bettendorf, IA
Karaoke Night w/ Stevie J. -Roadrun-
ner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham
Rd. Davenport, IA
Meet the Press -Peterson’s Bullseye Bar,
103 W. 3rd St. Sterling, IL
Night People -Len Brown’s North Shore
Inn, 7th Street and the Rock River
Moline, IL
Night People -Cabana’s, 2120 4th Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate -Sa-
lute, 1814 7th St Moline, IL
Patio - Ragaman -Bent River Brewing
Company, 1413 5th Ave. Moline, IL
Retro Ron -Mojo’s (River Music Experi-
ence), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Sister Sledge featuring Kathy Sledge
-Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention
Center, 1777 Isle Parkway Betten-
dorf, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -
Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St
Moline, IL
Terry and the Loan Sharks -Mound
Street Landi ng, 1029 Mound St.
Davenport, IA
The Hooks -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust
Davenport, IA
The Mike Blumme Trio (6pm) -Toucan’s
Cantina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st
Street Milan, IL
Tronicity -River House, 1510 River Dr.
Moline, IL
Troy Harris, pianist (6pm) -Phoenix, 111
West 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Who Cares? (5pm) -The Palace, 701 15th
Ave East Moline, IL
2011/07/30 (Sat)
40th Annual Street Fest: The Tailfins
(10am) - Just Chords (11:45am)
- The Fry Daddies (1pm) - Iden-
tity Crisis (3pm) - Funktastic Five
(5:30pm) - The Blue Band (7:30pm)
- Lynn Allen (10pm) -Downtown
Davenport, Davenport, IA
Alan Sweet and the Candymakers
-The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St.
Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate -Sa-
lute, 1814 7th St Moline, IL
Red Gallagher -Mojo’s (River Music Expe-
rience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Red Pepper Sage (6pm) -Toucan’s
Cantina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st
Street Milan, IL
Red Rocket -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619
34th St Rock Island, IL
Rock Camp USA Session #3 Concert
-The Redstone Room, 129 Main St
Davenport, IA
Rule #1 -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust
Davenport, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -
Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St
Moline, IL
The Funnies -River House, 1510 River
Dr. Moline, IL
The Slough Buoys (1pm) -Jim’s, 311 W.
2nd St. Rock Falls, IL
Third Rail Outdoor Party -Greenbriar
Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th
St Moline, IL
Zi ther Ensembl e (10am) -German
American Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
2011/07/31 (Sun)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Buddy Olson (3pm) -Ducky’s Lagoon,
13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL
Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’ Mel i a’s
Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd.
Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -11th Street Precinct,
2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate -Sa-
lute, 1814 7th St Moline, IL
Preston Shannon (6pm) -The Muddy
Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
River City 6 -Ri versi de Casi no and
Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riv-
erside, IA
2011/08/01 (Mon)
Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -Phoenix, 111
West 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke with Jeff Peiler -Bier Stube
Moline, 417 15th St Moline, IL
Live Lunch w/ Angela Meyer (noon)
-Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130
W 2nd St Davenport, IA
One Night Stand Open Mic -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate -Sa-
lute, 1814 7th St Moline, IL
Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
2011/08/02 (Tue)
ABC Karaoke Contest Night -The Rusty
Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’ Mel i a’s
Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd.
Rock Island, IL
Joe Nichols -Mississippi Valley Fair-
grounds, 2815 W. Locust St Daven-
port, IA
Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Sharky’s Bar & Grill, 2902
E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Mo (noon) -Mojo’s (River
Musi c Experi ence), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Maggie Drennon (6pm) -Mojo’s (River
Musi c Experi ence), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410
2nd St Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate -Sa-
lute, 1814 7th St Moline, IL
Open Mic w/ Jordan Danielsen -Bier
Stube Davenport, 2228 E 11th St
Davenport, IA
Ruby Jane -The Mill, 120 E Burlington
Iowa City, IA
2011/08/03 (Wed)
Blake Shelton -Mississippi Valley Fair-
grounds, 2815 W. Locust St Daven-
port, IA
Buddy Olson (6pm) -Ducky’s Lagoon,
13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL
Corporate Rock -Mi ssi ssi ppi Val l ey
Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Dav-
enport, IA
Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S
Linn St Iowa City, IA
Jeff Miller (6pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102
S Main St Port Byron, IL
Karaoke Night -Applebee’s Neighbor-
hood Gri l l - Davenpor t, 3005 W.
Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -Sharky’s Bar & Grill, 2902
E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Brent Feuerbach (noon)
-Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130
W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Alan Sweet and Siri
Mason -Mojo’s (River Music Experi-
ence), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Karl, Mike, & Doug
-Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Luis Ochoa -Uptown
Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 2340
Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate -Sa-
lute, 1814 7th St Moline, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s Bar
and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
Cody Beebe & the Crooks @ RIBCO – July 23
3 WEDNESDAY
2 TUESDAY
30 SATURDAY
31 SUNDAY
1 MONDAY

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 783 • July 21 - August 3, 2011 28 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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