ACTUATORS

Actuator: Actuator is a device that produces motion (displacement). ACTUATOR TYPE:
ROTARY ACTUATOR: The

rotary actuator is a device use to alternate the rotated position of an object. Just like the human wrist the actuator enables the rotation of an object, except that rotary actuators are available in a wide variety of models with different Sizes, Torques, Rotation angles. The energy for the rotation is delivered by pneumatic pressure. The rotary actuator converts the air pressure from a linear motion to a rotating motion.

LINEAR ACTUATOR: Electric

actuators with an output rod that provides linear motion via a motor driven ball or ACME screw assembly. The actuator's load is attached to the end of screw, or rod, and is often unsupported. Electric actuators whose load is attached to a fully supported carriage. Rod less linear actuators provides linear motion via a motor driven ball screw, acme screw, or belt drive assembly. ELECTRICAL ACTUATOR: Electrical actuators use a motor to drive a combination of gears that generate the desired torque or thrust level. Based on Operating Media Actuator Classified as
PNEUMATIC ACTUATOR & HYDRAULIC ACTUATOR: Hydraulic

actuators and pneumatic actuators use pressurized fluid such as air or hydraulic oil to produce Linear or Rotary motion in mechanical components. Though hydraulic and pneumatic power shares many characteristics in common, there are some key differences. For example, because hydraulic fluid is much less compressible than a gas, Hydraulic power is preferred over pneumatic when precise position control is required. On the other hand, pneumatic power has an edge in applications where the presence of hydraulic oil could cause problems (e.g. in food processing machines). Pneumatic systems are also typically less expensive to build than hydraulic.

ACTUATOR ACTION: SINGLE ACTING/DOUBLE ACTING: cylinders would extend by pneumatic or hydraulic pressure on the ram, and retract by spring force or gravity.
SINGLE ACTING

cylinders operate by fluid pressure in both directions: in other words, there is a pressure connection on both sides of the ram to force it one way or the other within the cylinder, depending on the valve setting. These actuators are therefore capable of a power stroke in both directions. Sometimes the piston is even fixed and the cylinder moves back and forth around it. In the world of double acting cylinders, you can find single rod types and double rod types. The most common type of pneumatic (or hydraulic) actuators is a cylinder.
DOUBLE ACTING

have a rod leading off the piston on one side, and are smooth on the other. The difference in area (and therefore action) between the rod end and the smooth end of a single rod cylinder's ram will of course cause a slight difference in action each direction, but this is usually small and therefore usually ignored. DOUBLE ROD TYPES have a rod coming off both ends of the piston. This may be perhaps so that the piston can do work in both directions, or it may just be to equalize the areas on both sides so that the force and speed of the actuator will be perfectly the same in both directions.
SINGLE ROD CYLINDERS

Sometimes, however, the system may require that the force and speed are NOT equal both directions. In this case you would need to install a 'differential' piston. The uneven cylinder areas will create a slow powerful work stroke in one direction, and a fast retract stroke back.

ACTUATOR MOUNTING CONFIGRATION
CYLINDER TYPES ACCORDING TO MOUNTING STYLES

Foot

Bottom Flush

Nose

Front/Rear Flush

Front Flange

Rear Flange

Pivot Clevis

Front Trunion

Rear Trunion

ACTUATOR INPUT VOLTAGE:

The voltage supplied to the Actuator 115V, 230V

ACTUATOR STROKE LENGTH: Maximum Travel ACTUATOR INPUT PRESSURE: The

length of Actuator in mm

pressure required to move the actuator from its upper

stop to rated travel in PSI