P. 1
Debt Advisory

Debt Advisory

Views: 268|Likes:
Published by Raul Taylor

More info:

Published by: Raul Taylor on Jul 29, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
Visibility:Private
See more
See less

03/09/2014

pdf

text

original

ADVISORY 

  From:    To:      Re:    Date:          Comptroller John C. Liu  Mayor Michael Bloomberg  Members of the New York City Council    Analysis and Recommendations for New York City if the Federal Debt  Ceiling is not Increased     Friday, July 29, 2011  

The Federal Government’s statutory debt ceiling is currently $14.29 trillion.  Because budgetary  spending exceeds revenues, Congress must borrow money to make up the difference.   The US  Treasury estimates that without any increase in the debt ceiling, by August 2nd the United  States will not have sufficient funds to pay all of its bills.  In the month of August alone it is  estimated that the US government will have a budgetary structural imbalance exceeding $135  billion.  This would force the federal government to prioritize between several critical  budgetary items including: the continuation of interest payments on the debt, maintenance of  social security benefits, payment to federal employees and funding of other crucial programs.   The Treasury has yet to announce how it would go about prioritizing payments. While the  natural assumption is that any prioritization would include making interest payments on the  federal debt and protecting the social safety net (including Social Security, Medicaid, and  Medicare) a Wednesday, July 27, 2011 article in the New York Times pointed out that:  “Officials have said repeatedly that Treasury does not have the legal authority to pay  bills based on political, moral or economic considerations. It cannot, for instance, set  aside invoices from weapons companies to preserve money for children’s programs. The  implication is that the government will need to pay bills in the order that they come  due.”  In order to keep the government running through November 2012, it is estimated that the debt  ceiling will need to be increased by $2.4 trillion. Most analysts believe that the debt ceiling can  be increased only through a vote of Congress although there is a vocal minority who believe the  President could act unilaterally.  The Republican leadership in the House of Representatives,  spurred on by conservative and Tea‐Party members of the Republican caucus, has stated that  any such increase in the debt ceiling must be accompanied by spending cuts which exceed this 

1|Page
 

increase.  Most Democrats are looking for an agreement that would involve both cuts to  spending and increases to revenues.   President Obama continues to call for a legislative compromise that would be in place past  November 2012. While there are new developments, it is still unclear whether a compromise  will be reached on time.  

Impact on City’s Cash Position: Low 
The City currently has approximately $6.9 billion of cash or cash equivalents on hand and  expects to receive more than $839 million in payments from the federal government in the  month of August.    New York State also receives hundreds of millions of dollars in direct federal aid each month.  If  these funds were to dissipate as a result of not increasing the debt ceiling, it is assumed that  the State may also find it difficult to meet all of its liabilities.    The City could therefore be at risk of losing up to an additional $461 million in direct State aid in  August.  Accounting for a loss of both Federal and State funding to the City, the total lost  revenue in August could exceed $1.39 billion.   Fortunately, the City’s cash position is strong during the summer.  At $6.9 billion, the current  cash balance is adequate to sustain the delay of Federal and State aid receipts for a limited  period of time.  Although under a worst‐case scenario the City stands to lose (temporarily)  more than $1.39 billion in Federal and State aid during the month of August, the City is in no  immediate danger of running short of cash.  So long as the debt ceiling issue is resolved, and aid  flows are restored, by the end of August, the cash balance should not fall below $2.6 billion.           

2|Page

NYC Ending Cash Balances, July 1, 2011 – August 31, 2011 

$10 $8
(in Billions)

$6 $4 $2 $0

Worst Case Balance

Status Quo  

This means that the City will continue to meet all of its normal obligations including payroll,  payments to vendors, and interest payments on outstanding debt.   We are therefore classifying the impact of not raising the debt ceiling on this category as  “Low.” 

Impact on City’s Social Security Beneficiaries: High 
  Over 1.09 million New Yorkers – many of whom are elderly and disabled ‐ receive an average  $1,063 in Social Security benefits each month.  In total, City residents receive over $1.16 billion  in Social Security payments each month.  Disbursements are staggered throughout the month  depending on the recipients’ birth dates. The August disbursements are scheduled for the 1st,  3rd, 10th, 17th, and 24th days of the month. These benefits could be at risk if the debt ceiling is  not increased. The Social Security profile for New York City is summarized below:    NYC Social Security Recipient Population Profile, December 2010     # Beneficiaries  Total Benefits     Bronx                     176,450   $169,942,000  Brooklyn                     301,475   $298,082,000  Manhattan                     235,805   $276,498,000  Queens                     300,695   $324,533,000  Staten Island                       81,015   $95,707,000  NYC Total                  1,095,440   $1,164,762,000  Per Recipient  Monthly Benefit  $963 $989 $1,173 $1,079 $1,181 $1,063

3|Page

NYC Breakdown by Beneficiary Category, December 2010     Retirement  Survivors     Bronx                     111,655                                     20,375   Brooklyn                     207,195                                     33,530   Manhattan                     180,155                                     20,920   Queens                     226,775                                     29,485   Staten Island                       52,685                                       9,175   NYC Total*                     778,465                                   113,485  

Disability                          44,420                           60,755                           34,735                           44,440                           19,160                         203,510 

Source:  OASDI Beneficiaries by State and County, 2010, U.S. Social Security Administration.  *Note: This estimate shows a deviation of 20 recipients greater than reflected in NYC Aggregate Profile 

  Since so many New Yorkers, particularly the elderly and disabled , rely on their monthly Social  Security benefit as their sole source of income ‐ using their check to pay rent, buy groceries and  just make ends meet – delaying their benefits for even a few days could inflict unacceptable  hardship.     We are therefore classifying the impact of not raising the debt ceiling on this category as  “High.”   

Impact on City’s Medcaid, Medicare, Public Assistance Programs: Medium 
The Federal government provides funding for several major social services programs in New  York City which could be at risk if the debt ceiling is not increased. Currently, Federal  reimbursement for Medicaid expenditures totals more than $1 billion each month.  A delay in  Federal Medicaid support could also jeopardize the State’s ability to pay Medicaid service  providers on a timely basis.  In June 2011, Federal and State funds accounted for $1.8 billion or  81 percent of New York City’s Medicaid expenses.  Any delay in the receipt of Medicaid funding  would impact the financial condition of hospitals, service providers and the City’s Medicaid  population of close to 3 million individuals.    In addition, any impact on the provisions of Medicare services could affect the approximately 1  million Medicare enrollees residing in New York City and could reduce revenues to the Health  and Hospitals Corporation by more than $50 million a month.      Receipt of public assistance benefits would also be adversely affected.  The Federal government  provides approximately 44 percent of the total funding for the City’s income maintenance  program.  Based on this percentage, the Federal outlay for public assistance would be  approximately $44 million monthly, along with State support of an additional $20 million.   

4|Page

Since millions of people and thousands of service providers rely on these programs, any aid  delay in payments could create real challenges.     We are therefore classifying the impact of not raising the debt ceiling on this category as  “Medium.” 

Impact on Municipal Bond Markets: Medium 
Currently any attempt to predict how the bond markets will react to a failure to raise the debt  ceiling or, even worse, to a default by the US government is highly speculative.  However, New  York City is one of the nation’s largest issuers of municipal bonds and as such, stands to be  affected by the growing market turmoil, and to a greater extent by fallout if the current failures  in Washington are not resolved promptly.  The City is scheduled to issue over $9.3 billion bonds  in the current fiscal year across the GO, TFA, Water and Hudson Yards credits.  These bonds  fund important capital projects and low interest rates make the projects more affordable.  In  addition, the City actively seeks opportunities to refinance high‐interest rate debt at a lower  cost to save taxpayers money.  These opportunities may be constrained if interest rates rise.      The City has successfully managed its capital borrowing through prior periods of market  turmoil, including the fallout from the Lehman bankruptcy in 2008.  However, higher debt costs  would be a burden on taxpayers for years to come.  While a default by the Federal government  on its debt is still only a remote possibility it does unfortunately remain a possibility, and a  default would have serious implications for all municipal debt issuers, including New York City.     We are therefore classifying the impact of not raising the debt ceiling on this category as  “Medium.” 

  Impact on City’s Pension Funds: Medium 
While it is uncertain exactly how the financial markets will react to not raising the debt ceiling  or a default by the US government, it is assumed that any such occurrence would likely create  increased volatility and short term dislocations.  As long term investors, while the markets may  readjust in the short term, the City’s asset allocation will need to be reviewed for the longer  term implications.  With over $7 billion of short term securities, the pension funds are well  equipped to make their near term pension payments to beneficiaries regardless of the near  term stock and bond market volatilities.  We are therefore classifying the impact of not raising the debt ceiling on this category as  “Medium.” 

  Recommendations   
1) Create Contingency Plan for City’s Seniors and Disabled     5|Page

Explore the feasibility of implementing a contingency plan whereby the City would  temporarily finance, in a way that would not increase the federal debt ceiling, at least one  month of Social Security payments to its residents in the event that the federal government  is unable to meet these scheduled obligations.  While the financing could come from a City  source, the Social Security Administration would need to continue to disburse the funds to  beneficiaries and facilitate reimbursement to the City as soon as federal funds are once  again made available.    An alternative option may be for the City to encourage local banks  to automatically extend  a zero or low‐interest credit line (or overdraft protection) to social security beneficiaries. It  is estimated that more than 85 percent of beneficiaries receive their payments through  direct deposit so this solution might be capable of addressing the needs of a significant  portion of beneficiaries.  We note that this option could be administratively complicated for  the banks to manage. The City could also explore ways in which short‐term financing could  be made available to assist banks.     In lieu of being able to continue financing benefits through the Social Security  Administration or area banks, the City must identify a comprehensive way to provide  emergency support to these beneficiaries through other means – perhaps by making short  term zero‐percent loans available at all senior centers or suspending property tax, water  and sewer bills or other payments due from beneficiaries to the City.  Because of the  unknown levels of demand, the provision of services must extend beyond what the City can  do on its own.  The City must coordinate with the existing network of not‐for‐profit service  providers in order to make available all means of assistance to those most vulnerable New  York City residents. This could include temporarily raising the amount of City support of  such service providers to facilitate an increased service level.     2) Establish Debt Ceiling Taskforce    Immediately convene an Inter‐governmental Debt Ceiling Taskforce which would include  representatives of the Comptroller’s Office, Mayor’s Office of Management & Budget, New  York City Council, and other relevant parties. The taskforce will monitor and address the  rapidly changing legislative and financial environments and consider the above  recommendations.  

6|Page

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->