P. 1
The Architecture of Interpretation

The Architecture of Interpretation

|Views: 660|Likes:
Published by Nithya Suri

More info:

Categories:Topics, Art & Design
Published by: Nithya Suri on Aug 01, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/23/2014

pdf

text

original

Pine Ford Acres DefenceHousing Project, 1941-1943 (Howe & Kahn, architect, Daniel Urban Kiley, landscape architect)

Federal Works Agency and Federal Public Housing Authority, Middletown Housing Development
Housing Development and Community Center

Pine Ford Drive
Middletown Borough, Dauphin County, PA
(Originally part of Olmsted Air Force Base)

Pine Ford Acres consisted of 450 unit housing complex on a 51 acre tract of land.

173

174

Carver Court Defense Housing, 1941-1943

(Howe, Stonorov & Kahn, architedt, Nathan Cronheim,
structural and mechanical engineer, Daniel Urban Kiley,
landscape architect)

Federal Public Housing Authority, National Housing Agency

Community Center and Housing Development

Foundry Street
Caln Township, Chester County, PA

Carver Court was completed in the early part of 1944 as a
public housing project for 100 black war workers and their
families, most of them employed at a nearby steel mill. It
comprised 100 concrete block and frame dwelling units and
a community building.

175

Pennypack Woods, 1941-1943 (Howe, Stonorov & Kahn,
architect, L.H. Doane Associates, structural engineer, Daniel
Urban Kiley, landscape architect)
Federal Public Housing Authority, National Housing Agency

Housing Development, Community Center and Stores
Crispin Street, Holme Avenue, Frankford Avenue and
Pennypack Street
Philadelphia, PA

176

Bomber City (Willow Run Housing
Development), 1942-1943 (Stonorov & Kahn)

Union of Automobile Workers and the Federal
Public Housing Authority

Holmes Road and Geddes Road
Washtenaw County, Michigan

Willow Run was designed as a city to house
the families of 6,000 aircraft workers near a
bomber plant operated by Ford. Five groups of
architects, including the firm of Stonorov &
Kahn, were chosen and each was asked to
design one neighborhood. A sixth firm was
asked to design the town center. Later in the
process two of the communities were
eliminated. The neighborhood designed by
Stonorov & Kahn was part of the final plan, but
the project was never realized.

177

Lily Ponds Houses, 1942-1947
(Stonorov & Kahn)
The United States of America, Alley Dwelling
Authority

Community Center and Housing Development

Anacostia Parkway, Eastern Avenue, and
Kenilworth Avenue
Washington, D.C.

Lily Ponds was a war housing project comprising
475 dwelling units of cinder block, hollow tile and
frame. It also included a community building.

178

179

Hotel for 194X, Architectural Forum, 1943 (Stonorov & Kahn)

180

Parasol Houses, Knoll Associates Planning Unit, 1944 (Stonorov & Kahn)

Stonorov & Kahn were invited, along with six other architectural firms, by the
furntiture manufacturer Hans Knoll to join a "planning unit," set up to study the
needs of contemporary households and devise new "equipment for living" --
essentially furniture and appliances --for his clients to manufacture. These were
then to be placed in an ideal architectural environment.

181

Model Men's Shoe Store, Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, 1944 (Stonorov & Kahn)

Model Furniture Store, Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, 1944 (Stonorov & Kahn)

182

Pennsylvania Solar House, Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Company, 1945-1947 (Stonorov & Kahn)

183

Drs. Lea and Arthur Finkelstein Residence,

addition, 1945-1948 (Stonorov & Kahn)

645 Overhill Rd
Ardmore, Lower Merion Township
Montgomery County, PA

Harry A. and Emily L. Ehle Residence, 1947-1948 (Louis Isadore Kahn,
architect, Abel Sorensen, associated architect)

Mulbery Lane
Haverford, Lower Merion Township, Montgomery County, PA

184

185

Day Camp Pavilion and Study Section for Community Center Building

United States Consulate BuildingsLuanda, Angola: 1959-62 (Unbuilt)

members.tripod.com

186

187

188

The Lustron House

189

190

The Lustron House

THE COST: Tentatively priced at $7500 to $8000 depending on location. Price not
guaranteed. No cellar or attic. Includes piping, connections and all bathroom and
kitchen fixtures except stove and refrigerator; includes automatic combination clothes
dishwasher and some built-in furniture. Total cost including lot, etc., about $10,500.

CARRYING COST: About $70 per month, including taxes, interest on mortgage,
heating and amortization; repairs and maintenance would probably not run over $50 per
year.

THE LOT: At least 50 x 100 ft.; this leaves room for a garage.

DELIVERY: Lustron homes plans full production starting this summer; first deliveries
promised for early summer.

ERECTION TIME: Three to five days.

BUILDING MATERIALS: Steel framing, factory welded into wall sections and
interlocking porcelain enameled panels for inside and outside walls and roof. Concrete
floor slab with waxed asphalt tile finish. Fireproof insulation 1 1/2" thick between
porcelain enameled panels.

EXPANSION: Larger models are being planned; steel construction makes expansion
practically impossible.

GENERAL DESIGN: Very well designed. About 1000 sq. ft. Living room serves as
passage; dinette accommodates six; twin beds could be fitted in either bedroom.
Washing machine comes with kitchen and there is space for ironing in utility room.

STORAGE SPACE: Sliding door closet 6 x 2 ft. in each bedroom. Additional closet
space, cupboards and drawers (sufficient for two people) in built-in dressing table unit in
master bedroom. Coat, broom and linen closets. Some storage space in utility room.
Drawers and shelf space in dinette unit; cupboards to ceiling in kitchen.

HEATING SYSTEM: Radiant heat supplied by oil-burning boiler unit suspended from
ceiling of utility room; warm-air heat distributed from ceilings. Should be efficient and
economical. 275 gallon oil tank.

WATER HEATER: Gas or oil fired 30 gallon water heater, located in utility room.

UPKEEP: Choice of six pastel colors for interior. Porcelain enameled finish, advertised
as "dull" is highly reflective. Can be cleaned with soap and water; chips can be
retouched with paintbrush. May need repainting after 10 or 15 years.

ELECTRIC FIXTURES: Plenty of electric outlets, wall switches, etc.

WINDOWS: Excellent. Aluminum frames, weather tight, good hardware and provisions
for putting on screens which are provided with house.

191

The Look House

The Lustron House

$7500 delivered and erected; price was
guaranteed on orders received before
June 1 but has not been raised. Includes
unfinished attic; cellar extra. Also
includes piping and connections to sewer
system, water, gas and electricity up to
20 ft. from front of foundation line.
Includes plumbing, heating, lighting,
kitchen and bathroom equipment. Lot
and grading would bring cost up to about
$10,000.

HOW DO THE
COST
COMPARE?

Tentatively priced at $7500 to $8000
depending on location. Price not
guaranteed. No cellar or attic. Includes
piping and connections as for Look
house, and all bathroom and kitchen
fixtures except stove and refrigerator;
also includes automatic combination
clothes and dishwasher and some built-
in furniture. Total cost including lot, etc.,
about $10,5000.

About $75 per month, including taxes
(figured at $250 per year); interest (4
1/2% on $5000); heating ($100 per year);
maintenance and repairs ($120 per
year); amortization.

CARRYING
COST

About $70 per month, including taxes,
interest on mortgage, heating and
amortization as estimated for Look
house; repairs and maintenance would
probably not run over $50 per year.

At least 50 x 100 ft.; this leaves room for
a garage.

THE LOT

At least 50 x 100 ft.; this leaves room for
a garage.

Adirondack Homes guarantees shipment
on first-come-first-served basis to any
area served by one of their distributors
within 30 days after approval of site and
financing arrangements.

DELIVERY

Lustron homes plans full production
starting this summer; first deliveries
promised for early summer.

Two to three weeks; local finishing
requires most of this time. Adirondack
Homes guarantees erection within 30
days after delivery to site.

ERECTION
TIME

Three to five days.

Conventional materials; prefabricated
wood frame comes to site in large
panels. Factory-assembled mechanical
core utility unit contains heating
equipment, plumbing, etc., or these can
be made up of standardized units.
Materials of interiors locally available:
walls plywood or plasterboard, floors
hardwood, usually oak. Fully insulated.

BUILDING
MATERIALS

Steel framing, factory welded into wall
sections and interlocking porcelain
enameled panels for inside and outside
walls and roof. Concrete floor slab with
waxed asphalt tile finish. Fireproof
insulation 1 1/2" thick between porcelain
enameled panels.

Sectional construction makes expansion
relatively easy.

EXPANSION

Larger models are being planned; steel
construction makes expansion
practically impossible.

192

The Look House

The Lustron House

Fairly well designed. 762 sq. ft. Location
of front door means living room must
serve as passage; dinette barely
accommodates four; large bedroom
would take twin beds but not easily;
small bedroom has room for one bed
only. Convenient kitchen but no space
for washing machine or ironing board.

GENERAL
DESIGN

Very well designed. About 1000 sq. ft.
Living room serves as passage; dinette
accommodates six; twin beds could be
fitted in either bedroom. Washing
machine comes with kitchen and there is
space for ironing in utility room.

Closet in each bedroom approximately 3
x 2 1/2 ft.; coat closet 3 1/2 x 2 1/2 ft.;
linen closet, broom closet in kitchen,
storage space about 8 x 2 1/2 ft.; attic
provides additional space, accessible
only by ladder or disappearing stair.
Cupbords to ceiling in kitchen.

STORAGE
SPACE

Sliding door closet 6 x 2 ft. in each
bedroom. Additional closet space,
cupboards and drawers (sufficient for two
people) in built-in dressing table unit in
master bedroom. Coat broom and linen
closets. Some storage space in utility
room. Drawers and shelf space in dinette
unit; cupboards to ceiling in kitchen.

Gas or oil burner, forced hot air. Heating
system only fair.

HEATING
SYSTEM

Radiant heat supplied by oil-burning
boiler unit suspended from ceiling of
utility room; warm-air heat distributed
from ceilings. Should be efficient and
economical. 275-gallon oil tank.

A 20-gallon gas water heater, which is
hardly adequate (see REPORTS, MAY).
A 40- or 50-gallon electric water heater is
available at extra cost.

WATER
HEATER

Gas or oil fired 30-gallon water heater,
located in utility room.

Walls painted in colors of your own
choosing; repainting inside and out
probably necessary every few years.

UPKEEP

Choice of six pastel colors for interior.
Porcelain enameled finish, advertised as
"dull" is highly reflective. Can be cleaned
with soap and water; chips can be
retouched with paintbrush. May need
repainting after 10 or 15 years.

Plenty of electric outlets; wall switches in
each room; eleven lighting fixtures;
overhead lights in kitchen, bathroom, etc.

ELECTRIC
FIXTURES

Plenty of electric outlets, wall switches,
etc. Hardware superior to that in Look
house.

Poor. Wood, far from weather tight,
cheap hardware, hard to open and close.
No provisions for weather stripping and
apparently no provision for screens.
Windows open from bottom out.

WINDOWS

Excellent. Aluminum frames, weather
tight, good hardware, and provisions for
putting on screens which are provided
with house.

193

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->