You are on page 1of 605

System Configuration

D800010X062

2005 Fisher-Rosemount Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in UK DeltaV, the DeltaV design, and PlantWeb are marks of one of the Emerson Process Management group of companies. All other marks are property of their respective owners. The contents of this publication are presented for informational purposes only, and while every effort has been made to ensure their accuracy, they are not to be construed as warrantees or guarantees, expressed or implied, regarding the products or services described herein or their use or applicability. All sales are governed by our terms and conditions, which are available on request. We reserve the right to modify or improve the design or specification of such products at any time without notice.

Contents
Developing the Control Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 System Capacities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Parameter and Function Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Hiding Intellectual Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Protecting Your Engineering Standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Expressions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Syntax Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Syntax for SFC Step Actions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Using the Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 I/O References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Matrix Parameter References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Inputs/Outputs of the Calc/Logic Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 External References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Internal References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Dynamic References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Diagnostic Parameters in Expressions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Operands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Keywords. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 SFC Commands and State Transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Non-Stored Action Qualifier Types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Stored Action Qualifier Types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Overriding Reset (R) Qualifier for Resetting Stored Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Confirms for Pulse Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

iii

Alarms and Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49


Alarms and Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 System Alarm Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Alarm Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Alarm Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Custom Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Events and Alarms Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Collecting Alarm and Event Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

The Continuous Historian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92


Setting up the Continuous Historian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Configuring the Continuous Historian Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Configuring History Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 History Data Sets and Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 History Data Set Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 History Data Retrieval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Data Compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Composite Ff Status Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Composite Historian Status Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Aggregate Functions Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Historian Run-Time Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Continuous Historian Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Continuous Historian Data Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Continuous Historian Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Continuous Historian Excel Add-In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Worksheet Function Reference. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 The Legacy Historian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 DeltaV OPC Historical Data Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 DeltaV OPC History Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 OPC Historical Data Access Clients. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 OPCHDAClient.exe Sample Input Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151

Controller Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156


Controller Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Auto-Sense Feature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Commissioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Decommissioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Inter-Controller Communications Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Controller Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Controller Performance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Preserving Configuration and Controller Data During Power Loss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164

I/O Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169


I/O Card and Channel Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Card Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Channel Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 DeltaV Redundant I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190

iv

System Configuration

Important Considerations for Using Redundant I/O Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Installing and Connecting Redundant Terminal Blocks and Series 2 Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Switchover Causes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 I/O Redundancy, Parameters and DSTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 Auto-Sensing and Configuring Series 2 Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 Identifying and Troubleshooting Series 2 Redundant Cards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 Example Switchover Situations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Device Signal Tags and SCADA Tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 Foundation Fieldbus and the DeltaV System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Foundation Fieldbus Technology Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Foundation Fieldbus Function Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 Using Fieldbus Blocks in the Control Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 Deciding Where to Run Control Function Blocks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 Changing Function Block Parameter Values in Fieldbus Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Fieldbus Devices General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 Using Fieldbus Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 Configuration Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232 Downloading the Block Configuration and Strategy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247

Fieldbus Device Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253


VCR Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 Valid Units and Channel Values for Fieldbus Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 Serial Devices and the DeltaV System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371 Maximum Number of Values for Datasets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Modbus Function Codes Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Using Serial Data in Control Strategies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 Serial Card Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 Serial Card Data Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382 HART Devices and the DeltaV System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385 Scaling HART Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386 Error Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387 Using Error Conditions for Control Strategy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393 Link Initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394 Accessing AMS HART Commands from the DeltaV Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 396 AS-Interface - General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 398 AS-Interface in the DeltaV System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399 Profibus DP - General Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401 Profibus DP in the DeltaV System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 DeviceNet - General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406 DeviceNet in the DeltaV System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 Configuring DeviceNet Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409 Using Profibus DP, DeviceNet, and AS-Interface with DeltaV Function Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 Anti-Aliasing Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414 Overrange and Underrange Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414 NAMUR Limit Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414 Failure Action Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414 What Causes a Card to Enter Its Failure Action Mode? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415 Failure Action by Card Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415

Isolated Input Channel Error Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416 Outputs After a Self-Test Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 Analog Output Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 Discrete Output Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 Integrating PROVOX and RS3 I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419

Customizing the Process History View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420 Downloading Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431 Uploading Recorded Parameter Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 439 Referencing Documents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440 System Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 441 DeltaV Configuration Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 445
DeltaV Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 445 Control Studio Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 451 Forcing an Input. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463 Using Modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463 Composites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463 Expressions in the DeltaV System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 474 Command Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 474 Reports and Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 474 Control Studio Tips of the Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 475 Recipe Studio Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 475 I/O Configuration Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 478 Standard Exports and Imports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482 Export, Import, and Bulk Edit of Configuration Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 484 User-Defined Exports and Imports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 484 DeltaV-INtools Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 552 DeltaV Logger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565 OPC Mirror Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 566 DeltaV Web Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 568

Recommended Configuration Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569


Recommended Practices for Using Fieldbus and Profibus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569 Fieldbus Configuration Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569 Fieldbus System Capacities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569 Write Requests to Static or Non-Volatile Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569 Configure Communications Failure Modes for Fieldbus Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 570 Put PID Algorithm in Final Control Element . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 570 Inspect the Import Log. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571 Changing Series 1 H1 Card Type to Series 2 Card Type in DeltaV Explorer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571 Profibus Failsafe Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571 Profibus Vendor Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571

vi

System Configuration

Recommended Practices for Configuring Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571 Estimate Controller Loading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571 Installation Instructions from the DeltaV CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 572 Recommended Practices for Creating Pictures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 573 General Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 573 Use a One-Second Refresh Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 573 Monitor CPU Usage on Pictures with Object Run-Time Attributes Enabled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 574 Use Reserved Pictures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 574 Displaying Matrix Parameter Arrays in DeltaV Operate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 574 Creating Datalinks for Command and State Driven Algorithm Type Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575 Recommended I/O Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575 Using HART Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575 Controller Redundancy Configuration Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575 Configuring User-Defined RTD Input Channels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575 Configuring a Sequence of Events (SOE) Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576 Recommended Practices for Using DeltaV Batch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577 Determining When an SFC Action Completes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577 Creating and Using Source Linkages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577 Looping and Branching in Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577 Avoiding Infinite Loops in a Recipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578 Avoiding Extra Memory Usage on the Batch Executive Machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578 Copying the Batch Operator Interface Configuration Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578 Segmenting Equipment into Specific IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 579 Renaming a Batch Historian Workstation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 579 Backing Up and Maintaining Batch Historian Archive Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 579 Archiving Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 580 Backing Up Archived Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 580 Deleting Data from the Main Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 580 Recommended Practices for Creating the Control Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 581 Downloading Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 581 Creating Custom Engineering Units Descriptors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 581 Understanding Expression Syntax. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 581 Writing Expressions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 581 Confirming an Action for a Pulse Qualifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 583 Recommended Practices for General Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 583 Interpreting Function Block Status Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 583 Understanding DeltaV Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 583 Naming Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 584 Backing Up Continuous and Batch History Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 584 Recommended Practices for Handling Alarms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 584 Using the Assign Alarm Command. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 584 Suppressing Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 584 Recommended Practices for Using Version Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585 Recommended Practices for Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585 Adding Printers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585 Printing to File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 586

Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 589

vii

viii

System Configuration

Developing the Control Strategy


The configuration engineer uses a top-down engineering approach to develop the control strategy for a DeltaV system. The DeltaV system is divided into levels so that the users can choose the level of detail at which they want or need to work. The following figure shows the levels into which the DeltaV system is divided:

Control Strategy Diagram Typically, the configuration engineer follows this sequence: 1 2 3 Makes high-level decisions that apply to the overall system and plant and uses the DeltaV Explorer to define the system characteristics. (The configuration engineer does not need to be concerned with lower details initially.) Moves down a level in detail and decides how to logically divide system into areas. Areas are logical divisions of a process control system. They can be physical plant locations or main processing functions. Progresses another level and identifies the modules that control the field devices within those areas. The configuration engineer can use the existing modules in the library as starting points for the modules required by the control strategy.

All of the previous steps can be done in the DeltaV Explorer. Using the library provided, more than three-fourths of the control strategy can be developed by duplicating existing library modules in the DeltaV Explorer. Then, the
Developing the Control Strategy 1

control strategy for the unique modules is defined using Control Studio. In Control Studio, engineers can define and modify the control strategies, cut and paste a large portion of the configuration, and then fill in the details. Engineers can also decide when to move to the next level of detail. In each level, most of the structure and characteristics for typical control strategies are already configured for the engineer, except for minor details. For example, module templates are used as a starting point for modules. The templates can define everything about the type of control, except for a few operating parameters. Using this type of general approach, the engineers can lay out the control strategies at each level, cut and paste the major pieces, fill in details, and then reveal the next level of detail. DeltaV software supports three types of common control languages for configuration: function blocks, sequential function charts, and structured text. Within a single control module, you can intermix these control languages. For example, a single module can leverage function blocks for closed loop analog control and Sequential Function Charts to perform interlocking. All three languages execute within the controller in their native form. There is no translation from one language to another prior to execution.

System Configuration

System Capacities
The following tables specify the tested capacity values of the DeltaV system. The values in the Fixed Limit column are limits imposed by the system that the user cannot exceed. Refer to Batch System Capacities for batch-related capacity limits. Capacity Limits for System Topology Description of System Capacity Control Network nodes Total simplex and redundant controllers per control network (each redundant controller pair counts as a single node) Workstations per Control Network (non-remote) Limit 120 1001

60 workstations2 consisting of: 1 ProfessionalPLUS Station Up to 10 Professional Stations Up to 59 Operator, Maintenance and/or Base Stations Up to 10 Application Stations (this is the supported limit)

Remote workstations (using Remote Access Services or RAS) per system

72 (10 on each of 7 Application Stations and 2 on the ProfessionalPLUS Station). 73

DeltaV Remote Clients (using Windows Remote Desktop Connection and Terminal Server) DSTs per system SCADA tags per system Asset Manager Servers

4 concurrent sessions on each Operator Station 2 concurrent sessions on each ProfessionalPLUS Station. 30,000 DSTs distributed among controllers and Application Stations 25,000 50

1. This is a fixed system limit. The system does not permit the configuration of more than 100 controller nodes. 2. This is a fixed system limit. The system does not permit the configuration of more than 60 workstation nodes. 3. This is a fixed system limit. The system does not permit more than seven application stations (Application or ProfessionalPLUS) to be configured as RAS servers.

System Capacities

Capacity Limits for Workstations Description of Workstation Capacity For ProfessionalPLUS, Professional, Operator, Maintenance and Base Stations with Appropriate Licenses Installed Total Unique Display links for systems using DeltaV Operate The total includes: - Dynamic property links per display - Real time trends per display - Data links typically count as one link < 300 (recommended) 300 to 600 (performance degradation) >600 (significant performance degradation) >1000 (not supported) Maximum open applications Records per event chronicle Maximum open DeltaV Explorer applications History values Cached displays (user defined) Cached displays (most recently used)) Open faceplates per module type Open detail displays Open pictures For the ProfessionalPLUS Station only Plant areas Modules per unit Named sets Alarm types DeltaV user accounts per system Parameters per security level Maximum open applications Maximum open Control Studio applications Maximum open engineering tasks on Professional Workstations 100 255 1000 255 200 150 10 4 60 (includes applications open on local ProfessionalPLUS workstations) 9 500,000 1 250* 30 3 4 1 30 (For proper operation, do not exceed 25.) Limit

System Configuration

Description of Workstation Capacity Number of concurrent Professional Workstations connected For Application Stations only OPC data values Maximum assigned modules DSTs for Data Acquisition and Calculation Control SCADA tags History values

Limit 6

30,000 1,500 2,000 25,000 20,0001

* The continuous historians ability to record values is dependent on the number of values collected and the sampling period specified for those values in the Add or Modify History Collection dialog box. To ensure that all values are collected, configure the number of values and their sampling period such that the value of the LOAD diagnostic parameter in the historian subsystem remains below 12%. Alternatively configure the number of values and their sampling period such that the value of ItemPSec remains below 2500. Capacity Limits for Remote Networks and Workstations Description of Workstation Capacity Remote workstations per ProfessionalPLUS (where the ProfessionalPLUS is acting as the Remote Access Server) Remote workstations per Remote Access Services (RAS) Application Station Fixed Limit 2*

10 total

*Additional remote workstations can access the ProfessionalPLUS for engineering data if they use another machine as their Remote Access Server. Capacity Limits for Remote Client Servers Description of Server Capacity Remote clients per ProfessionalPLUS Remote clients per Operator Station *All Operator Stations can be Remote Client Servers. Fixed Limit 2 4*

System Capacities

Capacity Limits for Controllers Description of Controllers Capacity Fastest module scan time Simultaneous online sessions I/O cards per controller DSTs per controller Fixed Limit 100 ms 4 64 M5 and MD - 750 Controller interfaced to PROVOX I/O - 750 Controller interfaced to RS3 I/O - 750 3,200 750 6 10% 400K M5 - 1000 parameters per second MD and remote I/O node - 2000 parameters per second M5 - 1 second MD and remote I/O node- 500 ms

SCADA tags Modules1 Nesting levels per control module Controller free time minimum2 Controller free memory3 Unsolicited data reporting4 Minimum reporting rate

1. The actual value might be less, depending on control strategy complexity. 2. Maintaining the free time above the recommended level ensures overhead to handle plant upsets, alarm bursts, and so on. controller redundancy affects controller loading, as described below. 3. Maintaining the recommended amount of free memory ensures that modules can be applied to the controller through a partial download, in most cases. Some SFCs or other batch-related modules could require more than 400K of free memory to support partial downloads. For batch controllers, several megabytes may be required to support the configuration. Keep track of the value of the phase logic SIZE parameter and the value of the controller FREMEM parameter to ensure that there is enough memory. 4. Develop configurations using a recommended limit of 500 parameters per second for the M5 controller and 1000 parameters per second for the MD controller and remote I/O node. Exceeding these recommended limits may affect system performance. Controller redundancy has an impact on controller free time. Redundancy typically requires at least 10% more controller CPU than the same configuration in a simplex controller. Larger configurations require more CPU time for redundancy processing. A large configuration (for example, 300 modules) could require 25% or more of the controller CPU for redundancy processing. The loading estimation tool might not adequately account for redundancy CPU loading on systems with more than 150 modules. The controller loading estimation tool is included on the DeltaV installation CD #2 in the _Support\Tools\LoadEstimator folder.

System Configuration

Communications Description of System Capacity Control network hops between devices (10 Mbit) Control network hops between devices (100 Mbit) Length of control network between hubs - copper Length of control network fiber optic segment Fixed Limit 4 2 100 m 2 KM Recommended Limit 4 2 100 m 1 KM

System Capacities

Parameters
The DeltaV system uses parameters in function blocks, modules, I/O configuration and diagnostic functions. Parameters provide the user with variables that individually are given constant values for specific applications and can denote the application. This allows the user to configure the logic in a block or module, read or write to a specific I/O channel or card type, or diagnose a system problem. Note When using the value of a parameter from a function block in your control strategy, the function block must execute before attempting to read the value of that parameter. For more detailed information regarding DeltaV parameters, refer to the following topics: Function Blocks - Parameters Module-Level Parameters I/O Card Parameters I/O Channel Parameters

System Configuration

Parameter and Function Security


Inside this topic DeltaV Locks Locks Assigned to Function Block Parameters Locks Assigned to Functions Lock Examples Through the use of locks and keys, the DeltaV system provides security mechanisms at both the parameter and fields level and at the function level. At the parameter and fields level, the DeltaV system allows you to control which users can write to specific parameters and parameter fields in the run-time information. At the function level, the DeltaV system allows you to control which users can perform certain functions. The DeltaV User Manager application provides an interface to the five essential components of security: Locks - Prevent users from changing the parameters and parameter fields assigned to the lock and prevent users from performing certain functions. You use the Explorer to assign locks to parameters, parameter fields and functions. It is helpful to think of a lock as something that specifies the name of the key that grants access. Keys - Provide permissions to individual users or whole groups of users. Each key is associated with a lock. You grant keys under the group and user properties dialogs. Users can be granted any number of keys or none at all. Groups - Enable you to classify users together and grant keys to everyone in the group. Users - Are DeltaV system and Windows users. You can assign users to one or more groups. The DeltaV User Manager application also allows you to create new Windows users without accessing the Windows User Manager application. When you create a new user, you can specify whether the user is a Windows user, a DeltaV system user, or both. Areas - DeltaV system users can be granted different sets of keys in each area. This feature can be used to grant parameter write access to operators for control modules within the operators' responsibility yet can also withhold access to other similar modules outside their responsibility. You can assign parameter and field locks to specific areas. The locks listed in Locks Assigned to Functions do not support area-specific assignments. These function locks must be assigned to area 0 (named Area_A by default).

Locks for parameters are assigned to parameter names rather than to specific instances of parameters. In other words, a lock on HI_LIM applies to all instances of parameters named HI_LIM. To lock a specific instance of a parameter, you must create a unique name for that parameter, such as HI_LIM1. Locks and keys assigned at the field level override those on the parameter itself. This means that specific parameter fields can be open to a large number of users while the parameter as a whole remains generally restricted. Note Because security settings on fields have precedence over parameter security settings, you must be very careful when defining access to fields. For example, if access to GAIN is restricted, but access to the CV field has been defined as less restricted, users with the less restrictive access will be able to change the GAIN parameter. When users make write requests to a specific parameter field, the system checks for a lock on the field. If there is no lock, the system checks for a lock on the parameter itself. When there is no lock on the parameter, the default lock is used. Users can write to the field of the parameter only when they have a key corresponding to the lock. Additionally, the workstation properties can restrict parameter writes by area. That is, the parameter can only be written to if the user has the key for the area and that area is assigned to the current workstation. Locks are also assigned to various user functions such as downloading, uploading, changing the configuration database and so on. Functions are assigned to default locks initially. You can change the lock associated with a function.

Parameter and Function Security

Security is located under the setup component in the Explorer hierarchy. Assign locks to parameters and parameter fields through the Parameter Security and Field Security properties under the Security section. Assign locks to functions through the Function Security properties under the Security section. You can also assign a default lock (keep in mind that many users might have a key to this lock). When you do not assign a lock to a parameter or field, the default lock applies. If you want to remove all security from a parameter, the lock specified for that parameter must be assigned to all users. For example: 1 2 3 4 5 Rename an unused lock (for example, User Lock 10) to something descriptive like, "Everyone". Use the "Everyone" lock on parameters that to which everyone needs write access (or at least to fields that do not have a field name lock defined). In DeltaV User manager, create a group named "All Users". Assign the "Everyone" key to the "All Users" group, sitewide (that is, in all plant areas defined). Make sure all DeltaV users are members of the "All Users" group.

The result is that all DeltaV users get the "Everyone" key in all defined plant areas. This enables them to write to parameters associated with the Everyone key unless a field name lock exists. If you create a new parameter in Control Studio with a unique name, you must add the parameter to the Parameter Security section in Explorer in order to assign a lock to it. Otherwise, the default lock applies. Note that there might be locks on the fields of a parameter you create. Field locks are determined by the parameter type on which the parameter is based. DeltaV Locks In the DeltaV system, locks prevent users from changing the parameters and parameter fields assigned to the lock and prevent users from performing certain functions. Locks Assigned to Function Block Parameters Any function block parameter that is writable has a lock assigned to it. You can change the lock assignments made by the system. Refer to the following table for a complete list of the parameter and field locks and a description of each lock's function: Parameter and Field Locks Lock Alarms Assigned to parameters that... concern alarms and the alarm horn. The Alarms lock affects access to the HORN parameter and the HENAB, MACK, and NALM fields. an operator needs to write to in order to control the process. Examples of parameters with the Control lock are MODE, SETPOINT, and OUTPUT. supervisors and engineers write to in order to configure the process. Operators typically do not write to these parameters. Examples of parameters with the Restricted Control lock are CONTROL_OPTS and DISABLE.

Control

Restricted Control

10

System Configuration

Lock Tuning

Assigned to parameters that... maintenance technicians and supervisors write to in order to tune performance. Typically (although not always), operators do not write to these parameters. Examples of parameters with the Tuning lock are GAIN, RESET, and HIGH_LIM. affect diagnostic information maintained by the system, such as parameters that reset instance counts. affect the records kept by the system, such as parameters that turn off the recording of event records. affect control system operation, such as parameters that start and stop devices and subsystems. you specify. These locks provide flexibility to your security scheme. Note When Recipe Authorization is enabled, User Lock 06 through User Lock 10 are reserved for recipe approval signers.

Diagnostic System Records System Maintenance User Locks 1 through 10

Locks Assigned to Functions Locks are assigned to various user functions, such as downloading, uploading, changing the configuration database, and so on. Functions are assigned to default locks initially. Use the DeltaV Explorer to change the lock associated with a function. Refer to the Batch Operations Security and Campaign Manager Security topics for information about the batch functions and locks. Refer to the History Data Set Security topic for information on Continuous Historian data set security functions and locks. Refer to the following table for a list of the function locks, the default function to which each lock is assigned, and descriptions of the tasks that users with a key to the lock can perform: Locks and Associated Functions Function ADMIN_CONFIG_DB Default Associated Lock System Admin Operation Function Use the database administrator tools to create, copy, and rename databases. Use AMS device configuration and calibration features. Make changes to the configuration database, access a module in debug mode. Save Process History View configuration. Area Specific No. Must have AREA_A assigned.

CHANGE_DEVICE_D B CHANGE_CONFIG_ DB

Can Calibrate

No. Must have AREA_A assigned. No. Must have AREA_A assigned.

Can Configure

CHART_SAVE

Can Configure

No. Must have AREA_A assigned.

Parameter and Function Security

11

Function DIAGNOSTIC_DATA _CLEAR

Default Associated Lock Diagnostic

Operation Function Reset all communication, port, and device statistics; clear integrity history. Initiate a controller switchover. Note: Users must have the key to the Control lock to perform a controller switchover. Download configuration and setup data to system nodes. Within Inspect: change the Enabled/Disable flag for a areas, modules and blocks. Change the alarming flag for a block. Set items on the View | Options property sheet. Set the limits. Use the controller upgrade utility to upgrade controller and I/O card firmware. Upload configuration, setup data to system nodes. Attach functions to locks in DeltaV Explorer. Make changes in the User Manager. Undo the check out of items checked out by other users. Check items in and out of a version control database.

Area Specific No. Must have AREA_A assigned.

DIAGNOSTIC_SWIT CHOVER

Diagnostic

No. Must have AREA_A assigned.

DOWNLOAD_CONFI G INSPECT_TUNE

Can Download

No. Must have AREA_A assigned. No. Must have AREA_A assigned.

Tuning

UPDATE_FIRMWAR E

System Admin

No. Must have AREA_A assigned.

UPLOAD_CONFIG

Can Configure

No. Must have AREA_A assigned. No. Must have AREA_A assigned. No. Must have AREA_A assigned. No. Must have AREA_A assigned. No. Must have AREA_A assigned.

USER_SECURITY_A TTACH_LOCKS USER_SECURITY_U SERMANAGER VC_ADMINISTRATO R VC_CHECKOUT_CH ECKIN

Can Configure

Can Configure System Admin

Can Configure

12

System Configuration

Function VC_DOWNLOAD_C HECKEDOUT

Default Associated Lock System Admin

Operation Function Download items that have been checked out of the version control database. Download recipes that are not authorized. Use the DeltaV Explorer to purge and recover items from the version control database. Use the DeltaV Explorer to rollback to a previous version. Label items in the version control database.

Area Specific No. Must have AREA_A assigned.

VC_DOWNLOAD_U NAUTHORIZED VC_PURGE_RECOV ER_ITEMS

System Admin System Admin

No. Must have AREA_A assigned. No. Must have AREA_A assigned.

VC_ROLLBACK_ITE MS VC_SET_LABEL

System Admin

No. Must have AREA_A assigned. No. Must have AREA_A assigned.

Can Configure

Lock Examples Removing a parameter or field from the security dialog lists in DeltaV Explorer may have unintended consequences. The following examples illustrate the effect of removing parameters and fields from the security dialog lists. Example 1: Attempt to write FIC101/MYPARAM.CV Field name is CV. CV is not listed in the Field Security dialog. Parameter name is MYPARAM. MYPARAM is not listed in the Parameter Security dialog. System Default security is configured as Control.

Result: The lock in effect is Control. Users with the Control key in FIC101's plant area can write it. Example 2: Attempt to write FIC101/MYPARAM.CV Field name is CV. CV is not listed in the Field Security dialog. Parameter name is MYPARAM. MYPARAM is configured as Tuning in the Parameter Security dialog. System Default security is configured as Control.

Result: The lock in effect is Tuning. Users with the Tuning key in FIC101's plant area can write it. Users with the Control key in FIC101's plant area cannot write it. Example 3: Attempt to write FIC101/MYALARM.PRI Field name is PRI. PRI is configured as System Records in the Field Security dialog. Parameter name is MYALARM. MYALARM is configured as Tuning in Parameter Security dialog. System Default security is configured as Control.

Result: The lock in effect is System Records. Users with the System Records key in FIC101's area can write it. Users with the Tuning key in FIC101's plant area cannot write it. Users with the Control key in FIC101's plant area cannot write it.

Parameter and Function Security

13

Hiding Intellectual Property


Use the Hide Internal Structure command to conceal any intellectual property contained in your DeltaV systems Composite Templates, Control Module Classes, Equipment Module Classes, and Phase Classes and in any instance of these templates and classes.

Types of Items Whose Internal Structure can be Hidden The Hide Internal Structure command hides function blocks but module level parameters remain visible. This image shows a composite template whose internal structure is fully visible. Instances of this composite template, such as a module, can be opened in DeltaV Control Studio in online, edit, and debug modes.

A Fully Visible Composite Template The following image shows the same composite template with a hidden internal structure. Because the internal structure is hidden, this composite template cannot be opened in Control Studio in edit mode. However instances of

14

System Configuration

this template, such as a module, can be opened in online and debug modes but users are not allowed to drill into the composite instance to see the internal structure.

Composite Template with Hidden Internal Structure For Module Class parameter shortcuts, (parameters that have the "Allow instance value to be configured" option enabled), the Hide Internal Structure command does not conceal the parameter path in instances of the Module Class. If you do not want parameter paths revealed in instances of the class, you must rename the parameters before using the Hide Internal Structure command. To rename parameters: 1 2 3 4 5 6 Select the Control or Equipment Module Class at the Library level and choose Configure from the context menu. Select the Parameters or I/O tab in the Configuration dialog. Select the parameter and click the Rename button. Enter a parameter name that will not reveal the path and click OK. Close the Configuration dialog. Now select the Control or Equipment Module Class and click Hide Internal Structure.

You must have DeltaV System Admin and Can Configure keys to access the Hide Internal Structure feature. Refer to the Parameter and Function Security topic for more information on locks and keys. To hide an items internal structure: 1 2 3 4 Open DeltaV Explorer Select the item (Composite Template, Control Module Class, Equipment Module Class, and Phase Class). Choose Hide Internal Structure from the context menu. Enter a password, confirm the password, and click OK.

Note An item cannot be hidden if it is in a protected category. Refer to Protecting Your Engineering Standards for information on hiding items in protected categories.

Hiding Intellectual Property

15

A hidden item cannot be: Opened in Edit mode in Control Studio (instances of the item can be opened in Control Studio in online and debug modes). Copied Converted to another type that would reveal the internal structure. For example, a linked composite cannot be converted to an embedded composite. Drilled into (if linked composite) Modified in any way

A hidden item's properties and history collection cannot be changed. However, a hidden item can be deleted. An instance of a hidden item can be modified from the Properties, History Collection, and Configure dialogs. Parameter shortcut values can be changed on an instance. After an items internal structure has been hidden, it can be accessed only with the password used to hide the structure. In most cases the owner of the intellectual property has the password. When a configuration that contains hidden items is exported, the hidden items and password are encrypted. The password persists even if the hidden item is exported, then deleted, and imported or re-imported into a different database. An item from an unencrypted configuration cannot be imported into the DeltaV system if that item already exists in the database and its structure is hidden. It is important to provide information about the owner of a hidden item. For example, suppose a problem arises with a control module with a hidden internal structure and users need to contact the module's owner for help. It is recommended that you use one or more string parameters to hold information about the owner and/or the items revision. Before hiding an item's internal structure, use Control Studio to add the string parameters. Be sure to add the parameters at the item's top level to ensure that the parameters remain visible after the item is hidden. Refer to the Control Studio online help for information on adding parameters. If DeltaV Version Control (VCAT) is enabled, do not check in an item that is unhidden. If an unhidden item is checked in, the internal structure of that version of the item can be viewed in VCAT history.

16

System Configuration

Protecting Your Engineering Standards


Once your engineering standards have been designed and validated for a project and saved in a DeltaV Library category, you can use the Protect command to prevent users from modifying items in that category. The following items can be protected: Composite and module templates (specific parameters of class-based templates can also be protected, regardless of the protection status of the category). Control module, equipment module, phase, and unit classes

Library Categories that can be Protected Items are protected through the use of a password. Users must have the Can Configure key to set and remove a password. A user with the System Admin key can unprotect an item without the password. When a categories are unprotected, all the items in that category become unprotected for all users. Protected parameters of class-based templates remain protected. Refer to the Parameter and Function Security topic for more information on locks and keys. To protect a library category: 1 2 3 4 Open DeltaV Explorer. Select the library category (Composite and Module Templates, and Control Module, Equipment Module, Phase, and Unit Classes ) and choose Protect from the context menu. Enter and confirm a password. Click OK.

Items in protected categories cannot be modified, deleted, moved or overwritten and new items cannot be added to a protected category. Note The Hide Internal Structure command cannot be applied to an item in a protected category. To hide an item in a protected category, first hide the item and then protect the category to which the item belongs. To protect a parameter in a class-based template: 1 2 Open DeltaV Explorer. Select the parameter of a class-based template and choose Protect from the context menu.

It is not possible to remove the protection in instances of the module made from the template.

Protecting Your Engineering Standards

17

Protection is not automatically preserved during a manual database export and import. To preserve protection when manually exporting and importing a database, check the Include the data for a DeltaV software upgrade checkbox. However, protection is automatically preserved when a DeltaV installation is upgraded with the DeltaV Upgrade Wizard.

18

System Configuration

Expressions
One of the fundamental capabilties required in a controller is its ability to compute expressions. An expression is structured text that represents a calculation and has a specific syntax. The expressions provide information for process operators so that they can make control decisions. This section provides an overview of the functions, operators, and syntax used for expressions. To write an expression, use the Expression Editor. The Action, Calc/Logic, and Condition function blocks, as well as the Sequential Function Charts, allow you to enter expressions for execution in the controller. Caution Do not use an external editor for writing expressions unless it is a straight ASCII text editor, such as Notepad. Using other editors can cause the expression to change during the import and export process. Expressions can be used for the following applications: Action Block Expression The expression in the action block allows you to evaluate an equation and assign the result of the evaluation to a parameter within the DeltaV system. Condition Block Expression Used with Boolean-valued expression. To set the condition, you must specify an expression as TRUE. Note that the timed part of condition definitions should not be part of the expression, but rather part of the definition of the condition. Calculation/Logic Block Expression Used with a collection of expressions whose results can be assigned to function block parameters or module parameters. For example, for an expression in a Calc/Logic block (CALC1) in the composite, COMPOS1, that is in the composite, COMPOS2, that is a block in the module, MOD, you can: Reference a CALC1 parameter within the block, IN1.CV. Reference a COMPOS1 parameter within a composite, ^/ATTR.CV. Reference a COMPOS2 parameter outside a composite, /COMPOS2/PARAM.CV. Reference a Module (MOD) parameter, /MSTATUS.CV. Reference another Module parameter, //FIC101/PID/SP.CV. Reference a diagnostic parameter from the module, //NODEX/OINTEG. Reference a DST parameter for the module, //DST/FIELD1_VAL_PCT. SFC Step Actions Used to assign the result of an expression to a database item, which can be an SFC step, state variable, or a parameter. SFC Step Transitions Used with a Boolean-valued expression. When it is evaluated as TRUE, the transition is triggered and associated steps are enabled or disabled. SFC Step Mode Used to allow operators (with the appropriate privileges) complete control over SFC execution by requiring that all transitions be forced. The operator also has the power to redo a given step before proceeding or to restart the sequence from a different point by changing the active step. The SFC can be placed into Step mode from Control Studio Online or Debug views.

Syntax Rules
An expression is made up of operands, operators, functions, constants, and keywords. Each expression must follow a specific syntax to be valid. Some of the rules for valid syntax expressions include: Calculation/Logic Block definitions have a temporary variable capability. The Condition function block evaluates a multi-line expression. The assignment operator (:=) is not a valid operator.

Expressions

19

The Action block requires the use of the assignment operator (:=). All other operators are valid in the Action block provided the final evaluation of the expression is an assignment. Named set constants are represented by SetName:valueName. The only data type supported is floating point. An external (or database) reference is represented by a 'path' surrounded by single quotes. The expression should end with a semi-colon (;). DeltaV software usually adds a semi-colon for you if one is not there. The number of characters in an expression cannot exceed 10,000. You can reduce expression length by relocating part of the expression or by making the expression code more compact.

Note The expression evaluator is stack oriented and allows a maximum of 32 operands and operators. The use of parentheses to organize the expression minimizes the stack usage. The equations are evaluated using RPN (Reverse Polish Notation). Relative Notation The following rules indicate the relative notation of parameters in an expression. Relative Notation Rules Notation // Relates to Rule External Rule References a parameter that is outside this module. References a parameter within the current module. References a parameter up one block level. References a parameter within a batch phase.

Module relative

^ /+/

Block relative Phase relative

Assignment Statements The := operator is an operator in DeltaV expressions. This operator allows for the assignment of calculated values to locations inside and outside of the current block. Examples of the assignment operator follow: 'Block1.mode.target' := MAN; RADIUS := .5;OUT1:= 5 *RADIUS;Assignment statements can be in any of the following formats: output := value; or 'external reference path' := value; or temporary variable := value;If you wanted to increment a module-level parameter called SYRUP, the expression might look like this: '/SYRUP' := '/SYRUP' + 1;Note The assignment operator is not valid in the Condition block. However, the assignment operator is required in the Action block.

20

System Configuration

If-Then-Else-End_if Statements The IF-THEN-ELSE-END_IF structure allows you to execute conditional code in expressions. When a block tests a condition that evaluates to TRUE, it executes one set of the statements; otherwise, it executes a different set of statements. The following example illustrates the IF-THEN-ELSE-END_IF structure: IF '/Block1.mode.ACTUAL' = MAN THEN '/Block1.mode.TARGET':= AUTO;ELSE OUT1:= IN1;END_IF;Note DeltaV software allows you to use ENDIF or END_IF for your convenience. However, structured text typically requires the use of the keyword END_IF. In the preceding example, the condition tested is whether 'Block1.mode.ACTUAL' is equal to manual. Notice that the '=' operator is not used as an assignment operator, but rather to test the two operands for equality. If the condition is TRUE, the 'Block1.mode.TARGET' is set to AUTO; otherwise, OUT1 is set to the value of IN1. Multiple statements can be placed between the THEN keyword and the ELSE keyword as well as between ELSE and the END_IF keyword. It is not always necessary to use the ELSE portion of the statement. For example, if you wanted to set the parameter CALC block parameter OUT1 to TRUE when the process variable of PID1 in LIC-549 goes above 75, the expression would look like this: IF '//LIC-549/PID1/PV.CV' > 75 THEN 'OUT1.CV' := TRUE; ENDIF;Note The CV extension in this example stands for current value . If the choice exists, ST stands for status. After you enter an expression, you can validate the expression syntax. The validation process identifies syntax problems with the expression and any unresolved parameters. The expression can be saved to the database with syntax errors, but the errors should be corrected before downloading the expression. While-Do-End_While The WHILE-DO-END_WHILE structure allows you to continue executing a group of statements while the value of an expression is True. This structure is available in the Calc/Logic and Action function blocks. The following example illustrates the WHILE-DO-END_WHILE structure: I := 1;WHILE (I <= 5) DO '^/PARAM1'[I][1]:= I + .12; I := I + 1;END_WHILE;Note The indices are outside of the single quotes unless the .CV field is used. The parameter syntax must be exactly as shown in the example (^/PARAM1[I][1]). It is recommended to show all access to the matrix parameter (an input or output parameter defined as a floating point array type) using two dimensions where the second is always [1]. Warning If a WHILE loops more than 1998 counts, the loop will be stopped, BLOCK_ERR and MSTATUS will be set, and the loop will not be executed until the module is downloaded. Exit This structure prematurely exits the innermost WHILE-DO loop currently being executed. The EXIT statement can only appear inside the statements of a WHILE_DO loop. The following example illustrates using EXIT in a WHILE-DO loop: I := 1;WHILE (I <= 5) DO '^/PARAM1'[I][1]:= I + .12; IF ('^/PARAM1'[I][1] > 5') THEN EXIT; END_IF; I := I + 1;END_WHILE;Note This command is only available in the Calc/Logic and Action function blocks because that is where the WHILE-DO construction is supported.

Expressions

21

Syntax for SFC Step Actions


For SFC step actions, the type of action determines the valid expressions. The three action typesBoolean, nonBoolean, and Assignmenthave the following impacts on expressions: Assignment Assigns the result of an expression to a destination. For example, the following action text sets a parameter to 1: Boolean Sets a destination to TRUE. This destination must be a module-level Boolean parameter of the module you are working on. The action text for this type of action is the Boolean parameter, and the action qualifier defines the action (when to set this parameter to TRUE). For example, if you want to set a Boolean parameter to TRUE for the module called MPARAMETER, enter the following action text: Non-Boolean Executes a specific block. This block can be either a composite block or a function block, but it must be in the module you are working on. Action Text for this type of action is the function block name. The action qualifier defines the action (when to execute this block). For example, to execute a PID block called PID1, enter the following action text: PID1;Tip To add a block to an SFC, select the Hierarchy View. Click the right mouse button and then click Add. Select the type of block to add, and answer the questions.

'//XV-101/DC1/SP_D':=1;

MPARAMETER;

Using the Variables


Variables are only used in expressions for the Calc/Logic Function block. You can simplify complex calculations by using variables to temporarily store values. The following examples show how variables can be used in a Calc/Logic block. pi := 3.14159; This expression assigns the value of input1 to the RADIUS variable: This expression assigns the value of 2 times the RADIUS to the DIAMETER variable: This expression assigns the value of 2 times pi times the RADIUS to the CIRCUMFERENCE variable: This expression assigns the value of pi times the RADIUS squared to the AREA variable: These expressions assign the variables to outputs of the Calc/Logic function block: RADIUS := IN1; DIAMETER := 2.0 * RADIUS; CIRCUMFERENCE := 2.0 * pi * RADIUS; AREA := 3.14 *(RADIUS * * 2); OUT1 := DIAMETER; OUT2 := CIRCUMFERENCE; OUT3 := AREA; Some keywords are reserved for DeltaV expressions and cannot be used as local variable names. Refer to the Keywords topic for information on the reserved keywords. From the above information, it is apparent that variables do not have to be declared. They are assumed to be variables because of the absence of quotation marks (,) around their names. Variable names are not case sensitive. All variables are floating point numbers. The value of a variable is retained from one scan to the next. The initial (first scan) value of a variable is zero.

22

System Configuration

The scope/visibility of variables is limited to the Calc/Logic function block in which they exist. VAR...END_VAR; This structure is used to declare local variables in expressions in CALC function blocks. If the Option Explicit statement is used it must be followed by VAR...END_VAR to declare local variables. Otherwise, any temporary variables that are not declared within the VAR...END_VAR structure (when using Option Explicit) will not be accepted by the structured text parser.

Option Explicit; (* This is optional.*) VAR (* Used to declare local variables *) T63; T64; T17; T18; END_VAR; T63 := .5; T64 := -15.803; T17 := SIGN(T63); T18 := SIGN(T64); T62 := 88; (* This will give an error with the option explicit since no T62 declared; otherwise no error is flagged. *) (* *) - This is a comment notation. Anything between "(*" and "*)" is treated as a comment, even if it spans lines. These comments do not nest. The first occurrence of "*)" will terminate the comment no matter how many instances of "(*" have occurred. The content of this comment has no effect on any processing. REM - This denotes that a remark is following. Anything on the line following "REM " (note the space after REM is required) is treated as a comment. The content of this statement has no effect on any processing.

Temporary Variables Temporary variables allow you to simplify complex calculations by using variables to temporarily store values. The following rules apply to temporary variables: The name of a temporary variable can only use A to Z, 0 to 9 and _. The name cannot start with 0-9 and is case insensitive. There is no way to declare temporary variables. There is no checking that a variable has been assigned before it is used. Slight misspellings of a variable will result in errors in the expression.

The following is an example of using temporary variables: RADIUS := 5.0;DIAMETER :=2.0 * RADIUS;circumference := 3.14 * DIAMETER;

I/O References
You can reference I/O signals in your expressions and use them in your calculations. You need to supply the full path of the signal, and possibly the parameter. For example, if you were referencing the input signal on the first channel, CH1, of the second card, C02, in a controller's subsystem, and the controller was CTRL3, the reference to that channel in your expression could look like this: '//CTRL3/IO1/C02/CH1/FIELD_VAL_PCTWhen you are reading data from a channel, you do not have to specify the parameter field. If you do not specify a field, the default (.CV) field is implied.

Expressions

23

When you are writing data to a channel, you can reference specific parameters. If you do not specify a field, the default (.CV) field is implied. You can read and write data to the I/O channels in your expressions to obtain the behavior you want. For example, suppose you wanted to convert an analog value to its corresponding temperature in Celsius. For this example, assume you have a temperature transmitter that sends an analog signal of 1 to 5 Volts. The voltage corresponds to a range of 0 to 200C, and you want to convert the analog value to a temperature value so that you can display it for the operator. First, you need to know which channel the 1-to-5 volt signal is on. For this example, assume that it is the signal on the channel we used previously. For the calculation, you would need to subtract 1.0 from the voltage because the temperature scale is zero-based. Then, you would need to multiply the value by 50 because 1.0 volt corresponds to 50 degrees in this example. The expression for the conversion might look like this: CELSIUS := '//CTRL3/IO1/C02/CH1/FIELD_VAL_PCT' *(4.0/100.0)* 50;

Matrix Parameter References


In DeltaV a matrix parameter is defined as a two-dimensional floating point array parameter. Arrays can contain as many as 240 elements. Arrays are arranged in a [row][column] combination of up to 127 by 127 as long at the total number of elements does not exceed the 240 element maximum. Note Change the number of columns and rows during configuration (using Control Studio). DeltaV does not support changing the size of an array during runtime. The array parameter participates in redundancy only if the number of elements is 200 or less. If there are more than 200 elements, the parameter does not transfer across the controller redundancy link. Note In batch expressions you can use array elements as values for step attributes, phase parameters, report parameters, recipe formula parameters, recipe step parameters, and unit parameters.

24

System Configuration

Define a matrix by selecting Floating point array when defining an output parameter.

Properties of an Output Parameter Configured as a 3 by 3 Floating Point Array

Expressions

25

Access array elements by extending the database reference with indices. There are two ways to do this: 'array'[row][column] In this form the array index references (row and column) are outside of the single quotes. The row and column specifiers can be variables or expressions. This form returns the default field (.CV) value of an array element. The index values are checked against the matrix definition. For example: 'ARRAY1'[MY_INDEX][2*abs(a)] The row index value is a variable and the column index variable value is an expression. 'array[row][column].field' In this form the entire array reference is enclosed in single quotes and field is required. In this form row and column specifiers must be integer constants. The index values are checked against the index dimensions. You must use this form to access fields other than CV. For example: 'ARRAY1[2][3].AWST' Note Matrix Parameter indices start at 1 but an index of 0 (zero) is interpreted as 1. For example, an index of [0][0] is interpreted as [1][1]. Use either of these forms to access array elements in expressions. Note that you must enter array indexes manually in the expression editor. To add and display historical array parameters, the syntax must be entered as follows: 'Module/reference[2][1].CV'To display and use the array parameter in DeltaV Operate, reference the array on the graphic as follows: 'DVSYS.Module/reference[2][1].F_CV'Note The DeltaV system updates array parameter values in the workstations every 10 seconds. Array values that change more frequently than 10 seconds cannot all be properly displayed at the workstations. When using matrix parameter referencing and the array resides in a different controller from the module writing to it, create the logic (in the module) to confirm each array element write before attempting the next array element write. Confirmation is not needed if the array and module both reside in the same controller.

Inputs/Outputs of the Calc/Logic Block


The inputs and outputs allow you to read values wired as inputs to a block or assign values to wired outputs from the block. The Calc/Logic block supports direct access to its inputs and outputs. The Action and Condition function blocks, however, do not have the ability to refer to wired inputs and outputs. The following examples show how a Calc/Logic block expression can use wired inputs and outputs: The following expression multiplies the input, IN1, by 2.0 and pi to compute a temporary variable: The following expression assigns the value of the input, IN1, to the output, OUT1: The following expression assigns the status field of input to the status field of the output: 'OUT.ST' := 'IN2.ST';Note The single quotes are required when a parameter field (CV or ST) is appended.

CIRCUM := IN1 * 2.0 * 3.14; OUT1:= IN1;

26

System Configuration

External References
External references are a built-in feature of the DeltaV software that allows you to refer to any input, output, or parameter that is available in any module in the DeltaV system. These external references are best configured by using the parameter browser available in all the expression dialogs. The browser brings up a graphical list of areas, blocks, and parameters. By selecting a parameter from the browser, you can avoid the potential of typographical errors and case-sensitivity when referencing block parameters. Note When using a reference field other than the .CV field, you will need to type the field name. Refer to the External Reference Parameter topic for field descriptions. References are denoted in expressions by surrounding the reference in single quotes (' '). Paths to external references are denoted by double slashes (//). For example, if a block in module LOOP1 is named BLOCK1, an external reference to a parameter in BLOCK1 looks like: IF ('//LOOP1/BLOCK1/MODE.ACTUAL' = MAN) THEN OUT1 := 5.0;ENDIF;

Internal References
Internal references are DeltaV built-in parameter data types. They allow you to refer to any input, output, or parameter that are available within the current module or phase. The best way to configure internal references is by using the parameter browser available in all of the expression dialogs. By selecting a parameter from the browser, you can avoid the potential of typographical errors and case sensitivity when referencing block parameters. Note When using a reference field other than the .CV field, you will need to type the field name. Refer to the Internal Reference Parameter topic for field descriptions. For a module, MOD, that contains the composite, COMPOS2, that contains the composite, COMPOS1, that contains the function block, PID1, all of the internal references shown below refer to the same parameter: Module relative /COMPOS2/COMPOS1/PID1/GAIN Module relative /PID1/GAIN Block relative ^/COMPOS1/PID1/GAIN For phases, a reference to a phase parameter looks like: Phase relative /+/WDOG_STATE.CV

Dynamic References
A dynamic reference parameter is a variation of the external reference parameter that lets you define a path to a value that is selected at run-time during execution of the algorithm. The selection is based on information not available at configuration (for example, an operator entry, a recipe parameter passed from batch control, or a run-time value of a control variable). The best way to configure dynamic references is by using the parameter browser available in all of the expression dialogs. By selecting a parameter from the browser, you can avoid the potential of typographical errors and case sensitivity when referencing block parameters. Refer to the Dynamic Reference Parameter for field descriptions.

Expressions

27

Dynamic references are established by assigning a parameter reference path string to the .$REF field of a dynamic reference parameter. For example, if a tank has two input valves, INLETA and INLETB, the value for the dynamic reference parameter, INLET.$REF, can be assigned the setpoint of INLET_A using a statement such as: 'INLET.$REF' := "//INLETA/SP"Following is an example using a string variable to store the parameter reference path: 'STRINGVAR' := "INLETA/SP" 'INLET.$REF' := 'STRINGVAR'

Diagnostic Parameters in Expressions


You can use diagnostic parameters in expressions to check the integrity and status of specific devices. Using the diagnostic parameters in expressions, you can perform error handling and react to unexpected conditions. For example, you could use a condition block and write an expression that checks the status of an I/O card. If the status is bad, you could execute a different control strategy. The expression for checking the status of an IO card would look similar to the following: '//CTLR1/IO1/C02/STATUS' != GOOD;Note As a general guideline, for parameters with a numeric value, the status is GOOD if it is zero. For Boolean parameters, FALSE is a GOOD status, and TRUE indicates an error. Hint You can use the report mode using, if you are not sure. button on the Browse Dialog to check the type of parameter that you are

For a numeric value, the expression would look similar to the following: '//CTLR1/IO1/C02/CH02/STATUS' = 0;

Strings
Strings can be used in all types of expressions in the DeltaV system. The use of strings allows great flexibility when constructing or selecting parameter reference paths in internal, external, and dynamic reference parameters. A reference parameter/field can be assigned a string constant or a string variable. String constants are enclosed in quotation marks (" "). String variables are enclosed in single quotes (' '). Note Strings referring to module names and associated paths must always use uppercase letters. Supported string functions are described below. String Assignment A string constant can be assigned to a parameter/field. For example: // empty

'OUTLET_POS.$REF' := "VLV1004/AO/OUT.CV";'OUTLET_POS.$REF' := ""; string constant A string parameter/field can be assigned to another string parameter/field. For example:

28

System Configuration

'TEMPSTR2.CV' := 'TEMPSTR1.CV';'OUTLET_POS.$REF' := 'TEMPSTR2.CV';A named set string value can be assigned to a string parameter/field. For example: 'STRING.CV' := 'NAMED_SET.CVS';Numeric Value to String Conversion If the right side of the assignment evaluates to a numeric value and the left side of the assignment is a string parameter, the numeric value is converted to a string, and the string is assigned. String to Numeric Value Conversion If the right side of the assignment evaluates to a string value and the left side of the assignment is a numeric parameter, the string is converted to a float, which is then converted to the type of the numeric parameter. String Comparison Using Relational Operators Two relational operators, equal (=) and not equal (!=), can be used to compare string parameter/fields or string constants, as in the following:

IF ('OUTLET_POS.$REF' = "VLV1004/AO/OUT.CV") THEN IF ("VLV1004/AO/ OUT.CV" != 'OUTLET_POS.$REF')THEN IF ('TEMPSTR2.CV' = 'TEMPSTR1.CV') THEN IF ('TEMPSTR2.CV' != 'TEMPSTR1.CV') THEN Other relational operators are not supported for string comparison. String Concatenation The full path is constructed from a partial path string (for example, a module name) and concatenated with a another string (such a string constant) using a plus operator (+). For example: 'OUTLET_POS.$REF' := 'MODULE.CV' + "/PID/SP.CV"; Note Strings written from expressions are limited to 256 characters. The software does not check if the limit is exceeded and no messages appear. You must ensure that strings written from expressions are no longer than 256 characters. If one of the terms is a string and the other is numeric, the numeric term is converted to a string and the two strings are concatenated, resulting in a string. For example: 'TEMPSTR.CV' := "FIC";'TEMPNUM.CV' := 105;'TEMPSTR2.CV' := 'TEMPSTR.CV' + 'TEMPNUM.CV''IF 'TEMPSTR2.CV' = "FIC105" THEN // would be true String Selection Function (SELSTR) The SELSTR function allows selection from up to five string constants or string parameters, based on an input to the string selection function. It is intended to take the place of a series of IFTHEN statements and temporary string parameters.

SELSTR takes float one term (expected to hold an integer value) and five string terms (usually string constants), returning a string that corresponds to the value of the float term: Float Value <1.0 >= 1.0 and <2.0 >= 2.0 and <3.0 >= 3.0 and <4.0 >= 4.0 and <5.0 >= 5.0 and <6.0 >=6 String Returned empty string first string parameter second string parameter third string parameter fourth string parameter fifth string parameter empty string

Expressions

29

For example: 'OUTLET_POS.$REF':= SELSTR('SEL.CV',"FIC101", PID1/SP.CV"; "FIC102","FIC103","","") + "/

Operands
An operand is the data or item in the expression that is operated on. All values are managed as floating point data. This includes parameters of function blocks that are floating point values. The valid operands in an expression are: Named set constants in the form 'SetName:ValueName'. Inputs (references to inputs of a function block that are float with status data types). Outputs (references to outputs of a function block that are float with status data types). Input Device Signal Tags (DSTs) (references to input signals that are float with status data types.

Note The expression evaluator is stack oriented and allows a maximum of 32 operands and operators. The use of parentheses to organize the expression minimizes the stack usage. The equations are evaluated using RPN (Reverse Polish Notation).

Operators
Operators allow you to make complex calculations with arithmetic operations within expressions. Operators use operands to act upon. Normally, operators are used in the following order: Operand1 Operator Operand 2; For example: OUT1 := 5; This example shows the use of the addition operator: OUT1 :=5 + 5; Normally, the value of the calculation is assigned to either an output, external reference, or temporary variable. The following operators are supported in DeltaV expressions: +, -, *, /, AND, OR, NOT, XOR, MOD, !, =,<>, ~=, !=, <, >, <=, >=, **, :=, (,), x?y:z, ~, ^,&, % Note The equality operator (=) takes precedence over the AND and OR operators. However, it is important to write your expressions using parenthesis so that the result is as expected.

30

System Configuration

Operator Description Operator * / Description Multiply Divide Notes The multiplication operator (*) causes its two operands to be multiplied. The division operator (/) causes the first operand to be divided by the second. If the first operand is less than zero and the second operand is zero, the divide operator returns the value -3.402823466e+38. If the first operand is greater than or equal to zero and the second operand is zero, the divide operator returns the value +3.402823466e+38. The addition operator (+) causes its two operands to be added. The subtraction operator (-) causes the second operand to be subtracted from the first. The conditional operator is a ternary operator (it takes three operands). Result := Conditional-expression ? Expression : Expression The first operand is evaluated and all side effects are completed before continuing. When the first operand evaluates to True (a nonzero value), the second operand is evaluated. When the first operand evaluates to False (0), the third operand is evaluated. For example, the expression alpha<beta ? delta : gamma; (where alpha and beta are simple operands) means that if alpha is less than beta, then evaluate delta; otherwise, evaluate gamma. You many need to rearrange your operands to use the ?: operator. For example, to write the conditional statement: IF IN1 < 90 THEN OUT1 := IN1;ELSE OUT1 := 90;ENDIF; using the ?: operator, the statement is as follows: OUT1 :=(IN1<90) ? IN1 : 90 Note Always simplify the second and third operands when using the ?: operator. & Bitwise AND The AND (bit) operator compares each bit of its first operand to the corresponding bit of its second operand. If both bits are 1, the corresponding resultant bit is set to 1. Otherwise, the corresponding resultant bit is set to 0. The logical AND operator produces the value 1 if both operands are 1 (non-zero). If either operand is 0, the result is 0. The inclusive OR (bit) operator compares each bit of its first operand to the corresponding bit of its second operand. If either bit is 1, the corresponding resultant bit is set to 1. Otherwise, the corresponding resultant bit is set to 0.

+ ?:

Add Subtract Conditional

AND |

Logical AND Bitwise OR

Expressions

31

Operator OR

Description Logical OR

Notes The logical OR operator performs an inclusive OR operation on its operands. The result is 0 if both operands are 0. If either operand has a non-zero value, the result is 1. The bitwise complement (or bitwise NOT) operator produces the bitwise complement of its operand. Note This operator only works on signed values. The logical negation (logical NOT) operator sets the result to 0 if its operand is TRUE (non-zero). If its operand is False (0), the result is 1. The OR (bit) operator compares each bit of its first operand to the corresponding bit of its second operand. If one bit is 0 and the other bit is 1 (non-zero), the corresponding resultant bit is set to 1. Otherwise, the corresponding resultant bit is set to 0. The logical exclusive OR operator compares the first operand to the second operand. If one operand is 0 and the other is 1 (non-zero), the result is 1. Otherwise, the result is 0. MOD is the remainder of simple integer division. For example, 13 / 5 (13 divided by 5) is 2 with a remainder of 3. Therefore, 13 MOD 5 is 3. When the division is inexact, the result is determined by the following rules: When the right operand is zero, the result is zero. When both operands are positive, the result is positive. When either operand is negative and the result is inexact, the result is defined as follows: In division where either operand is negative, the direction of truncation is toward zero. When either operation is negative in division with the remainder operator, the result has the same sign as the dividend (the first operand in the expression). For example -13 MOD 5 is -3, but 13 MOD -5 is 3. The first operand is equal to second operand. The first operand is greater than the second operand. The first operand is less than the second operand. The first operand is greater than or equal to second operand The first operand is less than or equal to second operand. The first operand is not equal to the second operand. Note The ~= operator only works on signed values.

Bitwise NOT

! or NOT

Logical NOT

Bitwise Exclusive OR

XOR

Logical Exclusive OR Modulus operator

MOD or %

= > < >= <= != or <> or ~=

Equality test Greater than Less than Greater than or equal to Less than or equal to Does not equal

32

System Configuration

Operator **

Description Raise to power

Notes The power operator computes the first operand raised to the power of the second operand. If the first operand is negative and the second operand is not an integer, the result is zero. The simple-assignment operator assigns its right operand to its left operand.

:=

Assignment to output

Note The expression evaluator is stack oriented and allows a maximum of 32 operands and operators. The use of parentheses to organize the expression minimizes the stack usage. The equations are evaluated using RPN (Reverse Polish Notation). Operator Precedence Rules Precedence Order 1 2 3 4 Operation Parenthesis Raise to power Logical NOT Bitwise NOT Multiply Divide Modulus Operator Add Subtract Unary minus Equality test Greater than Less than Greater than or equal to Less than or equal to Does not equal Bitwise AND Bitwise Exclusive OR Bitwise OR Logical AND Logical Exclusive OR Logical OR Conditional Symbol (Expression) ** ! or NOT ~ * / MOD or % + = > < >= <= != or <> or ~= & ^ | AND XOR OR ?: Order of Evaluation Nonassociative Left Left Left

Left

Left

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Left Left Left Left Left Left Right

Expressions

33

Functions
The DeltaV software supports a wide variety of functions. DeltaV functions are generally in the following format: FunctionName( param1, param2, ..., paramN) Note that the function name is followed by a parenthesis, and the parameters of the function are separated by commas. These functions can be used in either the Assignment or IF-THEN-ELSE-END_IF expression constructs. Expression Functions Function ABS (x) ACOS (x) Description Absolute value of x Arc cosine of x Notes Returns the absolute value of x. Returns the arcosine of x in the range 0 to radians. If x is less than -1 or greater than 1, ACOS returns a zero value. Returns the arcsine of x in the range -/2 to /2 radians. If x is less than -1 or greater than 1, ASIN returns a zero value. Assumes 16 bit operand for sign preservation

ASIN (x)

Arc sine of x

ASR16 (i,n)

Arithmetic Shift i Right n bits, an emulation of PROVOX ASR in DeltaV expression. Arc tangent of x Cosine of x Exponential of x

ATAN (x) COS (x) EXP (x)

Returns the arctangent of x in radians. Returns the cosine of x where x is in radians. Returns the exponential x of the floating-point parameter if successful. On overflow, the function returns INF (infinite), which is the MAX number for the data type. On underflow, the function returns a zero value. Computes x raised to the power of y. If x equals zero and y equals zero or if x is less than zero and y is not an integer, EXPT returns a value of one (1). Standard linear interpolation.

EXPT (x,y)

Raise x to the power of y Conversion from EU (e) to percent given the values at 0% (p0) and 100% (p100). Returns fractional part of a number Natural logarithm of x Log base 10 of x

EUP (e,p0,p100)

FRACT (x)

Returns the fractional part of x. The result is positive if x is greater than or equal to zero. The result is negative if x is less than zero. Returns the natural logarithm of x if successful. If x is not positive, LN returns a zero value. Returns the logarithm base 10 of x if successful. If x is not positive, LOG returns a zero value.

LN (x) LOG (x)

34

System Configuration

Function LOG2 (x,y)

Description Log base x of y

Notes LOG 2 (x,y) returns the logarithm base x (operand one) of y (operand two) when successful. If x or y is not positive, LOG2 returns a zero value and Bad status. Causes information about significant events detected in the control module algorithm to be recorded in the DeltaV Process History log. LOGEVENT takes one parameter (a string representing the event to be recorded) and records it in the Desc2 field of the process event record associated with this module. Note There is an 80-character limit on the Desc2 field. The return value is the greater of the two specified values. The return value is the smaller of the two specified values. Standard linear interpolation.

LOGEVENT

Returns a float value of 1.0 if the call succeeded and a value of 0.0 if the call failed.

MAX (x,y) MIN (x,y) PEU (p,p0,p100)

Maximum of x and y Minimum of x and y Conversion from Percent (p) to Engineering units given the values at 0% (p0) and 100% (p100). Rotate x to the left by y bits Rotate x to the right by y bits Rotate x to the left by y bits Rotate i Left n bits - an emulation of PROVOX 16 bit ROTL in DeltaV expression. Rotate x to the right by y bits Rotate i Right n bits emulation of PROVOX 16 bit ROTR in DeltaV expression.

ROL (x,y)

Rotates the unsigned x by y bits to the left. The function wraps bits rotated off one end of the value to the other end. (Same as ROTL.) Rotates the unsigned x by y bits to the right. The function wraps bits rotated off one end of the value to the other end. (Same as ROTR.) Rotates the unsigned x by y bits to the left. The function wraps bits rotated off one end of the value to the other end. (Same as ROL.) Assumes 16 bit operand.

ROR (x,y)

ROTL (x,y)

ROTL16 (i,n)

ROTR (x,y)

Rotates the unsigned x by y bits to the right. The function wraps bits rotated off one end of the value to the other end. (Same as ROR.) Assumes 16 bit operand.

ROTR16 (i,n)

Expressions

35

Function ROUND (x) SELSTR (x,a,b,c,d,e) SHL (x,y) SHR (x,y) SIGN (x)

Description Round x to nearest float Select a string Shift x left by y bits, no carry Shift x right by y bits, no carry Sign indicator of x

Notes Rounds x to the nearest integer value. Returns the string represented by a, b, c, d, or e depending on value of x. Shifts x left by y number of positions and fills with zeroes (0). Shifts x right by y number of positions and fills with zeroes (0). Returns a Boolean True value (1) if x is positive or zero. Returns a Boolean False value (0) if x is negative. Returns the sine of x where x is in radians. Returns the square-root of x. If x is negative, SQRT returns the value of x. Converts an ISO 8601 formatted string to an Epoch time value.

SIN (x) SQRT (x) STR_TO_TIM E (x) STBT (i,b,n)

Sine of x Square root of x Epoch time of x Set a bit position (n) in an integer value (i) to a given boolean value (b). This function returns a TRUE or FALSE when queried for system condition x. User passes one of the enumerated values for $sysstat_opts. Tangent of x Time of x, where x is a named set value of $time_format

SYSSTAT (x)

Allowable values are: Switchover AnyDownload MyDownload Powerfail TotalDownload Returns the tangent of x where x is in radians. Returns the current Local or UTC time as an Epoch Time value (the number of seconds since midnight, January 1, 1972). Note: Assign the output of this value directly to an output parameter to have it update at one second intervals. If you set an OUT value in a Calc block, then wire the output to a parameter, it updates every 64 seconds. Returns the time of day (in ISO 8601 format) of the specified Epoch time. Returns a floating point value representing the largest integer that is less than or equal to x. That is, TRUNC rounds x to the next lowest integer value.

TAN (x) TIME (x)

TIME_TO_ST R (x, y) TRUNC (x)

Time y expressed in format x Floor function

36

System Configuration

Constants
Constants are predefined, unchangeable values in expressions. These constants let you test values against DeltaV system values without you having to know their internal representations. DeltaV TRUE/FALSE Constants Constant FALSE TRUE Explanation Boolean FALSE. This number is evaluated as 0.0 Boolean TRUE. This number is evaluated as 1.0. If it is necessary to evaluate or test for a non-zero value, test for value <> FALSE (refer to the description for FALSE), do not test for value = TRUE unless value is guaranteed 1.0.

DeltaV Status Constants Status constants are implemented as an 8-bit status word. The numeric value of the status word is determined by which bits are set. Constant GOOD Explanation The GOOD constant is equivalent to a value of 128, which is the numeric value of a GoodNonCascade Nonspecific NotLimited status. When comparing a status value to GOOD using the equality operator (=), the two most significant bits of the status word are extracted. The comparison is TRUE for all values in the range of 128 to 191. To test a status for the entire range of GOOD status (GoodNonCascade and GoodCascade) use the greater than or equal to operator (>=). If you assign GOOD to a parameter's status, the status is set to GoodNonCascade NonSpecific NotLimited (numeric value 128). LIMITED_CO NSTANT LIMITED_HI GH LIMITED_LO W UNC When a status parameter is connected to an input and is compared to LIMITED_CONSTANT using the equality operator (=), the result will be TRUE if the quality of the status is LIMITED_CONSTANT. When a status parameter is connected to an input and is compared to LIMITED_HIGH using the equality operator (=), the result will be TRUE if the quality of the status is LIMITED_HIGH. When a status parameter is connected to an input and is compared to LIMITED_LOW using the equality operator (=), the result will be TRUE if the quality of the status is LIMITED_LOW. The UNC constant is equivalent to a value of 64, which is the numeric value of a Uncertain Nonspecific NotLimited status. When comparing a status value to UNC using the equality operator (=), the two most significant bits of the status word are extracted. The comparison is TRUE for all values in the range of 64 to 127. If the UNC keyword is used for assignment to an output connected to a status parameter, or UNC is assigned to the status of an output, the quality of the output is set to UNC.

Expressions

37

A CALC block's OUT parameters default to a status of GOOD (128). You must explicitly set the status if it is to be different. Status propagation is not automatic in CALC blocks. You can set the status to a numeric value (refer to the topic Function Block Status Values). You can also use the GOOD, BAD or UNC constants (for example, 'out1.st' := UNC). There are also constants for the limit status (the two least significant bits of the status word). If the signal is also limited or constant, you can use these additional constant words, but you must combine them with the status constant. For example, to set the status to GOOD High Limited, use the expression 'out1.st':= GOOD | LIMITED_HIGH. The "|" operator is a bitwise OR function. The expression writes a value of 130 to the status. DeltaV Mode Constants Constant AUTO Explanation When a mode parameter is connected to an input and compared to AUTO (automatic) using the equality operator (=), the result will be TRUE if the Actual mode is set to AUTO. If AUTO is used for assignment, the automatic Target mode will be written. The numeric value of the AUTO constant is 16. When a mode parameter is connected to an input and compared to CAS (cascade) using the equality operator (=), the result will be TRUE if the Actual mode is set to CAS. If CAS is used for assignment, the cascade Target mode will be written. The numeric value of the CAS constant is 32. Note The CAS constant is not supported for fieldbus function blocks. For fieldbus function blocks, use the numeric value 48 to set the target mode to CAS. This value (48) sets both the AUTO bit (16) and the CAS bit (32). When a mode parameter is connected to an input and compared to IMAN (Initialized Manual) using the equality operator (=), the result will be TRUE if the Actual mode is set to IMAN. The numeric value of the IMAN constant is 2. When a mode parameter is connected to an input and compared to LO (Local Override) using the equality operator (=), the result will be TRUE if the Actual mode is set to LO. When a mode parameter is connected to an input and compared to MAN (Manual) using the equality operator (=), the result will be TRUE if the Actual mode is set to MAN. If MAN is used for assignment, the manual Target mode will be written. The numeric value of the MAN constant is 8. When a mode parameter is connected to an input and compared to OS (Out of Service) using the equality operator (=), the result will be TRUE if the Actual mode is set to OS. If OS is used for assignment, the manual Target mode will be written. The numeric value of the OS constant is 1.

CAS

IMAN

LO

MAN

OS

These constants can be used as numerical values only. Never assign values to constants or use these reserved words as temporary variables in Calc/Logic blocks.

38

System Configuration

Comments
Comments are statements placed in an expression that act solely as a documentation tool for users. They have no effect on the expression. The structures of a comment can take two forms: REM A single line comment. Any text placed on a line that follows the line that this keyword is on is ignored. The following example demonstrates a comment using this structure:

REM This code was written June 1998 by B. Gates (* *) A multiline comment structure that must have the start and the end comment operator to be complete. The following example demonstrates a comment using this structure:

(* This comment was started on this line and finished on this line *)

Keywords
The following are reserved keywords in the DeltaV expressions, and they cannot be used as variable names: ABS ACOS AND ASIN ASR16 ATAN AUTO BAD CAS COS DO ELSE END_IF END_VAR END_WHILE EXP EXPT EUP FALSE FRACT GOOD IF IMAN LIMITED_CO NSTANT LIMITED_HI GH LIMITED_LO W LN LO LOG LOG2 MAN MAX MIN MOD NOT OR OS PEU REM ROL ROR ROTL ROTL16 ROTR ROTR16 ROUND SELSTR SHL SHR SIGN SIN SQRT STBT SYSSTAT TAN THEN TRUE TRUNC UNC VAR XOR WHILE

Expressions

39

SFC Commands and State Transitions


The modules containing SFCs in the DeltaV system have some predefined states and commands that support sequencing. The SFC can transition from one state to another depending on the commands it receives. SFCs have the following 5 states: IDLE ACTIVE STOPPED COMPLETED BLOCKED

The SFC also has the following predefined commands: Start Sequence Stop Sequence Reset Sequence

The COMMAND parameter of the SFC module reflects the commands that transition the SFC into different states. The following figure shows the state transitions and commands for SFCs:

SFC Flow Chart

40

System Configuration

Actions
Each step is associated with a number of actions. An action can assign a parameter value, set a variable, or run a function block. Therefore, there are three different types of actions: Assignment assigns the result of an expression to a variable. When an assignment action is active, the specified expression is evaluated, causing the destination parameter to be written with the result. No special action is taken when the transition to inactive occurs. Boolean references a module-level Boolean parameter of the module you are defining. The associated Action Text is the Boolean parameter. The action qualifier determines when the parameter is set to TRUE. Non-Boolean references a function block that is in the module hierarchy. The Action Text is the function block name. The action qualifier defines when the function block executes. Note You cannot write directly to a Device Signal Tag (DST) value in an action, even though the action parser allows you to configure it. Each action must have a configured action qualifier, which helps define when the action is active. Whether or not an action is active can be determined given its action qualifier and the step that is associated with the action. The step that is associated with an action is the step that initiated the action. Note If an action modifies a destination while that destination is currently being updated by an active action, the results will be unpredictable. There are two basic types of action qualifiers: non-stored and stored. An additional type of qualifier, the reset action qualifier ( R ), is used in conjunction with stored qualifiers to reset a stored action. Non-Stored Action Qualifiers: NNon-Stored LTime Limited DTime Delayed PPulse Stored Action Qualifiers: SSet (Stored) SDStored and Time Delayed DSDelayed and Stored SLStored and Time Limited Actions with a non-stored type of qualifier are only active while the associated step is active or for a portion of the time that the step is active, depending on the specific qualifier. Actions with a stored type of qualifier either are active for only a portion of the time that the associated step is active or remain active after the associated step has gone inactive, depending on the specific qualifier. Note Actions within a step are initially executed at step time=0 seconds. This affects the execution of time-relation actions. For example, if you configure a step action with a time delay of 10 seconds (time>=10), that step action is idle from step time=0 to step time=10. When the step time>=10 seconds, the action is executed. It is important to use the >= operator to ensure that the transition will trip when running on a heavily loaded system or when the system is being downloaded. Using time=10 operator requires that the time be 10 seconds and no more or less. If the timer count is 10.1 due to a download, then the action will not trip. Using >= allows that step to trip at any point immediately after 10 seconds.

Expressions

41

A third type of action qualifier, the overriding reset (R) qualifier is used to reset a stored Boolean or Non-Boolean action. For example, if you want to start an action in Step 1 and continue it until Step 5, you can either use a nonstored qualifier for the first four steps, or you can use a stored qualifier in Step 1 and a reset in Step 5. You can also reset a stored qualifier by performing an assignment action and setting the active parameter of the action to False. This is the only way to reset a stored assignment action. Refer to the Overriding Reset (R) Qualifier for Resetting Stored Actions topic for more details.

Non-Stored Action Qualifier Types


Non-stored Action Qualifier (N) A non-stored action of ANY type means that the action is only active while the step is active. A reset is not needed before the next write to the destination. Assignment Action The assignment statement is evaluated (and the assignment made) on each scan through the step actions while the step is active. When the step goes inactive, the assignment destination retains the assigned value. Boolean Action The Boolean destination referenced is written to TRUE on each scan through the step actions while the step is active. When the step goes inactive, the Boolean destination returns to False. Non-Boolean Action The function block referenced is evaluated for each scan through the step actions while the step is active. Time Limited Action Qualifier (L) A time limited action is similar to a non-stored action except that you can specify a maximum time that the action might be active. Note Actions within a step are initially executed at step time=0 seconds. For a time limited action of 10 seconds, the action is active from step time=0 to step time=9 and does not execute at step time=10. Assignment Action The assignment statement is evaluated (and the assignment made) on each scan through the step actions until either the time limit specified as part of the action configuration is met or the step goes inactive. Boolean Action The Boolean destination referenced is written to TRUE for each scan through the step actions until either the time limit specified as part of the action configuration is met or the step goes inactive. Non-Boolean Action The function block referenced is evaluated for each scan through the step actions until either the time limit specified as part of the action configuration is met or the step goes inactive. Time Delayed Action Qualifier (D) A time delayed action is similar to a non-stored action except you can specify a delay time before that action goes active. If the step goes inactive before the time delay is satisfied, the action does not go active as a result of this action. Assignment Action The assignment statement is evaluated (and the assignment made) on each scan through the step actions once the time limit specified as part of the action configuration is met. The action goes inactive when the step goes inactive.

42

System Configuration

Boolean Action The Boolean destination referenced is written to TRUE for each scan through the step actions once the time limit specified as part of the action configuration is met. The action goes inactive when the step goes inactive. Non-Boolean Action The function block referenced is evaluated for each scan through the step actions once the time limit specified as part of the action configuration is met. The action goes inactive when the step goes inactive. Pulse Action Qualifier (P) A pulse action of ANY type means that the action is only active on the first scan through the actions when the step goes active. Assignment Action The assignment statement is evaluated (and the assignment made) on the first scan through the step actions when the step goes active. After the first scan, the assignment destination retains the assigned value, but it is not rewritten for each scan. Boolean Action The Boolean destination referenced is written to TRUE on the first scan through the step actions when the step goes active. The Boolean returns to False on the second scan through the actions. Non-Boolean Action The function block referenced is evaluated on the first scan through the step actions when the step goes active.

Stored Action Qualifier Types


Set (Stored) Action Qualifier (S) A set (stored) action goes active when the step becomes active and stays active until reset. While the action is active, the action text is evaluated on every scan through the step actions. Refer to the reset action qualifier description to see how a reset can be done for each action type. Assignment Action The assignment statement is evaluated (and the assignment made) on each scan through the SFC actions. The action remains active until a reset action is evaluated for this set action. Refer to the reset action qualifier description to see how a reset can be done for an assignment action. Boolean Action The Boolean destination referenced is written to TRUE for each scan of the step actions while the set action remains active. The action remains active until a reset action is evaluated for that same Boolean destination. Refer to the reset action qualifier description to see how a reset can be done for a Boolean action. Non-Boolean The function block is evaluated on each scan through the step actions. The action remains active until a reset action is evaluated for that same function block. Refer to the reset action qualifier description to see how a reset can be done for a non-Boolean action. Note When the SFC stops, all actions stop. Because when the SFC stops all actions stop, you cannot have a stored action reset a sequence when the sequence stops.

Expressions

43

Stored and Time Delayed Action Qualifier (SD) A stored and time delayed (SD) action is similar to a stored action except that you can specify a delay time before the action goes active. If the step goes inactive before the time delay is satisfied, the action still goes active as a result of this action once the time delay is satisfied. When you create an assignment action with a Stored and Time Delayed (SD) qualifier and you have the SFC connected so that it loops back and continues to restart, the action will delay every time through the sequence, if it was reset. For example, S1 in the following figure contains a stored delay action, A1. Suppose A1 is a assignment action with the text '/PARAM1' := '/PARAM1' + 1; and a delay of 30 seconds. When S1 becomes active, A1 becomes active. A1 waits 30 seconds and then increments PARAM1. S3 contains an action that resets A1. Because it has been reset, A1 will delay every time S1 becomes active.

If A1 was not reset, it would stay active and keep the same output. (The delay would not recur.) So, if you did not want the delay to occur every time through the sequence, you would not reset the action every time. The same is true for a Time Delayed and Stored (DS) qualifier. The only difference between the Stored and Time Delayed (SD) and the Time Delayed and Stored (DS) qualifier occurs when the step goes inactive before the delay is finished. If this happens before the delay is complete in an SD action, the action is stored, but in a DS action if the step goes inactive before the delay is complete, the action is not stored because the delay did not complete. Note When the SFC stops, all actions stop. Also note that when the SFC stops, all actions stop. Therefore, you cannot have a stored action reset the sequence when the sequence stops. Assignment Action The assignment statement is evaluated (and the assignment made) on each scan through the step actions, once the time delay specified as part of the action configuration is met. The action actually goes active (and can be reset) when the step initially goes active. The action then stays active until a reset action is evaluated for this assignment statement. Refer to the reset action qualifier (R) description to see how a reset can be done for an assignment action. Boolean Action The Boolean destination referenced is written to TRUE for each scan through the step actions, once the time delay specified as part of the Action configuration is met. The action actually goes active (and can be reset) when the step

44

System Configuration

initially goes active. The action then stays active until a reset action is evaluated for that same Boolean destination. Refer to the reset action qualifier (R) description to see how a reset can be done for a Boolean action. Non-Boolean Action The function block usage referenced is evaluated for each scan through the step actions once the time delay specified as part of the action configuration is met. The action actually goes active (and can be reset) when the step initially goes active. The action then stays active until a reset action is evaluated for that function block usage. Refer to the reset action qualifier description to see how a reset can be done for a non-Boolean action. Time Delayed and Stored Action Qualifier (DS) A time delayed and stored action is similar to a stored action except that you can specify a delay time before that action goes active. If the step goes inactive before the time delay is satisfied, the action does not go active as a result of this action, and a reset is not required. Assignment Action The assignment statement is evaluated (and the assignment made) on each scan through the step actions once the time delay specified as part of the action configuration is met. The action actually goes active when the time delay is reached and stays active until a reset action is evaluated for this assignment statement. Refer to the reset action qualifier description to see how a reset can be done for an assignment action. Boolean Action The Boolean destination referenced is written to TRUE for each scan through the step actions once the time delay specified as part of the action configuration is met. The action actually goes active when the time delay is reached and stays active until a reset action is evaluated for that same Boolean destination. Refer to the reset action qualifier description to see how a reset can be done for a Boolean action. Non-Boolean Action The function block referenced is evaluated for each scan through the step actions once the time delay specified as part of the action configuration is met. The action actually goes active when the time delay is reached and stays active until a reset action is evaluated for that function block. Refer to the reset action qualifier description to see how a reset can be done for a non-Boolean action. Stored and Time Limited Action Qualifier (SL) A stored and time limited action is similar to a stored action except that you are allowed to specify a maximum amount of time for this action to be active. The action goes active when the step goes active and then remains active until the configured time has elapsed or a reset is evaluated. If the configured time limit is reached, a reset is not required. Assignment Action The assignment statement is evaluated (and the assignment made) on each scan through the step actions once the step goes active. The action stays active until the time limit specified as part of the action configuration is met or a reset action is evaluated for this assignment statement. Refer to the reset action qualifier description to see how a reset can be done for an assignment action. Boolean Action The Boolean destination referenced is written to TRUE for each scan through the step actions starting when the step goes active. The action stays active until the time limit specified as part of the action configuration is met or a reset action is evaluated for that same Boolean destination. Refer to the reset action qualifier description to see how a reset can be done for a Boolean action.

Expressions

45

Non-Boolean Action The function block referenced is evaluated for each scan through the step actions starting when the step goes active. The action stays active until the time limit specified as part of the action configuration is met or a reset action is evaluated for that function block. Refer to the reset action qualifier description to see how a reset can be done for a non-Boolean action.

Overriding Reset (R) Qualifier for Resetting Stored Actions


To stop the evaluation of a stored type of action, an action with the reset action qualifier is generally used. Any stored action that is active must be reset before a new value can be stored in that destination with predictable results. How you reset a stored action depends on the type of stored action it is (either Boolean, non-Boolean, or assignment). To reset a stored Boolean or non-Boolean action, you define a Boolean or non-Boolean action with a reset qualifier that resets either the Boolean parameter (for a Boolean action) or the block (for a non-Boolean action). For example, suppose S1 in the following figure of an SFC contains a stored Boolean action, A1.

A1 references a Boolean parameter called PARAM1. When the step S1 becomes active, the action A1 becomes active and the parameter PARAM1 is set to TRUE. In summary, you have an action A1 with: Type: Qualifier: Text: Boolean Stored '/PARAM1/

A1 stays active after the step becomes inactive because it is a stored action. Therefore, the parameter, PARAM1, continues to be set to TRUE until you reset the action. To reset the action and the Boolean parameter, PARAM1, you must create a step with an action that has a reset qualifier. For example, if you wanted to reset the Boolean parameter, PARAM1, during step S3, you could define a Boolean action for step S3 that has a Reset action qualifier and uses

46

System Configuration

PARAM1 for the action text. Then, when S3 becomes active, PARAM1 is reset. In summary, you would create an action with: Type: Qualifier: Text: Boolean Reset PARAM1

You can use this approach for either a Boolean or a non-Boolean action. However, to reset an assignment action, you must write the reset text differently. For example, suppose the same SFC contains a stored assignment action, A2, in step S1. When the step S1 becomes active, A2 becomes active and increments the parameter, PARAM2. In summary, you have an action A2 with: Type: Qualifier: Text: Assignment Stored 'PARAM2' := 'PARAM2' + 1;

The action stays active after the step becomes inactive because it is a stored action. Therefore, the parameter, PARAM2, continues to be incremented until you reset the action. To reset an assignment action, you must make the action inactive. You do this by setting the ACTIVE parameter to False. Therefore, you would create a non-stored action that sets 'S1/A2/ACTIVE' to False. For this example, you could use a Pulse (P) action qualifier. In summary, to reset the assignment action, A2, you would create an action with: Type: Qualifier: Text: Assignment Pulse (P) 'S1/A2/ACTIVE' := False;

Note If there is a parallel divergence in your sequence, you must put the reset action in all of the paths of the parallel divergence to make sure that the action gets reset.

Confirms for Pulse Actions


You can add a confirm expression to an action that has a pulse qualifier. To confirm an action, the action must be defined as a Pulse qualifier (which is configured on the Action Properties General dialog). Select the Action Properties Confirm dialog for that action. Write the confirmation expression and assign a timeout value. When the SFC step containing this action becomes active, the action is initiated. If confirmation is enabled, the confirmation expression is run. If confirmation does not occur within the timeout value, the action fails. For example, suppose you want to confirm that the motor is running before moving to the next action in the step. In this example, the action is to start the motor (Pulse qualifier with the action, SP:MOTOR=RUN, and a failure timeout set to 20 seconds). The Confirm expression for the Start motor step is PV:MOTOR = RUNNING with a possible confirm timeout value of 20 seconds. If there are no pending confirms and no failed confirms, the step action or actions have completed successfully. If the expression evaluates to TRUE, the SFC will proceed to the next step.

Expressions

47

A confirm requires either a Timeout value or a Timeout expression. You could set the Confirm Timeout to a Time value of 5, meaning that if the motor does not start running within 5 seconds the confirm times out. A timeout value of 0 means there is no time limit on the confirm timeout. When a step becomes active, the PENDING_CONFIRMS parameter for the step is set to equal the number of actions with confirms in the step. In our example, we have one action with one confirm. So, PENDING_CONFIRMS is set to 1. When a confirm either completes or times out, the PENDING_CONFIRMS is decreased by one. When all confirm actions within the step have either completed or timed out, PENDING_CONFIRMS is set to 0. If a confirm condition times out (the Confirm Timeout time expires or the Confirm Timeout expression becomes TRUE before the Confirm expression becomes TRUE), the FAILED_CONFIRMS parameter is incremented by 1 and the CONFIRM_FAIL parameter is set to TRUE. The CONFIRM_FAIL parameter is available at the action level, the step level, and in the SFC. It can be used to send an alarm so that the operator can take appropriate action. It is left to the user to configure the transition (following the action with a confirm) to allow confirmation to occur. This can be achieved by the transition expression being: 'S2/PENDING_CONFIRMS.CV' = 0 AND 'S2/CONFIRM_FAIL.CV' = FalseAn action with a pulse qualifier can have a built-in delay. This is useful when one or more pulse actions in a step do not occur immediately after the step becomes active. For example, delays can be used to achieve sequencing within a step. In this case, each action in the step (except the first one) has a delay configured. The second action is delayed until the first is completed. The third is delayed until the second is completed, and so on. This technique offers several advantages. Using a single step can help simplify complex diagrams. If a sequence must occur very quickly, doing the sequence in a single step can avoid the one-scan delay required by each transition expression. A delay uses either a delay time value or a delay expression. To add a delay time or expression, select the action and go to the Action Properties dialog's General tab. As a default, there is no delay time on an action with a pulse qualifier. If you want an action to be delayed until the previous action has completed, select Expression and enter a delay expression. Typically, the previous action will already have a confirm expression configured. The delay expression can check the previous action's state to see when it is complete. The previous action's state will be complete when its confirm expression evaluates to true. Then, the delay expression will evaluate to true, causing its pulse action to occur. The delay expression checks the STATE parameter of the previous action. The path is StepName/ActionName/ STATE. The following example delay expression checks to see if the value of the STATE parameter in action A1 of step S1 is complete. 'S1/A1/STATE.CV' = '$sfc_action_states:Complete'

48

System Configuration

Alarms and Events


This book contains information on alarms and events in DeltaV. Click on an item in the Table of Contents inside this book for more information.

Alarms and Events


Inside this topic Process Alarms Overview Device Alarms Overview Asset Optimization Alarms Overview An event is any noteworthy occurrence in your process or system that you want the system to react to and record. Events that are brought to the operator's attention are alarms. Along with standard alarms and events, the DeltaV system provides the means for users to easily create their own specific alarms and events. Alarms can be applied to any parameter. When that parameter is non-zero, the system can generate an alarm. The event can be logged to the Event Chronicle and optionally brought to the operator's attention as an alarm. The DeltaV system supports the following means for generating alarms: Standard alarm detection (PV alarms) is provided in the input and PID function blocks. The alarm limits are configured within the function block. When the alarm condition is detected, the alarm active parameter is set to 1 (for example, the high limit has been exceeded: HI_ACT = 1). Custom alarms can be applied to any parameter within a control module. When the parameter is non-zero, the alarm is set to active (1). Device alarms are generated by fieldbus devices based on the built-in fieldbus device alerts and PlantWeb alerts when the device alarms are enabled. Asset alarms are generated by external, mechanical assets such as turbines, engines, pumps, and motors and by external, optimization assets. Asset alarms are integrated into the DeltaV system through an External Asset Server running on an Application Station

The DeltaV Operate application provides special preconfigured displays that show operators the most important active alarms under their control. Active alarm lists can be shown by plant area or unit. With the appropriate security keys, the operator can acknowledge alarms and suppress noisy alarms until the cause can be resolved. This section refers to alarms generated in function blocks and modules as process alarms because they are typically triggered by a process change. This section also refers to alarms that are embedded in a fieldbus device as device alarms. Device alarms result from conditions detected in the device, by the device. Process Alarms Overview The DeltaV system supports the following process alarms: predefined (standard) alarms custom alarms

Standard alarms consist of HIGH-HIGH, HIGH, LOW-LOW, LOW, DEVIATION HIGH, and DEVIATION LOW. Standard alarms are only available in function blocks with built-in alarm state computation.

Alarms and Events

49

Custom alarms are supported at the module level (except unit modules and phase logic modules). Custom alarms reference existing parameters or user-defined expressions. A custom alarm can be used as an alarm for the operator or an event to be logged. You customize the alarm by selecting from a set of options. DeltaV process alarms require alarm calculation and alarm detection. Calculation - Many DeltaV function blocks include alarm state calculations. Any Boolean parameter can provide the alarm calculation component for a module. This component is the input to alarm detection. You can also create your own alarm state calculations by using function blocks that support expressions (for example, the Calc/Logic and Condition function blocks). Detection - In order for a module to detect the result of an alarm state calculation, you must associate the result of that calculation with a specific alarm parameter. When the alarm state calculates to the TRUE value, the associated alarm parameter triggers. For the standard alarms, simply select the function block on the diagram, click the right mouse button, and then click Assign Alarm. The software determines the detection parameters for you. For custom alarms, click the alarm view pane (lower-right window in Control Studio), click the right mouse button, and then click Add. You select the detection parameters for the alarm. Device Alarms Overview Fieldbus devices can report conditions directly to the DeltaV system. These conditions can range from potential problems such as hardware failures within the device, loop problems, and misconfigured parameters, to proactive reporting of upcoming maintenance needed. Device condition functionality is dependent on the device. Foundation fieldbus devices support either standard Foundation fieldbus alerts or PlantWeb alerts. Standard Foundation Fieldbus alerts - Devices report alerts in a single alarm: abnormal. This alarm is based on the standard Block Alarm definition. PlantWeb alerts - Devices report alerts in one of three alarms: Failed, Maintenance, and Advisory. The device alerts have been organized into one of these alarms based on the importance of the alert condition to the health of the device. These device alarms are visible through the DeltaV Operate alarm interface tools such as the alarm banner and the alarm summary object. The are also visible in the DeltaV Explorer. Device alarms can be added to your DeltaV displays as well. They may also provide a recommended action based on alarms. The Configuring Device Alarms topic provides more information. Although the alarm interface tools and operator displays give visibility to device alarms, the Diagnostics application remains the primary tool to find the cause of device integrity status problems. With DeltaV, all Foundation Fieldbus devices also have a communications failure (Not Communicating) alarm. This alarm is generated when DeltaV recognizes that a device is no longer communicating on the H1 segment. Asset Optimization Alarms Overview Alarms on external mechanical assets such as turbines, engines, pumps, and motors and alarms on external optimization assets that are monitored and diagnosed by systems that adhere to the Asset Optimization Architecture can be integrated into the DeltaV system and configured for PlantWeb alerts. External assets report alerts in one of four alarms: Not Communicating, Failed, Maintenance, and Advisory. Asset alarms are visible through the DeltaV Operate alarm interface tools such as the alarm banner and the alarm summary object and through DeltaV Inspect. Asset alarms can be added to DeltaV displays. Asset alarms are configured in the DeltaV Explorer. The Configuring Asset Optimization Alarms for PlantWeb Alerts topic provides more information.

50

System Configuration

System Alarm Management


Inside this topic Plant Areas Alarm Priorities Alarm States Alarm Types Alarm Importance Plant areas, alarm priorities, alarm types, and alarm states all affect the way the system manages individual alarms. Understanding these concepts is key to developing a good system alarm strategy. This section describes these systemwide concepts. For more information on events and alarms, refer to the Events and Alarms Reference topic. Plant Areas Each module is associated with a single plant area. Even if the module appears in the DeltaV Explorer under a unit module and the unit module is under a process cell, they are all under a plant area and, therefore, are associated with that plant area. Fieldbus device alarms are associated to an area based on the device configuration. A fieldbus device that is not yet associated wi6th a control strategy defaults to the area associated with its controller. By default, all nodes are associated with plant area AREA_A. The area assignment for a controller can be changed in controller properties. All controller integrity events and fieldbus device alarms for devices not yet associated with a control strategy use the controller's area assignment. It is possible to specify the area assignment for a fieldbus device through its associated controller's device properties. However, most area assignment is determined by the control strategy. When you assign a module function block to the primary function block in a fieldbus device, the device is then associated with the plant area (and unit) that contains the referencing module. The primary function block of a device is the function block with the lowest block index number. This block normally appears as the first block under the device in the DeltaV Explorer. While workstations can read and write parameters from anywhere in the system (unless restricted in the workstation properties dialog), they can only monitor events and maintain a list of active alarms in plant areas that have been assigned to the workstation's Alarms and Events subsystem. Any module or device that has an alarm reports it to all workstations to which the module's area is assigned, as long as the workstations' Alarms and Events subsystems have been enabled. A workstation monitors (logs to the Event Chronicle) all events in the system that are associated with the plant areas assigned to it. When you assign an area to a workstation and download it, you must log off the workstation and log on again before you can see the associated alarms in the Alarm List. You can add as many as 99 plant areas and assign the plant areas to specific workstations. Make these changes through the DeltaV Explorer. To assign an area to the Alarms and Events subsystem for a workstation, select the area and drag and drop it to the workstation's Alarms and Events subsystem. To view the areas assigned to a workstation, click Alarms and Events (under the workstation name). Note A module must also be assigned to the node where it is to execute (a controller or an Application Station is acceptable for some modules). This is done by assigning (dragging and dropping) the module to the Assigned Modules subsystem under the desired execution node. If you do not want an operator to have the authority to control an area (that is, have write parameters in associated modules), you can configure your system so that the operator has no parameter writing privileges (security write keys) in that area. Subsequently, when that operator is logged on, alarms from that area are not displayed in the Alarm

Alarms and Events

51

Banner or the Alarm List pictures. This way, you can control which alarms are seen by a particular operator. To define which areas a user is responsible for, define parameter security write keys for specific areas in the DeltaV User Manager. For information on how to lock alarm parameters, refer to the Parameter and Function Security topic. Additionally, you can configure the workstation to restrict control to only the areas assigned to the workstation. Therefore, when a user that has sitewide privileges logs on to the workstation, that user can only affect control to the areas assigned to the workstation. This prevents a user from controlling an area when the alarms cannot be displayed on the workstation. This is the default configuration when you create a workstation. The workstation shows the alarms it processes to DeltaV Operate only if the current user has any parameter security write keys for the area that contains the alarm. For example: Areas in the workstation's Alarms and Events subsystem Areas in which the user has write privileges Areas displayed in the Alarm Banner or Alarm List when this Operator is logged on A B C D

C C

D D

Additionally, this user can only write to parameters in Areas C & D when logged on to this workstation (providing the user has the key for the lock to which the parameter is assigned). Alarm Priorities Alarm priorities indicate to the operator the importance of an alarm. The priority affects the order in which alarms appear in the Alarm Banner and the Alarm List pictures in DeltaV Operate. The system presents all alarms that you configure with the same alarm priority the same way throughout the system. If you modify the definition of a particular alarm priority, all alarms configured using that alarm priority will use the new definition. There are 12 possible alarm priority levels: numeric values 4 through 15 plus a special log only priority level (value 3). The highest priority value is 15 (it is used for the most important alarms). The lowest priority value is 4. DeltaV systems prior to release 5.x used a priority system with three alarm priority levels plus the special log only priority level (value 3): 0 1 2 3 CRITICAL WARNING ADVISORY LOG

For backward compatibility, version 5.x no longer uses priority levels 0,1 and 2 in new configurations but will automatically convert those old priority levels into one of the new levels (4-15). Events with Log priority (level value 3) are not considered alarms. Use the Log priority to designate an event that is important enough to be recorded in the Event Chronicle but is not something the operator needs to be aware of.

52

System Configuration

Events with Log priority are not displayed in the Alarm Banner and the Alarm List links and do not turn on the alarm horn. By default, only four of the 12 (plus Log) priority levels are available for configuring alarm parameters in the system: Default Alarm Priority Definitions Level Value 15 11 7 3 Alarm Priority Name CRITICAL WARNING ADVISORY LOG Auto Acknowledg ed No No Yes Yes Auto Ack Inactive No No No No Horn Sound

Buzz.wav Alert_tone.wa v Beep.wav none

You can define up to eight additional priorities using the DeltaV Explorer. You can also modify the alarm priority names to better describe your alarm prioritizing system. Priority levels that are not explicitly configured are given the same properties as the next higher configured priority level. The acknowledged status of the alarm, the current alarm state, the priority value, and the time stamp on the alarm determine the alarm's importance in the system. Alarms with the larger priority values have the higher importance. Refer to the Alarm Importance topic for more information.

Alarms and Events

53

The following figure shows the dialog in the Explorer for an alarm priority.

Setting Alarm Priority Properties Window The alarm priority properties include the following: Value - Determines the priority value of the alarm priority. The higher the number, the greater the importance of the alarm. Auto Acknowledge New Alarms - Determines if alarms of this priority are automatically acknowledged at the time of alarm detection. The acknowledgment state of an alarm can affect flashing and the order in which alarms are presented in DeltaV Operate. Auto Acknowledge when Inactive - Determines if alarms of this priority are automatically acknowledged when the condition causing the alarm clears. This means that the alarm would no longer be shown in the Alarm Banner or Alarm List pictures even if the operator never acknowledged the alarm. Alarm Banner shows - Determines when alarms of this priority are displayed in the Alarm Banner. The choices are Not Hidden, Unit, and Module. Not Hidden specifies that active alarms of this priority are always shown in the Alarm Banner identified by its module (or device) name. The Module selection specifies that alarms of this priority should be identified by their module names and are not shown in the Alarm Banner if there is a more important alarm in Alarm Banner already showing this module name (the module would be identified at most once in the Alarm Banner). The Unit selection specifies that alarms of this priority should be identified by the name of the unit associated with this module, and these alarms are not shown in the Alarm Banner if there is a more important alarm in Alarm Banner already showing this the name of this unit (the unit would be identified, at most, once in the Alarm Banner).

54

System Configuration

Wave file - Determines the sound associated with active alarms of this priority. The DeltaV system includes several WAV format files. When you download the system, these files are copied to \DeltaV\data\sounds. When an alarm goes into the active state, the system plays a WAV file in a loop-back mode so that it sounds until the operator acknowledges the horn. You can disable the sound for alarms of a certain priority by deleting the WAV file reference. Alarms that are auto-acknowledged still play their wave files. Alarm States In the DeltaV system, alarms have six potential states, determined by the values of the fields of the alarm parameter. The following table shows the relationship between the alarm states and values of the alarm parameter fields: State Suppressed Disabled Inactive acknowledged Active unacknowledg ed Active acknowledged Inactive unacknowledg ed OPSUP Field 1 ("YES") 0 ("NO") 0 ("NO") 0 ("NO") ENAB Field (either 0 or 1) 0 ("NO") 1 ("YES") 1 ("YES") CUALM Field Determined by alarm state Forced to 0 ("OK") 0 ("OK") Non-zero (alarm word) Non-zero (alarm word) 0 ("OK") LAALM Field Determined by alarm state Forced to 0 ("OK") 0 ("OK") Non-zero (alarm word) Non-zero (alarm word) Non-zero (alarm word) NALM Field Forced to 0 ("NO") Forced to 0 ("NO") 0 ("NO") 1 ("YES")

0 ("NO") 0 ("NO")

1 ("YES") 1 ("YES")

0 ("NO") 1 ("YES")

Any time the state of an alarm changes, the system updates the alarm's information in DeltaV Operate and generates an alarm state change event that can be recorded in the Event Chronicles. Alarm Types An alarm type defines a set of characteristics that determine how alarms appear on displays and in the Event Chronicle. Each standard alarm is associated with one of these alarm types. If you create a custom alarm, you select or create the alarm type associated with it. Device alarms do not require alarm types. The alarm words are defined by the device's definition data, and the information communicated from the device is automatically converted into device alarm messages. Note that the alarm type does not define an alarm calculation for the alarm, you must define the alarm calculation for custom alarms. See Custom Alarm Calculation for more information. A single alarm type can be assigned to several alarms to give them the same display characteristics. There are 19 predefined alarm types. You can use these alarm types as they are, modify them, or create additional ones. Alarm type names are case sensitive.

Alarms and Events

55

Alarm Type Properties Alarm Type Name Any Alarm Change From Normal Change of State Communication Error Deviation Alarm Alarm Word ANY CFN COS COMM DEV Category SYSTEM PROCESS PROCESS INSTRUMENT PROCESS Alarm Message Any Alarm Value %P1 Change From Normal Value %P1 Change of State Communication Error Deviation Alarm Target %P1 Actual %P2 %P1 Floating Point Error General I/O Failure High Alarm Value %P1 Limit %P2 High High Alarm Value %P1 Limit %P2 Low Alarm Value %P1 Limit %P2 Low Low Alarm Value %P1 Limit %P2 New Alarm Value %P1 Open Circuit Detected Overrange Value %P1 Rate of Change Rate %P1 Limit %P2

Discrete Device Floating Point Error General I/O Failure High Alarm High High Alarm

FAILED FLT IOF HIGH HIHI

PROCESS SYSTEM INSTRUMENT PROCESS PROCESS

Low Alarm Low Low Alarm

LOW LOLO

PROCESS PROCESS

New Alarm Open Circuit Detected Overrange Rate of Change

NEW OCD OVER RATE

SYSTEM INSTRUMENT INSTRUMENT PROCESS

56

System Configuration

Alarm Type Name Statistical Alarm

Alarm Word ERROR

Category SYSTEM

Alarm Message Statistical Alarm Type %P1 Value %P2 Underrange Value %P1

Underrange

UNDER

INSTRUMENT

Note %P1 and %P2 represent the values of user-defined parameters. When configuring an alarm with Control Studio, check to see if the alarm message expects any user-defined parameters. If so, configure which parameter in that module should be read at the time of alarm detection to replace the %P1 (and %P2) in the alarm message. Userdefined parameters typically capture the value that caused the alarm, the limit value that was in effect at the time the alarm was detected, and so on. When the custom alarm requires a message that is different from the available Alarm Types messages, you must create a new alarm type. Before trying to use the alarm type in assigning an alarm to a module, you must create the new alarm type. The following figure shows the dialog in the Explorer for an alarm type.

Setting Alarm Type Properties Window

Alarms and Events

57

An alarm type determines the following: Alarm word - Appears in DeltaV Operate when the alarm is active or unacknowledged. The alarm word can appear in the Alarm Banner, the Alarm List picture, and in the detail and faceplate displays for the standard DeltaV modules. When you create a custom display or an Alarm List, you have the option to make the alarm word or the alarm name appear in the display. Although device alarms do not have an alarm type, they do have one of the following alarm words: COMM, FAILED, MAINT, ADVISE, and ABNORM. Alarm category - Appears in the Event Chronicle for every alarm state change (state changes are listed in the Alarm States topic). You can use the category for sorting and filtering alarm data inside Event Chronicle. Alarm message - Appears in the standard Alarm List picture. The alarm message is defined as the Description field. The message is also logged in the Event Chronicle. For process alarms, the alarm message is a combination of text strings and variables that you supply in the following form: text string %P1 text string %P2 where %P1 and %P2 represent parameter values. You define the parameters in the Optional Alarm Message Parameters section of the System Alarm Type dialog through the Explorer. For example, if you want the operator to see a message like the following for an alarm: High Alarm 80 Alarm Limit 72 you would type the following in the alarm message box: High Alarm %P1 Alarm Limit %P2 and use the following parameters for %P1 and %P2: Parameter 1: PV Parameter 2: HI_LIM For process alarms, the alarm message affects all the alarms associated with the alarm type unless you override both the message and message parameters for a specific alarm in Control Studio. For device alarms, the alarm message is determined by the information available from the device for the most recent condition change contributing to the alarm's activation. Fieldbus devices do not report a second condition contributing to an alarm until the first condition clears. The only message displayed describes the first condition causing the alarm.

58

System Configuration

Alarm Importance The acknowledged status of the alarm, the current alarm state, the priority value, and the time stamp on the alarm determine the alarm's importance in the system: Unacknowledged alarms have a higher importance than acknowledged alarms. After the acknowledgement status is considered, alarms that are still active are considered more important than alarms that have already cleared but have not been acknowledged by the operator yet. When more than one alarm has the same acknowledgment status and active status, alarms with larger priority values have the highest importance. When more than one alarm has the same priority value, active status, and acknowledgment status, the newer alarm has a higher importance.

For example, the most recent, acknowledged, active alarm with a priority value of 15 is the most important alarm in the system. Then, a new alarm occurs that is unacknowledged and has a priority value of 4. This new alarm is of higher importance than an acknowledged alarm with a priority value of 15 because of the acknowledgement status of the alarms.

Alarms and Events

59

Alarm Configuration
Inside this topic Configuring Standard Alarms Standard Alarms Calculation Standard Alarm Detection Conditional Alarming Deviation Alarming Standard Alarm Presentation Modifying Process Alarms Configuring Device Alarms Device Alarm Requirements Enabling Device Alarms Configuring Asset Optimization Alarms for PlantWeb Alerts Alarm Fields The following sections describe how standard and device alarms are configured. For information on how to create a custom alarm, refer to the Custom Alarms topic. Configuring Standard Alarms The following sections detail calculation and detection for the DeltaV standard alarm set. Standard Alarms Calculation Standard alarms use alarm calculations that are predefined in the DeltaV function blocks. You can select which of the alarm calculations you want the module to detect and present to the operator. For example, if you want only HI and LO alarms, select only those two. The module does not detect the other potential alarms. Examples of Function Blocks with Standard Alarms Function Block AI, Pulse Input, and Manual Loader function blocks DI function block PID, Fuzzy Logic Control, Alarm, and Ratio function blocks Standard Alarms HI, HIHI, LO, LOLO

DISC HI, HIHI, LO, LOLO, DV_HI, DV_LO

An example of a predefined alarm calculation is the HI alarm on the AI (analog input) function block. The HI alarm compares the PV to a limit value as follows: HI alarm is true if PV > Alarm Limit (HI_LIM)To create a standard alarm, select the function block on the diagram in Control Studio, click the right mouse button and then click Assign Alarm. On the Block

60

System Configuration

Alarms dialog, select the alarms you want to use. The system provides default information, including the name of the alarm, the alarm limit, and the alarm priority.

Assigning an Alarm Dialog Window After you select the alarm, you can rename it. You can use any name that makes sense for your application, such as FLOW_HI. When the alarm is active, the system displays this name in DeltaV Operate and includes it in the Event Chronicle. Because FLOW_HI is a module parameter, it is displayed with a bell icon in the alarm window of Control Studio and in the DeltaV Explorer hierarchy. You can also modify the default alarm limit and alarm priority. The alarm limit is the value above which you want FLOW_HI to activate an alarm. The alarm priority determines the color, sound, and importance to the operator. You must decide how important the FLOW_HI alarm is to your plant operation, as compared to the other possible alarms that could be occurring. Refer to the System Alarm Management topic for more details on alarm priority. Finally, you can make each standard alarm conditional by selecting the Conditional alarming box. The Conditional alarming box extends the block alarm parameters, enabling you to use time delays or additional process conditions to avoid unnecessary alarms. Selecting this box makes all of the standard alarms conditional. The Conditional Alarming topic provides more detailed information.

Alarms and Events

61

Standard Alarm Detection Each standard process alarm (except for fail) uses two parameters with the following name relationship: alarm_ACT - One (1) when true (in alarm) alarm_LIM - Associated limit value

For example, the HI alarm shown in the preceding check box has the following parameters: HI_ACT - HI alarm state parameter (true = in alarm) HI_LIM - HI alarm limit parameter (PV > HI_LIM = alarm)

All standard alarms use a calculation according to the following form: HI_ACT is true if PV > Alarm LimitThe system sends the alarm to DeltaV Operate when the HI_ACT parameter becomes true (HI_ACT is true when HI_LIM exceeds the limit value). All alarm calculations (that is, *_ACT) are basically true/false conditions, where the true condition indicates that the alarm is active. All alarms (for example, HI_ACT in the preceding discussion) display the configured alarm word (for example, High) in DeltaV Operate when there is an alarm. Conditional Alarming The conditional alarming feature enables you to easily add alarm time delays and enable/disable alarms to minimize nuisance alarms. For example, when an upstream pump is turned off, the downstream low flow alarm is temporarily not meaningful. The low flow alarm becomes a nuisance alarm when the pump is off and should be disabled. The LO_ENAB parameter can be used to dynamically enable/disable the alarm. When this pump is turned back on, it may be best for the low flow alarm to remain disabled for a short period of time, allowing the flow rate time to rise above the low flow alarm limit. The LO_ENAB_DELAY parameter causes a delay in setting an alarm immediately after the alarm has been enabled using the LO_ENAB parameter. Function blocks that have built in standard alarms support conditional alarming (AI, ALM, PID, FLC, DI, RTO, MANLD, PIN). Conditional alarming for a function block is enabled by selecting the context choice Assign Alarm and then checking the Conditional alarming check box. When conditional alarming is enabled, five new parameters are added to the block for each available ACT parameter (HI_ACT, HI_HI_ACT, LO_ACT, LO_LO_ACT, DV_HI_ACT, DV_LO_ACT and DISC_ACT). In the descriptions that follow, the term alarm_ is used to represent either HI, HI_HI, LO, LO_LO, DV_HI, DV_LO, OR DISC, depending to the particular alarm being configured. The ACT parameter indicates the current status of its alarm condition, with 1 (true) representing an alarm condition. The five additional parameters are: alarm_ENAB This parameter enables /disables conditional alarm processing for a single alarm. The default value for this parameter is enabled (1), when conditional alarming for a function block is enabled. You can write to the alarm_ENAB parameter to dynamically enable/disable the alarm based on external process conditions. When alarm_ENAB is disabled (0): The alarm_ACT parameter is immediately forced to 0 (false). No alarm processing occurs.

alarm_DELAY_ON This parameter delays the time (in seconds) that it takes for alarm_ACT to be true (1) after the alarm condition is detected. If the alarm condition clears before the delay time is reached, the alarm_ACT parameter remains false (0) and the timer is reset. Every time the alarm condition clears, the timer resets. alarm_DELAY_OFF This parameter delays the time (in seconds) that it takes for alarm_ACT to be set to 0 (false) after the alarm condition clears. If the alarm condition reoccurs before the delay time is reached, the alarm_ACT parameter remains true (1) and the timer is reset. Every time the alarm condition is detected, the timer resets.

62

System Configuration

alarm_ENAB_DELAY This parameter delays the time (in seconds) before alarm processing begins immediately after the alarm is enabled (alarm_ENAB becomes true). The alarm_ACT parameter is forced to 0 for the time specified (in seconds). The timer resets whenever alarm_ENAB goes from zero to 1. alarm_HYS - This parameter is used as a deadband when resetting base alarm conditions for analog values. The block uses the value of alarm_HYS instead of the standard ALARM_HYS. When conditional alarm detection is enabled, the block uses ALARM_HYS as the deadband for deviation alarm conditions only. Example Conditional alarm behavior is influenced by the module and block execution scan rates. For example, if a module executes at a five second scan rate and a block in the module executes every 10 module scans, then the block runs every 50 seconds. If any conditional alarming delay is set to 50 seconds or less, the delay condition is met the next time the block runs. So if the alarm condition is met, the alarm becomes active between 0 and 50 seconds after the alarm condition was met. If the delay condition was set to 51 seconds, the alarm would become active between 51 and 100 seconds after the alarm condition was met. Deviation Alarming PID, FLC, ALM and RTO are designed to minimize nuisance deviation alarms due to SP changes. The DV_HI_ACT or DV_LO_ACT parameters available in these blocks are forced to false for a period of time after a setpoint change is made that is large enough to (without the suppression) cause the deviation alarm condition to become active immediately. Changes in SP when the block is in Cas or RCas mode do not impact the calculation. The ACT parameter is forced to False until the deviation alarm condition would normally be reset (if it had not been suppressed). For example, if the deviation limit is 2 and a SP change of 3 is made, a deviation alarm would typically occur. However, since this deviation is due to a user SP change, the deviation alarm is disabled until the error (SP-PV) is less than 2. Standard Alarm Presentation DeltaV Operate is the alarm presentation vehicle in the DeltaV system. The presentation is based on the alarm properties and the alarm type. Refer to the System Alarm Management and Alarm Presentation topics for more details on configuring the alarm presentation. Modifying Process Alarms All the alarms you add to a module, whether custom or standard, appear in the Alarms window in Control Studio. To modify a standard or custom alarm: 1 2 3 Select the alarm in the Alarm window. Click the right mouse button and then click Properties. Edit the Alarm properties dialog.

Configuring Device Alarms Emerson Process Management fieldbus devices might have as many as four device alarms: Not Communicating (COMM_ALM) - the device has stopped communicating. Failed (FAILED_ALM) - the device has determined that it can not perform its critical functions.

Alarms and Events

63

Maintenance (MAINT_ALM) - the device has determined that it requires maintenance soon. Advisory (ADVISE_ALM) - the device has determined a condition that does not fall into the other categories. The severity of an advisory alarm depends on the device type.

Other fieldbus devices may have two device alarms: Not Communicating (COMM_ALM) and abnormal (ABNORM_ALM). The meaning of an abnormal alarm function depends on the device type. Refer to the device documentation for a more specific description of the parameters. The interface shows the individual alarms in the right pane along with their configurable parameters.

Device alarms can be enabled to participate in the DeltaV alarm interface tools such as the alarm banner and the alarm summary. Device Alarm Requirements In order for the device alarms to participate in the DeltaV system, make sure that: the H1 fieldbus card is a Series II card. Earlier cards do not support device alarms the controller is an MD controller. Earlier controllers do not support device alarms.

64

System Configuration

Also:

the fieldbus device follows module naming conventions. If the device name does not conform to the module name rules, device alarms cannot be enabled and the system notifies the user. device alarms are enabled.

Review the Plant Areas topic in order to understand in which area the device is assigned. Assign the area that contains the device to the Alarms and Events subsystem of the appropriate workstations Download the workstation setup data for the workstation. Many Fieldbus devices have configurable properties that enable/disable conditions detected within the device from contributing to causing a device alarm. Conditions that should cause an alarm should be enabled within the device. These properties can be accessed through the Configuration properties of the device in DeltaV Explorer. Fieldbus devices that support PlantWeb alerts have configurable properties that can suppress communication of each device alarm. If the device is to communicate that device alarm to the DeltaV controller, that device alarm must not be suppressed within the device. These conditions can be accessed through the Conditions dialog for the device in DeltaV Explorer.

Enabling Device Alarms Fieldbus device alarms are enabled by default when you add a new device to the control network from the Explorer library. However, device definitions from DeltaV version 6.1 and earlier do not have the alarms enabled. You must enable them.

Alarms and Events

65

You can change the enabled/disabled status of the alarms for the device as a whole and for each individual alarm. The enable/disable setting for the device is on the Alarms & Displays tab of the Fieldbus Device Properties dialog. To access the setting: 1 2 3 Select the fieldbus device. Right-click Properties. Click the Enable Device Alarms check box.

The Enable Device Alarms property determines whether the alarms are available within the DeltaV system. If this box is not checked, the alarms will not be available through parameter browsers. In addition, the individual alarms do not appear in the Explorer and device alarm communications will not be attempted with the device. If you disable device alarms for a device, any configurable properties of the individual alarms (alarm enable and priority) are discarded. If the device alarms for a device are subsequently enabled again, the configurable properties are set to their default values.

66

System Configuration

You enable or disable individual alarms as follows: 1 2 3 Select the alarm. Right-click Properties. Click the Enabled check box.

The enabled/disabled property for the individual alarms corresponds to the .ENAB field for the alarm. Control modules, OPC client applications and Operators using displays can change the .ENAB field for the alarm. Note Changing the .ENAB field for a device alarm does not change the corresponding alarm enable status in the field device. Also note that when you download the field device (along with the device alarms), the corresponding enable is set to be consistent with the setting in the field device. In general, it is possible to read and write the parameter fields of device alarms from control modules that run in the same node. This type of reading and writing is typically limited to enabling or disabling certain device alarms based on the operating state of the module. For example, you might want to disable advisory alarms, which depend on the process to be active to work properly, when the unit is idle. Configuring Asset Optimization Alarms for PlantWeb Alerts External mechanical assets such as turbines, engines, pumps, and motors, and external optimization assets report alerts in one of the following alarms: Not Communicating (COMM_ALM) the device has stopped communicating. Failed (FAILED_ALM) the device cannot perform its critical functions. Maintenance (MAINT_ALM) the device requires maintenance soon. Advisory (ADVISE_ALM) a device condition exists that does not fall into the other categories. The severity of the alarm depends upon the device type. Abnormal (ABNORM_ALM) the meaning of an abnormal alarm depends on the device type.

Use the DeltaV Explorer to configure asset alarms (after you enable Asset Optimization Alarms in System Preferences). Configuration involves adding an External Asset Server to an Application Station, configuring the server properties, synchronizing the server configuration with the DeltaV system, and configuring properties for the plant hierarchy, asset folders, and assets. The connection with the External Asset Server is made through the server connection URL and the server access credentials (user name and password). The server connection URL and server access credentials are configured in the Server Properties dialog box. Be sure to download the workstation after configuring asset alarms.

Alarms and Events

67

Adding and Configuring an External Asset Server Refer to the Getting Started with Your DeltaV Automation System manual for information on adding an Application station to the DeltaV Explorer. From the Application station, click External Asset Interfaces/New External Server to add an External Interface Server to the configuration. Once an External Asset Server has been added to the DeltaV system, you can delete it, rename it, configure its properties and synchronize its configuration with the DeltaV system. Use the Whats This help for information on the fields in the Properties dialog. Here are a few things to keep in mind when configuring the server properties: Description it is recommended that a meaningful description be used as this is whats seen in the DeltaV Diagnostics program. Server Connection URL and Access Credentials IP address or Node address obtained from the server's manager + asmx application name, unique for each server. Access Credentials Username and password in the form username|password. Alert Synchronization Period the DeltaV system periodically polls the Asset Server for new alarm information. Use this field to specify the time period between each poll. The range is 5 to 1440 minutes. Node Integrity Depends on Servers Integrity the default action is for the overall integrity of the External Asset Server to be rolled into the Application Stations integrity. It is recommended that the default be used because operators are immediately made aware of alarms when they are visible at the Application Station. Default Asset Alarms as new assets are created during synchronization, alarms are initially configured based on the defaults. Alarms that are grayed on the Default Asset Alarms page are not supported on the external asset system.

Synchronizing Configuration between an Asset Server and the DeltaV System The Synchronize Configuration command synchronizes the configuration of the DeltaV system with the asset server. Any differences between the DeltaV system and the asset server are changed on the DeltaV system. Synchronization does not affect the configuration of the external asset system. Select the Asset Server, right click and select Synchronize Configuration to open the Synchronize Configuration Wizard. Use this Wizard to make decisions about new assets that have not been added to the DeltaV system and old assets that no longer exist on the External Asset Server. Be sure to read the help text in the left pane of every screen. Successfully completing the Wizard builds the Plant Hierarchy structure. Refer to Configuring Asset Properties for helpful information about using the Wizard to customize multiple asset properties.

68

System Configuration

The following figure shows a plant hierarchy that was built in the DeltaV Explorer under the Application Station after the server configuration was successfully synchronized with the DeltaV

system. Configuring the Plant Hierarchy and Asset Folders The plant hierarchy name and asset folder names come directly from the Asset Server and cannot be renamed. They can be deleted. If you delete a plant hierarchy or asset folder from the hierarchy in the DeltaV Explorer, all subordinate objects are also deleted. Be aware that if an asset is deleted from the Explorer hierarchy but remains configured on the external asset server, it will show up again in the DeltaV Explorer when the configuration is resynchronized unless it is deleted during synchronization. Configuration options for the plant hierarchy and asset folders include adding a description and associating alarms and events with a DeltaV plant area. When alarms and events are associated with a plant area from the plant hierarchy or asset folders levels, all subordinate asset alarms are included in the association. This enables large groups of asset alarms to be easily assigned to a single area. However, an area can also be associated with a lower level asset folder. In addition, an individual asset can be associated with a control module for area association. Association at a lower level takes precedence over a higher level. Configuring Asset Properties You can use the Wizard during the synchronize configuration operation to configure the properties of multiple assets. You can also configure individual asset properties after an asset has been added to a Plant Hierarchy in the DeltaV Explorer. Use Control/Select in the Wizard to select multiple assets and then click the Create button to customize the properties. Use the Whats This help for information on the fields in the Property dialog boxes and use the help in the left pane of the Wizard. When assets are added to the DeltaV system, the system checks the names to ensure that no naming conflicts exist between the asset and other modules. The system automatically modifies an asset name during synchronization if a naming conflict occurs and includes the asset's original name in the asset's descriptor. If you customize an asset name through the Wizard, be sure that you observe DeltaV naming conventions. Otherwise, you will get an error message and the asset will not be added to the plant hierarchy. Refer to module naming conventions for information. Asset configuration options include adding a description, associating a primary control display and faceplate display with an asset, enabling and configuring asset alarms, and associating assets with a DeltaV plant area or module. Assets can be deleted from an asset folder and renamed. If an asset is deleted from the DeltaV system, but

Alarms and Events

69

remains configured on the external asset system, the asset will reappear in an asset folder when the configuration is synchronized again unless the asset is deleted during synchronization. Description A default description is taken from the asset server. Because the description appears in the DeltaV Operate Alarm Banner and Alarm Summary, it is highly recommended that you ensure that the description is meaningful to operators. Primary Control and Faceplate Displays Like other DeltaV device alarms, asset alarms can be associated with a faceplate display that operators use to respond to alarms on the asset. The default asset alarms faceplate is Asset_FP. Similarly, assets can be assigned to a primary control display. Refer to Responding to Alarms for information on the asset alarm faceplate and primary control displays. Area Associations Assets can be associated with a plant area for alarm and event reporting. Area associations can be made at the workstation, plant hierarchy, and asset folder levels. All subordinate levels are included in the area association of the parent level unless the subordinate level is associated with a different area. Review plant areas for more information. Module Associations Assets can be associated with modules. For example, the vibration alarms for a pump can be detected and reported through an asset module while the pump is monitored and operated through a control module. An asset associated with a module is associated with the same plant area and, if applicable, the same unit/equipment/control module as the associated module. The asset is also moved if the associated module is moved to a different area. This ensures that all alarms, both asset and control alarms for a single piece of equipment, are always reported in the same area. If the associated module is deleted, the asset alarm's area association is determined by the asset's parent level in the hierarchy. Enabling and Disabling Asset Alarms Like other alarms, asset alarms must be enabled in order to be visible to the DeltaV system. Alarms can be enabled/ disabled for an individual asset through the Alarm page of the Asset Property dialog and enabled/disabled for an asset and all subordinate assets through the Disable/Enable All Asset Alarms commands on the asset's context menu. Working with Asset Alarms The presentation and response to asset alarms in the DeltaV system is similar to other device alarms. Review the following topics for information: Alarm Presentation Responding to Alarms Alarm Fields

Diagnosing Problems Use the DeltaV Diagnostics program to diagnose problems at the External Asset Interfaces Subsystem and server levels. Refer to Books Online and the DeltaV Diagnostics help for information on using DeltaV Diagnostics. Asset Alarm Requirements For asset alarms to participate in the DeltaV system, be sure that: The asset name conforms to DeltaV module naming conventions. Alarms are enabled.

70

System Configuration

Plant area assignments have been made. The areas that contain the assets are assigned to the Alarms and Events subsystem on the Application Station as well as any Operator Station from which asset alarms are viewed. The Application Station has been downloaded.

Alarm Fields All alarm parameters created in modules support a number of fields. For example, for a module named FIC101 with an alarm parameter named HI_ALM to use a current alarm priority for a dynamic display, the syntax would be FIC101/HI_ALM.PRI. Module Alarm Parameter Fields Field CUALM1 Use Example FIC101/ HI_ALM.F_CU ALM FIC101/ HI_ALM.F_LA ALM FIC101/ HI_ALM.F_CV FIC101/ HI_ALM.F_NA LM Description Current alarm state Latched alarm state (active until acknowledged) (same as LAALM) new alarm (unacknowledg ed) used for Blink on New Alarm Priority Read/ Write R A_ (ASCII) OK/HIGH F_(FLOATING) 0, 1, 2.....

LAALM2

OK/HIGH

0, 1, 2.....

CV NALM3

R R/W

OK/HIGH NO/YES write NO to acknowledge

0, 1, 2..... 0/1

PRI

FIC101/ HI_ALM.F_PR I FIC101/ HI_ALM.F_EN AB

R/W

CRITICAL, WARNING, ADVISORY, LOG4 NO/YES

3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 0 (NO) causes the alarm to be disabled. 1 (YES) causes the alarm to be enabled. 0 (NO) has no effect on alarm behavior. 1 (YES) prevents activation of the alarm. The Alarm Suppress picture shows all of the suppressed alarms.

ENAB

Enables or disables the alarms

R/W

OPSUP

FIC101/ HI_ALM.F_OP SUP

Enables alarm suppression

R/W

NO/YES

Alarms and Events

71

Field INV

Use Example FIC101/ HI_ALM.F_IN V

Description Invert alarm input

Read/ Write R/W

A_ (ASCII) NO/YES

F_(FLOATING) 0/1

1 The alarm parameter CUALM (current alarm) can be either zero or non-zero (the non-zero value is determined by the alarm type and priority used). When CUALM is zero, the parameter is not in alarm. When CUALM is non-zero, the parameter is in alarm. 2 The alarm parameter NALM (new - unacknowledged - alarm) can be either zero (0) or one (1). When NALM is zero, there is no new alarm. When NALM is one, there is a new, unacknowledged alarm. When the alarm is acknowledged, the NALM value returns to zero. 3 The LAALM (latched alarm) parameter can be either zero or non-zero (the non-zero value is determined by the alarm type and priority used). When LAALM is zero, the parameter is not in alarm. When LAALM is non-zero, the parameter is in alarm. Once LAALM is in alarm (represented by a non-zero value), it remains set until both the condition and NALM return to zero. 4 Using the DeltaV Explorer, you can add additional alarm priority names and map them to any value (3 through 15). Module ALARMS Parameter Fields Field CUALM Use Example FIC101/ ALARMS[1].C UALM FIC101/ ALARMS[1].L AALM1 FIC101/ ALARMS[1].N ALM FIC101/ ALARMS[1].P RI FIC101/ ALARMS[1].A TTR FIC101/ ALARMS[1].TI N Description Current alarm state latched alarm Read/Write R A_ (ASCII) OK/HIGH F_ (FLOATING) 0, 1, 2.....

LAALM

OK/HIGH

0, 1, 2.....

NALM

new alarm

NO/YES

0/1

PRI

priority

CRITICAL, WARNING, ADVISORY, LOG2 HI_ALM

3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 153 N/A

ATTR

alarm parameter name timestamp when it went into alarm

TIN

Fri Dec 31, 1971 18:00:00:00

N/A

72

System Configuration

Field ENAB

Use Example FIC101/ ALARMS.ENA B FIC101/ ALARMS.PRI AD FIC101/ ALARMS.MA CK

Description alarm enabled

Read/Write R/W

A_ (ASCII) NO/YES. Write NO to disable all alarms in module 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 NO/YES. Write YES to acknowledge all alarms in module

F_ (FLOATING) 0/1

PRIAD

adjust effective priority of all alarms in module acknowledge module alarms

R/W

3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 0/1

MACK

1 Information about the five most important alarms in a module is accessed through ALARMS [1-5]. 2 These are default priority names. 3 Active alarms that have been suppressed (OPSUP is 1 (YES)) also appear in the modules ALARMS parameter, but their priority value is forced to the value 3 (LOG) so that they will appear only after unsuppressed active alarms.

Alarms and Events

73

Alarm Presentation
Inside this topic Alarm Banner Customizing the Alarm Banner Alarm Thresholds Menu Commands Troubleshooting the Alarm System The alarm priority and current alarm state determine many of the presentation characteristics for an alarm. For more information on alarm priority, alarm state, and alarm type, refer to the System Alarm Management topic. The following sections describe the components of the interface application that operators use to manage alarms. Alarm Banner The Alarm Banner is in the lower section of the screen in DeltaV Operate. It provides buttons for the five most important alarms monitored by this workstation for the current DeltaV user. Dual-monitor workstations display the ten most important alarms. The Alarm Banner enables the operator to focus on the most important alarms first. Any alarms of a priority (typically lower priority alarms) not shown in the alarm banner do not sound the horn on that workstation. The buttons show the name of the modules, units, and devices in alarm. The banner can show all active process alarms in a module, or you can configure the alarm priorities so that only the most important alarm for a module or unit occupies a position in the alarm banner (see the description for the Alarm Banner shows field). Maintenance workstations are designed for managing fieldbus devices and so show only device alarms in the alarm banner. The operator can access the display needed to correct the alarm condition by clicking the alarm in the Alarm Banner. For device alarms, the alarm banner shows alarms with the Warning priority. Each device alarm may be triggered by one of several device conditions. The banner shows one active alarm even if more than one device condition is causing the alarm. For example, if two device conditions are causing a Maintenance alarm, the banner only shows one Maintenance device alarm. There is also an extended information button next to each alarm button (refer to the following figure). When you click an extended information button, the associated alarm's time stamp, parameter name, alarm word, and alarm priority are displayed at the bottom of the banner. If you enable the Primary Control button and click one of the five alarm buttons (for example, CAS5), DeltaV Operate displays the primary control display (in the main process graphic area). If you enable the Faceplate button and click one of the five alarm buttons, DeltaV Operate displays the faceplate assigned to the module.

74

System Configuration

The control display is a property of the module or fieldbus device. You can define displays for a module using the Explorer or Control Studio. Define the displays for a device using the Device Properties in Explorer.

DeltaV Operate Alarm Banner

Customizing the Alarm Banner The DeltaV system allows you to manage how alarms are presented to your operator. The alarm banner in particular enables you to present alarm information to operators concisely and intuitively while minimizing nuisance alarms The alarm banner provides an overview of the operators highest priority alarms. The alarms shown are based on the areas for which the operator is responsible and are assigned to that operator's workstation. The alarm banner also provides the ability to select an alarm and go immediately to an associated display. The DeltaV system supports 12 different alarm priorities. Each priority includes a number of user-defined characteristics. You define alarm priorities in the DeltaV Explorer under Setup/Alarm Preferences. Once the alarm priorities have been defined, all alarms in your DeltaV system of that priority will behave the same (for example, they have the same color, sound, and acknowledge characteristics). Each priority has an alarm banner option of Not Hidden, Module or Unit. This option is set in the Alarm Priority Properties dialog box. Not Hidden specifies that active alarms of this priority are always shown in the alarm banner. The Unit and Module selections specify that alarms of this priority are displayed in the alarm banner only if they are the most important alarm for the associated Unit or Module. The default selection is Not Hidden. Since there is no one right approach for alarm presentation, the DeltaV system offers you the flexibility to easily define system-wide alarm presentation. The following table shows six typical alarm presentation methods. Select the method that best matches your plant operating philosophy. You can use combinations of the alarm presentation methods. Any combination of methods should follow a general philosophy. As you develop an alarm presentation philosophy, consider whether lower priority alarms should be treated differently than higher priority alarms or, consider the changes that should be made in alarm behavior as the alarm priority increases. Another approach is to think of the 12 priorities as three groups of four, where the characteristics are determined by the prioritys placement within the group.

Alarms and Events

75

Changing the default alarm presentation or a presentation method that you selected is quick and easy. Simply change each alarm priority in the DeltaV Explorer and download the Changed Setup Data to each workstation. Alarm priority changes are immediately seen on the workstations. Alarm Presentation Methods Alarm Banner Behavior Typical Use Alarm Philosophy What if a module has one alarm that is critical and another alarm that is not? What do I see in the alarm banner? The module is shown twice displaying the critical alarm and the other alarm in priority order.

1. Show all alarms (All alarm priorities configured to Not Hidden. This is the default.)

The alarm banner shows all alarms in priority order. When multiple alarms are active on the same module, multiple alarms are shown in the alarm banner for that module. The alarm banner shows alarms in priority order, by module. When multiple alarms are active on the same module, only the highest priority alarm is shown in the alarm banner for that module.

Systems with a smaller number of alarms per operator.

It is important for operators to see each individual alarm.

2. Show alarms by module (All alarm priorities configured to Module.)

Systems with a medium number of alarms per operator.

Showing every alarm adds too much clutter to the alarm banner. Operators need to see which modules have alarm activity. Showing only the highest priority alarm per module is the most productive approach. Operators need an overview of the plant from the alarm banner. Showing only the highest priority alarm per unit is the most productive approach.

The module is shown once displaying the critical alarm.

3. Show alarms by unit (All alarm priorities configured to Unit.)

The alarm banner shows alarms in priority order, by unit. When multiple alarms are active within the same unit, only the highest priority alarm is shown in the alarm banner for that unit.

Systems with a larger number of alarms per operator.

The unit is shown once displaying the critical (highest priority) alarm.

76

System Configuration

Alarm Presentation Methods

Alarm Banner Behavior

Typical Use

Alarm Philosophy

What if a module has one alarm that is critical and another alarm that is not? What do I see in the alarm banner? Both alarms are active and unacknowledged the module is shown once displaying the critical alarm. Both alarms are active and only the critical alarm is unacknowledged the module is shown once displaying the critical alarm. Both alarms are active and only the non-critical alarm is unacknowledged the module is shown twice displaying both the critical alarm and other alarm.

4. Show critical (high priority) alarms always, other (lower priority) alarms by module

Critical Alarms The alarm banner shows all critical alarms in priority order. When multiple critical alarms are active on the same module, multiple alarms are shown in the alarm banner for that module. All Other Alarms The alarm banner shows alarms in priority order, by module. When multiple alarms are active on the same module, only the highest priority alarm is shown in the alarm banner for that module.

Systems with a medium number of alarms per operator, with some very critical alarms.

There are some alarms that must always be presented to the operator. However, the majority of the other alarms are best presented by module.

Alarms and Events

77

Alarm Presentation Methods

Alarm Banner Behavior

Typical Use

Alarm Philosophy

What if a module has one alarm that is critical and another alarm that is not? What do I see in the alarm banner? The module and the critical alarm show once. The unit and the other alarm show once.

5. Show critical (high priority) alarms always, other (lower priority) alarms by unit

Critical Alarms The alarm banner shows all critical alarms in priority order. When multiple critical alarms are active on the same module, multiple alarms are shown in the alarm banner for that module. All Other Alarms The alarm banner shows alarms in priority order, by unit. When multiple alarms are active on the same unit, only the highest priority alarm within that unit is shown in the alarm banner for that module.

Systems with a larger number of alarms per operator, with some very critical alarms.

There are some alarms that must always be presented to the operator. However, the majority of the other alarms are best presented by unit.

78

System Configuration

Alarm Presentation Methods

Alarm Banner Behavior

Typical Use

Alarm Philosophy

What if a module has one alarm that is critical and another alarm that is not? What do I see in the alarm banner? The module and the critical alarm show once. The unit and the other alarm show once.

6. Show critical (high priority) alarms by module, other (lower priority) alarms by unit

Critical Alarms The alarm banner shows alarms in priority order, by module. When multiple critical alarms are active on the same module, only the highest priority alarm is shown in the alarm banner for that module. All Other Alarms The alarm banner shows alarms in priority order, by unit. When multiple alarms are active on the same unit, only the highest priority alarm within that unit is shown in the alarm banner for that module.

Systems with a larger number of alarms per operator, with multiple critical alarms on modules.

There are a number of critical alarms. Often there is more than one critical alarm on the same module. However, operators only need to know if a module has any critical alarm active. The majority of other alarms are best presented by unit.

Note You can customize the priority of the alarms displayed in the alarm banner using the UserSettings file. UserSettings contains one setting for device alarms and one setting for process alarms. By default, all process alarms are shown, and only device alarms of priority eight and above are shown. Alarm Thresholds The workstation alarm threshold determines what priority of alarms are shown in the alarm banner and sound the horns. By default, workstations are defined to show and annunciate all process alarms (priorities 4 -15) and a subset of device alarms (priorities 8 - 15). This means that device alarms with priorities below 8 will not be shown in the alarm banner and will not sound the horn. The device alarm defaults were selected because many low priority device

Alarms and Events

79

alarms do not represent a potential impact on the process and are primarily intended for maintenance personal. However, these alarms are still visible to the operator in the Alarm Summary display, in user-defined graphics and in the Event Chronicle. The default alarm threshold setting may be modified for one or more workstations in the User_Settings.grf file. The workstation variables used for alarm thresholds are frsVariables.gn_ProcessAlarmThreshold.CurrentValue frsVariables.gn_DeviceAlarmThreshold.CurrentValue These variables can also be changed dynamically while in run mode. For example a button can be configured to modify the alarm banner to only show and annunciate process alarms of priorities above 12, for use during an upset. Menu Commands Acknowledge All - This command acknowledges all of the alarms in the selected picture provided the picture has datalinks referencing each module down to its ALARMS[1] parameter, for example, DVSYS.LIC-101/ ALARMS[1].A_ATTR. If there is not an ALARMS[1] datalink on the picture, or if the Alarm Banner or toolbar area is selected, no alarms are acknowledged. Acknowledge One (Ctrl-K) - This command acknowledges a single selected alarm. Troubleshooting the Alarm System The section provides troubleshooting steps for some possible alarm problems. When something should be in alarm but is not, perform the following steps: 1 2 3 4 Make sure that the referenced alarm parameter (for example, HI_ACT parameter in a function block) is not 0. Make sure that the module is executing. If the module is executing, the MSTATE parameter value for the module will be In Service. Make sure that the alarm is enabled. The value of ENAB for both the alarm parameter and the module ALARMS parameter must be YES. For example: FIC-101/ALARM-HI.ENAB=YES and FIC-101/ALARMS.ENAB=YES. Check the value of NALM (the acknowledged status). The alarm might be auto-acknowledged. The value of NALM is determined by the alarm priority (for example, ALARM-HI.PRI) and can be overridden by the ALARMS.PRIAD field. If the alarm priority is configured as auto-acknowledged in the DeltaV Explorer and PRIAD is not overriding the value, the alarm is auto-acknowledged. Make sure that the necessary data has been downloaded. You must download the module in the controller. You must also download setup data to all affected nodes (workstations and controllers) whenever the alarm type or alarm priority configuration is changed. Determine how many active alarms you have. If there are more than five active alarms, the alarm banner will not show them.

When an alarm should be in THISUSER/ALARMS but is not, perform the following steps: 1 2 3 Determine which plant area the associated module is in. Make sure that the plant area determined in step 1 is the workstation's Alarms and Events subsystem. If it is not, assign the area and download the workstation. Check to see if there are any active alarms in THISUSER/ALARMS. If there are, compare them with the ones that are missing. This might suggest the problem with the alarms that are not in THISUSER/ALARMS.

80

System Configuration

4 5

Make sure that the controller is communicating. Use the DeltaV Diagnostics application to check the communications status. Review the steps in the above procedure, "When something should be in alarm but is not..."

When alarm state change records are missing from the Event Chronicle, perform the following steps: 1 Use DeltaV Diagnostics to make sure that the Event Chronicle is active on this workstation. The following indications could account for missing alarm state change records: 2 3 4 5 DirBad = BAD - The specified directory for the event data could not be found, or the database could not be created. DskFul = FULL - The configured limit of records that can be stored in the event database has been reached. RecWrR = -1 - The Event Chronicle on this workstation has not been configured to be active.

Make sure that the module that contains the alarm is in an area assigned to the workstation. Check to see if there are any alarm state change records in the Event Chronicle. If there are, compare them with the ones that are missing. This might suggest the problem with the alarms that are missing from Event Chronicle. Make sure that the controller is communicating. Use the DeltaV Diagnostics application to check the communications status. Review the steps in the above procedure, "When something should be in alarm but is not..."

When alarms do not activate the horn, perform the following steps: 1 2 3 4 Follow the steps in the above procedure, "When an alarm should be in THISUSER/ALARMS but is not..." Alarms must be in THISUSER/ALARMS before a horn can be active for them. Determine the effective priority of the horn. Alarms with a priority of Log do not sound the horn. Also, remember that the ALARMS.PRIAD value can change the effective priority of an alarm. Make sure that a .WAV file has been specified for the alarm priority. Make sure that the file specified is in the \SOUND directory. Also, note that SILENCE.WAV must be in the directory for the sound card to work. Make sure that DeltaV Operate is using the standard DeltaV alarm banner. This banner provides access to the HORN parameters. Make sure that the horn is enabled (THISUSER/HORN.HENAB=1).

Alarms and Events

81

Custom Alarms
Inside this topic Custom Alarm Calculation Custom Alarm Detection Custom Alarm Presentation Adding Custom Alarms Creating a Custom Calculation for the Alarm Defining the Alarm Detection The following sections detail the calculation, detection, and presentation aspects for the DeltaV custom alarms. For more information on how to configure different alarms, refer to the Alarm Configuration topic. Custom Alarm Calculation You can perform your own alarm state calculations using any of the function blocks. Typically, you would use function blocks that support expressions, such as: Condition function block Calc/Logic function block

The alarm state calculation typically uses logical and relational operators to: test the values in one or more parameters, compute a Boolean result (0 or 1), and write it to a new state parameter. Custom Alarm Detection To enable DeltaV alarm features, create an alarm in the same module and attach it to the Boolean state parameter that you computed. At the end of each module execution cycle, the alarms for the module are processed to detect any state changes. When the custom state computation results in a value that is non-zero, the alarm is triggered and is either displayed for the operator or logged in the event log. Custom Alarm Presentation DeltaV Operate is the alarm presentation vehicle in the DeltaV system. The presentation is based on the alarm properties and the alarm type. Refer to the Alarm Presentation topic for more details on configuring the alarm presentation. Adding Custom Alarms The following sections describe the entire process of creating an expression-based custom alarm. By following the examples, you create the expression (alarm calculation), assign the alarm to the output of the expression (alarm detection) and determine the message to the operator (alarm presentation). Note You do not have to create your own expression to use custom alarms. You can assign a custom alarm to any Boolean parameter on a function block or module (except unit modules, phase classes, and phase logic modules). The basic steps for adding an alarm are as follows: 1 2 3 In the Alarms view window, click the right mouse button, and then click Add. Select the alarm, click the right mouse button and select Properties. In the Alarm properties dialog - General tab, name the alarm and specify the Alarm type and a Priority.

82

System Configuration

4 5 6

In the Alarm parameter field (still on the Alarm properties dialog - General tab), enter the parameter that triggers the alarm. On the Advanced tab, select the alarm characteristics (enabled or inverted). Click OK.

Creating a Custom Calculation for the Alarm Custom alarm calculations must be associated with a parameter that has a value of either 0 or 1. A one (1) indicates an alarm condition, and a 0 indicates a non-alarm condition. Note If you create your own alarm calculations you must use one of the function blocks that support expressions (for example, the Condition function block or the Calc/Logic function block). The following example shows how to add a custom alarm to a module using a Condition block. In this example, the user wants to trigger an alarm every time the PV of the AI block is 70 or higher. Note The custom calculation creates a Boolean parameter that still must be associated with the alarm. This step only sets up the calculation that is associated with an alarm. To create a custom calculation, perform the following steps: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Drag an Analog Input block onto the diagram. The Analog Input block is in the I/O function block category. Drag a Condition block onto the diagram. The Condition block is in the Logical function block category. Click the Condition block. Click the right mouse button and then click Expression. In the Expression Editor dialog, click Insert Internal Parameter. Browse to find the HI_ACT parameter and the CV field in the AI block within this module. Click OK. In the Expression Editor dialog, click the >= symbol. Enter the value 1.

10 Click Parse. 11 When the expression parses without any errors, click OK. This sets up an expression to see if the HI_ACT parameter is greater than or equal to 70. For this module, the value of the expression is the value of the OUT_D parameter. Defining the Alarm Detection Alarm detection is where you identify the parameter that you want to trigger the alarm and you associate that parameter with the alarm. Using the example in Creating a Custom Alarm Calculation (HI_ACT > 70), define the alarm detection by following these steps: 1 2 3 4 Click the Condition block to select it. Click the right mouse button in the Alarms View window, and then click Add. Enter an alarm name. Make it relevant to the operation. Select the alarm, click the right mouse button and select Properties.

Alarms and Events

83

5 6

Select an Alarm type. For this example, the Any Alarm works. Select the Priority. The Priority of 'Log' only sends the event to the Event Journal and does not display it to the operator. Note This step sets the alarm presentation. Refer to the Alarm Presentation topic for more details. In the Related Parameters section, select the Alarm parameter for OUT of the Condition block. Use the Advanced tab to enable or invert the alarm characteristics or change the alarm message parameters (if available). Click OK.

7 8 9

The alarm detection is now defined for the parameter OUT of the Condition block. When the condition of HI_ACT > 70 for the AI block is reached, the output of the Condition block is set to True and the alarm is triggered. Note If the alarm was inverted, then the alarm is triggered when OUT of the Condition block is set to False.

84

System Configuration

Events and Alarms Reference


Inside this topic The ALARMS Parameter The HORN Parameter These sections contain information on configuring the ALARMS parameter and the HORN parameter. The ALARMS Parameter A module, area, or user can have many active alarms. The ALARMS parameter helps you to view and manage the five most important active alarms associated with a module, area, or user. The ALARMS parameter is an array parameter with values of 1 through 250. For this reason, the parameter is sometimes referred to as ALARMS[1-250]. The most important alarm is ALARMS[1]. The controller automatically creates an ALARMS parameter for each downloaded module. Each workstation keeps a list of active alarms that the current user should see and makes the five most important alarms accessible for display through an ALARMS parameter for each plant area and for THISUSER. The DeltaV system uses the ALARMS parameter associated with the current user to generate the data in the alarm banner. The Alarm Presentation topic describes the alarm banner in more detail. The system uses the ALARMS parameter associated with a module to generate the data in the defined faceplate and in the detail pictures for the module. The system determines the importance of an alarm by the following criteria: unacknowledged alarms are more important than acknowledged alarms. for alarms with equal acknowledgment status, the priority (CRITICAL, WARNING, ADVISORY) determines the importance. CRITICAL is the most important priority. ADVISORY is the least important priority. Alarms can also be assigned the LOG priority. When this happens, all alarm annunciation behavior is suppressed (for example, the alarm no longer appears in the alarm banner, it does not sound the horn, and so on). for alarms with equal acknowledgment status and equal priorities, the controller uses the time stamp. The most recent alarms are the most important.

The following examples show paths to the ASCII value of the priority for ALARMS parameters associated with the current user, an area, and a module: THISUSER/ALARMS[1].A_PRI AREA_A/ALARMS[1].A_PRI FIC101/ALARMS[1].A_PRI

Note The alarm parameter CUALM (current alarm) can be either zero or non-zero (the non-zero value is determined by the alarm type and priority used). When CUALM is zero, the parameter is not in alarm. When CUALM is nonzero, the parameter is in alarm. The alarm parameter NALM (new - unacknowledged - alarm) can be either zero (0) or one (1). When NALM is zero, there is no new alarm. When NALM is one, there is a new, unacknowledged alarm. When the alarm is acknowledged, the NALM value returns to zero. The LAALM (latched alarm) parameter can be either zero or non-zero (the non-zero value is determined by the alarm type and priority used). When LAALM is zero, the parameter is not in alarm. When LAALM is non-zero, the

Alarms and Events

85

parameter is in alarm. Once LAALM is in alarm (represented by a non-zero value), it remains set until both the condition and NALM return to zero. The following tables define all the ALARMS parameter fields for modules, areas and users. The Use Example column assumes a Module named FIC101. Module ALARMS Parameter Fields Field CUALM LAALM NALM Use Example FIC101/ ALARMS[1].F_CUALM FIC101/ ALARMS[1].F_LAALM FIC101/ALARMS[1].F_NALM Description current alarm state latched alarm new (unacknowled ged) used for Blink on New Alarm priority A_ (ASCII) OK/HIGH OK or HIGH NO or YES F_ (FLOATING) 0, 1, 2..... 0,1,2,.... 0 or 1

PRI

FIC101/ALARMS[1].F_PRI

CRITICAL, WARNING, ADVISORY, or LOG HI_ALM Mon Jun 17, 1997 21:04:05:22 N/A

3 through 15

ATTR TIN

FIC101/ALARMS[1].A_ATTR FIC101/ALARMS[1].A_TIN

param name time into alarm acknowledges all the alarms in the module

N/A N/A

MACK

FIC101/ALARMS.F_MACK

0 (NO ) is the initial value after download. 1 (YES) acknowledges all alarm parameters in the next execution cycle and resets to 0.

86

System Configuration

Field ENAB

Use Example FIC101/ALARMS.F_ENAB

Description enables or disables all alarms in the module

A_ (ASCII) N/A

F_ (FLOATING) 0 (NO) causes all alarm parameters ENAB to be overridden and evaluated as NO. Causes all alarms to be disabled. 1 (YES) is the initial value after download. Writing a 1 after writing a 0 restores the effect of the individual alarm parameter's ENAB setting. 0 alarm priority as configured 1 lowers all alarms by one priority (CRITICAL alarms become WARNING, and so on). 2 lowers all alarms by two priorities (CRITICAL alarms become ADVISORY; WARNING and ADVISORY alarms become LOG). 3 lowers all alarms by three priorities (all alarms become LOG), for example: FIC101/ ALARMS.F_PRIA D = 0 resets all effective alarm priorities to be that of the individual alarm priorities.

PRIAD

FIC101/ALARMS.F_PRIAD

adjusts the effective priority of all the alarms in the module

N/A

The following table lists the plant area level ALARMS parameter fields (used to show the top 5 active alarms in current user's operating plant area). The Use Example column assumes a plant area named AREA_A.

Alarms and Events

87

Area ALARMS Parameter Fields Field CUALM MODULE Use Example AREA_A/ ALARMS[1].F_CUALM AREA_A/ ALARMS[1].A_MODUL E AREA_A/ ALARMS[1].F_LAALM AREA_A/ ALARMS[1].A_CV Description current alarm state module name A_ (ASCII) OK/HIGH FIC101 F_ (FLOATING) 0, 1, 2..... N/A

LAALM CV

latched alarm module name (same as the MODULE field) new (unacknowled ged) priority

OK or HIGH .../FIC101

0,1,2,.... N/A

NALM

AREA_A/ ALARMS[1].F_NALM AREA_A/ ALARMS[1].F_PRI

NO or YES

0 or 1

PRI

CRITICAL, WARNING, ADVISORY, or LOG FIC101/ HI_ALM Mon Jun 17, 1997 21:04:05:22

0, 1, 2, or 3

ATTR TIN

AREA_A/ ALARMS[1].A_ATTR AREA_A/ ALARMS[1].A_TIN

mod/param name time into alarm

N/A N/A

The following table lists the THISUSER level ALARMS parameter fields (used to show the top 5 active alarms in all of the current user's system-wide operating plant areas): THISUSER ALARMS Parameter Fields Field MODULE Use Example THISUSER/ ALARMS[1].A_MOD ULE THISUSER/ ALARMS[1].F_CUAL M THISUSER/ ALARMS[1].F_LAAL M Description module name A_ (ASCII) FIC101 F_ (FLOATING) N/A

CUALM

current alarm state latched alarm state

OK/HIGH

0, 1, 2.....

LAALM

OK or HIGH

0,1,2,....

88

System Configuration

Field CV

Use Example THISUSER/ ALARMS[1].A_CV

Description module name (same as the MODULE field) new (unacknowled ged) priority

A_ (ASCII) FIC101

F_ (FLOATING) N/A

NALM

THISUSER/ ALARMS[1].F_NALM THISUSER/ ALARMS[1].F_PRI

NO or YES

0 or 1

PRI

CRITICAL, WARNING, ADVISORY, or LOG FIC101/ HI_ALM Mon Jun 17, 1997 21:04:05:22

0, 1, 2, or 3

ATTR TIN

THISUSER/ ALARMS[1].A_ATTR THISUSER/ ALARMS[1].A_TIN

mod/param name time into alarm

N/A N/A

The HORN Parameter The HORN parameter is a parameter associated with the current user that determines when the horn sounds and whether the horn has been enabled. The format for the parameter is THISUSER/HORN. The fields supported are: HENAB (1 is enabled. 0 is disabled.) CV (0 stops the horn from sounding.)

The HORN parameter is intended to be used only by the operator's alarm banner. Its use in other displays or by applications other than DeltaV Operate might interfere with the operation of the alarm banner and is not recommended.

Alarms and Events

89

Collecting Alarm and Event Records


Inside this topic Setting Up an Event Chronicle Setting up SOE Collection in a DeltaV System Managing Event Chronicle Database Size DeltaV workstations are each capable of collecting alarm and event data. The Alarms and Events subsystem helps you maintain a database of events and alarms called an Event Chronicle. Event Chronicle databases store alarms records, event records, log messages and events from Sequence of Events Cards. You determine which workstations maintain an active Event Chronicle database and the areas for which the workstation collects the events. The Process History Viewer application enables you to view and query the alarms and event records for any machine on the control network. Records are stored in the Jet database file: DeltaV\DVData\Ejournal.mdb. Specifying which Event and Alarms are Recorded A workstation records alarms and events for the areas listed under the Alarms and Events subsystem. It is practical to record alarms and events for the areas that match the operator span of control. If an operator on Op_Station_1 has control of Areas 1, 2 and 3, these areas should probably be included in the Alarms and Events Subsystem on Op_Station_1 . This allows the operator to view and query events records quickly on the local machine, without having to see records from other areas or connect to another machine to view records. At the same time, it may also be helpful to set up the ProfessionalPlus machine to record the alarms and events for the entire system. This enables operators to query records across all areas when necessary. A configuration like the one shown below enables operators to view and query records within their span of control on their local machine while enabling anyone to view or query all records by connecting to the ProfessionalPlus machine. Workstation Operator Span of Control Recommended Areas in the Alarms and Events Subsystem Area_1 Area_2 Area_3 Area_4 Area_5 Area_1 Area_2 Area_3 Area_4 Area_5

ProfessionalPlus

na

Operator Station 1

Area_1 Area_2 Area_3 Area_4 Area_5

Operator Station 2

90

System Configuration

Setting Up an Event Chronicle To record events in a workstation's Event Chronicle database: 1 2 3 4 Drag the areas for which you want to record events and alarms to the Alarms and Events subsystem using DeltaV Explorer. Select the Alarms and Events subsystem and right-click Properties. Check the Enabled box. Download the workstation.

Setting up SOE Collection in a DeltaV System By default, the ProfessionalPlus station Event Chronicle collects events from SOE cards. If you want these events collected in a different workstation, open the Events and Alarms Properties dialog for that workstation and click the System SOE Collector box. Only one workstation can be designated as the System SOE collector. Managing Event Chronicle Database Size You can set the maximum size of each Event Chronicle database through the Alarms and Events Advance Properties dialog in DeltaV Explorer. The maximum Event Chronicle databases is 500,000 records. The system has two primary functions for keeping the size of an Event Chronicle database within the maximum limit: Daily Maintenance - at a user-specified time of day, the system will delete or store records that are older than a userspecified number of days. The Process History Viewer application disconnects prior to this maintenance in order to give the function full access to the database. Use the Alarms and Events Advanced Properties dialog to define the parameters for this maintenance. Events that occur during daily maintenance are spooled and added to the database when the maintenance is complete. Unscheduled Maintenance (the in-place admin cycle) - when the database reaches the maximum size, in records stored, this function marks the oldest (10%) of records for deletion. This function does not free any disk space or reduce the database file size. However, during the next daily maintenance cycle, the file space used by the deleted records is reclaimed when the database file is compacted. Although unlikely, it is possible for the number of records to increase so much before the next daily maintenance function that some event records can go unrecorded. If the size of the database file becomes greater than the file size limit, the system discards incoming records and attempts to start daily maintenance regardless of the time of day. The database file size limit is determined as shown in the following table, which allows for a file size limit of approximately 10 times the normal (post daily maintenance) file size (assuming typical mixes of event records). Maximum Chronicle Size 500,000 records .. n records .. <=20,000 Database File Size Limit 500,000 Kb . n Kb . 20,000 Kb

After gaining experience with the typical number of events being recorded in an Event Chronicle database each day, adjust the Maximum Chronicle size x records and Remove records older than y days values with the goal that upon completing the daily maintenance cycle, inserting a typical day's worth of event records will not cause the maximum chronicle size to be reached before the next daily maintenance cycle. This assures optimum file space management; avoiding excessive disk storage usage.

Alarms and Events

91

The Continuous Historian


Inside this topic The Legacy Historian Using the Continuous Historian Continuous Historian Administration Tools Continuous Historian Excel Add-In Terminology The Continuous Historian is a collection of features and applications, well integrated into the DeltaV system, that provide capture of, access to, and management of time-series parameter values from the run-time DeltaV system. The Continuous Historian is automatically started by DeltaV services on DeltaV workstations that have had the Continuous Historian software installed and on which the Continuous History subsystem is enabled. On new DeltaV systems, the 250-tag Continuous Historian is installed automatically on every local DeltaV workstation type. It may be scaled up to 20,250 tags on the DeltaV Application Station. While running, the Continuous Historian supports: History data capture and storage as determined by the History Collection configuration for that workstation Any automatic history data management services that have been configured (such as automatic data discarding, moving to offline storage, etc.) History data services (browsing/reading/writing) for local and remote client applications

The Legacy Historian Before the development and release of the Continuous Historian, a third party product, the PI System from OSIsoft, Inc., was used. This product now has limited availability for use with the DeltaV System and is referred to as the "Legacy Historian." Existing Continuous Historian client applications are able to work with both Legacy Historian and Continuous Historian data services on the same system. On a system upgrade, the user has a choice of installing the Continuous Historian on the Application Station or keeping an existing Legacy Historian server. (Only one of the historians may exist on a workstation; however, both historians may exist within a DeltaV system.) See the Workstation information in the topic Setting Up the Continuous Historian for details on workstation support. For more information on system upgrades and converting history data, refer to the Continuous Historian Upgrade Planning Guide, located on the DeltaV installation CD #4 in the _Support directory. For additional information on the Legacy Historian requirements, refer to the topic The Legacy Historian. Detailed information on backing up the Legacy Historian Archives, Sizing Guidelines, and File Security can be found in the topics under Legacy Historian Archive Backup and Security. Using the Continuous Historian There are three main aspects of continuous data collection and presentation: Definition of history data to be collected in the modules and nodes Storage and management of the data by a continuous historian subsystem Presentation of the data through the Process History View application or client applications

92

System Configuration

History Data Collection History collection is a function used in the DeltaV Explorer and Control Studio to define the module parameters or node parameters to be monitored and stored in the Continuous Historian. History collection is an integral part of a module. If you copy a module, the new module includes the defined history collection. Library module templates include history collection, which can be modified by the user. History Data Storage The Continuous Historian allows high-volume data capture of time-associated parameter values and efficient storage of these values to non-volatile media (hard disks). Each workstation with a Continuous Historian history server component installed has a primary storage area that holds a collection of history data sets. One active history data set receives history samples from the real-time history stream. Zero or more current history data sets may also exist in primary storage. These data sets are former active history data sets that have been completed by hitting the time or size limit rules. The collection of active and current history data sets comprise the contiguous recent history data that is still online. The primary storage area may also contain zero or more extended history data sets that have been placed back online through the use of the Continuous Historian Administration tools. These data sets may be for any history tags for any period of time (without continuity with the active and current history data sets). Refer to the topic History Data Sets and Files for more information about history samples, data sets, and data files. History Data Presentation (Process History View) DeltaV Process History View is the application that is used to display real-time and historical data from the Continuous Historian subsystem as well as from the event chronicle (a subsystem that stores system events and alarms). Module and node trends are plotted on a graph, and events are displayed in a tabular (grid) format. Refer to the topic Customizing the Process History View for information about the application. You must download the setup data for the each workstation that has an enabled Continuous Historian subsystem or Legacy Historian in order for the Process History View to view the subsystem data. Continuous Historian Administration Tools The Continuous Historian Administration subsystem provides a number of tools to help you manage the data captured and available online. When the volume of online data grows too large, decisions need to be made about how to handle it. You can define rules to automatically discard selected data or move selected historical data from online history storage to offline data files. You can also interactively choose the historical data to discard or move to offline storage. Additional tools are available to let you temporarily bring online the history data from offline storage files. Refer to the topic Continuous Historian Administration for more information about these tools. Continuous Historian Excel Add-In The Continuous Historian provides an Excel Add-In to read online history data. The Add-In provides function configuration dialogs to help users create detailed worksheets containing historical data read from and interpolated from the Continuous Historian database. Worksheets can also include timestamp and status information associated with the historical values. Refer to the topic Continuous Historian Excel Add-In for more information about these tools.

The Continuous Historian

93

Terminology Following is a list of terms and their definitions. Active History Data Set - Holds the most recent history data captured for all history tags configured for the Continuous Historian. The data set holds the contiguous history record from the time it was created until the present. Continuous Historian - A collection of features and applications that provide capture of, access to, and management of time-series parameter values from the run-time DeltaV system. Current History Data Set - Data set created by rollover of the active history data set in the Continuous Historian. A current history data set is a former active history data set that has been completed by hitting the time or size limit rules or by direct creation of a new active data set. A current history data set holds history data for a collection of history tags within the time span of the data set. One or more current history data sets may exist in primary storage. Extended History Data Set - A history data set that has been placed back online through the use of the Continuous Historian Administration tools. Such data sets may be for any history tags for any period of time (without continuity with the active and current history data sets). Legacy Historian - A third-party historian product that has been replaced by the Continuous Historian. Use of the legacy historian is limited to existing users of that historian application. Primary Storage - A storage area on each workstation with a Continuous Historian history server installed. This area holds a collection of history data sets, including one active history data set, zero or more current data sets, and zero or more extended history data sets.

94

System Configuration

Setting up the Continuous Historian


Inside this topic Workstations Software Upgrades and History Data Conversion The Continuous Historian must be enabled on each workstation that will be used to collect or display history data. At most one Continuous Historian can be enabled on a DeltaV workstation. The Continuous Historian subsystem exists under the workstation in the DeltaV Explorer. The steps to set up the Continuous Historian are as follows: 1 2 Define history collection for module and node parameters. Refer to Configuring History Collection for more information. Assign modules to commissioned controllers or Application Stations.

Note If you do not assign the module to an Application Station or a commissioned controller, history will not be collected for the module. 3 4 5 Enable the Continuous Historian subsystem for each workstation that collects history and configure the Continuous Historian properties. Refer to Configuring Continuous Historian Properties for more information. Assign specific area folders and nodes to the Continuous Historian subsystem. Download the workstation. Note After the initial download of the history collection subsystem there may be a short period of time before the overall integrity of the subsystem reports GOOD. On Application Stations, if the Legacy Historian is already installed, there will be a check box for selecting the Legacy Historian if you wish to continue using that historian on that particular workstation. Workstations Continuous Historian data servers are available on all DeltaV workstation types (local or remote). Continuous Historian performance using slow network connections will not be as fast as when using fast network connections. The Continuous Historian is the only historian supported on the ProfessionalPLUS workstation and Operator Station nodes. On Application Stations, existing users are allowed to continue using the Legacy Historian or switch to the Continuous Historian. The choice is offered only in DeltaV software upgrades and then only if the Legacy Historian is installed on the workstation being upgraded. (The default selection is the Continuous Historian.) Only the Continuous Historian is available for use on new DeltaV installations. Continuous Historian client support is available on DeltaV local or remote workstation nodes (including remote terminal sessions hosted by a DeltaV workstation). Communications between client application nodes and Continuous Historian data serving nodes is provided by .Net remoting facilities.

The Continuous Historian

95

The table below summarizes the node support for the Continuous Historian and the Legacy Historian. Professional PLUS Local workstation (Node is on DeltaV ACN) Remote workstation Continuous Historian only Operator Station Continuous Historian only Application Station Users choice of Continuous Historian or Legacy Historian (only if the Legacy Historian is already installed). The default selection is the Continuous Historian. Users choice of Continuous Historian or Legacy Historian (only if the Legacy Historian is already installed). The default selection is the Continuous Historian.

Continuous Historian only

Software Upgrades and History Data Conversion To plan DeltaV software upgrades and conversion of history data, refer to the Continuous Historian Upgrade Planning Guide, located on the DeltaV installation CD #4 in the _Support directory. This guide provides details on the history data conversion process and other information about changing from the Legacy Historian to the Continuous Historian.

96

System Configuration

Configuring the Continuous Historian Properties


To configure the properties for the Continuous Historian, select the Continuous Historian subsystem under the workstation, right-click, and select Properties from the context menu. The following properties can be configured: The historian to be used (The Legacy Historian choice will only be available on Application Stations.) The target maximum historian size for the Primary storage area Active historian data set creation Current historian data set expiration behavior Automatic historian data set export

These properties are explained in more detail in the following paragraphs. Choose and Enable Historian On the General tab of the Continuous Historian Properties page, the user must select the check box Enabled to enable the historian. For Application Stations upgraded from previous DeltaV releases and on which the Legacy Historian is present, the user has the choice of continuing use of the Legacy Historian or changing to the Continuous Historian. The choice must match the choice made between the two historians when the DeltaV software was installed on that node. For the ProfessionalPLUS and local or remote Operator Stations, the Continuous Historian is the only historian supported; no choice is offered. Primary Storage Management On the Advanced tab, the Historian Storage options determine the automatic actions used to control the amount of disk space used for primary storage. The maximum history size establishes a target for the maximum amount of disk storage used in the primary storage area for the combined active and current history data sets. Extended history data sets do not count against the target. The configurable range is 100 MB to 10000 MB, with a default of 600 MB. When the primary storage used for active and current history data sets goes above the target size, the historian will remove one or more current history data sets to reduce storage to within the target. If automatic history data exporting is enabled, an attempt to export history data will be made before it is removed. In addition to specifying a target size for the primary storage, the user can specify a maximum historian time span in days (with a maximum of 9999 days) that current history data sets will remain in primary storage. Once the newest data in a current history data set is older than the expiration time span, the historian is authorized to automatically remove the data set. If the data set expires while in primary storage, automatic history data exporting is first attempted (if configured) before the data set is discarded. Active History Data Set Creation Rules exist to determine when an active history data set rolls over to become a current history data set. (A new active history data set is created when the rollover occurs.) Refer to the topic History Data Sets and Files for more information about history data sets. The rules for creation of a new active data set are: Data set size - This can be configured to trigger an early creation (before the configured period/start configuration) if the estimated size of the active history data set exceeds this size in MB. The default value is 200 MB. The minimum value is 50 MB. The value is constrained to always be less than or equal to the primary storage current history size target.

The Continuous Historian

97

Enable data set time span - The rollover occurs to create a current history data set that represents the desired time span. Options include: Calendar month periods - creation occurs at local time midnight on the first day of each month Weekly periods - creation occurs at local time midnight on each Sunday morning Daily periods - creation occurs at local time midnight each day None - creation occurs only when the data set size target is exceeded. This is the default setting.

Automatic History Data Set Export This property determines if history data should be exported automatically before it is removed from online storage. If automatic exporting is enabled, the user specifies the file system path to a directory available to that workstation where exported history data should be stored. History data removal actions will not be aborted if history data files cannot be stored in the specified directory. It is recommended that the export directory be on the same workstation as the Continuous Historian, but outside of the DeltaV system directory. Using mapped drives is not recommended because a mapped drive may not always be connected when the Continuous Historian is trying to export data.

98

System Configuration

Configuring History Collection


History collection is the definition of the module parameters or node parameters to be monitored and stored by the Continuous Historian. History tags are strings that uniquely identify a data source for which continuous history data can be captured. In the DeltaV system, history tags are the full path string that identifies a DeltaV parameter and field. There is at most one history collection configuration for any DeltaV parameter/field (history tag). History collection can be defined using the DeltaV Explorer or Control Studio. Users assign areas to the Continuous Historian subsystem in the DeltaV Explorer to complete the association to the specific history data server. History collection configuration "belongs" to the module (or node). If you copy a module, the new module includes the history collection from the original module. Library template modules also include history collection. Creating a module from a library template copies the history collection configuration to the new module. You can add to or modify the history collection configuration. Since a DeltaV system can contain a mix of Legacy Historians and Continuous Historians, the history collection configuration for a history tag can be used by both types of historians at the same time. The steps for configuring the collection of continuous history data in the DeltaV Explorer are as follows: 1 2 Select an Area or a module, click the right mouse button, and select History Collection from the context menu. On the History Collection dialog, click the Add button to configure the History Collection for that object. (To modify or delete an existing history collection, select a parameter and click the Modify or Delete button, respectively.) Fill in the Modify History Collection dialog. Use the Help button on the dialog for specific instructions. Download the workstation.

3 4

There are two ways to configure history collection in Control Studio. To add or modify history collection for a module: 1 2 Open a module and select History Collection from the File menu. On the History Collection dialog, click the Add, Modify, or Delete buttons to configure the History Collection for that object. (To modify or delete an existing history collection, select the parameter and click the Modify or Delete button, respectively.) Fill in the Modify History Collection dialog. Use the Help button on the dialog for specific instructions. Download the module.

3 4

Or, to add history collection for a particular parameter: 1 2 3 4 Open a module, select the desired function block and parameter. Right-click the parameter and select Add History Recorder from the context menu. Fill in the Add History Collection dialog. Use the Help button on the dialog for specific instructions. Download the module.

To confirm your entire History Collection configuration in the DeltaV Explorer, select the workstation's Continuous Historian subsystem, click the right mouse button, and select History Collection from the context menu. This presents a read-only view of all values to be historically collected for this workstation's Continuous Historian.

The Continuous Historian

99

Modify History Collection Dialog The Modify History Collection dialog is used to add or modify history collection. The dialog has two tabs, General and Advanced, as shown below:

100

System Configuration

The following properties are available for adding or modifying history collection: Parameter field path Sampling period Display Representation (Step, Line, or Automatic) Data Characteristic (Continuous or Manually entered) Data Compression enabled Data Compression Deviation (an absolute numeric value) Data Compression interval (Collect at least every time interval)

For more detailed information on the choices available, refer to the online help for the dialog. Configuring History Collection for Array Parameters To add a floating point array item to history, you cannot browse to the level of the array item. The parameter field path needs to be manually edited to include the array item, using the following format: ArrayParameterName[row,col].field

The Continuous Historian

101

For example: FP_ARRAY[2,1].CV The item will be added to the History Collection list as FP_ARRAY[2,1]. However, when downloaded to the Continuous Historian, the parameter is specified as FP_ARRAY[2][1].CV. When downloaded to the Legacy Historian, the parameter is specified as FP_ARRAY(2)(1).CV, because the Legacy Historian does not support the use of square brackets for array parameters. These syntax distinctions are important when you are configuring a Process History View trend for the array parameter. When configuring a pen in PHV, specify the array parameter path as Module/ArrayParameterName[row][col] for the Continuous Historian or Module/ArrayParameterName(row)(col) for the Legacy Historian.

102

System Configuration

History Data Sets and Files


Inside this topic History Samples History Data Sets History Data Files This topic defines some terms relating to history samples, data sets, and data files. History Samples When data is collected for a history tag, a "history sample" is produced. A history sample is the basic unit of history data for a history tag. A history sample is composed of: a value -- one of the DeltaV data types a timestamp -- the date-time when the history tag had this value a parameter status value -- an Ff style (.ST field) status value a Continuous Historian status value -- with information such as whether the continuous history stream was broken and the type of break

The Continuous Historian supports the following data types for history sample values: 32-bit float 32-bit signed integer (smaller DeltaV signed integer parameter field are converted to this type) 32-bit unsigned integer (smaller DeltaV unsigned integer parameter field are converted to this type) UNICODE string -- up to 512 characters Byte-enum -- holds both number and state name for DeltaV name set parameters

History Data Sets History data sets are collections of tag history sets that are currently accessible (that is, online) to history client applications. History data sets in a running Continuous Historian have one of these classifications: Active Current Extended

Active History Data Sets An active history data set holds the most recent history data captured for all history tags configured for this historian. It holds the contiguous history record from the time it was started until the present. An active history data set's content grows as it accumulates history tags and history samples from the real-time data stream from the data capture system.

The Continuous Historian

103

To assist in data management, the Continuous Historian can be configured to automatically "roll over" the active history data set. The active history data set is "closed" and becomes a "current" history data set. A new (empty) active history data set is started. The configuration rules for performing a rollover can be based on: the approximate history data file size limit (so that the current history data sets will usually fit on long-term storage media) calendar/time targets (so that current history data sets will represent convenient time spans; for example, days starting at midnight, weeks starting on Sundays at midnight, and so forth)

A new active history data set can also be created directly using the Create New Active Data Set tool in the Continuous Historian Administration application. Refer to the topic Continuous Historian Administration for more information. Current History Data Sets Current history data sets are created by active history data set "rollover" operations. They hold history data for a collection of history tags within the time span of the data set. They provide a means to manipulate history data captured in manageable "chunks," while keeping as much of the recently captured data accessible to history client applications as possible. For the current history data sets, the user may configure (on the Advanced tab of the Continuous Historian Properties dialog): a data set size a time span an export destination directory

If a time span is configured, it is applied to each current history data set as it is created. If automatic export has been configured, once the time span has expired on a current history data set or the size limit has been reached, the Continuous Historian will perform the export and remove the data set from primary storage. Users can manually export data from and/or discard current history data sets using Continuous Historian Administration tools. Extended History Data Sets Extended history data sets provide a means to bring history data that has been exported and no longer online, back online (that is, again made accessible to history data client applications). Continuous Historian Administration tools provide means to create extended history data sets from history data files. Once created, history data in the extended history data set is accessible in the same way as the data in the active and current history data sets. There are no assumptions about continuity of the data in an extended history data set with any of the other data on-line. The history tags in the extended history data set need not match (nor are they constrained by) the other history tags available on-line. The Continuous Historian performs no automatic data management for extended history data sets. They remain online (and occupy storage) until the user manually removes them. History Data Files History data files hold "off-line" history data for long term storage or bulk transfer (including Continuous Historian software version migration).

104

System Configuration

History Data Set Security


Continuous Historian data set security is part of the overall DeltaV security scheme. Access to individual Continuous Historian Administration functions, such as exporting or deleting history data sets, is restricted to those users who have been granted an access key individually or who belong to a group that has been granted a key. In addition, userdefined locks can be created, and Continuous Historian Administration functions can be assigned to the new locks. All Continuous Historian Administration operations are sitewide, requiring that Area_A be assigned. However, the specific administration functions (such as creating a new active data set) still require the appropriate key be granted to the correct areas. Refer to the Continuous Historian Administration topic for more information on these functions. Note For more information about locks and keys, refer to the User Manager application online help. For more information about configuring locks and operation level security, refer to the DeltaV Locks topic. Continuous Historian Security Keys by Function Function Name Controls whether the current DeltaV user (on this node) can: HDS_EXPORT delete history data sets HDS_BACKUP restore current history data sets from an off-line directory to primary storage HDS_ACTIVE

create a new active data set HDS_DELETE create extended history data sets HDS_RESTORE

export history data sets HDS_EXTENDED back up all current history data sets to an off-line directory

The Continuous Historian

105

History Data Retrieval


Client applications can request that data be retrieved from the history data server in several ways, including: Read raw samples - This provides access to the individual history samples stored in the history data sets. If data compression is enabled, the number of samples stored per unit of time could vary a great deal. The number of raw samples available online for a history tag that has a frequently changing value and with little or no compression could be quite large. Read processed data - This tells the server to return information for a history tag, derived by "processing" the raw history samples; it usually involves a substantial reduction in the volume of data returned, but the data is still useful for a specific purpose (drawing charts, performing analysis, looking for missing data, and so forth). Processing involves:

1 2

Subdividing the time span bounded by the start and end time into one or more, evenly sized subintervals (for example, 24-hour subintervals for the last month) Computing one or more "aggregate functions" for each subinterval. Refer to Aggregate Functions for more information on the aggregate functions supported.

In either type of request, a time span (ultimately resolved as a start time and an end time) is specified in the request to establish the time boundaries for the request. Timestamps that exactly match the start time are considered within the time span. Timestamps that exactly match the end time are not within the time span. Start and end times from a client application will often not exactly "hit" the timestamps for raw samples stored in the history server, so the following options exist for specifying how the server should handle the boundary sample situations: No boundary sample - specifies that no samples should be returned/used outside of the start and end times. The first sample to be used would be the first raw sample stored after the start time, and the last one used would be the last raw sample stored before the end time Outside of span - specifies that the time span should be increased to include the first raw sample beyond the specified start and/or end time Interpolate - specifies that a sample should be "derived" for the start and/or end time by interpolation (as appropriate for the data type) from the raw samples that are immediately before and after the boundary time specified.

A complicating factor for history data retrieval is that there may be discontinuities (holes) in the history record. Reading raw samples should return "hole start" samples that indicate the starting time and the reason for the hole (for example, the parameter cannot be read, the historian shut down, the tag was not configured to collect at that time, and so forth). Reading processed data should return sufficient information to let the client know if the requested aggregate was adversely affected by any holes in the history record within each subinterval. Another kind of discontinuity in the history record involves requesting history data for time spans up to and including the present. It is usually convenient for clients if the history server would, in this case, return a raw history sample representing what the history server currently considers "now." It is expected that a client repeating the same request for a "now" sample some time later would see different, that is, more current, results.

Data Compression
Data compression can be enabled when configuring history data collection for a history data tag, by enabling data compression and entering a deviation amount. The user can also select the type of display representation (Step, Line, or Automatic). Step representation displays the values as step changes on the trend and is usually used for discrete values (such as pumps) and for values that change in a step-like manner (such as setpoints). Line representation

106

System Configuration

displays values with point-to-point connections and is usually used for values such as process data. It is recommended that either Step or Line be specifically selected when configuring the Display Representation and that the plot method used to display the data in Process History View be set to the default setting. If the Display Representation is left as Automatic, then it will set a floating point value to Line, and an integer to Step. Refer to the Configuring History Collection topic for more information on enabling data compression when configuring history data collection. When data compression is disabled for a history tag, a sample (value, status, timestamp) is captured in the history database for each scan cycle (determined by the configured scan period). Even if the value of the history tag remains the same, a sample will be stored with the same value/status for each scan cycle. When data compression is enabled for a history tag, the only samples stored are those that are needed to represent the history record for the tag to the desired degree of accuracy. Clients reading archived data for a compression-enabled history tag should expect the request to return a variable number of unevenly spaced samples. Enabling data compression reduces storage requirements and improves performance when retrieving the history record for tags that change infrequently or by insignificant amounts. Viewing Compressed Data in Process History View As mentioned above, when configuring the history data collection for a tag, the user can select a display representation of Step, Line, or Automatic. The display representation chosen during configuration is important for several reasons: It determines the default behavior for displaying the data in Process History View (PHV) It affects the interpolation algorithm behavior that determines how to represent a value for a point in time between raw samples Along with the data type, it determines the compression technique used

Note The Process History View application allows the user to select a Line or a Step plot method for a given trend, regardless of the display representation configured for the tag's history collection and regardless of the compression technique used for gathering the data. Mixing the configured display representation and the PHV trend plot method can result in misleading trend graphing outputs. For example, if a history tag is configured for Line display representation, data collection and compression are optimized for producing sloping line rendering of history data. If the user overrides the default and chooses Step plotting in PHV, the trend may indicate that changes occurred in abrupt steps, when actually the trended parameter changed gradually (at a nearly constant slope). Conversely, if a history tag is configured for Step display representation and the user chooses Line plotting in PHV, the trend may indicate the values of a parameter changed gradually, when they did not. In summary, optimal rendering results will be achieved when the trend plot method in PHV matches the display representation configured for the tag history collection. It is therefore recommended that the default plot method be used in PHV, rather than selecting a plot method that might conflict with the configured display representation. Changing the display representation and downloading will affect the subsequent behavior of the system, but it does not change the history data already collected for a history tag. No attempt is made to track changes of display representation. The current configuration is interpreted as the preferred choice for rendering and interpolating values in all previous history data stored on-line for the tag.

Composite Ff Status Values


Certain aggregate functions used in "read processed" data requests involve picking a single raw sample from each subinterval as the information returned for the whole subinterval (for example, minimum value, maximum value, first raw sample, and so forth). In these cases, the Ff status of the raw sample picked is also returned.

The Continuous Historian

107

Other aggregate functions involve the computation of a result that can involve more than one raw sample (for example, an interpolated value at start of interval, a time-weighted average). In these cases, a "composite" Ff status is returned which summarizes the Ff status values for the raw samples involved in the computation. "Read raw" data requests also return a "composite" Ff status for the boundary samples when the boundary specification requested is "interpolated." Ff status values comprise three component values: Quality Bad Uncertain GoodCascade GoodNonCascade

Substatus Limits Constant HighLimited LowLimited NotLimited NonSpecific (Other values whose interpretation depends on the Quality)

The composite Ff status value returned is a value representing the "worst" of individual Ff status values seen. Specifically, each part of the composite Ff status is computed separately as follows: Quality - The composite Quality value is the worst of Quality values of all the raw sampled involved. As such: GoodCascade is "worse" than GoodNonCascade Uncertain is "worse" than Good Cascade Bad is "worse" than Uncertain

Substatus - If the Quality value AND the Substatus value of all the raw samples involved are exactly the same, the Substatus is that same value; otherwise a Substatus value of NonSpecific is returned. Limits - The composite Limit value is a "Limit value OR" function of all the individual Limit values from the raw samples involved.

Composite Historian Status Values


The historian (DvCH) status value indicates the validity of history information (involving historian behavior not covered by the Ff status value.) Historian values associated with raw history samples usually have at most one historian status bit set. Historian values returned for history aggregates (involving several raw data samples) are quite likely to have several historian status bits set. Composite historian status values for interpolated history samples or history aggregates are obtained by bit-ORing the individual historian status values that were involved in computing the interpolated sample or aggregate.

108

System Configuration

The individual historian status bits defined are: History data unavailable (** No Data **) - When set, indicates a type of "hole" in the history record. This status would let history clients know that the history server has no history data set mounted that includes this history tag for this point in time. Situations would include the period of time before the oldest history sample currently online for a history tag or gaps in the online history record due to history data sets being removed. History collection not configured (Not Configured) - When set, indicates a type of hole in the history record. This lets history clients know that the hole is intentional, that is, caused by the configuration engineer deciding to no longer have history captured for this tag on this node, or configuring the historian to be disabled. Historian/scanner shutdown (Historian shut down) - When set, indicates a type of hole in the history record. This status lets history clients know that the hole was a temporary outage due to the historian not operating or due to planned or unplanned DeltaV shutdowns. (It is likely that no other history tags have data available from this server at this point in time.) History data unreadable (Not Readable) - When set, indicates a type of hole in the history record. This lets history clients know that the history tags became unreadable for whatever reason (source node crash, communication problems, configuration changes partially distributed, and so forth). Aggregate value invalid (Bad Aggregate) - This status bit is set for aggregate values (requested using "read processed" calls) that could not be produced. Situations where it is impossible to compute a requested aggregate value might include: A minimum, maximum, or average is requested for an interval that is entirely within a hole in raw data samples, so there are no useful values that can be used in computing the aggregate. An aggregate is requested that is not supported on a history tag of that type (for example, requesting a timeweighted average for a string type history tag).

Aggregate Functions Supported


The aggregate functions in the table below are supported for all history data types. Aggregate Value Timestamp Composite Ff (DeltaV) Status Ff status (if any) for first raw sample Ff status (if any) for last raw sample Always constant value: Bad , NonSpecific, NotLimited (0) Composite DvCH (Archive) Status DvCH status for first raw sample DvCH status for last raw sample Composite of all raw samples in interval

First

Value (if any) of first raw sample Value (if any) of last raw sample Number of raw samples (including holes)

Timestamp for first raw sample Timestamp for last raw sample Timestamp for start of interval

Last

Count

The Continuous Historian

109

Aggregate

Value

Timestamp

Composite Ff (DeltaV) Status Composite from the raw samples used in interpolation Composite of all non-hole samples in interval and interpolated boundary samples

Composite DvCH (Archive) Status Composite from the raw samples used in interpolation Composite of all samples in interval and interpolated boundary samples

Interpolated

Interpolated value at start of interval

Timestamp for start of interval

% Available

% of time in interval where history data is present (0100)

Timestamp of first hole (start) in interval

The aggregate functions in the table below are supported for Float, 32-bit signed integer, and 32-bit unsigned integer history data types. Aggregate Value Timestamp Composite Ff (DeltaV) Status Ff status corresponding with Value Composite DvCH (Archive) Status DvCH status corresponding with value

Minimum

Value from the non-hole raw sample with the smallest numeric value Value from the non-hole raw sample with the largest numeric value Time-weighted average of nonhole raw samples in interval and interpolated boundary samples

Timestamp corresponding with Value

Maximum

Timestamp corresponding with Value

Ff status corresponding with Value

DvCH status corresponding with value

Time-weighted average

Timestamp for start of interval

Composite of all non-hole samples in interval and interpolated boundary samples

Composite of all samples in interval and interpolated boundary samples

110

System Configuration

Historian Run-Time Processes


The run-time Continuous Historian history service processes are started automatically when DeltaV services are started, and the Continuous Historian subsystem has been configured to be active on that workstation. History collection and history data services for client applications are not available until these processes are started. These run-time processes terminate when DeltaV services terminate. Real-time Data Collection When history tags are configured for collection, the DeltaV workstation hosting the active Continuous Historian periodically samples the parameter field and Ff status field for storage in the active history data set. The timestamp of the data sample is attached by the workstation during the sampling/storage process. Heavy ACN communications loading and /or Continuous Historian workstation loading can decrease the accuracy of the timestamp. System Clock Adjustments Most users who are concerned about having accurately time-stamped continuous history data will purchase an NTP server to ensure accurate time bases in all nodes in the DeltaV system and very small system time adjustment amounts. If an NTP server is not used, users may cause system time changes on nodes hosting Continuous Historians of any size--either forward or back in time. If the system time on a Continuous Historian node is set forward (time increased), the history clients will see history data as if it had not changed for the time span the clock was set forward. (There will be "flat lines" or gaps between samples plotted.) No unusual status values will be inserted indicating the time shift. If the system time is set backward (time decreased), the history record for the time span the clock was set back will essentially be re-recorded. History clients will see only the more recent data samples taken for that period. (There will be step changes in otherwise smooth changing values.) The earlier history samples that are "recorded over" will not be accessible to any history client or administration tool. No unusual status values will be inserted indicating the time shift.

The Continuous Historian

111

Continuous Historian Diagnostics


Only top-level diagnostic information about the health/performance of the Continuous Historian is available as diagnostic parameters and visible in the Diagnostic Explorer. Diagnostic parameters expose status Booleans or numeric levels that give users a means to use custom alarm logic to draw more attention to problems in the historian. In workstations where the Legacy Historian is installed, the current PHIST subsystem will continue to exist, unchanged. In local workstations where the Continuous Historian is installed, a new CHIST subsystem will exist (while DeltaV services are running).

The Continuous Historian subsystem exposes the following parameters. Name EXIST Type Boolean Usage 1 if the Continuous Historian is installed on this workstation. (Results in a read error otherwise.) Standard DeltaV software rev string (e.g. "7.4.0.4197.xr") Composite integrity of the Continuous Historian data collection and history server. 0 = GOOD , 1 = BAD. The string value is displayed in Diagnostics. History server is available. 0 = NO (not available), 1 = YES (available). Forces OINTEG to 1 (BAD) if SERVER = 0 and ITEMS > 0. Number of History Collection Tags currently configured. Number of History Collection Tags currently configured that are on scan (excludes items that are disabled or cannot be read or stored to history.) Number of History Collection Tags currently being scanned per second.

SWREV OINTEG

String Boolean

SERVER

Boolean

ITEMS ONSCAN

Int32 Int32

ITEMPSEC

Int32

112

System Configuration

Name READPSEC

Type Int32

Usage Number of history samples sent to history storage per second. When compression is enabled, only samples for parameters that have changed are sent to history storage. When compression is disabled, a sample is sent each scan cycle regardless of a parameter change being detected. Data Collection loading factor. Percent of time available for scanning used for scanning; e.g., 20 means that scanning took 20% of the time available to the scanning process. >100 means that scanning is not keeping up with the configured scan rates. Number of History Collection Tags that should be on scan but cannot be read for data sampling. Number of History Collection Tags that should be on scan but cannot be written to history storage. If > 0 forces OINTEG to 1 (BAD). 0=NO, 1=YES. The string value is displayed in Diagnostics. YES if real-time data collection has been stopped due to: Data storage (database) could not be opened for writing Data storage disk has too little free space for normal operation NO otherwise. If YES, forces OINTEG to 1 (BAD). Primary Storage Utilization factor. Percent of the primary storage target size that is currently consumed by active and current history data sets.

DCLOAD

Float32

BADREAD

Int32

BADWRITE

Int32

DCSTOP

Boolean

PRIUTIL

Float32

The Continuous Historian

113

Name PRIXSMB

Type Int32

Usage Excess disk space (in Mbytes = 1024*1024bytes) currently on the Primary storage drive if the Primary storage area reached the configured size target. Computed as: <available disk space on the primary storage drive> - <primary storage size target> + <primary storage used> This value will become negative if there is insufficient storage on the primary storage drive for the primary storage area to reach its configured maximum size target (that is, likely to run out of disk space and history data collection will stop). If < 0, forces OINTEG to 1 (BAD). Number of failed attempts to export a History Data Set since DeltaV and the Continuous Historian were started. Remains 0 if no Automatic Export directory is configured. Number of early Active History Data Set creations since DeltaV and the Continuous Historian were started. (Number of times that the Current History Data Set created was sizelimited rather than corresponding to the desired time period.) History storage process loading factor. Percent of time used in each history storage cycle. For example, 20 means that, in the last history storage, 20% of the time was used, and 80% of the time was waiting for the next storage cycle. >100 means the history server's memory data cache is filling because storage is not keeping up with the scanning interface. Number of samples written to history storage during the last storage cycle.

EXPFAILS

Int32

ERLACTIVE

Int32

HSLOAD

Float32

HSWRITES

Int32

114

System Configuration

Name SILOAD

Type Float32

Usage Scanning interface loading factor. Percent of time used in each scanning interface data transfer. For example, 20 means that the scanned data transfer took 20% of the cycle time, and 80% of the time was waiting for the next transfer cycle. >100 means the scanner process in memory data cache is filling because the scanning interface is not keeping up with scanning. Number of samples transferred by the scanning interface during the last transfer cycle.

SIWRITES

Int32

The Continuous Historian

115

Continuous Historian Data Conversion


Inside this topic Installing the Data Conversion Utility Starting the Data Conversion Utility Converting Data Files Canceling a Data Conversion Viewing the Data Conversion Log Reconverting an Archive The Continuous Historian Data Conversion utility is a standalone application that runs on Windows NT, NT Server, XP, 2000 Server, or 2003 Server. (It does not require that DeltaV system software be present.) The utility is used to convert Legacy Historian data from DeltaV versions 5.3.2, 6.3.4, 7.1, 7.2, and 7.3. The data conversion utility converts the Legacy Historian archive data to a file format to be used with the Continuous Historian tools. The files are saved as Exported History Data Sets (with a file extension of .xfc). IMPORTANT Before attempting to do any conversion of historian data from the Legacy Historian to the Continuous Historian format, become thoroughly familiar with the document, Continuous Historian Upgrade Planning Guide. The guide is located on the DeltaV installation CD #4 in the _Support directory. The Legacy Historian software must be installed on the system and its services must be running in order to use the data conversion utility. The off-line Legacy Historian archive data must be loaded into the online Legacy Historian system before the data conversion utility can convert the Legacy Historian archive data. The data conversion utility presents a list of archive files available for conversion and allows the user to specify where the converted data is to be stored. The generated files are named after the converted archive name; for example, the archive file piarch.001 would result in a converted file of piarch001_starttime.xfc. The utility indicates the progress of the conversion as it is being done. After conversion, the files can be brought into the Primary storage area using the Administration tool, Create Extended History Data Sets. Refer to the topic Continuous Historian Administration for more information. Installing the Data Conversion Utility The Continuous Historian Data Conversion utility is available on the DeltaV installation CD4. Browse to Support\Migration Utilities\Continuous Historian Data Conversion. Double-click the setup.exe file. A new folder, HistorianDataConversion, is created under Program Files. This folder contains the data conversion utility and other files. Starting the Data Conversion Utility As noted above, the Legacy Historian software must be installed on the system and its services must be running before you start the data conversion utility. In addition, the off-line Legacy Historian archive data that you wish to convert must be loaded into the on-line Legacy Historian system before data conversion can be done. To start the data conversion utility, browse to the Program Files\HistorianDataConversion folder and double-click HistorianDataConversion.exe. Converting Data Files On the Continuous Historian Data Conversion dialog, the Legacy Historian archive files that are available for data conversion are listed, along with their start and end times. (The current archive is not available for conversion.) Specify the History Data Source Node. The default value is the name of the node on which the conversion utility is installed. If you are converting legacy historian archive files that were collected on another node, the History Data Source Node field must be manually changed to that node name before converting those archives.

116

System Configuration

Select the check box next to each archive you wish to convert. Enter the directory name in the Export directory field, or click the Browse button. Using the Browse dialog, you can search for an existing directory or make a new folder for storing the converted files. Click the Convert button to begin the conversion. During the conversion process, a progress bar indicates the status of the conversion procedure. All the buttons on the dialog are disabled except for the Cancel button. The status bar shows the current time, the time spent, the tag that is being processed, and the archive being converted. When the conversion is done, a message displays how many data samples were converted and the status of the conversion. Canceling a Data Conversion If you cancel a data conversion that is in progress, you are asked to confirm that you want to stop the conversion process. If the response is Yes, the conversion of that file is halted and no conversion file is created. Any file conversions completed before the Cancel button is clicked are not affected. Viewing the Data Conversion Log You can click View Log to see details of the conversion process, including any errors that may have been encountered. The LogView dialog includes a Print button so that you can print the log details. Reconverting an Archive If you select an archive for conversion that has already been converted, you will get a message saying that the converted file already exists and are given the option to overwrite the existing file.

The Continuous Historian

117

Continuous Historian Administration


Inside this topic Create New Active Data Set Export History Data Set(s) Delete History Data Set(s) Create Extended History Data Set(s) Backup DeltaV Continuous Historian Data Restore DeltaV Continuous Historian Data Display Storage Details Data Set Properties Diagnostics The Continuous Historian Administration application provides tools to manage continuous history data. This application must be run on the same workstation as the Continuous Historian. The Primary storage area, highlighted in the left pane below, is used to store active, current, and extended history data sets. (Refer to the topic History Data Sets and Files for more information about history data sets.) The size and time span properties of the Primary storage area, data set size and time span properties, and the automatic actions for data set export are defined on the Continuous Historian Properties dialog in the DeltaV Explorer. (Refer to the topic Configuring the Continuous Historian Properties for more information on the Properties dialog.) The Automatic Exports area, shown in the left pane below, lists the data sets that have been automatically exported. One or more of these data sets can be returned to the Primary storage area as extended data sets using the Create Extended History Data Set(s) tool. The Administration tools are described briefly in the following paragraphs.

Create New Active Data Set This feature lets a user force creation of a new active data set. It can be accessed from the Tools menu or the toolbar icon; it can also be accessed by right-clicking the Primary storage and selecting Create New Active Data Set from the context menu. The active history data set is closed and becomes a current history data set. A new (empty) active history data set is started. This feature requires the user to have the DeltaV security key for the HDS_ACTIVE function.

118

System Configuration

Export History Data Set(s) This feature lets a user select one or more current/extended data sets for exporting to a user-defined directory. It is recommended that the export directory be on the same workstation as the Continuous Historian, but outside the DeltaV system directory. (Note that automatic exports of current history data sets can be set up using the Advanced tab of the Continuous Historian Properties dialog in the DeltaV Explorer.) The user selects the data set(s) to be exported. (When selecting multiple data sets, the standard Windows Ctrl and Shift features are available.) The user then clicks the Export History Data Set(s) icon (or selects the export option from the Tools menu or the context menu). A Browse window is opened for the user to browse to the export file destination directory. If there are no current/extended data sets, this function will not be available. The user can use the Create New Active Data Set to create a new active data set and convert the existing active data set to a current data set that can be exported. The data sets that are exported are not deleted from the Primary storage area. If the data set is again exported to the same directory, the export is given a unique name (with -n appended to the name); the newly exported data set does not overwrite the existing one. It is common for the size of exported data sets to be different from the size of the original data set. If the Export operation is interrupted using the Abort button, any data sets exported before the abort is confirmed are not affected; export of a data set that is in progress will not be completed. This feature requires the user to have the DeltaV security key for the HDS_EXPORT function. Delete History Data Set(s) This feature lets a user delete any of the current or extended history data sets in Primary storage. After selecting one or more data sets, the user can press the Delete key, select Delete from the Tools menu or the context menu, or select the Delete icon. If the Delete operation is interrupted using the Abort button, any data set in the process of being deleted will be completely deleted to ensure that there are no "incomplete" data sets. This feature requires the user to have the DeltaV security key for the HDS_DELETE function. Create Extended History Data Set(s) This feature is used to bring back into Primary storage one or more data sets that were previously exported to an archive directory. It can be accessed from the Tools menu or the toolbar icon; it can also be accessed by right-clicking the Primary storage or Automatic Exports area and selecting Create Extended History Data Set(s) from the context menu. A dialog opens to let the user type in a directory path or browse to an archive directory. After the user selects the data sets, they are listed in the dialog. The user may optionally enter a comment of up to 511 characters. If a data set to be restored has start and end times that overlap with an online data set, the extended data set will not be created. A message will be displayed in the progress bar dialog, along with the number of errors. It is common for the size of extended data sets to be different from the size of the original and exported data sets. If the Create Extended History Data Set(s) operation is interrupted using the Abort button, any extended data sets created before the abort is confirmed are not affected. Creation of an extended data set that is in progress will not be completed; it may take some time to delete the partially created data set. This feature requires the user to have the DeltaV security key for the HDS_EXTENDED function.

The Continuous Historian

119

Backup DeltaV Continuous Historian Data This feature lets users easily export all current history data sets to a subdirectory of a directory chosen by the user. It can be accessed from the Tools menu or the toolbar icon; it can also be accessed by right-clicking the Primary storage and selecting Backup DeltaV Continuous Historian Data from the context menu. It is recommended that the backup directory be outside the DeltaV system directory. The subdirectory will have a unique name that will be generated based on the date and time. The name format is DvCH_YYMMMDD_hh.mm. The file names of the backed up data sets are unique within the subdirectory; if the same files are backed up again, the subdirectory name will change, but the same data sets will have the same archived file names. The resulting export is a collection of history data files that may be restored as a collection or brought back online individually as extended history data sets. It is common for the size of exported data sets to be different from the size of the original data sets. If the Backup operation is interrupted using the Abort button, any exported data sets created before the abort is confirmed are not affected; creation of an exported data set that is in progress will not be completed. If there are no current data sets, this function will not be available. The user can use the Create New Active Data Set to create a new active data set and convert the existing active data set to a current data set that can be backed up. This feature requires the user to have the DeltaV security key for the HDS_BACKUP function. Restore DeltaV Continuous Historian Data This feature lets users restore current history data sets in Primary storage from data sets in a specified directory. It can be accessed from the Tools menu or the toolbar icon; it can also be accessed by right-clicking the Primary storage and selecting Restore DeltaV Continuous Historian Data from the context menu. The user types in the directory path or browses to the "restore from" directory. If a data set to be restored has start and end times that overlap with an online data set, or if a data set name is identical to a current or extended data set already in the database, that data set will not be restored and a message will be displayed in the progress bar dialog, along with the number of errors. It is common for the size of restored data sets to be different from the size of both the original data sets and the backed up data sets. If the Restore operation is interrupted using the Abort button, any data sets restored before the abort is confirmed are not affected. Restoration of a data set that is in progress will not be completed; it may take some time to delete the partially restored data set. This feature requires the user to have the DeltaV security key for the HDS_RESTORE function. Display Storage Details This feature provides a summary of the history data sets currently in the Primary storage area. It can be accessed from the Tools menu or by right-clicking the Primary storage and selecting Display Storage Details from the context menu. Information available includes the following: the physical location (directory path) of the storage area the total size of active and current data sets the space available for storage of additional data sets the total amount of storage defined for this storage area

Note that the extended data sets are not included in the storage size. (The user is responsible for creating and deleting extended data sets, and therefore for managing their storage within the capacity of the disk drive.) The total size of extended data sets is displayed in the status bar at the bottom of the Continuous Historian Administration window.

120

System Configuration

Data Set Properties This feature lets users view the read-only Data Set Properties dialog for a selected data set. It can be accessed by selecting a data set, right-clicking, and selecting Data Set Properties from the context menu. The properties include the historian server name, the type of data set (active, current, extended, or exported), the location and size, the start and end times, the number of tags, and the date it was created. The data set properties of exported data sets are displayed only for those data sets in the Automatic Exports directory. For extended data sets, the information may also include the name of the person who created the extended data set and any comments entered at the time it was created. The date created will be the same as the start time for the active and current data sets, but different for extended and exported data sets. Diagnostics This feature lets a user review the diagnostics for the Continuous Historian. It can be accessed from the Tools menu or the toolbar icon. It provides information on the historian server such as the last number of writes, the total number of cache writes, the total number of writes, and the percent busy. It also provides information on the Primary storage area, such as the current status, whether the disk is full, the percent of the storage area in use, and the free disk space. It also tells whether early creations of new Active data sets have been done and how many automatic exports have failed. For early creations of new active data sets, it doesn't show creations initiated by the user or creations initiated on a timed (for example, Daily) basis.

The Continuous Historian

121

Continuous Historian Excel Add-In


Inside this topic Installing the Continuous Historian Excel Add-In Accessing the Continuous Historian Excel Add-In Worksheet Functions Storage of Date and Time Storage and Precision Conversion Between GMT and Local Time Conversion Between GMT and GMT Offset The Excel Add-In provides four functions and associated dialogs that aid in the creation of detailed workbooks containing historical data read from the Continuous Historian database. The workbooks created can include historical values read directly or interpolated from the database. Workbooks can also include timestamp and status information associated with those values. Installing the Continuous Historian Excel Add-In The Continuous Historian Excel Add-In can be installed on any DeltaV workstation. The Add-In requires .NET Programmability Support to be installed before you install the Add-In. See the first procedure below for information on installing the .NET Programmability Support. Under Windows Server 2003, the .NET Framework 1.1 is installed with the operating system. This means that .NET Programmability Support is automatically installed with Excel, and no further action is required. To install the .NET Programmability Support 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 In Control Panel, open Add or Remove Programs. Select Microsoft Office 2003 and click Change. In the Office 2003 Setup dialog, choose Add or Remove Features and click Next. In the next dialog, check "Choose advanced customization of applications" and click Next. Expand Microsoft Office Excel. Click the down arrow on .NET Programmability Support. Choose "Run from My Computer" and click Update.

To install the Excel Add-In 1 2 3 4 5 In the DeltaV bin directory, double-click the file DvCHXLASetup.Office2003.msi, the installer for the Continuous Historian Excel Add-In. (Alternatively, you can right-click and select Install from the context menu.) Click Next on the Welcome screen. On the Select Installation Folder screen, accept the default directory for installation, and select whether the addin is to be available to others who may use the computer or only yourself. On the Confirm Installation screen, click Next to start the installation. When the installation is complete, click Close to exit the installer.

The .NET Programmability Support must be installed before Excel is used with the DeltaV Continuous Historian Excel Add-In. If Excel is started without .NET Programmability Support, you should follow the steps above to add the required support and then reactivate the DeltaV Continuous Historian Add-In by running the ExcelAddIn.reg file from the Add-In's installation folder (C:\Program Files\Emerson Process Management\DeltaV Continuous Historian Excel 2003 Add-In\ by default.)

122

System Configuration

The Continuous Historian Add-In must be uninstalled and reinstalled with each upgrade of the DeltaV System to a new version. You can uninstall the&nbsp; Add-In using the Windows Control Panel option Add or Remove Programs. You can also uninstall the Add-In by running the DvCHXLASetup.Office2003.msi installer and selecting the Remove option. Accessing the Continuous Historian Excel Add-In The Continuous Historian Excel Add-In installer adds a top level DeltaV menu item to the Excel worksheet menu bar. The DeltaV menu item is inserted between the Window and Help menu items. Under the DeltaV menu item, one or more options may reside. To access the Continuous Historian functions, open Excel and then click DeltaV | Continuous Historian and the worksheet function you wish to use.

Two other selections are Edit Function, which will bring up the worksheet function dialog for an existing formula for editing, and Refresh, which will cause all Continuous Historian worksheet functions on the active worksheet to be refreshed from the historian database. Worksheet Functions The Continuous Historian Excel Add-In provides dialogs to help in configuring the worksheet functions. The dialogs are: Configure Single Value Function - to configure a worksheet function to retrieve a single sample for a tag at a specified time (previous sample, next sample, or interpolated) Configure Raw Data Function - to configure a worksheet function to retrieve available samples for a single tag within a time period Configure Interpolated Data Function - to configure a worksheet function to retrieve a number of interpolated samples for a single tag at regular intervals over a time period Configure Calculated Data Function - to configure a worksheet function to retrieve calculated data relating to a single tag over a time period which is broken down into a number of subintervals of equal duration

For information on using the dialogs to configure the worksheet functions, refer to the topic Using the Worksheet Function Dialogs. For details on the functions, including the syntax and arguments, refer to the topic Worksheet Function Reference.

The Continuous Historian

123

Storage of Date and Time The Continuous Historian stores timestamps using Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). The Continuous Historian Excel Add-In supports viewing historical data in three ways: GMT - Dates and times are presented as they were recorded by the Continuous Historian. Local Time - Dates and times are presented in the user's local time as it applied at the time of the recording. For example, if the event occurred during daylight saving time, it will be presented showing the daylight saving local time even when viewed outside daylight saving time. GMT Offset - Dates and times are presented with a fixed, user-configurable, offset (+/- hh:mm) from GMT. This offset will be constant, and will disregard daylight saving time. This mode would be useful where data is viewed in a different locale from where it was recorded. It will allow the data to be viewed in an approximation of the local time of the plant.

Storage and Precision In Excel, dates are stored as sequential numbers, called serial values. By default, January 1, 1900 is serial number 1, and January 1, 2008 is serial number 39448 because it is 39,448 days after January 1, 1900. Times are stored as decimal fractions because time is considered a portion of a day. Thus 0.5 represents 12:00:00 (noon). Date/time values are stored in Excel worksheets as floating point numbers: the sum of the dates serial number and the times fraction. Using cell formatting, Excel allows times to be displayed with millisecond precision, for example: MM/DD/ YYYY hh:mm:ss.000, although it should be noted that the Continuous Historian records data on quarter-second boundaries: .000, .250, .500, .750.) Excels method of storing times does not handle leap seconds, since in converting from a decimal fraction to a userreadable time format (such as MM/DD/YYYY hh:mm:ss.000) Excel is working on the assumption that there are 86,400 seconds in a day. In a day containing a leap second, there are actually 86,401 seconds. Excel will never convert a time such that the value for seconds is greater than 59. Hence it is not possible to see the leap second at the end of 1998 (31 Dec 1998 11:59:60). Conversion Between GMT and Local Time In parts of the world where daylight saving time is used, users must be aware of issues arising from conversion between GMT and local times. Where daylight saving time is never used (for example, Arizona) there is no problem converting from GMT to local time and back again since there is a one-to-one correlation between GMT and Local times. The conversion problems arise from the fact that changes to or from daylight saving time affect the length of a day. In the case of changing to daylight saving time, an hour is skipped altogether in local time, whereas the change back from daylight saving time leads to certain local times occurring twice. If you wish to create a report that shows one days worth of data for your plant, you could do so using the Configure Calculated Data Function worksheet function dialog, supplying a start time and end time exactly one day apart. These times would most likely be specified in cells in the worksheet with an array formula referring to them by cell address. Furthermore, the end time is likely to be expressed by a formula such as StartTime + 24:00:00. Excel ignores daylight saving time when calculating such formulas, so the end time would show as being the same hour, exactly one day later than the start time. For 363 days in the year (except for leap years), this array function would return 24 hours worth of data; but for one day each year there would be 23 hours worth of data and for another day there would be 25 hours worth of data. You need to be aware that this will occur if you are using local time, and design your worksheets accordingly. That is, allow extra space in the table to accommodate the extra data as daylight saving time finishes; the table will be shorter as daylight saving time begins. A similar, though potentially more serious, problem occurs where you wish to find out data relating to an occurrence around the time that daylight saving time starts.

124

System Configuration

Consider a plant in a U.S. state that operates under Central Time. At 2:00 a.m. on October 31, 2004 daylight saving time ends (Central Daylight Time finishes and Central Standard Time is used). The local time thus goes from 01:59:59 to 01:00:00. This is the second time it has been 01:00:00 that day. If anything goes wrong in the plant during the next hour, it will not be possible to view that data in the DeltaV Continuous Historian Excel Add-In if local times are used. This is because, in converting to GMT, the first occurrence of times between 01:00:00 and 01:59:59 on October 31, 2004 is assumed. You would need to choose to use either GMT or GMT Offset when dealing with such issues. Conversion Between GMT and GMT Offset This conversion mode does not take account of daylight saving time. Therefore there are no conversion issues. A regular offset (which can be any number of hours and minutes, up to 23:59) is applied to the recorded GMT times, regardless of the recorded or current date. Using the Worksheet Function Dialogs The following example illustrates the use of the Configure Calculated Data Function dialog to analyze min, max, and average values for a single tag and time span. In this scenario, the user wishes to examine the min, max, and average statistics relating to a single tag (FIC-101.PV) over a one-hour period. He wishes to break the hour down into 60 one-minute intervals. The table produced will have the following column headers: Minimum Value Minimum Timestamp Maximum Value Maximum Timestamp Average Value To make the worksheet useful for future queries, the tag and time period will be specified in the worksheet. This will allow the user to change the tag or date/time very easily by changing the contents of cells A1 and B1 in order to see data for a different tag on a different day. To create the Excel worksheet 1 2 3 4 5 Open Microsoft Excel. In cell A1, enter the tag name, such as CHS250_1S/SGGN1/OUT.CV. In cell B1, enter the start date and time in the format mm/dd/yyyy hh:mm:ss; for example, 10/20/2004 08:15:00. (Note that the date format required by Excel is dependent on the user's locale.) In cell C1, enter the end time using a formula, for example "=B1 + 1/24". This sets the end time for the period to one hour (1/24 day) from the start time. Select cell A3 as the cell in which to enter the formula for the worksheet function. This will be the top left cell of the array in which the results are displayed.

Note A range of 61 rows by 5 columns will be needed for the results. (This includes the header row and 60 rows of data.) Rather than select the entire range, the user may select the top left cell of the range, for example, A3, and then use the option "Adjust selection to accommodate results" in the worksheet function dialog to automatically extend the range to the appropriate size.

The Continuous Historian

125

From the menu bar select DeltaV | Continuous Historian | Configure Calculated Data Function. The Configure Calculated Data Function dialog appears.

126

System Configuration

To use the Configure Calculated Data Function dialog The Connection field is pre-populated with the default Continuous Historian connection details. A browse button is available if it is necessary to browse to an alternate source. 1 2 3 For Tag, click the cell reference button to the right of the tag field . The Cell Reference dialog appears. Click on cell A1 in the worksheet to automatically fill in the cell reference, or type A1 or $A$1 in the dialog box. For Period, leave the Mode as Local Time.

4 5 6 7 8 9

For the Period start time, select Cell Reference and enter B1 (or $B$1) to indicate that the start time is stored in cell B1 (or click the cell reference button and then click on cell B1 in the worksheet). For the Period end time, select Cell Reference and enter C1 (or $C$1) to indicate that the end time is stored in cell C1 (or click the cell reference button and then click on cell C1 in the worksheet). For Intervals, select Interval, enter 1 and select minute(s) from the drop-down list. Under Display Data, select Header Row to show the column names for the returned data. Select the Columns by holding the Control key and selecting Minimum Value, Minimum Timestamp, Maximum Value, Maximum Timestamp, and Average Value. Click the right arrow button to add the selected columns to the Selected Columns list.

Note As changes are made to the optional fields, the Worksheet Required Range is updated to show the dimensions of the array that will be yielded. 10 Under Worksheet, make sure the option to "Adjust selection to accommodate results (if necessary)" is selected. (By default, this option is selected.) Note Since there is no data below or to the right of the selected cell, there is no need to check the "Insert rows and columns" checkbox. Also, since the selected dates do not run across the daylight saving change, there is no need to check the box for Extra rows. 11 Click the "Try It..." button to preview the results. Note This button opens a grid containing the actual data as queried from the DeltaV Continuous Historian database. The Try It window shows the row and column at which the data will be inserted. The dialog can be closed before the query is complete. While the query is being performed, the title bar indicates that it is working. On completion, the title bar indicates the number of rows and columns and the time taken to perform the query.

The Continuous Historian

127

12 Close the Try It results window and click OK on the main dialog.

128

System Configuration

The resulting worksheet, after clicking OK (and reformatting the column widths and the date format) is shown below:

The Continuous Historian

129

Worksheet Function Reference


Inside this topic Single Value Function Raw Data Function Interpolated Data Function Calculated Data Function Most users will want to use the worksheet function dialogs to configure the worksheet functions. However, it is possible to enter a worksheet function directly into the Excel formula bar. First, select an appropriately dimensioned array of cells for the expected results. In the formula bar, begin the function with "=" and, after typing in the function and arguments, end the entry using Ctrl+Shift+Enter to indicate that it is an array formula. (For a single cell, you can press Enter or Ctrl+Shift+Enter.) Excel encloses the formula in braces, {}, in the formula bar to indicate that it is an array formula. A worksheet function entered in this way can be edited with the appropriate worksheet function dialog by selecting the cell that contains the function formula and then selecting the "Edit Function" option from the DeltaV Excel AddIn menu choices. On the worksheet function dialog, you could then easily resize the array or change the values of one or more arguments. Note that it is possible to manually configure a function using advanced Excel features such as cell references and expressions for any argument--even those that do not support cell references in the worksheet function dialogs. These formulas can still be edited with the worksheet function dialogs; only if an argument is actually changed in the dialog will the manually edited cell reference or expression be lost. For example, a Columns argument could be entered as CONCATENATE ($A$1, ";", $A$2); if A1 contained "timestamp,GMT" and A2 contained "value" then the dialog would show "timestamp,GMT" and "value" as the selected columns. If any change was made to the selected columns in the dialog, then the argument would be written back as a single text string enclosed in quotes (that is, in the normal way). If no change was made to that field in the dialog, the CONCATENATE( ) expression would remain unchanged. To reduce the length of the formula (which may be necessary if Excel's limit of 255 characters is exceeded), the Columns argument in the example above could be set to $B$1, with cell B1 holding the following formula: =CONCATENATE($A$1, ";", $A$2). The four worksheet functions are: Single Value Function (DvCHValue) - a worksheet function to retrieve a single sample for a tag at a specified time (previous sample, next sample, or interpolated) Raw Data Function (DvCHRaw) - a worksheet function to retrieve available samples for a single tag within a time period Interpolated Data Function (DvCHInterppolated) - a worksheet function to retrieve a number of interpolated samples for a single tag at regular intervals over a time period Calculated Data Function (DvCHIntervals) - a worksheet function to retrieve calculated data relating to a single tag over a time period divided into a number of subintervals of equal duration

The format for each function, an example, and a description of the function arguments are presented in the remainder of this topic. Note, in the examples, that some of the arguments (such as strings, column names, tags, dates and times) must be enclosed in quotation marks, while others (cell references, numbers, and Booleans) are not. Single Value Function (DvCHValue) This worksheet function is used to retrieve a single sample for a tag at a specified time. If used to show headers, timestamps, or status information about the values, this function must be entered as an array formula in a range that

130

System Configuration

has the appropriate number of rows and columns. Use the DeltaV Continuous Historian "Configure Single Value Function" dialog to help set up a call to this function. Syntax DvCHValue(connection, tag, show_header, columns, time_mode, selection_mode, timestamp) Example =DvCHValue("localhost", "DeltaV=MAIN_WORKSTATION CHS250_1S/SGGN1/OUT.CV", TRUE, "Value;Timestamp", "GMT-06:00", 0, "9/25/04 12:00:00 PM") Function Arguments Connection - the node name of the DeltaV Continuous Historian server PC. Tag - the DeltaV tag for which you want to retrieve data. The tag can be text, such as FIC101.PV, or a cell reference. In the case of a cell reference (such as $A$1), the contents of the referenced cell must contain a valid tag. Show_header - A Boolean (TRUE or FALSE) that indicates whether or not you want the returned data to have a column header row. Columns - a string that defines the columns that will be included in the results. Column definitions are separated by semicolons. Each column definition comprises the column name and, optionally, various attributes relating to that specific column. Column attributes are separated by commas. Supported columns and attributes are as follows: Column name: Timestamp

Mode attribute: Local, GMT, or GMT +/-hh:mm Column name: Value

For INT32, UNIT32, and Float data types, the value stored by Excel is a Variant Double. For strings, the value stored by Excel is a Variant String. For enumerations, the value stored by Excel is the state name in a Variant String. Column name: Parameter Status (that is, FfStatus)

Mode attribute. Valid modes are: Text - which yields a descriptive string, such as GoodNonCascade NonSpecific NotLimited

IsGood - which yields a Boolean: TRUE if the parameter status is good, or FALSE if it is not good (that is, bad or uncertain) Number - which yields the raw value as an integer Column name: Collection Status (that is, DvCHStatus)

Mode attribute. Valid modes are: Text - which yields a descriptive string

IsGood - which yields a Boolean: TRUE if the collection status is good (that is, 0) or FALSE if it is not good (not zero) Number - which yields the raw value as an integer

The Continuous Historian

131

Time_mode - indicates how the timestamp argument should be interpreted. The Historian database records all times in GMT; the time_mode argument specifies what conversion, if any, should be applied to the supplied timestamp in order to convert to GMT. Local - the timestamp is treated as being in the client PC's time zone. Conversion to GMT takes into consideration whether the timestamp falls within daylight saving time. GMT - no conversion is necessary GMT+/-hh:mm - the time is adjusted by the specified hh:mm; daylight saving time has no effect.

Selection_mode - indicates how you want to select data in relation to the time(s) specified. If 0 - the sample immediately previous to the requested timestamp is returned. If 1 - the sample immediately after the requested timestamp is returned. If 2 - the value at the supplied timestamp is interpolated.

Timestamp - is a single timestamp for which the DeltaV Continuous Historian database is queried. It may be text or a cell reference. If the timestamp argument is a reference, the contents of the referenced cell must be a valid timestamp. Raw Data Function This worksheet function is used to retrieve available samples for a single tag within a specified time period. The function must be entered as an array formula in a range that has the appropriate number of rows and columns. Use the Continuous Historian "Configure Raw Data Function" dialog to help set up a call to this function. Syntax DvCHRaw(connection, tag, show_header, columns, time_mode, period_start, period_end, start_boundary, end_boundary, max_num_values) Example =DvCHRaw("localhost", "DeltaV=MAIN_WORKSTATION CHS250_1S/SGGN1/OUT.CV", TRUE, "Value;Timestamp,Local;Parameter Status,IsGood;Collection Status,Text", "GMT", "10/4/04 3:02:05 PM", "10/5/04 3:02:05 PM", 1, 1, 50) Function Arguments Connection - the node name of the DeltaV Continuous Historian server PC. Tag - the DeltaV tag for which you want to retrieve data. The tag can be text, such as FIC101.PV, or a cell reference. In the case of a cell reference (such as $A$1), the contents of the referenced cell must contain a valid tag. Show_header - A Boolean (TRUE or FALSE) that indicates whether or not you want the returned data to have a column header row. Columns - a string that defines the columns that will be included in the results. Column definitions are separated by semicolons. Each column definition comprises the column name and, optionally, various attributes relating to that specific column. Column attributes are separated by commas. Supported columns and attributes are as follows: Column name: Timestamp

Mode attribute: Local, GMT, or GMT +/-hh:mm Column name: Value

For INT32, UNIT32, and Float data types, the value stored by Excel is a Variant Double. For strings, the value stored by Excel is a Variant String. For enumerations, the value stored by Excel is the state name in a Variant String.

132

System Configuration

Column name: Parameter Status (that is, FfStatus)

Mode attribute. Valid modes are: Text - which yields a descriptive string, such as GoodNonCascade NonSpecific NotLimited

IsGood - which yields a Boolean: TRUE if the parameter status is good, or FALSE if it is not good (that is, bad or uncertain) Number - which yields the raw value as an integer Column name: Collection Status (that is, DvCHStatus)

Mode attribute. Valid modes are: Text - which yields a descriptive string

IsGood - which yields a Boolean: TRUE if the collection status is good (that is, 0) or FALSE if it is not good (not zero) Number - which yields the raw value as an integer Time_mode - indicates how the timestamp argument should be interpreted. The Historian database records all times in GMT; the time_mode argument specifies what conversion, if any, should be applied to the supplied timestamp in order to convert to GMT. Local - the timestamp is treated as being in the client PC's time zone. Conversion to GMT takes into consideration whether the timestamp falls within daylight saving time. GMT - no conversion is necessary GMT+/-hh:mm - the time is adjusted by the specified hh:mm; daylight saving time has no effect.

Period_start - the timestamp of the start of the period. If this is a cell reference, the referenced cell must contain a valid timestamp. Period_end - the timestamp of the end of the period. If this is a cell reference, the referenced cell must contain a valid timestamp. Start_boundary - defines how the start boundary is handled: If 0 (inside), the first sample returned will be the first sample after (or at exactly the same time as) the period_start. If 1 (outside), the first sample returned will be the first sample before (or at exactly the same time as) the period_start. If 2 (interpolated), an interpolated sample is created for the period_start time.

End_boundary - defines how the end boundary is handled: If 0 (inside), the last sample returned will be the first sample before (or at exactly the same time as) the period_end. If 1 (outside), the last sample returned will be the first sample after (or at exactly the same time as) the period_end. If 2 (interpolated), an interpolated sample is created for the period_end time.

Max_num_values - the maximum number of values you wish to retrieve. Any samples in the database within the time period in excess of this number will not be retrieved.

The Continuous Historian

133

If period_start is an earlier time than period_end, then samples are taken forward from the start time toward the end time. If period_end is an earlier time than period_start, then samples are taken backward from the start time toward the end time. If max_num_values is set to -1, all samples within the time period are retrieved.

Interpolated Data Function This worksheet function is used to retrieve a number of interpolated samples for a single tag at regular intervals over a time period. The function must be entered as an array formula in a range that has the appropriate number of rows and columns. Use the Continuous Historian "Configure Interpolated Data Function" dialog to help set up a call to this function. Syntax DvCHInterpolated(connection, tag, show_header, columns, time_mode, period_start, period_end, samples) Example =DvCHInterpolated("localhost", "DeltaV=MAIN_WORKSTATION CHS250_1S/SGGN1/OUT.CV", TRUE, "Value;Timestamp;Parameter Status,IsGood;Collection Status,IsGood", "Local", "10/6/04 11:04:02 AM", "10/7/04 11:04:02 AM", "60minutes") Function Arguments Connection - the node name of the DeltaV Continuous Historian server PC. Tag - the DeltaV tag for which you want to retrieve data. The tag can be text, such as FIC101.PV, or a cell reference. In the case of a cell reference (such as $A$1), the contents of the referenced cell must contain a valid tag. Show_header - A Boolean (TRUE or FALSE) that indicates whether or not you want the returned data to have a column header row. Columns - a string that defines the columns that will be included in the results. Column definitions are separated by semicolons. Each column definition comprises the column name and, optionally, various attributes relating to that specific column. Column attributes are separated by commas. Supported columns and attributes are as follows: Column name: Timestamp

Mode attribute: Local, GMT, or GMT +/-hh:mm Column name: Value

For INT32, UNIT32, and Float data types, the value stored by Excel is a Variant Double. For strings, the value stored by Excel is a Variant String. For enumerations, the value stored by Excel is the state name in a Variant String. Column name: Parameter Status (that is, FfStatus)

Mode attribute. Valid modes are: Text - which yields a descriptive string, such as GoodNonCascade NonSpecific NotLimited

IsGood - which yields a Boolean: TRUE if the parameter status is good, or FALSE if it is not good (that is, bad or uncertain) Number - which yields the raw value as an integer

134

System Configuration

Column name: Collection Status (that is, DvCHStatus)

Mode attribute. Valid modes are: Text - which yields a descriptive string

IsGood - which yields a Boolean: TRUE if the collection status is good (that is, 0) or FALSE if it is not good (not zero) Number - which yields the raw value as an integer Time_mode - indicates how the period_start and period_end arguments should be interpreted. The Historian database records all times in GMT; the time_mode argument specifies what conversion, if any, should be applied to the supplied timestamp in order to convert to GMT. Local - the timestamp is treated as being in the client PC's time zone. Conversion to GMT takes into consideration whether the timestamp falls within daylight saving time. GMT - no conversion is necessary GMT+/-hh:mm - the time is adjusted by the specified hh:mm; daylight saving time has no effect.

Period_start - the timestamp of the start of the period. If this is a cell reference, the referenced cell must contain a valid timestamp. Period_end - the timestamp of the end of the period. If this is a cell reference, the referenced cell must contain a valid timestamp. Samples - one of the following: The number of samples required (without quotation marks). The start and end of the period each yield a sample; therefore, this number must be 2 or greater. The interval between samples (enclosed in quotation marks). This is a positive number followed by a units string, which must be one of the following: hours, minutes, or seconds. If necessary, the period_end is automatically adjusted to extend the overall period such that it is a multiple of this interval.

Calculated Data Function This worksheet function is used to retrieve calculated data relating to a single tag over a time period divided into a number of subintervals of equal duration. The function must be entered as an array formula in a range that has the appropriate number of rows and columns. Use the Continuous Historian "Configure Calculated Data Function" dialog to help set up a call to this function. Syntax DvCHIntervals(connection, tag, show_header, columns, time_mode, period_start, period_end, intervals) Example =DvCHIntervals("localhost", "DeltaV=MAIN_WORKSTATION CHS250_1S/SGGN1/OUT.CV", TRUE, "Minimum Value;Minimum Timestamp;Maximum Value;Maximum Timestamp;Average Value", "Local", "10/6/04 11:33:33 AM", "10/7/04 11:33:33 AM", 50) Function Arguments Connection - the node name of the DeltaV Continuous Historian server PC. Tag - the DeltaV tag for which you want to retrieve data. The tag can be text, such as FIC101.PV, or a cell reference. In the case of a cell reference (such as $A$1), the contents of the referenced cell must contain a valid tag. Show_header - A Boolean (TRUE or FALSE) that indicates whether or not you want the returned data to have a column header row.

The Continuous Historian

135

Columns - a string that defines the columns that will be included in the results. Column definitions are separated by semicolons. Each column definition comprises the column name and, optionally, various attributes relating to that specific column. Column attributes are separated by commas. Supported columns and attributes are as follows: Column name: Minimum Timestamp

Mode attribute: Local, GMT, or GMT +/-hh:mm Column name: Minimum Value

For INT32, UNIT32, and Float data types, the value stored by Excel is a Variant Double. For strings, the value stored by Excel is a Variant String. For enumerations, the value stored by Excel is the state name in a Variant String. Column name: Minimum Parameter Status (that is, FfStatus)

Mode attribute. Valid modes are: Text - which yields a descriptive string, such as GoodNonCascade NonSpecific NotLimited

IsGood - which yields a Boolean: TRUE if the parameter status is good, or FALSE if it is not good (that is, bad or uncertain) Number - which yields the raw value as an integer Column name: Minimum Collection Status (that is, DvCHStatus)

Mode attribute. Valid modes are: Text - which yields a descriptive string

IsGood - which yields a Boolean: TRUE if the collection status is good (that is, 0) or FALSE if it is not good (not zero) Number - which yields the raw value as an integer Column name: Maximum Timestamp

Mode attribute: Local, GMT, or GMT +/-hh:mm Column name: Maximum Value

For INT32, UNIT32, and Float data types, the value stored by Excel is a Variant Double. For strings, the value stored by Excel is a Variant String. For enumerations, the value stored by Excel is the state name in a Variant String. Column name: Maximum Parameter Status (that is, FfStatus)

Mode attribute. Valid modes are: Text - which yields a descriptive string, such as GoodNonCascade NonSpecific NotLimited

IsGood - which yields a Boolean: TRUE if the parameter status is good, or FALSE if it is not good (that is, bad or uncertain) Number - which yields the raw value as an integer Column name: Maximum Collection Status (that is, DvCHStatus)

136

System Configuration

Mode attribute. Valid modes are: Text - which yields a descriptive string

IsGood - which yields a Boolean: TRUE if the collection status is good (that is, 0) or FALSE if it is not good (not zero) Number - which yields the raw value as an integer Column name: Average Value

For INT32, UNIT32, and Float data types, the value stored by Excel is a Variant Double. For strings, the value stored by Excel is a Variant String. For enumerations, the value stored by Excel is the state name in a Variant String. Column name: Composite Parameter Status (that is, FfStatus)

Mode attribute. Valid modes are: Text - which yields a descriptive string, such as GoodNonCascade NonSpecific NotLimited

IsGood - which yields a Boolean: TRUE if the parameter status is good, or FALSE if it is not good (that is, bad or uncertain) Number - which yields the raw value as an integer Column name: Composite Collection Status (that is, DvCHStatus)

Mode attribute. Valid modes are: Text - which yields a descriptive string

IsGood - which yields a Boolean: TRUE if the collection status is good (that is, 0) or FALSE if it is not good (not zero) Number - which yields the raw value as an integer Time_mode - indicates how the period_start and period_end arguments should be interpreted. The Historian database records all times in GMT; the time_mode argument specifies what conversion, if any, should be applied to the supplied timestamp in order to convert to GMT. Local - the timestamp is treated as being in the client PC's time zone. Conversion to GMT takes into consideration whether the timestamp falls within daylight saving time. GMT - no conversion is necessary GMT+/-hh:mm - the time is adjusted by the specified hh:mm; daylight saving time has no effect.

Period_start - the timestamp of the start of the period. If this is a cell reference, the referenced cell must contain a valid timestamp. Period_end - the timestamp of the end of the period. If this is a cell reference, the referenced cell must contain a valid timestamp. Intervals - one of the following: The number of intervals required (without quotation marks). The duration of each interval (enclosed in quotation marks). This is a positive number followed by a units string, which must be one of the following: days, hours, minutes, or seconds. If necessary, the period_end is automatically adjusted to extend the overall period such that it is a multiple of this interval.

The Continuous Historian

137

The Legacy Historian


On a system upgrade, the user has a choice of installing the Continuous Historian on the Application Station or keeping an existing Legacy Historian server. (Only one of the historians may exist on a workstation; however, both historians may exist within a DeltaV system.) Existing Continuous Historian client applications are able to work with both Legacy Historian and Continuous Historian data services on the same system. For more information on system upgrades and converting history data, refer to the Continuous Historian Upgrade Planning Guide, located on the DeltaV installation CD #4 in the _Support directory.. Differences Between the DeltaV System and the Legacy Historian Some discrepancies exist between the DeltaV system and the Legacy Historian regarding minimum and maximum limits for data values. The following table shows the limits for both the DeltaV system and the Legacy Historian and provides information on how the Legacy Historian stores data that falls outside the valid ranges. Data Type 32-bit unsigned integer DeltaV limits Max 4,294,967,295 Min 0 Legacy Historian limits Max 2,147,483,647 How does the Legacy Historian store the data? All values between 0 and 2,147,483,647 are stored correctly. Values between 2,147,483,648 and 4,294,967,295 are stored as zero. If you expect values larger than 2,147,483,647, consider: storing the integer in a floating point parameter. (These can handle a larger range but with some loss of precision.) scaling the integer to a smaller range (for example, recording the value as pounds instead of ounces). All values between -1.70141e+38 and 1.70141e+38 are stored correctly. Values between 1.70141e+38 and 3.4282e+38 are stored as 1.70141e+38. Values between -1.70141e+38 and -3.4282e+38 are stored as -1.70141e+38. All values between -2,147,450,880 and 2,147,483,647 are stored correctly. Values between -2,147,483,648 and 2,147,450,880 show as Status -252 in Process History View.

Floating point

Max 3.40282e+38 Min 3.40282e+38

Max 1.70141e+38 Min 1.70141e+38

32-bit signed integer

Max 2,147,483,647 Min 2,147,483,648

Max 2,147,483,647 Min 2,147,450,880

138

System Configuration

DeltaV OPC Historical Data Access


Inside this topic References DeltaV OPC History Server Functional Overview Properties and Methods Browser Performance Sample Client Applications The DeltaV OPC Historical Data Access (OPC HDA) server (known as the DeltaV OPC History Server) provides an OPC Foundation HDA interface to the DeltaV Continuous Historian based on Microsoft's OLE/COM technology. The OPC HDA interface specification defines custom Microsoft COM interfaces to access continuous historical data. The topics in this section are intended to be used as a guide for developers of OPC HDA compliant clients for DeltaV software. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with Microsoft OLE/COM technology and is generally familiar with OPC HDA specifications. The DeltaV OPC History Server incorporates a subset of the OPC Foundation OPC HDA specifications; it includes all the required interfaces and methods and some of the optional methods. Through this technology, the DeltaV OPC History Server provides programmers with the ability to perform the following tasks: Connect to the DeltaV Continuous Historian database Read DeltaV historical data Browse for available ItemIDs

Operating details involving the DeltaV OPC History Server (startup, shutdown, client interaction, etc.) are written to the Windows Event Log. References Users should be familiar with the following specifications, available from the OPC Foundation: OPC Foundation - OPC Historical Data Access Specification - Version 1.20 Released December 10, 2003 OPC Foundation - OPC Historical Data Access Automation Interface Standard - Version 1.0 Released January 26, 2001 OPC Foundation - OPC Common Definitions and Interfaces - Version 1.0 - October 27, 1998

Users who develop clients using Visual Basic or Excel with VBA may find the Automation Interface Standard most helpful. DeltaV OPC History Server Functional Overview The DeltaV Application Station acts as a gateway between the DeltaV Continuous Historian and other applications and networks. The DeltaV OPC History Server runs on this workstation, providing DeltaV historical data access to applications that are running either on the Application Station or on a machine with a network connection to the Application Station. The DeltaV OPC History Server also runs on the ProfessionalPLUS workstation. Note In order to run an OPC HDA client on a non-DeltaV workstation, first install the OPC Remote application. To install the OPC Remote application, use the setup file located in the OPC Remote directory on the DeltaV Installation CD (Disk 2, DVExtras\OPCRemote). The version must be the same as the installed version of the DeltaV software.

The Continuous Historian

139

DeltaV Network Diagram OPC HDA client applications can use the COM compliant Custom Interface or the OLE Automation Interface of the OPC HDA server. The custom interface supports clients written in C++. The OLE Automation Interface supports higher level business applications, such as Excel and Visual Basic.

OPC Interfaces Properties and Methods The DeltaV OPC History Server incorporates all the required interfaces and methods of the OPC HDA Specification. It also incorporates the optional "ReadProcessed" method under the IOPCHDA_SyncRead interface. See "OPC HDA Custom Interfaces and Methods" in the topic DeltaV OPC History Server for more information on the custom interfaces and methods. The DeltaV OPC History Server provides a timestamp and quality value associated with each history data value. For raw data values, the timestamp is the time the value was recorded by the DeltaV Continuous Historian. For processed

140

System Configuration

data values, the timestamp is the start of the interval, with two exceptions, minimum and maximum, which can be requested with actual timestamps or interval timestamps. The OPC HDA quality value makes use of the parameter and collection status quality information that is available from the DeltaV Continuous Historian. The DeltaV OPC History Server presents time to client applications in UTC. Client applications are responsible to make any necessary timestamp modifications (such as conversion to local time). Browser The DeltaV OPC History Server has a browser that exposes all parameters stored in the DeltaV Continuous Historian. The browser supports the use of "wild cards" for string filters to assist in finding the stored parameters. A single character may be filtered using the question mark character (?). For example, requesting TIC-100?/PID1/PV.CV will return TIC-1000/PID1/PV.CV, TIC-1001/PID1/PV.CV, etc. Multiple characters may be filtered by the asterisk character (*). For example, requesting TIC-1001/PID1/*.CV will return TIC-1001/PID1/OUT.CV, TIC-1001/PID1/PV.CV, and TIC-1001/PID1/SP.CV. In addition, the logical operators equal to (=) and not equal to (!=) may be used with the wild card filters to further refine the parameter search. Performance The DeltaV OPC History Server loading is determined by the client request loading. Client applications should be designed and tested to ensure that history collection performance is not degraded. The frequency of requests and the amount of data requested can both affect loading. Each request also imposes a load on the DeltaV Continuous Historian Server, and care should be taken to avoid loading it to the point that data collection would be affected. Sample Client Applications Two client applications are provided that allow browsing the items in the DeltaV OPC History Server and displaying raw data for individual items for a fixed time span or start/end time with a fixed number of samples. The applications can write the returned data to a file in a common file format (csv, xml) that can be used by third-party applications. One sample client application (OPCHDAClient.exe), located in the DeltaV\bin directory, allows the user to create an XML input script file that is used as a command line argument and writes output to text files. Several example script files are available in the DeltaV\samples directory. The functions of this client are documented in the topic OPC Historical Data Access Clients. A second client application, HDAprobe.exe, located in the DeltaV\bin directory, may be used for testing and troubleshooting purposes and to help understand the operation of the DeltaV OPC History Server. This client is not documented or supported. To use the OPCHDAClient.exe sample client provided with the DeltaV software, it is assumed that the user is familiar with XML and has access to an XML schema tool, such as XML Spy.

The Continuous Historian

141

DeltaV OPC History Server


Inside this topic Licensing Requirements DeltaV OPC History Server COM Objects OPC HDA Custom Interfaces and Methods The DeltaV OPC History Server provides access to continuous historical data stored by the DeltaV Continuous Historian. Licensing Requirements The DeltaV OPC History Server is available on the ProfessionalPLUS and Application Station. One OPC HDA client connection is allowed on each DeltaV OPC History Server without the need for a license. The DeltaV OPC History Server may be licensed for additional OPC HDA client connections on the ProfessionalPLUS and Application Station. DeltaV OPC History Server COM Objects The DeltaV OPC History Server provides the IOPCHDA Server Object, as illustrated below. The ProgID used to create an instance of the DeltaV OPC History Server is "DeltaV.OPCHDAsvr." An instance of the DeltaV OPC History Server (DOPCHDA1.exe) runs on each DeltaV node where the DeltaV Continuous Historian has been enabled. Each connection to the DeltaV OPC History Server has an instance of an IOPCHDA Server Object. The IOPCHDA Browser Object may only be created by invoking one of the methods in the IOPCHDA_Server interface. The optional IOPCHDA Client Object may be implemented by client applications needing to be notified when the DeltaV services are stopped. Clients implementing this interface must respond to the ShutdownRequest method in a timely manner. Historian Server Model

142

System Configuration

Historian Client Model

OPC HDA Custom Interfaces and Methods Individuals writing programs to access the DeltaV Continuous Historian data using the DeltaV OPC History Server should be familiar with the OPC Historical Data Access Specification, Version 1.2, Released December 10, 2003. The DeltaV OPC History Server implements the following OPC HDA custom interfaces and methods.

The Continuous Historian

143

IOPCCommon The IOPCCommon interface is defined in the OPC Common Definitions and Interfaces specification, Version 1.0, Dated October 27, 1998. The following methods make up this interface: IOPCCommon::SetLocaleID The only supported locale is English with a sublanguage of US English. IOPCCommon::GetLocaleID The value returned from this method corresponds to English with a sublanguage of US English. IOPCCommon::QueryAvailableLocaleIDs The available locale is returned by this method. IOPCCommon::GetErrorString This method may be used to convert from an HRESULT returned by any of the methods or the HRESULT for an HDA Item into a user friendly description of the error. IOPCCommon::SetClientName This method may be used by a client to set the name of the client. The client name is used in some of the events recorded in the Windows Event Log. IConnectionPointContainer The IConnectionPointContainer is a Microsoft defined interface used to obtain call back interfaces. The DeltaV OPC History Server implements this interface in support of the client providing an IOPCShutdown interface. The methods making up this interface are: IConnectionPointContainer::EnumConnectionPoints Only the IOPCShutdown interface is included in the IEnumConnectionPoints enumerator. IConnectionPointContainer::FindConnectionPoint This method may be used to obtain the interface corresponding to the IID_IOPCShutdown. IOPCShutdown This is a client-side interface used by the DeltaV OPC History Server to notify clients when the supporting DeltaV services are shutting down. The single method provided by this interface is: IOPCShutdown::ShutdownRequest This method is invoked by the DeltaV OPC History Server to notify the client that the DeltaV services are shutting down. IOPCHDA_Server This interface is the primary interface for the DeltaV OPC History Server. The IOPCHDA_Server interface provides a method for setting up access to historical data values. The methods that make up this interface are: IOPCHDA_Server::GetItemAttributes This method returns the list of attributes supported by the DeltaV OPC History Server. These are: Data Type Stepped ItemID Maximum Time Interval

144

System Configuration

Minimum Time Interval Exception Deviation IOPCHDA_Server::GetAggregates This method returns the list of aggregates supported by the DeltaV OPC History Server. These are: Interpolative Time Average Count Minimum Actual Time Minimum Maximum Actual Time Maximum Start End IOPCHDA_Server::GetHistorianStatus This method may be used to obtain the status of the DeltaV OPC History Server. IOPCHDA_Server::GetItemHandles This method returns associations between server handles and client handles for specific HDA items. IOPCHDA_Server::ReleaseItemHandles This method releases associations between server handles and client handles for specific HDA items. IOPCHDA_Server::ValidateItemIDs This method validates that specific HDA Item IDs are known to the server. IOPCHDA_Server::CreateBrowse This method returns a pointer to an OPCHDA_Browser interface. The Item ID filtering is specified as part of the creation of a new browser. IOPCHDA_Browser This interface provides a method to access the list of OPC HDA Item IDs that pass the filter criteria set when this browser was created. It should be noted that the DeltaV Continuous Historian provides a flat list of historical parameters. Thus, the DeltaV OPC History Server provides a flat list of OPC HDA Item IDs. IOPCHDA_Browser::GetEnum This method returns an enumeration containing all of the OPC HDA Item IDs provided by the DeltaV Continuous Historian that pass the filter criteria. IOPCHDA_Browser::ChangeBrowsePosition This method may be used to move up and down the list of OPC HDA Item IDs or to move directly to a particular OPC HDA Item ID. IOPCHDA_Browser::GetItemID This method provides a way to obtain the current OPC HDA Item ID. IOPCHDA_Browser::GetBranchPosition This method provides the current OPC HDA Item ID.

The Continuous Historian

145

IOPCHDA_SyncRead This interface provides access to the data held by the DeltaV Continuous Historian. IOPCHDA_SyncRead::ReadRaw This method reads the values, qualities, and timestamps from the DeltaV Continuous Historian database for the specified time domain for one or more OPC HDA Items. IOPCHDA_SyncRead::ReadProcessed This method requests an aggregate value or values to be computed by the DeltaV Continuous Historian for one or more OPC HDA Items, providing values, qualities, and timestamps. See IOPCHDA_Server::GetAggregates for a list of supported aggregates. IOPCHDA_SyncRead::ReadAtTime This method is not supported by the DeltaV OPC History Server at this time. IOPCHDA_SyncRead::ReadModified This method is not supported by the DeltaV OPC History Server at this time. IOPCHDA_SyncRead::ReadAttribute This method reads the attribute values and timestamps for the specified time domain for an item. The DeltaV OPC History Server only supports current values for attributes. See IOPCHDA_Server::GetItemAttributes for a list of supported attributes.

146

System Configuration

OPC Historical Data Access Clients


Inside this topic Non-DeltaV Workstations Copying OPCHDAAuto.dll to the Client OPCHDAClient.exe Sample Client Input Script File <Configuration> Tag <Execution> Tag <Steps> Tag <Step> Tag This section describes an OPC HDA sample client application for use with the DeltaV OPC History Server. This client application, OPCHDAClient.exe, is located in the DeltaV\bin directory. It allows the user to create an XML input script file that is used as a command line argument and writes output to text files. The XML schema file (DvOpcHda.xsd) for the XML script files is located in the DeltaV\bin directory, and several example XML script files are available in the DeltaV\samples directory. A second client application, HDAprobe.exe, is also available in the DeltaV\bin directory. This client is not documented or supported, but users may find it helpful for testing purposes. Users are also able to write their own OPC HDA client applications based on the OPC HDA specifications outlined in the topic DeltaV OPC History Server. To use the OPCHDAClient.exe sample client provided with the DeltaV software, it is assumed that the user is familiar with XML and has access to an XML schema tool, such as XML spy. Non-DeltaV Workstations If an OPC HDA client application (including the DeltaV sample clients) is running on a non-DeltaV workstation, OPC Remote must be installed on the non-DeltaV workstation in order to connect to the DeltaV OPC History Server.

Copying OPCHDAAuto.dll to the Client The file OPCHDAauto.dll must be present and registered on any client machine that is to run a VB client for OPC HDA. After installing OPCRemote, copy OPCHDAauto.dll to the client. To copy and register the file, do the following: 1 2 3 Copy the file OPCHDAauto.dll from the DeltaV workstation where the hot fix was installed to %WINDIR%\SYSTEM32\ on the client machine. Change to the %WINDIR%\SYSTEM32 directory. On the client machine, run the command "regsvr32 OPCHDAauto.dll ."

OPCHDAClient.exe Sample Client OPCHDAClient.exe is stored in the DeltaV\bin directory and can be accessed from the Windows Run command. The XML schema file, DvOpcHda.xsd, is also in the DeltaV\bin directory. The client accepts an XML script file name as the command line argument and writes output to text files. An example of the Run command line is: OPCHDAClient.exe MyScriptFile.xml

The Continuous Historian

147

The script file specifies what the client application should perform. It defines one or more steps. Each step retrieves data from one data item and generates one data output file. A single log file will also be generated that contains the overall execution procedure and detailed error information. Input Script File The input script in the command line argument for the OPCHDAClient.exe is an XML file. The XML script file must conform to the schema defined in the file DvOpcHda.xsd. The schema file, which should never be modified, may be used to validate the XML script file (including syntax and data types) used as input to OPCHDAClient.exe. The tags defined in the following are optional or take default values. The script has two parts, configuration and execution: <DeltaVOpcHdaClient> <Configuration></Configuration> <Execution></Execution> </DeltaVOpcHdaClient> All timestamps in the script file are UTC time to be consistent with the OPC HDA standard. <Configuration> Tag The Configuration tag defines the execution configuration detailed in its subtags. <Configuration> has the following single value tags. Tag Name LogFileDirectory LogFileName OutputDirectory OutputFileName OutputFileFormat HostName TimeSetting Definition Execution log file directory Execution log file name Data output file directory Data output file name prefix Data output file format Server machine name Time format in the output file Value/Comment Current directory by default OpcHdaLog by default Current directory by default Must be specified XML(default), TXT, CSV Local host by default LOCAL(default), UTC

<Execution> Tag The Execution tag defines the data to be retrieved from the DeltaV OPC History Server. <Execution> has one complex tag: <Execution> <Steps> </Steps> </Execution>

148

System Configuration

<Steps> Tag <Steps> contains a list of <Step> tags. The steps will be executed in sequence. <Step> Tag The <Step> tag defines the configuration of one data item to be retrieved from the DeltaV OPC History Server, detailed in its subtags. <Step> has the following single value tags. Tag Name Interface Method Definition The interface pointer to use. The interface method to call. Value/Comment IOPCHDA_SyncRead ReadRaw ReadProcessed ReadAttribute "LOOP/SGGN/OUT.CV". DeltaV specific. OPCHDA_Interpolative OPCHDA_TimeAverage OPCHDA_Count OPCHDA_MinimumActualTim e OPCHDA_Minimum OPCHDA_MaximumActualTim e OPCHDA_Maximum OPCHDA_Start OPCHDA_End OPCHDA_DataType OPCHDA_Stepped OPCHDA_ItemID OPCHDA_Max_Time_Int OPCHDA_Min_Time_Int OPCHDA_Exception_Dev OPCHDA_EXCEPTION_DEV_ TYPE "10-Jan-2001 + 1 MO", "25 January 1996", "8:30:00", "20:30:00", "July 25, 1996 8:30:00" , "8:30:00 Jan 25, 1996", "1/25/1996 8:30:00"

ItemID AggregateID

Name of the data item Aggregate ID parameter used in ReadProcessed method

AttributeID

Attribute ID parameter used in ReadAttribute method

StartTime

The start time of data values. If the string cannot be parsed by COleDateTime, then it is in OPC HDA time format or some conventional date format shown here.

The Continuous Historian

149

Tag Name EndTime

Definition The end time of data values. If the string cannot be parsed by COleDateTime, then it is in OPC HDA time format or some conventional date format shown here. NumValues parameter used in ReadRaw method Bounds parameter used in ReadRaw method ResampleInterval parameter used in ReadProcessed method. In milliseconds. Appended to OutputFileName defined in Configuration tag to form the file name for this step.

Value/Comment "10-Jan-2001 + 2 MO", 25 January 1996, 9:30:00, 21:30:00, July 25, 1996 9:30:00, 9:30:00 Jan. 25, 1996, "1/25/1996 9:30:00" 1, 2, (1 by default) TRUE, FALSE (default) 0 by default

NumValues Bounds ResampleInterval

FileSuffix

Many of these parameters can be understood by reading the OPC HDA specification, Section 4.4.3, for the ReadRaw, ReadProcessed, and ReadAttribute methods.

150

System Configuration

OPCHDAClient.exe Sample Input Scripts


Inside this topic OpcHdaRaw.xml OpcHdaProcessed.xml OpcHdaAttr.xml Output File Tab/Comma Delimited Output Files XML Output Log File The three sample XML input scripts are in the DeltaV\samples directory for use with the OPCHDAClient.exe sample client. The three sample script files provide examples of how to read raw, processed, and attribute data from the DeltaV OPC History Server. The sample script files are named OpdHdaRaw.xml, OpcHdaProcessed.xml, and OpcHdaAttr.xml. The script file specifies what the client application should perform. It defines one or more steps. Each step retrieves data from one data item and generates one data output file. A single log file is also generated that contains overall execution procedure and detailed error information. OpcHdaRaw.xml The OpcHdaRaw.xml sample script provides an example of how to obtain raw data from the DeltaV OPC History Server. In the following example, the goal is to read one day's raw data of the tag "FIC-101/PID1/SP.CV" before current time, with bounds. The data is to be read from the local DeltaV OPC History Server, with output to an XML file named FIC-101.XML. The script file (OpcHdaRaw.xml) contains the following:<DeltaVOpcHdaClient> <Configuration> <OutputFileName>FIC-101</OutputFileName> </Configuration> <Execution> <Steps> <Step> <Interface>IOPCHDA_SyncRead</Interface> <Method>ReadRaw</Method> <ItemID>FIC-101/PID1/SP.CV</ItemID> <StartTime>NOW - 1 D</StartTime> <EndTime>NOW</EndTime> <NumValues>1</NumValues> <Bounds>TRUE</Bounds> </Step> </Steps> </Execution> </DeltaVOpcHdaClient> OpcHdaProcessed.xml The OpcHdaProcessed.xml sample script provides an example of how to obtain processed (also known as interpolated or calculated) data from the DeltaV OPC History Server. In the following example, the goal is to read

The Continuous Historian

151

one day's interpolated values of "FIC-101/PID1/SP.CV" before current time, at 10-minute intervals. The data is to be read from the local DeltaV OPC History Server, with output to a tab-delimited text file named FIC-101.TXT. The script file (OpcHdaProcessed.xml) contains the following: <DeltaVOpcHdaClient> <Configuration> <OutputFileName>FIC-101</OutputFileName> <OutputFileFormat>TXT</OutputFileFormat> </Configuration> <Execution> <Steps> <Step> <Interface>IOPCHDA_SyncRead</Interface> <Method>ReadProcessed</Method> <ItemID>FIC-101/PID1/SP.CV</ItemID> <StartTime>NOW 1 D</StartTime> <EndTime>NOW</EndTime> <ResampleInterval>600000</ResampleInterval> <AggregateID>OPCHDA_INTERPOLATIVE</AggregateID> </Step> </Steps> </Execution> </DeltaVOpcHdaClient> OpcHdaAttr.xml The OpcHdaAttr.xml sample script provides an example of how to obtain attribute data from the DeltaV OPC History Server. In the following example, the goal is to read current data type and exception deviation of "FIC-101/PID1/ SP.CV". The attribute data is to be read from a remote server machine called PROPLUS, with output to XML files named FIC-101_CurrentType.XML and FIC-101_ExecDev.XML. T The script file (OpcHdaAttr.xml) contains the following: <DeltaVOpcHdaClient> <Configuration> <OutputFileName>FIC-101</OutputFileName> <HostName>PROPLUS</HostName> </Configuration> <Execution> <Steps> <Step> <Interface>IOPCHDA_SyncRead</Interface> <Method>ReadAttribute</Method> <ItemID>FIC-101/PID1/SP.CV</ItemID> <StartTime>NOW</StartTime> <EndTime></EndTime> <AttributeID>0x01</AttributeID> <FileSuffix>_CurrentType</FileSuffix> </Step> <Step> <Interface>IOPCHDA_SyncRead</Interface> <Method>ReadAttribute</Method> <ItemID>FIC-101/PID1/SP.CV</ItemID>

152

System Configuration

<StartTime>NOW</StartTime> <EndTime></EndTime> <AttributeID>OPCHDA_EXCEPTION_DEV</AttributeID> <FileSuffix>_ExecDev</FileSuffix> </Step> </Steps> </Execution> </DeltaVOpcHdaClient> Output File The following is the table of keywords that are used in the output files. The keywords will be column names in text output files and tag/attribute names in XML output files. Data Value TimeStamp Quality AtrtributeValue Item Attribute ItemID AttributeID AggregateID XML only XML only XML only XML only XML only

Tab/Comma Delimited Output Files There are two types of text output files, both of which are readable by Excel. The value of TXT for OutputFileFormat in the script file indicates a tab-delimited text file with a file extension of .txt; the value of CSV for OutputFileFormat in the script file indicates a comma-delimited text file with a file extension of .csv. The first row of the data will be column names, which are selected from the keyword list in the table above. The following is a partial output from the OpcHdaRaw.xml sample script in comma-delimited output file format (*.csv). DataValue,TimeStamp,Quality 12.345,December 23 2004 8:30:00,192 12.346,December 23 2004 8:31:00,192 12.347,December 23 2004 8:32:00,192 12.348,December 23 2004 8:34:00,192 The following is a partial output from the OpcHdaProcessed.xml sample script in tab-delimited output file format (*.txt).

The Continuous Historian

153

DataValue TimeStamp Quality 12.345 December 23 2004 8:30:00 192 12.446 December 23 2004 8:40:00 192 12.547 December 23 2004 8:50:00 192 12.648 December 23 2004 9:00:00 192 The following is the output from the OpcHdaAttr.xml sample script showing a comma-delimited output file of the current data type: AttributeValue,TimeStamp 5,December 24 2004 8:30:00 XML Output The XML output file uses a very simple schema that can be loaded into Internet Explorer or into a Microsoft Word document using the XML capabilities in MS Office. Item tag has the following properties: Item ID - the item ID in DeltaV defined format Aggregate ID - absent if not an aggregate value

It contains a list of DataValue tags, each of which has the following properties: TimeStamp - the timestamp of the data in UTC Quality - the quality as defined in the OPC HDA specifications

Attribute tag has the following properties: ItemID - the item ID in DeltaV defined format AttributeID - the attribute ID as defined in the OPC HDA specifications

It contains a list of AttributeValue tags, each of which has a TimeStamp property. The following is a partial output from the OpcHdaRaw.xml sample script in XML output file format. <DeltaVOpcHdaData> <Item ItemID=FIC-101/PID1/SP.CV> <DataValue TimeStamp=December 23 2004 8:30:00,192 Quality=192>12.345</DataValue> <DataValue TimeStamp=December 23 2004 8:40:00,192 Quality=192>12.346</DataValue> <DataValue TimeStamp=December 23 2004 8:50:00,192 Quality=192>12.347</DataValue> <DataValue TimeStamp=December 23 2004 9:00:00,192 Quality=192>12.348</DataValue> </ Item> </DeltaVOpcHdaData> The following is a partial output from the OpcHdaProcessed.sml sample script in XML output file format. <DeltaVOpcHdaData> <Item ItemID=FIC-101/PID1/SP.CV AggregateID=OPCHDA_INTERPOLATIVE> <DataValue TimeStamp=December 23 2004 8:30:00,192 Quality=192>12.345</DataValue> <DataValue TimeStamp=December 23 2004 8:40:00,192 Quality=192>12.446</DataValue> <DataValue TimeStamp=December 23 2004 8:50:00,192 Quality=192>12.547</DataValue> <DataValue TimeStamp=December 23 2004 9:00:00,192 Quality=192>12.648</DataValue>

154

System Configuration

</Item> </DeltaVOpcHdaData> The following is the output from the OpcHdaAttr.xml sample script showing an XML output file of the current data type. <DeltaVOpcHdaData> <Attribute ItemID=FIC-101/PID1/SP.CV AttributeID=OPCHDA_DATA_TYPE> <AttributeValue TimeStamp=December 24 2004 8:30:00,192>5</AttributeValue> </Attribute> </DeltaVOpcHdaData> Log File The log file will log general steps taken during the execution. If an error occurs, detailed information will be logged as well.

The Continuous Historian

155

Controller Considerations
Nodes are physical devices or pieces of equipment on the LAN, such as a controller or a console. You control your process by downloading modules and defining I/O blocks and other configuration elements in the nodes. The configuration tells the node how to act and what information you want to receive or save from the process. You can define a node using the Configuration Assistant application or the DeltaV Explorer. To look at the status of a node, use the Diagnostics application. Note Unless specifically noted otherwise, all references to a workstation in the Books Online refer to one of these DeltaV workstation types: Professional, ProfessionalPLUS, Operator or Base.

Controller Functionality
The functionality that a controller supports depends on the combination of the controller model, cards installed, and revision level of the DeltaV software. The following table shows the functionality supported by several controllers and cards and the current revision of the DeltaV software. All of the controller and card combinations support standard functionality. Controller Functionality Controller and Card Sequence of Events (SOE) Device Alerts Redundant I/O DeviceNet NeuralNet, MPC, MPC Pro, Lab Entry and Inspect Function Blocks No No Yes

M5 Controller M5Plus Controller MD Controller

No No Yes

No No Yes1

No No Yes2

No No Yes

1. Series 2 H1 card required for Device Alerts. 2. Series 2 I/O cards required for redundant I/O.

Auto-Sense Feature
When you connect controllers and I/O cards to an operational DeltaV control network, the system automatically senses the controller and cards, as well as the card types. You do not have to type in all the I/O card types connected to a controller because the DeltaV system does it for you.

156

System Configuration

Commissioning
An automatically sensed controller must be commissioned in order to be fully functional in the system. When the system first senses a controller on the network, the controller is displayed in the Decommissioned Controllers section of the Explorer. A decommissioned controller does not have an ID, an address, or a name. It is not bound to any controller definition in the database. Commissioning is the process of dragging the controller icon from the Decommissioned Controllers section to the Control Network section within the Explorer. Commissioning a controller assigns an address and ID to the controller, and prompts you to supply a name and description.

Decommissioning
Decommissioning a controller takes it out of service. When you decommission a controller, all the information in the controller is erased. You should not unassign modules when you decommission a controller because these assignments can be restored through a download after you commission the controller. Note Whenever you need to remove or a controller for service, or to move it to a new location on the control network, you should decommission the controller. When you decommission a controller, the controller icon and all its database information remains visible in the Explorer. Database information includes all the configured cards, card types, channel types, and all the modules assigned to the controller. You can restore all of this information by commissioning the controller and selecting the Download Controller Node. Note You can potentially lose online data if it is different from the information in the controller. For example, if you have made online changes to a module from Control Studio, you lose this data when you decommission the controller unless you first upload that data into the database. Refer to Uploading Recorded Parameter Changes for more information.

Inter-Controller Communications Guidelines


This section describes controller communication behaviors in order to help you design your system to ensure data transmission between DeltaV nodes. Before describing these behaviors, it is necessary to understand the definition of Read, Synchronous Write, and Buffered Asynchronous Write through a few examples: Read Example - Controller B has an input parameter defined as an external reference to a parameter in Controller A. Controller B initiates unsolicited updates from Controller A by requesting data from Controller A. When a parameter is read in Controller B, no communication is sent to Controller A; instead, the data from the last unsolicited update is read. Parameter updates from A to B occur when the parameter in B changes. The unsolicited send occurs at the same priority as low priority modules on the source node. When referencing a parameter in another node in an expression, you can verify communications with that parameter or node with the .CST field. The .CST field can be referenced in blocks such as the CALC block or SFC expression. When verifying the status of a reference in another controller, .CST is recommended instead of .ST. The .ST value is set by the sending node. As such, if communications is lost, the .ST value does not change and holds its last value. The CST value is set by the receiving node. Every time the module executes, the .CST value is updated with the current remote status. Buffered Asynchronous Write - When calculation block expressions, action block expressions, and SFC/PLM/ Phase Class actions write to a parameter in another node, the output is buffered. This is followed by an asynchronous

Controller Considerations

157

write request to the destination node with the new data. These occur at a priority lower than low priority modules on the source node. Buffered asynchronous writes are also done for external reference parameters in other nodes. With these definitions in mind, note the following constraints regarding data exchange between nodes: Buffered writes are processed every 500 milliseconds. Reading data is preferable to writing data, both for loading reasons and for communications status reasons. A read operation has the appropriate status, depending on the state of communications. At the destination, a written value holds the last value and last status and does not indicate communications problems if they exist. If there is a communication failure between nodes, a written value does not reflect the current value and status of the source data. Note Normal situations occur in which both reads and writes fail. Partial downloads, overload, redundancy switches, and other operations can all cause a read or write operation to fail (possibly without any indication of failure) at some instant. Unsolicited send operations contain a maximum of 1000 parameters per second. This total is enforced, regardless of the number of nodes to which unsolicited send operations are targeted. If there are more than 1000 unsolicited parameters to be sent through an unsolicited send operation within a second, the excess parameters are held until the next second. This means that, although the parameter data eventually arrives at the receiving node, the date may be slightly older than expected. Write operations of either type are recommended to be no more than 20 per second per node. The scan rate of modules configured with asynchronous writes must be greater than 100 ms to allow processing time between write operations. Reading any or all array elements from one controller to another is supported. Write operations of arrays from node to node are not supported. An error is returned to the caller. Buffered asynchronous write operations are not confirmed. If the control strategy depends on moving critical data between nodes using buffered asynchronous write operations, the configuration must provide a means to confirm any important write operation. The system can be configured to read the last write status using the AWST (Asynchronous Write STatus) field. SFC Actions will read AWST and retry writes that may have failed. Note Due to normal system dynamics, a group of buffered asynchronous writes (such as multiple actions in a single SFC step) does not necessarily act on the destination parameters in a predictable order. Due to the relative priority of the various read and write operations versus other tasks in each node, in cases of overload situations, reads and writes may not occur when expected.

Controller Redundancy
The DeltaV system supports redundant controllers. A redundant controller consists of a pair of standard controllers on separate 2-wide power/controller carriers connected together. Each controller requires a separate power supply mounted on its carrier. One of the controllers in the pair is the active controller. The other controller is the standby controller. The standby controller contains the same configuration as the active controller. When an active controller fails, the standby controller takes over providing uninterrupted control operation without user intervention. The standby controller gets updates of certain parameter values in the active controller over the redundancy link, but does not execute control logic. When the switchover occurs, the new active controller reads back I/O data and the modules begin to execute. A limited amount of re-initialization occurs in order to resume control without disruption. For example, certain control and output function blocks begin executing in out-of-service mode and climb to their target mode in order to force handshaking with other blocks. In most cases control actions resume on the first scan after a

158

System Configuration

switchover. For complex modules, one or a few scans of handshaking may be required. The apparent mode change on a switchover is expected and has no adverse effect on control. Even though each controller in a redundant pair does have its own MAC address and node address, a redundant controller counts as a single node on the DeltaV control network in terms of network capacity. A redundant controller requires a redundant controller license. Downloading a redundant controller without a license results in a description of "Redundancy Not Licensed" in Process History View. In addition, the RedEnb diagnostics parameter has a value of NO if no license is present. Switchovers A switchover from the active to the standby controller can occur for the following reasons: Hardware failure within the active controller Communications failure between the active controller and the I/O subsystem Communications failure of both the primary and secondary network connections in the active controller Removal of the active controller from the carrier Manual switchover request Loss of power supply for the active controller

When a switchover occurs, the node status area on the Alarm Banner indicates the status change to the operator. Alarm events are regenerated with new timestamps. The Alarm List is updated with the new times. The system stores a record of each switchover and the reason it occurred (if known). The switchover is logged in the Process History event chronicle. If the standby controller should fail, the software disables switchovers until you replace the failed unit. Generally, there is no user impact related to a controller switchover. However, there are certain situations that the user should be aware of when configuring control. These relate to HART digital variables, external references to other controllers, and forced debug parameter values. HART digital variables will have a value of zero with Bad status for six or more seconds after a controller switchover. If you access a HART digital variable in an expression (Calc, Condition, or Action function block; SFC transition or action), be sure to also consider the status of the variable in the expression. For example, use the value only when the status is Good. Accessing HART digital variables in AI function blocks or by external reference parameters should be done for monitoring, not control purposes. When a controller switches over it can take several seconds to re-establish communication with other controllers. External reference parameters that reference parameters in another controller will have BadNoCommNUV status during this brief period following a switchover. Understand how downstream function blocks and expressions will react to this bad status on a switchover so that your configuration will not create an output disruption. Refer to the status handling subtopic of specific function blocks for this information. A Condition function block that references a parameter in another controller has the potential to change its OUT_D parameter when the referenced controller switches over. You can prevent this by selecting the Abort on Read Errors option in ALGO_OPTS. This is recommended unless you want OUT_D.ST to be BadNoCommNUV during the switchover. In this case leave the Abort option deselected and change ERROR_OPT to Use Last. Forced debug parameter values (that is, those set in Control Studio's debug mode) are not retained following a controller switchover. The value of the parameter is set to the default value as configured. Manual Switchovers Users with the Diagnostic Key can initiate a switchover from DeltaV Diagnostics. In Diagnostics, a redundant controller has a Redundancy subsystem. To perform a manual switchover, select the Redundancy subsystem, click the right mouse button, and then click Redundancy switchover.

Controller Considerations

159

Controllers have three parameters that determine whether a manual switchover can occur: PExist -- indicates whether the standby controller is physically present PAvail -- indicates whether the standby controller has received a download and is ready to take over RedEnb -- indicates whether redundancy has been enabled for the pair. In order for redundancy to be enabled, the active controller must have received a download.

In order for a manual switchover to occur, all three of the above parameters must have a value of Yes. If not, the Status parameter provides additional details about why the controller cannot switch over. Creating a Controller Placeholder To create a placeholder for a redundant controller in DeltaV Explorer, add a controller node, and then click the Redundant Controller option on the node's properties. Installing a Redundant Controller Installing a redundant controller is as simple as installing a single controller. The auto-sense feature in the DeltaV system recognizes two controllers on adjacent, connected carriers as a redundant controller. Refer to Installing your DeltaV Automation System for physical installation instructions. After installation, drag the controller from the Decommissioned Controllers section to the control network or to a redundant placeholder. Assign an appropriate redundant license to the controller and download the controllers to enable redundancy. Installing a Standby Controller You can connect a second controller to an existing controller's carrier to introduce redundant control without interrupting your process. The system automatically commissions a standby controller when you install it. It is not necessary to remove or decommission the active controller. The active controller continues to operate without interruption. The system automatically assigns the standby with an address and downloads the standby controller with the latest download and with any online changes made to the active controller. To install a standby controller follow these steps: Caution Follow the steps in the order shown. Do not install a second 2-wide carrier that already has a power supply and controller installed. Doing so will result in a loss of configuration data for the active controller. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Using the DeltaV Explorer, assign an appropriate redundant controller license to the controller node that you want to make redundant in DeltaV Explorer. Install a second 2-wide carrier to the left of the current 2-wide carrier. Insert the appropriate Power Supply in the left slot of the 2-wide carrier plug in the power cord. Connect an M5 or higher version controller to the carrier. The version of the controller you connect must match the existing controller's version. The DeltaV Explorer displays a redundant controller icon in place of the simplex icon. If you are changing a simplex controller to a redundant pair, there is a one-time step required. In the DeltaV Explorer, click the right mouse button on the controller, click Download, and then click Setup Data. This turns on redundancy for the pair but does not disrupt any existing process control.

Replacing a Failed Controller When a switchover occurs, remove the failed controller and plug in a replacement. The system automatically commissions the replacement and makes it the standby controller. Removing Controllers The commissioning and decommissioning function in the DeltaV Explorer affects both controllers in the pair. You can remove one controller in a redundant pair without decommissioning it. For example, if you remove the standby

160

System Configuration

controller and reinstall it, the address is reestablished, the standby receives a current download and is ready to accept a switchover. If you remove the active controller without decommissioning, the standby takes over control. When you reinstall the controller, the address is reestablished and the reinstalled controller becomes the standby controller. Anytime one controller is removed from a pair, the DeltaV Explorer continues to identify the controller as redundant. If you want to change a redundant controller to simplex, you must change the properties of the controller in DeltaV Explorer and download the controller's setup data. Do not disconnect a carrier and its controller while the controller is powered and operating. If a controller and carrier must be removed, power down the controller before disconnecting the carrier and its controller. Note Before removing both the controllers of a redundant pair, decommission the node through the DeltaV Explorer. Diagnostics The DeltaV Diagnostics displays a redundant controller icon in place of the simplex icon for redundant controllers and placeholders. The DeltaV Diagnostics enables you to view diagnostics, MAC addresses, and node (IP) addresses for both controllers in a pair. Diagnostics also enables you to flash the lights on either controller in the pair independently using the Identify Controller menu selection. All diagnostic and address information for the standby controller is accessed through the active controller at the Standby level (below the Redundancy Subsystem). Diagnostics requires a commissioned communicating controller to be able to flash the lights (unlike Explorer, which can use the database MAC address when the controller is decommissioned). However, you can Telnet or perform a TCP/IP PING directly to the primary or secondary network connection node addresses on the standby. Upgrading Controller Firmware If the redundant controllers require a firmware upgrade (such as for a DeltaV version upgrade), the controllers contain flash ROM that allows you to update the firmware while your process is running. Simply upgrade the standby controller, then perform a manual switchover from Diagnostics. You can then upgrade controller that you recently switched to standby at your convenience. There is no downtime.

Controller Considerations

161

Controller Performance
Inside this topic Module Scan Rate Execution Order within the Module Scan Rate Multiplier Scan Rate of Interacting Modules The DeltaV controller balances memory and CPU capacity with Device Signal Tag (DST) licensing limits. It is possible to exceed a controller's memory and CPU capacity even if the controller license supports the number of DSTs in the control strategy. However, for a typical application in a wet process industry, the configuration engineer should be able to implement the required control strategies up to and including the DST license limit of the given controller. Following are some guidelines to help deliver the maximum controller CPU performance. Module Scan Rate The scan rate of control modules affects CPU loading. A newly created module has a default scan rate of 1 second. The library's module templates have default scan rates between 500 milliseconds and 5 seconds. Before increasing the scan rate of a module, consider process dynamics, the response times of the transmitters, and final control elements associated with the module. Faster module scan rates can consume CPU capacity without improving control performance. Setting a reasonable scan rate requires an understanding of the process dynamics for analog control modules. When the controlled variable reacts slowly to changes in the manipulated variable, the module scan rate can be set slower than when the controlled variable reacts quickly. This means that flow and liquid pressure loops must have a faster scan rate (500 milliseconds or 1 second) than a temperature loop scan rate (5 or 10 seconds). The scan rate of a level loop depends on the throughput (versus the size) of the vessel but can often be 2 or 5 seconds. Although it is customary to overscan analog control modules slightly, running all loops faster than necessary quickly consumes the CPU. Monitoring modules, which gather data to display on DeltaV Operate, should have a maximum scan rate of 1 second, which is the fastest display update rate. These modules can often be executed at a 2 or 5 second rate, based on the speed of the transmitter to detect process parameters. Modules that control discrete devices (for example, motors and valves) can usually be scanned at 1 second. At this rate, outputs are driven soon after the setpoint is changed. When process interlocks are involved, it is sometimes necessary to speed up the scan rate to 500 milliseconds. If the module needs to sense momentary push buttons in the field, set the scan rate to 500 milliseconds. Execution Order Within the Module An incorrect execution order of module function blocks can make the module appear to scan slower than its actual scan rate. Note Input blocks should execute before control blocks or output blocks. The default execution order is based on the order the blocks are created. Note the execution order of the blocks in the bottom right of each block and change as needed. For example, consider the INTERLOCK_D input of the Device Control function block or the TRK_IN_D input of the PID function block. These values might be used by the blocks to stop a motor or close a control valve. If the Device Control or PID block executes before the block(s) that determine the value of the input, the module loses a

162

System Configuration

scan before acting on the input. For more information, refer to the section entitled Set the Execution Order of Function Block in the Control Studio help system. Scan Rate Multiplier A scan rate multiplier can be applied to a function block so that it executes at a slower rate than the module. Some modules need a relatively fast scan rate to perform time-critical functions, such as interlocking or push-button detecting. Apply a scan rate multiplier to blocks that do not need to execute every scan. For more information, refer to the section entitled Scan Rate in the Control Studio help system. Scan Rate of Interacting Modules Control strategies can span multiple control modules. Select scan rates that meet the timing requirements of any interacting modules but still make efficient use of the CPU. For example, you use module templates from the library to create several motor modules with interlocks. The interlock conditions in each of these modules are configured using expressions in Condition function blocks. If the interlock conditions rely on values of parameters in other modules, the scan rate of those other modules should be at least as fast as the motor module. The configuration engineer does not set the execution order of control modules. Only the execution order of blocks within modules is set. So, the user does not control the order of execution of modules with the same scan rate. Modules that interact with other modules having the same scan rate could effectively be delayed 1 scan in terms of acting on information from another module. This might lead the configuration engineer to scan all interacting modules at twice the required scan rate. If there is a requirement that all discrete devices (for example, motors) interlock to the passive state within 1 second, then setting the scan rate of all modules involved in interlock conditions or discrete control to 1 second does not guarantee that the requirement will be met. However, setting the scan rate to 500 milliseconds satisfies the requirement with the possibility that it might be costly from a CPU loading perspective. A possible alternative when CPU load is an issue would be to base interlock conditions on values at input channels (via I/O type parameter paths) where possible, rather than on parameters in other control modules (via module type parameter paths) instead of overscanning all of the interacting modules. This keeps the interlock information current to within about 25 msecs.

Controller Considerations

163

Preserving Configuration and Controller Data During Power Loss


Inside this topic Preserving Configuration During Power Loss Setting Controller Restart Controller Nonvolatile Memory Cold Restart Versus User Restart Restart Diagnostic Parameters If a controller loses power, it also loses all of the modules that have been downloaded to it as well as any online parameter changes. The controller provides a cold restart feature that preserves some of this data and restart the controller automatically. This is accomplished by storing configuration data and optionally storing certain parameter values in the controllers nonvolatile memory. Preserving Configuration During Power Loss Each time you request a total download for a controller, the system downloads the data to the controller's RAM. This data is used for control. The system also downloads the data to the controller's nonvolatile flash memory (if the Cold Restart Perform Within option is greater than zero) and to the ProfessionalPLUS workstation. The Cold Restart Perform Within option is available in the Controller Properties dialog in DeltaV Explorer. The download stored in the nonvolatile memory is a compressed duplicate of the download sent to the controller RAM. The download stored in the ProfessionalPlus workstation is the same script file that is sent to the controller RAM. In the event of a power failure, the controller can initialize itself using the data in nonvolatile memory. This nonvolatile memory includes the downloaded values with the exception of parameter values that you designated to be restored as described in Preserving Parameter Values During Power Loss. The initialization process is relatively fast and does not require communication with the ProfessionalPlus workstation. If for some reason the nonvolatile memory is not present, the system downloads the download scripts from the ProfessionalPLUS workstation. Preserving Parameter Values During Power Loss Any parameters that have changed since the download are not part of the download script that is stored in nonvolatile controller memory or in the ProfessionalPlus. There are two strategies for preserving these online parameter changes available after a power loss. First, for tuning parameters that are adjusted periodically, you can upload these online changes and then download to Controller Cold Restart Memory in DeltaV Explorer to keep the controller cold restart memory current. However, this strategy is only useful for values that change infrequently. Many parameter changes, such as integrator totals, operating parameters and calculated values can be better preserved by designating them as values to be restored after restart. The Restore parameter values after restart feature enables the user to specify that the values of certain parameters in controller RAM are also preserved in nonvolatile memory in the event of controller power loss. The selected parameter values will be preserved if the restart occurs within the user-specified cold restart time. After a total download, the parameters for which Restore parameter values after restart have been checked are restored to the values saved in nonvolatile memory (unless the restore parameter feature is disabled in the total download configuration). The memory used to store these parameter values does not degrade with use. It is not the same as the memory used for storing the cold restart configuration download data. Note The Restore parameter values after restart feature is only supported by the MD controller.

164

System Configuration

Valid Module Types Control modules and equipment modules support the restore parameter values feature. Valid Parameters The MCOMMAND and VERSION, module-level parameters support the restore parameter values feature. Userdefined, module-level parameters of the following types also support the restore parameter values feature: Floating Point Floating Point W/ Status Boolean Boolean W/Status Discrete W/Status 8 bit signed int 16 bit signed int 32 bit signed int 8 bit unsigned int 16 bit unsigned int 32 bit unsigned int 32 bit unsigned int w/status Named set (value only) Mode Internal Reference Parameters (this functions only when one parameter that supports the restore parameter values feature directly references another parameter that also supports the feature.

To restore a value for a parameter that is not a user-defined, module-level parameter, you can set up an internal reference for the parameter and designate that its value be restored on restart. The following energy metering function blocks (AGA_SI and AGA_US) parameters support the restore feature automatically: CURR_VOLUME CURR_ENERGY CURR_HRS_ON LAST_VOLUME LAST_HRS_ON LAST_ENERGY VOL_ACCUM PCT_CURR_VOLUME PCT_CURR_ENERGY PCT_LAST_VOLUME PCT_LAST_ENERGY PCT_CURR_HRS_ON PCT_LAST_HRS_ON

Controller Considerations

165

PCT_VOL_ACCUM CURR_VOLUME_GOOD CURR_ENERGY_GOOD CURR_HRS_ON_GOOD VOL_ACCUM_GOOD

Enabling the Restore Parameter Value Feature In order to enable the restore parameter values feature: 1 2 3 Check the Restore parameter value after restart checkbox in the user-defined parameter properties. Check the Restore parameter values after restart checkbox on the module properties dialog. Set the controller cold restart feature for the associated controller as described below.

Setting Controller Restart You can set the restart feature on a controller basis. Not all controllers need to be enabled for a cold restart. In the controller properties (viewed through the Explorer), use the Cold Restart Perform Within option under the Controller tab to specify how you want the system to respond when power is restored to a controller. The Cold Restart Perform Within time is the maximum power failure duration for which the system automatically downloads all lost data to the controller prior to getting the controller running again. You can specify the time in a combination of days (0 through 30), hours (0 through 24), and minutes (0 through 60). A setting of 0 disables automatic restart. The power must return within the time specified. When power is restored before the time elapses, the controller goes into the COLDRESTART state. However, if the specified time elapses before power is restored, the controller goes into the USERRESTART state. This state requires you to download the controller node from the Explorer. Note Set the Cold Restart Time to at least two minutes. In some cases, a time of one minute might not allow for necessary network messaging to occur before the restart time elapses. Note The loss of power to a controller and a subsequent cold restart or user restart can be disruptive to the process. An uninterruptible power supply (UPS) is highly recommended as a means to prevent process disruption during a short power loss. For example, if you specify 1 hour in the Controller Node properties box and the controller loses power and regains power in an hour or less, the controller downloads itself using the configuration stored in nonvolatile memory. However, if the controller regains power after 61 minutes or more, you must perform the equivalent of a restart by downloading the controller node. Controller Nonvolatile Memory The local cold start database (controller nonvolatile memory) is written (that is, made usable) if a non-zero cold restart time is specified (under controller properties) and one of the following operations is performed: total download selection of Download | Controller Cold Restart Memory from DeltaV Explorer

The local cold start database (controller nonvolatile memory) is cleared (that is, made unusable) by any of the following operations: controller upgrade decommission/commission

166

System Configuration

partial download upload

If the local database is unusable and a non-zero cold restart time is configured, the controller receives its download scripts from the ProfessionalPlus workstation cold start database in the event of a restart that occurs before the cold restart time has elapsed. The hardware used for storing the parameter values supports unlimited write cycles. However, the amount of space allocated for the restore parameter values after restart feature is 390 kilobytes. Consider the following to avoid exceeding the 390 kilobyte limit: Each parameter configured with Restore parameter values after restart uses 8 bytes of controller NVM. There is an additional overhead of 12 bytes for modules: a module with one parameter uses 20 bytes of controller NVM. Function blocks may introduce additional overhead.

To determine how much free NVM is available, check the controller's FreNVM parameter in DeltaV Diagnostics. Cold Restart Versus User Restart There are significant factors to consider when deciding to set your controller for a cold restart performed by the system or a user restart. Cold Restart Since the cold restart is an automatic feature, it conveniently restarts a controller without any user intervention. However, the cold restart configuration in nonvolatile memory will not contain online changes to parameter values that have not been uploaded and then downloaded. To prevent loss of online changes, you can use the Restore parameter value on restart feature (described above) in a limited way to preserve certain key values. In addition to this, it is recommended that you regularly upload online changes to tuning parameters and then download to Controller Cold Restart Memory in DeltaV Explorer to keep the controller cold restart memory current. When you perform an upload, the system invalidates the configuration in nonvolatile memory and uses the configuration in the workstation for any cold restarts until the nonvolatile memory is updated. Downloading to controller cold restart memory updates the nonvolatile memory without affecting the working configuration in the controller. To do this, you can either select the controller in the DeltaV Explorer and then right-click Download | Controller Cold Restart Memory or click Download | Setup Data (if you have changed the Cold Restart Perform Within option from zero to greater than zero). User Restart A user restart downloads the current database configuration. Also, the system informs the user of online changes to the module prior to the power failure and allows the user to selectively upload these changes so that they may be included in the download. Restart Diagnostic Parameters The controller supports the following diagnostic parameters related to power failure and restart. Unless otherwise specified, they are available through the DeltaV Diagnostics application: COLDRESTART is true if the node is in the cold restart state. COLDSTRTSRC is the source from which the controller receives its download data during a cold restart. The possible values are Controller (that is, controller nonvolatile memory), Workstation (that is, ProfessionalPLUS download scripts), or Not Configured (if Cold Restart Perform Within is equal to zero).

Controller Considerations

167

USERRESTART is true if the node is in the user restart state. LASTPFDUR is the duration of the last power failure experienced in seconds. PFCOUNT is the count of power failures since being commissioned or reset. SECSLASTPF is the number of seconds since restarting from the last power failure. FRENVM (Free Non-volatile Memory) is the amount of memory (in bytes) that can be allocated to parameters for which the user has checked the Restore parameter value after restart feature. COLD RESTART DATA SIZE is the size of the local configuration (that is, the configuration stored in nonvolatile controller memory). This parameter is only available through the controller maintenance port. COLD RESTART SPACE REMAINING is the free nonvolatile memory space. This parameter is only available through the controller maintenance port.

168

System Configuration

I/O Configuration
The DeltaV I/O subsystem supports multiple types of I/O cards, including analog and discrete input and output cards, HART output and input cards, serial cards, the H1 Fieldbus card, AS-Interface card, Profibus DP card, RTD, ohms, Thermocouple, mV, Multifunction, and the SOE (Sequence of Events) card. The I/O subsystem consists of a terminal block that snaps onto the carrier to provide screw termination for field wiring and the actual I/O card that snaps over the terminal block and onto the carrier. The I/O card converts field signals to the appropriate format for control and communications.

I/O Card and Channel Types


To specify the location and type of channel associated with the field measurement, you configure the channel or port type and the Device Signal Tag (DST) of the IO_IN or IO_OUT parameter. The following channel types are available. Channel Types for I/O Cards I/O Card Analog Input Card Channel or Port Types Analog Input Channel Description Reports the analog value present at the channel. Function Block Use Used with AI and PID function blocks as input I/ O references. Used with AO and PID function blocks as readback references to read a 4 to 20 mA signal. Used with AI and PID function blocks as input I/ O references. Used with AI and PID function blocks as readback references to read a 4 to 20 mA signal. Used with AI and PID function blocks as input I/ O references.

HART Analog Input Channel

Reports the analog value present at the channel and up to four digital values from a HART field device.

Serial Card

RS232 port RS422/485 half duplex port RS422/485 full duplex port

Reports the serial value present at the port. Protocol can be RTU or ASCII. Baud rate options range from 300 to 115,200.

I/O Configuration

169

I/O Card Analog Output Card

Channel or Port Types Analog Output Channel

Description Drives the output to an analog value written by the controller and holds the output at that value. Drives the output to an analog value written by the controller and holds the output at that value. This channel type also sends HART commands to gather as many as eight dynamic variables and four device variables from a HART field device. Reports the discrete value present at the channel.

Function Block Use Used with AO and PID function blocks as output I/O references when driving a 4 to 20 mA signal. Used with the AO function block as output I/ O references. Used with AO and Alarm Detection function blocks as readback references to read dynamic and device variables. The 8 dynamic variables are used in AI function blocks. Used with DI and Device Control function blocks as input I/O references when reading a discrete (On/Off) signal. Used with DO function blocks as a readback I/O reference for a discrete signal. Used with AI and PID function blocks as input I/ O references to read a pulse count.

HART Analog Output Channel

Discrete Input Card

Discrete Input Channel

Pulse Count Input Channel

Reports the number of discrete pulses detected at the channel. For preSeries 2 cards, maximum input frequency for pulses is 125 Hz. For Series 2 cards, maximum input frequency for pulses is 75 Hz.

170

System Configuration

I/O Card Discrete Output Card

Channel or Port Types Discrete Output Channel

Description Drives the output to a discrete value written by the controller and holds the output at that value. Outputs immediately reflect the output value that was received. Upon receiving a configuration that indicates a change from one type of output to another, the outputs switch to the off state. Produces a momentary pulse by driving the output active for a specified time period each time the controller writes a value of TRUE (1, On). Upon receiving a new pulse value, the existing pulse is allowed to terminate normally before the new value is written. Upon receiving a configuration that indicates a change from one type of output to another, the outputs switch to the off state. Produces a continuous pulse by driving the output active for a percentage of a specified time period. Upon receiving a new continuous pulse value, the existing pulse is allowed to terminate normally before the new value is written. Upon receiving a configuration that indicates a change from one type of output to another, the outputs switch to the off state.

Function Block Use Used with DO and Device Control function blocks as output I/O references when driving as discrete signal.

Momentary Output Channel

Used with DO and Device Control function blocks as output I/O references to output a fixed-duration pulse whenever the block writes a TRUE (1) value to the channel.

Continuous Pulse Output Channel

Used with AO and PID function blocks as output I/O references when driving an actuator requiring discrete pulse input.

I/O Configuration

171

I/O Card Isolated Input Card

Channel or Port Types Thermocouple

Description Reports the temperature of the thermocouple and is Cold Junction Compensated. Reports the absolute value of the voltage at the screw terminals, and that voltage is uncompensated for the local cold junction temperature. Reports the temperature of the RTD bulb. Reports the ohms of the measured element. Reports the value of the millivolts at the screw terminals. Reports the value of the voltage at the screw terminals. Reports the temperature of the RTD bulb. Reports the ohms of the measured element. Reports the temperature of the RTD bulb.

Function Block Use Used with AI function blocks as input I/O references. Used with AI function blocks as input I/O references.

Uncharacterized thermocouple

RTD, ohms

Used with AI function blocks as input I/O references. Used with AI function blocks as input I/O references. Used with AI function blocks as input I/O references. Used with AI function blocks as input I/O references. Used with AI function blocks as input I/O references. Used with AI function blocks as input I/O references. Used with AI function blocks as input I/O references.

Resistance

mV

Voltage

RTD, ohms Card

RTD Channel

Resistance Channel

User

172

System Configuration

I/O Card SOE Card (Sequence of Events)

Channel or Port Types Discrete Input Channel

Description Reports the discrete value present at the channel.

Function Block Use Used with DI and Device Control function blocks as input I/O references when reading a discrete (On/Off) signal. Used with DO function blocks as a readback I/O reference for a discrete signal. Used with DI and Device Control function blocks as input I/O references when reading a discrete (On/Off) signal. Used with DO function blocks as a readback I/O reference for a discrete signal. Used with AI function blocks as input I/O references.

SOE Discrete Input Channel

Reports the discrete value present at the channel and captures up to 32 processupset events per card and sends the events to a specified workstation.

Thermocouple, mV* Card

Thermocouple

Reports the temperature of the thermocouple and is cold junction compensated. This card does not support open loop detection. Reports the absolute value of the voltage at the screw terminals, and that voltage is uncompensated for temperature (for example, mV input).

Uncharacterized Thermocouple

Used with AI function blocks as input I/O references.

I/O Configuration

173

I/O Card Multifunction Card

Channel or Port Types DI or Pulse Input (PIN) Channel

Description Reports the number of discrete pulses or peaks of a sine wave detected at the channel. Maximum input frequency is 50KHz. Channel 1 can be used as an external trigger to enable or disable the capture of pulses on channels 2, 3, and 4. To enable the capture of pulses, use DeltaV Explorer to set the ENABLE_PI_GATING card-level parameter to True. Define channel 1 as DI and channels 2, 3 and 4 as PI. The card status will be Bad if ENABLE_PI_GATING is True, but the channels are not defined correctly. Each port functions as an AS-Interface master. The AS-Interface master controls communications on the network by polling the slave devices, issuing commands, and receiving and processing replies from the slave devices. Supports auto-sensing and auto-addressing of devices. Functions as the Link Active Scheduler (LAS) and manages the transmission of messages across a fieldbus segment. Each port connects to one fieldbus segment. Up to 16 devices are supported for each segment.

Function Block Use Used with the Pulse Input function block to read the FREQUENCY parameter of a DST from a pulse input channel. Used with the Pulse Input function block to read the FREQUENCY parameter of a DST from a pulse input channel.

DI or Pulse Input (PIN) Channel for pulse input gating

AS-Interface Card

2 ports

Same as Discrete Input, and Discrete Output cards.

H1 Fieldbus

2 ports

Supports up to 64 Foundation Fieldbus function blocks.

174

System Configuration

I/O Card DeviceNet

Channel or Port Types one port

Description Supports polled communication as the DeviceNet master and acts as the interface between the DeviceNet network and the DeltaV system. Supports up to 61 slave devices and supports the online addition of devices. Functions as the Profibus DP master and acts as the interface between the Profibus DP network and the DeltaV system. Supports up to 64 slave devices and supports the online addition of devices.

Function Block Use Same as Analog Input, Analog Output, Discrete Input, and Discrete Output cards.

Profibus DP

one port

Same as Analog Input, Analog Output, Discrete Input, and Discrete Output cards.

* Note When the Thermocouple, mV card is plugged into a Thermocouple terminal block, it functions as a Thermocouple card. When it plugs into an I/O terminal block, it functions as an mV card.

Card Parameters
The properties associated with I/O cards are described by card parameters. These values give you information about the I/O card; they are not configurable. The following are the card parameters displayed in the DeltaV Diagnostics: EXIST - Boolean value that shows if a card is physically present at the given path (TRUE = card is present, False = card is not present). HWREV - Text string containing the hardware revision level of the card at the given path. The card reports a zero if it does not support hardware revision reporting. MODEL - Text description of the card model at the given path. OINTEG - Represents the overall integrity of the card (0 = Good, 1 = Bad). SNUM - Text string containing the serial number of the card at the given path. The card reports a zero if it does not support a serial number. ST_REV - Not used. STATUS - Text description of the current condition of the card.

I/O Configuration

175

The conditions are analyzed in the following order and if any of them exist, the appropriate integrity is determined and the appropriate status is displayed. If none of the below conditions exist, then the integrity is set to 0, and the status is set to Good. Condition No card in slot unconfigured No card in slot - configured Card Status - No Communications Card Status - Failstate Card Status - Hardware Error Card Status - Configuration Error Card Status - 5% Communications Error Card Status - Not Configured Any Channel Integrity Bad Status No Card No Card No Card Bad - Failstate Active Bad - Hardware Error Bad - Configuration Error 5% Comm Error Rate with Card Good - No Installed Config Good OINTEG Value 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

SWREV - Text string containing the software revision level of the card at the given path. XACTE - Integer representing the number of unsuccessful communications between the controller and the card at the given path due to cyclic redundancy check (CRC) errors, invalid data, or other causes. XACTG - Integer representing the number of successful communications between the controller and the card at the given path. XACTTO - Integer representing the number of timed-out communications between the controller and the card at the given path. This integer depicts the number of times the card did not respond to the controller.

Channel Parameters
The properties associated with the I/O channel types are described by channel parameters. You modify the channel parameters through DeltaV Explorer. All channels have the following non-configurable parameters: OINTEG - Represents the overall integrity of the channel (0 = Good, 1 = Bad). STATUS - Text description of the current condition of the channel. ST_REV - Incremented each time a configuration parameter is modified.

176

System Configuration

The following channel parameters are available: Channel Parameters Channel Type Analog Input Channel Channel Parameter FIELD_VAL_PCT FILTER Can Configure? No Yes Description The last value reported by the card (in percent of range) and the current status of the channel. Controls the filtering performed on the I/O card. You should consider the execution rate of the control modules using the channel when you configure FILTER. Controls whether NAMUR alarming is performed on the channel. If enabled and if the transmitter supports it, an analog value that is outside the NAMUR limits (106.25% and 2.5%) for four seconds has its status marked as Bad: Sensor Failure. The percent value at which the analog value is considered overrange. If the signal is above this limit, its status indicates the value is limited high. The percent value at which the analog value is considered underrange. If the signal is below this limit, its status indicates the value is limited low. The 4 to 20 mA signal of the HART transmitter, scaled in the range and engineering units of XD_SCALE or OUT_SCALE, depending on L_TYPE. HART status is applied. The 4 to 20 mA signal of the HART transmitter, in percent of range. HART status is not applied.

NAMUR_ENA

Yes

OVERRANGE_P CT

Yes

UNDERRANGE_ PCT

Yes

HART Analog Input Channel: Analog Process Values

HART_FIELD_V AL

No

FIELD_VAL_PCT

No

I/O Configuration

177

Channel Type HART Dynamic Variables

Channel Parameter HART_PV

Can Configure? No

Description The Primary Variable returned by the HART transmitter, in engineering units. This value is read digitally. The Secondary Variable returned by the HART transmitter, in engineering units. This value is read digitally. The Tertiary Variable returned by the HART transmitter, in engineering units. This value is read digitally. The 4th Variable returned by the HART transmitter, in engineering units. This value is read digitally. Set to True (1) if digital communication with the HART instrument has stopped or was never started. If digital communication is successful, this parameter is set to False (0) immediately.

HART_SV

No

HART_TV

No

HART_FV

No

HART Analog Input Channel: System Status Values

NO_COMM

No

178

System Configuration

Channel Type HART Analog Input Channel: HART Field Device Status Values

Channel Parameter DEV_MALFUNC

Can Configure? No

Description Set and cleared by tracking Field Device Malfunction (HART status bit #7) from the HART instrument. If the HART instrument detects a malfunction within itself, this parameter is set to True (1). Set and cleared by tracking More Status Available (HART status bit #4) from a HART instrument. This indicates that there are additional details that the devices can return. If this is set use AMS or Hart hand-held device to get additional information. Set and cleared by tracking the Non-Primary Variable Out of Limits (HART status bit #1) from a HART instrument. If one of the measured non-primary variables is outside its sensor operating limits (high or low), this parameter is set to True (1). Set and cleared by tracking the Process Variable Analog Output Fixed (HART status bit #3) from a HART instrument. If the HART device analog output value is fixed to a requested value, this parameter is set to True (1). Set and cleared by tracking the Primary Variable Out of Limits (HART status bit #0) from a HART instrument. If the measured primary variable is outside the sensor operating limits (high or low), this parameter is set to True (1). Set and cleared by tracking the Primary Variable Analog Output Saturated status from a HART instrument. If the analog output from the HART device is out of range (high or low), this parameter is set to True (1).

MORE_STATUS

No

NPV_PAST_LIM

No

PV_FIXED

No

PV_PAST_LIM

No

PV_SAT

No

I/O Configuration

179

Channel Type HART Analog Input Channel: Other Values

Channel Parameter FILTER

Can Configure? Yes

Description Controls the filtering performed on the I/O card. You should consider the execution rate of the control modules using the channel when you configure FILTER. Selects which HART status error values are ignored. This parameter acts as a mask to hide HART status error notifications that you select as unimportant to your operation. Controls whether NAMUR alarming is performed on the channel. If enabled and if the transmitter supports it, an analog value that is outside the NAMUR limits (106.25% and 2.5%) for four seconds has its status marked as Bad: Sensor Failure. The percent value at which the analog value is considered overrange. If the signal is above this limit, its status indicates the value is limited high. The percent value at which the analog value is considered underrange. If the signal is below this limit, its status indicates the value is limited low. For HART analog input and output channels, HINTEG indicates that a HART error is present (0=Good, 1=Bad) even if HART_ERRORS is configured to ignore the error. When HART_ERRORS is configured to ignore one or more HART errors, a corresponding active HART error does not contribute to Bad OINTEG on the channel; however, it does contribute to Bad HINTEG on the channel. HINTEG is always Bad when OINTEG is Bad.

HART_ERRORS

Yes

NAMUR_ENA

Yes

OVERRANGE_P CT

Yes

UNDERRANGE_ PCT

Yes

HINTEG

No

180

System Configuration

Channel Type Analog Output Channel

Channel Parameter FAIL_ACTION_ MODE

Can Configure? Yes

Description Controls the behavior of the channel when the card goes into failure action condition due to lost communication with the controller. You can configure the channel to hold the value at the start of the failure action condition (select Hold last value) or to go to the failure action value (FAIL_ACTION_VAL). The value the channel transitions to when the card goes into failure action condition, in percent. This value is used only if FAIL_ACTION_MODE is configured to set the value to FAIL_ACTION_VAL. The value the channel goes to upon initial download before any function block action, in percent. The current value driven to the card, in percent, and the fieldbus status of the output channel. The primary variable returned by the HART transmitter, in engineering units. This value is read digitally. The secondary variable returned by the HART transmitter, in engineering units. This value is read digitally. The tertiary variable returned by the HART transmitter, in engineering units. This value is read digitally. The fourth variable returned by the HART transmitter, in engineering units. This value is read digitally.

FAIL_ACTION_V AL

Yes

INIT_VAL

Yes

OUT

No

HART Analog Output Channel: Dynamic Variables

HART_PV

No

HART_SV

No

HART_TV

No

HART_FV

No

I/O Configuration

181

Channel Type HART Analog Output Channel: Device Variables*

Channel Parameter HART_DV_SLOT 0 HART_DV_SLOT 1 HART_DV_SLOT 2 HART_DV_SLOT 3 DV_SLOT_CONF IG DV_SLOT0_COD E DV_SLOT1_COD E DV_SLOT2_COD E DV_SLOT3_COD E

Can Configure? No No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No

Description The slot 0 device variable value. This value is read digitally. The slot 1 device variable value. This value is read digitally. The slot 2 device variable value. This value is read digitally. The slot 3 device variable value. This value is read digitally. The mask that determines which slot codes are enabled. The slot 0 device variable code sent digitally from the AO card. The slot 1 device variable code sent digitally from the AO card. The slot 2 device variable code sent digitally from the AO card. The slot 3 device variable code sent digitally from the AO card. Set to True (1) if digital communication with the HART instrument has stopped or was never started. If digital communication is successful, this parameter is set to False (0) immediately.

HART Analog Output Channel: System Status Values

NO_COMM

182

System Configuration

Channel Type HART Field Device Status Values

Channel Parameter DEV_MALFUNC

Can Configure? No

Description Set and cleared by tracking Field Device Malfunction (HART status bit #7) from the HART instrument. If the HART instrument detects a malfunction within itself, this parameter is set to True (1). Set and cleared by tracking the Non-Primary Variable Out of Limits (HART status bit #1) from a HART instrument. If one of the measured non-primary variables is outside its sensor operating limits (high or low), this parameter is set to True (1). Set and cleared by tracking the Process Variable Analog Output Fixed (HART status bit #3) from a HART instrument. If the HART device analog output value is fixed to a requested value, this parameter is set to True (1). Set and cleared by tracking the Primary Variable Out of Limits (HART status bit #0) from a HART instrument. If the measured primary variable is outside the sensor operating limits (high or low), this parameter is set to True (1). Set and cleared by tracking the Primary Variable Analog Output Saturated status from a HART instrument. If the analog output from the HART device is out of range (high or low), this parameter is set to True (1). Selects which HART status error values are ignored. This parameter acts as a mask to hide HART status error notifications that you select as unimportant to your operation. Controls the behavior of the channel when the card goes into failure action condition due to lost communication with the controller. You can configure the channel to hold the value at the start of the failure action condition (select Hold last value) or to go to the failure action value (FAIL_ACTION_VAL). The value the channel transitions to when the card goes into failure action condition, in percent. This value is used only if FAIL_ACTION_MODE is configured to set the value to FAIL_ACTION_VAL.

NPV_PAST_LIM

No

PV_FIXED

No

PV_PAST_LIM

No

PV_SAT

No

HART Analog Output Channel: Other Values

HART_ERRORS

Yes

FAIL_ACTION_ MODE

Yes

FAIL_ACTION_V AL

Yes

I/O Configuration

183

Channel Type

Channel Parameter INIT_VAL

Can Configure? Yes

Description The value the channel goes to upon initial download before any function block action, in percent. The current value driven to the card, in percent, and the Fieldbus status of the output channel. For HART analog input and output channels, HINTEG indicates that a HART error is present (0=Good, 1=Bad) even if HART_ERRORS is configured to ignore the error. When HART_ERRORS is configured to ignore one or more HART errors, a corresponding active HART error does not contribute to Bad OINTEG on the channel; however, it does contribute to Bad HINTEG on the channel. HINTEG is always Bad when OINTEG is Bad.

OUT

No

HINTEG

No

184

System Configuration

Channel Type Discrete Input Channel

Channel Parameter FIELD_VAL_D FILTER

Can Configure? No Yes

Description The last Boolean value reported by the card and the current status of the channel. Use the filter to eliminate false detection of events in the presence of noise or contact bounce from the source. Set FILTER to None, Fast, or Slow. NONE: Use NONE when the source for the channel is bounceless and noise will not be coupled into the signal wiring because of the proximity of the source and/or the routing of the wiring. Bounceless sources are typically solid state, not mechanical, contacts. If the response time is not critical, it may be more appropriate to use one of the other choices. FAST: Use FAST when the source is a mechanical contact with relatively quick settling time (generally small relay contacts or snap switches). This setting should remove most noise coupled into the signal wiring. The response is slower than the NONE setting and faster than the SLOW setting. SLOW: Use SLOW when response time is not critical, in electrically noisy environments, or when interfacing to large mechanical relay contacts. The response is very slow in comparison to the other two options. The filter behaves like a low-pass filter driving an input. The break frequency is 5 Hz for FAST and 0.43 Hz for SLOW. This should eliminate changes of state due to noise or contact bounce. Enables the card to detect open and short circuit, if a user has added external resistors to the wiring. The last counter value reported by the card and the status of the channel. At 65535, the counter rolls to zero. Enables the card to detect open and short circuit, if a user has added external resistors to the wiring.

LINEFAULT_DET ECT

Yes

Pulse Count Input Channel

COUNTER_IN

No

LINEFAULT_DET ECT

Yes

I/O Configuration

185

Channel Type Pulse Input Channel

Channel Parameter COUNTER_IN

Can Configure? No

Description Tracks the number of pulses on this channel. The parameter value rolls over to zero when the counter reaches its limit. Controls the filtering performed on the I/O card. The value you select depends on the frequency range of the signal, the desired response time, and the desired accuracy. If the channel is operating in the high end of the specified frequency range of the card, you can configure relatively small filters and still meet the card's accuracy specification. If the channel is operating in the low end of the card's frequency range, then larger filters are required to meet the accuracy specification. The larger filters have better accuracy but slower response time. Smaller filters have quicker response time but can lose some accuracy. Pulse frequency input. Resets the counter to zero when a value of one is written to the parameter. Controls the behavior of the channel when the card goes into failure action condition due to lost communication with the controller. You can configure the channel to hold the value at the start of the failure action condition (select Hold last value) or to go to the failure action value (FAIL_ACTION_VAL). The Boolean value the channel transitions to when the card goes into failure action condition. This value is used only if FAIL_ACTION_MODE is configured to set the value to FAIL_ACTION_VAL. The Boolean value the channel goes to upon initial download before any function block action. The initial value is configurable; the default value is zero. Enables the card to detect open and short circuit, if a user has added external resistors to the wiring. The current Boolean value driven to the card and the status of the output channel.

FILTER

Yes

FREQUENCY RESET_COUNT Discrete Output Channel FAIL_ACTION_ MODE

No Yes Yes

FAIL_ACTION_V AL

Yes

INIT_VAL

Yes

LINEFAULT_DET ECT OUT_D

Yes

No

186

System Configuration

Channel Type Continuous Pulse Output Channel

Channel Parameter FAIL_ACTION_ MODE

Can Configure? Yes

Description Controls the behavior of the channel when the card goes into failure action condition due to lost communication with the controller. You can configure the channel to continue to output the current pulse at the start of the failure action condition (select Hold last value) or to go to the failure action value (FAIL_ACTION_VAL). The Boolean value the channel transitions to when the card goes into failure action condition. This value is used only if FAIL_ACTION_MODE is configured to set the value to FAIL_ACTION_VAL. The percentage of the PULSE_PERIOD the channel is on during initial download before any function block action. You set INIT_ON_TIME to zero for no pulse. Enables the card to detect open and short circuit, if a user has added external resistors to the wiring. The current percentage of the PULSE_PERIOD the channel drives its output TRUE (1, On) and the status of the channel. The length of time between pulses of the channel, from 0.1 to 100 seconds. The module should execute at some multiple of the PULSE_PERIOD.

FAIL_ACTION_V AL

Yes

INIT_ON_TIME

Yes

LINEFAULT_DET ECT ON_TIME

Yes

No

PULSE_PERIOD

Yes

I/O Configuration

187

Channel Type Momentary Output Channel

Channel Parameter FAIL_ACTION_ MODE

Can Configure? Yes

Description Controls the behavior of the channel when the card goes into failure action condition due to lost communication with the controller. You can configure the channel to complete the current pulse at the start of the failure action condition (select Hold last value) or to go to the failure action value (FAIL_ACTION_VAL). The Boolean value the channel transitions to when the card goes into failure action condition. This value is used only if FAIL_ACTION_MODE is configured to set the value to FAIL_ACTION_VAL. Enables the card to detect open and short circuit, if a user has added external resistors to the wiring. Controls the pulse for the channel. The channel outputs a pulse of specified duration each time OUT_D is one. OUT_D also includes the current status of the channel. Note that when the channel is configured as momentary external references and function blocks always interpret OUT_D as zero. The value of the sensor or analog signal scaled in the range and engineering units of XD_SCALE or OUT_SCALE, depending upon L_TYPE. The last value reported by the card (in percent of range) and the current status of the channel. Controls the filtering performed on the I/O card. You should consider the execution rate of the control modules using the channel when you configure FILTER. The percent value at which the analog value is considered overrange. If the signal is above this limit, its status indicates the value is limited high. The percent value at which the analog value is considered underrange. If the signal is below this limit, its status indicates the value is limited low.

FAIL_ACTION_V AL

Yes

LINEFAULT_DET ECT OUT_D

Yes

No

All RTD, Thermocouple, Voltage, and mV Channel Types

FIELD_VAL

No

FIELD_VAL_PCT FILTER

No Yes

OVERRANGE_P CT

Yes

UNDERRANGE_ PCT

Yes

188

System Configuration

Channel Type RTD Channel Types Only

Channel Parameter COMPENSATION

Can Configure? Yes

Description Resistance in ohms of the length of the wire(s) for 2-wire RTD. Although this parameter is available for 3 and 4 wire RTD channels, it is only useful in 2wire RTD channel type configurations. Number of wires in the RTD sensor Controls whether chatter control is enabled or disabled. When CHATTER_CONTROL is enabled, the card stops reporting events that occur repeatedly at intervals less than 100 milliseconds and DeltaV Diagnostics reports a status of CHATTERING for the channel. The last Boolean value reported by the card and the current status of the channel. Maximum temperature. RTD sensor alpha coefficient. RTD sensor delta coefficient. RTD resistance in ohms at 0 degrees Celsius

NUM_WIRES SOE Discrete Input Channel CHATTER_CONT ROL

Yes Yes

FIELD_VAL_D User-defined RTD Channel Type FULLSCALE ALPHA DELTA ZERO

No Yes Yes Yes Yes

* When using the DV_SLOT variables to read the instrument mode from a HART output device, the DeltaV system treats these values as floating point values. Therefore, the DV_SLOT variable associated with the instrument mode contains the following values for instrument mode: Out of service = 0 In service = 1.4013E-045 When using an AI function block to reference these values, the scale of the block must be set appropriately to prevent seeing a 0 value for both instrument modes. The DeltaV system also treats the control mode read from the HART output device as a floating point value. Each HART output device has its own definition for control mode. Following are the DV_SLOT values that correspond to the possible control mode integer values: 0 (Test) = 0 1 = 1.4013E-045 2 (Digital) = 2.8026E-045 3 (Analog RSP) = 4.2039E-045 When using an AI function block to reference these values, the scale of the block must be set appropriately to handle these values.

I/O Configuration

189

DeltaV Redundant I/O


The following DeltaV Series 2 I/O cards support redundancy. (Follow the links for specifications and wiring diagrams.) DI, 8-Channel, 24 VDC, Dry Contact DO, 8-Channel, 24 VDC, High-Side AO, 4-20 mA with HART AI, 4-20 mA with HART Serial Fieldbus H1

Series 2, redundant capable cards are configured, auto-sensed, upgraded, and operated just like the Series 1 cards. Series 2 simplex cards can function as drop-in replacements for Series 1 simplex cards of the same type. With the exception of the Series 2 simplex H1 card, which requires the Series 2 H1 terminal block, no wiring change is required to replace a Series 1 card. Series 2 cards report their operating mode (simplex or redundant) to the DeltaV controller based on the type of terminal block on which they are installed. New redundant terminal blocks provide wiring terminations for the redundant cards. If a card is installed on a redundant terminal block, it reports itself as operating in redundant mode; otherwise, it reports itself as operating in simplex mode. If all cards are redundant, the controller can support up to 32 redundant pairs. Refer to Example Switchover Situations for some scenarios that are intended to help you to know when a switchover has occurred and to diagnose and solve the problems that caused the switchover.

Important Considerations for Using Redundant I/O Cards


Rules You Must Follow The lower slot number in a redundant pair must be an odd number, and the upper slot number must be the next higher even number. For example, you can install redundant pairs in slots 1 and 2, 3 and 4, and 9 and 10. You cannot install redundant pairs in slots 6 and 7 or 24 and 25. In this example from DeltaV Explorer, the redundant pair, C07, occupies slots 7 and 8. Notice that the next available slot, C06, was not used; this is because the lower slot number in a redundant pair must be odd.

MD controllers are required for redundant I/O. Previous releases of the controllers are not compatible with redundant I/O.

Redundant Terminal Blocks Other than redundant terminal blocks, no additional software or hardware is required to support redundancy. A redundant terminal block spans two adjacent slots on the I/O carrier. A redundant I/O card consists of two

190

System Configuration

Series 2 cards installed in a redundant terminal block. Both cards access the same set of channels in the terminal block. The double-wide redundant terminal blocks require only a single set of wires for each redundant channel or fieldbus segment. (The exception is the Redundant Interface terminal block that uses two sets of wires for the Series 2 Serial card. One set of wires is for each interface, such as a computer.) The redundant terminal blocks contain screw terminals appropriate for the card type, and signals from the screw terminals are connected to both cards in a redundant pair.

Line Fault Detection The Series 2 DI, 8-Channel, 24 VDC, Dry Contact and the Series 2 DO, 8-Channel, 24 VDC, High-Side cards support line fault detection. (For DI cards, modify the wiring to include a series and parallel resistor at the sensor.) This capability can be enabled or disabled by configuration changes. After resolving line fault errors, use the Clear Saved Fault Information command in DeltaV Diagnostics to re-enable switchovers if the same problems are detected again. Refer to the information on clearing saved fault information in the Identifying and Troubleshooting Series 2 Redundant Cards topic for more information.

Manual Switchovers Always use the DeltaV Diagnostics program to perform a manual switchover. Removing the active card in a redundant pair can cause a disruption in the output signal. To perform a switchover in Diagnostics, select the card, click the right mouse button, and select Redundancy Switchover.

Installing and Connecting Redundant Terminal Blocks and Series 2 Cards


The DeltaV system supports the following redundant terminal blocks. (Follow the links for specifications and channel and port assignments.) Redundant Analog Input Redundant Analog Output Redundant Discrete Redundant H1 Redundant Interface

To install a redundant terminal block 1 2 3 Make sure that 24 VDC field power is provided to the carrier. Check the key settings on the corresponding Series 2 cards and set the keys on the terminal block to match. Refer to I/O Interface Keying for information on key settings. Locate the assigned slot location on the I/O interface carrier. Remember that the lower slot number must be odd, and the upper slot number must be the next higher even number. Place the tabs on the back of the redundant terminal block through the slots on the carrier and push the terminal block up to lock it into place. Connect the field wiring for the redundant terminal blocks. as shown in the Series 2 card wiring diagrams and redundant terminal block figures. Click the above links for terminal block port and channel assignment and click the links in Redundant I/O Cards for wiring diagrams for the Series 2 cards in redundant mode.

I/O Configuration

191

To install a redundant I/O card A redundant I/O card consists of two Series 2 cards installed in a redundant terminal block. 1 2 3 4 Make sure that 24 VDC field power is provided to the carrier. Locate the assigned slots on the I/O interface carrier. Align the connectors on the Series 2 card with the connectors on the I/O carrier and the redundant I/O terminal block and push to attach. Tighten the mounting screws.

Switchover Causes
The DeltaV controller constantly scans both the active and standby cards and directs a switchover from the active to the standby card when a failure occurs. Switchover is very smooth and occurs in a matter of milliseconds. The last known good values of the output are held during switchover. A redundancy switchover can occur under the following circumstances: Open and short circuit faults in the channels during installation or operation Card errors due to external noise near the system or noise on the carriers, cards, or channels Improper grounding that might cause some channels to draw huge currents and high voltages Momentary loss of field power Fatal condition on the active card (for example, the active card cannot communicate with the controller) Non-fatal condition on the active card. These conditions are dependent upon the card type (for example, a failure of the A/D converter on an AI card)

Refer to Example Switchover Situations for some scenarios that are intended to help you identify when a switchover has occurred and diagnose and solve the problems that caused the switchover.

I/O Redundancy, Parameters and DSTs


To the DeltaV system, a redundant pair is one logical redundant card. In parameter paths and Device Signal Tags (DSTs), the DeltaV system references the pair as a single item composed of two cards. The DeltaV system uses the standard I/O prefix, Cxx, to access information about the pair where xx is the lower (odd) slot number occupied by the pair. For example, the DeltaV system references redundant cards in slots 1 and 2 as C01 in paths and in default, DST names. Use the Cxx prefix (such as C01) in a path to access information about the pair of cards. For example, to return overall status information about a redundant pair in slots 1 and 2 on controller CTLR-1A, use the path: CTLR1A/IO1/CO1/STATUS. DSTs are associated only with the pair, not with an individual card within the pair. For example, an AI block would use the following path to reference a value from a redundant pair in slots 1 and 2:C01/CH01/FIELD_VAL_PCT. Similarly, configuration parameters for cards, ports, and channels reference the pair. There is no configuration for a specific card in the pair. To access the value for the FILTER parameter for channel 1 of a redundant pair in slots 1 and 2, use the following path:C01/CH01/FILTER. However, some diagnostic parameters permit access to an individual card within the pair. The path to these parameters consists of the path identifier for the pair, such as C01, plus the physical card to be accessed. For example, to read the overall integrity of the standby card, use the path:CTLR/IO1/C01/STBY_OINTEG. To determine which slot contains the active and standby cards, use the paths: CTLR/IO1/ACT_SLOT and CTLR/ IO1/STBY_SLOT.

192

System Configuration

Auto-Sensing and Configuring Series 2 Cards


Inside this topic The Enable Auto Switchback Parameter Like existing I/O cards, you can add Series 2 cards to the database by auto-sensing redundant pairs already present on the control network and configuring redundant pairs offline. Auto-Sensing Series 2 I/O The auto-sense command returns information about any redundant pairs present on the control network. If you autosense a Series 2 card that is connected to a redundant terminal block, the card reports itself as operating in redundant mode. If you auto-sense a Series 2 card that is installed on a simplex terminal block or not installed on a terminal block, the card reports itself as operating in simplex mode. A card's redundancy status is known even if its redundant partner is not present at the time of auto-sensing because the card detects that it is connected to a redundant terminal block. In the case of a missing redundant partner, the Auto-Sense Cards dialog indicates a redundant pair and states that a card is not installed. In this example, the Auto-Sense Cards dialog shows that the card in slot 10 is not installed.

Note The Auto-Sense Cards dialog presents information about installation errors in red text and informational messages in blue text. However, auto-sense cannot always detect an incorrectly installed terminal block when at least one of the cards is in the correct slot. (For example, auto-sense will not detect a problem if a terminal block is incorrectly installed in slots 3 and 4 and a card exists in slot 3 but no cards are in slots 2 and 4.) For this reason, it is recommended that you verify your installation with DeltaV Diagnostics. Configuring Series 2 Cards Offline Adding and configuring Series 2 I/O offline in the DeltaV Explorer is performed in much the same way as pre-Series 2 I/O. The Add Card dialog box includes a Card class selection field (such as the Discrete Input class of cards), a Card type field (such as 24 VDC, Dry Contact), and a Card series field (Series 1 or Series 2 if Series 2 is supported by

I/O Configuration

193

the card class and type). Click the down arrows to expand the list boxes and make your selections for card class, type, and series.

Change Card Series Without Replacing Card A useful feature of this dialog is the ability to change the card series without first deleting the card from your configuration and re-entering all the card information. As long as the original card class and type support Series 2 cards, you can change from Series 1 to Series 2 simplex or redundant; or from Series 2 simplex or redundant to Series 1. Simply click the down arrow in the Card series field and select Series 1 or Series 2 as required and then select the Card is Redundant checkbox if you want the Series 2 card to operate in redundant mode. Be sure that you download your changes and remember that Series 2 cards must use an MD controller when operating in redundant mode. The Features area shows the supported card features based on the selections for card class, type, and series. In the above example, the card selected has the basic features, plus line fault detection and redundancy. The Card is redundant check box is active when the selected card type supports redundancy and is cleared by default. Select this box to enable redundancy for this card. The Card is redundant check box controls the information displayed in the Slot position field. The Slot position field displays only valid and applicable slots depending upon the card selection

194

System Configuration

and redundancy settings. The context-sensitive help provides complete descriptions for all the fields in this dialog box. The Enable Auto Switchback Parameter Redundant Series 2 cards have an enable automatic switchback (ENABLE_AUTO_SWBK) parameter that controls whether or not the active and standby cards switch over more than one time when faults are detected. The default is enabled (True). Note ENABLE_AUTO_SWBK cannot be disabled for Redundant Series 2 Serial and H1 cards. For these cards, it is always True. To enable or disable the parameter, select the redundant card in DeltaV Explorer, right-click ENABLE_AUTO_SWBK, and then select Properties.

When ENABLE_AUTO_SWBK is True and: a fault occurs, the active card switches over. the same fault occurs, the new active card does not switch over. (If both cards detect the same problem, it is probably a field error.) a different fault occurs, the new active card switches over.

When ENABLE_AUTO_SWBK is False and: a fault occurs, the active card switches over. a subsequent fault occurs, the cards do not switch over until the saved fault information command is issued. Refer to the information on clearing saved fault information in the Identifying and Troubleshooting Series 2 Redundant Cards topic for more information.

Note If ENABLE_AUTO_SWBK is False and the controller detects a new card in the redundant pair, a switchover will be allowed to the new card if the active card has a fault. For example, if you replace the standby card or if communications is lost and then reestablished with the standby card, a switchover can occur even if ENABLE_AUTO_SWBK is False. The decision to enable or disable automatic switchback depends on the requirements of your process and the importance of the card. Disabling ENABLE_AUTO_SWBK requires manual intervention for switchovers to occur

I/O Configuration

195

but prevents cards from frequently switching over. On the other hand, enabling ENABLE_AUTO_SWBK causes cards to switch over but, under certain circumstances, can result in frequent switchovers.

Identifying and Troubleshooting Series 2 Redundant Cards


The redundant card icon, , makes it easy to identify redundant Series 2 cards in DeltaV Explorer, and the card's LEDs and DeltaV Diagnostics program provide troubleshooting and diagnostic information. DeltaV Explorer The redundant card icon, , appears on the odd slot number in DeltaV Explorer. The odd slot is the first slot on which the terminal block is installed. In this example from DeltaV Explorer, the redundant pair, C07, occupies slots 7 and 8. Notice that the next available slot, C06, was not used; this is because the lower slot number in a redundant pair must be odd.

The procedure for enabling and disabling ports or channels on redundant Series 2 cards is the same as that for preSeries 2 cards: select the channel or port, click the right mouse button, select Properties, and then select Enabled. To enable multiple channels or ports, select the I/O subsystem, click the right mouse button, and then select Configure I/ O. LEDs The LEDs on the Series 2 cards show basic operating data. The correct operating conditions for the green Power/ Active LED is solid for the active card and flashing for the standby card. The red LED (continuous on or flashing) indicates fault conditions. Refer to the LED checklists in the Checking the LED Indicators on Each Device topic for complete information on each Series 2 card. Use DeltaV Diagnostics to diagnose problems. (Scroll through the topic and find the appropriate table for your card.)

196

System Configuration

Diagnostics The left pane in DeltaV Diagnostics presents a redundant pair of cards slotwise. In the following image, a redundant AI, 8-channel, 4-20 mA HART card is installed in slots 7 and 8 (C07 and C08).

The active card is depicted with the black half of the image in the foreground (C07), and the standby card is depicted with the grey half of the image in the foreground (C08). Diagnostic Parameters The right pane in DeltaV Diagnostics shows diagnostic parameters for the selected card in the redundant pair. The following image shows the diagnostic parameters for a standby redundant Series 2 Serial card.

I/O Configuration

197

The online help for the Diagnostics program provides descriptions of all the parameters. To access the help, select the parameter, click the right mouse button, and then select What's this. Following are descriptions of the SwitchAvail, Pstatus, POInteg, and State parameters: SwitchAvail (Switchover Available) - Indicates if the redundant pair is available for switchover. Possible values include: Unavailable - Missing Cards Available Disabled Available - common faults (resolve problem and clear saved fault information) Unavailable - missing standby Unavailable - standby faulty Unavailable - switchback disabled Unavailable - both cards faulty (resolve problem and clear saved fault information) No Card Good Integrity Error Termination Block Incorrectly Installed No Communication Between Cards No Communication With Partner Active Card Problem Standby Card Problem Standby Card Not Present Both Cards Report Problem Switchover Occurred, Possible Field Problem Possible Loss of Field Power Not Operational

PStatus (Pair Status) - Shows the status of the redundant pair. Possible values are:

POInteg (Pair Integrity) - Overall integrity (good or bad) of the redundant pair State (Redundant cards) - Indicates whether or not the selected card is active. A state of Standby means not active; it does not mean that the card is necessarily available to take over as active.

To view parameter values for channels or ports, select the active card. The values are shown for the active card only; Diagnostics displays "Not Available on Standby" if the standby card is selected. If the channels or ports are disabled, Diagnostics shows "@@@@@" for the channel or port's Value parameter and "No installed configuration" for the Status parameter. Clearing Saved Fault Information on Redundant Cards Use the Clear Saved Fault Information command in DeltaV Diagnostics after any problems reported by the redundant card pair are identified and resolved. Redundant cards hold back previous error information to prevent switching back and forth. Users must acknowledge the problem and then clear the saved fault information. The Clear Saved Fault Information command re-enables switchovers if the same problems are detected again. One way to determine if you need to use this command is to look at the card's SwitchAvail parameter. If the value for the SwitchAvail parameter reads "Available common fault" or "Unavailable - both cards faulty," send the Clear Saved Fault Information command.

198

System Configuration

For example, suppose a wire becomes loose on an Analog Input termination block. As soon as the active card detects the open loop, the controller records the fault, and the redundant pair switches over. Then, the new active card detects the open loop, and the controller records the fault again. In such a situation, detection of the same open loop will not cause a switchover. Once you find and secure the loose wire, use the Clear Saved Fault Information command to enable switchover if the condition is detected again. Note If switchovers are not occurring as expected, be sure that the ENABLE_AUTO_SWBK parameter is enabled. Refer to The Enable Auto Switchback Parameter topic for more information. To access the Clear Saved Fault Information command: 1 2 Select the redundant I/O card that is reporting either of the above values in the SwitchAvail parameter. Click the right mouse button and select Clear Saved Fault Information.

I/O Configuration

199

Example Switchover Situations


Inside this topic Redundancy link chip failure Communication failure due to open or bent pin Brief loss of field power Electrical noise on the carrier Open channel fault on DO card Excessive current withdrawal Open pin fault The scenarios described in this section are example situations that could cause redundant Series 2 cards to switch over. They contain guidelines to help you understand what can cause a switchover and what you can do to remedy the fault. Seven situations are presented: For each situation, read the information in the table and then click the link in the Possible Problem column for suggestions of how to fix the problem. Card type and LED indications Possible Problem

Diagnostics shows an integrity error on the card and the following parameter values: Status = No communication with partner PStatus = No communication between cards Status = No communication with partner PStatus = No communication between cards PStatus = Possible loss of field power Status = Bad - Hardware error

All Series 2 cards Power/Active LED on the former standby card goes to solid green indicating it is now the active card. Power/Active LED on the former active card goes to flashing green indicating it is now the standby card. Red LED is off. All Series 2 cards Power/Active LED on the former standby card goes to solid green indicating it is now the active card. Power/Active LED on the former active card goes to flashing green indicating it is now the standby card. Red LED is off. All Series 2 cards that use field power Flashing Red LEDs Power/Active LED on the former standby card goes to solid green indicating it is now the active card. Power/Active LED on the former active card goes to flashing green indicating it is now the standby card.

Redundancy link chip failure

Communication failure due to open or bent pin

Brief loss of field power

200

System Configuration

Card type and LED indications

Diagnostics shows an integrity error on the card and the following parameter values: PStatus = No Card Status = No Card

Possible Problem

Series 2 redundant Serial cards (Can affect other cards depending upon card's noise level tolerance) Flashing Red LEDs on serial cards Power/Active LED on the former standby card goes to solid green indicating it is now the active card. Power/Active LED on the former active card goes to flashing green indicating it is now the standby card. Series 2 redundant DO, 8-Channel, 24 VDC, High-Side Flashing Yellow LEDs Power/Active LED on the former standby card goes to solid green indicating it is now the active card. Power/Active LED on the former active card goes to flashing green indicating it is now the standby card. Series 2 redundant AI, 4-20mA, Hart Flashing Red LED on the former active card Power/Active LED on the former standby card goes to solid green indicating it is now the active card. Power/Active LED on the former active card goes to flashing green indicating it is now the standby card. Series 2 redundant H1 Power/Active LED on the former standby card goes to solid green indicating it is now the active card. Power/Active LED on the former active card goes to flashing green indicating it is now the standby card. Red LED is off. Redundancy Link Chip Failure

Electrical noise on the carrier

Channel Status = Bad Hardware Error Channel OInteg = Bad, Pair Status Possible Field Problem

Open channel fault on DO card

PStatus = Termination Block Incorrectly Installed Status = Bad Configuration Error

Excessive current withdrawal

PStatus = Standby Card Problem

Open pin fault

Series 2 redundant cards contain a microchip that enables redundancy. If the chip fails, the redundant cards stop communicating, and a switchover occurs instantaneously. To correct this issue: 1 2 3 Replace the faulty card. Open DeltaV Diagnostics (click Start | DeltaV | Operator | Diagnostics). For each card, select the card, click the right mouse button, and then select Clear Saved Fault Information.

I/O Configuration

201

Communication Failure due to Open or Bent Pin Some of the pins that connect the card to the carrier can become bent or broken during installation or through improper handling. An open or bent pin shorts to the adjacent pin and causes the redundant cards to stop communicating and a switchover to occur. To correct this issue: 1 2 3 4 Remove the redundant cards and check for bent or broken pins. Straighten any bent pins and re-insert the card into its slot on the carrier. Replace the card if a pin is broken or bent beyond repair. Open DeltaV Diagnostics (click Start | DeltaV | Operator | Diagnostics). For each card, select the card, click the right mouse button, and then select Clear Saved Fault Information.

Brief Loss of Field Power A brief loss of field power to the DeltaV system (for example, a few seconds) causes all cards that operate on field power to switch over. (Most cards operate on field power.) To correct this issue: 1 2 3 Reset the cards by removing each card from the carrier and then re-inserting it into its slot. Open DeltaV Diagnostics (click Start | DeltaV | Operator | Diagnostics). For each card, select the card, click the right mouse button, and then select Clear Saved Fault Information.

Electrical Noise on the Carrier Electrical noise on the carrier affects the communication between Series 2 redundant serial cards and causes them to switch over. To correct this issue: 1 Determine if there is any electrical noise near the carrier and, if so, remove the noise source. Flashing red LEDs and loss of communication between the card and the carriers indicate the existence of noise. Noise can be caused by electrical activity (such as welding), the use of devices (such as 2-way radios), or natural causes (such as lightning), occurring close to the DeltaV installation. 2 3 4 Reset the serial cards by removing each card from the carrier and then re-inserting it into its slot. Open DeltaV Diagnostics (click Start | DeltaV | Operator | Diagnostics). For each card, select the card, click the right mouse button, and then select Clear Saved Fault Information.

Open Channel Fault on DO Card Occasionally, during setup or normal operation of the DeltaV system, one or more channel wires can become loose and cause an open channel fault. Open channel faults cause a switchover in Series 2 redundant DO cards. To correct this issue: 1 2 Open DeltaV Diagnostics (click Start | DeltaV | Operator | Diagnostics). Select the card from the I/O subsystem in the left pane in Diagnostics.

202

System Configuration

In the right pane, read the Status and OInteg parameter values for all channels to determine if there is an open connection. Look for values, such as Status = Bad Hardware Error and OInteg = Bad, Pair Status Possible Field Problem. Fix any wiring problems on the card. In Diagnostics, select each card, click the right mouse button, and then select Clear Saved Fault Information.

4 5

Excessive Withdrawal of Current Causes Hardware Error Providing a constant 24 VDC without current limit protection to the inputs of a redundant AI card for long periods of time during normal operation of the DeltaV system can cause a hardware error on the card. The excessive current damages the card's internal components. To correct this issue: 1 2 3 4 5 Replace the card with the blinking red LED as it is probably damaged. Use a multimeter or other measurement device to determine if any of the channels are drawing 24 VDC without current limit protection and fix this problem. Reset the cards by removing each card from the carrier and then re-inserting it into its slot. Open DeltaV Diagnostics (click Start | DeltaV | Operator | Diagnostics). For each card, select the card, click the right mouse button, and then select Clear Saved Fault Information.

Open Pin Fault on Series2 Redundant H1 Card Some of the pins that connect Series 2 redundant H1 cards to the terminal block can bend or break during installation or through improper handling and cause an open pin fault. An open pin can cause problems on one or both of the ports. To correct this issue: 1 2 3 4 5 Open DeltaV Diagnostics (click Start | DeltaV | Operator | Diagnostics). Scroll through the parameters for the standby card and determine if there is a port problem. Remove the redundant cards and check for bent or broken pins. Straighten any bent pins and re-insert the card into its slot on the carrier. If a pin is broken or bent beyond repair, replace the card. For each card, select the card, click the right mouse button, and then select Clear Saved Fault Information.

I/O Configuration

203

Device Signal Tags and SCADA Tags


Inside this topic Device Signal Tags (DSTs) DST Counting for Classic I/O, Profibus DP, AS-Interface I/O, and DeviceNet I/O DST Counting with Foundation Fieldbus DST Counting with Serial I/O DST Counting in Application Stations DSTs and the Advanced Unit Management License Enforcement of System-Wide Licensing for Controllers SCADA Tags This section defines the differences between Device Signal Tags (DSTs) and SCADA tags. It also defines the distinction between AO, AI, DO, and DI DSTs used for control, monitoring, and advanced unit management.

Device Signal Tags (DSTs) Device Tags represent instruments, valves, and other field devices. A DST consists of a Device Tag and a specific signal from that device. The licenses purchased with the system determine the number and types of DSTs allowed by the system. DSTs in DeltaV controllers are identified based on the manner in which the application is configured. Function blocks are grouped into modules. Inputs and outputs from Classic I/O, Serial I/O, Profibus I/O, AS-Interface I/O, and DeviceNet I/O referenced by the function blocks are DSTs.

DST Counting for Classic I/O, Profibus DP, AS-Interface I/O, and DeviceNet I/O For licensing, DSTs are counted in the following ways: Each output from a function block to the I/O subsystem counts as one DO DST if it is a discrete signal, or one AO DST if is an analog signal. An input referenced by one or more function blocks in a module counts as one DI DST if it is a discrete signal, or one AI DST if it is an analog signal. An input signal referenced by function blocks in multiple modules, counts as a DI DST or an AI DST in each module. Any input that is referenced in a graphic or a history collection and is not referenced in a function block is not counted as a DST instead, it is counted as a SCADA value.

The total number of DSTs in a controller is equal to the total number of DSTs in all of its modules. In the figure, the controller has two modules and five DSTs: three input DSTs (either discrete or analog depending on signal type) in

204

System Configuration

Module 1 and one input and one output DST (either discrete or analog depending on signal type) in module 2 adding to a total of five DSTs.

The DSTs were counted in the following way: Input A is referenced by one function block and is therefore counted as one input DST (either analog or discrete depending on signal type). Input B is referenced by two function blocks, but the function blocks are in the same module so it is counted as one input DST, either analog or discrete depending on signal type. Input C is referenced by function blocks in two modules so it is counted as two input DSTs. Output D is counted as one output DST, either analog or discrete depending on signal type.

DST Counting with Foundation Fieldbus In contrast to the I/O types discussed elsewhere, with Foundation Fieldbus I/O, a DST is added to the count when certain function blocks are added to a controller module. The type of DST depends on the function block. Specifically, each instance of the following function blocks adds to the DST count as shown: FFAI Fieldbus Analog Input: Adds 1 AI DST FFAO Fieldbus Analog Output: Adds 1 AO DST

I/O Configuration

205

FFDI Fieldbus Discrete Input: Adds 1 DI DST FFDO Fieldbus Discrete Output: Adds 1 DO DST

Each occurrence of the following blocks adds 8 to the DST count: FFMDI Fieldbus Multiple Discrete Input: Adds 8 DI DSTs FFMDO Fieldbus Multiple Discrete Output: Adds 8 DO DSTs

For example, two FFAI blocks, contained in the same module and referencing the same transmitter signal, count as two AI DSTs. Similarly, two FFMDI blocks, contained in the same module and referencing the same device, count as 16 DI DSTs. DST Counting with Serial I/O The serial card in the I/O subsystem supports datasets. A dataset can contain up to 100 values of either analog in, analog out, discrete in, or discrete out signals (a value can be a discrete value, setpoint value, register value, and so on). Datasets that contain Boolean or discrete values are discrete datasets. Datasets containing anything else are analog datasets. Each port on a serial card supports up to 16 datasets. Therefore, a serial card supports up to 3,200 values. Each dataset counts as one DST as long as a single module references all values in the dataset. If multiple modules reference values in a dataset, the DST count for the dataset is equal to the number of modules referencing the dataset. Values referenced only in graphics or a history collection count as SCADA values, not DSTs. DST Counting in Application Stations The Application Station contains many of the same function blocks that exist in DeltaV controllers. The primary difference is that the Application Station does not contain function blocks specifically for control such as PID. Another difference is the manner in which DSTs are defined and counted. In an Application Station, a DST is counted each time certain function blocks are used. The following are the function blocks that create DST counts. AI Analog Input: One AI DST ALM Alarm Detection: One AI DST AO Analog Output: One AO DST CALC Calculation: One AI DST DI Discrete Input: One DI DST DO Discrete Output: One DO DST MDI Multiple Discrete Input: Eight DI DSTs MDO Multiple Discrete Output: Eight DO DSTs PIN Pulse Input: One DI DST

DSTs and the Advanced Unit Management License The system-wide Advanced Unit Management (AUM) license allows the creation of class-based units typically used for batch control. Class-based units provide the phase logic structure and the embedded interface to the batch executive. The figure provides a logical representation of class-based units and controller modules. Each class-based unit takes on the total DST count of all the modules assigned to it. Class-based unit 1 has a DST size of 300 (a total of 250 DI,

206

System Configuration

DO, AI, and AO DSTs in one controller module plus 50 total DSTs in another module). Class-based unit 2 has 400 DSTs, and class-based unit 3 has 200 DSTs. The AUM license that allows the creation of these class-based units must be equal to or greater than the sum all DSTs assigned to class-based units. In this example, the sum of all DSTs assigned to classed-based units is 900. A 900-DST AUM license is required.

Enforcement of System-Wide Licensing for Controllers System-wide controller licenses reside in the ProfessionalPLUS station. The system checks the entire configuration database at the time of download to determine if the configured DST counts are within the sizes of the system-wide licenses. DSTs are in a hierarchy with AO DSTs as the highest type, then AI DSTs, DO DSTs, and DI DSTs as the lowest type in the hierarchy. The system does not permit a download if either: the total system DST count exceeds the ProfessionalPLUS license size, or the number of any of the DSTs categorized as AO, AI, DO, or DI exceeds the system-wide Control license size for that type of DST and enough unused DSTs of a higher type are not available to make up the difference.

If the system contains class-based units, one more check is made before download is permitted. This check counts DSTs configured and associated with class-based units and compares this quantity with the DST size of the systemwide Advanced Unit Management license. A download will not occur if the DST count exceeds the size of the Advanced Unit Management license. License Enforcement Example A configuration has 20 AO DSTs and 27 AI DSTs. The system is licensed for 25 AO DSTs and 25 AI DSTs. Though the configuration exceeds the licensed AI DST limit, the download is permitted because there are enough licensed, but unused, AO DSTs to make up the difference.

I/O Configuration

207

SCADA Tags Many values brought into a DeltaV system by way of OPC and Serial are used for monitoring purposes. Because of this, the DeltaV system allows you to host these values as SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) tags instead of DSTs. SCADA tags are values that come into the DeltaV system by way of OPC and Serial and are not used in a control strategy. They are inexpensive, lightweight values that can be passed around the system quickly and efficiently. SCADA tags can be easily displayed to the operator, saved in the historian, or displayed in a trend. To get SCADA tags from OPC into the DeltaV system you must create modules that contain input parameters and assign these modules to the Application Station. You can then use OPC mirror to map the incoming OPC values from a third party interface to the input parameters in the modules running in the Application Station. These modules are considered SCADA tags and are not counted as DSTs. You can also have modules running in the Application Station with input parameters referencing parameters in a module running in a controller. These input parameters are also considered SCADA tags and are not counted as DSTs.

208

System Configuration

Foundation Fieldbus and the DeltaV System


Successful fieldbus installations in a DeltaV system depend using the right information at each system stage. The following table lists key topics for review when planning and implementing a DeltaV system with fieldbus devices. In addition, consult your device documentation for device-specific information. System Stage Fieldbus Basics Topic Foundation Fieldbus Technology Fieldbus Devices General Information Site Preparation DeltaV Site Preparation Manual Description Describes the fundamentals of the fieldbus protocol. Describes the DeltaV interfaces to key fieldbus device features. Describes how to properly prepare your site for electrical power and grounding prior to installing your DeltaV system. Proper power and grounding is essential for systems that include fieldbus devices. Describes how to install the components of a DeltaV system. Presents a simplified approach to installing a fieldbus system as part of the DeltaV system. Describes how to use the DeltaV applications to perform common fieldbus procedures. Provides VCR specifications and valid units and channels for fieldbus devices. Provides instructions for working with devices. Provides troubleshooting steps using the H1 card LEDs and various DeltaV applications.

Installation

Installing Your DeltaV Automation System Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV System

Configuration

Fieldbus Configuration Procedures Fieldbus Device Specifications Using Fieldbus Devices

Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting with the DeltaV System

Foundation Fieldbus Technology Overview


Inside this topic Physical Layer Communication Layer User Application Layer Fieldbus is an all digital, serial, bi-directional communication protocol that interconnects devices such as actuators, sensors, discrete devices, and controllers in the field. It is a Local Area Network (LAN) for instruments that enables basic control and I/O to be moved to the field devices. In the DeltaV system, the H1 fieldbus card connects to the fieldbus segment and interfaces with fieldbus devices. The H1 card connects to any vacant slot in an I/O Interface Carrier. The H1 card has two ports and each port can connect to one fieldbus segment. Up to 16 devices are supported for each segment.

I/O Configuration

209

Foundation Fieldbus is a specific fieldbus technology developed and supported by Emerson Process Management and the other members of the independent Fieldbus Foundation. Foundation Fieldbus technology uses Device Descriptions and function blocks to enable intelligent field devices to execute control functions traditionally performed by a distributed control system. The Foundation Fieldbus H1 technology is modeled on the Open Systems Interconnect (OSI) model and consists of three parts: Physical Layer - receives messages from the Communication Layer (Stack) and converts them into signals on the fieldbus segment; receives signals on the fieldbus segment and converts them into messages Communication Layer - (Communication Stack made up of the Data Link Layer, Fieldbus Access Sublayer, and Fieldbus Message Specification). The Data Link Layer controls transmission of messages on the fieldbus segment. User Application Layer - DeltaV applications, such as Control Studio and Explorer Note The User Application Layer is not defined by the OSI model. The Fieldbus Foundation specified a User Application Model that Fisher-Rosemount used to develop DeltaV software applications. Physical Layer Refer to the Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Automation System manual for information on installing the H1 card, wiring the fieldbus segment, and cabling and power requirements. Communication Layer The transmission of messages across the fieldbus is managed through a deterministic centralized bus scheduler called the Link Active Scheduler (LAS). The H1 card functions as the LAS. Some of the Link Active Scheduler's responsibilities are: Managing scheduled transfers Managing unscheduled transfers Maintaining the Live List

Note The H1 card is the only primary Link Master allowed on the fieldbus segment. No other Link Master is allowed on the segment or unpredictable results can occur. DeltaV supports one backup Link Master device on each fieldbus segment. Scheduled Transfers Scheduled transfers are typically used for the regular, cyclical, exchange of control loop data between devices on the fieldbus segment. The LAS maintains a schedule called the Compel Data schedule, which is a list of transmit times for all the data buffers that need to be cyclically transmitted. The data buffers are in the fieldbus devices. When it is time for a fieldbus device to send a data buffer, the LAS issues a message called a Compel Data message to the device. When the fieldbus device receives the Compel Data message, it broadcasts or publishes the data in the buffer to all devices on the fieldbus and any device that is configured to receive the data receives it. The devices that are configured to receive the data are called subscribers. Although scheduled transfers are the highest priority activity performed by the LAS, it requires the smallest portion of a macrocycle. (A macrocycle is a single iteration of a schedule.) A link, or Virtual Communication Relationship (VCR), is defined as a connection between a fieldbus parameter in one device on the segment and a fieldbus parameter in another device on the segment. Some devices support publisher and subscriber VCRs and other devices support Free VCRs.

210

System Configuration

Publisher and Subscriber VCRs A subscriber VCR is an output from a fieldbus device to an input in another device on the segment. The input device can be another fieldbus device or a DeltaV controller. A publisher VCR is an output from a DeltaV controller to the input of a parameter in a fieldbus device. Here are a few examples of publisher and subscriber VCRs: The link between a function block running in a controller to a function block running in a device is a publisher VCR. The link between a function block running in a device to a function block running in a controller is a subscriber VCR. The link between a function block running in a device to a function block running in another device is a subscriber VCR

The H1 card supports as many as 35 H1 publisher VCRs and 50 fieldbus device subscriber VCRs per port as long as the total number of VCRs does not exceed 50. For example, the card can support 35 H1 publisher VCRs and 15 fieldbus device subscriber VCRs per port or five H1 publisher VCRs and 45 fieldbus device subscriber VCRs. Refer to the VCR Specifications topic for the maximum number of subscriber and publisher links supported by fieldbus devices that use these types of links. Note: Many backup Link Master devices cannot support these limits. This means that the configuration can exceed the capacity of the backup Link Master device. If communication is lost between the H1 card and the segment, the backup Link Master device may be unable to handle the segment scheduling and the schedule download may fail. If the backup Link Master device indicates Schedule Download Failure in DeltaV Diagnostics, the device cannot function as a backup Link Master. If an H1 card configuration has more than 25 publisher/subscriber VCRs per port, test the configuration before going online to ensure that the backup Link Master device can support the configuration. To avoid a Schedule Download Failure due to lack of capacity in the backup Link Master consider the following options: Upgrade to a backup Link Master that supports the segment's publisher and subscriber VCRs. Do not configure any device as a backup Link Master. Reduce the number of publisher and subscriber VCRs on the segment. Free VCRs A Free VCR can function as a publisher link, a subscriber link, or a device alarm. Device alarms require one VCR. For example, if a device can support a maximum of five VCRs, and one VCR is used for a device alarm, the remaining four VCRs can be used for any combination of publisher and subscriber links. Each port on the H1 card can support a maximum of 50 input links and 35 output links as long as the total number does not exceed 50 VCRs. Refer to the VCR Specifications topic for the maximum number of Free VCRs supported by devices that use these types of links. Unscheduled Transfers Unscheduled transfers are typically used for user initiated changes such as setpoint changes, tuning changes, and downloads and uploads. Unscheduled transfers require the greatest portion of a macrocycle. The LAS gives all devices on the fieldbus a chance to send unscheduled messages between transmissions of scheduled messages. The LAS grants a device permission to use the fieldbus for unscheduled messages by issuing a Pass Token (PT) message to the device. When the device receives the PT, the LAS allows it to send unscheduled messages until it has finished or until the maximum token hold time has expired; whichever is the shorter time. The device can send unscheduled messages to a single destination or it can multicast the message to multiple destinations. The LAS maintains a list of the devices that are properly responding to the PT message. This list is called the Live List. Live List Maintenance New devices can be added to the fieldbus at any time. Between the times it sends out Compel Data messages, the LAS sends out Probe Node (PN) messages to the addresses not in the Live List. If a new device is present at that address, it receives the PN and answers with a Probe Response (PR) message. When the LAS receives the PR

I/O Configuration

211

message from the device, it adds the device to the Live List. Whenever a device is added or removed from the Live List, the LAS broadcasts the change to all devices. This allows each device to maintain a current copy of the Live List. User Application Layer - Fieldbus in the DeltaV System The DeltaV system connects to the fieldbus segment through an H1 card. The DeltaV system enables you to graphically configure your fieldbus devices and H1 cards, establish communication between fieldbus and conventional devices, and monitor the performance of the control loops operating in the fieldbus devices. In the DeltaV Explorer, the H1 cards are under the I/O subsystem for the controller associated with the fieldbus device. Each fieldbus card has two ports and each port can connect to one fieldbus segment. Fieldbus ports are indicated by the icon in the DeltaV Explorer. Up to 16 devices are supported for each segment. The H1 card and the ports associated with the card manage the fieldbus device behaviors. For specific information refer to the following: Foundation Fieldbus Function Blocks Using Fieldbus Function Blocks in the Control Strategy Deciding Where to Run Control Function Blocks Changing Function Block Parameters in Fieldbus Devices

Foundation Fieldbus Function Blocks


Foundation Fieldbus has defined a standard user application based on blocks. Blocks are representations of different types of application functions. The blocks in a user application are: resource blocks, function blocks, and transducer blocks. The arrangement and interconnections of the blocks determine the function of the fieldbus devices. Resource Block The resource block describes the characteristics of the fieldbus device such as device name and type, manufacturer, serial number, amount of free memory, and free time. There is only one resource block in a device. You can access the resource block in the DeltaV Explorer to perform the following: examine the status of the fieldbus device view and change resource configuration initiate a master reset or self-test of the fieldbus device

Function Blocks Function blocks provide the control system behavior. The input and output parameters of the function blocks can be linked over the fieldbus segment. Typically the AI, AO, and PID function blocks run in fieldbus devices. For example, a simple temperature transmitter contains an AI function block; a control valve might contain a PID function block as well as the AO block. As with other function blocks, you configure these function blocks in Control Studio and then assign them to run in the fieldbus devices. During a download, the function block tag that is configured in the DeltaV Explorer is downloaded to the device and the function block tag in the device is overwritten. Refer to the section "Configuring Fieldbus Function Block Tags" in Using Fieldbus in the Control Strategy for more information on fieldbus function block tag names. Transducer Block The transducer block performs front end processing of data signals received from the I/O and offloads this work from the function block. For example, a transducer block might read a signal from a sensor and convert the signal to Engineering Units, thus relieving the function block of the conversion task. The transducer block contains

212

System Configuration

information, such as calibration date and sensor type. There is usually one transducer block for each AI and AO function block. You can access the transducer block in the DeltaV Explorer to do the following: display status of the sensors view and change configuration such as transducer block parameters change the sensor upper, lower, and zero trim

Using Fieldbus Blocks in the Control Strategy


The following sections provide some guidelines for using fieldbus function blocks in DeltaV control applications. Use Only the Available Number of Links Fieldbus devices allow a limited number of links between their function block parameters and parameters in other fieldbus devices. Some devices support input and output links called publisher and subscriber VCRs and other devices support links called Free VCRs. A subscriber VCR is an output from a fieldbus device to an input in another device on the segment. The input device can be another fieldbus device or a controller. A publisher VCR is an output from a DeltaV controller to the input of a parameter in a fieldbus device. For example, suppose a device allowed only four links as inputs to their function blocks and only four links as outputs from their function blocks. This limit is quickly reached if Feed Forward, Cascade, and Track control methods are used because these types of control require more inputs and outputs. During application configuration, the DeltaV system notifies you if the subscriber or publisher limit for a device has been reached. Refer to the VCR Specifications topic for the maximum number of subscriber and publisher links supported by fieldbus devices that use these types of links. Free VCRs function as either input or output links or device alarms. Device alarms require one Free VCR. For example, if a device supports five Free VCRs and one Free VCR is used for a device alarm, then four Free VCRs are available to the device. Refer to the VCR Specifications topic for the maximum number of Free VCRs supported by devices that use these types of links. Understanding Module Execution Time and Macrocycles The module execution time as defined in Control Studio and the macrocycles are independent. The module execution time determines how often the module executes while the macrocycles (schedule, required, and actual) determine how often the fieldbus function blocks on the port execute. The schedule macrocycle is the user-specified execution time for all the fieldbus function blocks on the segment. The required macrocycle (reported by the DeltaV system) is the minimum execution time plus any publisher Compel Data (CD) time. Use the DeltaV Explorer to specify the schedule macrocycle and to read the required macrocycle. To specify the schedule macrocycle, click the right mouse button on the fieldbus port, click Properties, and then click the General tab. (In the table below, note that the actual macrocycle will be set to the required macrocycle if the schedule macrocycle is a lower value than the required macrocycle. In other words, the actual macrocycle is set to the greater of the schedule or required macrocycle.) Click the Advanced tab to read the required macrocycle. The minimum schedule spacing is the spacing between consecutive compel data messages. This value should only be changed based on a recommendation from Emerson Process Management.

I/O Configuration

213

Use these guidelines to determine the actual macrocycle: 1 2 The actual macrocycle is equal to the schedule macrocycle if the required macrocycle is less than or equal to (<=) the schedule macrocycle. The actual macrocycle is equal to the required macrocycle if the required macrocycle is greater than (>) the schedule macrocycle. The following table provides some examples that show how the actual macrocycle is determined: If the schedule macrocycle is: 1 second 1 second 0.5 seconds 0.5 seconds and the required macrocycle is: 0.6 seconds 1.2 seconds 1 second 0.8 seconds then the actual macrocycle is: 1 second 1.2 seconds 1 second 0.8 seconds

Understanding the Stale Link Count Limit The DeltaV software automatically configures a Stale Link Count Limit parameter for communication between fieldbus devices and for communication between DeltaV and fieldbus devices. The Stale Link Count Limit specifies the number of communications that can be missed before the parameter status is set to BAD. If the limit is set too low (for example, if it is set to one), then inputs can be set momentarily to BAD and control can go to MANUAL under normal operations. The default Stale Link Count Limit for the DeltaV software is three for communications between fieldbus devices. DeltaV can set the Stale Link Count Limit to more than three for communications between the DeltaV Controller and the fieldbus if the module execution rate is faster than the schedule macrocycle. Note This parameter is automatically set by the DeltaV system and is not user configurable. Use a Conservative Module Execution Time For fieldbus function blocks, the module execution time (set in Control Studio) determines the rate at which the controller reads the blocks' parameters over the fieldbus segment (as opposed to non-fieldbus function blocks where the read does not occur over wiring from a device). It is highly recommended that you keep the module execution time as slow as possible to minimize the loading on the fieldbus segment. Note If there are links between fieldbus function blocks (running in a fieldbus device) and controller function blocks (running in the controller), be sure that the module execution rate is a multiple (>=2) of the actual macrocycle. Fieldbus links can go to BadNoCommLUV if the module execution rate is not slower than the actual macrocycle. Refer to the previous section, "Understanding Module Execution Time and Macrocycles" for information on the actual macrocycle. Limit Write Requests to Fieldbus Function Block Parameters Because of the effect on the segment's bandwidth, it is recommended that you limit write requests to fieldbus function blocks to three (no more than 30 outstanding requests per controller for any one time) and use write requests only when necessary. Like module execution times, write requests can impact the rate at which the View List is scanned and can use up a good deal of the fieldbus bandwidth. For example, if a Calc block's output is linked to an external reference that is tied to the SP of a fieldbus PID block, the system will attempt a write of the value (over the fieldbus) to the fieldbus device with each execution of the module. Note Be especially careful when using periodic writes to static fieldbus parameters in an expression since this type of write can increment the block's static revision parameter (ST_REV), which then causes the controller to issue two more requests to read static View List data. Refer to the Fieldbus Foundation specification for more information on

214

System Configuration

the View List. For DeltaV, VIEW_3 is constantly being read, but VIEW_4 is requested when the static revision counter (contained in VIEW_3) is incremented. Limit Periodic Writes to Static or Non-Volatile Parameters It is recommended that you limit the number of periodic writes to all static or non-volatile parameters such as HI_HI_LIM, LOW_CUT, SP, TRACK_IN_D, OUT, IO_OPTS, BIAS, STATUS_OPTS, SP_HI_LIM, and so on. Static parameter writes increment the static revision counter, ST_REV, and are written to the device's non-volatile memory. Consult the device documentation to determine if a parameter is static or non-volatile. If writes to a static parameter are unavoidable, it is recommended that the module logic first read the parameter value, then compare the existing value to the new value, and write the new value only if it is outside an acceptable deadband. Note Fieldbus devices have a non-volatile memory write limit. If a static or non-volatile parameter is configured to be written periodically, the device can stop its normal operation or fail to accept new values after it reaches its limit. Use Valid Input and Output Links When linking to fieldbus resident function block parameters, DeltaV restricts users to only input and output parameters. Other non-linkable parameters are not visible for the links. Similarly, Show and Hide parameters are not supported for fieldbus function blocks. Use Valid Channel Assignments Fieldbus Input (AI) and Output (AO) function blocks must have a valid channel number for device signals. When you configure a fieldbus AI and AO block, you must set the channel parameter to a valid number or the blocks will remain in OOS mode. Refer to the device documentation and to the Valid Units and Channel Values for Fieldbus Devices topic. Use Valid XD_SCALE Fieldbus Input (AI) and Output (AO) function blocks must have a valid XD-SCALE. When you configure fieldbus AI and AO function blocks, you must set valid XD-SCALE units or the block will remain in OOS. Only the AI function block XD-SCALE units can change the units in the transducer. XD_SCALE EU100 and EU0 do not have to match because only XD_SCALE units are transferred to the transducer block. Check proper scale and unit information using the transducer block properties for the specific transmitter. To find units for a device, refer to the Valid Units and Channel Values for Fieldbus Devices topic. Assign Fieldbus Function Blocks to Devices If a module contains any <unassigned> fieldbus function blocks, the LAS is unable to generate the schedule for the entire module even if the module contains properly linked and assigned function blocks. You are notified of any <unassigned> modules during a download of the fieldbus device. In Control Studio, click the right mouse button on the function block and then click Assign to Fieldbus Device. Configuring Fieldbus Function Block Tags Fieldbus function block tags configured in the DeltaV Explorer are included in device downloads. This means that the function block tag in the DeltaV system matches the tag in the device. As a result , users reading function block tags directly from a device can easily locate that function block in the DeltaV system and vice versa. Here are a few things to keep in mind about naming fieldbus function blocks: 1 2 It is recommended that function block tags in a fieldbus device are not changed with a handheld digital device. Changing a function block tag in the DeltaV Explorer requires a device download.

I/O Configuration

215

3 4

When a function block tag is changed in the DeltaV Explorer, a blue triangle appears on the device indicating that the change must be downloaded to the device to synchronize the device database with the DeltaV database. When a device is downloaded, control and I/O running in the device is suspended. Be sure to follow appropriate control safeguards.

Download Modules First After Replacing Fieldbus Devices After a fieldbus device or revision is replaced, blue triangles ( ) appear on the port, the device, and any function blocks assigned to the device. The blue triangle indicates that the item needs to be downloaded. Download the module first and take the default option to include the port and the device in the download.

Deciding Where to Run Control Function Blocks


Certain control function blocks can run in the fieldbus devices or in the DeltaV controller. This topic discusses the pros and cons of each method. Consider a simple regulatory control loop with an AI, PID, and AO function block. The AI block must run in the transmitter and the AO block must run in the valve. The PID block can run in either of the field devices or in the DeltaV Controller. The configuration of the control module's function block diagram is similar regardless of where the PID algorithm runs. The difference is in how you assign the PID block. In DeltaV Control Studio, you can assign the PID block to fieldbus and run it in either the transmitter or valve, or you can drag the PID block off the palette and run it in the controller. Following is a summary of the advantages of each method. Running the PID block in the device: improves controllability due to synchronous execution conserves controller CPU resources reduces the number of VCRs on the segment provides additional control options, such as form and structure can facilitate conditioning of the input and output, if required

Running the PID block in the controller:

Running the PID Block in the Fieldbus Device Synchronous Execution Improves Controllability For typical PID loops, control performance is about the same when it is done in the DeltaV Controller with classic I/ O or on a fieldbus segment within the devices. This may not be true with hybrid control where the control loop spans the fieldbus segment and the controller. This issue involves sampling rates and synchronous versus asynchronous execution and is not limited to the DeltaV software. Any time a host system provides the control using fieldbus devices on an H1 segment, control performance can be sacrificed unless the loop dynamics are sufficiently slow. To understand why control performance can be compromised with hybrid control, compare control in the DeltaV controller using classic I/O with control in fieldbus devices. Control in the controller is asynchronous, that is, the execution of control modules and function blocks is not synchronized with the execution of the I/O cards or I/O bus communication. But analog I/O cards scan at a fast rate (around 25 milliseconds) and I/O bus communication is fast (typically between 20 and 80 milliseconds depending on the number and mix of I/O cards). Even though all these

216

System Configuration

elements are asynchronous, a control module can easily execute at a scan rate of 500 milliseconds without violating the rule of thumb that the control interval be at least three times slower than the longest asynchronous sampler. Control on the H1 fieldbus segment is synchronous, but the execution rate is somewhat slow due to the low bandwidth bus and low power processors used in the devices. Execution of function blocks on an H1 segment is scheduled in a given scan (called the macrocycle) such that an AI function block in a transmitter executes before the PID block (in the transmitter or valve), which executes before the AO block in the valve. The LAS (Link Active Scheduler), normally the H1 interface card, orchestrates the communication between devices over the fieldbus such that block execution and communication are synchronized. The achievable macrocycle time on a segment is a function of the number and type of devices on the segment and the amount of control and monitoring configured. As a result, it is possible to limit the number of devices on a segment to achieve the desired macrocycle, say 500 milliseconds to 1 second. Synchronous control on the H1 segment at the macrocycle rate is as good or better than control in the controller at the same control interval. Control performance becomes an issue if the PID block runs in the controller and the AI and AO blocks run in devices on the segment. In this case, the AI and AO blocks execute once each macrocycle, but execution and communication with the PID block in the controller is asynchronous. The difference between this hybrid control and control in the controller using classic I/O is that with classic I/O, input and output data can be transferred to and from the I/O bus every 25 milliseconds. With hybrid control, this transfer of data occurs at the macrocycle rate of about 500 milliseconds to 1 second. There is no real control benefit achieved by executing the PID block in the controller faster than three times the macrocycle rate. If the macrocycle is 500 milliseconds, the fastest control interval of benefit is 2 seconds. A 1 second macrocycle supports a practical control interval no faster than the 5 second option. Therefore, hybrid control can compromise the controllability of loops with fast dynamics. Conserves Controller CPU Resources Running a function block in a field device instead of in the controller reduces the blocks controller CPU demand by approximately 50 percent. Running the block in the device eliminates the demand on the controller CPU caused by the execution of the blocks control algorithm. However, there is processing required to communicate view list data between the field block and the extended block (sometimes called a shadow block) in the controller. The net result is about a 50 percent reduction in controller CPU resources when the block resides in the device. Reduces the Number of VCRs on the Segment There are two types of VCRs (Virtual Communication Relationships) on each port: publisher and subscriber VCRs. An H1 interface card can support up to 50 total publisher and subscriber links on each port. Running the PID block in the controller consumes three VCRs on the port for one simple loop. Running the PID block in the transmitter consumes two VCRs and running it in the valve consumes one VCR. Running one VCR or two VCRs does not significantly reduce the number of devices the segment will support. However, using three VCRs for a simple loop can significantly reduce the number of devices the segment will support. Running the PID Block in the DeltaV Controller Provides Additional Control Options You cannot configure the manufacturer specific parameters, Form and Structure, when the PID block runs in fieldbus devices. You can configure these parameters only when the PID block runs in the controller.

I/O Configuration

217

May Facilitate Input Output Conditioning (if required) When a control loop goes beyond the simple AI-PID-AO combination, there may be a rationale for having the PID block reside in the controller. In most cases however, there are calculation blocks available in fieldbus devices for this purpose. Examples of conditioning include, but are not limited to the following: selecting the input from multiple sensors compensating a flow for temperature and pressure characterizing the control output rate limiting the control output during a startup or shutdown situation

If you find it necessary to perform this type of conditioning in the controller, you do not lose anything by also running the PID block in the controller because anything done in the controller (such as conditioning) eliminates synchronous control. However, it is usually possible for the entire loop to reside in field devices on the segment, thus maintaining synchronous execution. For example: Use the Input Selector function block to select the input from multiple sensors. Use the Arithmetic block for pressure-temperature compensation. Use the Signal Characterizer block to characterize both the forward and backward paths of the control output. Enable rate limiting by placing the AO block in Auto mode and manipulating the setpoint during startup or shutdown (Setpoint rate limits apply in Auto mode but not in Cas mode).

Changing Function Block Parameter Values in Fieldbus Devices


You can change parameter values for function blocks that run in fieldbus devices the same way that you change parameter values for function blocks that run in the DeltaV Controller. You can use: DeltaV Operate to write the value through a datalink that allows data entry Control Studio online or debug to write the value for any writeable function block parameter in the device DeltaV Explorer or Control Studio to download the module

Using DeltaV Operate From DeltaV Operate you can enter the data through any datalink that allows data entry. Typically this is done from a faceplate or detail display, but it can also be done from a primary control display. When you enter the data, the workstation writes the value to the parameter in the extended block (sometimes called a shadow block) in the control module in the controller. The extended block communicates data to and from the block in the fieldbus device. When the extended block receives the write request from the workstation, it does not immediately update its own parameter value. Rather, it passes the write down to the fieldbus device. On the next scan of the control module in the controller, the extended block asks the block in the device for its dynamic view list parameter data. If ST_REV, the static revision, has incremented since the previous scan, the field block updates the extended block with its static view list parameter data. ST_REV is incremented any time a static parameter is written. At this point, the extended block parameter values match those in the field block. After the next unsolicited reporting of data by the control module to the workstation and update of the display in DeltaV Operate, the value that had been written is visible on the display. Display update times may appear slower following writes to parameters in field blocks as compared to writes to controller resident blocks because of the additional communication over the fieldbus segment. The delay can become significant when there are more than 10 devices are the segment.

218

System Configuration

Using Control Studio Online or Debug From Control Studio online or debug you can enter any writeable function block parameter in the fieldbus device. The mechanism for the update of the value in the device is the same as described above. Device-sourced function blocks that appear in control module function block diagrams are really controller resident extended blocks. Any writeable parameter can be changed in the extended block, but some parameters require that the target mode be OOS (Out of Service) in order for the update in the device to be successful. Using DeltaV Explorer or Control Studio to Download the Module You can download the control module from the Explorer or from Control Studio. In order for extended block parameters to be sent to the device during the download, you must check the function block on the download dialog (the DeltaV software does this for you when a parameter has been changed in the configuration database). When the function block is checked, the values of all configurable parameters in the extended block are sent to the device for update. This technique is the least efficient and most time consuming method of making function block parameter changes in the device. The high level of communication that occurs on the H1 segment during this type of download does not impact control, but can result in slower display response at the operator workstation. When possible, it is better to change fieldbus function block parameters from the Operator Station or Control Studio online than to download. To update the values in the configuration database after making a change from the Operator Station or Control Studio online, use the DeltaV Explorer or Control Studio to upload the module.

I/O Configuration

219

Fieldbus Devices General Information


Inside this topic Device Descriptions and Methods Accessing Methods from DeltaV Operate Autosensing Fieldbus Devices Commissioning and Decommissioning Fieldbus Devices Diagnosing Fieldbus Devices Fieldbus Device Status Conditions Suppressing Device Alarms Device Audit Trail Fieldbus devices are field instruments, such as transmitters and valves, with processors that monitor device performance and state. Fieldbus devices use a digital, rather than analog, connection to a host system such as the DeltaV system. Function blocks reside in the fieldbus devices and enable the devices to execute control in the field. Fieldbus devices notify the control system of standard operating parameters and are self-diagnosing and capable of reporting device problems such as instrument out of calibration to the control system. Each fieldbus device must have a unique physical device tag and a corresponding network address. The device tag is assigned to the device when it is commissioned and (for most device states), the device retains the tag in its memory when it is disconnected. The device does not retain the tag when the device is made Spare. When the device is made Spare, the tag information is lost. The network address is the current address that the fieldbus is using for the device. The Fieldbus Foundation uses addresses in the range 0-255. Group addresses and DLLs use addresses 0 - 15, commissioned devices use addresses 20-35, standby devices use addresses 232-247, and offline and spare devices use addresses 248-251. Fieldbus supports four device classes: Unknown - the fieldbus device class is not known at this time. Basic device - sends and receives messages on the fieldbus but does not control when devices have access to the fieldbus. Link Master - controls when devices access the fieldbus and executes the link schedule which synchronizes communications with function block execution on the fieldbus. Link Master devices are capable of taking over as LAS if the Primary Link Master device fails. The backup Link Master must use address 20. Bridge - links multiple fieldbus segments. This device class is not currently supported. The DeltaV system supports one backup Link Master on each segment.

Note Link Master devices should always be Commissioned. Unpredictable behavior could occur if a Link Master capable device is in Standby or Offline and the Primary Link Master device fails. Any temporary device should only be connected to the fieldbus as a Basic device. For more information, refer to the Commissioning and Decommissioning Fieldbus Devices topic. Device Descriptions and Methods A Device Description is similar to a driver for the device. For fieldbus devices, the Device Description includes the calibration procedures, parameter procedures, and other information required by the control system to communicate with the fieldbus device. Standard Device Descriptions are provided by the Fieldbus Foundation and optional, incremental Device Descriptions are provided by the device manufacturer. Device Descriptions are written in the Device Description Language (DDL) and the host system such as the DeltaV system uses library functions called Device Descriptions Services to read the Device Descriptions. Device Description technology enables interoperability among fieldbus devices. Interoperability, a key benefit of fieldbus technology, is the ability of a host

220

System Configuration

system to operate multiple devices, independent of manufacturer, on the same fieldbus segment without loss of minimum functionality. The DeltaV system supports a number of fieldbus devices from different manufacturers. The device description files necessary to support these devices are included in the DeltaV install image. If a fieldbus device is not included in the DeltaV install image, you must install the device description for that device. The device description is specific to the device type and revision and many device description files are available on the vendors' websites. The device description files must include a file with an .fhx extension to work with the DeltaV system. You can download the device description files to a disk, CD, or directory on your system and then use the DeltaV Explorer to add the device descriptions to the DeltaV Explorer library. Install the device description files on the ProfessionalPLUS workstation and the DeltaV system will automatically synchronize the device descriptions on the other workstations. To install a device description: 1 2 3 4 5 Click Start | DeltaV | Engineering | DeltaV Explorer to open DeltaV Explorer. Insert the device description disk or CD into the drive. (The device description can also be on a local shared hard drive.) Navigate to the Fieldbus Devices (Library/Fieldbus Devices). Click the right mouse button and select Add Device Definition. Browse for the location of the drive or directory where the device definition files are stored and click OK. You are not required to select each file individually. The device definition files are automatically selected when you select the drive. (If the directory contains more than one file of a needed file type, an error is displayed. The duplicate file types must be removed before attempting to add the device.) Read the Warning message. If you want to proceed with the installation, click Yes. Follow the instructions to install the device description files.

6 7

Methods Device Descriptions can also include a set of processing routines called Methods. Methods provide a way to access and manipulate parameters within a device. For example a DD for a Valve Controller might include methods for automatically calibrating valve travel, manually calibrating travel, restarting a device, and calibrating the internal pressure sensor information for display. In the DeltaV system, the methods reside in the Transducer and Resource blocks. Some methods, such as calibration methods are available through the context menus for the Transducer block. Other methods such as the restart method, are available through the context menu for the Resource block.

I/O Configuration

221

To access a calibration method for a Digital Valve Controller, perform the following steps: 1 2 3 Click Start | DeltaV | Engineering | DeltaV Explorer to open the DeltaV Explorer. Select the device from the All Containers pane. Select the device's Transducer block from the Contents of pane, right-click, select Calibration, and then select the desired calibration method.

222

System Configuration

To access the restart method for a Digital Valve Controller, perform the following steps: 1 2 3 Open DeltaV Explorer. Select the device from the All Containers pane. Select the device's Resource block from the Contents of pane, right-click, and then select Restart DVC.

Accessing Methods from DeltaV Operate You can provide access to device methods from DeltaV Operate pictures using scripting that call the AMSMenu application included with DeltaV software. The AMSMenu application opens a menu that contains device methods. The command line for the AMSMenu application has two forms which take different command line parameters: AMSMenu <dev tag> -bi <blk index> AMSMenu -n <dev tag> -m <mfg id> -t <dev type id> -r <rev num> -i <phys dev id> -bt <blk tag> -bi <blk index> where dev tag is the tagname of the field device in the database, blk index is the block or object index of the device's Resource or Transducer block listed in DeltaV Explorer, mfg id is the identifier code for the device manufacturer, dev type id is the identifier code for the device type, rev num is the device's revision number, phys dev id is the unique identifier for this device type, blk tag is the tagname of the resource or transducer block of the device, blk index is DeltaV Explorer object index for the device's Transducer or Resource block.

I/O Configuration

223

Note: The mfg id and the dev type id must be the hexadecimal values. With the first form, the AMSMenu application connects to the DeltaV database to get the manufacturer, type, and revision of the device, then passes this information to the same AMS interface that DeltaV Explorer uses. In the second form, the command line provides all the device information so the AMSMenu application does not connect to the DeltaV database and is therefore faster. For example, if your configuration includes a device named FY-101 that has the following characteristics: Manufacture ID: 5100 (hex) Device Type ID: 5900 (hex) Revision Level: 7 Physical Device ID: 0051000100FisherDVC0112461319931 Block Tag: TRANSDUCER Block Index: 450

The following script opens a menu when the object the script is attached to is clicked: Private Sub Rect1_Click() frsruntask "AMSMenu", "-n FY-101 -m 5100 -t 5900 -r 7 " _ & "-i 0051000100FisherDVC0112461319931 -bt TRANSDUCER -bi 450" End Sub The menu that it opens is:

These are the same methods that appear if you right click the device's Transducer block in DeltaV Explorer. See Working with Other Applications in the DeltaV Operate manual for more information. Autosensing Fieldbus Devices When the H1 fieldbus cards are plugged into the I/O carrier, the fieldbus devices are connected to the H1 cards' terminal block, the Device Descriptions loaded, the H1 card automatically detects the fieldbus devices, recognizes the device types, and makes this information available to the DeltaV system. Note The DeltaV system autosenses the H1 cards. As with other cards and devices, you can add H1 cards and fieldbus devices as placeholders in the DeltaV Explorer. A placeholder device matches the manufacturer and model of a device that has not been connected and holds the device tag and address. When you are ready to commission the device, move it to Standby, and drag the device to the placeholder. The device connects to the segment with the device tag and address that was specified for the placeholder.

224

System Configuration

Commissioning and Decommissioning Fieldbus Devices Commissioning and decommissioning fieldbus devices is done in the DeltaV Explorer and involves moving the devices through several device states. The online help for the DeltaV Explorer explains how to commission and decommission fieldbus devices. Fieldbus devices have five stable states in the DeltaV system: Commissioned - For a fieldbus device that is at its assigned address. To move a commissioned device to the Off-line or Spare state, you first decommission the device. Caution It is recommended that if you intend to keep a fieldbus device in the Off-line or Spare states (decommissioned) for any length of time, you remove the device from the segment. A decommissioned fieldbus device is given a temporary address and failure to remove it from the segment could prevent normal commissioning on the segment. Off-line - For a fieldbus device that you want to disconnect for maintenance and then return to the segment at the same address. For example, you would take a device offline to recalibrate it. If an off-line device is reconnected, it automatically uses a standby address. You must commission the standby device by dragging and dropping it onto the appropriate placeholder. After the device is commissioned, download the device in order to make it function as it did prior to being decommissioned. Spare - For a fieldbus device that you want to disconnect and no longer use in your DeltaV system. Each device has a device tag that designates the role the device performs in the DeltaV system. If you decide that you no longer want to use the device, you should clear its tag. To clear the tag, make the device spare. A spare device is part of your inventory of spare devices, not an instrument with a specific purpose. If, at some time, you decide to put a spare device back into service, the system moves it to Standby automatically when you attach the device to the segment. Standby - A safety feature for fieldbus devices. The device is moved to a standby address until it is commissioned. A device comes to standby from the Off-line and Spare states. Mismatch - The fieldbus device was commissioned on another control system and then connected to a DeltaV system. When the H1 card finds a device in the assigned address range that has not been commissioned for this particular segment, it designates it as a mismatched device. If you want to commission it, place it in Off-line, then move it to Standby, then commission it. In the meantime, the DeltaV system lets the device remain where it is. Device Class Mismatch - The attached field device is not the same class for which the device was commissioned. Schedule Download Failed - The LAS Schedule could not be downloaded to this field device.

I/O Configuration

225

The following figure shows state transitions in fieldbus devices.

State Transitions 1 A commissioned device is decommissioned to Spare. The device is usually removed from the segment after doing this. A Spare device loses its address and device tag. Note that a commissioned device automatically changes to a Spare if its placeholder is deleted. A decommissioned device that has not been removed from the segment is placed in Standby. This might occur if a Mismatch device had been made Spare and you want to put it in Standby without taking it off the segment. A Standby device is dragged to an available placeholder that matches the manufacturer, device type and device revision and is commissioned. A commissioned device is taken Off-line - the device retains its tag and address. This is normally done when the device is to be temporarily removed from the segment and reattached in the same service. The device must be removed from the segment after it is taken Off-line. A device that was previously Off-line is attached to a segment other than the one from which it was removed. A commissioned device is removed from a segment and attached to a segment other than the one from which it was removed. The device might have been inadvertently attached to the wrong segment. A Mismatch device is made Spare. An Off-line device is made Spare. This is done if a device is placed on a segment with another device with the same tag as this device. Making the device spare allows you to clear the device tag without removing the device from the segment. A Standby device can transition to Spare if it was previously in the Spare state before it was in the Standby state.

2 3 4

5 6 7 8

10 A Standby device can transition to Off-line if it was previously in Offline state before it was in the Standby state. 11 A device can transition from Mismatch to Off-line. Fieldbus devices can also go through the following transitional states: Comm Initializing - The H1 card is establishing communications with the field device. Unrecognized - The field device has not been commissioned at this address. Unknown - The field device is transitioning between states. Typically, a device will be in one of the above states for only a few seconds. If it remains in one of these states it indicates a problem. Additionally, if a device goes into the Comm Fail state it indicates that the device is communicating on the bus (it is in the live list) but communications between the H1 card and the device is currently disrupted.

226

System Configuration

If a device remains in the Comm Initializing or Comm Fail state, cycle the device power. If a device remains in the Unrecognized state, it either has not been commissioned or has been attached to the wrong segment. If a device is in the Schedule Download Failure state, then the segment currently does not have a functional backup LAS. If a device shows a Device Class Mismatch, there is something wrong with the device. Diagnosing Fieldbus Devices The DeltaV Explorer, Control Studio, and Diagnostics programs as well as the H1 card itself provide a great deal of diagnostic information on fieldbus devices. H1 Fieldbus Card Communication information between the card and fieldbus devices is available from a visual inspection of the H1 card. The bottom two LEDs on the H1 card reflect communication between the port and fieldbus devices on that port. A blinking yellow LED indicates that the port is communicating with fieldbus devices but either a communication problem exists with an attached fieldbus device or no function blocks are configured on the segment. If the LED is off, either the port is disabled or the H1 card is not communicating with any fieldbus devices on the port. Use the DeltaV Explorer to enable and download the port and Control Studio to create and download configuration. A solid yellow LED indicates good communication between the port and devices on that port and at least one function block is configured on the segment. DeltaV Explorer Indicators in the DeltaV Explorer tell you if an H1 port or a fieldbus device needs to be downloaded or commissioned. The on an H1 port or device means that the port or device needs to be downloaded. Select the port or device, click the right mouse button, and then select Download to open a dialog box that lists the fieldbus configuration information to be downloaded. The on a device means that the device needs to be commissioned. To commission the device, select it from the Decommissioned device list and drag it to either the port or device placeholder.

Control Studio Use Control Studio in online mode to diagnose problems with modules running in fieldbus devices. You must assign and download a module before viewing it in online mode. 1 2 Open the module in Control Studio. Click View | On-line to create an online (or debug) session in which you can examine module and block parameters. A red X on a function block parameter indicates a problem with the function block. Caution Any online changes affect your process because the changes are made to downloaded modules in the controller. Use extreme care when changing values or stopping the execution of an algorithm. 3 4 Select the block with the red X. The Parameter View window in Control Studio displays a full list of parameters for that block. Double-click a parameter in Parameter View to open the Parameter Properties dialog for that parameter.

Diagnostics Use DeltaV Diagnostics to perform the following tasks: determine if the device is commissioned check integrity on the H1 card, backup Link Master device, and ports check overall port statistics and communication statistics for each device

I/O Configuration

227

Open DeltaV Diagnostics and click View | Details or View | Compare to quickly see the device state. If the device is not commissioned, open the DeltaV Explorer and commission the device. Then, download the port and the device. If the device is commissioned, check integrity on the port and then check port and device communication statistics. Port Integrity Typically, integrity problems originate below the node and then rise to the node level. Integrity problems are indicated by the overlay. Start by looking for a controller with the overlay and, if found, expand the controller hierarchy until you find the root cause of the problem. If a fieldbus card has an integrity problem, expand the card to see which port has the problem. Select each port and look at the port's status. Possible port status values are: Good - Good basic communications with all devices on this port No Termination on Link - This port is not terminated. Check attached cable. Link Error - PCMCIA Card problem exists. Replace the H1 card. Duplicate Address on Link - Another device is currently communicating at this port's address. No Communications on Link H1 Card Problem - Replace the H1 card. One or more function block problems on link or device problem - Expand the port and check the state of each fieldbus device on the port. Any state other than Commissioned indicates a potential problem with that fieldbus device.

Port Communication Statistics The Port Statistics command provides a broad view of communication activity on the port. Click the right mouse button on the port and then click Port Statistics. In the Port Statistics dialog look for the following: Retries Invalid responses Stack errors Timeouts

Note If any of the port statistics and communication statistics are continually increasing, a potential communications problem could exist on this port. To isolate the problem, investigate the communication statistics on each fieldbus device. Refer to the following section for information. Next, look at detailed port statistics. Click the right mouse button on the port and then click Display Port Detail Statistics. In the Detailed Port Statistics dialog, look for the following: Identifies Initiates Aborts

Tip Clicking the Reset Stats button resets all values to 0 and makes it easier to read the statistics. Device Communication Statistics Finally, look at communication statistics for each device. Click the right mouse button on each device, click Display Communication Statistics, and look for the following: Aborts received and sent Initiates received and sent

228

System Configuration

Pcr Timeouts Livelist appearances - the number of times the device showed up as new

Fieldbus Device Status/Conditions Fieldbus devices can be configured to detect and report specific device alert conditions directly to the DeltaV system. These conditions can range from potential problems (such as hardware failures within the device, loop problems, and misconfigured parameters) to proactive reporting of upcoming maintenance needed. To view Foundation Fieldbus device conditions in DeltaV Explorer, right-click the device and select Status/Conditions. Optionally, device alarms can be enabled on a Fieldbus device. When a device detects a condition, it will generate an alarm, in addition to setting the appropriate condition on the status or conditions screen. The alarm is reported in the Event Chronicle, is displayed in alarm summaries, and may be displayed in the DeltaV Operate alarm banner, depending on user configuration (MD controller, Series 2 H1 card required). A standard device faceplate shows the active alarms for a fieldbus device. The detail button on the faceplate accesses the same screen as the Status/ Conditions selection in the DeltaV Explorer. Device condition functionality is dependent on the device. Foundation Fieldbus devices support either standard Foundation Fieldbus alerts or PlantWeb alerts. Standard Foundation Fieldbus alerts - Devices report alerts in a single alarm: abnormal. This alarm is based on the standard Block Alarm definition. PlantWeb alerts - Devices report alerts in one of three alarms: failed, maintenance and advisory. The device alerts have been organized into one of these alarms based on the importance of the alert condition to the health of the device. With the DeltaV system, all Foundation Fieldbus devices also have a communications failure alarm. This alarm is generated when the DeltaV software recognizes that a device is no longer communicating on the H1 segment.

Fieldbus devices that support PlantWeb alerts also allow you to suppress conditions from the Status/Conditions screen. Suppression from the Status/Conditions screen prevents the device from reporting the condition to the DeltaV system. It is also possible to prevent reported alarm conditions from appearing in the alarm banner and alarm list. This type of alarm suppression is described in the Suppressing Device Alarms topic.

I/O Configuration

229

Suppressing Device Alarms You can suppress device alarms from several places in the DeltaV system: For an alarm category (failed, maintenance, advisory), use the alarm's faceplate in DeltaV Operate. For conditions of an alarm category, use the Status/Conditions dialog from the device's context menu.

Because alarms contain multiple conditions, suppressions at the alarm category level will always override suppressions at the condition level. Example: A fieldbus device reports that it is due to be calibrated. The Calibration Due condition appears as a Maintenance alarm in the Status/Conditions dialog, the DeltaV alarm banner, and Event Chronicle. Because regular service is scheduled for the following week, the user might choose to suppress all Maintenance alarms from that device using the Details faceplate. Alternatively, the user could choose to suppress only the Calibration Due condition from appearing in the alarm banner and the Event Chronicle by checking the box above the condition in the Status/ Conditions dialog for that device. In both cases, the Status/Conditions dialog continues to display the condition as active. Viewing the Audit Trail Device Audit Trail software enables the DeltaV system to maintain an audit trail of historical records, called events, for fieldbus devices. Device Audit Trail records changes to a device's configuration, such as changes made from a resource or transducer block's properties screen or context (right-click) menu. When a user changes a device's upper or lower sensor trim, for example, Device Audit Trail records the changes. An audit trail is maintained for all standby and commissioned fieldbus devices. The Device Audit Trail is not installed with the DeltaV software. The setup file is located in the DV_Extras directory on disk 3 of the DeltaV installation CDs . Refer to the DeltaV Release News for Device Audit Trail upgrade procedures. Once the software is installed and licensed, you can view events for a device by selecting the Resource or Transducer block and right-clicking Audit Trail. The events displayed are associated with the selected block. The audit trail display includes the following information for each event: date and time of the event user who made the change event type (configuration change in the current version) reason the event was recorded application affecting the change

230

System Configuration

Using Fieldbus Devices


Inside this topic Installing Generic Fieldbus Devices Configuring Fieldbus Devices or Placeholders Comparing Fieldbus Device Configurations Installing Generic Fieldbus Devices The DeltaV system requires a set of device definition files for each fieldbus device type and device revision. Many fieldbus device definition files are pre-installed with the DeltaV system. However, when you install a generic fieldbus device, you must first install the device's definition files from the ProfessionalPLUS workstation. After you install the device definition files from the ProfessionalPLUS workstation, you synchronize the device definitions on the other DeltaV workstations in order to make the other workstation's device definitions current with those on the ProfessionalPLUS workstation. Use the DeltaV Explorer on the ProfessionalPLUS workstation to load the device definition files. Refer to the DeltaV Explorer online help for information on installing fieldbus device definition files. Note Fieldbus devices that are supported on the DeltaV system have been tested for interoperability with the DeltaV system. Non-supported devices have not been tested for interoperability with the DeltaV system and may not operate properly. Configuring Fieldbus Devices or Placeholders The Configuration dialog shows the parameters of a fieldbus device's resource and transducer blocks. These parameters are grouped on tabs. The fields on each tab correspond to fieldbus device parameters. To launch the Configuration dialog, right-click a device and select Configure from the context menu. Use the Configuration dialog box to: View current parameter configurations Modify parameters Display the manufacturer's help on parameters (click the question mark button on the title bar and then click the parameter)

Comparing Fieldbus Device Configurations You can compare the configurations of two fieldbus devices. The devices can be two physical or placeholder devices (or one of each), but must be the same device type and revision. You can compare (and copy, depending on device state and configuration selected) parameter information between: Two configurations of a single fieldbus device (current to historical or historical to another historical) Two commissioned fieldbus devices (current to current, current to historical, historical to current, historical to historical) A placeholder and a standby fieldbus device during commissioning of the standby device A placeholder and a commissioned fieldbus device Two placeholders

Reconciling is the process of comparing configurations before commissioning. When you drop a device onto the fieldbus port, you are commissioning it. If the configuration differs from the current values, you have the opportunity to reconcile the values in either configuration to the other. A wizard steps you through the process. Configuration and configuration comparisons are available from the device context menu.

I/O Configuration

231

Configuration Procedures
Inside this topic Create a Device Placeholder Define the Control Strategy Select the Blocks Assign Blocks to Fieldbus Configure Parameters Connect Inputs and Outputs Assigning the Strategy to a Node Saving a Strategy Commission a Device Replacing a Commissioned Device This document explains how to use the DeltaV applications to perform common fieldbus procedures, such as creating device placeholders, defining a control strategy for a fieldbus device, commissioning devices, using fieldbus device methods, and configuring device parameters. This is not a comprehensive resource as requirements for a host system, such as the DeltaV system, differ between devices but, rather, a starting point. For complete information, refer to the device's user manuals, the online help for the DeltaV applications, and DeltaV Books Online. Create a Device Placeholder Device support files must be installed before you can add a device to the segment or create a device placeholder. The DeltaV system includes built-in support for a number of fieldbus devices from different device manufacturers. The files necessary to support these devices are included in the DeltaV install image and are available in the DeltaV Explorer library (DeltaV System / Library / Fieldbus Devices). If a fieldbus device is not included in the DeltaV install image, you must install a set of device support files for that device. Many device files that have been tested with the DeltaV system are available from the website www.EasyDeltaV.com/fda. If the device files that you require are not available on the website, contact the device manufacturer. Refer to the Device Descriptions and Methods topic for information on how to install device support files. About Device Placeholders A device placeholder is an electronic representation of a device that exists in the DeltaV database with no associated physical device. You can use a placeholder to configure block parameters offline and have your control strategy in place prior to attaching the device to the segment. When you are ready, you can attach the device to the segment and use the DeltaV system to reconcile any differences between the placeholder and the device when you commission the device. Note The use of placeholders is optional and depends on the size and requirements of your fieldbus application. However, it is recommended that you use placeholders for large applications. If you do not want to use placeholders, you can attach your devices directly to the segment.

232

System Configuration

Click Start | DeltaV | Engineering | DeltaV Explorer to open DeltaV Explorer.

Navigate to the fieldbus ports. The ports are under the fieldbus H1 card. The card is under the I/O subsystem.

3 4

Right-click the port to which you want to attach the device placeholder and select New Fieldbus Device. The Fieldbus Device Properties dialog opens. Enter the appropriate information about the device in the dialog box. The DeltaV system selects an address. You can customize this field, but it is not necessary. Select the device type and revision based on the type of device you want to add. The device properties must match the properties of the device you will commission later.

I/O Configuration

233

Remember that DeltaV Explorer has extensive online help. Click the Help button on this dialog box for help on any of the fields. Fieldbus devices often provide error detection for a variety of device conditions. Refer to Device Alarms Overview and Configuring Device Alarms for more information. Select the Alarms and Displays tab in the Fieldbus Device Properties dialog to enable Device Alarms to be reported by the device. Note The alarms and displays tab is only shown when supported by the DeltaV hardware. Device alerts are supported by MD controllers with Series 2 H1 cards. Each device can also be configured with a primary control display and faceplate. DeltaV includes a standard device faceplate. 5 Click OK to add the device placeholder to the segment. The device appears as a decommissioned device on the segment.

When device alarms are enabled, alarms become visible in the right pane in DeltaV Explorer when you select the Fieldbus Device Alarms icon for the device. Select an alarm and right-click properties to enable or disable it or to change the alarm's priority.

Define the Control Strategy No more than 64 field function blocks can be assigned to any H1 card. An H1 card can support two fieldbus segments. A maximum of 16 devices and 32 function blocks can run on a segment. You use the DeltaV Control Studio application to create the control strategy. You can start Control Studio from the task bar by clicking Start | DeltaV Engineering | Control Studio, or you can launch Control Studio from the Applications menu in the DeltaV Explorer. Remember that Control Studio has extensive online help. You can access the help through the Help menu (Help/Control Studio Help Topics), the "What's this?" commands (select an object and click the right mouse button), and the context-sensitive help on the dialog boxes. Defining the control strategy consists of selecting the blocks you want to use, assigning the blocks to run in a fieldbus device or in the controller, configuring the blocks' parameters, and connecting the blocks' inputs and outputs. Then you assign the strategy to a node, save the strategy, commission the device, and download the device and strategy. You will use several Control Studio window panes to define the control strategy: the Palette, Diagram, and Parameter

234

System Configuration

panes. The following image shows a basic strategy and points out the Control Studio window panes that are used to create it.

For this example, we will use a basic control strategy composed of an AI, AO, and PID block, and we will configure one parameter for an AI block. The intent of this example is to explain how to use the DeltaV Control Studio application to create a control strategy - not to show you how to create a control strategy for a particular device. Consult your device documentation for function block parameter definitions and recommended values and other configuration options for your device. Selecting the Blocks Click the down arrow in the list box at the top of the palette and select IO. This makes the I/O function blocks available to you. 1 2 Drag the Analog Input function block from the palette to the diagram pane to create a generic AI block. The handles around the AI block indicate that it is selected. At this point, you may want to rename the AI block to make it meaningful to you. Select the block with the right mouse button and click Rename.

Assigning Blocks to Fieldbus For information on how assigning blocks to fieldbus devices affects loop performance and how you can achieve maximum performance, refer to the topic Using DeltaV Tune with Fieldbus Devices. Now we will assign the AI block to a fieldbus device. Remember that for fieldbus, blocks can run in either the Controller or the fieldbus devices. The decision about where to run the blocks is based on your requirements, and there are pros and cons to each method. Refer to the Deciding Where to Run Control Function Blocks topic for help in making the decision. For this exercise, we will run the blocks in the device.

I/O Configuration

235

Select the block with the right mouse button and click Assign I/O | To Fieldbus. (To run the blocks in a controller, click Assign I/O | To Signal Tag.)

Click the Browse button and find the device to which you want to assign this block. Navigate through the controller, I/O card, port, and device to get to the blocks. Some devices may have more than one AI block

236

System Configuration

because the device may be capable of outputting more than one variable. In this image, the device, PDT2, has two AI blocks: FFAI1 and FFA12.

Select one of the AI blocks and click OK. Now that the block has been assigned to a device, we will configure a parameter for the device.

For information on how assigning blocks to fieldbus devices affects loop performance and how you can achieve maximum performance, refer to the topic Using DeltaV Tune with Fieldbus Devices. Configuring the Parameters If it is not already selected, select the AI block, and you will see its default set of parameters listed in the parameter pane. In order for the device to work properly, you must configure the device's parameters. 1 Double-click one of the dots on the Filtered by box at the top of the parameter list.

I/O Configuration

237

This opens the Parameter Filtering dialog.

Click the Select All button to make all parameters visible to you.

238

System Configuration

The CHANNEL and XD_SCALE parameters must be correctly configured for AI and AO blocks or a configuration error will occur when the device is downloaded.

Let's take the CHANNEL parameter as an example of how to configure a parameter. Because each device may be capable of more than one measurement, when you configure an AI block, you specify which measurement you want the block to process. The value for the CHANNEL parameter tells the block which measurement to process.

I/O Configuration

239

Double-click the CHANNEL parameter to open the Properties dialog for this parameter. The device manufacturer publishes valid values for the channels, and much of this information is available in DeltaV Books Online. Now, we'll find that information in books online. Select the question mark in the upper right corner of the dialog, drag it to the Value field, and press the left mouse button. This opens context-sensitive help for the Value field.

The help contains a link to the Valid Units and Channel Values for Fieldbus Devices topic. Click the link to open this topic in DeltaV Books Online. Once in Books Online, click your device in the list of devices to find the valid units and channel values for the device. Enter that value in the Value field and click OK.

Now you know how to configure a parameter for a block. Experiment with Control Studio and open the Properties dialog boxes for other AI parameters or drag another block onto the diagram and look at its parameters. When you are ready, configure the other blocks in your control strategy. Consult the device documentation for recommended parameter values. Then, connect all inputs and outputs, assign the strategy to a node, and save and download the strategy. Connecting Inputs and Outputs Algorithms that determine how information is exchanged between devices run in the background in Control Studio. You wire the blocks together in Control Studio to create the algorithms that describe how you want the blocks to execute. The output of one block flows into another block as an input. In our example control strategy, the output of

240

System Configuration

the AI block flows into the PID block as input, the output of the PID block flows into the AO block as input, and so on.

To wire blocks together: 1 2 3 Click the connection point where you want the wire to begin. The cursor turns into a Hold the left mouse button down and drag the cursor to the end point. Release the left mouse button at the end point and the line is drawn between the two points. on the toolbar. .

If you have trouble drawing the connections, use the Connection tool Assigning the Strategy to a Node

Now, you assign the strategy to a node to tell the DeltaV system where it will run. A strategy can be assigned to a workstation or a controller. Generally, control strategies run in a controller.

1 2

Click the Assign to Node button

on the toolbar.

Select the controller to which you want to assign the module and click OK.

Saving a Strategy Once you have created your control strategy and assigned it to a node, you must save it. A strategy is saved as a module. 1 2 3 Click File | Save. In the Look in: box, select the location (Area) where you want the strategy to run. Name the module and click Save.

I/O Configuration

241

Commissioning a Device Commissioning a device assigns it an address on the segment and makes the device available to the DeltaV system. You use the DeltaV Explorer to commission devices. You can reconcile any differences between the device and the placeholder during the commissioning process. After commissioning a device, you download. 1 2 3 Attach the device to the segment. Click Start | DeltaV | Engineering | DeltaV Explorer to open the DeltaV Explorer. The device should appear under Decommissioned Fieldbus Devices. It may take a minute for the device to appear. Tip: Press the F5 key to update the list.

The device must be in the Standby state before you can commission it. To determine if a device is in Standby, select Decommissioned Devices, click View | Details from the menu bar, and be sure that the words "Standby Fieldbus Device" appear under Type in the right pane.

If the device is not in Standby, select the device in the right pane, click the right mouse button, and select Standby. It may take a minute or so for the device to transition to Standby. 5 Now be sure that the decommissioned device's properties, Device Type, Manufacturer, and Device Revision, match the placeholder properties. To check the properties, select the item, click the right mouse button, and select

242

System Configuration

Properties. If necessary, edit the placeholder properties to match the device properties. (For information about how to create a placeholder, refer to the Create a Device Placeholder topic.) 6 Select the device from the Decommissioned Fieldbus Devices list and drag it to the placeholder.

The Device Commissioning Wizard - Start opens. 7 Read the information on the Device Commissioning Wizard - Start dialog and click Next to open the Device Commissioning Wizard Reconcile Device dialog.

We will use this dialog to reconcile any differences between the placeholder and the device. 8 Click the Reconcile Device button. (If you do not click this button and click Next instead, the parameters in the device will remain as they are and will overwrite the parameters in the placeholder when you commission the device.) The Reconcile Device dialog shows two sets of fieldbus device configuration parameters: parameters in the placeholder and parameters in the device. This dialog allows you to transfer parameters from a placeholder to

I/O Configuration

243

a device and edit parameters in the device. The following figure shows the dialog for reconciling resource block parameters.

Click the Help button and read about reconciling device parameters. Click the Transducer block in the upper left corner of the Reconcile dialog to reconcile the transducer block parameters. Read the device documentation before reconciling transducer block parameters.

Click OK when you are finished reconciling parameters and then click Finish to commission the device.

It may take a little while to commission the device. Several factors contribute to the time it takes to commission. Among these are the number of function blocks and devices and the time it takes for devices to

244

System Configuration

move through the various device states. Replacing a Commissioned Device The tasks required to replace an already commissioned device with a new device depend on the differences between the new and old device. In general, to replace a commissioned fieldbus device in DeltaV do the following: 1 From DeltaV Explorer, decommission the device you are replacing by selecting the device, right clicking, then select Decommission.

When prompted whether the device should be taken Offline or made Spare, choose Spare to erase the tag in the device. 2 Remove the old device from the bus and connect the new device. The new device appears in the Decommissioned Fieldbus Devices folder under the port. It may take a minute for the device to appear. Tip: Press the F5 key to update the list. 3 The device must be in the Standby state before you can commission it. To determine if a device is in Standby, select Decommissioned Devices, click View | Details from the menu bar, and be sure that the words Standby Fieldbus Device appear under Type in the right pane.

If the current state of the new device is Mismatch then you must make the device go into the Offline state and then bring to the Standby state. In the DeltaV Explorer Contents pane, verify that the revision of the new device matches the revision defined in the device placeholder Properties.

I/O Configuration

245

Change the revision of the placeholder if necessary to match that of the new device. 5 Commission the new device by dragging it from the Decommissioned Fieldbus Devices folder to the device placeholder. This starts the Device Commissioning Wizard. Click the Reconcile Device button on the wizard. (If you do not click this button and click Next instead, the parameters in the new device overwrite the parameters in the placeholder.) The Reconcile Device dialog shows two sets of fieldbus device configuration parameters: parameters in the placeholder and parameters in the device. Use the dialog to decide which settings in the new device, if any, should be read into the configuration database 7 8 Download the device. Check for other downloads required. Check the Fieldbus port for a blue triangle. Check the modules that are assigned to blocks in the device for blue triangles. The port, other devices on the segment, or modules may require download if the device revision has changed.

246

System Configuration

Downloading the Block Configuration and Strategy


Inside this topic Confirming a Module's Operation Using Methods Configuring Device Parameters You have assigned the strategy to a node, saved it, reconciled differences between the device and placeholder, and commissioned the device. The changes you have made are stored in the DeltaV database but have not yet been written to the device. The DeltaV system places a blue triangle next to the device in DeltaV Explorer to indicate that the device needs to be downloaded.

1 2 3 4

Select the device with the right mouse button and click Download | Fieldbus Device. DeltaV informs you if items subordinate to this one also need to be downloaded and can verify the configuration if you choose. Make sure the modules associated with the devices on the segment have been downloaded. The module information must be sent to the H1 card before devices are downloaded. Read the important Warning and if you are sure you want to download, click Yes. When the download is complete, the blue triangle disappears from the device.

There may be other blue triangles in the DeltaV Explorer hierarchy. Download those items if you are comfortable doing so or read the DeltaV Explorer help on downloading for more information. Confirming a Module's Correct Operation Control Studio's On-line mode is a powerful tool for confirming a module's correct operation and for diagnosing module problems. You must assign and download a module before you can view it in On-line mode. 1 2 3 4 Open the module in Control Studio. Click View | On-line to create an online session in which you can examine module and block parameters. If the module is operating correctly, the outputs are displayed next to the block. If there is a problem with a function block, a red X appears on the function block. To determine the source of the problem, perform the following steps: Check the BLOCK_ERR parameter (double-click a parameter to edit it) and determine if the block is out of service (OOS) or if it has a block configuration error. Among the problems that can cause a block to be out of service are misconfiguration, bad sensor input, and problems with the download. Check the status of the block's input and output parameters. For example, a status of BadNoCom indicates that information is not being sent to the block's inputs. If the block has a bad PV, verify that the correct XD_SCALE, UNITS, and RANGE are transferred. If the data has intermittent bad status, check the required macrocycle and the module execution rate. The module execution rate should be >= 2 times the actual macrocycle.

Remember that if you make any changes in On-line mode, the changes are not saved in the database. Use Control Studio or Explorer to upload the changes to the database.

I/O Configuration

247

Using Methods For the example, we'll use the Set Sensor Connections method to configure the sensor connections for a Rosemount Multivariable Temperature Transmitter, Model 3244 MV. The interface to this method is much like a software Wizard and the method resides in the Transducer block for this device. Refer to the Device Descriptions and Methods topic for more information about methods. Depending upon the type of device you are working with, you might have to put AI and AO blocks in Out of Service or Manual mode before running a method. (Refer to the device documentation for a description of the methods available for the device.) 1 Select the device, click the right mouse button on the Transducer block, and select Sensor Config | Set Sensor Connections.

248

System Configuration

2 3

Select the sensor that you want to configure and click Next. Click the down arrow on the list box, select the sensor type, and click Next.

4 5

Click the down arrow on the list box, and select the sensor connection type (2, 3, or 4-wire connection). When the configuration is complete, click Finish.

Configuring Device Parameters Use the DeltaV Explorer to view current device parameters and change parameter values. The parameters are grouped on tabs associated with the Resource and Transducer blocks.

I/O Configuration

249

Select the device with the right mouse button and click Configure.

250

System Configuration

The Device Configuration dialog box opens. The Resource block parameters are displayed by default when the dialog opens.

2 3

The tabs along the top of the dialog indicate the various parameter groupings. Click a tab to view the parameter values. Enter or select new values for parameters that can be edited. When you edit a value, the tab and edited field changes to yellow. in the upper right corner, drag it to

Remember that help is available for any of the fields on this dialog. Select the the field for which you want help, and click the mouse button.

I/O Configuration

251

Click the Transducer block to view and edit the Transducer block parameters.

5 6

Click the tabs to view parameter values and enter or select new values for editable parameters. When you are finished, either click the OK button to commit parameter changes and close the dialog box or click the Apply button to commit parameter changes and continue working in this dialog box.

252

System Configuration

Fieldbus Device Specifications


The following sections provide detailed information for certain fieldbus devices: VCR Specifications Valid Units and Channel Values

VCR Specifications
The following tables list the VCR specifications for certain fieldbus devices. The tables are organized according to whether the devices use Free VCRs or not. The following table shows the maximum number of free VCRs for those devices supported by the DeltaV system that use Free VCRs. Each port on the H1 card supports a maximum of 50 linkable VCRs (a maximum of 50 device subscribers or 35 H1 publishers). Enabling fieldbus alarms in a device consumes one alarm VCR and reduces by one the available number of Free VCRs for publisher and subscriber links. Fieldbus Device Free VCRs Emerson Process Management Device El-O-Matic 0990 ELQ On/Off Extended Revision 3 4 El-O-Matic 22C0 ELQ On/Off Advanced 3 4 El-O-Matic 7360 ELQ Positioner Extended 3 4 El-O-Matic 8000 ELQ Positioner Basic 3 4 El-O-Matic A2C0 ELQ On/Off Pneumatic El-O-Matic DD30 ELQ Positioner Advanced 4 3 4 El-O-Matic F800 ELQ On/Off Basic 3 4 DeltaV H1 Carrier Fisher Controls DVC5000f Fieldbus Digital Valve Controller 1 6 Max Number Free VCRs 8 9 9 9 9 6 8 5 8 8 7 8 5 9 10 Link Master Capable N Y N Y N Y N Y Y N Y N Y N N

Fieldbus Device Specifications

253

Emerson Process Management Device Fisher Controls DVC5000f AO/PID Valve Controller Fisher Controls DVC5000f AO/PID/IS Valve Controller Fisher Controls DVC5000f DO/DI Valve Controller Fisher Controls DVC6000f Digital Valve Controller Micro Motion 2700 Coriolis Flow Meter Revision 7 8 9 7 8 1 1 2 3 Micro Motion 5300 Coriolis Flow Meter Rosemount 644 Rosemount 848 Rosemount 752 Fieldbus Remote Indicator Rosemount 1100 MLT Continuous Gas Analyzer Rosemount 3244 Temperature Transmitter 1 1 4 2 1 2 3 Max Number Free VCRs 12 16 16 11 8 17 4 5 14 5 9 16 17 16 6 9 (this revision supports a maximum of 5 subscriber VCRs) 9 6 8 9 16 17 17 Link Master Capable N N N N N N N Y Y N N Y Y Y N Y

4 Rosemount 3051 Pressure Transmitter 3 6 7 20 22 Rosemount 3144 Temperature Transmitter 1

Y N Y Y Y Y Y

254

System Configuration

Emerson Process Management Device Rosemount 3900 Tank Radar REX Level Transmitter Rosemount 5600 Tank Radar Pro Level Transmitter Rosemount 8742 Magnetic Flow Meter Revision 1 1 1 3 4 5 Rosemount 8800 Vortex Flow 1 2 3 4 5 Rosemount Analytical 4081 PH Meter 1 2 3 Rosemount Analytical 4081 C/T Conductivity Toroid or Contact Rosemount Analytical 4081 FG Flue Gas Oxygen Analyzer 2-wire Rosemount Analytical Oxymitter 5000 1 2 1 2 1 3 Rosemount Analytical BINOS 1000 Rosemount Analytical 5081 pH/ORP Meter Rosemount Analytical 5081A Fieldbus Transmitter Rosemount Analytical 5081-C Conductivity Transmitter Valve Automation Pneumatic Actuator FieldQD3A0 3 1 1 1 1 Max Number Free VCRs 14 7 6 8 9 16 6 5 6 8 8 5 7 8 6 8 6 7 6 8 9 8 7 8 8 Link Master Capable Y Y N N N Y N N Y Y Y N Y Y N Y N Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y

Fieldbus Device Specifications

255

Emerson Process Management Device Generic Devices ABB 600T Pressure Transmitter 1 2 ABB 2600T Pressure Transmitter ABB Trio-Wirl V_4000 ABB FXE4000 Mag Flowmeter ABB 2000T Pressure Transmitter ABB TB82pH pH/ORP/pION Transmitter ABB TB82TE 2- Electrode Conductivity Transmitter ABB TB82EC 4- Wire Conductivity Transmitter ABB TF02 Temperature Transmitter Anderson Instruments Pressure Transmitter Anderson Instruments Temperature Transmitter Buerket Werke 21C3 Powerbox Dresser FVP Valve Positioner 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 EIM Valve Positioner EIM On/Off Valve Endress+Hauser Cerabar S 1 1 1 2 Endress+Hauser Deltabar S 1 2 Endress+Hauser Micropilot II Endress+Hauser Micropilot M 1 2 3 Endress+Hauser Promass 83 1 2 3 11 11 2 12 3 2 2 2 3 2 2 12 14 20 8 8 2 12 3 12 3 11 11 14 20 N Y Y N Y N N N N N N N N N Y Y Y N N N N N N Y Y Y Revision Max Number Free VCRs Link Master Capable

256

System Configuration

Emerson Process Management Device Endress+Hauser DeltaPilot S Endress+Hauser Levelflex M Endress+Hauser Promag 53 Revision 1 3 1 2 Endress+Hauser Prosonic 93 Endress+Hauser Prosonic M Fuji FCX-A2 Pressure Transmitter Flowserve AccuMX Application FlowServe Logix 1400 Controller Honeywell ST-3000 Pressure Transmitter 1 3 1 2 4 5 6 7 8 Honeywell STT35F Temperature Transmitter Invensys IASPT10 Invensys Process Systems Valve Positioner SRD960 Invensys Process Systems Valve Positioner SRD991 Knick Electronische Messgerate Stratos FF 2231X Oxy Knick Electronische Messgerate Stratos FF 2231X pH Krohne BM70 A/P Radar Level Gauge 2 22 9 9 1 1 2 3 Krohne BM100 Reflex Radar Transmitter Krohne IFC090 ElectroMagnetic Flowmeter Limitorque -MX100 Ledeen LFFC - LD - 1.0 2 1 1 1 Max Number Free VCRs 11 11 10 17 20 11 2 15 12 12 10 11 10 10 3 12 12 4 4 5 5 7 13 15 17 Link Master Capable N Y N N Y Y N Y N N N N N N N Y Y N N N N N N N N

Fieldbus Device Specifications

257

Emerson Process Management Device Mettler - Toledo GmbH Oxy 4100FF Mettler - Toledo GmbH ph 2100FF Metso Automation Metso Automation ND9000F Valve Controller Ohmart Fieldbus Level/Density Oval Corporation Ex-Delta Vortex Flowmeter Pepperl+Fuchs PF-0001 PR Electronics 5350A Head Mount Temperature Txr. PR Electronics 6350 Panel Mount Temperature Txr. SAMSON AG Advanced Positioner Type 3787 Revision 1 1 3 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 Siemens AG. SIPART PS2 FF Valve Positioner StoneL Corporation FF VCT 1 1 2 StoneL Corporation IO Module 52 StoneL Corporation IO Module F2 Topworx 0100 DVC Vega Vegabar Pressure Transmitter Vega Vegaflex Guided Microwave Transmitter Vega Vegapuls Radar Level Transmitter Yamatake Corporation ATT Temperature Transmitter Yamatake Corporation Standard Magnetic Flow Transmitter Yamatake Corporation DST Pressure Transmitter Yamatake Corporation AvP303 Valve Positioner 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 Max Number Free VCRs 4 4 12 17 6 2 21 11 11 10 14 12 9 9 9 13 16 4 3 3 13 2 11 13 Link Master Capable N N Y Y N N N Y Y N Y N N N N N N N N N N N N N

258

System Configuration

Emerson Process Management Device Yokogawa EJA100A Pressure Transmitter Revision 1 2 Yokogawa DYF/LC1 Vortex Flowmeter Yokogawa Valve Positioner YVP 1 2 3 Yokogawa AE100 Mag Flow Meter Yokogawa YTA320 Temperature Transmitter Yokogawa DAQ Station Yokogawa YEWFLOW Vortex Flowmeter 1 2 3 1 2 Yokogawa PH202-F pH Analyzer 1 2 Yokogawa SC202-F Conductivity/Resistivity Analyser Yokogawa ISC202-F Inductivity/Conductivity Analyzer Westlock BIFFICON2000 Westlock FPAC Valve Controller 1 2 1 2 1 1 Max Number Free VCRs 4 11 13 12 20 9 25 17 2 10 4 4 4 4 4 4 17 17 Link Master Capable N Y Y N Y Y Y Y N y N N N N N N N N

The following table shows the maximum number of Publisher and Subscriber VCRs for these generic devices supported by the DeltaV system. These devices do not support Free VCRs. Each port on the H1 card supports a maximum of 50 VCRs. Fieldbus Device Subscriber and Publisher Links Device Revision Max Number Publisher VCRs 4 11 Max Number Subscriber VCRs 1 2 Link Master Capable Y N

Endress+Haus er Prowirl 72 Endress+Haus er Prowirl 73

1 1

Fieldbus Device Specifications

259

Device

Revision

Max Number Publisher VCRs 4

Max Number Subscriber VCRs 6

Link Master Capable N

Endress+Haus er Temperature Transmitter TMT-165 FlowServe Corporation BUSwitch Controller K-TEK AT100 level Transmitter Rotork Valve Positioner Smar Equipamentos LD-302 Pressure Transmitter Smar Equipamentos TT-302 Temperature Transmitter Smar Equipamentos IF-302 Current Transmitter Smar Equipamentos FI-302 Current Output Transmitter Smar Equipamentos FP-302 Basic Positioner Transmitter

2 3

6 6

6 2

N N

13

11

1 2 2 3 4 2 3 4 2 3 4 2 3 4 2 3 4

9 14 6 6 3 6 6 4 6 6 5 6 6 8 6 6 4

9 10 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 9 6 6 7

N N N N Y N N Y N N N N N Y N N Y

260

System Configuration

Device

Revision

Max Number Publisher VCRs 6 6 4

Max Number Subscriber VCRs 6 6 7

Link Master Capable N N Y

Smar Equipamentos FY-302 Advanced Positioner Transmitter

2 3 4

Fieldbus Device Specifications

261

Valid Units and Channel Values for Fieldbus Devices


Valid Units and Channel Values for Yokogawa Valve Positioner YVP Rev 2 and 3
AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output (AO channel = 1) % Consult Yokogawa for a complete list of valid units for this device.

Valid Units and Channel Values for Yokogawa DAQ Station (DX100/ DX200/MV200) Rev 3
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values (AI channel = 1) % V mV C (AI channel = 4) % V mV C (AI channel = 7) % V (AI channel = 2) % V mV C (AI channel = 5) % V mV C (AI channel = 8) % V mV C C C (AI channel = 6) % V mV C (AI channel = 9) % V mV C (AI channel = 3) % V

262

System Configuration

Valid Units and Channel Values for Yokogawa Temperature Transmitter YTA320 Rev 2
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Sensor 1 Temperature (AI channel = 1) Sensor 2 Temperature (AI channel = 2) Terminal Board Temperature (AI channel = 3) Temperature Difference Between Sensors 1&2 (AI channel = 4) K C F R mV OHM

K C F R mV OHM Average Temperature s of Sensors 1&2 (AI channel = 5) K C F R mV OHM

K C F R mV OHM Backup Temperature (AI channel = 6)

K C F R

K C F R mV OHM

DI Block Channel Values Limit Switch 1 (DI channel = 7) Limit Switch 2 (DI channel = 8)

Fieldbus Device Specifications

263

Limit Switch 3 (DI channel = 9) Limit Switch 4 (DI channel = 10)

Valid Units and Channel Values for Masoneillan Dresser Valve Positioner Rev 2 and 3
AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output (AO channel = 1) %

Valid Units and Channel Values for Metso Neles 800 Valve Positioner Rev 3
AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output (AO channel = 1) %

Valid Units and Channel Values for Metso ND9000F, Rev. 1


AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output ( Valve Control ) (AO channel = 1) %

264

System Configuration

DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values READBACK _D from position sensor (DO channel = 12) NA READBACK _D from Limit Switches (DO channel = 12) NA

DI Block Valid Units and Channel Values DI: Travel <=2% (DI channel = 21) NA DI: Travel >= 98% (DI channel = 22) NA DI: Limit switch LS1 (DI channel = 23) NA DI: Limit switch LS2 (DI channel = 24) NA

Valid Units and Channel Values for Fisher DVC5000f FieldBus Digital Valve Controller 300 Rev 6
AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output (AO channel = 1) %

Valid Units and Channel Values for Fisher DVC5000f AO/PID 5400 Rev 7
AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output (AO channel = 1) %

Fieldbus Device Specifications

265

Valid Units and Channel Values for Fisher DVC5000f AO/PID/IS 5420 Rev 8 and 9
AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output (AO channel = 1) %

Valid Units and Channel Values Buerkert Werke Power I/O Box, Rev 1
Block Type DO DO DO DO Channel # 1 2 3 4 Function Pilot Valve 1 Pilot Valve 2 Pilot Valve 3 Pilot Valve 4

Valid Units and Channel Values for TopWorx DVC-FF Discrete Valve Controller, Rev 2
Valid Units and Channel Values Block Type DO DO DO DO DO DI Channel # 1 2 3 4 5 6 Function Open/Close Open Close Stop Open/Close/ Stop Valve is Opened/Valve is Closed Valve is Opened Valve is Closed

DI DI

7 8

266

System Configuration

Block Type DI DI

Channel # 9 10

Function Auxiliary limit switch input Cycle Time Open Alarm (CTOA) Cycle Time Closed Alarm (CTOA) Cycle Count Alarm (CCA) Masked Alarm

DI

11

DI DI

12 13

Valid Units and Channel Values for Valve Automation Pneumatic Actuator D3A0-FieldQ, Rev 1
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Position (AI channel = 2) 0-100% Temperature (AI channel =9) -127 - 128 C -127 - 128 F DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values FieldQ Output Command (DO channel = 3) 0 = Close 1 = Open Alternate Discrete Command (DO channel = 5) 0 = Stop Unit Recognizing 1 = Start Unit Recognizing

Fieldbus Device Specifications

267

DI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output Readback Status (DI channel = 4) 0 = Closed Close Indicator Input (DI channel = 7) 0 = Close Input Not Active 1 = Close Input Active Open Indicator Input (DI channel = 8) 0 = Open Input Not Active 1 = Open Input Active

1 = Opened 2 = Stopped 4 = Opening 5 = Closing 6 = Limit Switch Fault

Valid Units and Channel Values for Vega Radar Level Transmitter Vegapuls Rev 1
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values PV (AI channel = 1) % SV1 (AI channel = 2) % SV2 (AI channel 3) m cm mm Ft in

268

System Configuration

Valid Units and Channel Values for Vega Guided Microwave Transmitter Vegaflex Rev 1
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values PV (AI channel = 1) % SV1 (AI channel = 2) % SV2 (AI channel 3) m cm mm Ft in Total Sensor value (AI channel = 5) m cm mm Ft in

Valid Units and Channel Values for Vega Pressure Transmitter Vegabar Rev 1
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values PV (AI channel = 1) % SV1 (AI channel = 2) m cm mm Ft in in H2O in Hg mm H2O mm Hg Psi Bar mBar g/cm2 SV2 (AI channel = 3) % Temperature (AI channel = 4) K C F R

Fieldbus Device Specifications

269

PV (AI channel = 1)

SV1 (AI channel = 2) Kg/cm2 Pa kPa MPa ftH2O

SV2 (AI channel = 3)

Temperature (AI channel = 4)

Valid Units and Channel Values for Endress+Hauser, GmbH DeltaPilot S, Rev 1
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Measured Level/ Volume (AI channel = 1) % m ft mm in gon rev Sensor Temperature (AI channel = 2) C F R K

270

System Configuration

Valid Units and Channel Values for Endress+Hauser, GmbH Promass 83 Rev 1 and 2
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process Mass Flow (AI Channel = 1) Process Volume Flow (AI Channel=2) cm3/s cm3/m cm3/h cm3/d dm3/s dm3/m dm3/h dm3/d m3/s m3/m m3/h m3/d l/s l/m l/h l/d hl/s hl/m hl/h hl/d Ml/s Ml/m Process STD. Volume Flow (AI Channel=3) Nl/s Nl/m Nl/h Nl/d Nm3/s Nm3/m Nm3/h Nm3/d scm/s scm/m scm/h scm/d scft/s scft/m scft/h scft/d Process Density (AI Channel=4) Process STD. Density (AI Channel=5) g/Scc kg/Nl kg/Nm3 kg/Sm lb/Scf

g/s g/m g/h g/d kg/s kg/m kg/h kg/d t/s t/m t/h t/d oz/s oz/m oz/h oz/d lb/s lb/m lb/h lb/d ton/s ton/m

g/cm3 g/cc kg/dm3 kg/l kg/m3 SD4C SD15C SD20C SG4C SG15C SG20C lb/ft3 lb/gal lb/bbl lb/bbl BEER lb/bbl PETR lb/bbl TANKS Implb/gal Implb/bbl BEER Implb/bbl PETR

Fieldbus Device Specifications

271

Process Mass Flow (AI Channel = 1)

Process Volume Flow (AI Channel=2) Ml/h Ml/d cc/s cc/m cc/h cc/d af/s af/m af/h af/d ft3/s ft3/m ft3/h ft3/d flo/s flo/m flo/h flo/d gal/s gal/m gal/h gal/d Mgl/s Mgl/m Mgl/h Mgl/d Impgal/s

Process STD. Volume Flow (AI Channel=3)

Process Density (AI Channel=4)

Process STD. Density (AI Channel=5)

ton/h ton/d

272

System Configuration

Process Mass Flow (AI Channel = 1)

Process Volume Flow (AI Channel=2) Impgal/m Impgal/h Impgal/d ImpMgal/s ImpMgal/m ImpMgal/h ImpMgal/d bbl/s bbl/m bbl/h bbl/d bbl N/s bbl N/m bbl N/h bbl N/d bbl B/s bbl B/m bbl B/h bbl B/d bbl P/s bbl P/m bbl P/h bbl P/d bbl T/s bbl T/m bbl T/h bbl T/d

Process STD. Volume Flow (AI Channel=3)

Process Density (AI Channel=4)

Process STD. Density (AI Channel=5)

Fieldbus Device Specifications

273

Process Mass Flow (AI Channel = 1)

Process Volume Flow (AI Channel=2) Impbbl/s BEER Impbbl/m BEER Impbbl/h BEER Impbbl/d BEER Impbbl/s PETR Impbbl/m PETR Impbbl/h PETR Impbbl/d PETR

Process STD. Volume Flow (AI Channel=3)

Process Density (AI Channel=4)

Process STD. Density (AI Channel=5)

Process Temperature (AI Channel = 6) C F R K

Totalizer 1 (AI Channel=7) g kg t cm3 dm3 m3 ml l hl Ml Nl

Totalizer 2 (AI Channel=8) g kg t cm3 dm3 m3 ml l hl Ml Nl

Totalizer 3 (AI Channel=9) g kg t cm3 dm3 m3 ml l hl Ml Nl

274

System Configuration

Process Temperature (AI Channel = 6)

Totalizer 1 (AI Channel=7) Nm3 oz lb ton cc af ft3 ozf gal Mgal bbl bbl BEER bbl PETR bbl TANKS Sm3 Scf Impgal ImpMgal Impbbl BEER Impbbl PETR

Totalizer 2 (AI Channel=8) Nm3 oz lb ton cc af ft3 ozf gal Mgal bbl bbl BEER bbl PETR bbl TANKS Sm3 Scf Impgal ImpMgal Impbbl BEER Impbbl PETR

Totalizer 3 (AI Channel=9) Nm3 oz lb ton cc af ft3 ozf gal Mgal bbl bbl BEER bbl PETR bbl TANKS Sm3 Scf Impgal ImpMgal Impbbl BEER Impbbl PETR

DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values DO Block (Channel=16 ) NA

Fieldbus Device Specifications

275

Valid Units and Channel Values for Endress+Hauser, GmbH Promag 53 Rev 1 and 2
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process Mass Flow (AI Channel = 1) g/s g/m g/h g/d kg/s kg/m kg/h kg/d t/s t/m t/h t/d oz/s oz/m oz/h oz/d lb/s lb/m lb/h lb/d ton/s ton/m ton/h ton/d Process Volume Flow (AI Channel=2) cm3/s cm3/m cm3/h cm3/d dm3/s dm3/m dm3/h dm3/d m3/s m3/m m3/h m3/d l/s l/m l/h l/d hl/s hl/m hl/h hl/d Ml/s Ml/m Ml/h Ml/d cc/s Totalizer 1 (AI Channel=7) g kg t cm3 dm3 m3 ml l hl Ml Nl Nm3 oz lb ton cc af ft3 ozf gal Mgal bbl bbl BEER bbl PETR bbl TANKS Totalizer 2 (AI Channel=8) g kg t cm3 dm3 m3 ml l hl Ml Nl Nm3 oz lb ton cc af ft3 ozf gal Mgal bbl bbl BEER bbl PETR bbl TANKS Totalizer 3 (AI Channel=9) g kg t cm3 dm3 m3 ml l hl Ml Nl Nm3 oz lb ton cc af ft3 ozf gal Mgal bbl bbl BEER bbl PETR bbl TANKS

276

System Configuration

Process Mass Flow (AI Channel = 1)

Process Volume Flow (AI Channel=2) cc/m cc/h cc/d af/s af/m af/h af/d ft3/s ft3/m ft3/h ft3/d flo/s flo/m flo/h flo/d gal/s gal/m gal/h gal/d Mgl/s Mgl/m Mgl/h Mgl/d Impgal/s Impgal/m Impgal/h Impgal/d ImpMgal/s ImpMgal/m

Totalizer 1 (AI Channel=7) Sm3 Scf Impgal ImpMgal Impbbl BEER Impbbl PETR

Totalizer 2 (AI Channel=8) Sm3 Scf Impgal ImpMgal Impbbl BEER Impbbl PETR

Totalizer 3 (AI Channel=9) Sm3 Scf Impgal ImpMgal Impbbl BEER Impbbl PETR

Fieldbus Device Specifications

277

Process Mass Flow (AI Channel = 1)

Process Volume Flow (AI Channel=2) ImpMgal/h ImpMgal/d bbl/s bbl/m bbl/h bbl/d bbl N/s bbl N/m bbl N/h bbl N/d bbl B/s bbl B/m bbl B/h bbl B/d bbl P/s bbl P/m bbl P/h bbl P/d bbl T/s bbl T/m bbl T/h bbl T/d Impbbl/s BEER Impbbl/m BEER Impbbl/h BEER Impbbl/d BEER Impbbl/s PETR Impbbl/m PETR

Totalizer 1 (AI Channel=7)

Totalizer 2 (AI Channel=8)

Totalizer 3 (AI Channel=9)

278

System Configuration

Process Mass Flow (AI Channel = 1)

Process Volume Flow (AI Channel=2) Impbbl/h PETR Impbbl/d PETR

Totalizer 1 (AI Channel=7)

Totalizer 2 (AI Channel=8)

Totalizer 3 (AI Channel=9)

DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values DO Block (Channel=16) NA

Fieldbus Device Specifications

279

Valid Units and Channel Values for the Fisher Rosemount Systems DeltaV H1 Carrier Rev 1
MDI Block (Channel=1) MDO Block (Channel=2)

Valid Units and Channel Values for Endress+Hauser GmbH Prosonic 93 Rev 1
Process Volume Flow Ch1 (AI Channel=2) cm3/s cm3/m cm3/h cm3/d dm3/s dm3/m dm3/h dm3/d m3/s m3/m m3/h m3/d l/s l/m l/h l/d hl/s hl/m hl/h hl/d Totalizer 1 (AI Channel=7) Totalizer 2 (AI Channel=8) Totalizer 3 (AI Channel=9) DO Block (Channel=16 ) Process Volume Flow Ch2 (AI Channel=20) cm3/s cm3/m cm3/h cm3/d dm3/s dm3/m dm3/h dm3/d m3/s m3/m m3/h m3/d l/s l/m l/h l/d hl/s hl/m hl/h hl/d

g kg t cm3 dm3 m3 ml l hl Ml Nl Nm3 oz lb ton cc af ft3 ozf gal

g kg t cm3 dm3 m3 ml l hl Ml Nl Nm3 oz lb ton cc af ft3 ozf gal

g kg t cm3 dm3 m3 ml l hl Ml Nl Nm3 oz lb ton cc af ft3 ozf gal

280

System Configuration

Process Volume Flow Ch1 (AI Channel=2) Ml/s Ml/m Ml/h Ml/d cc/s cc/m cc/h cc/d af/s af/m af/h af/d ft3/s ft3/m ft3/h ft3/d flo/s flo/m flo/h flo/d gal/s gal/m gal/h gal/d Mgl/s Mgl/m Mgl/h Mgl/d

Totalizer 1 (AI Channel=7)

Totalizer 2 (AI Channel=8)

Totalizer 3 (AI Channel=9)

DO Block (Channel=16 )

Process Volume Flow Ch2 (AI Channel=20) Ml/s Ml/m Ml/h Ml/d cc/s cc/m cc/h cc/d af/s af/m af/h af/d ft3/s ft3/m ft3/h ft3/d flo/s flo/m flo/h flo/d gal/s gal/m gal/h gal/d Mgl/s Mgl/m Mgl/h Mgl/d

Mgal bbl bbl BEER bbl PETR bbl TANKS Sm3 Scf Impgal ImpMgal Impbbl BEER Impbbl PETR

Mgal bbl bbl BEER bbl PETR bbl TANKS Sm3 Scf Impgal ImpMgal Impbbl BEER Impbbl PETR

Mgal bbl bbl BEER bbl PETR bbl TANKS Sm3 Scf Impgal ImpMgal Impbbl BEER Impbbl PETR

Fieldbus Device Specifications

281

Process Volume Flow Ch1 (AI Channel=2) Impgal/s Impgal/m Impgal/h Impgal/d ImpMgal/s ImpMgal/m ImpMgal/h ImpMgal/d bbl/s bbl/m bbl/h bbl/d bbl N/s bbl N/m bbl N/h bbl N/d bbl B/s bbl B/m bbl B/h bbl B/d bbl P/s bbl P/m bbl P/h bbl P/d bbl T/s bbl T/m bbl T/h bbl T/d

Totalizer 1 (AI Channel=7)

Totalizer 2 (AI Channel=8)

Totalizer 3 (AI Channel=9)

DO Block (Channel=16 )

Process Volume Flow Ch2 (AI Channel=20) Impgal/s Impgal/m Impgal/h Impgal/d ImpMgal/s ImpMgal/m ImpMgal/h ImpMgal/d bbl/s bbl/m bbl/h bbl/d bbl N/s bbl N/m bbl N/h bbl N/d bbl B/s bbl B/m bbl B/h bbl B/d bbl P/s bbl P/m bbl P/h bbl P/d bbl T/s bbl T/m bbl T/h bbl T/d

282

System Configuration

Process Volume Flow Ch1 (AI Channel=2) Impbbl/s BEER Impbbl/m BEER Impbbl/h BEER Impbbl/d BEER Impbbl/s PETR Impbbl/m PETR Impbbl/h PETR Impbbl/d PETR Process Sound Velocity Ch1 (AI Chan=21) m/s ft/s

Totalizer 1 (AI Channel=7)

Totalizer 2 (AI Channel=8)

Totalizer 3 (AI Channel=9)

DO Block (Channel=16 )

Process Volume Flow Ch2 (AI Channel=20) Impbbl/s BEER Impbbl/m BEER Impbbl/h BEER Impbbl/d BEER Impbbl/s PETR Impbbl/m PETR Impbbl/h PETR Impbbl/d PETR

Process Sound Velocity Ch2 (AI Chan=22) m/s ft/s

Process Flow Velocity Ch1 (AI Chan=23) m/s ft/s

Process Flow Velocity Ch2 (AI Chan=24) m/s ft/s

Process Volume Flow AVG. (AI Chan=25) cm3/s cm3/m cm3/h cm3/d dm3/s dm3/m dm3/h dm3/d m3/s m3/m m3/h

Process Volume Flow SUM (AI Chan=26) cm3/s cm3/m cm3/h cm3/d dm3/s dm3/m dm3/h dm3/d m3/s m3/m m3/h

Fieldbus Device Specifications

283

Process Sound Velocity Ch1 (AI Chan=21)

Process Sound Velocity Ch2 (AI Chan=22)

Process Flow Velocity Ch1 (AI Chan=23)

Process Flow Velocity Ch2 (AI Chan=24)

Process Volume Flow AVG. (AI Chan=25) m3/d l/s l/m l/h l/d hl/s hl/m hl/h hl/d Ml/s Ml/m Ml/h Ml/d cc/s cc/m cc/h cc/d af/s af/m af/h af/d ft3/s ft3/m ft3/h ft3/d flo/s flo/m flo/h

Process Volume Flow SUM (AI Chan=26) m3/d l/s l/m l/h l/d hl/s hl/m hl/h hl/d Ml/s Ml/m Ml/h Ml/d cc/s cc/m cc/h cc/d af/s af/m af/h af/d ft3/s ft3/m ft3/h ft3/d flo/s flo/m flo/h

284

System Configuration

Process Sound Velocity Ch1 (AI Chan=21)

Process Sound Velocity Ch2 (AI Chan=22)

Process Flow Velocity Ch1 (AI Chan=23)

Process Flow Velocity Ch2 (AI Chan=24)

Process Volume Flow AVG. (AI Chan=25) flo/d gal/s gal/m gal/h gal/d Mgl/s Mgl/m Mgl/h Mgl/d Impgal/s Impgal/m Impgal/h Impgal/d ImpMgal/s ImpMgal/m ImpMgal/h ImpMgal/d bbl/s bbl/m bbl/h bbl/d bbl N/s bbl N/m bbl N/h bbl N/d bbl B/s bbl B/m bbl B/h

Process Volume Flow SUM (AI Chan=26) flo/d gal/s gal/m gal/h gal/d Mgl/s Mgl/m Mgl/h Mgl/d Impgal/s Impgal/m Impgal/h Impgal/d ImpMgal/s ImpMgal/m ImpMgal/h ImpMgal/d bbl/s bbl/m bbl/h bbl/d bbl N/s bbl N/m bbl N/h bbl N/d bbl B/s bbl B/m bbl B/h

Fieldbus Device Specifications

285

Process Sound Velocity Ch1 (AI Chan=21)

Process Sound Velocity Ch2 (AI Chan=22)

Process Flow Velocity Ch1 (AI Chan=23)

Process Flow Velocity Ch2 (AI Chan=24)

Process Volume Flow AVG. (AI Chan=25) bbl B/d bbl P/s bbl P/m bbl P/h bbl P/d bbl T/s bbl T/m bbl T/h bbl T/d Impbbl/s BEER Impbbl/m BEER Impbbl/h BEER Impbbl/d BEER Impbbl/s PETR Impbbl/m PETR Impbbl/h PETR Impbbl/d PETR

Process Volume Flow SUM (AI Chan=26) bbl B/d bbl P/s bbl P/m bbl P/h bbl P/d bbl T/s bbl T/m bbl T/h bbl T/d Impbbl/s BEER Impbbl/m BEER Impbbl/h BEER Impbbl/d BEER Impbbl/s PETR Impbbl/m PETR Impbbl/h PETR Impbbl/d PETR

Process Volume Flow Difference (AI Chan=27) cm3/s cm3/m cm3/h

Process Sound Velocity AVG. (AI Chan=28) m/s ft/s

Process Flow Velocity AVG. (AI Chan=29) m/s ft/s

286

System Configuration

Process Volume Flow Difference (AI Chan=27) cm3/d dm3/s dm3/m dm3/h dm3/d m3/s m3/m m3/h m3/d l/s l/m l/h l/d hl/s hl/m hl/h hl/d Ml/s Ml/m Ml/h Ml/d cc/s cc/m cc/h cc/d af/s af/m af/h af/d

Process Sound Velocity AVG. (AI Chan=28)

Process Flow Velocity AVG. (AI Chan=29)

Fieldbus Device Specifications

287

Process Volume Flow Difference (AI Chan=27) ft3/s ft3/m ft3/h ft3/d flo/s flo/m flo/h flo/d gal/s gal/m gal/h gal/d Mgl/s Mgl/m Mgl/h Mgl/d Impgal/s Impgal/m Impgal/h Impgal/d ImpMgal/s ImpMgal/m ImpMgal/h ImpMgal/d bbl/s bbl/m bbl/h bbl/d bbl N/s

Process Sound Velocity AVG. (AI Chan=28)

Process Flow Velocity AVG. (AI Chan=29)

288

System Configuration

Process Volume Flow Difference (AI Chan=27) bbl N/m bbl N/h bbl N/d bbl B/s bbl B/m bbl B/h bbl B/d bbl P/s bbl P/m bbl P/h bbl P/d bbl T/s bbl T/m bbl T/h bbl T/d Impbbl/s BEER Impbbl/m BEER Impbbl/h BEER Impbbl/d BEER Impbbl/s PETR Impbbl/m PETR Impbbl/h PETR Impbbl/d PETR

Process Sound Velocity AVG. (AI Chan=28)

Process Flow Velocity AVG. (AI Chan=29)

Fieldbus Device Specifications

289

Valid Units and Channel Values for Fisher DVC5000f DO/DI Digital Valve Controller
Rev 7 Valid Units and Channel Values
Valid Units and Channel Values Block Type DO Channel DI Channel Channel # 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Description "Valve Control" "Travel > 97%" "Travel < 3%" "Below LO LO limit" "Below LO limit" "Above HI limit" "Above HI HI limit" "Within Proximity LO LO" "Within Proximity LO" "Within Proximity HI" "Within Proximity HI HI"

Rev 8 Valid Units and Channel Values


Valid Units and Channel Values Block Type DO Channel Channel # 1 Description "Valve Control"

290

System Configuration

Block Type DI Channel

Channel # 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Description "Travel > 97%" "Travel < 3%" "Below LO LO limit" "Below LO limit" "Above HI limit" "Above HI HI limit" "Within Proximity LO LO" "Within Proximity LO" "Within Proximity HI" "Within Proximity HI HI"

Valid Units and Channel Values for StoneL FF VCT Rev 1 & 2
DO Block Channel Values Discrete Output Value 1 (DO channel = 3) 0 = Close 1 = Open DI Block Channel Values Discrete Input Value 1 (DI channel = 1) 0 = Open 1 = Close Discrete Input Value 2 (DI channel = 2) 0 = Close 1 = Open Discrete Output Value 2 (DO channel = 4) 0 = Close 1 = Open

Fieldbus Device Specifications

291

Valid Units and Channel Values for StoneL IO Module 52


DI Block Channel Values Discrete Input Primary Value 1 (DI channel = 1) 0 = Open 1 = Close DO Block Channel Values Discrete Output Final Value 1 (DO channel = 3) 0 = Open 1 = Close Discrete Output Final Value 2 (DO channel = 4) 0 = Close 1 = Open Discrete Input Primary Value 2 (DI channel = 2) 0 = Close 1 = Open

Valid Units and Channel Values for StoneL IO Module F2


DI Block Channel Values Discrete Input Primary Value 1 (DI channel = 1) 0 = Open 1 = Close DO Block Channel Values Discrete Output Final Value 1 (DO channel = 3) 0 = Open 1 = Close Discrete Output Final Value 2 (DO channel = 4) 0 = Close 1 = Open Discrete Input Primary (DI channel = 2) 0 = Close 1 = Open

292

System Configuration

AI Block Channel Values Analog Output Primary Value 1 (AI channel = 5) % AO Block Channel Values Analog Output Final Value 1 (AO channel = 6) %

Valid Units and Channel Values for ABB 600T Rev 1 and 2
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Differential Pressure (AI channel = 1) in H20 (68F) in Hg (C) ft H20 (68F) mmH20 (68F) mmHg (C) mmHg psi psia psig Bar mBar millibar g/cm2 kg/cm2 microPa mPa Case Temperature (AI channel = 2) C F K R

Fieldbus Device Specifications

293

Differential Pressure (AI channel = 1) kPa Torr P cP St cSt N/m mN/m J EJ PJ TJ MJ kJ mJ WH TWH GWH MWH KWH cal Kcal Mkal Btu decatherm ft-lb W TW GW

Case Temperature (AI channel = 2)

294

System Configuration

Differential Pressure (AI channel = 1) KW mW microW nW pW MJ/h Btu/h m2/s

Case Temperature (AI channel = 2)

Fieldbus Device Specifications

295

Valid Units and Channel Values for ABB 2600T Rev 1


Differential Pressure (AI channel = 1) in H20 (68F) in Hg (C) ft H20 (68F) mmH20 (68F) mmHg (C) mmHg psi psia psig Bar mBar millibar g/cm2 kg/cm2 microPa mPa kPa Torr P cP St cSt N/m mN/m J EJ PJ Case Temperature (AI channel = 2) C F K R

296

System Configuration

Differential Pressure (AI channel = 1) TJ MJ kJ mJ WH TWH GWH MWH KWH cal Kcal Mkal Btu decatherm ft-lb W TW GW KW mW microW nW pW MJ/h Btu/h m2/s

Case Temperature (AI channel = 2)

Fieldbus Device Specifications

297

Valid Units and Channel Values for ABB TF02 Rev 1


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Sensor 1 Temp (AI channel = 1) AI Block Index 300 Only K C F R Sensor 2 (AI channel = 2) AI Block Index 350 Only K C F R

Valid Units and Channel Values for ABB 2000T Rev 1


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Differential Pressure (AI channel = 1) in H20 (68F) in Hg (C) ft H20 (68F) mmH20 (68F) mmHg (C) mmHg psi psia psig Bar mBar millibar g/cm2 kg/cm2 microPa Case Temperature (AI channel = 2) C F K R

298

System Configuration

Differential Pressure (AI channel = 1) mPa kPa Torr P cP St cSt N/m mN/m J EJ PJ TJ MJ kJ mJ WH TWH GWH MWH KWH cal Kcal Mkal Btu decatherm ft-lb W TW

Case Temperature (AI channel = 2)

Fieldbus Device Specifications

299

Differential Pressure (AI channel = 1) GW KW mW microW nW pW MJ/h Btu/h m2/s

Case Temperature (AI channel = 2)

Valid Units for ABB 2-Electrode Conductivity Transmitter (TB82TE), Rev 1


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Conductivity/ Concentration (AI Channel = 1) MS/cm S/cm % Ppm ppb Temperature (AI Channel = 2) C F Conductivity/ Concentration (AI Channel = 3) MS/cm S/cm % Ppm ppb Uncompensated Conductivity (AI Channel = 4) MS/cm S/cm

300

System Configuration

Valid Units for ABB 4-Electrode Conductivity Transmitter (TB82EC), Rev 1


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Conductivity/ Concentration (AI Channel = 1) MS/cm S/cm % Ppm ppb Temperature (AI Channel = 2) C F Conductivity/ Concentration (AI Channel = 3) MS/cm S/cm % Ppm ppb

Valid Units for ABB pH/ORP/pION (TB82pH ), Rev 1


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values PH/ORP/pION (AI Channel = 1) Temperature (AI Channel = 2) Sensor Input (AI Channel = 3) Reference Impedance (AI Channel = 4) Function Generator Output (AI Channel = 5) %

pH MV

C F

mV

KOhm

Valid Units for ABB Trio-Wirl Vortex/Swirl Flow Meter Rev 1


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Actual Flow (Volumetric) (AI Channel = 1) l/s l/m l/h m3/s m3/m Volumetric Flow (AI Channel = 2) l/s l/m l/h m3/s m3/m Mass Flow (AI Channel = 2) g/s g/m g/h kg/s kg/m

Fieldbus Device Specifications

301

m3/h m3/d ft3/s ft3/m ft3/h ft3/d usgps usgpm usgph usgpd igps igpm igph igpd bbl/s bbl/m bbl/h bbl/d Totalizer Volumetric (AI Channel = 3) l m3 ft3 ugl igl bbl Frequency (AI Channel = 5) Hz

m3/h m3/d ft3/s ft3/m ft3/h ft3/d usgps usgpm usgph usgpd igps igpm igph igpd bbl/s bbl/m bbl/h bbl/d Totalizer Mass (AI Channel = 3) g kg t lb

kg/h kg/d t/m t/h t/d lb/s lb/m lb/h lb/d

Temperature (AI Channel=4) C F K

302

System Configuration

Valid Units and Channel Values for ABB FXE4000 Mag Flow Meter Rev 2
Actual Flow (Volumetric) (AI Channel = 1) lbs/s lbs/min lbs/h l/s l/min l/h m3/s m3/min m3/h igps igpm igph mgd gpm gph bbl/s bbl/min bbl/h bbl/d kg/s kg/min kg/h kg/d g/s g/min g/h kgal/d Totalizer block 1 (AI Channel = 2) m3 l igal Gal bbl Kg T G lbs Lb kgal Totalizer Block 1 (AI Channel = 2) m3 l igal Gal bbl Kg T G lbs Lb kgal

Fieldbus Device Specifications

303

Actual Flow (Volumetric) (AI Channel = 1) kga/h kga/min kga/s t/d t/h t/min

Totalizer block 1 (AI Channel = 2)

Totalizer Block 1 (AI Channel = 2)

304

System Configuration

Valid Units and Channel Values for Anderson Instruments Pressure Transmitter
Pressure Channel (AI channel = 1) psi Bars millibars Kg/cm2 Pascals Kpascals Torr inH2O (68 deg F) inHg (0 deg C) mmH2O (68 deg F) mmHg (0 deg C)

Valid Units and Channel Values for Anderson Instruments Temperature Transmitter
Temperature (AO channel = 1) oC oF

Valid Units and Channel Values for Rosemount 3051 Rev 3, 6, 7, and 20
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process Pressure (AI channel = 1) in H20 (68F) in Hg (C) ft H20 (68F) Case Temperature (AI channel = 2) C F

Fieldbus Device Specifications

305

Process Pressure (AI channel = 1) mm H20 (68F) mmHg (C) psi bar millibar g/cm2 kg/cm2 Pa kPa torr atm

Case Temperature (AI channel = 2)

Valid Units and Channel Values for Rosemount 3051 Rev 22


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process Pressure (AI channel = 1) in H20 (68F) in H20 (4F) in Hg (0C) ft H20 (68F) mm H20 (68F) mmHg (C) psi bar millibar g/cm2 kg/cm2 Pa Terminal Temperature (AI channel = 2) C F

306

System Configuration

Process Pressure (AI channel = 1) Mpa kPa torr atm

Terminal Temperature (AI channel = 2)

AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Gage/Absolute Pressure (MF) (AO channel = 5) psia Process Temperature (MF) (AO channel = 6) F

Valid Units and Channel Values for Micro Motion MVD 2000 Series Rev 1 and 2
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Mass Flow (AI channel = 1) Process Temperature (AI channel = 2) g/s % g/min g/h kg/s kg/min kg/h kg/d t/min t/h t/d lb/s lb/min lb/h Density (AI channel = 3) K C F R Volume Flow (AI channel = 4) kg/m3 g/cm3 kg/L g/ml g/L lb/in3 lb/ft3 lb/gal Ston/yd3 API SG Drive Gain (AI channel = 5) m3/s m3/min m3/h m3/d L/s L/min L/h ML/d CFS CFM CFH ft3/d SCFM

Fieldbus Device Specifications

307

Mass Flow (AI channel = 1)

Process Temperature (AI channel = 2) lb/d Ston/min Ston/h Ston/d Lton/h Lton/d

Density (AI channel = 3)

Volume Flow (AI channel = 4)

Drive Gain (AI channel = 5) SCFH gal/s GPM gal/d Mgal/d ImpGal/s ImpGal/min ImpGal/h ImpGal/d bbl/s bbl/min bbl/h bbl/d

AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Pressure (AO channel = 6) in H20 (68F) in Hg (0C) ft H20 (68F) mm H20 (68F) mmHg (0C) psi bar millibar g/cm2 kg/cm2 Pa kPa

308

System Configuration

Pressure (AO channel = 6) torr (0C) atm

Valid Units and Channel Values for Micro Motion 5300 Rev 1
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Mass flow (AI channel = 1) g/s g/min g/h kg/s kg/min kg/h kg/d t/min t/h t/d lb/s lb/min lb/h lb/d Ston/min Ston/h Ston/d Lton/h Lton/d Process temperature (AI channel = 2) K C F R Density (AI channel = 3) kg/m3 g/cm3 kg/L g/ml g/L lb/in3 lb/ft3 lb/gal Ston/yd3 Volume flow (AI channel = 4) m3/s m3/min m3/h m3/d L/s L/min L/h ML/d CFS CFM CFH ft3/d SCFM SCFH gal/s GPM gal/d Mgal/d ImpGal/s ImpGal/min ImpGal/h

Fieldbus Device Specifications

309

Mass flow (AI channel = 1)

Process temperature (AI channel = 2)

Density (AI channel = 3)

Volume flow (AI channel = 4) ImpGal/d bbl/s bbl/min bbl/h bbl/d

Valid Units and Channel Values for Ohmart Fieldbus Level/Density Rev 2
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Channel 1 - Primary Value Engineering Unit In, ft, cm mm, m %, counts per second, no units counts per second, no units In, ft, cm, mm, m %, counts per second no units In, ft, cm, mm, m, %, counts per second, no units counts per second no units In, ft, cm, mm, m %, counts per second, no units

2 - Secondary Value 3 - Primary Value Counts

4 - Primary Value w/Relay

5 - Secondary Value w/Relay 6 - Primary Value Counts w/Relay

AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Channel 7 - Compensation Value Engineering Unit counts per second, degrees C, degrees F, kg/s

310

System Configuration

Valid Units and Channel Values for Oval Corporation Ex-Delta Vortex Flow Meter Rev 1
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Volumetric Flow (A1 channel = 1) L/min L/h M3/min M3/h kL/min kL/h g/min g/h Kg/min Kg/h t/min t/h

Fieldbus Device Specifications

311

Valid Units and Channel Values for Rosemount 644 Temperature Transmitter Rev 1
Sensor 1 Temp (AI channel = 1) K C F R mV ohm Case Temp (AI channel = 2) K C F R ohm

Valid Units and Channel Values for Rosemount 752 Remote Indicator Rev 2
Not applicable. Configure display from the device transducer block. Refer to the product manual for further instructions.

Valid Units and Channel Values for Rosemount 848 Temperature Transmitter Rev 4
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Sensor 1 Temp (AI channel = 1) K C F R mV ohm Sensor 2 Temp (AI channel = 2) K C F R mV ohm Sensor 3 Temp (AI channel = 3) K C F R mV ohm Sensor 4 Temp (AI channel = 4) K C F R mV ohm

312

System Configuration

AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Sensor 5 Temp (AI channel = 5) K C F R mV ohm Differential Temperature (Sensor 1 & 2) (AI channel = 9) K C F R mV ohm Sensor 6 Temp (AI channel = 6) K C F R mV ohm Differential Temperature (Sensor 3 & 4) (AI channel = 10) K C F R mV ohm Sensor 2 Temp (AI channel = 7) K C F R mV ohm Differential Temperature (Sensor 5 & 6) (AI channel = 11) K C F R mV ohm Sensor 8 Temp (AI channel = 8) K C F R mV ohm Differential Temperature (Sensor 7 & 8) (AI channel = 12) K C F R mV ohm

FFMAI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Housing Temperature (AI channel = 13) K C F R mV ohm Sensor Temp (FFMAI channel = 1) K C F R mV ohm

Fieldbus Device Specifications

313

Valid Units and Channel Values for Rosemount 5600 Tank Radar Pro Level Transmitter Rev 1
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Level (AI Channel = 1) m ft in mm Volume (AI Channel = 5) m3 gal bbl ft3 Ullage (AI Channel = 2) m ft in mm Avg. Temperature (AI Channel = 6) K C F Rate (AI Channel = 3) ft/s m/s m/h Signal Strength (AI Channel = 4) mV

Valid Units and Channel Values for Rosemount Vortex 8800 Rev 1, 2, 3, and 4
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Volume flow (AI channel = 1) gal/s GPM gal/h CFM CFH ft3/d SCFM SCFH bbl/min

314

System Configuration

Volume flow (AI channel = 1) bbl/h bbl/d ImpGal/s ImpGal/min ImpGal/h ImpGal/d L/s L/min L/h L/d m3/min m3/h m3/d Mm3/d Nm3/min Nm3/h Nm3/d lb/s lb/min lb/h lb/d Ston/h Ston/d t/h t/d kg/s kg/min kg/h kg/d

Fieldbus Device Specifications

315

Volume flow (AI channel = 1) ft/s m/s

Valid Units and Channel Values for Rosemount 3244 Rev 1, 2, 3, and 4
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Sensor 1 Temp (AI channel = 1) K C F R mV ohm Case Temp (AI channel = 2) K C F R ohm Sensor 2 Temp (AI channel = 3) K C F R mV ohm Delta Temp (sens 1&2) (AI channel = 4) K C F R mV ohm

Note Valid units are sensor specific for the 3244 device. For example, mV units cannot be used when the sensor is set up for RTD.

316

System Configuration

Valid Units and Channel Values for EIM Controls EA00 Positioner, Rev 1
Block Type AI Channel AI Channel AI Channel AI Channel AI Channel AO Channel AO Channel DI Channel DI Channel DI Channel DI Channel DI Channel DI Channel DI Channel DO Channel DO Channel DO Channel Channel # 4 15 16 17 18 3 16 2 5 7 9 11 12 13 6 8 10 Description Position Analog Aux 1 Readback Analog Aux 1 Input Analog Aux 2 Input Torque Setpoint Analog Aux 1 Output Actuator Readback Actuator Status Disc Aux 1 Out Command Readback Disc Aux 2 Out Command Readback ESD Readback Disc Aux Input 1 Disc Aux Input 2 Disc Aux 1 Out Command Disc Aux 2 Out Command ESD Out

Valid Units and Channel Values for EIM Controls ED00 Fieldbus On/Off Valve, Rev 1
Block Type AI Channel AI Channel Channel # 4 15 Description Position Analog Aux 1 Readback

Fieldbus Device Specifications

317

Block Type AI Channel AI Channel AI Channel AO Channel DI Channel DI Channel DI Channel DI Channel DI Channel DI Channel DI Channel DO Channel DO Channel DO Channel DO Channel

Channel # 16 17 18 16 2 5 7 9 11 12 13 1 6 8 10

Description Analog Aux 1 Input Analog Aux 2 Input Torque Analog Aux 1 Output Actuator Readback Actuator Status Disc Aux 1 Out Command Readback Disc Aux 2 Out Command Readback ESD Readback Disc Aux Input 1 Disc Aux Input 2 Actuator Command Disc Aux 1 Out Command Disc Aux 2 Out Command ESD Out

Valid Units and Channel Values for El-O-Matic - DD30 Rev 3 and 4
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Temperature (AI channel = 3) C F AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Setpoint (AO channel = 22) % Torque running (AI channel = 9) % Torque maximum (AI channel = 8) % Position (AI=channel 10) %

318

System Configuration

Valid Units and Channel Values for Rosemount Magmeter 8742 Rev 1, 3, 4 and 5
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Volume flow (AI channel = 1) gal/s GPM gal/h gal/d CFS CFM CFH ft3/d bbl/s bbl/min bbl/h bbl/d ImpGal/s ImpGal/min ImpGal/h ImpGal/d cm3/s cm3/min cm3/h cm3/d L/s L/min L/h L/d m3/s m3/min

Fieldbus Device Specifications

319

Volume flow (AI channel = 1) m3/h m3/d ft/s ft/min ft/h m/h m/s lb/s lb/min lb/h lb/d STon/s STon/min STon/h STon/d kg/s kg/min kg/h kg/d t/s t/min t/h t/d

320

System Configuration

Valid Units and Channel Values for El-O-Matic - 7360 Rev 3 and 4
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Temperature (AI channel = 3) C F AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Setpoint (AO channel = 22) % Torque running (AI channel = 9) % Torque maximum (AI channel = 8) % Position (AI channel = 10) %

Valid Units and Channel Values for El-O-Matic - 8000 Rev 3 and 4
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Temperature (AI channel = 3) C Position (AI channel = 10) %

AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Setpoint (AO channel = 22) %

Valid Units and Channel Values for El-O-Matic - 22C0 Rev 3 and 4
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Temperature (AI channel = 3) C F Torque running (AI channel = 9) % Torque maximum (AI channel = 8) %

Fieldbus Device Specifications

321

DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values ELQ 1 Command (DO channel = 17) 0 = close 1 = open 2 = stop DI Block Channel Values ELQ 1 Status (DI channel = 1) Aux 1 Output Status (DI channel = 2) Aux 2 Output Status (DI channel = 11) Aux 3 Output Status (DI channel = 12) Aux 1 Input (DI channel = 4) Aux 2 Input (DI channel = 5) Aux 3 Input (DI channel = 6) Aux 4 Input (DI channel = 7) Heater Status (DI channel = 16) ELQ 2 Status (DI channel = 14) Aux 1 Output Command (D0 channel = 18) Aux 2 Output Command (D0 channel = 19) Aux 3 Output Command (D0 channel = 20)

Valid Units and Channel Values for El-O-Matic f800 Rev 3 and 4
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Temperature (AI channel = 3) C

322

System Configuration

DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values ELQ 1 Command (DO channel = 17) 0 = open 1 = close 2 = stop DO Block Channel Values ELQ 1 Status (DI channel = 1) ELQ 2 Status (DI channel = 14)

Valid Units and Channel Values for El-O-Matic - 0990 Rev 3 and 4
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Temperature (AI channel = 3) C F DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values ELQ 1 Command (DO channel = 17) 0 = close 1 = open 2 = stop DI Block Channel Values ELQ 1 Status (DI channel = 1) Aux 1 Output Status (DI channel = 2) Aux 1 Output Command (D0 channel = 18) Torque running (AI channel = 9) % Torque maximum (AI channel = 8) %

Fieldbus Device Specifications

323

Aux 1 Input (DI channel = 4) Aux 2 Input (DI channel = 5) Aux 3 Input (DI channel = 6) Aux 4 Input (DI channel = 7) Heater Status (DI channel = 16) ELQ 2 Status (DI channel = 14)

Valid Units and Channel Values for Samson AG Advanced Positioner Type 3787 Rev 1 and 2
Output (AO channel = 1) %

Valid Units and Channel Values for Westlock FPAC Valve Controller EP40106 Rev 1
DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values DO Channel No. 1 - Open/Close 2 - Close 3 - Open 4 - Stop 5 - Open/Close/Stop Output (Readback) 0 - Closed 1 - Opened 2 - Closing 3 - Opening 0 - Not Closed 1Closed 0 - Not Open 1 Opened 0 - Not Stopped 1 Stopped 0 - Closed 1 - Opened 2 - Stopped 3 - Closing 4 - Opening

324

System Configuration

DO Channel No. 6 - Open/Close For Second Valve 7 - Open For Second Valve 8 - Close For Second Valve

Output (Readback) 0 - Closed 2 1 - Opened 2 2 - Closing 2 3 Opening 2 0 - Not Closed 2 1 Closed 2 0 - Not Open 2 1 Opened 2

DI Block Valid Units and Channel Values DI Channel No. 9 - Open/Close 10 - Open 11 - Closed 12 - Open/Close/Stop 13 - Maskable Signal Input 0 - Closed 1 - Opened 2 Stopped 3 - Closing 4 - Opening 0 - Not Open 1- Open 0 - Not Closed 1 - Closed 0 - Closed 1 - Opened 2 Stopped 3 - Closing 4 - Opening 0 - Maskable Signals Items OK 1 - One or more Maskable Signal Items has Exceeded limit 0 - Auxiliary 1 Dry Contact closed 1 - Auxiliary 1 Dry contact open. 0 - Auxiliary 2 Dry Contact closed 1 - Auxiliary 2 Dry contact open. 0 - Closed 2 1 - Opened 2 2 Stopped 2 3 - Closing 2 4 Opening 2 0 - Not Open 2 1 - Open 2 0 - Not Closed 2 1 - Close 2

14 - Auxiliary Input 1

15 - Auxiliary Input 2

16 - Open/Close For Second Valve 17 - Open For Second Valve 18 - Close For Second Valve

Fieldbus Device Specifications

325

Valid Units and Channel Values for Westlock BIFFICON2000 Rev 1


DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values DO Channels 1 - Open/Close/Stop 2 - Disable Setpoint and Opne/ Close/Stop or allow setpoint to take precedence 0 - Close command 1 - Open command 2 - Stop command 0 - Disable Setpoint and send a Close command 1 - Disable Setpoint and send an Open command 2 - Disable Setpoint and send a Stop command 3 Allow the Setpoint to take precedence 0 - No ESD command 1 - ESD command 0 - No Interlock Open command 1 - Interlock Open command 0 - No Interlock Close command 1 - Interlock Close command 0 - No Interlock Close and Open command 1 - Interlock Close and Open command 0 - No Disable Setpoint and send an Open command 1 - Disable Setpoint and send an Open command 0 - No Disable Setpoint and send a Close command 1 - Disable Setpoint and send a Close command 0 - No Disable Setpoint and send a Stop command 1 - Disable Setpoint and send a Stop command 0 - No Open command 1 - Open command 0 - No Close command 1 - Open command

3 - ESD 4 - Interlock Open 5 - Interlock Close 6 - Interlock Close and Open

7 - Disable Setpoint and send Open

8 - Disable Setpoint and send Close

9 - Disable Setpoint and send Stop

10 - Open 11 - Close

326

System Configuration

DO Channels 12 - Stop 45 - Open/Close 0 - No Stop command 1 - Stop command 0 - Open command 1 - Close command

Valid Units and Channel Values for El-O-Matic a2c0 Rev 4


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Temperature (AI channel = 3) C DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values ELQ 1 Command (DO channel = 17) 0 = close 1 = open 2 = stop DI Block Channel Values ELQ 1 Status (DI channel = 1) Aux 1 Output Status (DI channel = 2) Aux 1 Input (DI channel = 4) Aux 2 Input (DI channel = 5) Aux 3 Input (DI channel = 6) Aux 4 Input (DI channel = 7) ELQ 2 Status (DI channel = 14) Aux 1 Output Command (D0 channel = 18)

Fieldbus Device Specifications

327

Valid Units and Channel Values for Honeywell ST3000FF Rev 6, 7, and 8
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process Pressure (AI channel = 1) Pa GPa MPa kPa mPa uPa hPa bar mbar torr atm psi psia psig g/cm2 kg/cm2 inH2O inH2O (4C) inH2O (68F) mmH2O mmH2O (4C) mmH2O (68F) ftH2O ftH2O (4C) ftH2O (68F) inHg Calculated Level (AI channel = 2) %

328

System Configuration

Process Pressure (AI channel = 1) inHg (0C) mmHg mmHg (0C)

Calculated Level (AI channel = 2)

Valid Units and Channel Values for Honeywell STT35F Rev 2


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process Temperature (AI channel = 1) C F K R Ohm mV

Valid Units and Channel Values for Knick 2231x pH Transmitter Rev 1
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Acidity (AI channel = 1) % ORP (AI channel = 2) mV Temperature (AI channel = 3) C F Reference Impedance (AI channel = 5) Kohm Slope (AI channel = 6) % Asymetrie (AI channel = 7) mV Glass Impedance (AI channel = 4) Mohm

Fieldbus Device Specifications

329

Valid Units and Channel Values for Knick 2231x Oxygen Transmitter Rev 1
Saturation (AI channel = 1) % Concentration (AI channel = 2) mg/l ug/l ppm ppb Slope (AI channel = 5) A Volume Concentration (AI channel = 6) % ppm Temperature (AI channel = 3) C F Zero (AI channel = 4) A

Valid Units and Channel Values for Krohne BM70 A/P Rev 2 and 3
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Level (AI channel = 1) meter centimeter millimeter feet inch yard Distance (AI channel = 3) meter centimeter millimeter feet inch yard Volume (AI channel = 5) cubic meter cubic decimeter cubic centimeter liter hectoliter cubic inch cubic feet cubic yard cubic mile pint quart US gallon imperial gallon Reflection (AI channel = 6) percent

330

System Configuration

Level (AI channel = 1)

Distance (AI channel = 3)

Volume (AI channel = 5) bushel barrel barrel liquid

Reflection (AI channel = 6)

Valid Units and Channel Values for Krohne BM100A Rev 2


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Level (AI channel = 1) meter centimeter millimeter feet inch yard Distance (AI channel = 3) meter centimeter millimeter feet inch yard Volume (AI channel = 5) cubic meter cubic decimeter cubic centimeter liter hectoliter cubic inch cubic feet cubic yard cubic mile pint quart US gallon imperial gallon bushel barrel barrel liquid Reflection (AI channel = 6) percent

Fieldbus Device Specifications

331

Valid Units and Channel Values for Krohne IFC090 Electromagnetic Flowmeter Rev 1
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Flow Rate (AI channel = 1) m3/S

Valid Units and Channel Values for Ledeen LFFC-LD-1.0 Rev 1


DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values DO Block Channel Values Close (DO channel = 1) Open (DO channel = 2) Stop (DO channel = 3) Open/Close/Stop/Enter ESD (DP channel = 4) Open/Close (DO channel = 5) Inhibit Open/Inhibit Close/ Uninhibited/Inhibit Operation (DO channel = 6) Enter ESD (DO channel = 7) DI Block Valid Units and Channel Values DI Block Channel Values Aux 1 (DI channel = 9) Aux 2 (DI channel = 10) Aux 3 (DI channel = 11)

332

System Configuration

DI Block Channel Values Stop (DI channel = 12) Discrete State Mask (DI channel = 13) Open (DI channel = 14) Close (DI channel = 15) Enter ESD (DI channel = 16)

Valid Units and Channel Values for Limitorque MX100 Rev 1


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Current Valve Position (AI channel = 12) % Value of Analog Input 1 (AI channel = 13) % Value of Analog Input 2 (AI channel = 14) %

DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Command Stop/ Open/Close (DO Channel = 9) 0 = Stop 1 = Open 2 = Close DI Block Channel Values Valve Status and Control Mode (DI Channel = 2) Opened + Remote = 33 Closed + Remote = 34 Valve Status (Moving/Stopped) (DI Channel = 3) Opened = 1 Closed = 2 Mechanical and Electrical Faults 1 (DI Channel = 4) Monitor Relay = 1 Valve Jammed = 2 Command Emergency Shutdown (DO Channel = 10) 0 = Disable Network ESD 1 = Enable Network ESD Command Energize Relays (DO Channel = 11) AS-1 to AS-4 = Bits 03 AR-1 to AR-3 = Bits 46

Fieldbus Device Specifications

333

Opening + Remote = 36 Closing + Remote = 38 Stopped + Remote = 40 Opened + Local = 65 Closed + Local = 66 Opening + Local = 68 Closing + Local = 72 Stopped + Local = 74 Opened + Stopped = 75 Closed + Stopped = 76

Opening = 4 Closing = 8 Stopped = 16

Manual Moved = 4 Over Torque = 8 Phase Error = 16 Over Temp = 32 Monitor Relay +Valve Jammed = 3 Monitor Relay + Manual Move = 5 Monitor Relay + Over Torque = 9 Monitor Relay + Phase Error = 17 Monitor Relay + Over Temp = 33 Monitor Relay + Valve Jammed + Manual Move = 7 Monitor Relay + Valve Jammed + Phase Error = 19 Monitor Relay + Valve Jammed + Over Temp = 35

Opening + Stopped = 78

Closing + Stopped = 82

Stopped + Stopped = 144 Mechanical and Electrical Faults 2 (DI Channel = 5) Thermal Overload = 1 Phase Error = 2 Valve Jammed = 4 Manual Moved = 8 Open Torque Switch Fault = 16 Close Torque Switch Fault = 32 Emergency Shutdown and Inhibits (DI Channel = 6) Local ESD Active = 1 Remote ESD Active = 2 Open Inhibit Active = 4 Close Inhibit Active = 8 Local ESD Active + Open Inhibit = 5 Local ESD Active + Close Inhibit = 9 Discrete Input from User (DI Channel = 7) ESD Input = Bit 0 (Terminal 21) Open Inhibit = Bit 1 (Terminal 10) Close Inhibit = Bit 2 (Terminal 9) Stop Pushbutton Input = Bit 3 (Terminal 6) Open Pushbutton Input = Bit 4 (Terminal 7) Close Pushbutton Input = Bit 5 (Terminal 5)

334

System Configuration

Thermal Overload + Manual Moved = 9 Thermal Overload + Phase Error = 3 Thermal Overload + Valve Jammed = 5 Open Torque Switch Fault + Manual Moved = 24 Close Torque Switch Fault + Manual Moved = 40 Read Discrete Output (DI Channel = 8) State of AS-1 = Bit 0 (Terminals 1,2) State of AS-2 = Bit 1 (Terminals 3,4) State of AS-3 = Bit 2 (Terminals 31,32) State of AS-4 = Bit 3 (Terminals 42,43)

Remote ESD Active + Open Inhibit = 6 Remote ESD Active + Close Inhibit = 10 Open Inhibit Active + Close Inhibit Active = 12

Valid Units and Channel Values for Rosemount Analytical OXY-5000 (Rev 1 and 3)
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process O2 (AI channel = 1) % (not % O2) Case Temp (AI channel = 2) C O2 Cell temp (AI channel = 3) C

Fieldbus Device Specifications

335

Valid Units and Channel Values for Rosemount Analytical pH 4081 Rev 1, 2, and 3
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process pH (AI channel = 1) pH Process temp (AI channel = 2) C F

Valid Units for Rosemount Analytical OXY 4081F/G Rev 1 and 2


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process O2 (AI channel = 1) % (not % O2) O2 Probe temp (AI channel = 2) C

Valid Units for Rosemount Analytical Conduct 4081T/C Rev 1 and 2


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process Conductivity (AI channel = 1) S/cm Mohm-cm % Process temp (AI channel = 2) C F Absolute Conductivity (AI channel = 3) S/cm

336

System Configuration

Valid Units for Rosemount Analytical 5081pH/ORP Rev 1


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values pH/ORP (AI channel = 1) pH mV Process Temp (AI channel = 2) C F Reference Impedance (AI channel = 3) Kohm Glass Impedance

Mohm

Valid Units for Rosemount Analytical 5081A Amperometric Transmitter, Rev 1


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Concentration (AI channel = 1) % Temperature (AI channel = 2) C F Sensor Current (AI channel = 3) nA pH (AI channel = 4) ph mV

Valid Units for Rosemount Analytical 1000 Continuous Gas Analyzer, Rev 3
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Sensor 1 (AI channel = 1) % ppm Sensor 2 (AI channel = 2) % ppm

A0 Block Valid Units and Channel Values AO channel = 3 % ppm

Fieldbus Device Specifications

337

Valid Units for Rosemount Analytical 5081-C Conductivity Transmitter, Rev 1


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Conductivity (AI channel = 1) s/cm Temperature (AI channel = 2) C Raw Conductivity (AI channel = 3) s/cm

Valid Units for SMAR LD302 Rev 2, 3, and 4


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Sensor Pressure (AI channel = 1) psi inches H20 (68F) Consult Smar for a complete list of valid units for this device.

Valid Units for SMAR TT302 Rev 2, 3, and 4


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Sensor 1 Temp (AI channel = 1) C F Sensor 2 Temp (AI channel = 2) C F

Consult Smar for a complete list of valid units for this device.

Valid Units for SMAR FI302 Rev 2, 3, and 4


AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output 1 (AO channel = 1) mA Output 2 (AO channel = 2) mA Output 3 (AO channel = 3) mA

338

System Configuration

Consult Smar for a complete list of valid units for this device.

Valid Units for SMAR FY302 Rev 2, 3, and 4


AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output (AO channel = 1) % Consult Smar for a complete list of valid units for this device.

Valid Units for SMAR IF302 Rev 2, 3, and 4


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Sensor 1 (AI channel = 1) mA Sensor 2 (AI channel = 2) mA Sensor 3 (AI channel = 3) mA

Consult Smar for a complete list of valid units for this device.

Valid Units for SMAR FP302 Rev 2, 3, and 4


AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Sensor 1 (AO channel = 1) psi Consult Smar for a complete list of valid units for this device.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

339

Valid Units for Yamatake Temperature Transmitter ATT Rev 1


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Temperature (AI channel = 1) K C F R

Valid Units for Yamatake AVP 303 Valve Positioner, Rev 1


A0 Block Valid Units and Channel Values AO channel = 1 0 - 100%

Valid Units for Yamatake MagW 3000 Magnetic Flow Transmitter, Rev 2
A0 Block Valid Units and Channel Values AI channel = 1 g/s g/min g/h g/d kg/s kg/min kg/h kg/d t/s t/min t/h t/d

340

System Configuration

AI channel = 1 lb/s lb/min lb/h lb/d lb/s lb/min lb/h lb/d m/s m/min m/h m/d L/s L/min L/h L/d gal/s GPM gal/h gal/d bbl/s bbl/min bbl/h bbl/d mgal/s mgal/min mgal/h mgal/d kgal/s kgal/min

Fieldbus Device Specifications

341

AI channel = 1 kgal/h kgal/d cm/s cm/min cm/h cm/d %

Valid Units for Yamatake Pressure Transmitter DST Rev 1


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Pressure (AI channel = 1) Pa MPa KPa hPa Bar mBar psi g/cm2 kg/cm2 inH2O mmH2O inHg Temperature (AI Channel = 2) K C F R

342

System Configuration

Valid Units for Yokogawa MagFlowmeter Admag AE100 Rev 4


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process Flow (AI channel = 1) m/s ft/s m3/s m3/min m3/h m3/d L/s L/min L/h L/d cm3/s cm3/min cm3/h cm3/d Mgal/s Mgal/min Mgal/h Mgal/d Kgal/s Kgal/min Kgal/h Kgal/d gal/s GPM gal/h gal/d mgal/s

Fieldbus Device Specifications

343

Process Flow (AI channel = 1) mgal/min mgal/hr mgal/d kbbl/s kbbl/min kbbl/h kbbl/d bbl/s bbl/min bbl/h bbl/d mbbl/s mbbl/min mbbl/h mbbl/d mbbl/s mbbl/min mbbl/h mbbl/d Consult Yokogawa for a complete list of valid units for this device.

Valid Units for Yokogawa DP EJA100A Rev 1 and 2


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Sensor Pressure (AI channel = 1) psi kPa Consult Yokogawa for a complete list of valid units for this device.

344

System Configuration

Valid Units and Channel Values for Yokogawa DYF/LC1 Vortex Flowmeter Rev 1
Mass Flow / Volumetric Flow (AI channel = 1) kg/s Kg/min kg/h kg/d ton/s ton/min ton/h ton/d lb/s lb/min lb/h lb/d m3/s m3/min m3/h m3/d L/s L/min L/h L/d CFS CFM CFH ft3/d gal/s GPM gal/h Process Temperature (AI channel = 2) C F DI Channel = 3 DI Channel = 4

Fieldbus Device Specifications

345

Mass Flow / Volumetric Flow (AI channel = 1) gal/d ImpGal/s ImpGal/min ImpGal/h ImpGal/d bbl/s bbl/min bbl/h bbl/d SCFM SCFH Nm3/s Nm3/min Nm3/h Nm3/d Sm3/s Sm3/min Nm3/h Nm3/d NL/s NL/min NL/h NL/d SL/s SL/mi SL/h SL/d

Process Temperature (AI channel = 2)

DI Channel = 3

DI Channel = 4

Consult Yokogawa for a complete list of valid units for this device.

346

System Configuration

Valid Units and Channel Values for Yokogawa Vortex YF100E Rev 1 and 2
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process Pressure (AI channel = 1) kg/s Consult Yokogawa for a complete list of valid units for this device.

Valid Units and Channel Values for Yokogawa pH Analyzer pH-202F Rev 1 & 2
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process pH (AI channel = 1) Manual setting on the instrument with service code 1. pH ORP Process Temperature (AI channel = 2) Process "ORP" (AI channel = 3) Manual setting on the instrument with service code 2. mV ( ORP ) pH

C, F

Consult Yokogawa for a complete list of valid units for this device.

Valid Units and Channel Values for Yokogawa Conductivity/Resistivity Analyzer SC-202F Rev 1 & 2
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process Conductivity (AI channel = 1) Manually enter service codes on the instrument itself. S/cm Process Temperature (AI channel = 2) Process Second Conductivity (AI channel = 3) Manually enter service codes on the instrument itself. S/cm Process Concentration (AI channel = 4)

C,F

Consult Yokogawa for a complete list of valid units for this device.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

347

Valid Units and Channel Values for Yokogawa Inductivity/Conductivity Analyzer ISC-202F Rev 1 & 2
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process Conductivity (AI channel = 1) Manually enter service codes on the instrument itself S/cm Process Temperature (AI channel = 2) Process Second Conductivity (AI channel = 3) Manually enter service codes on the instrument itself. S/cm Process Concentration (AI channel = 4)

C,F

Consult Yokogawa for a complete list of valid units for this device.

Valid Units and Channel Values for Fuji FCX-A2 Pressure Transmitter, Rev 1
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Process Pressure (AI channel = 1) kPa Consult Fuji for a complete list of valid units for this device.

Valid Units and Channel Values for Endress+Hauser GmbH Temperature Transmitter TMT165 - Rev 4
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Sensor 1 Temperature (AI Channel=1) C F R K Sensor 2 Temperature (AI Channel=2) C F R K

348

System Configuration

Valid Units and Channel Values for Endress+Hauser GmbH Micropilot II, Rev 1
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Measured Level/ Volume (AI Channel=1) % L hl m3 dm3 cm3 ft3 gallon ImpGal kg t lb S Ton m ft mm in Measured Distance (AI Channel=2) m ft mm in

Fieldbus Device Specifications

349

Valid Units and Channel Values for Endress+Hauser GmbH Micropilot M Rev 2 and 3
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Measured Level/ Volume (AI Channel=1) % L hl m3 dm3 cm3 ft3 gallon ImpGal kg t lb S Ton m ft mm in Measured Distance (AI Channel=2) m ft mm in

350

System Configuration

Valid Units and Channel Values for Endress+Hauser, GmbH, Levelflex M Rev 3
Measured Level/ Volume (AI Channel=1) % L hl m3 dm3 cm3 ft3 gallon ImpGal kg t lb S Ton m ft mm in Measured Distance (AI Channel=2) m ft mm in

Valid Units and Channel Values for Endress+Hauser, GmbH, Deltabar S, Rev 1 and 2
Sensor Pressure or Linearization (AI Channel=1) % mbar bar Pa Sensor Temperature (AI Channel=2) C F K

Fieldbus Device Specifications

351

Sensor Pressure or Linearization (AI Channel=1) hPa kPa MPa mmH2O mH20 inH20 ftH20 psi g/cm2 kg/cm2 kgf/cm2 atm lb/ft2 Torr mmHg inHg ft3/min ft3/h l/s ft3/s m3/s norm m3/h stdft3/min m3/min USG/h USG/d g/min kg/s kg/min

Sensor Temperature (AI Channel=2)

352

System Configuration

Sensor Pressure or Linearization (AI Channel=1) kg/h t/min t/h t/d lb/s lb/min lb/h cm dm m inch ft l hl cm3 dm3 m3 ft3 usgal impgal ton kg lb metric tonne

Sensor Temperature (AI Channel=2)

Fieldbus Device Specifications

353

Valid Units and Channel Values for Endress+Hauser, GmbH, Cerabar S, Rev 1 and 2
Sensor Pressure or Linearization (AI Channel=1) % mbar bar Pa hPa kPa MPa mmH2O mH20 inH20 ftH20 psi g/cm2 kg/cm2 kgf/cm2 atm lb/ft2 Torr mmHg inHg ft3/min ft3/h l/s ft3/s m3/s norm m3/h stdft3/min Sensor Temperature (AI Channel=2) C F K

354

System Configuration

Sensor Pressure or Linearization (AI Channel=1) m3/min USG/h USG/d g/min kg/s kg/min kg/h t/min t/h t/d lb/s lb/min lb/h cm dm m inch ft l hl cm3 dm3 m3 ft3 usgal impgal ton kg

Sensor Temperature (AI Channel=2)

Fieldbus Device Specifications

355

Sensor Pressure or Linearization (AI Channel=1) lb metric tonne

Sensor Temperature (AI Channel=2)

Valid Units and Channel Values for Endress+Hauser GmbH Prosonic M Rev 3
AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Measured Level/ Volume (AI Channel=1) % L hl m3 dm3 cm3 ft3 gallon ImpGal kg t lb S Ton m ft mm in L/s L/min L/h Measured Distance (AI Channel=2) m ft mm in Sensor Temperature (AI Channel=3) F C

356

System Configuration

Measured Level/ Volume (AI Channel=1) m3/s m3/min m3/h CFS gal/s GPM gal/h Mgal/d ImpGal/s ImpGal/min ImpGal/h

Measured Distance (AI Channel=2)

Sensor Temperature (AI Channel=3)

Fieldbus Device Specifications

357

Valid Units and Channel Values for Endress+Hauser GmbH 72 Prowirl, Rev 1
Massflow (AI channel = 1) g/s g/m g/h g/d kg/s kg/m kg/h kg/d t/s t/m t/h t/d oz/s oz/m oz/h oz/d lb/s lb/m lb/h lb/d Ton/s Ton/m Ton/h Ton/d Volumetric Flow (AI channel = 2) cm3/s cm3/m cm3/h cm3/d dm3/s dm3/m dm3/h dm3/d m3/s m3/m m3/h m3/d l/s l/m l/h l/d hl/s hl/m hl/h hl/d Ml/s Ml/m Ml/h Ml/d cc/s cc/m cc/h Std. Volumetric Flow (AI channel = 3) cm3/s cm3/m cm3/h cm3/d dm3/s dm3/m dm3/h dm3/d m3/s m3/m m3/h m3/d l/s l/m l/h l/d hl/s hl/m hl/h hl/d Ml/s Ml/m Ml/h Ml/d cc/s cc/m cc/h Totalizer 1 (AI channel = 7) g kg t cm3 dm m3 ml l hl Ml Nl Nm3 oz lb ton cc af ft3 ozf gal Mgal bbl bbl BEER bbl PETR bbl TANKS Sm3 Scf

358

System Configuration

Massflow (AI channel = 1)

Volumetric Flow (AI channel = 2) cc/d af/s af/m af/h af/d ft3/s ft3/m ft3/h ft3/d flo/s flo/m flo/h flo/d gal/s gal/m gal/h gal/d Mgl/s Mgl/m Mgl/h Mgl/d Impgal/s Impgal/m Impgal/h Impgal/d ImpMgal/s ImpMgal/m ImpMgal/h ImpMgal/d

Std. Volumetric Flow (AI channel = 3) cc/d af/s af/m af/h af/d ft3/s ft3/m ft3/h ft3/d flo/s flo/m flo/h flo/d gal/s gal/m gal/h gal/d Mgl/s Mgl/m Mgl/h Mgl/d Impgal/s Impgal/m Impgal/h Impgal/d ImpMgal/s ImpMgal/m ImpMgal/h ImpMgal/d

Totalizer 1 (AI channel = 7) Impgal ImpMgal Impbbl BEER Impbbl PETR

Fieldbus Device Specifications

359

Massflow (AI channel = 1)

Volumetric Flow (AI channel = 2) bbl/s bbl/m bbl/h bbl/d bbl N/s bbl N/m bbl N/h bbl N/d bbl B/s bbl B/m bbl B/h bbl B/d bbl P/s bbl P/m bbl P/h bbl P/d bbl T/s bbl T/m bbl T/h bbl T/d Impbbl/s BEER Impbbl/m BEER Impbbl/h BEER Impbbl/d BEER Impbbl/s PETR Impbbl/m PETR Impbbl/h PETR Impbbl/d PETR

Std. Volumetric Flow (AI channel = 3) bbl/s bbl/m bbl/h bbl/d bbl N/s bbl N/m bbl N/h bbl N/d bbl B/s bbl B/m bbl B/h bbl B/d bbl P/s bbl P/m bbl P/h bbl P/d bbl T/s bbl T/m bbl T/h bbl T/d Impbbl/s BEER Impbbl/m BEER Impbbl/h BEER Impbbl/d BEER Impbbl/s PETR Impbbl/m PETR Impbbl/h PETR Impbbl/d PETR

Totalizer 1 (AI channel = 7)

360

System Configuration

DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output (DO channel = 16) NA

Fieldbus Device Specifications

361

Valid Units and Channel Values for Endress+Hauser GmbH 73 Prowirl, Rev 1
Mass Flow (AI Chan=1) g/s g/m g/h g/d kg/s kg/m kg/h kg/d t/s t/m t/h t/d oz/s oz/m oz/h oz/d lb/s lb/m lb/h lb/d Ton/s Ton/m Ton/h Ton/d Vol. Flow (AI Chan=2) cm3/s cm3/m cm3/h cm3/d dm3/s dm3/m dm3/h dm3/d m3/s m3/m m3/h m3/d l/s l/m l/h l/d hl/s hl/m hl/h hl/d Ml/s Ml/m Ml/h Ml/d cc/s cc/m Std. Vol. Flow (AI Chan=3) Nl/s Nl/m Nl/h Nl/d Nm3/s Nm3/m Nm3/h Nm3/d scm/s scm/m scm/h scm/d scft/s scft/m scft/h scft/d Density (AI Chan=4) g/cm3 g/cc kg/dm3 kg/l kg/m3 SD4C SD15C SD20C SG4C SG15C SG20C lb/ft3 lb/gal lb/bbl lb/bbl BEER lb/bbl PETR lb/bbl TANKS Implb/gal Implb/bbl BEER Implb/bbl PETR Std. Density (AI Chan=5) g/Scc kg/Nl kg/Nm3 kg/Sm lb/Scf Temperature (AI Chan=6) C F R K

362

System Configuration

Mass Flow (AI Chan=1)

Vol. Flow (AI Chan=2) cc/h cc/d af/s af/m af/h af/d ft3/s ft3/m ft3/h ft3/d flo/s flo/m flo/h flo/d gal/s gal/m gal/h gal/d Mgl/s Mgl/m Mgl/h Mgl/d Impgal/s Impgal/m Impgal/h Impgal/d ImpMgal/s ImpMgal/m ImpMgal/h

Std. Vol. Flow (AI Chan=3)

Density (AI Chan=4)

Std. Density (AI Chan=5)

Temperature (AI Chan=6)

Fieldbus Device Specifications

363

Mass Flow (AI Chan=1)

Vol. Flow (AI Chan=2) ImpMgal/d bbl/s bbl/m bbl/h bbl/d bbl N/s bbl N/m bbl N/h bbl N/d bbl B/s bbl B/m bbl B/h bbl B/d bbl P/s bbl P/m bbl P/h bbl P/d bbl T/s bbl T/m bbl T/h bbl T/d Impbbl/s BEER Impbbl/m BEER Impbbl/h BEER Impbbl/d BEER Impbbl/s PETR Impbbl/m PETR

Std. Vol. Flow (AI Chan=3)

Density (AI Chan=4)

Std. Density (AI Chan=5)

Temperature (AI Chan=6)

364

System Configuration

Mass Flow (AI Chan=1)

Vol. Flow (AI Chan=2) Impbbl/h PETR Impbbl/d PETR

Std. Vol. Flow (AI Chan=3)

Density (AI Chan=4)

Std. Density (AI Chan=5)

Temperature (AI Chan=6)

Totalizer 1 (AI chan = 7) G Kg T Cm3 Dm3 m3 Ml L Hl Ml Nl Nm3 Oz Lb Ton Cc Af ft3 Ozf Gal Mgal Bbl Bbl BEER Bbl PETR Bbl TANKS

Totalizer 2 (AI chan = 8) g kg t cm3 dm3 m3 ml l hl Ml Nl Nm3 oz lb ton cc af ft3 ozf gal Mgal bbl bbl BEER bbl PETR bbl TANKS

Flow Velocity (AI chan = 23) m/s Ft/s

Heat Flow (AI chan = 53) MW kW kcal/s kcal/m kcal/h kcal/d Mcal/m Mcal/d kJ/s kJ/m kJ/h kJ/d MJ/s MJ/m MJ/h MJ/d GJ/s GJ/m GJ/h GJ/d Mcal/h Gcal/s Gcal/m Gcal/h Gcal/d

Spec. Enthalpy (IA chan = 54) kWh/kg kJ/kg MJ/kg kcal/kg Btu/lb

Calc. Sat. Pressure (AI chan = 55) mbar bar Pa hPa kPa MPa mmH2O mH2O inH2O ftH2O psi g/cm^2 Kg/cm^2 kgf/cm^2 atm Lb/ft^2 Torr mmHg inHg ft3/min ft3/h l/s ft3/s M3/s norm m3/h

Fieldbus Device Specifications

365

Totalizer 1 (AI chan = 7) Sm3 Scf Impgal ImpMgal Impbbl BEER Impbbl PETR

Totalizer 2 (AI chan = 8) Sm3 Scf Impgal ImpMgal Impbbl BEER Impbbl PETR

Flow Velocity (AI chan = 23)

Heat Flow (AI chan = 53) Tons kBtu/s kBtu/m kBtu/h kBtu/d MBtu/s MBtu/m MBtu/h MBtu/d GBtu/s GBtu/m GBtu/h GBtu/d

Spec. Enthalpy (IA chan = 54)

Calc. Sat. Pressure (AI chan = 55) stdft3/min M3/min USG/h USG/d g/min Kg/s Kg/min Kg/h t/min t/h t/d Lb/s Lb/min Lb/h cm dm M inch Ft L Hl cm^3 dm^3 M^3 ft^3 usgal impgal ton Kg

366

System Configuration

Totalizer 1 (AI chan = 7)

Totalizer 2 (AI chan = 8)

Flow Velocity (AI chan = 23)

Heat Flow (AI chan = 53)

Spec. Enthalpy (IA chan = 54)

Calc. Sat. Pressure (AI chan = 55) Lb metric tonne

Z-Factor (AI Chan=56) NA NA

Reynolds number (AI Chan=57) NA NA

Frequency (AI Chan=58) Hz

Elec. Temperature (AI Chan=59) C F K R

AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Analog Output (DO channel = 17) NA DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output (DO channel = 16) NA

Valid Units and Channel Values for Rotork IQ, AQ, Q, IQM, AQM Electric Actuator, Rev 1 & 2
DI and DO Block Channel Values Block Type DI Channel Channel # 1 2 DO Channel 1 2 3 4 Description Valve Code Valve Code Open Close ESD Interlock

Fieldbus Device Specifications

367

Block Type

Channel # 5 6 7 8

Description Relay 1 Relay 2 Relay 3 Relay 4

AI Block Channel Values Position (AI channel = 1) % AO Block Channel Values Desired Position (AI channel = 1) % Torque (AI channel = 2) %

Valid Units and Channel Values for Pepprl + Fuchs FDO-VC-Ex4.FF Rev 1
DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values (DO channel = 1) 0 = Close 1 - 255 = Open (DO channel = 2) 0 = Closed 1 - 255 = Open (DO channel = 3) 0 = Closed 1 - 255 = Open (DO channel = 4) 0 = Closed 1 - 255 = Open

Valid Units and Channel Values for FlowServe Valve Controller, Rev 4 and 5
AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output (AO channel = 1) %

368

System Configuration

Valid Units and Channel Values for FlowServe AccuMX Application Rev 2
AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Control Valve Flow (AO channel = 1) % DI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Valve Status & Control Mode (DI channel = 2) NA Valve Status Moving/Stopped (DI channel = 3) NA Actuator Mech. & Electrical Faults 1 (DI channel = 4) NA Actuator Mech. & Electrical Faults 2 (DI channel = 5) NA

DI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Emergency Shutdown & Inhibits (DI channel = 6) NA Discrete Input from User (DI Channel = 7) NA Read Discrete Output (DI channel = 8) NA

DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Command Stop/Open/Close (DO channel = 9) NA Command Emergency Shutdown (DO channel = 10) NA Command Energize Relays (DO channel = 11) NA

AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Current Valve Position (AI channel = 12) % Analog Input 1 (AI channel = 13) % Analog input 2 (AI channel = 14) %

Fieldbus Device Specifications

369

Valid Units and Channel Values for FlowServe BuSwitch Rev 2 & 3
DI and DO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Discrete Output 1 (DO channel = 1) 1 = Energized 0 = De-energized Discrete Output 2 (DO channel = 2) 1 = Energized 0 = De-energized

Discrete Input 1 (DI channel = 1)

Discrete Input 2 (DI channel = 2)

Valid Units and Channel Values for Invensys IASPT10, Rev 22


AI Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output (AI channel = 1) InH2O (68 degrees F)

Valid Units and Channel Values for Invensys SRD960, Rev 9


AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output (AO channel = 1) %

Valid Units and Channel Values for Invensys SRD991, Rev 9


AO Block Valid Units and Channel Values Output (AO channel = 1) %

370

System Configuration

Serial Devices and the DeltaV System


Inside this topic Configuring a Serial Card Configuring Port Properties Configuring a Serial Device Configuring a Dataset The standard DeltaV Serial Card supports serial devices that use the Modbus RTU or ASCII protocol. The programmable Serial Card supports custom protocols. Both cards communicate through RS232, RS422/485 half duplex, or RS422/485 full duplex signals. The Serial Cards support both master and slave modes of communications. Master mode is normally used to communicate with a PLC or other third party device supporting the Modbus protocol. In this mode, the Serial Card is the master device on the serial communications link and controls the requesting of data from the other device. Slave mode is used for connection to a Modbus master device. In slave mode, the Serial Card acts as a slave to the connected device responding to data read and write requests issued by the master. The card is capable of emulating up to 16 slave devices on each port. You configure the devices on the port and set them to different slave addresses. If you want a serial card to have one slave address, configure a port with only one device object and create all the datasets under that device. Datasets are described in more detail below. Configuring a Serial Card The Serial Card is one of the card types in the DeltaV Explorer. You configure it as you would any other card. For example, you can plug in the card and have the system auto-sense it, or you can configure a placeholder for the card before connecting the actual card. Each Serial Card has two ports. Each port can support as many as 16 serial devices. The DeltaV Explorer help describes how to add Serial Cards to your I/O subsystem. Configuring Port Properties Once you have configured a Serial Card, you can set the serial port properties and add serial devices to the ports. The following table describes the configurable serial port properties. Serial Port Properties Property Baud rate Data bits Description Valid Values 300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, or 115200 7 or 8 As many as 256 characters Description Determines the baud rate for serial data exchange. Determines the number of data bits. Use 7 for ASCII and 8 for RTU mode. Describes the use of the port. This description only appears when you view the port properties from the DeltaV Explorer.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

371

Property Enabled

Valid Values Checked or not checked

Description Enables the port. If the port is not enabled, the Serial Card does not scan for input data or transmit output when in master mode and does not respond to Modbus messages when in slave mode. Determines the amount of time the Serial Card waits for a response from the serial device after sending a request message. More specifically, this indicates the time from when the Serial Card sends the last character of the request message until the time the last character of the response message is received. This property is only applicable when in Modbus master mode. Determines whether the port acts as a Modbus master or slave. Determines the parity. Determines the port type to be used for the serial connection. Note RS-485 Full Duplex is not supported when the card is configured as a Modbus slave in a multidrop configuration.

Message timeout (ms)

100 ms through 25.5 seconds in 100 ms increments

Mode Parity Port type

Master or Slave Even, Odd, None RS-232, RS-422/485 Full Duplex, RS422/485 Half Duplex

Retry count

0 through 255

Determines the number of times the Serial Card retries a failed message. This is only applicable when in master mode. When the Serial Card issues a Modbus request to a device, it expects a response message to be returned. If no response or an error response is returned, the Serial Card retries the failed message the number of times configured in the Retry count property. Determines whether the Serial Card sends all current output values to the serial devices on power-up, reset, switchover or after a download. This property is only applicable when in Modbus master mode.

Send outputs on startup

Checked or unchecked

372

System Configuration

Property Stop bits Transmit Delay (ms)

Valid Values 1 or 2 100 ms through 25.5 seconds in 100 ms increments

Description Determines the stop bits. Determines the amount of time the Serial Card delays between requests for input data and/or requests to write output data to the Modbus Device. This value is used to slow down Modbus master requests being transmitted to slave devices that require a time delay between requests. The default Transmit Delay value is 0 since most Modbus devices do not require any delay. This value can also be used when in slave mode to delay the response to a Modbus master request.

Configuring a Serial Device To set a port to a specific modbus address, configure a device on the port and set the device address to the desired slave address. The DeltaV Explorer help provides step-by-step instructions for adding serial devices. For example, the following steps describe how to configure two serial devices (a multi-port configuration) connected to port 1 of a serial card. 1 2 3 4 Select port 1 (PO1) of the serial card. Right-click and select New Serial device. Set the device address to match the address of the physical device connected to the serial card. Repeat steps 1 through 3 for the second device. Set the address of the second device to match the address of the physical device connected to the serial card.

Configuring a Dataset In master mode, the Serial Card exchanges data with the serial device through a dataset. A dataset is a collection of parameters associated with a serial device. The parameters in the dataset hold data values that correspond to registers or data in a serial device. The dataset defines the type and amount of data being sent to or received from the serial device. All the data values for a dataset have the same properties. Properties include the data type, data direction, and so on. The data values in a dataset map to a contiguous series of serial device registers or data. In slave mode, the Serial Card emulates sets of data through datasets. The datasets are used to define the data that the Serial Card and DeltaV system are to emulate. The dataset in the slave mode defines the type and amount of data the Serial Card supports. All the data values for a dataset have the same properties. You can create as many as 16 datasets for each Serial Card port. These 16 datasets can be allocated to the serial devices in several ways. For example, you can configure one serial device with 16 datasets, or you can have 16 devices on the port with one dataset each. The DeltaV Explorer help describes how to add a dataset for a Serial Card. Basically, you define the dataset through the Serial Dataset properties dialog. The following table defines the fields in the dialog.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

373

Serial Dataset Properties Property Data direction Card Type Standard, Programmable Valid Values Input or output Description Defines whether this dataset sends DeltaV data to a serial device (output) or receives data from a serial device (input). The Data Direction indicates whether this data set is input data from the slave device or output data to be sent to the slave device when in master mode. The Data Direction is not needed when in the slave mode. The default value for Data Direction is Input. Identifies the Dataset Tag associated with this dataset. You use the Dataset Tag when configuring a module that reads from or writes to a serial device. Determines the type of data this dataset contains (Boolean, discrete, integer, floating point, and so on). This field value creates storage space for the dataset and determines how the DeltaV System accesses the data. The String data type is only valid if the PLC data type is input registers or holding registers. Indicates to which device address this dataset corresponds. Describes the use of the dataset. This description only appears when you view the properties of the dataset from the DeltaV Explorer. Standard cards: the number of Modbus values (registers or coils) to be read or written when in master mode. When in slave mode, the Number of Values defines the size (in registers or coils) of the data set used to emulate Modbus data. Programmable cards: the number of data values to be read from or written to the custom device.

Dataset Tag

Standard, Programmable

An existing Dataset Tag or a new Dataset Tag you create by typing in a name. Boolean; discrete; 8-bit, 16-bit, and 32-bit signed integers; 8-bit, 16bit, and 32-bit unsigned integers; floating point; and string 0 to 65535 As many as 256 characters

DeltaV data type

Standard, Programmable

DeltaV start address Description

Programmable Standard, Programmable

Number of values

Standard, Programmable

Standard cards: dependent on the PLC data type and the DeltaV data type. Refer to the table entitled Maximum Number of Values for Datasets for details. Programmable cards: 0 to 100.

374

System Configuration

Property Output mode

Card Type Standard, Programmable

Valid Values Complete block or single value

Description The Output Mode controls how output data is transmitted to the Modbus slave when the Serial Card is in master mode. If the Output Mode is set to Block, then the entire data set is output when any value in that set changes. If the Output Mode is set to Single Value, then the outputs are set to the Modbus device one value (register or coil) at a time when the values are changed. The Output Mode is only configurable if the Data Direction is set to output. The default value for the Output Mode is Block. Determines whether the output dataset should be read back during the Serial Card's input scan. If this box is checked, the Serial Card reads back the values during the card's next input scan. The values that are read back update the current output values. If this box is not checked, no output read back will be performed. You can only configure this field if the Data direction is set to output. This field is not applicable when in slave mode. For master mode, defines which data table to read from or write to in the serial device. For slave mode, defines which data table (type) the Serial Card is to emulate.

Output read back

Standard, Programmable

Checked or unchecked

PLC data type

Standard

For outputs: coils or registers For inputs: coils, input status, input registers, holding registers, diagnostic data For slave mode: coils, input status, input registers, or Holding Registers An integer from 0 to 9999 Read only

PLC register offset PLC start register address Special Data

Standard Standard

Identifies the starting register that maps to the first dataset parameter. Indicates the PLC register address corresponding to the first value in the Modbus device or configured data type. Special Data fields can be used for any purpose not covered by the standard fields.

Programmable

0 to 65535

Fieldbus Device Specifications

375

For example, the user needs a dataset with the following parameter values: Output mode: Output DeltaV datatype: floating point PLC datatype: holding registers Number of values: 2

The following steps describe how to configure the values: 1 2 3 4 5 Select the device (for example, Dev01 under port PO1). Right click and select New Dataset. On the General tab select output in the Data direction field. On DeltaV tab select Floating point with status in the DeltaV data type field. On PLC tab select holding registers and set Number of values to 2.

Maximum Number of Values for Datasets


The following table defines the number of values supported in a dataset depending on the PLC data type and the DeltaV data type defined for the dataset. When mapping serial device register data to 32-bit signed or unsigned integers or floating point values, the Serial Card maps two consecutive serial device registers to one of these 32-bit data values. Therefore, when calculating the actual number of DeltaV parameters associated with a dataset of these types (32-bit signed or unsigned integer or floating point), the number of DeltaV parameters is half the number of values configured for the dataset. If the data type is string, the Serial Card reads one string from the serial device. The size of the string is defined by the Number of values field. The size is the number of values * 2. The default value for the number of values field is 1. Maximum Number of Values for Datasets Serial Device Data Type Coils, Input Status DeltaV Data Type All except 32-bit signed and unsigned integer and floating point 32-bit signed and unsigned integer and floating point All data types All data types Maximum Number of Values 100

Coils, Input Status Input Registers, Holding Registers Diagnostics

50 100 17

Modbus Function Codes Supported


The Serial Card uses the following Modbus Communications Protocol function codes to read and write values to and from the Modbus Device when acting as a Modbus master device. These same Modbus function codes are supported in slave mode to allow the master device to read and write data to and from the Serial Card.

376

System Configuration

Supported Modbus Function Codes Code 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 Meaning Read Coil Status Read Input Status Read holding registers Read input registers Force Single Coil Preset Single Register Diagnostics Description Obtains current status (on/off) of a group of logic coils Obtains current status (on/off) of a group of discrete inputs Obtains current binary value in one or more holding registers Obtains current binary value in one or more input registers Forces logic coil to a state of ON or OFF Writes a single binary value into a holding register In master mode, Subfunction 2 is used to retrieve the Diagnostic Register of a PLC. In slave mode, Subfunction 0 is supported to allow remote masters to check the Communications link. Forces a series of consecutive logic coils to defined ON or OFF states Writes specific binary values into a series of consecutive holding registers Obtains the Run (on/off) state of a PLC

15 16 17

Force Multiple Coils Preset Multiple Registers Report Slave ID

Fieldbus Device Specifications

377

Using Serial Data in Control Strategies


Inside this topic Reading or Writing an Operator Display's Serial Data Using a Serial Dataset DST Writing an Operator Display's Setpoint to a Specific Dataset Register Writing an AI Value to a Specific Dataset Register Reading a Dataset Value Using an Internal Read Parameter Reading a Dataset Value Using an AI Block Creating Alarms for Dataset Registers Serial device data can be read or written from the Operator Display by referencing the DST/register number parameter associated with the containing data set in an Operator Display Data Link. Reading or Writing an Operator Display's Serial Data Using a Serial Dataset DST 1 2 3 4 Open a display for editing. Click the Data Link tool from the graphics toolbox. Drag the Data Link to the desired location on the display and click the left mouse button. Enter the dataset's DST name followed by the register number in the tagname field (for example: CTLR101010101/R40101). You can also use the Parameter Browse feature to browse for the DST and register name. Set the other Data Link parameters to their desired values and click OK.

You can use serial device data in control modules. For example, use serial data as the I/O reference in standard function blocks or create module-level parameters that reference the Dataset Tag and parameter associated with the register with which you want to work. The following specific examples describe how to read from and write to serial devices using a control module and a control module reference. Writing an Operator Display's Setpoint to a Specific Dataset Register 1 2 3 4 5 Create a module containing an Internal Write parameter (located on the Special Items palette). Modify the Internal Write parameter properties by selecting a parameter type of External Reference. For the External parameter path field, click Browse. Click Device Tags in the Type field and All Device Tags in the Look in field. The list includes dataset tags. Double-click the dataset tag that contains the parameter (register) that corresponds to the dataset value that you want to write to. Double-click the parameter. This parameter can be linked to a display's input data field. The result in Control Studio looks like this:

378

System Configuration

Writing an AI Value to a Specific Dataset Register 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Create a module containing an Analog Input block. Double-click the IO_IN parameter and then click Browse to select a specific analog input channel. If desired, scale the analog input value using the XD_SCALE, OUT_SCALE, and L_TYPE parameters. Add an Internal Write parameter to the diagram. The Internal Write parameter is on the Special Items palette. Modify the properties of the Internal Write parameter by selecting a parameter type of External Reference. For the External parameter path, click Browse. Select Device Tags in the Type field and All Device Tags in the Look in field. The list include dataset tags. Double-click the dataset tag that contains the parameter (register) that corresponds to the dataset value to which you want to write. Wire the AI block's Out parameter to the Internal Write parameter. The result in Control Studio looks like this:

Note Any value that is on the Output side of the AI block is written to the serial device regardless of the status of the AI block. Reading a Dataset Value Using an Internal Read Parameter 1 2 3 4 5 Create a module containing an Internal Read parameter (located on the Special Items palette). Modify the properties of the Internal Read parameter by specifying a parameter type of External Reference. To select an External parameter path, click Browse. Click Device Tags in the Type field and All Device Tags in the Look in field. The list include dataset tags. Double-click the dataset tag containing the parameter (register) that corresponds to the dataset value that you want to read from. Double-click the parameter. This parameter can be linked to a display. The result in Control Studio looks like this:

Fieldbus Device Specifications

379

Reading a Dataset Value Using an AI Block 1 2 3 4 5 6 Create a module containing an Analog Input block. Double-click the IO_IN parameter. To select a device tag, click Browse. Click All Device Tags in the Type field. This shows all the Device Tag names including the dataset tag name you want to read. Double-click the Device Tag that contains the parameter (register) from which you want to read. Double-click the parameter. If desired, scale your input value using the Analog Input block's XD_SCALE, OUT_SCALE, and L_TYPE parameters. The result in Control Studio looks like this:

Creating Alarms for Dataset Registers The Monitor Wizard creates a module containing alarms for each register in a dataset that you specify. You access the wizard through the DeltaV Explorer in one of two ways: Either click the area where you want the module to reside and then right-click Monitor Data Wizard or drag the dataset to the area. Refer to the DeltaV Explorer help for the specific procedure. For floating point values, the wizard creates alarms using the Alarm Limit function block. For discrete values, the wizard creates module-level alarms. In either case, external reference parameters bring in the dataset register values.

Serial Card Outputs


The following sections describe how output data is handled by the Serial Card. Send Outputs on Startup Each port on the Serial Card contains a configuration item called Send Outputs On Startup that controls how outputs are handled on initial configuration of the Serial Card and during switchover for Series 2 redundant Serial cards. This feature applies only to output datasets. If this configuration item is not enabled in the serial port configuration, initial output values are not sent out to the Modbus devices connected to the port under any circumstances. If Send Outputs on Startup is set then, in most cases, the card sends the current outputs to the serial devices on powerup, reset, download, and switchover. If a dataset is being configured for the first time, it is transitioning from the unconfigured to the configured state. In this case, the card sends initial values to the serial devices instead of current values. If a Serial Card that was previously configured is downloaded again or partially downloaded, the initial values are not sent to the Modbus devices even if the Send Outputs On Startup configuration item is enabled. If a new output dataset is added to a Serial Card configuration and the card is downloaded again, initial output values for the newly

380

System Configuration

configured dataset are sent to the Modbus Device, but any other datasets that were previously configured do not send out their initial values. Specify the initial output values through the dataset registers. To access the register values, click the dataset in Explorer. The registers are displayed in the right pane with names like R1, R2, and so on. Right-click a register to enter an initial value. Redundant Serial Card Switchovers When Send Outputs on Startup is enabled for Series 2 redundant Serial cards, the last output value is sent to the Modbus devices connected to the serial port when the cards switchover. If the values in your Modbus devices change frequently, it is recommended that you enable Output Readback on the output datasets to ensure that the Modbus devices maintain their values. Refer to the following topic, Using Outputs in Control Modules, for more information on this option. Using Outputs in Control Modules When using serial output data in control modules, remember that the output values are only sent to the Modbus devices when the value changes. This might cause problems if there is a program running in the Modbus device (for example, a PLC) that could overwrite a register being used for output data by a DeltaV control module. The DeltaV control module might think that the output register has one value in it when it actually contains a different value written by a third party. The control module does not send the output value to the Modbus device until the output value changes. To prevent this situation, enable the Output Readback option for any output datasets that could be changed by a third party. When the Output Readback option is enabled, the Serial Card reads the ouput values from the Modbus device during its normal input scan and updates the corresponding values in the DeltaV system if they change. This ensures that the output register values in the DeltaV system always match what is actually in the Modbus device.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

381

Serial Card Data Mapping


Inside this topic Mapping of Modbus Coils and Input Status Mapping of Modbus Input Registers and Holding Registers Mapping of Modbus Diagnostics Mapping of DeltaV Data to Modbus Coils and Input Status Mapping of DeltaV Data to Modbus Input and Holding Registers

Mapping of Modbus Coils and Input Status Modbus coils and input status values are both single bit values. The Serial Card treats both types of values the same with regard to data mapping. The mapping details for each data type are described in the following table. Mapping Coil and Input Status Data to DeltaV Data Types DeltaV Data Type Boolean Mapping Method The card maps each coil or input status value directly to a single Boolean value with no data conversion. The card sets the integer or floating point value to 0 if the coil or input status bit has a value of 0 or to 1 if the coil or input status bit has a value of 1. Not supported.

Discrete, signed integer, unsigned integer, and floating point

String

Mapping of Modbus Input Registers and Holding Registers Modbus input registers and holding registers are both 16 bit values read from or written to the Modbus device. The Serial Card treats both register types the same with regard to data mapping. Mapping Input and Holding Register Data to DeltaV Data Types DeltaV Data Type Boolean Mapping Method The card sets the Boolean value to 0 if the Modbus register has a value of 0 and to a value of 1 if the Modbus register has a value other than 0. The card maps the lower 8 bits of the Modbus register to the DeltaV value with no additional conversion. The card maps all 16 bits of the Modbus register directly into the DeltaV integer value.

Discrete, 8 bit signed integer and 8 bit unsigned integer 16 bit signed integer and 16 bit unsigned integer

382

System Configuration

DeltaV Data Type 32 bit signed integer and 32 bit unsigned integer

Mapping Method The card maps two consecutive Modbus registers to the DeltaV value. The first register is the least significant word, and the second register is the most significant word. Floating point values are stored on Modbus PLCs in IEEE format in two consecutive registers where the first is the least significant word and the second is the most significant word. The Serial Card maps the two consecutive Modbus registers to the DeltaV floating point value using the first register as the least significant word and the second as the most significant word. The Number of values field indicates the size of the string. The Serial Card maps the specified registers to a single DeltaV string with a length equal to number of values * 2. The first register specified contains the first two characters of the string where the high order byte of the register contains the first character and the low order byte contains the second character. The remaining registers contain the rest of the string characters in the same order.

Floating point

String

Mapping of Modbus Diagnostics The Modbus diagnostics supported by the Serial Card contain the PLC diagnostic register contents and the PLC run indicator. The Serial Card treats this data as 17 discrete bits of data. The first 16 bits correspond to the PLC diagnostics register information, and the seventeenth bit is the PLC run indicator. This information is retrieved from the Modbus device using function codes 8 and 17. For data mapping purposes, the Serial Card treats this data as if it were 17 coils or input status values. Therefore, the data is mapped to DeltaV data types exactly like coil and input status data are mapped. Mapping of DeltaV Data to Modbus Coils and Input Status Modbus coils and input status values are both single bit values and are treated the same for data mapping purposes by the Serial Card.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

383

Mapping DeltaV Data Types to Coil and Input Status Data DeltaV Data Type Boolean Mapping Method The card maps each DeltaV Boolean value directly to a single Modbus coil or input status value with no data conversion. The card sets the coil or input status to a value of 0 if the DeltaV value is 0 and to 1 if the DeltaV value is anything other than 0. Not supported.

Discrete, signed integer, unsigned integer, and floating point

String

Mapping of DeltaV Data to Modbus Input and Holding Registers Modbus input registers and holding registers are both 16 bit values read from or written to the Modbus device. The Serial Card treats both register types the same with regard to data mapping. Mapping DeltaV Data Types to Input and Holding Registers DeltaV Data Type Boolean Mapping Method The card sets the Modbus register to 0 if the Boolean has a value of 0 and to 1 if the Boolean has a value of 1. The card maps the DeltaV value to the lower 8 bits in the Modbus register and sets the upper 8 bits to 0. The card maps all 16 bits of the DeltaV integer directly into the Modbus register. The card maps the DeltaV value to two consecutive Modbus registers. The first is the least significant word, and the second is the most significant word.

Discrete, 8 bit signed integer and 8 bit unsigned integer 16 bit signed integer and 16 bit unsigned integer 32 bit signed integer and 32 bit unsigned integer

384

System Configuration

DeltaV Data Type Floating point

Mapping Method Floating point values are stored on Modbus PLCs in IEEE format in two consecutive registers with the first being the least significant word and the second being the most significant word. Therefore, the Serial Card maps DeltaV floating point values to two consecutive Modbus registers. The first register contains the least significant word, and the second contains the most significant word. The Number of values field indicates the size of the string. The Serial Card maps the string to consecutive Modbus registers starting with the start register configured for the dataset. The first Modbus register contains the first two characters of the string with the high order byte containing the first character and the low order byte containing the second character. The card maps the remaining characters in the string to ascending Modbus registers with the characters in the same order in the registers.

String

HART Devices and the DeltaV System


The DeltaV system provides the capability to interface to HART devices. The HART information is communicated digitally and is very helpful for device diagnostics. This information can be used in the DeltaV system to affect control strategy or to alert operators to a transmitter malfunction. The DeltaV system communicates with HART devices through the following channels: HART analog input HART analog output

The HART analog input channel communicates the following values: Analog - raw 4 to 20 mA signal, Card and channel status are applied, no HART status is applied. Field value, in percent (FIELD_VAL_PCT) Field value, in engineering units (HART_FIELD_VAL) Primary Variable, in engineering units (HART_PV) Secondary Variable, in engineering units (HART_SV) Tertiary Variable, in engineering units (HART_TV) 4th Variable, in engineering units (HART_FV) Hybrid - 4 to 20 mA signal, Card, Channel, and HART status are applied. HART Dynamic Variables - digital signal, Card, Channel, and HART status are applied.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

385

The HART analog output channel communicates the following values: Hybrid - 4 to 20 mA signal, Card, Channel, and HART status are applied. Field value, in engineering units (OUT) Primary Variable, in engineering units (HART_PV) Secondary Variable, in engineering units (HART_SV) Tertiary Variable, in engineering units (HART_TV) 4th Variable, in engineering units (HART_FV) Slot 0 device variable, in engineering units (HART DV SLOT0) Slot 1 device variable, in engineering units (HART DV SLOT1) Slot 2 device variable, in engineering units (HART DV SLOT2) Slot 3 device variable, in engineering units (HART DV SLOT3) HART Dynamic Variables - digital signal, Card, Channel, and HART status are applied.

HART Device Variables - digital signal, Card, Channel, and HART status are applied.

Some multivariable devices have a predefined set of Dynamic Variables; in others, you can assign process values to the Dynamic Variables through an external device or application. Refer to the vendor's documentation for your HART device for specific information. Refer to the Link Initialization topic for information on setting up the devices to communicate correctly with the DeltaV system. Caution When both DeltaV software and AMS software (version 1.3 or earlier) are communicating with the same HART instruments, configure AMS as a secondary master or else the DeltaV system might not detect dynamic changes to the instrument's analog range values and units. This could result in defective product, damaged equipment, and a possible safety hazard. When DeltaV (version 3.3 or later) and AMS (version 1.4 or later) are communicating with the same HART instruments, AMS works through the DeltaV system's software and wiring.

Scaling HART Values


Note The scaling for AOUT is the same as for AIN, except that it does not have LTYPE or OUT_SCALE. If the units selected are Special Units ("", "-", "no units"), then the scale and the units information are uploaded from the device and saved in the function block. Once the function block is running and the units have been synchronized between DeltaV and the device, anytime the units or scale information is changed in the device by AMS or a handheld (275), the units are uploaded to the controller. An exception to this occurs if, during scaling, the controller receives a non-recoverable error from the device, in which case it continues attempting to recover the error indefinitely by reinitializing the HART link. During this time, it must ignore configuration change flags from the device (It might have already changed the units but not the scale, so we cannot read the device's values and replace the controller's.). Therefore, the user cannot change the scaling information in the device and expect it to be uploaded to the controller. The user must recover the error by changing the scale information in the function block. The user can use one of the Special Units to upload the scaling information from the device if needed. When the IO_IN parameter of an Analog Input function block references the HART_FIELD_VAL parameter, the AI function block downloads scaling values and units to the HART transmitter to provide the correct translation between

386

System Configuration

transmitter units and process units. You select the type of scaling by configuring the linearization type parameter (L_TYPE): Direct signal conditioning - The values for 0% and 100% of OUT_SCALE are downloaded to the transmitter and the Analog Input function block OUT parameter is scaled using these values. Indirect signal conditioning - The values for 0% and 100% and the units of XD_SCALE are downloaded to the transmitter. The channel input value is scaled using a linear interpolation between the range values of XD_SCALE and the range values of OUT_SCALE. Indirect square root signal conditioning - The values for 0% and 100% and the units of XD_SCALE are downloaded to the transmitter. The normalized channel input value has a square root applied before it is scaled using a linear interpolation between the range values of XD_SCALE and the range values of OUT_SCALE. For example, if you have a transmitter with a range of xC to yC and you want to use the range 100C to 300C for control, configure L_TYPE = Direct and OUT_SCALE = 100C - 300C. The range 100C to 300C is downloaded to the transmitter, and the channel input value of 100C to 300C is displayed in the HART_FIELD_VAL parameter. If you have a transmitter with a range of x inches to y inches and you want to use the range 0 inches to 150 inches for the transmitter and the range of 0 gallons to 3000 gallons per minute for control, configure L_TYPE = Indirect square root, XD_SCALE = 0 - 150 in., and OUT_SCALE = 0 - 3000 gallons per minute. The range 0 to 150 inches is downloaded to the transmitter, and the channel input value of 0 to 150 inches is displayed in the HART_FIELD_VAL parameter. Because these values are downloaded to the transmitter during link initialization, make sure you configure the correct values in XD_SCALE and OUT_SCALE. Many HART devices have different rules on initialization values. Refer to the Link Initialization topic for information on setting up the devices to communicate correctly with the DeltaV system.

Error Conditions
HART field devices report internal self-test status information and indications of signal integrity. This information is sent in a status byte that is sent with each HART message. The error conditions affect the status associated with channel data, the channel integrity parameter (OINTEG), and the status text visible in the diagnostics application (STATUS). Effect of Error Conditions on Channel Data Status When an Analog Input function block references a HART channel, error conditions affect the statuses of the OUT parameter in the Analog Input function block. The following table describes the effect of HART and system-derived errors on the status of the OUT parameter. (If multiple errors are present, the worst case status is reported.) HART Error Conditions Parameter Effect of HART Error Conditions on Parameter Status PV Fixed Field Device Malfunction Analog Output Saturated No effect No effect NPV Out of Limits PV Out of Limits

HART_PV HART_SV

No effect No effect

Bad Bad

No effect Bad

Bad Bad

Fieldbus Device Specifications

387

Parameter

Effect of HART Error Conditions on Parameter Status PV Fixed Field Device Malfunction Analog Output Saturated No effect No effect NPV Out of Limits PV Out of Limits

HART_TV HART_FV DEV_MALF UNC NO_COMM NPV_PAST_L IM OINTEG PV_FIXED PV_PAST_LI M PV_SAT Only AI HART_FIELD _VAL FIELD_VAL_ PCT Only AO OUT HART_DV_S LOT0 HART_DV_S LOT1 HART_DV_S LOT2 HART_DV_S LOT3

No effect No effect

Bad Bad True (1)

Bad Bad

Bad Bad

True (1) True (1) True (1) True (1) True (1) True (1) True (1) True (1) True (1)

Bad No effect

Bad No effect

Bad No effect

No effect No effect

Bad No effect

Bad No effect No effect No effect No effect

Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad

Bad No effect No effect No effect No effect

No effect No effect No effect No effect No effect

Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad

388

System Configuration

Derived Status Error Conditions Parameter Effect of Derived Status Error Conditions on Parameter Status Scaling Errors Unit Mismatch(1) Unconfigure d Digital Var Loss of Digital Comms Bad No effect Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad 5% Digital Comm Error Rate Uncertain No effect Uncertain Uncertain Uncertain Uncertain Uncertain Uncertain Uncertain Uncertain

HART_FIELD _VAL FIELD_VAL_ PCT HART_PV HART_SV HART_TV HART_FV HART_DV_S LOT0 HART_DV_S LOT1 HART_DV_S LOT2 HART_DV_S LOT3 DEV_MALF UNC NO_COMM NPV_PAST_L IM OINTEG PV_FIXED PV_PAST_LI M PV_SAT

Bad No effect No effect No effect No effect No effect No effect No effect No effect No effect

Bad No effect No effect No effect No effect No effect ????? ????? ????? ?????

No effect No effect Bad (2) Bad (2) Bad (2) Bad (2) Bad (2) Bad (2) Bad (2) Bad (2)

True

True

True

1. Users must verify that the unit and range used in AI or AO function blocks for digital parameters match the device to ensure proper data scaling. 2. Only the digital variable that is unconfigured will have Bad status.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

389

Non-HART Error Conditions Parameter Effect of non-HART Error Conditions on Parameter Status Card Status: No Railbus Comms, Hardware Error, Fault State, Config Error, or Not Configured HART_FIELD_VAL FIELD_VAL_PCT HART_PV HART_SV HART_TV HART_FV HART_DV_SLOT0 HART_DV_SLOT1 HART_DV_SLOT2 HART_DV_SLOT3 DEV_MALFUNC NO_COMM NPV_PAST_LIM OINTEG PV_FIXED PV_PAST_LIM PV_SAT True (1) True (1) True (1) Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad Channel Status: Hardware Error, Config Error, or Not Configured Card Status: 5% Railbus Comm Error

Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad Bad

Uncertain Uncertain Uncertain Uncertain Uncertain Uncertain Uncertain Uncertain Uncertain Uncertain

390

System Configuration

Analog Out HART Error Conditions Parameter Effect of Analog Out HART Error Conditions on Parameter Status Valve Diagnostics in Progress HART_FIELD_VAL FIELD_VAL_PCT HART_PV HART_SV HART_TV SLOT0 SLOT1 SLOT2 SLOT3 HART_FV DEV_MALFUNC NO_COMM NPV_PAST_LIM OINTEG PV_FIXED PV_PAST_LIM PV_SAT Effect of Error Conditions on the Channel Integrity Parameter The channel integrity parameter (OINTEG) is True (1) when one or more of the following conditions are True: HART card detects a problem with itself. An open or short is detected on a HART channel input. An analog NAMUR high or low level is detected (AI only). DEV_MALFUNC is True and not ignored via the HART_ERRORS parameter. PV_FIXED is True and not ignored via the HART_ERRORS parameter. There has been a problem configuring the HART instrument during initialization. If any of the conditions below exist, OINTEG will be True (1) except for Good and Good - No Installed Config. True (1) Bad No effect No effect No effect No effect No effect No effect No effect No effect No effect

Effect of Error Conditions on Diagnostics Status Text

Fieldbus Device Specifications

391

Error conditions trigger text information in DeltaV Diagnostics to help you troubleshoot problems. The following status text strings might appear: Good - No problems detected, data is valid. Good - No Installed Config - Channel has not been configured. No Card - There is no card in the slot. Not Enabled - The channel is currently disabled. A/D Converter Error - The HART channel detected an error in its A/D converter (AI only). Sensor Bad - The HART channel detected an open or short or a NAMUR high or low limit alarm (AI only). Open Loop Detected - The HART channel has detected an open loop. Short Circuit - The HART channel has detected a short circuit. Stale Data - The controller detected that the AI-HART channel is not updating data (AI only). Not Communicating with Device - The HART channel is unable to digitally communicate with the attached HART instrument. Bad - Configuration Error - The channel encountered an error while configuring the channel. Device Malfunction - The HART instrument detected a problem with itself or with one of its associated sensors. Analog Output Current Fixed - The HART instrument is reporting that its analog output value is configured to a fixed value. Primary Variable Out of Limits - The HART instrument is reporting that the primary measurement is outside the sensor limits. Analog Output is Saturated - The HART instrument is reporting that the analog output value is saturated. Non-primary Variable Out of Limits - The HART instrument is reporting that one of the non-primary measurements is outside the associated sensor limits. Device Configuration Access is Restricted - The HART channel attempted to write the analog output scale information to the attached HART instrument, and the instrument reported that it has restricted access. Device Configuration Units Invalid - The HART channel attempted to configure the analog output scale information of the attached HART instrument and the instrument reported that the units specified are not valid for this instrument. Device Configuration Both Ranges Out of Limits - The HART channel attempted to configure the analog output scale information of the attached HART instrument, and the instrument reported that both the upper and lower range values were outside valid limits. Device Configuration Upper Range Too High - The HART channel attempted to configure the analog output scale information of the attached HART instrument, and the instrument reported that upper range value was too high. Device Configuration Upper Range Too Low - The HART channel attempted to configure the analog output scale information of the attached HART instrument, and the instrument reported that the upper range value was too low. Device Configuration Lower Range Too High - The HART channel attempted to configure the analog output scale information of the attached HART instrument, and the instrument reported that the lower range value was too high. Device Configuration Lower Range Too Low - The HART channel attempted to configure the analog output scale information of the attached HART instrument, and the instrument reported that the lower range value was too low.

392

System Configuration

Device Configuration Range Span Too Small - The HART channel attempted to configure the analog output scale information of the attached HART instrument, and the instrument reported that the difference between the high and low range values was too small. Device Configuration Cannot be Changed - Device is Busy (Other Master Has Taken Out of Service) - The HART channel attempted to configure the analog output scale information of the attached HART instrument, and the instrument reported that it was busy (AOUT only). Device Configuration Cannot be Changed - Device is Busy - The HART channel attempted to configure the analog output scale information of the attached HART instrument, and the instrument reported that it was busy (AI only). Device Configuration Cannot be Read - Device is Busy - The HART channel attempted to read the analog output scale information of the attached HART instrument, and the instrument reported that it was busy. Device Configuration Cannot be Read - The HART channel attempted to read the analog output scale information of the attached HART instrument, and the instrument reported a problem. Device Configuration Units or Range Invalid - The HART channel attempted to configure the analog output scale information of the attached HART instrument, and the instrument reported that the units or one or both range values are invalid. Device Configuration Set to Nearest Possible Value - The HART channel attempted to configure the analog output scale information of the attached HART instrument, and the instrument reported that it set one or both of the range values to the nearest possible value. Configuration Does Not Match Device - The HART channel has not yet attempted to configure or read the analog output scale information of the attached HART instrument. Diagnostics in Progress - The HART channel is performing Valve Diagnostics (Valve Stimulus Testing) on a Fisher valve (AOUT only).

Using Error Conditions for Control Strategy


In addition to the status associated with the Analog Input function block OUT parameter, you can reference the possible error conditions directly in a control module by linking an Internal Read Parameter via an External Reference to one of the HART channel Boolean parameters. This reference counts as a DST. The following are the HART channel Boolean parameters: Field Device Malfunction (DEV_MALFUNC) - True when the HART instrument detects a problem with itself or associated sensors. PV Fixed (PV_FIXED) - True when the HART instrument has been in test loop mode or is in multidrop mode. In test loop mode, the HART instrument's analog output value is held at the configured value and does not reflect the process. PV Saturated (PV_SAT) - True when the analog output of the HART instrument is saturated. PV Past Limits (PV_PAST_LIM) - True when the primary measurement is outside the sensor operating limits. In this case, the analog parameters (FIELD_VAL_PCT and HART_FIELD_VAL) and the digital parameter (HART_PV) are not reliable; this is reflected in their associated status values. NPV Past Limits (NPV_PAST_LIM) - True when one of the non-primary measurements is outside the sensor operating limits. There is no indication of which non-primary measurement is bad. No Communications (NO_COMM) - True when the HART channel cannot communicate digitally with the attached HART instrument.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

393

Overall Integrity (OINTEG) - True when one or more of the following conditions are True: AI-HART card detects a problem with itself An open or short is detected on a HART channel input An analog NAMUR high or low level is detected DEV_MALFUNC is True PV_FIXED is True There has been a problem configuring the HART instrument during initialization If any of the conditions related to the diagnostic status text strings listed above exist, OINTEG will be True (1) except for Good and Good - No Installed Config.

Customizing Control on Error Conditions In some cases, you might want to use HART data even though the instrument is reporting certain error conditions. The HART_ERRORS parameter allows you to select which HART status error values are ignored in your control strategy. The HART_ERRORS parameter masks HART error conditions that you determine are not required for your application. For example, you might have a measured variable that is outside limits occasionally but is not a problem for the process. You can select the Ignore PV Out of Limits for All PV Status option in the HART_ERRORS parameter to disregard this error condition. You modify the HART_ERRORS parameter by selecting the channel properties and checking one or more of the following actions: Ignore PV Out of Limits for All PV Status - Primary variable (PV) values that are higher or lower than the configured limits are ignored when determining PV statuses. Ignore NPV Out of Limits for All NPV Status - Non-primary variable (NPV) values that are higher or lower than the configured limits are ignored when determining NPV statuses. Ignore PV Output Saturated for All PV Status - PV values that are output saturated are ignored when determining PV statuses. Ignore PV Output Fixed for All PV Status - PV values that have a fixed output are ignored when determining PV statuses. Ignore FLD Device Malfunction for All Status - Values determined during a field device malfunction are ignored when determining statuses. Ignore Loss of Digital Comms for FV_PCT Status - Values determined during the loss of digital communications are ignored when determining the field value in percent (HART_FIELD_VAL) status. Override Unsupported Device Scale - If a HART device returns Not a Number (NaN) for the signals Upper or Lower Scale, the DeltaV system ignores the scale returned by the device and uses the scale configured in the I/O blocks HART_FIELD_VAL parameter. Note The default value for these actions is disabled (False). That is, these status conditions are not ignored. When you enable these actions, the block ignores the specified statuses.

Link Initialization
In order for the HART field device to be compatible with the DeltaV system, it must be able to communicate using the HART commands listed in this section.

394

System Configuration

In the DeltaV system, HART link initialization is performed by the DeltaV AI-HART card and the controller function block. I/O Card Initialization When a HART card is plugged in, it assumes that all channels are analog only. When you configure the card, you can set the channel to HART_ANALOG_INPUT (AO also). The card then tests for an open circuit. If no open circuit is detected, the card sends out HART Command 0 (Read Manufacturer and Device Type) followed by Command 59 (Write Number of Response Preambles). Controller Function Block Channel Initialization The DeltaV Controller also performs HART channel initialization. As soon as the controller is notified that an AIHART card configuration is complete, it sends Command 0 to each HART channel. If a function block is linked to the HART_FIELD_VAL parameter (for AI) or OUT parameter (for AOUT) of the HART channel, the first time the function block executes, it sends scaling information (high and low range and units) to the HART instrument for its analog output signal. The units code is sent via HART Command 44 (Write Primary Variable Units). The high and low range information is sent via HART Command 35 (Write Primary Variable Range Values). At this time, the HART instrument sets a bit saying that it has changed its configuration to the new values. The controller sends HART Command 15 (Read Primary Variable Output Information) to read the range and units information. This is followed by Command 38 (Reset Configuration Change Flag) to clear the change flag in the instrument. Note that if command 44 is not supported, command 15 is inserted before command 35 in the description above. There are other scenarios that affect link initialization, including: You might connect a hand-held device to an instrument in the field to change its scale values. The controller detects this change in the instrument and sends Command 15 to read the new values followed by command 38. During loop tuning, you can change the range values in an AI function block. These changes are sent to the HART instrument. You might specify range values to a high level of precision and some HART instruments might not be able to support that precision. The controller sends Command 15 to detect the actual range precision the instrument is using in the process.

If a HART instrument does not support the HART Commands 44 and 35 (used to set the scale values), the values read by HART Command 15 are compared to those specified by the function block. If the values are the same, they are accepted and the link initialization continues. If the values are not the same (or if the HART instrument is writeprotected or blocking access to that configuration information), the controller stops the HART link initialization for 5 seconds, restarts it with cmd 0, and the initialization repeats. HART Special Units Handling The HART protocol allows units that might be unique to a particular HART instrument and unknown to the DeltaV system. To deal with this for a specific function block, select one of the following values for the Engineering unit descriptor: hyphen (-), blank space ( ), or no units. The DeltaV system then uses the units and scale information that are currently configured in the HART instrument. If the type of units are known to the DeltaV system, the units are displayed in the XD_SCALE parameter of the function block. However if they are unknown to the DeltaV system, the units field in XD_SCALE is blank. HART Scan Update Rate (AI) After this card's initialization phase, the card sends out Command 3 (Read Dynamic Variables and Primary Variable) repeatedly to each HART channel. The HART scan update rate for each input channel configured for HART is 600800 ms. The analog values for each input channel are scanned in much faster than the HART scan update rate. Passthrough messages sent by AMS can cause a card's HART scan rate to be twice the rate without AMS running.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

395

HART Scan Update Rate (AOUT) After this card's initialization phase, the card sends out Command 3 (Read Dynamic Variables and Primary Variable) repeatedly to each HART channel. The HART scan update rate for each output channel configured for HART is 600800 ms. If device variables (DV_SLOT) are configured for a channel, the card sends command 33 to read the configured device variables. The HART scan update rate for each channel configured for device variables is an additional 600800 ms. Passthrough messages sent by AMS can cause a card's HART scan rate to be as much as twice the rate without AMS running. If valve diagnostics is running on a channel, the card's HART scan rate can be as much as twice the rate without diagnostics running. As an example: The scan rate for an 8 channel analog output card with all channels configured for HART is 4.8 to 6.4 seconds: If device variables is also running, the scan rate can be 9.6 - 12.8 seconds. If AMS and device variables are running, the scan rate can be 19.2 - 25.6 seconds. If AMS, device variables, and valve diagnostics are running, the scan rate can be 38.4 -51.2 seconds.

Accessing AMS HART Commands from the DeltaV Explorer


From the DeltaV Explorer, you can launch AMS HART (Asset Management Solutions) in context from a HART device, if you have also been configured as an AMS user. You can use AMS HART commands to: Open AMS from a HART device View AMS status and conditions for a HART device View AMS configuration for a HART device Compare AMS configuration for a HART device View the Device Audit Trail for a HART device

The AMS HART software is not installed with the DeltaV software. It is a stand-alone client/server system that is installed and licensed separately from the DeltaV software. The license file specifies the allowed number of concurrent users. The AMS HART Device Audit Trail is installed with the AMS HART software. Refer to the HART AMS Installation manual for complete information. Note Once AMS HART is launched either from the DeltaV Explorer or the Start menu, only one instance of it runs on the DeltaV workstation. Prerequisites for Launching AMS HART from DeltaV Explorer There are some prerequisites for launching AMS HART from the DeltaV Explorer: The client component of the AMS HART software must be installed on the same workstation as the DeltaV software. The user must be logged onto the DeltaV system. The user must have an AMS user name and password. The device must be connected to a HART-enabled channel. The DeltaV DSTs (Device Signal Tags) and the AMS device tags must match for each device.

396

System Configuration

To access the AMS HART commands from the DeltaV Explorer: Be sure that the prerequisites listed above have been met. 1 2 Click Start | DeltaV | Engineering | DeltaV Explorer to open the DeltaV Explorer. Navigate to the HART channel and ensure that it is enabled. (Select the channel, click the right mouse button, and select Properties to see if it is enabled.) Refer to the DeltaV Explorer online help if you need assistance in navigating to an object. Auto-sense the HART device to create the device tag. (Select the channel, click the right-mouse button, and select Auto-sense HART device.) The tag appears beneath the channel in the Explorer hierarchy. Select the device, click the right-mouse button, and select the desired AMS HART command from the context menu. Enter your AMS user name and password and wait for the AMS HART Tag Search dialog to open. Once AMS is opened, you do not have to re-enter your user name and password. You remain logged on to AMS until you exit the AMS application.

3 4 5

AMS displays device information in the Tag Search dialog and then opens the dialog associated with the selected menu command. Use the Help menu in AMS for complete help on AMS HART. Tip You can access AMS HART commands from the AMS Tag Search dialog. Select the device in the Tag Search dialog, click the right mouse button, and select a command from the context menu.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

397

AS-Interface - General Information


Inside this topic The AS-Interface Network Communication on the Network The AS-Interface is a communications protocol that interconnects simple binary devices such as actuators, sensors, and discrete devices in the field. A single, AS-Interface yellow cable replaces the traditional cable cluster and provides simple cabling and fast connection and disconnection for devices. The AS-Interface Network An AS-Interface network comprises an AS-Interface master and up to 31 slave devices such as actuators, sensors, and display devices. Slave devices with a built-in AS-Interface chip connect directly to the AS-Interface network. Other slave devices act as an interface between conventional devices (actuators or sensors without the AS-Interface chip) and the AS-Interface network. The DeltaV AS-Interface card has two ports and each port functions as an AS-Interface master. The AS-Interface master controls communications on the network by polling the slave devices, issuing commands, and receiving and processing replies from the slave devices. There can be only one AS-Interface master on the network. An ASInterface network can support up to 124 inputs and 124 outputs. (Each slave can support up to four inputs and four outputs.) The maximum cable length anywhere between repeaters and extenders on an AS-Interface network is 100m. Communication on the Network Communication begins when the new AS-Interface master port configuration is downloaded and consists of three phases. In the first phase, the master polls each slave device and requests the slave's profile (I/O configuration and Identification code). This is a fixed-format description of the device that is referred to as the AS-Interface Device Type in the DeltaV software. For more information on the AS-Interface Device Type, refer to the AS-Interface Slave Configuration topic. In the second phase, the master sends a four bit parameter value to each slave. The parameter value controls specialized, non-standard functions of the device such as dark-on rather than the standard light-on for a photosensor. In the third phase, the master sends each slave its output values and receives each slave's input values.

398

System Configuration

AS-Interface in the DeltaV System


Inside this topic AS-Interface Master Configuration AS-Interface Slave Configuration Diagnostics To properly operate the devices on the AS-Interface network, the DeltaV AS-Interface card conforms to the ASInterface master specifications for device configuration, addressing, and data exchange. You use the DeltaV Explorer to configure the AS-Interface master and slave devices and the DeltaV Diagnostics application to view diagnostic information on the AS-Interface master and slave devices. Refer to the DeltaV Explorer's online help for complete information on configuring the AS-Interface master and slave devices. AS-Interface Master Configuration AS-Interface master configuration consists of specifying the action that the AS-Interface master takes if the controller fails, and enabling or disabling the Auto Address feature. In the event of a controller failure, the AS-Interface master can reset devices (turn the devices' outputs off and disable data exchange) or continue polling the slave devices. Auto addressing specifies how an address is assigned when a device is replaced. For more information, refer to the Communication on the Network topic. AS-Interface Slave Configuration Device configuration consists of assigning an AS-Interface Device Type to the device and assigning the device address. An AS-Interface Device Type is a fixed-format description of the device that the AS-Interface master uses to communicate with the slave device. You create your own AS-Interface Device Type from the device's data sheet. The AS-Interface Device Type consists of an Identification code and I/O Configuration (taken together these are defined by the AS-Interface Specification as the device Profile) the Parameters for the device, and the inputs and outputs supported by the device. (In the DeltaV Explorer, the Profile appears in the format S-[I/O Configuration].[Identification Code] as defined by the AS-Interface Specification. For example, S-2.0.) The Identification code and I/O Configuration are designated by the device manufacturer. The Identification code identifies the type of device and the I/O Configuration identifies the device's input and output bits. The four bit Parameters are used to customize the device behavior. When a new AS-Interface slave device is created in the DeltaV Explorer, each input and output for the device is assigned a channel label and a Device Signal Tag (DST). The labels and DSTs appear under the device in the Explorer hierarchy. A Device Signal Tag is a unique name that represents a specific signal from the device. The signal is used in the control strategy and counted for licensing. A default DST name is assigned by the system when the device is created but you can rename it at any time. The channel label is taken from the device's AS-Interface Device Type and can be modified through the AS-Interface Device Type's property page. Refer to the Port Downloads section for information on downloading the AS-Interface ports. Addressing Each slave device connected to an AS-Interface network has an address between 1 and 31. All AS-Interface devices are shipped from the manufacturer with address 0 a temporary address that prohibits data exchange. A new ASInterface slave device is assigned an address when it is created in the DeltaV Explorer. When a device is replaced, it can have its address assigned through a hand-held device or it can be automatically set to the original address through the Auto Address feature on the AS-Interface master. Auto-Sensing The auto-sense feature aids in AS-Interface device configuration. Auto-sensing lists the slave devices existing in the database and those sensed on the port and shows each device's address, name, I/O configuration, and Identification

Fieldbus Device Specifications

399

code. This feature can be used to add devices to the configuration, and to clear and set addresses. You must download the port to activate slave devices. Tip Turn off the Auto-address enable feature before attempting to clear an address. Port Downloads The action that the AS-Interface master takes following a new port download depends on the changes included in the new configuration. Changes to port properties: Auto address enable and Action in the event of controller failure are copied to the master and there is no effect on the slave devices on the network. Warning If a slave device is added or removed from the configuration or if a slave address or profile is changed, the AS-Interface master must restart the port. Restarting the port consists of the master transitioning to the offline state where it resets all slave devices and reactivates the slaves. Resetting the slave devices causes the slaves to deactivate their outputs. Once the port restarts, slave outputs return to the controller-driven state. Diagnostics Diagnostics displays the slave devices, DSTs, and values and provides advanced diagnostic information that is supported by the AS-Interface master. Refer to the Diagnostics online help for complete information on diagnosing AS-Interface slave devices and the AS-Interface master port.

400

System Configuration

Profibus DP - General Information


Inside this topic The Profibus DP Network Communication on the Network Profibus DP GSD Files Profibus DP is a communications protocol that provides an interface for discrete devices such as actuators and sensors in the field. Twisted pair shielded copper cable is used for data transmission. The high speed, easy to install, RS485 transmission technology that is often used by Profibus DP is referred to as H2. The Profibus DP Network A Profibus DP network consists of a Profibus DP master and Profibus slave devices. The DeltaV Profibus card supports up to 64 slave devices on a Profibus network. A Profibus slave can support both process input and output data on a host system such as the DeltaV system or it can support only process input or only process output data. A maximum of 244 bytes of input values and 244 bytes of output values are allowed. There are two types of Profibus slave devices: compact and modular. The difference between a compact and modular device is based partly on how Profibus modules (referred to as Slots in the DeltaV system) are used in the device's configuration. A Profibus module is a function such as analog input or analog output or discrete input or discrete output, that can be added to a Profibus device's configuration. The configuration for a compact device is generated based on a fixed number of modules in a particular order. The configuration for a modular device is generated based on the number and order of modules that the user selects. A Device Definition, identified by the revision level for the device, is available for every Profibus slave device. The Device Definition is used to identify the Profibus device and contains information that makes it possible for manufacturer-independent configuration tools such as the DeltaV Explorer to configure Profibus slave devices. The Device Definition is described in a manufacturer-supplied text file with a .GSD extension. For more information, refer to the Profibus DP GSD Files topic. The port on the DeltaV Profibus DP card is the Profibus DP master and acts as the interface between the Profibus network and the DeltaV system. You use the DeltaV Explorer to add the DeltaV Profibus DP card and configure your Profibus slave devices. For more information on configuring devices in the DeltaV system, refer to the Profibus DP in the DeltaV System topic. Communication on the Network Communication is cyclical and begins when the port is downloaded. The Profibus master starts communication by sending parameter values to the slave devices. The parameters are associated with the device and the device's modules. The Profibus module parameters are transmitted in the order of the module configuration. Then, the Profibus master sends a copy of the device configuration to the device, the device verifies that there is a match in configuration data, and data exchange begins.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

401

Profibus DP .GSD Files The Profibus DP protocol specifies that the device manufacturer provide a text file for every Profibus slave device. Generally, this file has a .GSD extension although language-specific versions (.GSG for German, .GSE for English, .GSF for French, and so on) might be available. This file contains the maximum number of Profibus modules in the device configuration, the parameter values specified for each module, and the number of input and output bytes in the data exchange messages. The parameter values customize the device behavior. The Device Definition also contains the supported baud rates, timing information, fail safe behavior, and diagnostic error codes. The Device Definition is added to the DeltaV Library to add a new Profibus Device to the DeltaV system. The Device Description describes how the device communicates, it does not describe the data semantics or data type. For each Profibus module the user configures signals that describe the I/O that the Slot (Profibus module) provides to the DeltaV system. For more information, refer to the Profibus Module Signals topic.

402

System Configuration

Profibus DP in the DeltaV System


Inside this topic Configuring the Profibus Master Adding and Creating Device Definitions Profibus Module Signals Configuring Slave Devices Adding and Configuring Slots Modifying and Assigning DeviceTags Using Profibus DP with DeltaV Function Blocks The DeltaV Profibus DP card conforms to the Profibus specification as an interface to a control application such as the DeltaV system and provides some diagnostic information on slave devices. There is one port on the DeltaV Profibus DP card. You use the DeltaV Explorer to: Add and configure the Profibus master (the Profibus card's port) Add Device Definitions (.GSD files) to the DeltaV Explorer Library Configure Profibus slave devices and Profibus Slots Specify parameter values for the Profibus Slot Create Profibus module signals

Refer to the DeltaV Explorer online help for detailed information on adding and editing Device Definitions and configuring Profibus devices. Configuring the Profibus Master Profibus master configuration consists of specifying the action the Profibus master takes if the controller fails, setting the baud rate for all devices on the network, setting the master's address, and specifying network properties. The supported baud rates, in bits per second (bps), for Profibus devices are 9.6K 19.2K, 93.75K, 187.5K, 500K, and 1.5M. The address for the Profibus master is usually 1. The DeltaV Explorer online help on the port properties dialog provides detailed information on all the configuration properties for the Profibus master. Adding and Creating Device Definitions Adding the Device Definition creates a hierarchy of categories (Profibus Family, Manufacturer, Model, Device Revision, and modules) under Profibus Devices in the DeltaV Library. You can change the device and module parameter values and overwrite the default values specified by the manufacturer. You can also create Profibus module signals in the Library. For more information, refer to the Profibus Module Signals topic. Tip It is recommended that you change a module or device parameter value at the Library level rather than at the Slot level to ensure that future instances of the module or device inherit that parameter value. If you change a device parameter value at the Library level, existing instances of that device are not changed but future instances of the device inherit the new parameter value. If you change a module parameter value or signal at the Library level, existing instances of that module are not changed but future instances of the module (Slots) inherit the new parameter value or signal even if the module is added to an existing device. If a device is associated with a particular Device Definition in the Library, the DeltaV Explorer will not allow you to delete or re-add that Device Definition. This ensures that the Device Definitions in the Library are consistent with existing devices.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

403

Profibus Module Signals The Device Definition contains information about data length, it does not contain information about the data itself. For each Profibus module in the Library, you add Profibus module signals that contain information such as signal direction, data type and the location of the signal value within the modules data. You can configure module signals at the library level and at the physical network level. Library Configuration - To save engineering time for similar devices, create default signals in the library. Configure the signals that are common to all instances of a module type. When you add a slot for that module type to a device, it is created with the signals defined for it in the library. (You can also create module signals at the physical device.) Physical Network Configuration - Complete the configuration of the signal at the physical configuration level. Provide a description of the signal and associate it with a specific Device Signal Tag (DST). For more information on DSTs, refer to the Modifying and Assigning Device Tags topic. Configuring Slave Devices The Configuration steps vary depending upon whether the slave device is compact or modular. However for both device types, you can specify if the device is enabled or disabled, assign an address, and set the device's Watchdog Timer. The Watchdog Timer specifies the amount of time before the device goes into its fail safe mode if communication on the network stops. The address is automatically assigned for both device types when the device is created however, you can change the device address. Slave devices can have an address between 2 125. It is recommended that address 1 be reserved for the Profibus master. Addresses are unique; no two devices, slave or master, can have the same address on a port. Configuring a compact device consists of adding the slave device to the Profibus master port and setting the device properties (enable and Watchdog Timer). When a compact device is added to the Profibus master port, the slots and parameters defined for that device are automatically created below the device in the DeltaV Explorer hierarchy. (Remember that configuration for a compact device is generated based on a fixed number of Profibus modules in a particular order.) Configuring a modular device consists of adding the device to the Profibus master port and setting the device properties (enable and Watchdog Timer). However, because the configuration for a modular device is generated based on the number and order of its modules, you configure the device by adding modules (called Slots in DeltaV) in the correct order. Depending on the type of module, you may have to add signals or adjust parameter values. Parameters values can affect diagnostics, ground fault detection, failure actions and many other device characteristics. For devices that have configuration parameters at the device and or the slot level, it is important to provide parameter values for proper operation of the device. Note When entering parameter values, note that the values you enter are always in decimal format for Profibus devices. Adding and Configuring Slots A new Slot for a slave device is created with the module parameter values and signals specified for that Device Definition in the Library. These values can be overwritten at the Slot level but new instances of the device or module will not inherit this value. For more information on inheritance, refer to the Tip in the Adding and Creating Device Definitions topic. Slots can be added until the maximum number of bytes and slots specified by the device

404

System Configuration

manufacturer for that device have been met. When you add a new Slot, the dialog box displays the manufacturer's limits and shows you the number of used and available bytes and slots.

The .GSD file specifies the number for the first slot. The default is 0. You must number the Slots contiguously to successfully download the device. The Profibus protocol specifies that there can be no gaps in Slot numbers. The Slot types and Slot order of the physical device must match the configuration in the DeltaV configuration database or the device can not establish communication with the master. Modifying and Assigning Device Tags When you create a Slot from a Profibus Library module to which a signal was added, the signal and a DST are created below the Slot in the DeltaV Explorer hierarchy. The DST is marked with a yellow tag. A default DST name (for example PDT2S000AL1 in the following figure) is automatically assigned but it can be renamed so that it is meaningful in your control strategy.

A DST is a unique name that represents a specific signal from the device. The signal is used in the control strategy and counted for licensing. At the Slot level, you can customize the DST name and modify the signal properties for that device. Remember that any modifications made to the signal at the Slot level do not affect the Profibus Library module that contains that signal. If you have previously configured a DST, you can browse for it and assign it to a signal. Using Profibus DP with DeltaV Function Blocks Refer to Using Profibus DP, DeviceNet, and AS-Interface with DeltaV Function Blocks for more information.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

405

DeviceNet - General Information


Inside this topic DeviceNet Network DeviceNet is a low-cost communications protocol that connects devices such as motor starters and variable speed drives to a network. It is a networking solution that reduces wiring costs and provides for interoperability among multiple vendors. Refer to the Open DeviceNet Vendor Association's (ODVA) website at www.odva.org for complete information. DeviceNet Network The port on the DeltaV DeviceNet card acts as the DeviceNet master and can support up to 61 devices. The port is the interface between the DeltaV system and the DeviceNet network. Device configuration is done through Electronic Data Sheet (EDS) files. These files are specially formatted ASCII files, provided by the device manufacturer, that are required for configuring a device with the DeltaV Explorer. The EDS file contains all the parameter information for a device. Refer to the DeviceNet EDS Files topic for more information. The following table shows the recommended DeviceNet trunk lengths at various baud rates: Baud Rate 125 k 250 k 500 k Maximum Trunk Length for Series 1 500 m (1640 ft.) 250 m (820 ft.) 61 m (200 ft.)* Maximum Trunk Length for Series 2 500 m (1640 ft.) 250 m (820 ft.) 100 m (328 ft.)

* ODVA specifications allow for a maximum trunk length of 100 m (328 ft.) at 500 k baud; however, testing indicates that a few device types experience unstable operation at these limits. Emerson Process Management recommends a maximum trunk length of 61 m (200 ft.) at 500 k baud to maintain a stable DeviceNet system with a wide variety of devices. Communication on the DeviceNet Network Data exchange using polling is the normal method of communication and begins when the port is downloaded. The port uses the polling connection configured in the device. The port verifies the device's Vendor ID, Device Type, and Product Code, and I/O polling size attributes and then begins exchanging data with the device. The data is mapped by the user to signals. Refer to the Adding DeviceNet Signals topic. Note The change-of-state and strobe methods of communication are not supported by the DeltaV system. DeviceNet EDS Files The DeviceNet protocol specifies that the device manufacturer provide a text file for every device. This file, called an Electronic Data Sheet (EDS), contains all the parameter information for a device: number of parameters, parameter groupings, parameter name, minimum, maximum, and default values, units, data format, and scaling. The EDS file may also specify the default I/O polling sizes. When the EDS file is imported into the DeltaV Library, it creates a new DeviceNet revision. When the revision is added to the port, it creates a new DeviceNet device.

406

System Configuration

DeviceNet in the DeltaV System


Inside this topic Configuring the DeviceNet Master Importing and Modifying Electronic Data Sheets Modifying Input/Output Sizes Modifying Parameter Values in the Library and Setting Parameter Download Preferences Using DeviceNet with DeltaV Function Blocks The DeltaV DeviceNet card conforms to the DeviceNet specification as an interface to a control application such as the DeltaV system. There is one port on the DeltaV DeviceNet card. In the DeltaV system, you use the DeltaV Explorer to perform the tasks described in this section. Note The DeltaV system supports only DeviceNet devices that support I/O polling. Configuring the DeviceNet Master Configuring the DeviceNet master consists of adding the card to the DeltaV Explorer's I/O subsystem and configuring the port. In the Add Card dialog, select Bus Cards in the Card class field and then select DeviceNet as the card type. Port configuration involves specifying the card's behavior if it can't communicate with the DeltaV Controller (Stop Scanning or Continue Scanning) and specifying the baud rate (125kb, 250kb, or 500kb). Remember that the baud rate for each device must match the baud rate set for the DeviceNet master. Refer to Setting the Baud Rate for more information. The DeltaV Explorer online help on the port properties dialog box provides detailed information on all the configuration properties for the DeviceNet card. Importing and Modifying Electronic Data Sheets Importing an EDS file into the DeltaV Explorer Library creates a hierarchy of categories (Vendor Name, Device Name, Major Revision) under DeviceNet Devices in the DeltaV Explorer Library. Once you import an EDS file into the library, you can modify device input/output sizes, select the parameters to download, and modify parameter values. Right-click on the revision in the library and select Properties to see the revision properties (Vendor ID, Device Type, and Product Code, other device information, and default values for the input/output sizes). Note Any changes that you make to a revision at the Library level (modifying parameter values, input/output sizes, signal values) other than parameter download options will affect future instances of the device but existing instances of the device are not affected. Changes made to device parameters, I/O sizes, or signals at the device level affect only that device. Modifying Input/Output Sizes The input/output sizes for the device are configurable. The DeltaV system uses the default input/output sizes if available in the EDS file; otherwise, it sets the input/output sizes to 0. Refer to the device documentation to determine the input/output sizes and to determine how to map the data to DeltaV signals. Modifying Parameter Values in the Library and Setting Parameter Download Preferences There are two types of parameters for DeviceNet devices: Read only parameters that are used to monitor the current status of devices. Read only parameters are not configurable and are not downloaded. Configurable parameters that can be modified and downloaded.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

407

You can view and modify default parameters and select the parameters that you want to include in the download at the DeltaV Explorer Library level. Any changes made to default parameters at the Library level affect the selected revision and all devices of that type subsequently created from that revision. Follow these steps to modify default parameters in the Library: 1 2 3 Select the revision. Click the right mouse button. Select Default Parameters.

Use the Default Parameters dialog box to modify the default parameters and to open the Download Preferences dialog box. Use the Download Preferences dialog box to select the parameters that you want to include in the download and to deselect the parameters that you want to exclude from the download. Refer to the DeltaV Explorer online help for complete help on the fields in this dialog box. It is highly recommended that you refer to the device documentation and select for download, only those parameters that are needed for the device. In addition, deselect parameters that have potential side effects such as MAC ID and baud rate. When you click OK in the Download Preferences dialog, you will see your changes in the Default Parameters dialog box. Using DeviceNet with DeltaV Function Blocks Refer to Using Profibus DP, DeviceNet, and AS-Interface with DeltaV Function Blocks for more information.

408

System Configuration

Configuring DeviceNet Devices


Inside this topic I/O Polling Setting the Device Address Setting the Baud Rate Modifying Parameter Values at the Device Level Downloading Devices Uploading Parameter Values Adding DeviceNet Signals Configuring a DeviceNet device involves adding the device to the port, enabling or disabling I/O polling, setting the device address, setting the baud rate, modifying parameter values and input/output size, and adding signals. To add a new DeviceNet device, drag a revision from the DeltaV Explorer Library to the port under the DeviceNet card, or right-click the port, select New DeviceNet Device, and browse for the revision. When you add or delete a device placeholder, or change its address, you must download the port. Use the device properties dialog (right-click on the device and select Properties) to enable I/O polling, add a device description, set the device address, and modify the input/output sizes for this device only. Refer to the Modifying Input/Output Sizes topic. Enabling I/O Polling Select the Enable I/O Polling option to exchange I/O data between the device and the DeviceNet master. In order for data exchange to occur, the VendorID, Device Type, Product Code, and input/output sizes must match. Note If there is no match, the connection breaks, and no data is exchanged. Also, the VendorID, Device Type, Product Code, and input/output sizes cannot be read from the device. The verification only identifies a match in these items, it does not read back the values. Disable I/O Polling and download the device, and then read back Vendor ID, Device Type, Product Code, and input/output sizes using DeltaV Diagnostics to troubleshoot communication problems. Setting the Device Address An address configured for a DeltaV Explorer placeholder must match the MAC ID of the device you intend to place on the network. (Address 63 is reserved for new devices and address 62 is reserved for diagnostic purposes. Do not use these addresses.) You can set the address: On the device using switches and device specific parameters. With DeltaV Diagnostics if the device supports the standard method of addressing through setting the MAC ID parameter of the DeviceNet Object.

Follow these steps to set the device address: 1 2 3 4 Disable I/O Polling for the device in DeltaV Explorer and download the DeviceNet card. Open DeltaV Diagnostics. Right click on the device in the left pane, select Set Device Address, and enter an address. Enable I/O Polling and download the card in DeltaV Explorer to resume data exchange.

Note Set the address before you put the device on the network if the port is operational. Do not attach the device if you do not know the address or baud rate.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

409

Setting the Baud Rate The baud rate for each device must match the baud rate set for the DeviceNet master. Do not attach a device if you do not know the baud rate and be sure that the baud rate is correct before attaching a device to the network. The manner in which the baud rate is set depends upon the device type: Some devices use switches on the front of the device to configure the baud rate. Consult the device documentation for information. The EDS file for some devices supports a baud rate parameter for configuration through DeltaV. Some devices support the use of the DeviceNet Object's baud rate attribute to set the baud rate. (Consult the device's conformance documentation.) Use DeltaV Diagnostics to set the baud rate for this type of device. Be sure to disable I/O Polling for the device and to reset or power cycle the device for the baud rate to take effect. If the device supports neither switches nor the baud rate parameter, use a diagnostics tool to configure the baud rate. Consult the device documentation for information. The EDS file for some devices supports an autobaud rate parameter for configuration through DeltaV. Enable this parameter and attach the device to the network.

Modifying Parameter Values at the Device Level You can read and modify parameters in online and offline devices. Online Devices You can read and modify parameter values in an online device. When you modify parameter values for an online device, the value is stored in both the device and in the configuration database. (The value is written to the device and read back from the device. If the write and read are successful, the value is stored in the database.) Remember that any parameter modifications made at the device level affect only that device. Any new devices of the same type inherit the parameter values specified in the device revision. To modify parameters, select the device, click the right mouse button, and select Modify Parameters. Offline Devices If you attempt to modify parameters in an offline device, you will receive a message that the DeltaV system cannot communicate with the device and you are given the option of modifying parameters offline. When you modify parameter values in an offline device, the values are stored in the database only. Later, you can download to synchronize the values in the database with the values in the device. Refer to the Downloading Devices topic for more information. NVRAM Button Some devices require an explicit command to save parameter values in non-volatile memory. If you are modifying parameter values for a device with this requirement, the NVRAM button is enabled on the Modify Parameters dialog box. Click this button to save the parameter values to non-volatile memory. If you download the parameters to a device with this requirement, the save command is sent automatically if the parameter download is successful. Downloading Devices You have four download options at the device level: Device, Properties and Signals, Parameters, and Update Device Download Status. Select download to download the device as well as properties and signals and parameters. Select Properties and Signals to download these options only and select parameters to download parameters only. Note If you decide to download a device and during the download you notice a parameter value that is incorrect in the database, you can deselect the parameter for download, download the device, and then modify the value online. You cannot modify a value during the download.

410

System Configuration

Uploading Parameter Values Uploading parameters reads all configurable parameters from the device and stores the values in the database. To upload parameters, select the device, click the right mouse button, and select Upload Parameters. Adding DeviceNet Signals The EDS file may contain information about the data length, but it does not contain any information about the data itself. The user maps the data to signals which have no semantic meaning to the system. For each signal you can specify signal direction, data type, byte offset, scaling, and the bit pattern. You can configure a device's signals at the DeltaV Explorer library level and at the physical network (I/O) level. Library Configuration - To save engineering time for similar devices, create default signals in the library. Configure the signals that are common to all the instances of the device. When the default information is complete, drag the device revision to a DeviceNet port on the network. Physical Network Configuration - Select the device at the I/O level, select New DeviceNet Signal from the right mouse menu, configure the signal, and then assign a Device Signal Tag (DST) to the signal. (Select the signal, and select Assign Device Tag from the right mouse menu.)

Fieldbus Device Specifications

411

Using Profibus DP, DeviceNet, and AS-Interface with DeltaV Function Blocks
The following sections provide information for configuring Profibus DP, DeviceNet and AS-Interface devices with AI, AO, DO, PID and DC function blocks. Analog Signal Scaling for AI and AO Function Blocks If you check Use Scaling in the Properties dialog for a Profibus and DeviceNet analog signal, the associated AI or AO function block ignores its XD_SCALE parameter during block execution and the system uses the scaling values defined for the signal. If the Use Scaling box is not checked in the signals Properties dialog, the corresponding function block uses the scaling values defined in its XD_SCALE parameter. For an AI function block, set the L_TYPE parameter to Indirect and configure the OUT_SCALE parameters range and units configured accordingly. Special Considerations for Writing Output Signals If you are writing output signals to a Profibus, DeviceNet, and AS-Interface device that has been configured for failsafe action, be sure your control module is configured to track the failsafe action in the device should it occur. For example, if communication between the DeltaV system and the device is disrupted the device itself may drive its outputs to a failsafe state. The DeltaV system must know this has occurred and take appropriate action so that outputs are not driven to the last good state by the DeltaV system when communication with the device is restored. Configure your control module so that this happens, because the Profibus, DeviceNet, and AS-Interface standards do not support readback of output values. Profibus DP, DeviceNet, and AS-Interface output signals should be written in control modules by means of an external reference parameter, which writes the value to the I/O card even when signal status is Bad. If you use a Profibus DP, DeviceNet or AS-Interface DST reference in function blocks such as AO, DO, PID, and DC the value is not written when signal status is Bad. It is important for the control module to be able to write the failsafe value to the I/O card when the Profibus DP, DeviceNet, or AS-Interface device is in the failsafe state, to prevent a bump when the failsafe state has cleared.

Using an Analog Output DST with the PID Function Block

412

System Configuration

If your Profibus DP, DeviceNet, or AS-Interface device goes to a failsafe state due to a failure in the device or a loss of communication with the DeltaV system, the status of its DSTs in the DeltaV system is Bad. The following shows a technique for analog outputs using a DeltaV PID function block. A condition function block detects Bad status in the output DST and, after the failsafe time duration, causes the PID block output to track the failsafe value in the device. After the failsafe state in the device clears, the PID block initializes from the failsafe value. The following figure shows a similar technique for a discrete output using the Device Control function block. The condition block is used in the same way as in the figure. In this case the DC block becomes interlocked to the 0 (passive) state when the device goes to failsafe state. When the failsafe state clears, SP_D and CAS_IN_D are in the passive state, and can be written to the active state at the appropriate time.

Using a Discrete Output DST with the DC Function Block

Using a Discrete Output DST with Boolean or Expression Logic The previous figure illustrates using the condition block when you are writing the discrete output with boolean or expression logic. Whether the output is maintained or pulsed, the idea is to be sure the output is the device failsafe value when the device is in the failsafe state.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

413

Anti-Aliasing Filtering
Hardware and software signal filtering is supported in the DeltaV system: The analog input card contains hardware filtering that limits the frequency of the input signal seen by the digital-toanalog (D/A) converter to about 3 Hz. In addition, you can define software filtering to be applied at the analog card when you configure the analog input channel properties (FILTER channel parameter). This feature prevents aliasing of the signal if the module execution rate is set slower than twice the highest frequency component of the input signal. The default setting for the software filter is Filter Disabled. If an input signal is relatively free of process noise and is contained in a module executing a moderately fast rate, you might not need to apply additional software filtering at the card. If you choose to modify the filter, you see a selection of filter time constants in the Named State list. If you follow the module execution rate guideline (period of control) that is shown in parentheses next to the filter time constant you select, no aliasing will occur, even if the signal has significant noise. Note If you modify the filter on an input channel, you might need to retune any control block that uses the channel for its controller variable.

Overrange and Underrange Detection


Overrange and underrange detection is provided on each channel input obtained through the 4-20 mA signal and the FIELD_VAL_PCT and HART_FIELD_VAL parameters. The detection point is specified in percent of scale through the I/O channel properties OVERRANGE_PCT and UNDERRANGE_PCT parameters. When the channel signal exceeds the overrange or underrange values, the status of the analog input block PV parameter is set to high- or lowlimited, respectively. If you set these limits to 131% and -25% on a channel, the overrange and underrange detection is disabled.

NAMUR Limit Detection


You can enable NAMUR limit detection for the analog input value by configuring the I/O channel properties NAMUR_ENA parameter. When this feature is enabled (TRUE) and the IO_IN type is FIELD_VAL_PCT or HART_FIELD_VAL, the status of the input is set to Bad if the signal level is above 21 mA or below 3.6 mA for more than four seconds. The Bad status is cleared when the signal returns within these limits. You can use this feature when the transmitter is designed to flag a device failure by setting its current signal outside the normal 4-20 mA range.

Failure Action Settings


All I/O cards in the DeltaV I/O subsystem support failure action operation. The failure action depends upon the card type. After the controller downloads a configuration to an I/O card, it enables a 2-second RailTimeOut Period in the I/ O cards. After the timeout period is enabled, if communications to the controller are lost for more than 2 seconds, the I/O cards will enter the failure action mode. Once a card is in the failure action mode, it requires an exit failure action

414

System Configuration

mode from the controller to resume normal operations. This 2-second timeout period is not configurable by the user, nor can it be disabled.

What Causes a Card to Enter Its Failure Action Mode?


A card enters its failure mode when communications with the controller are lost for more than 2 seconds. Among the conditions that cause configured I/O cards to enter the failure action mode are: A simplex controller is removed. A simplex controller is upgraded. A hardware or software failure in the controller that interrupts communications for more than 2 seconds.

Note I/O cards must be receiving DeltaV power and field power to enter the configured failure action mode.

Failure Action by Card Type


While all DeltaV I/O cards support failure action, a card's failure action operation depends upon its type. All configured I/O cards turn on the red Error LED, but only output cards take any further failure action. The following failure action configuration options are available for configured OUTPUT channels: Failure Action Mode Designates if the channel should HOLD LAST VALUE or OUTPUT FAILURE ACTION VALUE.

Fieldbus Device Specifications

415

Failure Action Value Specifies the value used if the channel is configured to OUTPUT FAILURE ACTION VALUE. Failure Action Mode Options Hold Last Value: The output is held at the last value received from the controller before the failure action condition occurred. Use Configured Failure Action Values: The output is driven to the configured failure action value when the failure action condition is entered. Note All outputs values below 1 mA (including failure action values) are clamped to 1mA to ensure that the open loop detection mechanism of the D/A converter is always operable.

Card Analog Output

Discrete Output

Hold Last Value: The outputs continue with the latest configuration and output values. This applies to all channel types. If the channel is configured to be continuous pulse output type, it continues with the latest period and duty cycle. If the channel is configured to be a momentary pulse output type, it continues to process the current pulse. No additional pulses can be generated. Use Configured Failure Action Values: In this mode, failure action forces the outputs to go to predefined levels. If the channel is configured as momentary or continuous pulse output type, the pulse is aborted for the failure action value.

Redundant Cards For redundant Series 2 cards, loss of controller communication with both cards causes both cards to take their failure action, but with slight differences. Both cards illuminate their red Error LEDs, but only the active card drives the field outputs. Removing the active card will NOT cause failure action output values to remain, since a switchover cannot occur when a card is removed.

Isolated Input Channel Error Detection


The Isolated Input cards RTD and Thermocouple channels support full error detection for open loops and short circuits. MilliVolt and Voltage channels support partial error detection. For RTD and Thermocouple channels, use the

416

System Configuration

channel Status parameter in DeltaV Diagnostics to diagnose errors. For MilliVolt and Voltage channels, use the Value and Status parameters to diagnose errors. The following table shows how DeltaV Diagnostics reports short circuits and open loops in Isolated Input card channels. Channel Type RTD - 2 Wire Error Condition Short Open Wire to Terminal 2 Open Wire to Terminal 3 Value in DeltaV Diagnostics Sensor Out of Range Sensor Out of Range; then Sensor Bad Sensor Out of Range; then Sensor Bad Sensor Out of Range Sensor Out of Range; then Open Sensor or A/D Converter error Sensor Out of Range Sensor Out of Range; then Open Sensor or A/D Converter error Sensor Out of Range Sensor Out of Range; then Open Sensor Sensor Out of Range Sensor Out of Range; then Open Sensor Sensor Out of Range Shows the Cold Junction Compensation temperature. Value drifts upward; then goes out of range. Value drifts upward; then goes out of range. Value is approximately 50%. Value is approximately 50%. Value is approximately 50%. Value near zero; Status may or may not be Bad. Value near zero; Status may or may not be Bad. Value near zero; Status may or may not be Bad. Value is approximately 50%. Value is approximately 50%. Value is approximately 50%.

RTD - 3 Wire

Short Open Wire to Terminal 2 Open Wire to Terminal 3 Open Wire to Terminal 4

RTD - 4 Wire

Short Open Wire to Terminal 1 Open Wire to Terminal 2 Open Wire to Terminal 3 Open Wire to Terminal 4

Thermocouple

Short Open Wire to Terminal 2 Open Wire to Terminal 3

mV - Bipolar

Short Open Wire to Terminal 2 Open Wire to Terminal 3 Short Open Wire to Terminal 2 Open Wire to Terminal 3

Volts - Unipolar

Volts - Bipolar

Short Open Wire to Terminal 2 Open Wire to Terminal 3

Fieldbus Device Specifications

417

Outputs After a Self-Test Failure


DeltaV output cards perform a power up self-test as well as a periodic online self test once the cards are running. Each card type has a unique behavior.

Analog Output Cards


All Power-Fail, RAM, ROM, Database Integrity, and other self-test failure errors can initiate a restart of the card. During a restart, the outputs are off (zero current) while all the self-tests are performed. After the card successfully completes all the power-up self-tests, the outputs are driven to 1 mA and wait for the system to download the configuration and enable the channels. The download and channel enabling are performed automatically. Note Analog output card outputs cannot be driven below 1 mA except when in an error condition.

Discrete Output Cards


Cold Restart - A cold restart turns off the outputs. After a successful completion of self-tests, the outputs remain off until a valid configuration has been received. All self-test errors are treated as Cold Restart Errors. Note Upon receiving a configuration that indicates a change from one type of output to another, the outputs switch to the off state.

418

System Configuration

Integrating PROVOX and RS3 I/O


The DeltaV Interface to PROVOX I/O and DeltaV Interface to RS3 I/O enable you to use existing PROVOX and RS3 I/O with a DeltaV system. Support for PROVOX and RS3 I/O is integrated into the DeltaV Explorer, Diagnostics and Control Studio applications. Documentation for these interface products is in the following locations: DeltaV Disk 4 \_Support\DeltaV Interface for PROVOX IO DeltaV Disk 4 \_Support\DeltaV Interface for RS3 IO

Fieldbus Device Specifications

419

Customizing the Process History View


Inside this topic Process History View Command Line Interface Design Specifying the Filename Specifying a New Document Type Specifying the Area Name Specifying the Device (Node) Name Specifying the Module (Tag) Name Specifying the Event Type Specifying the Category Specifying the Start Time Specifying the Time Interval Specifying the End Time Specifying the Comparison Time Specifying the Parameter Reference Names Specifying Parameter Reference Substitution String Prompting for Parameter Reference Substitution String Specifying a Comparison Time Specifying a Parameter Specifying a State Specifying a Level1 Specifying a Desc1 Specifying a Desc2

Process History View Command Line Interface The Process History View Command Line Interface (CLI) allows you to customize the initial startup of the DeltaV Process History View from DeltaV Operate. Its primary purpose is to enable you to create Operator Interface toolbar buttons or other pictures to launch Process History View in context with the picture currently displayed in Operator Interface.

Design The CLI for the Process History View is designed to support different initial startup situations for the Process History View application. You can start the Process History View application with an Events, Charts, or E+Charts document and then modify it to display the desired result. In order to support the startup situations, the command line has arguments for specifying: filename - (filename) new document type - (/new) area name - (/area) device name - (/device or /dev or /node) module name - (/module or /tag) event type - (/type) category - (/category or /cat)

420

System Configuration

start time - (/starttime) time span - (/span or /hour or /hours) end time - (/endtime) comparison time - (/starttime2 or /comparetime) parameter reference names - (/trend or /trends) parameter reference replacement name - (/sub) module selection (/prompt) (opens the DeltaV Browser)

Note You can use a hyphen (-) in place of a forward slash (/). Therefore, you can enter /area as area. If there is a filename, it must be the first argument. After each parameter, there must be a space followed by the value for that parameter. The startup command is CHS. This example starts the Process History View application and opens a saved file called Reactor.phvc. If you do not provide a specific directory, the Process History View application searches for the file in the default charts subdirectory (DeltaV/Dvdata/Charts). In this example, Process History View opens the file Reactor.phvc, which resides in the default charts subdirectory (DeltaV/Dvdata/Charts): CHS Reactor.phvcThe arguments are order independent and uncoupled (except for time options). However, some only affect a specific type of display. For example, if displaying a Chart, the event-specific arguments are ignored. If a filename is provided, it must be the first argument after the CHS command. Avoid combining mutually exclusive searches. For example, you can only pair the event type ALARM with the category PROCESS. Similar pairings occur for the event types CHANGE and DOWNLOAD. Note If you combine mutually exclusive options, remember that when you specify the event type ALARM, you can only specify the category PROCESS. Any other value results in records not being found. Instead, the CLI accepts these currently mismatched pairs with the result being that records are not found in the chronicle. Arguments (parameters and qualifiers) are indicated by either a hyphen (-) or forward slash (/) and are not case sensitive. Wildcards You can use the wildcard characters * or ? when specifying an Event Filter argument (area, device, and so on). The wildcard character '*' represents zero or more of any printable character, and the wildcard character '?' represents a single printable character. Both wildcard characters can appear multiple times in an argument, and there are no restrictions on the placement of the wildcard characters. (Wildcard characters can appear at the beginning, end, or anywhere in an argument.) The following sections provide details for each argument. Specifying the Filename To open a document that was saved using the Process History View application, provide the filename in the command line. The filename must be the first parameter after the executable name, CHS. If the file exists in the default directory for Process History View documents (DeltaV/Dvdata/Charts), supply only the filename and .phv_ extension on the command line (FIC101.phvc). If the file exists in a subdirectory (DeltaV/Dvdata/Charts/reactors), include the subdirectory with the filename and extension (reactors/FIC101. phvc). In the first example, Process History View opens the file Motors.phvc, which resides in the default directory (DeltaV/Dvdata/Charts). In the second example, Process History View opens the file MyChart.phvc, which resides in the subdirectory ../lib.

Customizing the Process History View

421

Examples: CHS Motors.phvc CHS lib/MyChart.phvc Specifying a New Document Type Flag name : new Type : New Document Applies to : Events, Chart, and EChart Acceptable values : One of the character strings (Event, Chart, EChart). Not case sensitive. Description : This argument opens a new document of the specified type (Chart, EChart, or Events). Chart opens a new empty document that shows only a graph. EChart opens a new empty document that shows both the graph and events grid, and Events opens a new empty document that shows only the events grid. This parameter creates a new Process History View document. Typically, the /new argument can be combined with other arguments. Examples: CHS /new events CHS /new Chart CHS /new EChart Specifying the Area Name Flag name : area Type : Event Filter Applies to : Events and E+Chart Acceptable values : One or more character strings. Enclose in parentheses or double quotes. If more than one value, separate with a comma. Description : This parameter is used to add entries to the Area filter list. The search string can be a single area name, a list of area names, or the string thisUser. The string thisUser can also appear in a list of areas. If an area name is repeated in the list, only one instance of it is retained. If the option is not present on the command line, no filtering of areas is performed. Example :CHS /new events /area (AREA_1, AREA_2) Specifying the Device (Node) Name Flag names : device , dev , node Type : Event Filter Applies to : Events and E+Chart Acceptable values : One or more character strings. Enclose in parentheses or double quotes. If more than one value, separate with a comma. Description : This parameter is used to add entries to the Node filter list. The search string can be a single Node name or a list of Node names. If a node name is repeated in the list, only one instance it is retained.

422

System Configuration

If the option is not present on the command line, no filtering of node names is performed. Examples: CHS /new events /node (CTLR1, CTLR2) CHS /new events /dev (CTLR1) Specifying the Module (Tag) Name Flag names : module, tag Type : Event Filter Applies to : Events and E+Chart Acceptable values : One or more character strings. Enclose in parentheses or double quotes. If more than one value, separate with a comma. Description : This parameter is used to add entries to the Module filter list. The search string can be a single Module name, or a list of Module names. If a Module name is repeated in the list, only one instance of it is retained. If the option is not present on the command line, no filtering of Module names is performed. Examples: CHS /new events / Module (InletFlow, OutletFlow) CHS /new events / Module (OneFlow) Specifying the Event Type Flag name : type Type : Event Filter Applies to : Events and E+Chart Acceptable values : One or more of the character strings (EVENT, ALARM, CHANGE, STATUS and DOWNLOAD). Enclose in parentheses or double quotes. If more than one value, separate with a comma. Description : This parameter is used to add entries to the Type filter list. The search string can be a single Type, or a list of Types. If a Type is repeated in the list, only one instance of it is retained. If the option is not present on the command line, no filtering of Types is performed. Examples: CHS /new events /type (EVENT, ALARM) CHS /new events /type (EVENT) Specifying the Category Flag names : category , cat Type : Event Filter Applies to : Events and E+Chart Acceptable values : One or more character strings (USER, PROCESS and SYSTEM). Enclose in parentheses or double quotes. If more than one value, separate with a comma.

Customizing the Process History View

423

Description : This parameter is used to add entries to the Category filter list. The search string can be a single Category or a list of Categories. If a Category is repeated in the list, only one instance of it is retained. If the option is not present on the command line, no filtering of Category is performed. Example :CHS /new events /Category (USER, PROCESS) Specifying the Start Time Flag name : starttime Type : Time specification Applies to : Events, Chart, and E+Chart Format : Same formats as the endtime argument. There are two valid formats. For specifying the absolute start time, either use the format specified for the workstation ( Start | Control Panel | Regional Settings ) or a valid Continuous Historian format. Description : The start time is treated differently for Event displays than it is for Charts and E+Charts. In Event displays, specifying the start time results in the display of the most recent events, beginning at the specified time, and ending at the current time. The default display is the most recent hour if not otherwise defined. This argument is not to be used with the time span arguments for Events. If you provide both a start time and a time span, the start time is ignored. The start time must be in the format specified in Regional Settings (available in the Control Panel). Example :CHS /new events /starttime 10:00 For Charts and E+Charts, the default time range is 8 hours, ending at the current time. If creating a new Chart or E+Chart with the /new qualifier, use the /starttime argument to select a specific start time. If opening an existing file, you can use this parameter to change the configured value in the file. If using the Process History View application, this is the same as clicking Chart | Configure Chart, clicking the Time Scale tab, and entering the value in the Time Start field. For Charts and E+Charts, you can use the starttime argument with the other time specification arguments, span or endtime . The start time argument can be either of the two following types: 1 2 Same format as defined in the Date and Time tabs of the Regional Settings dialog (available in the Control Panel). A valid Continuous Historian time format:

Absolute :DD-MMM-YY hh:mm:ss Relative :+- D, h, m, s Valid code :SUNDAY, TODAY, JULY, Current time :* Combination of * or a Valid code with a relative offset: YESTERDAY+8h Examples: CHS /new chart /starttime 10:00 /endtime 14:00 CHS /new E+Chart /starttime Monday+8h /span 12 Note The keyword today means today's date at 00:00, and the keyword yesterday means yesterday's date at 00:00. Other keywords are the days of the week (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday) and months of the year (January, February, March). You can also use a format such as Tuesday+14h to mean 2 PM of the most recent Tuesday. Since the time string can contain forward slashes (12/05/97 08:00:00 PM), enclose the string in double quotes or parentheses.

424

System Configuration

Specifying the Time Interval Flag names : span , hour , hours ( recommended usage : span ) Type : Time span specification Applies to : Events, Chart, and E+Chart Format : if span: #days #hours:#minutes if hour or hours: #hours Acceptable values : If using the /span argument, the day must be a positive integer (it is not required for spans of less than one day). For example, specify two days as "2 00:00" . The hour is an integer between 0 and 23. The minute is an integer between 0 and 59. If just a single integer is supplied, it is considered that number of hours. For example, specify five hours as either "5" or "5:00". Note The hour (and hours) flags support of previous versions but are not recommended. Description : The time interval is treated differently for Event displays than it is for Charts and E+Charts. In Event displays, specifying the time interval results in the most recent specified interval of events to be displayed. The default is for no time filtering. Also, do not use the time span with the StartTime argument. By design, arguments display only the most recent events, and the end time is always the current time. Therefore, provide either a start time or a time interval to specify a smaller time span. If you provide both a start time and a time span, the start time is ignored. For Charts and E+Charts, you must specify the time interval with the span argument. For any new chart, the default time range is 8 hours, ending at the current time. If creating a new Chart or E+Chart with the /new qualifier, use the / span argument to modify the value from its default 8 hours. If opening an existing file, you can use this parameter to change the configured value in the file. If using the Process History View application, this is the same as clicking Chart | Configure Chart, clicking the Time Scale tab, and entering the value in the Span field. For Charts and E+Charts, you can use the span argument used with the other time specification arguments, starttime and endtime . Examples: 1 In this example, the Process History View application opens a new events document that displays events that occurred four hours prior to the current time. CHS /new events /span 4 2 In this example, the Process History View application opens an existing file, and modifies the time span to 2 hours. CHS motor.phvc /span "2:00"

Specifying the End Time Flag name : endtime Type : Time specification Applies to : Chart, and E+Chart Format : As specified in Regional Settings, or a valid Continuous Historian time. Description : For Charts and E+Charts, the default time range is 8 hours, ending at the current time. If creating a new Chart or E+Chart with the /new qualifier, use the /endtime argument to select a specific end time other than current time ('*'). If opening an existing file, you can use this parameter to change the configured value in the file. If using the

Customizing the Process History View

425

Process History View application, this is the same as clicking Chart | Configure Chart, clicking the Time Scale tab, and entering the value in the Time End field. You can use the endtime argument with the other time specification arguments, span or starttime . The endtime argument can be either of the two following types: 1 2 Same format as defined in the Date and Time tabs of the Regional Settings dialog (available in the Control Panel). A valid Continuous Historinan time format:

Absolute :DD-MMM-YY hh:mm:ss Relative :+- D, h, m, s Valid code :SUNDAY, TODAY, JULY, Current time :* Combination of * or a Valid code with a relative offset: YESTERDAY+8h Examples: CHS /new chart /starttime 10:00 /endtime 14:00 CHS /new E+Chart /starttime Monday /endtime TODAY Note The keyword today means today's date at 00:00, and the keyword yesterday means yesterday's date at 00:00. Other keywords are the days of the week (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday) and months of the year (January, February, March). You can also use a format such as Tuesday+14h to mean 2 PM of the most recent Tuesday. Since the time string can contain forward slashes (12/05/97 08:00:00 PM), enclose the string in double quotes or parentheses. If endtime is an asterisk (current time), the chart shifted left 20% of the time window when it initially opens. If you want the chart to start with a relatively full screen and still update in real time, configure the start time and the time span so that the current time is in the window near the right portion of the screen. For example, if you want a time window of 8 hours, set the Span to 7:59 and set the Starttime to *-8h. Data updates for 1 minute before the time scale is shifted to keep the current time visible. Using the values 8:00 for Span and * for Endtime displays the most recent 6 hours and 24 minutes (80% of 8 hours), and updates for 1 hour and 36 minutes before shifting the time scale. In these examples (one showing the starttime and endtime arguments and the other showing the starttime and span arguments), the Process History View application opens an existing file (Motors.phvc) with a time range that starts yesterday at 00:00 and ends today at 00:00: Examples: CHS Motors.phvc /starttime YESTERDAY /endtime TODAY CHS Motors.phvc /starttime YESTERDAY /span 24:00

Specifying the Comparison Time Flag names : starttime2, comparetime Type : Comparison time specification Applies to : Chart, and E+Chart Format : As specified in Regional Settings, or a valid Continuous Historian time.

426

System Configuration

Description : Identical to format for endtime (and starttime for Charts and E+Charts): 1 2 Same format as defined in the Date and Time tabs of the Regional Settings dialog (available in the Control Panel). A valid Continuous Historian time format:

Absolute :DD-MMM-YY hh:mm:ss Relative :+- D, h, m, s Valid code :SUNDAY, TODAY, JULY, Current time :* Combination of * or a Valid code with a relative offset: YESTERDAY+8h The comparison time creates a chart that compares all defined trends with a duplicate trend starting at a different point in time. The point in history is specified by the starttime or comparetime option. If you open an existing file, each defined trend is copied to the first available location, and the trend specific start time is updated with the value sent with this parameter. If you create a new Chart or E+Chart, all defined trends are copied in a similar way. In the first example, the Process History View application opens a new trend document and compares data for the parameter reference REACTOR1/PID1/PV.CV, starting from 00:00 today with itself at 00:00 yesterday. In the second example, the Process History View application opens a previously created file and requests comparison information starting at 2:00 am. Examples: CHS /new chart /trend (REACTOR1/PID1/PV.CV) /starttime Today /span 24 /starttime2 Yesterday CHS Reactor1.phvc /starttime2 2:00 Specifying the Parameter Reference Names Flag names : trend, trends Type : Parameter Reference Names Applies to : Chart, and E+Chart Acceptable values : Any valid parameter reference in the system. For any values collected historically, the full pathname is required (include the .CV, .ST, and so on). For points not available historically, but available in OPC, enter the parameter reference with or without the extension. Description : There can be up to 8 parameter reference names specified per Chart or E+Chart. Enclose the parameter name list in parentheses or double quotes. If specifying more than one parameter reference, separate the individual elements of the list with commas. In this example, Process History View shows data for the last hour for the two trends, MTR101/PID1/PV.CV and MTR201/PID1/PV.CV: Examples: CHS /span 1:00 /trend (MTR101/PID1/PV.CV, MTR201/PID1/PV.CV) Specifying Parameter Reference Substitution String Flag name: sub

Customizing the Process History View

427

Type : Substitution string Applies to : Chart and E+Chart Acceptable values : A single character string. If the string contains a hyphen (-) or a forward slash (/), you must enclose the entire string in parentheses or double quotes. Description : The argument sub is used to modify the parameter reference strings already defined in an existing chart, such that the module name portion of the defined parameter reference is replaced with the substitution string. A parameter reference (such as FIC-101/PID1/PV.CV) is in the form: MODULE NAME/BLOCK/PARAMETER.FIELD All characters in the parameter reference up to the first forward slash (/) are replaced by the string sub. For example, if a document contains the configured parameter references FIC101/PID1/PV.CV and FIC-101/PID1/SP.CV, and sub MTR101 is specified on the command line, the chart automatically changes the two parameters to MTR101/PID1/PV.CV and MTR101/PID1/PV.CV. If a parameter reference is blank, it will remain blank. If a parameter reference contains no forward slash, the entire string is replaced with the substitution string. If a Chart or E+Chart is called with a substitution string, then it is not possible to save the chart. However, it is possible to modify the existing configuration before exiting. In this example, the chart Motors.phvc contains the parameter references FIC-101/PID1/PV.CV and FIC-101/PID1/ SP.CV, which are replaced by MTR101/PID1/PV.CV and MTR101/PID1/PV.CV. Example :CHS motors.phvc /sub MTR101 Note You must supply a filename with the sub argument. Prompting for Parameter Reference Substitution String Flag name : prompt Applies to : Chart and E+Chart Acceptable values : A single character string. If the string contains a hyphen (-) or a forward slash (/), enclose the entire string in parentheses or double quotes. Description : The argument prompt is identical to sub except that it starts the DeltaV Browser to select a module. Then, like sub, it replaces modules existing in the chart with the module selected in the browser. The string following the prompt flag is the starting location for the browser. This can be any string but is typically the area where the expected module resides (for example, AREA_A). If the area is unknown, enter any string that does not match an existing area (for example, /prompt NONE). It is also a good idea to put a default value with the /prompt argument. If the user presses the Cancel button while browsing, the default value is used in the substitution. Specifying a Comparison Time Flag name : starttime2 or comparetime Type: Chart StartTime2 entry Applies to : Events and E+Chart Acceptable values : Any valid time string. Description : Copies every Parameter Reference configured in a chart and sets the StartTime2 parameter for each of the copied items to the time parameter entered with this command. Example : CHS chart1.phvc/starttime2 2:00

428

System Configuration

Specifying a Parameter Flag name : parameter Type: Event Filter Applies to : Events and Echart Acceptable values : Any string. Wildcards can be used in the string (* is a multi-character wildcard and ? is a single character wildcard.) Description : Places the associated string into the Parameter field of the Other Columns page of the Event Filters.. Example : CHS /new events/parameter ALARM* Specifying a State Flag name : state Type: Event Filter Applies to : Events and Echart Acceptable values : Any string. Wildcards can be used in the string (* is a multi-character wildcard and ? is a single character wildcard.) Description : Places the associated string into the State field of the Other Columns page of the Event Filters. Example : CHS /new events/state ACTIVE Specifying a Level1 Flag name : level1 Type: Event Filter Applies to : Events and Echart Acceptable values : Any string. Wildcards can be used in the string (* is a multi-character wildcard and ? is a single character wildcard.) Description : Places the associated string into the Level1 field of the Other Columns page of the Event Filters. Example : CHS /new events/level1 2-LOW Specifying a Desc1 Flag name : desc1 Type: Event Filter Applies to : Events and Echart Acceptable values : Any string. Wildcards can be used in the string (* is a multi-character wildcard and ? is a single character wildcard.) Description : Places the associated string into the Level1 field of the Other Columns page of the Event Filters. Example : CHS /new events/desc1 HIGH

Customizing the Process History View

429

Specifying a Desc2 Flag name : desc2 Type: Event Filter Applies to : Events and Echart Acceptable values : Any string. Wildcards can be used in the string (* is a multi-character wildcard and ? is a single character wildcard.) Description : Places the associated string into the Level1 field of the Other Columns page of the Event Filters. Example : CHS /new events/desc2 LOW

430

System Configuration

Downloading Data
Inside this topic What Happens during a Download When To Download What To Download The workstations and controllers in your DeltaV system require configuration data from the DeltaV database in order to operate. Initially, the DeltaV database stores all of the configuration data. You make changes to the configuration in the database without affecting the operation of the controllers and workstations. When the configuration is complete, you download that information to the workstations and controllers. The data that you download allows the DeltaV system to manage your control strategy. For example, workstations need to know all of the other nodes in the system as well as which areas to monitor and where to record events. Likewise, controllers must have their assigned modules downloaded so that the modules can run in the controller. You must also download the I/O card data so that the controller knows the type and enabled status of the channels and the Device Tag associated with each channel. You can download any data from within the DeltaV Explorer application. It is possible to download the entire configuration (entire database) or small parts of the configuration by making the appropriate selections within Explorer. For example, the Explorer lets you download a single controller, setup data, I/O card, or module by selecting the icon for that item and choosing Download on the context menu (the menu that appears when you click the right mouse button). In addition, you can download individual modules from within Control Studio. A download temporarily disrupts the part of the operation of the controller or workstation that is being downloaded. Care must be taken to determine if the process can withstand this temporary disruption. To ensure the safety of the process, it might be necessary to delay the download of the configuration changes until the process can be shut down. To minimize the effects of such disruption, it is recommended that only those parts of the configuration that have changed be downloaded. This is particularly important in the case of controllers. Download Physical Network To download the entire configuration, perform the following steps: 1 2 Download the physical network. Select the Physical Network icon and then right-click Download | Physical Network. The workstation downloads all of the configuration data for all of the nodes in the system. Note Downloading using the Object | Download | Physical Network command also downloads the configuration data. Download Control Network Downloading the control network is the same as downloading the physical network. To download the control network, click the Control Network icon and then right-click Download | Control Network. The workstation downloads all of the configuration data for all of the nodes in the system. Note Downloading using the Object | Download | Control Network also downloads the configuration data. Full (Total) Download (Workstation or Controller) To download the entire configuration of a workstation or controller, select the item you want to download, right-click, and then click the Download option from the menu. This downloads the entire configuration for the node selected (workstation or controller) and is called a full (total) download. Use a full download when the node has not yet been downloaded or has no configuration. Total controller downloads should be avoided when the process is running. If there is already configuration present in the controller, a total

Downloading Data

431

download will generally cause parameter values in the controller to be replaced with those from the configuration database. There are some exceptions where matching behavior occurs, such as in controller function blocks directly connected to output channels and for fieldbus shadow blocks. Depending on your configuration you could experience an output disruption on a total controller download. The Restore parameter values after restart feature applies for all total downloads to MD controllers. Refer to Preserving Configuration and Controller Data During Power Loss for more information on this feature. Partial Download If only part of the configuration has changed since the last full (total) download, a partial download may be the best download option. A partial download minimizes disruption to control strategies that are currently running. A partial download occurs when you select one or more modules and initiate a download. When you initiate a partial download, the system sends the module changes to the appropriate controller. However, the new modules will not execute until the running module completes its execution scan. When the scan of the current module is complete, the controller copies the parameter value/function blocks combinations, as defined in the following table. For MODE parameters the system copies the target mode field to the new module. The block calculates the actual mode field when it begins to execute. Output and control blocks generally start in OOS mode on the first execution after a download (partial and total, and on the first execution after a controller switchover), then climb to their target mode. This provides proper re-initialization and handshaking with other blocks. The mode change is expected and has no adverse effect on control. On a partial download loops initialize to the current setpoint value regardless of whether setpoint ramping is on. The partial download function matches function block parameters (in the old and new versions) by function block name and type. User-defined parameters are matched by name and type. The partial download copy function supports module-level, user-defined parameters for both modules and composites. You can determine partial download behavior on a module-by-module basis using the Parameter download behavior field on the General tab of the Module Properties dialog. Select one of the following options: Preserve critical block values The controller copies critical function block values from the executing module to the new module during a download. This selection typically minimizes disruption to the process. Critical function block parameters are defined in the table below. Preserve user-defined and critical block values The controller copies user-defined parameter values from the completed scan of the current module to the new version of the module during a download . When the new module executes its first scan, it uses the copied values in order to minimize process disruption. As shown in the table, only a single field is copied for some of the function block parameters. This is the case because the other fields (for example, Actual Mode or Target) are recalculated on block execution. For userdefined parameters, the entire parameter is always copied. Use configured values The controller does not copy any parameter values from the executing module but uses the values from the configuration database.

Instances when the Parameter Copy function does not occur: The function block type is changed. The data type of the user-defined parameter is changed. For example, the INPUT1 parameter is changed from type float to type integer. The dimension of an array parameter is changed. There is no matching parameter or function block. Empty dynamic reference - $REF string is empty.

432

System Configuration

Types of user-defined parameters that do not support the copy behavior: External/Internal references These are always set to the configured value. User-defined parameters that are not at the top-level of modules or composites (for example, user-defined parameters that are associated with SFCs or phases inside PLM, SFC, and unit modules).

SFCs do not support the copy behavior for user-defined parameters. Critical Function Block Parameters Preserved During Partial Download Function Block Analog Input Pulse Input Analog Output Bi-directional Edge Trigger Negative Edge Trigger Positive Edge Trigger Bias/Gain Ratio Counter Device Control Parameters and Fields OUT, MODE.TARGET MODE.TARGET, PV, SP, SP_WRK, OUT LAST_IN

MODE.TARGET, OUT COUNT, RESET_IN, IN_D, OUT_D MODE.TARGET, OUT_D, LASTOUT_D, FV_D, FAIL_ACT, LASTPV_D, PV_D, LASTSP_D, SPWRITE, DC_STATE, RESET_D, ACCEPT_D, SP_D, LASTOUT_D(1-4) OUT_D, MODE.TARGET LAST_OUT_D, MODE.TARGET, OUT_D, PV_D, READBACK_D, SP_D CURR_VOLUME, CURR_ENERGY, CURR_HRS_ON, LAST_VOLUME, LAST_ENERGY, LAST_HRS_ON, VOL_ACCUM, PCT_CURR_VOLUME, PCT_CURR_ENERGY, PCT_CURR_HRS_ON, PCT_LAST_VOLUME, PCT_LAST_ENERGY, PCT_LAST_HRS_ON, PCT_VOL_ACCUM MODE.TARGET, PV, SP, OUT, SP_WRK, FIELD_VAL, LASTOUT MODE.TARGET, SP, OUT, SABSTOTAL, ABSTOTAL, STOTAL, RTOTAL, SRTOTAL, SSP, IN_1, IN_2, REV_FLOW1, REV_FLOW2, RESET_IN

Discrete Input Discrete Output Flow Metering (AGA_SI and AGA_US)

Fuzzy Logic Control PID Integrator

Downloading Data

433

Function Block Inspect Input Selector Lab Entry Model Predictive Control

Parameters and Fields ENABLED, PERFORMANCE, UTILIZATION MODE.TARGET, OUT, SELECTED, SP_SELECT MODE.TARGET, OUT, DELAY BKCALIN[x], CNSTR[x], DSTRB[x], MNPLT[x], MODE.TARGET, OUT[x], SP[x] BKCALIN[x], IN[x], PROC_IN[x], PROC_OUT[x], SP[x] MODE.TARGET, OUT, FUTURE MODE.TARGET, BKCAL_OUT, SP, SP_WRK, OUT_1, OUT_2 ELAPSED_TIMER, IN_D, OUT_D ELAPSED_TIMER OUT_D MODE.TARGET, OUT_1, OUT_2 ELAPSED_TIME, IN_D, OUT_D

Model Predictive Control Professional (MPCPro) Neural Network Splitter On-Delay Timer OFF-Delay Timer Retentive Timer Reset/Set Flip-flop Set/Reset Flip-flop Signal Characterizer Timed Pulse

Refer to the topics When to Download and What to Download for more details. Setup Data Download You also download a subset of configuration data that is not directly related to a module. This data is called setup data. Setup data includes named sets, parameter security, cold restart information, redundancy information, alarm preferences, and event chronicle definitions. A download of the setup data sends these changes to all the workstations and controllers. You can download setup data alone or with the configuration data. To download setup data alone, select the object in DeltaV Explorer (for example, a controller) in the left pane. Then, click Object | Download | Setup Data. To download setup data along with all other configuration data, click Object | Download | Selected Object. Delete Unused Card Configuration When you delete an I/O card using DeltaV Explorer, you must download this change to the controller. The Delete Unused Card Configuration command downloads the deleted card information to the controller configuration without disrupting control or requiring a download of the I/O subsystem. To use this command, select the I/O Subsystem for the controller in DeltaV Explorer and then right-click Download | Delete Unused Card Configuration. Resending Successful Downloads The Resend Last Known Good Download function sends the last successful total download to a node without going to the database. If you have performed a total download followed by one or more partial downloads, this function

434

System Configuration

resends all of the information contained in the total download as well as the partials. For controllers, the function sends the same download script that would be sent to a controller that restarts after a power failure. This function is especially useful for situations where a workstation fails due to a disk error. It enables you to bring the new or repaired node up to the previous operational status without downloading recent edits to the configuration. Do not use the Resend Last Known Good Download function after decommissioning a controller. Perform a full download after recommissioning a controller. Downloading Values Referenced from OPC Mirror Control modules support references to values derived from OPC Mirror. If a module references a value from OPC mirror (for example, using an external reference parameter), the parameter value may change to the default configured value after a download rather than using the value from OPC Mirror. To prevent this, make sure that the Parameter download behavior on the module properties is set to Preserve user-defined and critical block values. Otherwise, you must refresh the associated OPC Mirror pipe in order to restore the value in the module.

What Happens During a Download When you select a download option, the system evaluates the data in the database for possible errors or omissions to determine if it can be downloaded. For example, if you have a module referencing I/O from a different controller node, the system displays a dialog that informs you of that fact. In the same way, the system displays a dialog if function blocks in a Fieldbus module have not been assigned to fieldbus devices. The dialog box has the following buttons: Download Anyway, Print, Cancel. The user selects one of these in order to cancel or proceed with the download. Note When you download a controller or a module for a controller, if the DeltaV system detects that parameter changes have been made to the module online a popup appears asking if you want to select online parameter changes to upload. The popup has three buttons: Yes -- Click this button to select the parameter changes to upload before downloading. No -- Click this button to upload all parameter changes before downloading. Cancel -- Click this button to avoid uploading any parameter changes and proceed to the Download Confirmation dialog.

For more information on uploading parameters, refer to the Uploading Recorded Parameter Changes topic. Note It is possible for a DeltaV user to make online changes between the time a user requests the download and the time the system transfers the data. Online changes made within this window of time are not displayed as uploadable parameter changes. For this reason, it is important for users performing downloads to coordinate the downloads with those who have permission to make online parameter changes. If you decide to continue downloading, the system downloads the data to the appropriate nodes and stores a copy of the data on the ProfessionalPLUS workstation in the Powerup directory (\\DeltaV\DVData\Powerup). If the download is a total download involving controllers, the system also stores a compressed version of the relevant portions of the download in the controllers' nonvolatile memory. This enables the controller to perform a cold restart and download itself if power fails and is restored. Refer to the topic entitled Preserving Configuration and Controller Data During Power Loss for more information on how cold restart works. Caution A download can potentially bump the I/O. To prevent accidentally bumping the I/O, place the block producing the outputs in manual mode before you download. Care must be taken to determine if the process can withstand this temporary disruption. To ensure the safety of the process, it might even be necessary to delay the download of the configuration changes until the process can be shut down.

Downloading Data

435

Alarm parameter fields all get initialized to their default (or configured) value as is appropriate, the first execution cycle of the module establishes the initial alarm state for it's alarms. In practice, this means that inactive, unacknowledged alarms appearing in the alarm list prior to a download will not be in the list after the download because they are initialized to acknowledged by the download. Downloading large modules to a controller can use a large amount of system resources. Exact amounts vary depending on the module being currently run by the controller and the size of the module being downloaded. To ensure that you do not have a problem with system resources, place the running block in manual mode before you download. Large databases require significant amounts of free disk space in order to download successfully. Make sure that there is a least half the size of the database in free disk space before downloading the database. When to Download The DeltaV Explorer marks the physical objects that require a download with the symbol (blue triangle).

However, if you are making changes to the setup data, you see the symbol (blue triangle) next to the ProfessionalPLUS workstation (at the node level only). The setup data are global data. The changes you make to the setup data affect all of the controllers and workstations. You must download ProfessionalPLUS setup data (or changed setup data) in order for the setup data to be distributed to all workstations and controllers. Caution A download can potentially bump the I/O. To prevent this from occurring, place the block producing the outputs in Manual mode before you download. Care must be taken to determine if the process can withstand this temporary disruption. To ensure the safety of the process, you might even need to delay the download of the configuration changes until the process can be shut down. Refer to the following table for a complete list of changes that require you to download. Note A full download of each controller node must be performed before any partial download is allowed. The following table lists changes you can make in the Explorer that would require a download. Database Changes and Their Corresponding Downloads When you make this change in the database: Assign a module to a controller. Unassign a module from a controller. Assign a module from one controller to another. Add a workstation node. You must perform this download function: Download the module to the controller node. This updates the local module table in the ProfessionalPLUS station. Select the module that you want to delete, right-click, and then click Download | Delete from Controller to remove the module from the controller. This updates the local module table. Download the module to the destination controller node. This removes that module from the source node. Create the workstation node, export the workstation configuration data to a floppy disk, run workstation configuration on the new node, and then download the new workstation. Download the new controller. Download the I/O Card.

Add a controller node. Add a card to a controller.

436

System Configuration

When you make this change in the database: Modify a card. Modify a channel. Edit a module. Add an alarm type. Modify an alarm type. Modify an alarm priority. Modify parameter security or field security. Add a new named set. Modify a named set. Add a named state to a named set used by a command-driven or state-driven module. Assign an area to a workstation. Unassign an area from a workstation. Commission a controller.

You must perform this download function: Download the I/O Card. For serial cards, also download control modules that reference the card. Download the I/O Card. Download the modified module to the controller node. Download the ProfessionalPLUS setup data. Download the ProfessionalPLUS setup data. Download the ProfessionalPLUS setup data. Download the ProfessionalPLUS setup data. Download the ProfessionalPLUS setup data. Download the ProfessionalPLUS setup data. Perform a partial download of the effected module within the controller. Perform a download of the setup data for the controller in which the module resides. Download the workstation node. Download the workstation node. Download the controller node. If other controller nodes were downloaded prior to commissioning this controller, download the setup data for those controllers. Until the setup data has been download, modules in those controllers cannot communicate with modules in the recently downloaded controller. Download the ProfessionalPLUS station. Download the ProfessionalPLUS station. Download the ProfessionalPLUS station. Download the ProfessionalPLUS station. Redundancy detection is automatic and does not require decommissioning. After installing the standby controller, open DeltaV Explorer. Select the newly redundant pair icon, right click and select Download | Setup Data. This turns on redundancy for the pair but does not disrupt any existing process control. Download the setup data to all nodes. Also, stopping and restarting of services such as the Batch Executive may be required.

Add or remove a key from a user or group. Add or remove a user. Add or remove a user from a group. Add or remove a group. Add a second (redundant) controller to a simplex controller.

Remove a node from the DeltaV network.

Downloading Data

437

Note There are other times when you must download that are not signaled by a change in the database. You only need to perform a full download for the affected node. A power outage requires that the node without power be downloaded again after power returns. Refer to the Preserving Configuration and Controller Data During Power Loss topic for more information. Also, replacing a controller requires a download for the replaced controller. Refer to the Auto-Sense Feature topic for more information. What to Download To minimize process disruption, download I/O components at the lowest level that downloads the desired changes. For example, if you add or modify a card, download only the card rather than downloading the whole I/O subsystem or the whole controller. By referencing the hierarchy in DeltaV Explorer, you can determine the lowest level object to download. Expand the hierarchy (click the + next to an object) and download the lowest level object with a to it. next

Note When downloading a node, the other workstations on the network must wait until the download is complete. The DeltaV system attaches application locks and does not permit any other workstation to modify the data. To preserve outputs during a download, a module-level download that includes AO, DO, Loop, and Device Control is partial. Caution A download can potentially bump the I/O. To prevent this, place the block producing the outputs in manual mode before you download. Care must be taken to determine if the process can withstand this temporary disruption. To ensure the safety of the process, it might be necessary to delay the download of the configuration changes until the process can be shut down.

438

System Configuration

Uploading Recorded Parameter Changes


You can change the parameter values in a module online (in a running controller) either through Control Studio or through DeltaV Operate. As soon as you make one change to a module online, the database module and the online module no longer match. You could examine the CHANGE records in Event Chronicle to find the changes that have been made, but there is an easier way to assess the online changes that have been made. The configuration host workstation in your system monitors all recorded parameter changes (anything that would appear in any of the Event Chronicle databases in your system). The Upload command opens a dialog that summarizes this list of recorded parameter changes.

If you are uploading multiple modules, the dialog appears as shown. If you are uploading a single module, the dialog title includes the module name and the Node Name and Modules columns do not appear. The most recent value set for each parameter (and field) and the user who made the change appears in the list. If two or more changes were made to the same parameter and field within two seconds, the Same Time column includes a question mark (?). The present controller configuration, operating parameters and I/O is not necessarily included in the upload process. Any parameter changes made by the control algorithms in the controller, as is done in SFC processing, are not included in the upload. You select which parameter values you want to write to the database modules. The Upload command is available in the DeltaV Explorer and in Control Studio. Note Upload before download does not capture the present configuration and operating parameters in the controller. Only manual operator changes from the workstations are recorded. Any settings automatically performed by the controller are not included in the upload. Use with caution, major process interruption could result from using this feature if the specific implementation of the users configuration is not taken into account. When an upload operation is interrupted before it completes, the values that it uploads before the interruption are retained by the database. Caution Select only the parameter changes that represent desired configuration changes to the module in the database. Normally, changes to operating parameters (setpoints or operating state parameters that are initialized or written by the module and many phase logic module parameters as well) would not be selected for upload. Caution When you request an upload, make sure you select all of the values you want. Parameter changes that are not selected are discarded, and not uploaded to the database. The download replaces the online values with the values in the database and discards any recorded parameter changes for the downloaded module. Note For remote workstations, downloading (total download) the RDS (Remote Data Server) Application Station sends the configuration, setup data, displays, and charts to all the Remote Workstations (1st and 2nd hop) under that RDS.

Uploading Recorded Parameter Changes

439

Referencing Documents
The integration feature enables you to launch a document from any description field in DeltaV Explorer, Control Studio, or Recipe Studio. For example, you can enter a field such as C:\Procedures\MainShutdown.htm to point to a specific HTML file that your organization has created. To open the document, right-click the address in the Description field and then click Launch. When you click Launch, the appropriate application opens and loads the file. For html and Microsoft Word documents, if the application is already open, the control loads the document in the open application. If the document is a text document, the control opens a new instance of Notepad for each referenced file. Other examples of valid entries are: C:\Spreadsheets\reactor1.xls C:\ModuleDescriptions\FIC101.doc This feature is only supported on the ProfessionalPLUS station. All referenced documents must be on the ProfessionalPLUS station as well. The browser used must be the version of Internet Explorer that is included with the Windows operating system.

440

System Configuration

System Preferences
Inside this topic Defining System Preferences Advanced Unit Management Preference Batch Preference Fieldbus Preference Profibus Preference AS-Interface Preference DeviceNet Preference RS3 I/O Preference PROVOX I/O Preference Asset Optimization Alarms Preference DeltaV System Preferences improve the ease of use of the system by allowing you to tailor the Engineering Tools to hide any functions that you might not require. Enabling or disabling a function causes the DeltaV applications to reveal or conceal the applicable menus and choices without adding or removing any application software. Any configuration that exists for a disabled function becomes inaccessible, but the data is retained in the database. Enabling/Disabling functionality is independent of licensing.

Defining System Preferences To enable a function using DeltaV System Preferences, perform the following steps: 1 Click Start | DeltaV | Engineering Tools | System Preferences. The System Preferences dialog is displayed. 2 3 Select the check box that corresponds with the function that you want to enable. Click OK.

Note Restart DeltaV client applications after changing a preference in order for the change to take affect.

Advanced Unit Management Preference This preference enables or disables the following features of the Advanced Unit Management function: DeltaV Explorer Unit classes and phase classes in the library Aliases in Control Strategies Unit modules, unit phases, and phase logic modules in process cell creation. Module Properties | Arbitration tab Dialogs that allow you to enter a class name

System Preferences

441

Control Studio Activation of the Insert Alias button in Expression editor Display of unit classes and phase classes when adding a new module Module Properties | Arbitration tab Dialogs that allow you to enter a class name Opening unit class, phase class or class-based unit module

Operator/Application Station Enable batch execution option in the Properties dialog

Batch Preference This preference enables or disables the following features of the Batch function: Start menu options Batch, Recipe Studio, Batch History View, and Batch Operator Interface

DeltaV Explorer Activation of the Recipe Studio and Batch Operator Interface toolbar buttons and menu options Applications | Recipe Studio and Applications | Batch Operator Interface menu options Process cell classes in the library Recipes and external phases in system configuration Batch Executive and Batch Historian in the physical network

Control Studio Tools | Batch Operator Interface menu option DeltaV Operate Activation of the Batch History View, Batch Operator Interface, and Recipe Studio toolbar buttons Applications | Batch Operator Interface, Applications | Batch History View, and Applications | Recipe Studio menu options

Fieldbus Preference This preference enables or disables the following features of the Fieldbus function: DeltaV Explorer Fieldbus devices in the library Fieldbus card in the New I/O Card selection list

Control Studio Foundation Fieldbus options on Assign I/O menu Convert to Fieldbus function Add Palette Item | Extension in custom palette creation

442

System Configuration

Profibus Preference This preference enables or disables the following features of the Profibus function: DeltaV Explorer Profibus DP devices in the library Profibus DP card in the New I/O Card selection list

AS-Interface Preference This preference enables or disables the AS-Interface function as follows: DeltaV Explorer AS-Interface devices in the library AS-Interface card in the New I/O Card selection list

DeviceNet Preference This preference enables or disables the DeviceNet function as follows: DeltaV Explorer DeviceNet devices in the library DeviceNet card in the New I/O Card selection list

RS3 I/O Preference This preference enables or disables the following features of the DeltaV Interface to RS3 I/O: DeltaV Explorer Controller with RS3 I/O in new node selection list RS3 I/O subsystem in RS3 controller node Interface to RS3 I/O card cages, cards and card/channel parameters

Control Studio Interface to RS3 card/channel parameters

Diagnostics Interface to RS3 card/channel diagnostic parameters

System Preferences

443

PROVOX I/O Preference This preference enables or disables the following features of the DeltaV Interface to PROVOX I/O: DeltaV Explorer Controller with PROVOX I/O in new node selection list PROVOX I/O subsystem in PROVOX controller node Interface to PROVOX I/O card files, cards channels and related parameters

Control Studio Interface to PROVOX card/channel parameters

Diagnostics Interface to PROVOX card/channel diagnostic parameters

Asset Optimization Alarms Preference This preference enables or disables the following features of Asset Optimization Alarms: DeltaV Explorer External Asset Interfaces subsystem under an Application Station Interface to External Asset Server, asset folders, and assets Wizard for synchronizing configuration between the DeltaV system and the asset server

Diagnostics Interface to asset server and individual assets' diagnostics parameters

444

System Configuration

DeltaV Configuration Applications


The following sections provide information on the various DeltaV applications. These topics describe the functions of each of the applications and contain basic user interface tips.

DeltaV Explorer
In DeltaV Explorer, you can see the hierarchy of objects in your database. Objects include controllers and I/O cards, workstations, areas, modules, equipment, and many other items. The Explorer program is modeled after Windows Explorer. The user interface, navigation, and shortcut features in DeltaV Explorer are similar (if not identical) to Windows Explorer. The DeltaV Explorer gives you a visual representation of the system hardware and configuration that you can navigate and modify. You can quickly populate your database with the DeltaV Explorer. The DeltaV Explorer includes a graphical representation of the library modules that you can use as templates for you own modules. Drag and drop library modules into areas and then modify these modules in Control Studio. You can also quickly navigate through your database to learn about its contents. The DeltaV Explorer allows you to define system characteristics and view the overall structure and layout of the system. You use a tree-like structure to add, delete, or modify your system. You can perform the following functions graphically: add workstations and controllers to the database add areas and modules to the database add alarm types to the database move or copy items by dragging and dropping their icons edit alarm types and alarm priorities edit network properties edit parameter security edit controller properties edit workstation properties download modules in controllers launch other DeltaV programs import/export

DeltaV Explorer User Interface


The DeltaV Explorer user interface consists of a window that is divided into panes. Across the top window pane are the bars: title bar, tool bar, and menu bar. The left pane contains the hierarchy structure of your entire DeltaV system. This includes the library items, setup configuration, physical plant areas, equipment, and logical control modules.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

445

The right window pane displays the contents of the item selected on the left pane. For example, if you click Area A in the left pane, then the right window pane lists all the items that make up Area A.

The DeltaV Explorer Window

DeltaV Explorer Tips of the Day


The following tips are designed to assist you in using DeltaV Explorer's features. These tips are displayed when first starting the application. They can also be accessed from the Help | Tip of the Day menu. Tailor Functionality You can tailor the Engineering Tools to provide only the required functionality. Run the System Preferences utility from the Start menu on the ProfessionalPLUS workstation. The choices in the menus and toolbars will be simplified accordingly. Multiple Item Select You can select multiple items in the right pane of DeltaV Explorer and then perform a common action on them (for example, select multiple modules and download them). Split View You can split DeltaV Explorer into two windowpanes using the View | Split menu option. You can use this split view to keep the Physical Network onscreen in the lower pane at all times while using the upper pane to navigate around your configuration. You can even drag and drop between panes. Tuning Fuzzy Logic Control Function Blocks In DeltaV Explorer, you can tune the Fuzzy Logic Control function block in a module automatically by right-clicking the block and then selecting Tune from the context menu. Module Diagnostics In DeltaV Diagnostics, if you select the Assigned Modules subsystem of a node, a snapshot of the current

446

System Configuration

status of all modules is displayed in tabular form. You can then select the column headers (for example, UnResRef, Forced, OOS) to sort the table based on those columns. Unresolved References In DeltaV Diagnostics, if you expand the Assigned Modules subsystem of a node, all modules and a visual indicator of integrity problems for each module are displayed. If you right-click a module, a list of unresolved references within that module is displayed. Edit Expressions You can view and edit expressions from DeltaV Explorer by double-clicking the T_Expression parameter. Operator Diagnostics Diagnostic information can be shown on operator displays. To determine the parameter path, select the object in Diagnostics and use the Detail view. Refresh When engineering from more than one workstation, make sure that you refresh the view of DeltaV Explorer periodically. You can do this by pressing the [F5] key. Download Status If you are unsure of the download status being displayed by DeltaV Explorer, select the node, right-click, choose download, and then select UpdateDownload Status. This will verify the correct download status of the node. Work in Progress You can use the Work in Progress flag during configuration to mark a module as being unfinished. This will have no effect on the operation of the module.

Indicators
In the DeltaV Explorer, objects can have a visual status indicator on or over the normal object icon.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

447

Node Status Indicators Indicator Definition Incomplete information - indicates that the downloading node (the workstation) does not have all the information on the node with this indicator. To clear this indicator, click the node with the indicator, click the right mouse button, and then click Download Setup Data. This transfers setup data from the database to the physical node. It also updates the downloading workstation node so that the workstation has all the information it needs to manage the new node. This indicator can appear on controllers and workstations that are physically connected to the network or on controller or workstation placeholders. Note that you cannot download the system data for a placeholder; the physical node must be connected first. Integrity - indicates that the node is communicating but has an integrity problem. Controllers can have this indicator for several reasons. For example: There is a mismatch between the I/O configuration and the physical I/O. Compare the controller's I/O configuration in the Explorer with the actual I/O cards connected to the controller. The controller is configured for network redundancy but does not have the necessary connections to support it. Check to see if the node is configured to support network redundancy. If it is, make sure the controller has a network connection. Workstations can have this indicator for several reasons. For example: The workstation is configured for network redundancy but does not have the necessary connections. Check to see if the workstation is configured to support network redundancy. If it is, make sure the workstation has a network connection. The workstation cannot communicate with at least one controller that it needs to communicate with. The event chronicle database has detected an error (such as an invalid directory). No configuration - indicates that the node does not have a configuration. This can occur if the node has never been downloaded. For controllers, this can occur if there is a power failure and cold restart was not enabled for the node. Not communicating - indicates that the node is not communicating. This indicator occurs when there is a bad connection, if the controller is not powered up, or if the controller is decommissioned. To clear this indicator, go to the node and make sure it is connected, that the wiring is correct and sound, and that the node is powered up. The Explorer enables you to launch the Diagnostics application and view diagnostics data for any selected Explorer object. This can provide useful diagnostic information for nodes that have the indicator. To investigate integrity problems for a node, click its icon, click the right mouse button, and then click Diagnose.

448

System Configuration

Download Status Indicators Indicator "Needs Downloading" Value Yes Definition

Indicates that some of the parameters in the database for this node no longer match the parameters in the node itself. If you perform a download, some changes will be made to the node. If this indicator is not present, no download is required. Indicates that some of the parameters in the database for this node might not match the parameters in the node itself. Select the node, click the right mouse button, and then click Download | Update Download Status to determine if a download is required.

Unknown

Module Indicators Indicator Definition Library module. You can drag library modules into an area, modify them, and use them in your configuration strategy. Module in an area. A module in an area is the database copy of the module. Area modules can be edited and assigned by reference to a specific controller. Module assigned to a controller. The control associated with this module is placed in the controller when the controller is downloaded. Module assigned to a controller and downloaded Downloaded module for which the assignment has been removed

DeltaV Explorer Navigation


Navigating the DeltaV Explorer window is easy. You can use your mouse or the keyboard or any combination of the two to select items, access menus, perform functions, toggle between programs, and so on.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

449

Navigation Tips Action Click the right mouse button Click the left mouse button Result Provides a context menu. This menu changes based on what the selected item is. Selects the item, whether an icon, a menu option, or a button. When selecting the menu or button, the function represented by the menu or button is executed. Using the left mouse button, selects the item and executes the function represented by the item. Accepts and executes the selected item. This item can be a button, a menu option, or an object. Moves the cursor to the next field in a dialog window. Toggles between running applications, for example, switching between DeltaV Explorer and Control Studio. Selects the function for that item. This is available in menus, buttons and dialogs, providing there is a character that is underlined. Note In some cases, you can press only the underlined character. This is only true when the menu, button or dialog currently has focus. Using the left mouse button, displays Properties for that item. Displays Context Help for that item. Activates menu bar. Displays Context menu for the selected item. Activates Find command. Activates Cut command. Activates Copy command. Activates Paste command. Displays Properties for that item. Refreshes the screen. Switches panes. Switches to parent folder (in hierarchy). Expands everything under the current selection (in hierarchy). Expands the current selection (in hierarchy).

Double-click Enter key Tab key Alt + Tab Alt + underlined character

Alt + double-click F1 F10 Shift + F10 F3 Ctrl + X Ctrl + C Ctrl + V Alt + Enter F5 F6 Backspace Keypad * Keypad +

450

System Configuration

Action Keypad Right arrow Left arrow

Result Collapses the current selection (in hierarchy). Expands the current selection if it is not expanded (in hierarchy). Collapses the current selection if it is expanded; if current selection is not expanded, it goes to parent (in hierarchy).

The following terms are universal in Windows applications. The DeltaV documentation uses these terms. Special Terms for Navigation Term Collapse Definition To close the list and hide all the items that make up the list. Click the next to the item to collapse the list. A menu that changes based on what item is selected when the menu is called. The menu is dependent on the context from which it is accessed. The context menu is accessed by clicking the right mouse button. To remove (cut) an item from one spot and placing (pasting) it in a new spot. To select an item with a single-click of the left mouse button and, while holding the mouse button down, move the item on the window. This results in a copy of the selected item being created. To double-click an item and expose the layers underneath. You can then drill down into one of the layers by doubleclicking that layer. You can drill down any item that has layers until you reach the lowest layer. To open a list and view all the items that make up the list. Click the next to the top item to expand the list.

Context Menu

Cut + Paste Drag + Drop

Drill Down

Expand

Control Studio Application


Use the Control Studio application to create, modify, and delete modules and composite templates for your control strategy. Control Studio provides full editing capability for control modules. Control modules contain a group of logically related system objects and have unique tag names. In general, control modules represent your process control equipment, such as valves, analog control loops, pumps, agitators as so on. Modules contain the control algorithm, parameters, alarming, and more. For more information on modules, refer to the Modules topic.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

451

You use the Control Studio to create and modify modules in the DeltaV system. You can start Control Studio from the task bar by clicking Start | DeltaV | Engineering | Control Studio as shown in the following figure or, if you are running DeltaV Explorer, you can start Control Studio by clicking a module in an area, clicking the right mouse button, and then clicking Modify.

Starting Control Studio from the Start Menu You can perform many tasks on a module with Control Studio. Typically, you start by defining the module, its algorithm, and then the parameters. After these exist, you can use the parameters for alarming, displays, trending, journaling, and more. From within Control Studio, you can perform the following tasks: Create a new module or composite block. Create a module from an existing module. Edit the algorithm for a module or composite block. Edit the parameters for a module. Define alarms for a module or composite block. Debug the algorithm for a module. Edit expressions in the algorithm. Assign the module to a node. Download a module.

452

System Configuration

The Control Studio window is divided into different sections called views. The following figure shows Control Studio and the different views.

The Control Studio Program Window You can size, hide, and arrange the views depending on what you are editing and your personal preference. If you create a new module from scratch, when you open Control Studio, the views will be empty. When a view is not currently visible, you can make it visible from the View menu.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

453

Control Studio User Interface


The Control Studio has multiple window panes you use to define the characteristics of a module. They are the Diagram View, the Parameter View, the Hierarchy View, and the Alarm View.

The Control Studio Window From the Hierarchy View, you view the components of the module and of its composite function blocks. From the Parameter View, you define specific characteristics of objects on the diagram, such as function blocks, steps, or modules. From the Diagram View, you create function blocks and sequential function chart algorithms graphically on a diagram that defines how the module behaves.

454

System Configuration

From the Alarm View, you view the enabled alarms for the block or module. You configure the alarm limits, priorities, and more from the Alarm View. From the Palette View, you access the icons that represent function blocks, modules, and SFCs. The Palette View is discussed in the following topic, The Palette.

The Palette
The Palette in the Control Studio contains all the blocks available in the DeltaV System. These blocks are the foundation of the modules you use in creating your DeltaV system's control strategy.

The Control Studio Palette To move an item from the Palette to the diagram, use the drag and drop technique. From the palette, choose the category you need (for example, Analog Control, I/O, Math, Special Items) and select the icon you want. Hold the mouse button down and move (drag) the icon to where you need it on the diagram. When positioned, release the mouse button (drop). The icon is now copied to the Diagram View.

Control Studio Navigation


Navigating in Control Studio is easy. You can use your mouse or the keyboard or any combination of the two to perform such as selecting items, accessing menus, editing parameters, and toggling between programs.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

455

Navigation Tips Action Click the right mouse button Result Provides a context menu. This menu changes based on what the selected item is. Selects the item, whether an icon, a menu option, or a button. When selecting the menu or button, the function represented by the menu or button is executed. Using the left mouse button, selects the item and executes the function represented by the item. Accepts and executes the selected item. This item can be a button, a menu option, or an object. Moves the cursor to the next field in a dialog window. Toggles between running applications, for example, switching between DeltaV Explorer and Control Studio. Selects the function for that item. This is available in menus, buttons and dialogs, providing there is a character that is underlined. Note In some cases, you can press only the underlined character. This is only true when the menu, button or dialog currently has focus.

Click the left mouse button

Double-click

Enter key

Tab key Alt + Tab

Alt + underlined character

Note The right mouse button is used extensively in Control Studio. You can access all the block, alarm, and parameter properties by clicking the right mouse button. The following terms are universal in Windows applications. The DeltaV documentation uses these terms.

456

System Configuration

Special Terms for Navigation Term Collapse Definition To close the list and hide all the items that make up the list. Click the next to the item to collapse the list. A menu that changes based on what item is selected when the menu is called. The menu is dependent on the context from which it is accessed. The context menu is by clicking the right mouse button. To remove (cut) an item from one spot and placing (pasting) it in a new spot. To select an item with a single-click of the left mouse button and, while holding the mouse button down, move the item on the window. This results in a copy of the selected item being created. To double-click an item and expose the layers underneath. You can then drill down into one of the layers by double-clicking that layer. You can drill down any item that has layers until you reach the lowest layer. To open a list and view all the items that make up the list. Click the next to the top item to expand the list.

Context Menu

Cut + Paste Drag + Drop

Drill Down

Expand

Function Block Diagram Function Block Diagrams (FBDs) are comprised of individual Function Blocks and Special Palette Items, such as Input/Output parameters, Internal read/write parameters, and comments. Refer to Function Block Diagram Algorithms for Modules for details about FBDs. Online and Debug Viewing of Function Blocks When you want to closely examine the performance and functionality of an algorithm, you can use the online or debug view capability of Control Studio. While in the online view, you can step through an algorithm element-byelement and see the specific input and output values of a block. This allows you to solve problems, identify areas to increase performance, and gain an understanding of a function. You can also use the online view from DeltaV Operate to monitor the execution of your control logic. When you are in the debug view, you can also force the values or set and remove breakpoints to debug any problems found in the module. Control Studio only writes out those values that have been changed.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

457

In both online and debug views there are visual indicators to help you quickly recognize the operational status of your modules: (bold connection line) indicates a non-zero value. (dashed connection line) a feedback wire. This indicates that the source block is executing after the destination block in the execution order. The value coming down the wire reaches the destination block on the next scan of the module. (yellow highlighted question mark) indicates a non-zero value for BLOCK_ERR parameter. Refer to the BLOCK_ERR online help and books online topics for possible causes. (red X) indicates that the status of the associated parameter is Bad. (blue question mark) indicates that the status of the associated parameter is Uncertain. Use online or debug view to perform the following tasks. Note Some of the following functions (for example, setting a breakpoint) are only available in debug view. monitoring the progress of sequences and the current values of parameters stopping the algorithm from executing running the algorithm once setting a breakpoint and have the algorithm execute until it reaches the breakpoint (in debug mode only) advancing through the algorithm or sections of the algorithm step by step drilling into a composite forcing values to see results disabling steps, transitions, and actions

Note The modules that you are viewing in either online or debug view must be downloaded in the controller, and some of the changes you make can affect the process. Caution Editing online or debugging a function block diagram can affect the process that you are currently running. Stopping the FBD from Executing You can stop a specific function block algorithm from executing in order to more closely examine the behavior. However, you do affect the currently running process when you stop the execution. Use extreme care when stopping execution. Once the execution is stopped, you can advance through a function block diagram and force input values to a particular value to watch the results and the behavior of the blocks. You can stop the execution by clicking On-line | Stop from the pull-down menu or by setting a breakpoint (available in debug mode only). When the algorithm has stopped, a yellow arrow is displayed on the first block in the diagram. The arrow indicates the next block that will be executed.

Signal Generator Block as Next to Execute in Diagram

458

System Configuration

Caution Any changes you make online affect your process because the changes are made to downloaded modules in the controller. Use extreme care when changing values or stopping the execution of an algorithm. Advancing through the Diagram The simplest and most revealing method of debugging is advancing by single-steps through the diagram from one block to the next. As you advance from one block to the next, Control Studio highlights your location in the diagram using a yellow arrow.

Signal Generator Block as Next to Execute in Diagram While you are advancing through the diagram, you can observe the inputs and outputs of the function blocks, and verify that you are getting the output values you expect. When you are debugging an algorithm, try to identify the block that does not have the behavior you expected, and start your troubleshooting with that block. When you have a composite block on your diagram, you can Advance In to the composite to see the blocks or steps the composite contains. If you do not want to look at the details of the composite, you can Advance Over a composite. When you advance over a composite, Control Studio treats the composite as a single block on the diagram instead of a group of multiple blocks, and advances to the next block in the diagram at the current level. Forcing Input Values You might want to see the behavior of a block when it has a certain input. However, the block might not currently have the input value you need. In Control Studio, you can force the input value of function blocks in order to observe the behavior. To force an input value, click On-line | Force Input from the pull-down menu. The display indicates the forced input as shown in the following figure.

A Forced IN Input You cannot force the output of a block to a particular value; you can only force the input to a particular value. Remember to remove the forced input when you want the algorithm to execute normally. Running to a Breakpoint Sometimes it is not practical to advance step-by-step from the beginning of a diagram until you reach the place where you think the problem is. The solution to this is the breakpoint. Using a breakpoint, you can tell the algorithm where to stop. The algorithm runs until it reaches a breakpoint, and then it stops.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

459

When you set a breakpoint, a red circle indicates where the breakpoint is set. The following figure shows a function block with a breakpoint set.

Function Block with Breakpoint Set Remember to remove the breakpoint when you want the algorithm to execute normally.

Online and Debug Viewing of SFCs


Control Studio provides both an online and a debug view of a Sequential Function Chart (SFC) algorithm to help you with the development and use of SFCs for process control. Some of the functions you can perform in the online view include the following: disabling steps, transitions, and individual step actions forcing a transition to TRUE stopping, starting, and resetting embedded and linked composite levels of the algorithm stopping and starting execution of an SFC setting or forcing inputs to desired values. Control Studio only writes out those values that have been changed.

Caution If you edit an SFC online, you can affect the process that is currently running. Double-click a transition to drill down into it and Control Studio's online view displays a graphical representation of the expression in a new dialog as follows: All components of a transition that have correctly evaluated are marked with a green check mark. Any parameters of the expression that have an error are marked with a question mark (?). Any element of the transition that has not correctly evaluated is marked with a red X.

460

System Configuration

An expression that has not entirely been evaluated is marked with a red X while some of the underlying components (those that have evaluated correctly) display a green check mark. The expression contains a discrete parameter with a value of 0 is shown with a green checkmark in the lowest level of the tree next to the parameter name. A red X is displayed when the discrete parameter has any nonzero value.

The debug view for SFCs allows you to disable transitions, steps, and actions, as well as force transitions. When actions or steps are disabled, they are displayed as inactive in the diagram even though the active parameter still gives an indication of active; this way, you can see which actions would be taking place without actually executing the actions. Note SFC algorithms do not fully support the online edit of embedded composites containing function blocks. If you drill into and set a breakpoint in an embedded composite, the breakpoint will not be reached, and execution will not stop at that breakpoint. Disabling Steps By disabling a step, you can stop the execution of an action in the step or prevent the action from executing (if the step has not become active yet). A disabled step is shown with a red X through the step. This indicates that the step does not cause actions to be evaluated. The following figure shows a disabled step.

A Disabled Step in an SFC Note that disabling a step does not affect the time periods associated with the individual actions. For example, an action with a Pulse action qualifier can only be evaluated on the first scan through the actions of an active step. When

DeltaV Configuration Applications

461

the step is disabled before it becomes active, any actions in that step that have a Pulse action qualifier are not evaluated. Another example that illustrates this time period contingency within disabled steps involves the Delay action qualifier. When an action on a disabled step uses the Delay action qualifier with a 30-second delay, and the step is enabled 20 seconds after the step goes active, the action with the Delay qualifier must wait an additional 10 seconds before it is evaluated. Conversely, when the step becomes enabled after more than 30 seconds after the step goes active, the action must wait until the next scan to get evaluated. Disabling Transitions When a transition is disabled, it always evaluates to False when it is active. This way, you can control the flow through an SFC by keeping all the steps prior to the disabled transition active and all of the steps that follow it inactive. A disabled transition can stop the flow through a particular branch of a sequence select divergence in the SFC. This keeps the steps that precede this transition active, and the actions continue to be evaluated according to the action qualifier of each. In addition, a disabled transition keeps the steps that follow the transition from going active. The online view shows the value that the disabled transition would have if it were not disabled.

Example of a Disabled Transition When you want to hold an SFC where it currently is, disable all active transitions and active steps. Any active transition, whether enabled or disabled, can be forced to True by clicking SFC Online | Force transition. If you disable all of the transitions, you can then step through the SFC by forcing transitions when required. You can also disable a single transition to force the SFC down another branch of a sequence select divergence. Disabling Actions Disabling an individual action is similar to disabling the step the action is in. The difference is that disabling an individual action allows the enabled actions of the step to be evaluated as normal. A step with individual actions disabled is displayed with a small red X in the lower right corner of the step. The following figure shows a step with disabled actions.

An SFC Step With a Disabled Function When an action is disabled, the action time continues to be incremented. For example, if a Time-limited action with a period of 30 seconds is disabled for the first 20 seconds of the step, then the action is only active for 10 seconds after it is enabled. When you disable stored actions in the step from which they were started, the actions are inactive even if the step is made active. Note You can disable all of the actions for a step by disabling the step. However, the individual action disables are not overwritten. That is, when actions 1 and 3 are disabled and the user disables the step, all actions are disabled, but enabling the step does not cause actions 1 and 3 to become enabled. Forcing Transitions The option to force a transition allows you the flexibility to directly influence the flow through a running SFC. Note that forcing a transition only affects active transitions. If a transition is active and then becomes disabled or its

462

System Configuration

condition evaluates to False, forcing the transition causes processing to continue through the transition as if it were enabled and True for the next scan. This is a momentary request. A forced transition is only temporary; the transition returns to normal operation after the processing is complete. As a debugging sequence select tool, forcing a transition allows you to force execution of a particular branch of a sequence select divergence. To do this, disable all of the transitions in the divergence and then force the transition for the desired path. Stopping, Starting, and Resetting Levels You can manipulate portions of the SFC by starting, stopping, or resetting individual levels of an SFC algorithm. For example, consider an SFC that uses a linked composite containing an SFC for draining the contents from a vessel. If there is an equipment failure that requires you to drain the vessel manually, you could drill down into the composite and click Stop Sequence to stop the SFC from trying to drain the vessel. The title for the SFC is displayed as Sequenced Stopped. If you want to restart the draining, click Start Sequence. Stopping and Starting Module Execution You can completely stop all execution in a module by stopping the module. While the module is stopped, the title of the module is displayed as Stopped, and all action and transition processing for each level of the module stops. Unlike disabling steps and actions, stopping a module does affect timing values for actions. For example, if a Delay action is delaying for 30 seconds and you stop the module 15 seconds into the delay, the action will delay another 15 seconds once the module is started again. Setting Values You can directly affect values in the SFC while it is processing. For example, if the SFC has a parameter for showing the setpoint, you can set a value for that parameter and change the setpoint.

Forcing an Input
You can override an input wire and provide the signal value you want for an input by forcing the input. This function only works on composites that contain SFCs and are referenced from a function block diagram. The inputs to the SFC that are connected to wires from the function block diagram can be forced to new values.

Using Modules
A module is a reusable control algorithm that focuses around process equipment. Modules link algorithms, conditions, alarms, displays, and other characteristics together for a particular piece of equipment. The DeltaV system has a library of modules with all the necessary characteristics already defined. You modify the modules to fit your needs as you develop your control strategies. For more information on modules, refer to the Modules topic.

Composites
The DeltaV system allows you to group control strategies within modules into multiple layers of a diagram. These layers or groups are called composites. Although many control languages can be contained in a composite, they are represented on the diagram as a single element.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

463

For example, if you opened a single composite on a function block diagram, you might find that it contains one or more additional function blocks and composites, or even a sequential function chart. Parameters can be wired to the composite so that data can pass in and out of it. Composites can be nested to a depth of six levels within the control module's diagram. The following figure provides a graphical example of a single-level composite that is in a function block diagram. The composite in this example contains three function blocks.

Single-level Composite Function Block Diagram There are several ways that composites help to create control strategies. In addition to their manageability, composites can perform the following functions: improve readability of a large control strategy by allowing you to group the elements into logical control tasks provide a means to hierarchically organize your control strategies allow control logic to be copied and reused allow the various control languages (Function Block Diagrams and Sequential Function Charts) to be intermixed within the same control module provide a mechanism to develop control logic segments one time, store them in the library, maintain them in a single location, and still use that logic in a number of different control modules

464

System Configuration

The following figure provides a graphical example of how composites appear within a control strategy diagram.

Composites as Part of the Overall Control Strategy The control module's main diagram in the figure is a Function Block Diagram. The block labeled TRACK is a composite that contains additional function blocks. The block labeled STARTUP is a composite that contains a sequential function chart. Notice that the TRACK composite's data values are being received from and sent to the upper-level diagram. In the STARTUP composite, however, only a start signal is received from the top-level Function Block Diagram. You add a composite to a Function Block Diagram by dragging the Custom Block on the Special Items palette to the function block diagram. You can add a composite to an SFC by clicking the right mouse button on the right side of the Hierarchy View and clicking Add. Composites can be either embedded or linked. Embedded composites are actually stored and maintained as part of the control module. Changes to an embedded composite can only affect the control module it belongs to. Linked composites, on the other hand, are stored within the DeltaV library. Any number of control modules can reference linked composites within their diagrams. Changes to the structure of these composites must be made within the DeltaV library. This way, all modules that reference the linked composite can be updated with the structural changes.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

465

The following figure shows a representation of two modules that contain two separate, embedded blocks.

Embedded Composites Diagram The following figure shows a representation of two modules that are linked to the same library composite.

Linked Composite Diagram Refer to the following sections for more information on linked and embedded composites.

Composite Definitions
A composite block is a function block that contains a sheet of control logic. Composites are useful in several ways. They allow you to perform the following tasks: Segment the control logic into logical groupings. This allows improved organization and readability of the control strategy. Arrange control strategies hierarchically. Composites can be placed inside other composites. Intermix various control languages (function block diagrams and sequential function charts) within a single control module.

466

System Configuration

Place a section of control logic in the library and reference this logic from one or more modules. Modifying the library automatically updates all modules that reference the library. This type of composite is known as a linked composite. Paste commonly used control logic into a new control module. The source could be another module or a library composite. This type of usage is known as an embedded composite.

You connect multiple function blocks or a sequential function chart together to form a composite. Composites can be stored in the library so that you can reuse them repeatedly on diagrams or charts when you want to perform the same function more than once. The following figure is a representation of a composite function block definition that is used for signal conditioning.

Composite Function Block for Signal Conditioning Composites are created in Control Studio. You can view the structure of the composite definition and drill down the levels of the composite in the Hierarchy View of Control Studio. You can also step into a composite block when you are editing a downloaded module online. Once you have the composite created, you can add it to your library and your palette so that you can use it on your diagrams and charts. Composites can be linked or embedded.

The icon for an embedded composite looks like this: Custom Block assistant on the Special Items palette.

. You can add an embedded composite by using the

The icon for a linked composite looks like this: . The arrow indicates a link to another composite. You can add a linked composite by using the Custom Block assistant on the Special Items palette. You can convert embedded composites to linked and linked composites to embedded by selecting the composite block and clicking the right mouse button and clicking Convert. For a description of linked and embedded composites, refer to the Linked and Embedded Composites topic.

Linked and Embedded Composites


When deciding to link or embed a composite, you should know how you want the data to be updated. Composites, especially linked composites, contain some subtle functional differences that are important to consider when

DeltaV Configuration Applications

467

developing and maintaining control strategies. Among the distinguishing characteristics of composites is the type of data it contains, which can either be structural information or parameter information. Structural information for a composite containing a function block diagram includes all the function blocks contained in the diagram, how they are wired together, and where they are placed on the diagram. For composites containing SFCs, the structural information includes what steps and transitions are contained on the diagram, how the steps and transitions are connected together, and where the steps and transitions are placed on the diagram. Parameter information for a composite containing a function block diagram includes all the parameter names, parameter data values (including expressions), status information, and filter settings. For composites containing SFCs, the parameter information includes step actions, step transition conditions, and module parameters. The following figure shows the relationship of structural and parameter information for both embedded and linked composites. For a more in-depth discussion on the characteristics of embedded composites and linked composites, refer to the following two sections.

Relationship of Structural and Parameter Information for Embedded and Linked Composites

Embedded Composites
When you use an embedded composite, both the structural and the parameter data are stored as part of the module (refer to the previous figure). When you edit the module in the offline view, both types of information can be modified. Double-click an embedded composite (or click the right mouse button and then click Edit) to open the composite for modification. Like in any control diagram within DeltaV, you can edit the parameter information when in the online view. If you created the embedded composite from a library composite, an exact copy of the library composite is made and placed within the control module. From that point forward, all links back to the original library composite are broken. If your purpose is to create a composite that you can modify without affecting the original block or any other composite blocks that are linked to the original, embed the composite. An embedded composite is a separate, standalone object; modifying it does not change the source block, and modifying the source block does not change the new composite.

468

System Configuration

Linked Composites
Linked composites also provide some useful features, but a greater understanding of how linked composites work is essential for you to fully take advantage of these features. With linked composites, you develop and maintain the control logic once, and that structural information can be used in several different control modules. The structural information is always maintained in the library, while the parameter information is stored within the control module itself. By storing the parameter information in the control module, you can adjust the values of the composite for each control module that references it. When a library composite is placed on a diagram as a linked composite, all the parameter information associated with that library composite is copied, with default values, to the control module. To modify these values for a specific control module, double-click the composite when the composite is selected from within the control module's diagram. You can then adjust the default values to the values you want to use. The control module stores all the parameter values that were changed from the library default values. If, at a later time, you modify the default value in the library for a parameter, any control module that has not had that parameter modified also receives the updated parameter value. For example, if you modify the default value for parameter ABC, any module for which that default value has not been set receives the new value as the default. Modules in which parameter ABC was modified are unaffected by the parameter change in the library. Note Changes to default parameter values in Linked Composite templates take effect in modules referencing templates only after a partial download of these modules. You can also change a default parameter value in an single instance of the composite template by disconnecting (delinking) the parameter from the template. Open the instance of the composite and select the parameter. Right click and select Properties. Deselect the Use Default Value from Composite Template option. The composite is still linked to the template, but this parameter's default value can now be changed for this instance of the module. The structural information of a linked composite is stored in the library. Changing any structural information on the library composite automatically modifies all control modules that reference the library composite. There are three ways to edit the structural information of a library composite: From within the DeltaV Explorer, select the composite in the library, click the right mouse button, and then click Edit. This launches a Control Studio window. From within Control Studio, click File | Open and click Objects of Type: Composite Templates. Then select the desired library composite by name and click OK. While editing a control module from within Control Studio, select a linked composite, click the right mouse button, and then click Edit Object. This launches a second Control Studio window with the composite loaded and ready for editing.

If you want to be able to change the original composite block definition and have that change propagate to all of the other composites you create from the block, use a linked composite. This way, you can fix or edit a composite in one place and all of the other linked blocks are changed automatically. When you link a composite block, it gets updated if you modify the original block or the composite template it was created from. Linked data is stored in the source block; the block you create from the original stores the location of the source block and displays a representation of the original block. Note If you have the linked composite open in a copy of Control Studio, go to that copy of Control Studio and press F5. This refreshes the window and your changes are displayed.

Creating Composites
You can create your own linked or embedded composites. You can start from an existing composite or start from scratch. Use Control Studio to create your composite. You do not have to create an embedded composite from a copy of an existing composite.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

469

Creating an Embedded Composite

In a function block diagram, you can create an embedded composite by dragging the Custom Block Special Items palette and clicking Embedded Composite, as shown in the following figure.

from the

Creating Custom Blocks Wizard Before clicking Next, enter the name of the composite in the Block Name field. After clicking Next, select the type of algorithm you want to use for the composite. You can create a Function Block Diagram (FBD) composite or a Sequential Function Chart (SFC) composite. The name indicates the type of algorithm the composite contains.

Custom Block Wizard: Selecting Number of Inputs and Outputs The number of inputs you set on this dialog determines the number of values to which you can wire from the containing FBD into the composite. In the composite, these wired values are input parameters and used as inputs to the composite's control strategy. The number of outputs determines the number of values that can be wired from the composite back to blocks in the containing FBD. In the composite, these wired output values are output parameters.

470

System Configuration

All input and output parameters are visible parameters on the composite block in the containing function block diagram. In an SFC, you can insert an embedded composite by clicking the right mouse button on the right side of the Hierarchy View and then clicking Add. A dialog appears, and you click Embedded Composite, as shown in the following figure.

Creating Custom Block for an SFC Wizard Then, you enter the block name and then click next. After clicking Next, select the type of algorithm you want to use for the composite. You can create a Function Block Diagram (FBD) composite or a Sequential Function Chart (SFC) composite. The inputs and outputs are not wired in an SFC diagram, but you might want to create a number of input and output parameters for use in the composite. After setting these numbers, click Finish. The composite now appears in the hierarchy view, but not on the SFC diagram. You run the algorithm in the composite using a non-boolean action in a step, and you can reference the parameters in the composite.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

471

Creating a Linked Composite

In a function block diagram, you can create a linked composite by dragging the Custom Block Special Items palette and clicking Linked Composite, as shown in the following figure:

from the

Creating a Linked Custom Composite Block Wizard After you enter the name, click Next and select whether you want to link to an existing object or a new object. The dialog looks similar to the following.

Creating a Custom Linked Composite Block Wizard: Selecting Linked Object Type Once you select the type of object you want to link to, click Next. Then, you can browse for any existing objects or define new objects. Once you have identified what the composite is linked to, click Finish.

472

System Configuration

In an SFC, you can insert a linked composite by clicking the right mouse button on the right side of the Hierarchy View and then clicking Add. The steps are then like the previous procedure for adding a linked composite to an FBD: Click Linked Composite and identify what the composite is linked to. The inputs and outputs are not wired in an SFC diagram. The linked composite appears in the Hierarchy View, but not on the SFC diagram. You run the algorithm in the composite using a non-boolean action in a step, and you can reference the parameters in the composite.

Converting Composites
Composites can be converted from linked to embedded and vice-versa. There are many reasons that you might want to convert them from one type to another: Perhaps you need to make a structural change in a composite that is linked, but you do not want to affect other composites that are also linked to the same library composite. Perhaps you created an embedded composite that could be used multiple places in your application. You would like to be able to use it in multiple algorithms and maintain it in one place. Perhaps you want to replace a composite's links to a particular library composite with links to a different library composite.

You can convert composites to different types and establish different links using the Convert command in Control Studio. The conversion options in Control Studio are as follows: Convert to Embedded Convert to Existing Convert to New

To accomplish a conversion, select the composite in a diagram, click the right mouse button, and then click Convert. Click To Embedded if you want to change a linked composite to embedded or To New if you want to change an embedded composite to a new linked composite. Click To Existing to convert an embedded or linked composite to a linked library composite that exists in the library. Note If you convert an embedded composite to a linked composite, the embedded composite will no longer exist in the database. During any of these conversions, wires to parameters of the same name are maintained. However, the values defined for those parameters with the same name are inherited from the new block. Parameters that no longer exist after conversion lose their wired links and the default values.

Convert to Embedded
Use the Convert to Embedded command in Control Studio to change a linked composite to an embedded composite. The new embedded composite keeps the same structural and parameter information, but the links to the library composite are broken. This allows you to make changes to the new embedded composite without affecting your other composites.

Convert to Existing
Use the Convert to Existing command in Control Studio to remove the selected composite and copy an existing composite in its place. If parameters are named the same in both composites and the parameters have been changed from the default value, the values of the existing composite's parameters are used. In other words, if you have modified the default value for a parameter with the same name as a parameter in the new composite, the value will remain. Any parameter that has not been modified will receive the updated parameter value.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

473

For example, if you have modified the default value for parameter ABC, the value for ABC in the new composite will remain the same. Any parameter for which the default value has not been set will receive the new value from the composite as the default. Parameter ABC will be unaffected by parameter changes in the library. Note If you convert an embedded composite to a linked composite, then the embedded composite will no longer exist in the database.

Convert to New
Use the Convert to New command in Control Studio to put a new composite in the library. If you convert a linked composite to a new composite, you essentially rename the composite and put a copy of the renamed composite in the library. The links are then made to the new composite in the library. If you convert an embedded composite to a new library composite, you put a copy of the composite in the library. Then links are established to the new composite in the library.

Expressions in the DeltaV System


User-defined expressions in the DeltaV system are used in function blocks to execute calculations, to perform conditional checks, and to perform system-wide reads and writes. The steps and actions in SFCs also use expressions. These expressions are based on the IEC 61131-3 Structured Text language. For more information on expression syntax, refer to the Expressions topic.

Command Languages
You can create algorithms for your modules in the DeltaV system using one of the following command languages: Function Block Diagrams (FBDs) - typically used for analog control, monitoring, motor control, and discrete valve control Sequential Function Charts (SFCs) - typically used for time-variant sequencing Structured Text (ST) - used within DeltaV software to create expressions in the condition, action, and calc/ logic function blocks as well as in actions and transitions in SFCs.

Reports and Printing


In the DeltaV System, you can print reports that document your configuration and your process. To get a configuration report, you can print a record of your configuration at any level in the DeltaV Explorer using the File | Print command, or you can document a specific module in Control Studio. Detailed reports on modules are provided by the DeltaV software. Select the information you want to print, including the module parameters and their values, the hierarchy, the alarms, and the module's algorithm. To obtain reports about events and alarms in your process, you can perform a query and print the results in the Event Chronicle application.

474

System Configuration

Control Studio Tips of the Day


The following tips are designed to assist you in using Control Studio's features. These tips are displayed when first starting Control Studio. They can also be accessed from the Help | Tip of the Day menu. Function Block Execution Order The correct execution order of function blocks makes the module run as efficiently as possible. You may set the function block execution order manually or allow Control Studio to determine the order automatically. Scan Rate Multiplier It is possible to make a function block run slower than the module that contains it. To do so, right-click a function block and select Block Scan Rate. Extensible Parameters Certain function blocks allow the number of input/output parameters to be increased or decreased. You can increase or decrease this number by right-clicking a function block and then selecting Extensible Parameters. Show Parameter Function block parameters that are not visible on the block can be displayed. To select such a parameter for display, right-click the associated function block and then select Show Parameter. Phase Requests It is very important that your phase waits for the Phase Request to be completed, as signified by the REQUEST register returning to 0, before issuing another request. Always follow any step that writes a value to REQUEST with a transition expression that waits for 'REQUEST' = 0. Unfinished Configuration A Work in Progress flag is available to mark your module as unfinished. This flag has no effect on the operation of the module. The download procedure will inquire whether modules with this flag set should be downloaded. Alarm Priorities You can write to the PRI parameter of an alarm to adjust the priority of the alarm in run time. Setting Execution Order after Adding a New Function Block After you add a function block, you can insert it into the execution order without having to reorder everything else manually. To insert a new function block into the execution order, press the Shift key, click the function block that precedes the new function block's place in the execution order, and then click the new function block. Function Block Diagram Wire Highlighting In the Online or Debug view, you can distinguish the wires that carry non-zero numeric values. Select Diagram Preferences from the Tools menu and check the box called Highlight non-zero wires. Feedback Wires Wires that carry feedback signals in function block diagrams are displayed as dashed lines. Feedback wires are determined when a module is saved or when the function block execution order is set.

Recipe Studio Application


A recipe defines a sequence of control functions that are started and stopped in a specific order as well as the variables and the equipment used to produce a batch. Recipes enable a batch plant to use the same process equipment to produce many different products or product formulations. Recipe Studio provides a graphical interface for creating, modifying, or deleting recipes.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

475

Recipe Studio creates two types of recipes: master recipes and control recipes. A master recipe is best thought of as a template or as the generic version of a recipe. A control recipe can be thought of as a product-specific version of the recipe. Any recipe you create or modify with Recipe Studio can be saved as a master or control recipe. Saving recipe information as a master recipe enables you to modify it later without restriction. Start Recipe Studio from the task bar by clicking Start | DeltaV | Engineering | Recipe Studio, as shown in the following figure. If you are running the DeltaV Explorer, you can run Recipe Studio by selecting a recipe, clicking the right mouse button, and then clicking Modify.

Start Menu for DeltaV Recipe Studio

476

System Configuration

The Recipe Studio window is divided into different sections called views. Each view is a window pane and can be resized to fit your needs. You can size, hide, and arrange the views depending on what you are editing and your personal preference. When a view is not currently visible, you can make it visible from the View menu.

The Recipe Studio Window Recipe Studio Tips of the Day The following tips are designed to assist you in using Recipe Studio's features. These tips are displayed when first starting the application. They can also be accessed from the Help | Tip of the Day menu. Default Transition Conditions When creating transitions, select Tools | Default Transition Conditions to make Recipe Studio automatically create default transition conditions. Verify Recipe After creating a recipe, make sure that you verify it. Verifying a recipe checks each level of the recipe and determines whether each step is connected and correctly configured. Recipe Studio The MAX_RESERVED parameter must be set to zero to allow ten phases to run in parallel in a recipe. Phase Restart The type of restart for a phase cannot be modified at configuration time. It can be modified dynamically from within the phase by writing to the RESTART_TYPE parameter. Phase Execution A phase can be made to execute across a transition without stopping the phase. This is useful when another phase has to be started in parallel part of the way through the first phase. Refer to the Using the DOWNLOAD_REQ Parameter topic in Books Online for more information. Phase Simulation If a phase has Simulate enabled, the Batch Executive will communicate with the Recipe Simulator instead of

DeltaV Configuration Applications

477

the phase in the controller. Additional configuration (using the REQUEST command) within the Recipe Simulator is required to fully mimic phase logic interaction with the Batch Executive. Releasing a Formula If you forgot to release your formula to production in Recipe Studio, you can do so in DeltaV Explorer by right-clicking the formula. Recipe Parameters Parameters can be created by drilling into any level of a recipe that is open in Recipe Studio. However, a recipe parameter can only be deleted if the operation, unit procedure, or procedure it belongs to is opened in Recipe Studio. Recipe Layout The layout of a recipe in the PFC view of the BOI follows the layout in Recipe Studio. Configuring recipes so that they always start in the top left corner of the diagram with the vertical size and spacing of the icons reduced allows for a better online display. Unit Aliases When using a unit alias in any step of a procedure, then all steps (within that procedure) that have classbased equipment assignments should use unit aliases also.

I/O Configuration Application


The I/O Configuration application gives you the ability to view your I/O channels, device tags, and the module parameters that reference them. The I/O configuration application also allows you to enable and disable multiple channels and edit the properties of I/O reference parameters and channels. Start the I/O Configuration application from DeltaV Explorer menus (Applications | I/O Configuration) or the DeltaV Explorer tool bar by clicking .

The I/O Configuration application lets you view I/O data in three ways. These views are available under the View menu. Control Strategies - Show a hierarchy that includes areas, assigned modules, and I/O reference parameters. For each parameter, this view displays the parameter type and its associated Device Tag.

478

System Configuration

From the control strategies view, you can select parameters and edit their properties by clicking the right mouse button.

Control Strategy View in I/O Configuration Network - Shows a hierarchy that includes each controller node and its I/O subsystem. The I/O subsystem shows the I/O cards connected to the controller and the channels on each I/O card. For each channel, this view displays the

DeltaV Configuration Applications

479

channel type and the associated Device Tag; it also shows whether the channel is enabled and provides references to this channel by modules.

Network View in I/O Configuration

480

System Configuration

Sort by Device Tag - Shows all of the Device Tags in the system, their hardware paths, and any module parameters that reference the Device Tags

Sort by Device Tag in I/O Configuration Filter the data by node, card, area, and module by clicking the Filter by command under the View menu.

Filter By Menu

DeltaV Configuration Applications

481

Standard Exports and Imports


The standard exports and imports functions store configuration data in an .fhx file. Typically, you do not need to edit an .fhx file. Use the standard exports and imports functions to store or transfer configuration data. For example, you can export configuration data and then import it into another system. Press the F5 key after an import to refresh DeltaV Explorer. If you are reinstalling or upgrading DeltaV software on a system, you can export that system's configuration and then import the configuration to that system again. When exporting and importing the entire DeltaV system for an upgrade or reinstall, select the Include the data for a DeltaV software upgrade check box on the Export and Import dialogs to save and restore the following user-defined information: custom engineering units version history recipe authorization history download history fieldbus device commissioning alarm priorities merging behavior on named sets

If you are exporting and importing to move or merge configuration information, you do not need to select the Include the data for a DeltaV software upgrade check box. Use standard exports as part of a system backup procedure. You can create standard export files of the entire configuration database, for an individual module, or at any level in between. Note When importing modules, the values of parameters in the function block template definitions in the library can change depending on how you perform the import. Changes to the function block templates do not propagate to existing modules in the library or in areas. For example: 1 2 3 4 5 6 In Control Studio, create a module that includes an AI block. Save the module as AI_TEST. From DeltaV Explorer, export the module to an FHX files. Delete the module AI_TEST from the database. Change the value of a parameter (for example, OUT) in the AI function block template in the library. From DeltaV Explorer, import the FHX file containing the module AI_TEST. A dialog appears asking if you want to update the existing AI object in the database (that is, the AI function block template in the library) with the AI block that is in the file you are importing. If you click Yes, the AI block function block template in the library is replaced with the AI block from the import file. If you click No, the AI function block template in the library will not be replaced. The module AI_TEST retains its AI block parameter values (as defined in the FHX) in either import case.

482

System Configuration

The standard import and export functions are available using the following DeltaV Explorer commands: File | Import | Standard DeltaV Format File | Export | Selected Object

To export, you can also select an object in the DeltaV Explorer hierarchy, right-click, and then click Export from the context menu. The DeltaV Explorer also support drag and drop exports and imports. You can drag an item from DeltaV Explorer onto an application (for example, Windows Explorer, MS Excel, MS Outlook, Notepad, Desktop, MS Word). This causes the item to be exported and then opened by or attached to the application, depending on how the application behaves. Dragging an FHX file to the highest level of the tree in DeltaV Explorer causes the file to be imported. When importing a configuration, a message may appear stating that the database already contains an object with the same name. This message asks if you want to update the existing object with the import file's object. Replying No to All typically allows the existing database items to be used (not the ones from the import file). However, there are certain objects that are always imported (or force updated) from the .fhx file. The force update list includes the following objects:ALARM TYPE ALARM ANNUNCIATION LOCK GROUP USER DEFAULT LOCK FIELD SECURITY PARAMETER SECURITY FUNCTION SECURITY NAMED SETS If VCAT is enabled, this can result in import log errors where the system was not able to overwrite library items that were not checked out. To recover, run sync-database after importing. Note When importing a database, any duplicate equipment IDs are renumbered. The equipment being imported is what gets renumbered. If two or more users are working concurrently on the same database, segment the equipment into specific IDs (for example, all tanks get 0-99, all agitators get 101-199, and so on). Then, when you combine the databases through an import, all of the equipment will retain the correct IDs, and your logic will reference the correct IDs.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

483

Export, Import, and Bulk Edit of Configuration Data


In addition to Standard Imports and Exports, the DeltaV system provides other ways to create configuration information using third-party tools: User-defined import/export using the Excel Bulk Edit Template User-defined import/export using to an ODBC compliant database (MS-Access, for example) INtools interface add-ins

Note It is recommended that you create a backup copy of the configuration database before bulk importing data.

User-Defined Exports and Imports


Inside this topic Supported Data Types Transferable Configuration Objects Format Specification Parameter Option Shortcuts in Class-based Modules User-defined exports and imports transfer configuration data to and from text files. You define the type and order of the data with a format specification file. The sections that follow provide the information you need to develop the files necessary for user-defined imports and exports. You can also work with a predefined set of files included with the DeltaV software. Throughout these sections, import and export operations are also described as transfers and the data in the spreadsheet, text file, or relational database is called external data. The following list outlines the tasks required in User-Defined Export and Import: 1 Select, create, or modify a format specification file (.fmt) to define the data to be exported and imported. Use the Format Specification wizard (from DeltaV Explorer select File | Format Specification) to create or modify a format specification file. If you are exporting and importing custom modules, create a template from the object you want to bulk edit. For more information, refer to the Bulk Edit Example - Custom Module topic. Export a selected object to a text file. Move the text file to the target machine. Import the text file.

2 3 4 5

The tasks required to create and edit class-based modules and class-based modules containing class-based modules are more involved. Refer to Bulk Edit Example - Class-based Modules and Bulk Edit Example - Class-based Modules Containing Class-based Modules. If you want to edit the information in the text file refer to Bulk Edit Overview. Note You can specify one object type for each import or export operation. For example, if you build a spreadsheet of channel data, the associated cards and controllers must already exist in the configuration database in order for the data to import correctly. The imported file can contain the card and controller names as well as the channel data, but these items are only used during the import to map the channel data correctly in the configuration database. You can also export and import using ODBC data. Refer to the Export and Import Using ODBC topic for more information.

484

System Configuration

Supported Data Types The DeltaV system supports the user-defined transfer of ASCII data (as text files that can be edited in a Unicode text editor or up to 255 characters in Excel using the DeltaV Bulk Edit template) and ODBC data (to a Microsoft Access .mdb file, for example).

Transferable Configuration Objects You can transfer (import and export) a subset of the objects in the configuration database. Each of the objects you can transfer has a number of fields. The information in the fields of files you are importing must be in a certain syntax that depends on the field. Refer to the Object Syntax topic for more information. Note: Bulk Edit does not support import or export of PROVOX or RS3 I/O.

Format Specification Before you can export data to bulk edit, you must have a format specification file to define the data for the object to export or import. The format specification file defines the format for data exported from and imported to the DeltaV database. Sample format specification files and some corresponding export files are included in the DeltaV installation. They are in the directory DeltaV/DVData/BulkEdit. You can use these as is or use the Format Specification wizard to create new .fmt files and then export data to create your own .txt files. Note Format specification files that you have created on a previous release of DeltaV should be reviewed to incorporate new data fields that may have been added in the current release. The following table lists the sample format files and output data files included with the DeltaV system. Sample Format Specification and Data Files Object Type Card Channel Fieldbus Device Fieldbus Port Formula Module Sample .fmt Files Card.fmt Channel.fmt FF_Device.fmt FF_Port.fmt Formula.fmt AnalogMonitor_Modul e.fmt, DiscreteMonitor_Modu le.fmt, Loop_Module.fmt, Motor_Valve.fmt Serial_Dataset.fmt Serial_Port.fmt Prog_Serial_Port.fmt Sample .txt Files cards.txt channels.txt ff_devices.txt ----analog_monitors.txt, discrete_monitors.txt, loops.txt, motor_valves.txt

Serial Dataset Serial Port Programmable Serial Port

-------

DeltaV Configuration Applications

485

Object Type Programmable Serial Dataset Profibus Port Profibus Device Profibus Slot Profibus Signal AS-Interface Device AS-Interface Discrete I/ O AS-Interface Port

Sample .fmt Files Prog_Serial_Dataset.fm t Prof_Port.fmt Prof_Dev.fmt Prof_Slot.fmt Prof_Sig.fmt ASI_Dev.fmt ASI_Disc_IO.fmt ASI_Port.fmt

Sample .txt Files -----------------

The format specification file defines the object to export and import, including the order of the data fields. The specification also defines the comment character, separator character, and the use of blank lines and columns. When you export data the output .txt files follow the field order specified in the .fmt files. To create or modify a format specification file, follow these steps: 1 From DeltaV Explorer, select File | Format Specification. Then, select New or Edit. If you selected Edit, select a format file to edit from the Open Format Specification dialog, then click Open. The Format specification - General dialog opens. 2 3 Select or verify the filename of the format specification file you are editing. Then, set the other options on the dialog as desired. Click Next. The Format specification - Select fields dialog opens. 4 Set or verify the Object type.

486

System Configuration

For the following object types, a Subtype field appears: Card object - Subtypes are card types. Channel object - Subtypes are channel types: 100 mv input, discrete input, discrete output, and so on. Formula object - Subtypes are formulas in Procedures, Unit Processes, or Operations. Module object - Subtypes are either specific modules or module templates.

If you select a subtype you can export information specific to the subtype. The fields that appear in the Field names area depend on the object type and subtype selected. Note that for each of the object types, there are required fields (that is, fields the import file must contain to be successfully imported). For information on required fields, refer to the Object Syntax topic. 5 6 Choose the fields to include in the format file. Click Next. The Format specification - Field order dialog appears. 7 If you are creating the format specification to import an existing data file, order the fields and insert skip columns as required. Use skip columns as placeholders if your import file contains data that you do not want or need to import. The number and order of fields in the format file must match the import data file exactly. If they do not match, importing the data results in errors. Click Next. The Format specification - Which fields must already exist in the database dialog appears. Depending on the object for which you are creating a specification file, there may be one or more fields listed in this dialog. Select a field to allow imports only when data in the selected fields already exist in the configuration database. For example, if you select the ctrlr (controller) field in this dialog, controllers listed in the ctrlr field in the import file must already exist in the configuration database to import data. 9 Click Finish. The software saves the format file.

Parameter Option Shortcuts Parameter option shortcuts in class-based modules (for parameters such as CONTROL_OPTS) appear in the heading column of the export file with generic option names. For example, PID1$CONTROL_OPTS.OPTION5. To see the descriptive term for the options you can do either of two things: Refer to DeltaV\bin\BitstringTranslations.txt Rename the parameter shortcut.

BitstringTranslations.txt DeltaV\bin\BitstringTranslations.txt contains a list of parameter options and the corresponding descriptive strings for the options. For example, the line for CONTROL_OPTS.OPTION5 looks like: CONTROL_OPTS.OPTION5 CONTROL_OPTS.ActOnIR If you encounter generic option names in your export files you can refer to the file to find the parameter and the option to see the descriptive term for the option.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

487

Note The DeltaV software uses BitstringTranslations.txt during configuration and operation. Do not modify BitstringTranslations.txt in any way. Doing so may cause unpredictable results. Rename Parameter Shortcuts You can make the descriptive terms appear in the export file by renaming the parameter shortcut in the control module class to the actual parameter name before you export a module. For example, to rename PID1$CONTROL_OPTS: 1 2 3 4 5 Select Advanced Definitions | Control Module Classes | General | module_name. Right click and select Configure. Select the Parameters tab of the module Configuration dialog. Select PID1$CONTROL_OPTS and click Rename. Rename the parameter shortcut CONTROL_OPTS. When you export the file will contain the descriptive strings in the headings for the CONTROL_OPTS options. If you rename the parameter shortcut to anything other than CONTROL_OPTS, the generic option names appear.

Object Syntax for User-Defined Exports and Imports


The tables in this section define the valid syntax and field values for the transferable objects. Each table has three columns: Field -- The field name as it appears in the format specification wizard and exported data files Valid Values -- The syntax of valid field values or a list of valid values Required for Import -- Indicates whether a field must exist in the import file and contain a value for the data to be successfully imported

Note Do not enclose field values in quotes. Click the following links to see a list of fields that each object contains and information about each field: Aliases AS-Interface devices AS-Interface discrete I/O AS-Interface ports Cards Channels DeviceNet devices DeviceNet ports DeviceNet signals Fieldbus ports Fieldbus devices Formulas Modules created from templates and class-based templates Process cells Profibus ports

488

System Configuration

Profibus devices Profibus slots Profibus signals Programmable serial ports Programmable serial datasets Serial ports Serial datasets Unit modules

In addition, this section contains three additional tables: Summary of required fields for each object type Valid card types Valid channel types

Valid Field Values for Aliases Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters. Unit class name, which must contain one alphabetical character and can have up to 40 characters Plant area name, which may be contain up to 16 characters Unit module name, which must contain one alphabetical character and can have up to 16 characters Name of the alias being exported The path string configured for external reference parameters Ignore this alias name T or F Required for Import No

unit_mod_class

Yes

area

Yes

unit_mod_name

Yes

alias_name alias_path

Yes No

ignore

No

DeltaV Configuration Applications

489

Valid Field Values for AS-Interface Devices Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters. Any valid controller name. The controller must exist in the database for the import to be successful. 1 through 8 PO1 and PO2 As many as 16 characters. The string must contain one alphabetical character and can include the following: $, -, _ 1 to 31 Sample 2In x 2Out module Sample proximity sensor Any other user-defined type True or False True or False True or False True or False True or False Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

card_slot asi_port_slot asi_dev_tag

Yes Yes Yes

asi_dev_addr asi_dev_type

Yes Yes

asi_dev_enable asi_dev_param0_enabl e asi_dev_param1_enabl e asi_dev_param2_enabl e asi_dev_param3_enabl e

No No No No No

490

System Configuration

Valid Field Values for AS-Interface Discrete I/O Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters Any valid controller name. The controller must exist in the database for the import to be successful. 1 through 8 P01 and P02 1 to 31 As many as 16 characters. The string must contain one alphabetical character and can include the following: $, -, _ Sample 2In x 2Out Module Sample proximity sensor Any other user-defined type asi_dev_sig_tag asi_disc_io_name Any valid name for Device Signal Tags Any valid user-defined name for AS-Interface Discrete I/Os No Yes Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

card_slot asi_port_slot asi_dev_addr asi_dev_tag

Yes Yes Yes Yes

asi_dev_type

No

Note that for an import or export of an AS-Interface device to succeed, the AS-Interface port must already exist.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

491

Valid Field Values for AS-Interface Ports Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters Any valid controller name. The controller must exist in the database for the import to be successful. 1 through 8 P01 and P02 True or False Reset devices. Continue polling. True or False Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

card_slot asi_port_slot enable ctrlr_fail_action auto_addr_enable

Yes Yes No No No

Note that for an import or export of an AS-Interface port to succeed, the controller must already exist. Valid Field Values for Card Objects Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters. Any valid controller name. The controller must exist in the database for the import to be successful. 1 through 64 See the Card Types table. T = redundant F = not redundant Card-level parameters Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

card_slot card_type redundant parameter

Yes Yes No No

492

System Configuration

Valid Field Values for Channel Objects Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters. Any valid controller name. The controller must exist in the database in order to import the channels. 1 through 64 Varies according to the card type See the Channel Types table. 16 characters or fewer. The string must contain at least one alphabetical character and can include the following characters: $, - and _. T = enabled F = disabled Channel-level parameters Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

card_slot channel_slot channel_type device_signal_tag

Yes Yes Yes No

enable parameters

No No

Valid Field Values for DeviceNet Devices Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters. Controller name. Up to 16 characters long Valid range for card slot is 1-64 for a given controller. Required for Import No

ctrlr card_slot

Yes Yes

DeltaV Configuration Applications

493

Field dev_net_port_slot

Valid Values A port on the DeviceNet card. The port connects to as many as 64 DeviceNet devices. Polling T or F As many as 16 characters. Must contain one alphabetical character and any of the following: $, -, _ DeviceNet device address. From 1 to 61 The manufacturer of this DeviceNet device The model of this DeviceNet device The revision of this DeviceNet device Input size in bytes between 0 and 255 Output size in bytes between 0 and 255

Required for Import Yes

dev_net_dev_enable_io _polling dev_net_dev_tag

No Yes

dev_net_dev_addr dev_net_dev_manu dev_net_dev_model dev_net_dev_rev dev_net_dev_input_siz e dev_net_dev_output_si ze

Yes Yes Yes Yes No No

Valid Field Values for DeviceNet Ports Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters. Controller name. Can contain up to 16 characters Valid range for card slot is 1-64 for a given controller. Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

card_slot

Yes

494

System Configuration

Field dev_net_port_slot

Valid Values A port on the DeviceNet card. The port connects to as many as 64 DeviceNet devices. T or F The rate at which information is sent over the Profibus network. Use Select Entry for list of valid entries. Stop scanning or continue scanning. Use Select Entry for list.

Required for Import Yes

enable baud_rate

No No

fail_action

No

Valid Field Values for DeviceNet Signals Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters. Controller name. Up to 16 characters long Valid range for card slot is 1-64 for a given controller. As many as 16 characters. Must contain one alphabetical character and any of the following: $, -, _ The manufacturer of this DeviceNet device The model of this DeviceNet device The revision of this DeviceNet device DeviceNet device address. From 1 to 61 Required for Import No

ctrlr card_slot

Yes Yes

dev_net_dev_tag

Yes

dev_net_dev_manu dev_net_dev_model dev_net_dev_rev dev_net_dev_addr

Yes Yes Yes Yes

DeltaV Configuration Applications

495

Field dev_net_sig_name

Valid Values As many as 16 characters. Must contain one alphabetical character, and any of the following: $, -, _ As many as 16 characters. Must contain one alphabetical character and any of the following: $, -, _ DeviceNet signal direction input: input or output DeviceNet signal byte offset: the byte location of the start of signal information DeviceNet signal datatype: the type of data this DeviceNet signal represents T or F DeviceNet signal low scale value: the signal value for 0% of scale DeviceNet signal high scale value: the signal value for 100% of scale DeviceNet signal start bit: the first bit to read data from DeviceNet signal number of used bits: the number of bits in the data word

Required for Import Yes

dev_net_sig_tag

No

dev_net_sig_dir

Yes

dev_net_sig_byte_offse t

No

dev_net_sig_data_type

Yes

dev_net_sig_use_scalin g dev_net_sig_low_scale _val dev_net_sig_high_scal e_val dev_net_sig_start_bit

No No

No

No

dev_net_sig_num_used _bits

No

496

System Configuration

Valid Field Values for Fieldbus Devices Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters. Any valid controller name. The controller must exist in the database for the import to be successful. 1 through 8 See the Card Types table. T = redundant F = not redundant 1 through 2 As many as 32 characters. The string must contain one alphabetical character and can include the following: $, -, _ 20 through 35 Derive valid values from the device description. Derive valid values from the device description. Derive valid values from the device description. A unique identifier for the fieldbus device T or F T or F Any valid picture name Any valid picture name Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

card_slot card_type redundant fb_port_slot fieldbus_device_tag

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

fieldbus_device_addres s fieldbus_device_manuf acture fieldbus_device_type

Yes Yes

Yes

fieldbus_device_rev

Yes

fieldbus_id fieldbus_device_bklk_ master enable_alarms primary_display faceplate_display

No No No No No

DeltaV Configuration Applications

497

Field ABNORM_ALM.ENA BLE ABNORM_ALM.PRI ORITY ADVISE_ALM.ENAB LE ADVISE_ALM.PRIOR ITY COMM_ALM.ENABL E COMM_ALM.PRIORI TY FAILED_ALM.ENAB LE FAILED_ALM.PRIOR ITY MAINT_ALM.ENABL E MAINT_ALM.PRIORI TY

Valid Values T or F Any valid alarm priority* T or F Any valid alarm priority* T or F Any valid alarm priority* T or F Any valid alarm priority* T or F Any valid alarm priority*

Required for Import No No No No No No No No No No

* The pick lists in the Excel template show the system-defined alarm priorities only. If these priorities have been renamed or if new priorities have been added then the pick lists are not updated. You can enter these priorities manually. Valid Field Values for Fieldbus Ports Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters. Any valid controller name. The controller must exist in the database for the import to be successful. 1 through 8 See the Card Types table. Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

card_slot card_type

Yes Yes

498

System Configuration

Field redundant fb_port_slot enable fb_port_macrocycle fb_port_min_sch_spaci ng parameters

Valid Values T = redundant F = not redundant 1 through 2 T = enabled F = disabled Valid value Refer to Books Online Valid values for the associated parameter

Required for Import Yes Yes No No No No

Valid Field Values for Formulas Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters. 16 characters or fewer. This string must contain at least one alphabetical character and can include the following characters: $, - and _. 16 characters or fewer. This string must contain at least one alphabetical character and can include the following characters: $, - and _. As many as 20 characters using any keyboard characters. This string is the Description field in the Controller Properties dialog. T = Released F = Not released Required for Import No

recipe_name

Yes

formula_name

Yes

version

No

release_to_production

No

Note that for an import or export of a formula to succeed, batch parameters must already exist.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

499

Valid Field Values for Modules* Note If a module is not created from a module template, you must create a template for the module in order to successfully export and import it with a user-defined format. Refer to Bulk Edit Example - Custom Module for instructions on creating a template for a module. Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters. Note that only the first 24 characters appear in faceplates. Any valid controller name Any valid area name. The area must exist in the database in order for the import to be successful. 16 characters None Yes*** 0.1 = 100 ms 0.2 = 200 ms 0.5 = 500 ms 1 = 1 second 2 = 2 seconds 5 = 5 seconds 10 = 10 seconds 30 = 30 seconds 60 = 60 seconds Any valid picture name Any valid picture name Required for Import No

ctrlr area

No No**

module_name module_type module_subtype scan_rate

Yes No Yes*** No

primary_display detail_display

No No

500

System Configuration

Field faceplate_display * Phase logic modules are not supported. ** The system looks up the correct area on import. If the area cannot be found, the module is imported to AREA_A. *** This field is required for new modules. If you do not provide this field, the system imports an empty module with default parameters. The name in this field must match the name of the module template that the structure of the new module is based on.

Valid Values Any valid picture name

Required for Import No

Valid Field Values for Process Cells Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters. Plant area name may be up to 16 characters long. Process cell class, which must contain one alphabetical character and can have up to 16 characters Equipment ID used by the system to acquire and release resources. Valid range: 1 to 32767 Required for Import No

area

Yes

proc_cell_name

Yes

equip_id

No

DeltaV Configuration Applications

501

Field max_owners

Valid Values Specifies the number of requesters that can use this resource simultaneously Specifies the graphic used to represent this equipment in DeltaV Operate

Required for Import No

mmi_pic

No

Valid Field Values for Profibus Devices Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters Any valid controller name. The controller must exist in the database for the import to be successful. 1 through 8 The slot to which the Profibus port is assigned T = enabled F = disabled As many as 16 characters. This string must contain one alphabetical character and can include the following: $, -, _ The address of the Profibus device The family for the device being imported The manufacturer of the Profibus device The model of the Profibus device The revision level of the Profibus device Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

card_slot profibus_port_slot enable profibus_dev_tag

Yes Yes No Yes

profibus_dev_addr profibus_dev_family profibus_dev_manufacturer profibus_dev_model profibus_dev_revision

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

502

System Configuration

Field profibus_dev_watchdog_en able profibus_dev_watchdog_ti me

Valid Values T = enabled F = disabled The time following a communication failure that a device failure action occurs

Required for Import No No

Note that for an import or export of a Profibus device to succeed, the Profibus card and Profibus port must already exist. Valid Field Values for Profibus Ports Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters Any valid controller name. The controller must exist in the database for the import to be successful. 1 through 8 The slot to which the Profibus port is assigned T = enabled F = disabled A device address between 1 and 125. Use an address that does not conflict with a slave device address. The rate at which information is sent over the Profibus network. Is a Profibus repeater on the segment to which this card is attached? T = yes F = no Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

card_slot profibus_port_slot

Yes Yes

enable station_address

No No

baud_rate

No

repeater

No

DeltaV Configuration Applications

503

Field fms_device min_io_cycle max_io_cycle token_rotation_time slot_time idle_time1 idle_time2 ready_time quiet_time gate_update_factor msg_retry_limit token_retry_limit fail_action

Valid Values Retain the default settings for this check box and these fields. Only Emerson Process Management personnel or users with extensive Profibus experience should alter these fields. If you plan to alter these fields, record the default values before making any changes.

Required for Import No No No No No No No No No No No No

How the port reacts if the controller fails

No

Valid Field Values for Profibus Signals Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters Any valid controller name. The controller must exist in the database for the import to be successful. 1 through 8 As many as 16 characters. This string must contain one alphabetical character and can include the following: $, -, _ Manufacturer of this Profibus device Model of this Profibus device Revision level of this Profibus device Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

card_slot profibus_dev_tag

Yes Yes

profibus_dev_manufacturer profibus_dev_model profibus_dev_revision

Yes Yes Yes

504

System Configuration

Field profibus_dev_addr profibus_slot_module_num profibus_slot_definition profibus_sig_name profibus_sig_tag profibus_sig_diag_chan profibus_sig_dir profibus_sig_byte_offset profibus_sig_data_type profibus_sig_use_scaling profibus_sig_low_scale_val ue profibus_sig_high_scale_va lue profibus_sig_start_bit profibus_sig_num_bits

Valid Values The address of the Profibus device The Profibus module number The definition of the module installed in this slot Any name that is valid for Profibus signals The device signal tag associated with this signal Number of the channel to use for diagnostics input or output The byte location of the start of signal information The type of data this Profibus signal represents T or F The signal value for 0% of scale The signal value for 100% of scale The first bit to read data from The number of bits in the data word

Required for Import Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes No Yes No No No No No

Note that for an import or export of a Profibus signal to succeed, the Profibus device must already exist. Valid Field Values for Profibus Slots Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters Any valid controller name. The controller must exist in the database for the import to be successful. Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

DeltaV Configuration Applications

505

Field card_slot profibus_port_slot profibus_dev_tag

Valid Values 1 through 8 The slot to which the Profibus port is assigned. As many as 16 characters. This string must contain one alphabetical character and can include the following: $, -, _ Any name that is valid in the system for Profibus slots The definition of the module installed in this slot The Profibus module number

Required for Import Yes Yes Yes

display_name profibus_slot_definition profibus_slot_module_num

Yes Yes Yes

Note that for an import or export of a Profibus slot to succeed, the Profibus device must already exist. Valid Field Values for Programmable Serial Datasets Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters Any valid controller name. The controller must exist in the database for the import to be successful. 1 through 8 RED_PROG_SERIAL_32D S (Prog. Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/RS485, Redundant) PROG_SERIAL_32DS (Prog Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/RS485) PROG_SERIAL_32DS_SE R2 (Prog Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/RS485, Series 2) T = redundant F = not redundant Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

card_slot card_type

Yes Yes

redundant

Yes

506

System Configuration

Field device_signal_tag

Valid Values 16 characters or fewer. This string must contain at least one alphabetical character and can include the following characters: $, and _. 1 or 2 PIO_CFG_NAME_PORT_ PROG_SERIAL_RED PIO_CFG_NAME_PORT_ PROG_SERIAL 1 through 16 1 through 16 1 through 16 input or output Boolean with status Discrete with status 8-bit unit with status 16-bit unit with status 32-bit unit with status 8-bit unit with status 16-bit unit with status 32-bit unit with status Floating point with status String with status Dependent on the PLC data type and the DeltaV data type. Refer to the Maximum Number of Values table in the Serial Device Configuration topic. Determines how the serial card transmits output data to the serial device T = Readback the output. F = Do not readback the output. The type of data this dataset contains 0 to 65535 0 to 65535

Required for Import No

serial_port_slot serial_port_pio_name

Yes Yes

serial_device_index serial_device_address dataset_number dataset_data_direction dataset_datatype

Yes No Yes No No

dataset_num_values

No

dataset_output_mode

No

dataset_output_readback

No

device_data_type data_start_addr special_data1

No No No

DeltaV Configuration Applications

507

Field special_data2 special_data3 special_data4 special_data5

Valid Values 0 to 65535 0 to 65535 0 to 65535 0 to 65535

Required for Import No No No No

Valid Field Values for Programmable Serial Ports

Field description

Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters Any valid controller name. The controller must exist in the database for the import to be successful. 1 through 8 RED_PROG_SERIAL_32 DS (Prog. Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/RS485, Redundant) PROG_SERIAL_32DS (Prog Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/RS485) PROG_SERIAL_32DS_S ER2 (Prog Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/RS485, Series 2) T = redundant F = not redundant 1 or 2 PIO_CFG_NAME_PORT _PROG_SERIAL_RED PIO_CFG_NAME_PORT _PROG_SERIAL master or slave 1 through 255 100 through 25500

Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

card_slot card_type

Yes Yes

redundant serial_port_slot serial_port_pio_name

Yes Yes Yes

serial_master_slave serial_retry_count serial_message_timeout

No No No

508

System Configuration

serial_transmit_delay serial_send_outputs

0 through 25500 T = Send outputs on startup. F = Do not send outputs on startup. RS232 RS422/RS485 half duplex RS422/RS485 full duplex 300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, or 115200 even odd none 7 or 8 1 or 2 T = Enable port. F = Disable port.

No No

serial_port_type

No

serial_baud_rate

No

serial_parity

No

serial_data_bits serial_stop_bits enable

No No No

Valid Field Values for Serial Datasets* Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters Any valid controller name. The controller must exist in the database for the import to be successful. 1 through 8 SERIAL_32DS (Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/RS485) SERIAL_32DS_SER2 (Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/RS485, Series2) RED_SERIAL_32DS (Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/RS485, Redundant) T = redundant F = not redundant Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

card_slot card_type

Yes Yes

redundant

Yes

DeltaV Configuration Applications

509

Field device_signal_tag

Valid Values 16 characters or fewer. This string must contain at least one alphabetical character and can include the following characters: $, and _. 1 or 2 PIO_CFG_NAME_PORT_ SERIAL PIO_CFG_NAME_PORT_ SERIAL_RED 1 through 16 1 through 16 1 through 16 input or output Boolean with status Discrete with status 8-bit unit with status 16-bit unit with status 32-bit unit with status 8-bit unit with status 16-bit unit with status 32-bit unit with status Floating point with status String with status Dependent on the PLC data type and the DeltaV data type. Refer to the Maximum Number of Values table in the Serial Device Configuration topic. Determines how the serial card transmits output data to the serial device T = Readback the output. F = Do not readback the output. coils input status input registers holding registers diagnostics data

Required for Import No

serial_port_slot serial_port_pio_name

Yes Yes

serial_device_index serial_device_address dataset_number dataset_data_direction dataset_datatype

Yes No Yes No No

dataset_num_values

No

dataset_output_mode

No

dataset_output_readback

No

dataset_plc_datatype

No

510

System Configuration

Field dataset_plc_reg_addr_offset

Valid Values 0 through 65535

Required for Import No

* Refer to the Serial Device Configuration topic for details on each field. Valid Field Values for Serial Ports Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters Any valid controller name. The controller must exist in the database for the import to be successful. 1 through 8 SERIAL_32DS (Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/RS485) SERIAL_32DS_SER2 (Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/RS485, Series2) RED_SERIAL_32DS (Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/RS485, Redundant) T = redundant F = not redundant 1 or 2 PIO_CFG_NAME_PORT_ SERIAL PIO_CFG_NAME_PORT_ SERIAL_RED RTU or ASCII master or slave 1 through 255 100 through 25500 0 through 25500 T = Send outputs on startup. F = Do not send outputs on startup. Required for Import No

ctrlr

Yes

card_slot card_type

Yes Yes

redundant serial_port_slot serial_port_pio_name

Yes Yes Yes

serial_protocol_type serial_master_slave serial_retry_count serial_message_timeout serial_transmit_delay serial_send_outputs

No No No No No No

DeltaV Configuration Applications

511

Field serial_port_type

Valid Values RS232 RS422/RS485 half duplex RS422/RS485 full duplex 300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, or 115200 even odd none 7 or 8 1 or 2 T = Enable port. F = Disable port.

Required for Import No

serial_baud_rate

No

serial_parity

No

serial_data_bits serial_stop_bits enable

No No No

Valid Field Values for Unit Modules Field description Valid Values As many as 255 characters using any keyboard characters. Note that only the first 24 characters appear in faceplates. Plant area name may be up to 16 characters long. Unit class name, which must contain one alphabetical character and can have up to 40 characters Unit module name, which must contain one alphabetical character and can have up to 16 characters Flag used during configuration to mark a module as being unfinished T or F scan_rate Use Select Entry for list of valid entries. No Required for Import No

area unit_mod_class

Yes Yes

unit_mod_name

Yes

work_in_progress

No

512

System Configuration

Field primary_display

Valid Values The primary control display picture name without ODF extension Associates the unit module with a picture file (such as Process.grf) Associates the unit module with a picture file (such as Process.grf) Equipment ID used by the system to acquire and release resources. Valid range: 1 to 32767

Required for Import No

detail_display

No

faceplate_display

No

equip_id

No

max_owners

Specifies the number of requesters that can use this resource simultaneously

No

The following table summarizes the fields that must exist in the import file for an object to be successfully imported. Note that Required Data on Import is different than the fields you specify in the Which fields must already exist in the database dialog you use when creating or editing a format file. Required Data on Import Object Type Card Required Data on Import ctrlr card_slot card_type ctrlr card_slot channel_slot channel_type ctrlr card_slot card_type redundant fb_port_slot fieldbus_device_tag fieldbus_device_address fieldbus_device_manufacture fieldbus_device_type fieldbus_device_rev

Channel

Fieldbus Device

DeltaV Configuration Applications

513

Object Type Fieldbus Port

Required Data on Import ctrlr card_slot card_type redundant fb_port_slot recipe_name formula_name module_name module_subtype ctrlr card_slot card_type redundant serial_port_slot serial_port_pio_name serial_device_index dataset_number ctrlr card_slot card_type redundant serial_port_slot serial_port_pio_name ctrlr card_slot card_type redundant serial_port_slot serial_port_pio_name ctrlr card_slot card_type redundant serial_port_slot serial_port_pio_name serial_device_index dataset_number ctrlr card_slot profibus_port_slot

Formula Module Serial Dataset

Serial Port

Programmable Serial Port

Programmable Serial Dataset

Profibus Port

514

System Configuration

Object Type Profibus Device

Required Data on Import ctrlr card_slot profibus_port_slot profibus_dev_tag profibus_dev_addr profibus_dev_family profibus_dev_manufacturer profibus_dev_model profibus_dev_revision ctrlr card_slot profibus_port_slot profibus_dev_tag display_name profibus_slot_definition profibus_slot_module_num ctrlr card_slot profibus_dev_tag profibus_dev_manufacturer profibus_dev_model profibus_dev_revision profibus_dev_addr profibus_slot_module_num profibus_slot_definition profibus_sig_name profibus_sig_dir profibus_sig_data_type ctrlr card_slot asi_port_slot asi_dev_tag asi_dev_addr asi_dev_type ctrlr card_slot asi_port_slot asi_dev_addr asi_dev_tag asi_disc_io_name ctrlr card_slot asi_port_slot

Profibus Slot

Profibus Signal

AS-Interface Device

AS-Interface Discrete I/O

AS-Interface Port

The following table lists the card types available. This table includes both the card display names (the names shown in dialogs and selection lists) and the export names (the names that appear in export files). The table also includes the valid channel types and port types for each card type.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

515

Card Types Display Name AI Card, 4 Ch., Isolated Input Export Name TI_4CH_ISOLATED Valid Channel and Port Types ISO_TC_CHAN ISO_TC_B_CHAN ISO_TC_E_CHAN ISO_TC_J_CHAN ISO_TC_K_CHAN ISO_TC_N_CHAN ISO_TC_R_CHAN ISO_TC_S_CHAN ISO_TC_T_CHAN ISO_MV_25_CHAN ISO_MV_55_CHAN ISO_MV_100_CHAN ISO_VOLT_0_5_CHAN ISO_VOLT_0_10_CHAN ISO_VOLT_1_5_CHAN ISO_VOLT_1_CHAN ISO_VOLT_5_CHAN ISO_VOLT_10_CHAN ISO_RTD_RES_CHAN ISO_RTD_PT100_CHAN ISO_RTD_PT200_CHAN ISO_RTD_NI120_CHAN ISO_RTD_USER_CHAN ISO_RTD_CU10_CHAN AI_CHAN AI_CHAN AI_HART_CHAN AI_CHAN AI_HART_CHAN AI_CHAN AI_HART_CHAN_RED AI_CHAN_RED AI_HART_CHAN AI_CHAN AI_HD_HART_CHAN AI_HD_CHAN AO_CHAN AO_DISABLED_HART_C HAN AO_ENABLED_HART_C HAN

AI Card, 8 Ch., 1-5 VDC AI Card, 8 Ch., 4-20 mA AI Card, 8 Ch., 4-20 mA, HART AI Card, 8 Ch., 4-20 mA, HART, Intrinsically Safe AI Card, 8 Ch., 4-20 mA, HART, Redundant AI Card, 8 Ch., 4-20 mA, HART, Series 2 AI Card, 16 Ch., 4-20 mA, HART, Series 2 AO Card, 8 Ch., 4-20 mA AO Card, 8 Ch., 4-20 mA, HART

AI_8CH_1-5V AI_8CH_4-20 AI_8CH_HART_4-20 AI_8CH_HART_4-20_IS AI_8CH_HART_420_RED AI_8CH_HART_420_SER2 AI_16_CH_HART_4-20 AO_8CH_4-20 AO_8CH_HART_4-20

516

System Configuration

Display Name AO Card, 8 Ch., 4-20 mA, HART, Intrinsically Safe

Export Name AO_8CH_IS_HART

Valid Channel and Port Types AO_DISABLED_HART_C HAN AO_ENABLED_HART_C HAN AO_DISABLED_HART_C HAN_RED AO_ENABLED_HART_C HAN_RED AO_DISABLED_HART_C HAN AO_ENABLED_HART_C HAN AO_CHAN ASI_PORT DNIC_PORT DI_IS_CHAN PCI_IS_CHAN DI_SOE_REG_CHAN DI_SOE_EV_CHAN DI_HD_CHAN DI_CHAN PCI_CHAN DI_CHAN PCI_CHAN DI_CHAN PCI_CHAN DI_CHAN PCI_CHAN DI_CHAN PCI_CHAN DI_CHAN_SER2 PCI_CHAN_SER2 DI_CHAN_RED PCI_CHAN_RED DI_CHAN PCI_CHAN DO_HD_CHAN

AO Card, 8 Ch., 4-20 mA, HART, Redundant

AO_8CH_HART_420_RED

AO Card, 8 Ch., 4-20 mA, HART, Series 2

AO_8CH_HART_420_SER2

AO Card, 8 Ch., Intrinsically Safe ASI Card, 2 Ports Device Net Card, 1 Port DI Card, 16 Ch., Intrinsically Safe DI Card, 16 Ch., Sequence of Events DI Card, 32 Ch., High Density DI Card, 8 Ch., 120 VAC, Dry Contact DI Card, 8 Ch., 120 VAC, Isolated DI Card, 8 Ch., 230 VAC, Dry Contact DI Card, 8 Ch., 230 VAC, Isolated DI Card, 8 Ch., 24 VDC, Dry Contact DI Card, 8 Ch., 24 VDC, Dry Contact, Series 2 DI Card, 8 Ch., 24 VDC, Dry Contact, Redundant DI Card, 8 Ch., 24 VDC, Isolated DO Card, 32 Ch., High Density

AO_8CH_IS ASI DNIC DI_16CH_IS DI_16CH_SOE DI_32CH_HD DI_8CH_115VAC_DCT DI_8CH_115VAC_ISO DI_8CH_240VAC_DCT DI_8CH_240VAC_ISO DI_8CH_24VDC_DCT DI_8CH_24VDC_DCT_SE R2 DI_8CH_24VDC_DCT_RE D DI_8CH_24VDC_ISO DO_32CH_HD

DeltaV Configuration Applications

517

Display Name DO Card, 4 Ch., Intrinsically Safe

Export Name DO_4CH_IS

Valid Channel and Port Types DO_CHAN MPO_CHAN CPO_CHAN DO_CHAN MPO_CHAN CPO_CHAN DO_CHAN MPO_CHAN CPO_CHAN DO_CHAN MPO_CHAN CPO_CHAN DO_CHAN_RED MPO_CHAN_RED CPO_CHAN_RED DO_CHAN_SER2 MPO_CHAN_SER2 CPO_CHAN_SER2 DO_CHAN MPO_CHAN CPO_CHAN FIC_PORT RFIC_PORT FIC_PORT MV_100_CHAN DIN_CHAN PIN_CHAN PIC_PORT PROG_SERIAL_PORT PROG_SERIAL_PORT_R ED PROG_SERIAL_PORT

DO Card, 8 Ch., 120/230 VAC, High Side DO Card, 8 Ch., 120/230 VAC, Isolated DO Card, 8 Ch., 24VDC, High Side

DO_8CH_115_240VAC_H SS DO_8CH_115_240VAC_IS O DO_8CH_24VDC_HSS

DO Card, 8 Ch., 24VDC, High Side, Redundant DO Card, 8 Ch., 24VDC, High Side, Series 2 DO Card, 8 Ch., 24 VDC, Isolated

DO_8CH_24VDC_HSS_R ED DO_8CH_24VDC_HSS_S ER2 DO_8CH_24VDC_ISO

Fieldbus H1 Card, 2 Ports Fieldbus H1 Card, 2 Ports, Redundant Fieldbus H1 Card, Series 2, 2 Ports Millivolt Input Card, 8 Ch. Multifunction I/O Card Profibus DP Card, 1 Port Prog Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/ RS485 Prog. Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/ RS485, Redundant Prog Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/ RS485, Series 2

FIC RFIC FIC_SER2 MV_8CH MULTI_14CH PIC PROG_SERIAL_32DS RED_PROG_SERIAL_32D S PROG_SERIAL_32DS_SE R2

518

System Configuration

Display Name RTD Input Card, 8 Ch.

Export Name RTD_8CH

Valid Channel and Port Types RTD_CU10_CHAN RTD_NI120_CHAN RTD_PT100_CHAN RTD_PT200_CHAN RTD_PT500_CHAN RTD_RES_CHAN RTD_USER_CHAN SERIAL_PORT SERIAL_PORT_RED SERIAL_PORT TC_CHAN TC_B_CHAN TC_E_CHAN TC_J_CHAN TC_K_CHAN TC_N_CHAN TC_R_CHAN TC_S_CHAN TC_T_CHAN

Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/RS485 Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/RS485, Redundant Serial Card, 2 Ports, RS232/RS485, Series2 Thermocouple Input Card, 8 Ch.

SERIAL_32DS RED_SERIAL_32DS SERIAL_32DS_SER2 TC_8CH

The following table lists the valid values for the channel_type field in import and export files for channel objects. Channel Types Channel Type 20 Millivolt Input Channel 50 Millivolt Input Channel 100 Millivolt Input Channel 100 Millivolt Input Channel 0-5 Volt Input Channel 0-10 Volt Input Channel 1-5 Volt Input Channel 1 Volt Input Channel 5 Volt Input Channel 10 Volt Input Channel Actuator Sensor Interface Port Export Name ISO_MV_25_CHAN ISO_MV_55_CHAN MV_100_CHAN ISO_MV_100_CHAN ISO_VOLT_0_5_CHAN ISO_VOLT_0_10_CHAN ISO_VOLT_1_5_CHAN ISO_VOLT_1_CHAN ISO_VOLT_5_CHAN ISO_VOLT_10_CHAN ASI_PORT

DeltaV Configuration Applications

519

Channel Type Analog Input Channel Analog Input Channel Analog Input Channel Analog Output Channel Continuous Pulse Output Channel Continuous Pulse Output Channel Continuous Pulse Output Channel Cu 10 RTD Input Channel Cu 10 RTD Input Channel DeviceNet Interface Port Discrete Input Channel Discrete Input Channel Discrete Input Channel Discrete Input Channel Discrete Input Channel (SOE REG) Discrete Input Channel (HD) Discrete Input Channel (IS) SOE Discrete Input Channel Discrete Input Channel (SOE EV) Discrete Input Channel (MF) Discrete Output Channel Discrete Output Channel Discrete Output Channel Discrete Output Channel (HD) Fieldbus Interface Port Fieldbus Interface Port Hart Analog Input Channel Hart Analog Input Channel Hart Analog Input Channel Hart Analog Output Channel

Export Name AI_HD_CHAN AI_CHAN AI_CHAN_RED AO_CHAN CPO_CHAN_RED CPO_CHAN CPO_CHAN_SER2 ISO_RTD_CU10_CHAN RTD_CU10_CHAN DNIC_PORT DI_CHAN DI_CHAN_RED DI_CHAN_SER2 DI_SOE_REG_CHAN DI_HD_CHAN DI_IS_CHAN DI_SOE_EV_CHAN DIN_CHAN DO_CHAN DO_CHAN_RED DO_CHAN_SER2 DO_HD_CHAN RFIC_PORT FIC_PORT AI_HD_HART_CHAN AI_HART_CHAN AI_HART_CHAN_RED AO_ENABLED_HART_CHAN

520

System Configuration

Channel Type Hart Analog Output Channel Hart Disabled Analog Output Channel Hart Disabled Output Channel Momentary Output Channel Momentary Output Channel Momentary Output Channel Ni 120 RTD Input Channel Ni 120 RTD Input Channel Profibus Interface Port Programmable Serial Port Pt 100 RTD Input Channel Pt 200 RTD Input Channel Pt 100 RTD Input Channel Pt 200 RTD Input Channel Pt 500 RTD Input Channel Pulse Count Input Channel Pulse Count Input Channel Pulse Count Input Channel Pulse Count Input Channel (IS) Pulse Input Channel Resistance RTD Input Channel Resistance RTD Input Channel Serial Port Type B Thermocouple Input Channel Type E Thermocouple Input Channel Type J Thermocouple Input Channel Type K Thermocouple Input Channel Type N Thermocouple Input Channel

Export Name AO_ENABLED_HART_CHAN_RE D AO_DISABLED_HART_CHAN AO_DISABLED_HART_CHAN_R ED MPO_CHAN MPO_CHAN_RED MPO_CHAN_SER2 ISO_RTD_NI120_CHAN RTD_NI120_CHAN PIC_PORT PROG_SERIAL_PORT ISO_RTD_PT100_CHAN ISO_RTD_PT200_CHAN RTD_PT100_CHAN RTD_PT200_CHAN RTD_PT500_CHAN PCI_CHAN PCI_CHAN_RED PCI_CHAN_SER2 PCI_IS_CHAN PIN_CHAN ISO_RTD_RES_CHAN RTD_RES_CHAN SERIAL_PORT ISO_TC_B_CHAN ISO_TC_E_CHAN ISO_TC_J_CHAN ISO_TC_K_CHAN ISO_TC_N_CHAN

DeltaV Configuration Applications

521

Channel Type Type R Thermocouple Input Channel Type S Thermocouple Input Channel Type T Thermocouple Input Channel Type B Thermocouple Input Channel Type E Thermocouple Input Channel Type J Thermocouple Input Channel Type K Thermocouple Input Channel Type N Thermocouple Input Channel Type R Thermocouple Input Channel Type S Thermocouple Input Channel Type T Thermocouple Input Channel Uncharacterized Thermocouple Input Channel Uncharacterized Thermocouple Input Channel User Defined RTD Input Channel User Defined RTD Input Channel

Export Name ISO_TC_R_CHAN ISO_TC_S_CHAN ISO_TC_T_CHAN TC_B_CHAN TC_E_CHAN TC_J_CHAN TC_K_CHAN TC_N_CHAN TC_R_CHAN TC_S_CHAN TC_T_CHAN TC_CHAN ISO_TC_CHAN ISO_RTD_USER_CHAN RTD_USER_CHAN

522

System Configuration

Exporting User-Defined Data


Inside this topic Selecting Items to Export Searching for Items to Export To export an object or any of its component objects, perform the following steps: 1 In DeltaV Explorer, select the object that you want to export. Then, select File | Export | User Defined... A wizard appears and leads you through the steps necessary to export the object.

The dialog contains two radio buttons that determine how you select data to export: Select the Children of selected component button to choose items in and below the selected component. Refer to the Selecting Items to Export topic for more information. Select the Search results button to search the DeltaV system for items to export. Refer to the Searching for Items to Export section for more information.

After you have selected the items to export by either of these methods the Format Source dialog appears. 2 Select the format specification file that defines the items whose data you are exporting. Then, click Next. The Export Target dialog appears. 3 Click Browse to open a select Export File dialog. Either select an existing text (.txt) file or enter a new filename to export data to. Then, click Next.

DeltaV Configuration Applications

523

The Export Results dialog appears. 4 Click the Export button to export the data. A log of the export actions appears in the dialog. Note that the export files are Unicode text files.

Selecting Items to Export After you select the Children of selected component button and click Next, the dialog changes to show a hierarchical view of the selected object and its children. Use the dialog to select specific objects of the same type to export. (You cannot export data for different types of objects at the same time.) Click Next and the Format Source dialog appears unless the software detects that some of the selected objects cannot be exported. If so, take the appropriate action and continue. After the Format Source dialog appears, return to the beginning of the Exporting User-Defined Data topic for information on how to continue the export.

Searching for Items to Export After you select the Search results button and click Next, the Find dialog appears. Use this dialog to search the entire DeltaV system for objects to export. You can perform simple searches by name and object type. Click the Advanced button to apply one or more criteria to your searches. For example, you can search for items of a specific type whose description contains a specific text string. You can use the wildcard characters "?" (match any single character) and "*" (match any number of characters) in the Value field of the conditions you specify. You can specify multiple conditions. After you complete your search, select items in the list by clicking, Shift-clicking, Control-clicking, and then clicking the Select button. The Format Source dialog appears. Return to the beginning of the Exporting User-Defined Data topic for information on how to continue the export.

524

System Configuration

Using the Bulk Edit Template


Inside this topic Editing User-defined Export Data Using the Bulk Edit Template Moving Modules with Bulk Edit Editing Channel Types User-defined exports and imports transfer configuration data to and from text files. DeltaV provides an Excel Bulk Edit template you use to edit the configuration in a spreadsheet. With bulk editing you can easily create or modify large amounts of configuration data, such as I/O channels. The sections that follow provide the information you need to develop the files necessary for user-defined imports and exports. You can also work with a predefined set of files included with the DeltaV software. Throughout these sections, import and export operations are also described as transfers and the data in the spreadsheet, text file, or relational database is called external data. The following list outlines the tasks required in using the Bulk Edit template to modify configurations: 1 Select, create, or modify a format specification file (.fmt) to define the data to be exported and imported. Use the Format Specification wizard (from DeltaV Explorer select File | Format Specification) to create or modify a format specification file. If you are exporting and importing custom modules, create a template from the object you want to bulk edit. For more information, refer to the Bulk Edit Example - Custom Module topic. Export a selected object to a text file. Open the Bulk Edit template from Excel. Open the exported data file from the Bulk Edit template. This creates an ASCII version of the file (with _ASCII appended to the file name). (The output from the user-defined export is Unicode, and some versions of Excel