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Metro Weekly - 08-04-11 - Game Theory

Metro Weekly - 08-04-11 - Game Theory

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All about video games and how they are related to the LGBT community. Interviews with Dan Hewitt, David Edison, Mike Larson and Paul Smith. Plus scenes from Cobalt, Duplex Diner and Town, featuring Raja.
All about video games and how they are related to the LGBT community. Interviews with Dan Hewitt, David Edison, Mike Larson and Paul Smith. Plus scenes from Cobalt, Duplex Diner and Town, featuring Raja.

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AUGUST 4, 2011 4 METROWEEKLY

The DuMont Delay
While Senate approves one gay nominee in July,
another judicial pick waits in limbo
DuMont
by Chris Geidner
O
n July 18, Sen. CharleS
Schumer (D-n.y.) spoke in
soaring tones of the action
the Senate was about to take
on the judicial nomination of J. Paul
Oetken, an out gay attorney confrmed
to serve as a u.S. District Court judge
for the Southern District of new york
on an 80-13 vote that evening.
“as the frst openly gay man to be
confrmed as a federal judge and to
serve on the federal bench, he will be a
symbol of how much we have achieved
as a country in just the last few decades,”
Schumer told the chamber. “and impor-
tantly, he will give hope to many tal-
ented young lawyers who, until now,
thought their paths might be limited
because of their sexual orientation.”
The judicial nominee who has been
waiting longer than any other in the
Obama administration for a hearing in
the Senate Judiciary Committee, how-
ever, also is an openly gay man – and no
one is willing to say, specifcally, why
his nomination is stalled.
President Barack Obama nomi-
nated that man, edward DuMont, to
serve as an appellate judge on the u.S.
Court of appeals for the Federal Circuit
more than 15 months ago. DuMont was
praised at the time by scholars on the
left and right. eugene Volokh, a liber-
tarian-leaning law professor at uCla
School of law who described DuMont
as a friend, spoke at the time about “the
apolitical, quality factors that ed has
going for him.”
yet, despite the highest ranking –
“unanimously well qualifed” – from
the american Bar association, DuMont
has not had so much as a single hearing
scheduled within the Senate Judiciary
Committee on his nomination, which is
a necessary step before scheduling the
nomination for a committee vote.
Committee spokeswoman erica
Chabot told Metro Weekly on July 29,
“Chairman [Patrick] leahy (D-Vt.) has
been prepared to move forward with
this nomination for months, but has
been trying to accommodate committee
republicans, who continue to not want
to move forward with the nomination.”
also, White house spokesman Shin
Inouye told Metro Weekly, “The presi-
dent continues to urge the Senate to
move forward on all his nominees,
including this one.”
The committee spokeswoman for
ranking minority committee member
Sen. Chuck Grassley (r-Iowa), Beth
levine, told Metro Weekly on aug. 1,
however, “There are questions in Mr.
DuMont’s background investigation
that have to be resolved.”
levine confrmed that the questions
have been shared with the Democrats
on the committee and with DuMont,
but said that she was unaware of and,
in any event, could not share any spe-
cifcs.
Chabot expressed surprise at the
levine’s response, saying on aug. 1,
“It is not the committee’s policy to
discuss background investigations on
nominees.”
Inouye did not respond to a request
for comment on levine’s claim.
later, on aug. 2, when asked whether
leahy would ever bring the nomination
up for a hearing without republican
willingness to do so, Chabot replied via
email, “The Committee is working with
the White house to determine how the
White house would like the Committee
to proceed with the nomination.”
When the Senate took no action
on DuMont’s nomination in the 111th
Congress, the nomination was returned
to the president on Dec. 22, 2010. On
Jan. 5, though, Obama renominated
DuMont – along with seven other
appellate judicial nominees and 34 dis-
trict court nominees.
at this point, DuMont has waited
longer for a hearing than any other
judicial nominee in the Obama admin-
istration currently before the Senate.
Three of the seven appellate nominees
renominated Jan. 5 have been con-
frmed; two had committee hearings
and await Senate action; one – Goodwin
liu, now a nominee for the California
Supreme Court – was withdrawn after a
successful Senate flibuster of the nomi-
nation; and two – DuMont and Victoria
nourse – await hearings.
nourse, originally nominated three
months after DuMont, worked for the
Senate Judiciary Committee and with
then-Sen. Joseph Biden in drafting the
Violence against Women act. She has
had a hold placed on her nomination
by Sen. ron Johnson (r-Wis.), who has
said that nourse “really has very little
connection to the state of Wisconsin,
and nobody in the legal community in
Wisconsin knows anything about her.”
L
G
B
T
News
Now online at MetroWeekly.com
Feature: Meet David Gaider, head writer of Dragon Age
Video: Play “Guess the Rest” with Raja at Town Danceboutique
LGBTNews
METROWEEKLY 6 AUGUST 4, 2011
Bancroft PllC – argue that same-sex
marriages are not a fundamental right
and that sexual orientation classifcations
should not be subjected to any height-
ened scrutiny. Windsor’s lawyers, on the
other hand, argue that marriage is a fun-
damental right and that sexual orienta-
tion classifcations should be subjected to
heightened scrutiny. although the argu-
ment seems semantic, the answers to
these questions could have a signifcant
impact on whether DOMa stands.
under the 14th amendment – applied
to the federal government through the
Fifth amendment – all laws that affect
fundamental rights or classify people into
groups receive a level of scrutiny: ratio-
nal basis, which is the lowest form of
scrutiny; intermediate scrutiny; or strict
scrutiny.
The u.S. Supreme Court has not made
a determination about the level of scruti-
ny to apply to sexual-orientation classif-
cations, even in the two cases in which it
struck down anti-lGBT laws – Romer v.
Evans and Lawrence v. Texas. If a funda-
mental right is impacted, that too triggers
heightened scrutiny.
If heightened scrutiny is found to
apply, then the law will be found to be
unconstitutional unless – depending on
the level of review – the government
shows an important or compelling inter-
est is advanced by the law. If the lowest
level of scrutiny applies, then the law is
presumed to be constitutional and the
court must only fnd a legitimate interest
to be advanced.
In the flings, BlaG gives several
DuMont – who noted his member-
ship in the Gay, lesbian, Bisexual &
Transgender attorneys of Washington
(GaylaW) on his Senate Judiciary
Committee questionnaire, as well as for-
mer membership in the national lGBT
law association – was the frst out gay
judicial nominee of the Obama adminis-
tration. a former clerk for Judge richard
Posner of the u.S. Court of appeals for
the Seventh Circuit, DuMont is a gradu-
ate of Stanford law School who worked
in the Solicitor General’s Offce during
the Clinton administration.
his nomination to the Federal Circuit,
supporters said at the time, would be
uncontroversial due to the court’s spe-
cialty docket. unlike other appellate
courts that hear all appeals in a certain
geographic area, the Federal Circuit has
its cases determined by the subject of
the litigation. among the cases the court
hears are those dealing with patent law
and certain types of lawsuits against the
government. l
BLAG’S Latest
DOMA Defense
In pair of flings, House tells court
that DOMA is constitutional
by Chris Geidner
The hOuSe BIParTISan leGal
advisory Group (BlaG) has been
defending the Defense of Marriage act
(DOMa) in court since President Barack
Obama and attorney General eric holder
announced Feb. 23 that the Department of
Justice would no longer defend Section 3
of the law – the federal defnition of mar-
riage as one man and one woman only.
In one of those cases – edith
Windsor’s challenge to the law because
of the $350,000 estate tax bill she was
ordered to pay following the death of her
wife, Thea Spyer – BlaG on aug. 1 fled
its motion to dismiss the case, arguing
that Windsor does not have a legal claim
to make because DOMa is constitutional.
additionally, BlaG – led by the house
republican leadership – fled its opposi-
tion to her motion for summary judg-
ment, which Windsor’s lawyers had fled
in late June.
In the dueling flings, BlaG’s law-
yers – led by attorney Paul Clement of
interests advanced, including that “cau-
tion” was appropriate in the face of “a
proposed novel redefnition of the foun-
dational social institution.” BlaG argues,
“as an empirical matter, the long-term
social consequences of granting legal
recognition to same-sex relationships
remain unknown.”
BlaG goes on to argue, “Whether or
not same-sex marriages are as benefcial
to society as traditional marriage in other
respects, it would have been reasonable
for Congress to have been concerned that
defning same-sex relationships as ‘mar-
riages,’ despite the fact that they neces-
sarily cannot result in children without
assistance — and are (and particularly in
1996, were) less likely to involve children
— would weaken society’s understand-
ing of the importance of marriage for
children.”
In her earlier fling, Windsor argued,
far from being dismissed, her case should
succeed without the need for a trial
because she is right on the legal argu-
ments and there are no factual disputes.
her lawyers – led by roberta Kaplan of
Paul, Weiss, rifkind, Wharton & Garrison
llP – note that “under the Constitution,
discriminatory classifications cannot
merely perpetuate past stereotypes or
enforce prior discrimination.”
Windsor’s fling continued: “Thus, the
fact that lesbians and gay men have his-
torically been denied access to marriage
cannot provide the necessary indepen-
dent basis for the federal government’s
disregard of existing state-approved mar-
riages of same-sex couples today.” l
Edith “Edie” Windsor, right, with wife Thea Spyer
P
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LGBTNews
METROWEEKLY.cOM 7
Attacks Continue
Suspect shoots at transgender
woman one block from Mclean
attack
by yusef najaf
JuST 11 DayS aFTer a TranSGen-
der woman, lashai Mclean, was shot
and killed, another transgender woman,
Tonya harrell, says an unidentifed
suspect fred shots at her in the 6200
block of Dix Street ne – one block from
where Mclean was killed, according to
the Metropolitan Police Department.
none of the bullets struck harrell, who
managed to fee the scene uninjured, at
approximately 2:45 a.m., Sunday, July 31.
MPD describes a single suspect in the
July 31 shooting as “a black male, 17-19
years old, 5’6”, 180 lbs, dark complexion.”
The MPD release describing the July
31 attack reads, “The victim was in the
6200 block of Dix Street ne when a sus-
pect approached [her] on foot. … The sus-
pect asked for change and without wait-
D
y
l
a
n

C
O
M
S
T
O
C
K
Mourners at the July 23 vigil for Lashai Mclean
LGBTNews
METROWEEKLY 8 AUGUST 4, 2011
Bridge Builder
La Raza honors lesbian Latina
member of its board
by yusef najaf
The naTIOnal COunCIl OF la
raza, the nation’s largest hispanic
civil rights organization, and the Gill
Foundation, which advocates for lGBT
equality, joined to honor Catherine Pino
of Falls Church for her efforts in advanc-
ing civil rights, at a July 25 reception.
Pino is co-founder of D&P Creative
Strategies, a progressive consulting frm,
and has also served as a board member
for the Congressional hispanic Caucus
Institute (ChCI) and the Gay & lesbian
alliance against Defamation (GlaaD).
“nClr appointed me to their board
at the beginning of the year and they
made a conscientious decision to appoint
an open lesbian to their board, which
is huge in the latino community,” Pino
said, speaking to Metro Weekly.
“homosexuality is usually a taboo
subject in our community and so I’ve
worked most of my adult life really try-
ing to bridge the two communities,” she
added.
Speaking of the July 25 reception, Pino
called the event “an incredible honor.”
“What was so beautiful was that we
had over 200 people that came, and not
just lGBT people, lots of allies and lots of
latinos. … It was really special.”
Ingrid Duran, Pino’s partner in busi-
ness and life, introduced Pino at the
reception.
Pino says the two launched their con-
sulting frm “to change the world.”
ing for a reply pulled a semi-automatic
handgun and shot at the victim, without
hitting the victim.”
according to the release, due to simi-
larities, MPD is looking at the two attacks
as “a potential emerging pattern.”
Police in the Sixth District are
working with the MPD’s Gay and
lesbian liaison unit (Gllu), as well
as Transgender health empowerment
(The) and the Prince George’s County
Police Department to “enhance patrol
efforts in the area” where the shootings
occurred.
Mclean was killed in the 6100 block of
Dix Street ne on July 20. no arrests have
been made. In that case, MPD describes
the suspects as “two black males in their
late teens to early 20s.
“The frst suspect is described as being
6-feet-tall with a thin build and light
complexion. The shooter is described as
being shorter and having a darker com-
plexion than the other suspect.”
Speaking with Metro Weekly Monday,
aug. 1, MPD Deputy Chief Diane Groomes
said that while she can’t confrm the
Sunday shooting is related to the July 20
killing of Mclean, the circumstances are
“identical.”
“When I heard what occurred, to me
it kind of seems like an identical situa-
tion,” she said. “The facts were two peo-
ple approach a transgender woman, in
this case around 3 a.m., we do not know
what words were said [to Mclean]; this
one … approached Tanya and said, ‘Give
me change.’ When she walked away, one
yelled at her and shoots at her.” l
“We started a business. People
thought we were crazy. We wanted to
give back to the communities we cared
about, which is the latino communities
and the lGBT communities, so that’s
what we’re doing.”
Those efforts include working with
the human rights Campaign, as well as
la raza and GlaaD. l
Pino
marketplace - real estate
9 METROWEEKLY.cOM
marketplace - real estate
AUGUST 4, 2011 10 METROWEEKLY
Weekly evenTS
ANDRoMEDA TRANScuLTuRAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services
(by appointment). 202-291-4707 or
andromedahealthcenter.org.
BET MiSHPAcHAH, founded by members of
the LGBT community, holds Saturday morning
Shabbat services, 10 a.m., followed by kiddush
luncheon. Services in DCJCC Community Room,
1529 16th St. NW. betmish.org.
BRAziLiAN GLBT GRouP, including others
interested in Brazilian culture, meets. For loca-
tion/time, email braziliangaygroup@yahoo.com.
Dc AquATicS cLuB (DCAC) practice session at
Marie Reed Aquatic Center, 2200 Champlain St.
NW. 8-9:30 a.m. swimdcac.org.
Dc FRoNT RuNNERS running/walking/social
club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and
supportive environment, socializing afterward.
Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk;
or 10 a.m. for fun run. info@dcfrontrunners.org or
dcfrontrunners.org.
Dc THiRTy SoMETHiNG social group (dinners,
concerts, etc.) for gay guys in their 30s meets.
To join/more information, send name and email
address to dcthirtysomething@yahoo.com.
DiGNiTy NoRTHERN ViRGiNiA sponsors
Mass for LGBT community, family and friends.
6:30 p.m., Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill, 3606
Seminary Road, Alexandria. All welcome. 703-
912-1662, dignitynova@gmail.com.
Dc SENTiNELS basketball team meets at Turkey
Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan Ave.
NE, 2-4 p.m. For players of all levels, gay or
straight. teamdcbasketball.org.
iDENTiTy offers free and confdential HIV test-
ing in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave.,
Suite 411. Walk-ins 12-3 p.m. For appointments
other hours, call 301-422-2398.
uS HELPiNG uS hosts Exercise Group:
Stretching and Low Impact Aerobics, 10-11 a.m.,
3636 Georgia Ave. NW. $15. 202-446-1100.
Sunday, August 7
ADVENTuRiNG outdoors group and Chrysalis
arts and culture group cosponsor easy Paw Paw
Tunnel Hike near Cumberland, Md. Optional
Potomac swim. Bring beverages, lunch, bug spray,
sunscreen, swimsuit, towel and about $25. Meet
9 a.m., Forest Glen Metro, Kiss & Ride lot. Call
Craig, 202-462-0535. adventuring.org.
ATLANTic STATES GAy RoDEo
ASSociATioN presents monthly trail ride. 11
a.m.-noon, approx. Piscataway Stables, Clinton,
Md. $25 per rider. All experience levels welcome.
Patrick, trail@asgra.org or 202-352-2356.
Weekly evenTS
Dc AquATicS cLuB (DCAC) practice session at
Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van Buren St. NW.
9-10:30 a.m. swimdcac.org.
Friday, August 5
Weekly evenTS
ANDRoMEDA TRANScuLTuRAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services
(by appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedahealthcenter.org.
BET MiSHPAcHAH, founded by members of the
GLBT community, holds Friday night Shabbat
services followed by “oneg” social hour. 8:30 p.m.
Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529 16th
St. NW. betmish.org.
GAy DiSTRicT, a non-church-affliated discus-
sion and social group for GBTQ men between
18 and 35, meets at 8:30 p.m., St. Margaret’s
Episcopal Church, 1820 Connecticut Ave. NW.
gd@gaydistrict.org or gaydistrict.org.
GAy MARRiED MEN’S ASSociATioN
(GAMMA) is a peer-support group that meets in
Dupont Circle every second and fourth Friday at
7:30 p.m. gay-married.com or GAMMAinDC1@
yahoo.com.
HiV TESTiNG at Whitman-Walker Health,
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St.
NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. For an appointment call
202-483-TEST. whitman-walker.org.
NATioNAL ciTy cHRiSTiAN cHuRcH, an
inclusive congregation, hosts Noontime Pipe
Organ Recital, 12:15-1 p.m., 5 Thomas Circle NW.
202-797-0103 or nationalcity.org.
SMyAL’S REc NiGHT provides a social atmo-
sphere for GLBT and questioning youth, featur-
ing dance parties, movie nights and game nights.
Leandrea.Gilliam@smyal.org.
TRANSGENDER HEALTH EMPoWERMENT
“Diva Chat” support group. 6-8 p.m., 1414 North
Capitol St. NE. Snacks provided. 202-636-1646.
Saturday, August 6
ADVENTuRiNG outdoors group goes tubing
down Antietam Creek near Sharpsburg, Md. Call
Paul, 202-321-1180. adventuring.org.
cHRySALiS arts & culture group enjoys all-you-
can-eat corn roast at historic Union Mills home-
stead near Westminster, Md. Ticket and transpor-
tation fees around $20. Mike, 202-833-0000 or
schonaconda@yahoo.com.
thurSday, August 4
Weekly evenTS
ANDRoMEDA TRANScuLTuRAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services
(by appointment). Call 202-291-4707, or visit
andromedahealthcenter.org.
cAREGiVERS coNNEcT is a support group for
those caring for loved ones living with HIV/AIDS
or a recent cancer diagnosis. Co-sponsored by
Whitman-Walker Health and Mautner Project.
Registration required. Contact peersupport@
wwc.org.
Dc AquATicS cLuB (DCAC) practice session at
the Takoma Aquatic Center, 7:30-9 p.m.
Visit swimdcac.org.
Dc LAMBDA SquARES gay and lesbian square-
dancing group features mainstream through
advanced square dancing at the National City
Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW, 7-9:30
p.m. Casual dress. Email info@dclambdasquares.
org, call 301-257-0517 or visit
dclambdasquares.org.
The DuLLES TRiANGLES Northern Virginia
social group meets for happy hour at Sheraton in
Reston, 11810 Sunrise Valley Drive, second-foor
bar, 7-9 p.m. All welcome. Email info@
dullestriangles.com or visit dullestriangles.com.
HiV TESTiNG at Whitman-Walker Health. The
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St.
NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center,
2301 MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Call
202-483-TEST. Visit whitman-walker.org.
iDENTiTy offers free and confdential HIV test-
ing in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave., and
in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave.,
Suite 411. Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments
other hours, call Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978 or
Takoma Park at 301-422-2398.
uS HELPiNG uS hosts a Narcotics Anonymous
Meeting, 6:30-7:30 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
The group is independent of UHU. 202-446-1100.
11 METROWEEKLY.cOM
Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in the
gay community, from alternative social events to volunteer opportunities.
Event information should be sent by e-mail to calendar@metroweek-
ly.com; by fax to 202-638-6831; or by mail to Metro Weekly, Attn:
Community Calendar, 1012 14th Street NW, Suite 209, Washington, D.C.
20005. Deadline for inclusion is noon on the Friday before publication.
“Announcement” submissions that are not date-specifc may run for two
weeks, with the option for listing organizations to resubmit if appropriate.
Questions about the calendar can be directed to the Metro Weekly offce
at 202-638-6830.
LGBTCommunityCalendar
marketplace - professional services
AUGUST 4, 2011 12 METROWEEKLY
BETHEL cHuRcH-Dc is a progressive and radi-
cally inclusive church with services at 2 p.m. in St.
Stephens Episcopal Church, 1525 Newton St. NW.
betheldc.org.
DiGNiTy WASHiNGToN offers Roman Catholic
Mass for the LGBT community. 6 p.m., St.
Margaret’s Church, 1820 Connecticut Ave. NW. All
welcome. Sign interpreted. 202-546-2235, dignity@
dignitywashington.org, or dignitywashington.org.
FRiENDS MEETiNG oF WASHiNGToN meets for
worship, 10:30 a.m., 2111 Florida Ave. NW, Quaker
House Living Room (next to Meeting House on
Decatur Place), 2nd foor. Special welcome to lesbi-
ans and gays. Handicapped accessible from Phelps
Place gate. Hearing assistance. quakersdc.org.
HoPE uNiTED cHuRcH oF cHRiST welcomes
GLBT community for worship. 10:30 a.m., 6130 Old
Telegraph Road, Alexandria. hopeucc.org
METRoPoLiTAN coMMuNiTy cHuRcH oF
WASHiNGToN, D.c. services at 9 a.m. (ASL inter-
preted) and 11 a.m. Children’s Sunday School at 11
a.m. 474 Ridge St. NW. mccdc.com, 202-638-7373.
RAiNBoW FAMiLiES Dc’s “Maybe Baby” series
for LGBT singles and couples considering parent-
hood meets 3-5 p.m. info@rainbowfamiliesdc.org.
ST. STEPHEN AND THE iNcARNATioN, an
“interracial, multi-ethnic Christian Community”
offers services in English, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., and
in Spanish at 5:15 p.m. 1525 Newton St. NW. 202-
232-0900, saintstephensdc.org.
uNiTARiAN uNiVERSALiST cHuRcH oF
SiLVER SPRiNG invites LGBTQ families and indi-
viduals of all creeds and cultures to join the church.
Services 9:15 and 11:15 a.m. 10309 New Hampshire
Ave., Silver Spring. uucss.org.
Monday, August 8
Weekly evenTS
GETEquAL meets 6:30-8 p.m. at Quaker House,
2111 Florida Ave. NW. getequal.wdc@gmail.com.
KARiNG WiTH iNDiViDuALiTy (K.i.) SERVicES,
3333 Duke St., Alexandria, offers free “rapid” HIV
testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 703-823-4401.
METRoPoLiTAN coMMuNiTy cHuRcH oF
WASHiNGToN, D.c., sponsors an HIV-positive
support group. 7 p.m., 474 Ridge St. NW. Open to
all. Matt, ndc20003@yahoo.com.
SMyAL offers free HIV Testing, 5-7 p.m.,
by appointment, for youth 21 and younger.
Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155 or
HIVprevention@smyal.org.
uS HELPiNG uS hosts a black gay men’s evening
affnity group. 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
202-446-1100.
WASHiNGToN WETSKiNS Water Polo Team
practices 7-9 p.m. Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van
Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic swim-
ming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299-0504;
secretary@wetskins.org; or wetskins.org.
Whitman-Walker Health HiV/AiDS SuPPoRT
GRouP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets 7
p.m. 202-939-7671, hivsupport@wwc.org. 13 METROWEEKLY.cOM
tueSday, August 9
ARLiNGToN GAy & LESBiAN ALLiANcE offers
a Candidate Forum for contested primary races.
Meet and greet 6:30-7 p.m.; forum at 7 p.m. National
Rural Electric Cooperative Conference Center,
Room CC2, 4301 Wilson Blvd., Arlington.
info@agla.org, agla.org.
ADVENTuRiNG outdoors group bikes 15 miles in
Franklin and Zachary Taylor parks in Northern
Virginia. Bring helmet, beverage, $2 fee. Meet 6:25
p.m., Clarendon Metro, elevator entrance. Scott,
703-535-7356. adventuring.org.
THE GAy AND LESBiAN AcTiViST ALLiANcE
(GLAA), local nonpartisan political lobbying group,
meets at 7 p.m., Wilson Building, 1350 Pennsylvania
Ave. NW, Room 120, to discuss MPD response to
hate crimes and other matters. 202-667-5139,
glaa.org.

Weekly evenTS
ANDRoMEDA TRANScuLTuRAL HEALTH offers
free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services (by
appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedahealthcenter.org.
ASiANS AND FRiENDS weekly happy hour, with
dinner afterward, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Cobalt/30
Degrees Lounge, 1639 R St. NW. afwashington.net.
Dc AquATicS cLuB (DCAC) practice session at
Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van Buren St. NW.
7:30-9 p.m. swimdcac.org.
Dc FRoNTRuNNERS running/walking/social club
serving greater D.C.’s LGBT community and allies
hosts an evening run/walk. dcfrontrunners.org.
Whitman-Walker Health’s GAy MEN’S HEALTH
AND WELLNESS/STD cLiNic opens at 6 p.m.,
1701 14th St. NW. Patients are seen on walk-in basis.
No-cost screening for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea and
chlamydia. Hepatitis and herpes testing available
for fee. whitman-walker.org.
HiV TESTiNG at Whitman-Walker Health. D.C.:
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. For an appoint-
ment call 202-483-TEST. Visit whitman-walker.org.
THE HiV WoRKiNG GRouP of THE cENTER
hosts “Packing Party,” where volunteers assemble
safe-sex kits of condoms and lube. 7 p.m., Green
Lantern, 1335 Green Court NW. thedccenter.org.
iDENTiTy offers free and confdential HIV testing
in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave., and in
Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite 411.
Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments other hours,
call Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978 or Takoma Park
at 301-422-2398.
AUGUST 4, 2011 14 METROWEEKLY
marketplace - professional services
15 METROWEEKLY.cOM
SMyAL offers free HIV Testing, 5-7 p.m., by
appointment, for youth 21 and younger. Youth
Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155 or
hivprevention@smyal.org.
uLTiMATEouT, LGBT ultimate Frisbee, practices
6:30-8 p.m., National Mall in front of Air & Space
Museum. All welcome. Ben, schockb@gmail.com.
http://on.fb.me/lqcEof.
uS HELPiNG uS hosts “A Positive U” support
group for black gay men living with HIV/AIDS, 7-9
p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW. 202-446-1100.
WASHiNGToN WETSKiNS Water Polo Team
practices 7-9 p.m., Takoma Aquatic Center, 300 Van
Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic swim-
ming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299-0504
or secretary@wetskins.org. wetskins.org.
Sunday, August 14
LAMBDA Sci-Fi, monthly meeting and social for
LGBT sci-f/fantasy/horror fans meets 1:30 p.m.,
1414 17th St. NW. James, 202-232-3141.
lambdascif.org. l
AD LiB, a group for freestyle conversation, meets
about 7:45 p.m., covered-patio area of Cosi, 1647
20th St. NW. All welcome. Jamie, 703-892-8567.
Dc AquATicS cLuB (DCAC) practice session at
Marie Reed Aquatic Center, 2200 Champlain St.
NW. 8-9:30 p.m. swimdcac.org.
iDENTiTy offers free and confdential HIV testing
in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave. Walk-
ins 2-7 p.m. For appointments other hours, call
Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978.
KARiNG WiTH iNDiViDuALiTy (K.i.) SERVicES,
at 3333 Duke St., Alexandria, offers free “rapid”
HIV testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Call 703-823-4401 for details.
HiV TESTiNG at Whitman-Walker Health. D.C.:
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-6 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. For an appoint-
ment call 202-483-TEST. whitman-walker.org.
PRiME TiMERS oF Dc, social club for mature gay
men, hosts weekly happy hour/dinner. 6:30 p.m.,
Windows Bar above Dupont Italian Kitchen, 1637
17th St. NW. Carl, 703-573-8316; or Bill,
703-671-2454.
SMyAL’S LGBTQ Youth Arts Program, for youth
13-21, meets 5-7 p.m., Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE.
Stephanie Remick at 202-567-3163 or
stephanie.remick@smyal.org.
KARiNG WiTH iNDiViDuALiTy (K.i.) SERVicES,
at 3333 Duke St., Alexandria, offers free “rapid” HIV
testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 703-823-4401.

SMyAL offers free HIV Testing, 5-7 p.m., by
appointment for youth 21 and younger. Youth
Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155 or
hivprevention@smyal.org.
SuPPoRT GRouP FoR LGBTq youTH ages 13-21
meets at SMYAL, 410 7th St. SE, 5-7 p.m. Leandrea
Gilliam, 202-546-5940, ext. 116, or
leandrea.gilliam@smyal.org.
uS HELPiNG uS hosts a support group for black
gay men 40 and older. 7-9 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave.
NW. 202-446-1100.
WedneSday, August 10
BiG GAy BooK GRouP meets at 7 p.m. to discuss
Death in the Fifth Position by Gore Vidal, writing as
Edgar Box. Location TBD. biggaybookgroup.com.

THE LAMBDA BRiDGE cLuB meets at 7:30 p.m.,
Dignity Center, 721 8th St. SE, for Duplicate Bridge.
No reservations needed. All welcome. Visit
lambdabridge.com.
Weekly evenTS
ANDRoMEDA TRANScuLTuRAL HEALTH offers
free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services (by
appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedahealthcenter.org.
AUGUST 4, 2011 16 METROWEEKLY
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LGBTopinion
FOr ThOSe
who don’t know
already, I suppose
I need to come out
publicly. I am, of
course, a gamer.
I don’t mean
that I’m someone
you’ll fnd play-
ing Angry Birds in
the dentist’s waiting room (although
I totally am). I mean that video games
are a major, important part of my life.
how important? Important enough
that under my TV sit an XBox 360,
a PlayStation 3 and a Wii. Important
enough that right at this moment I have
a PlayStation Portable and nintendo DS
within easy reach.
you see that guitar on the cover of
this week’s issue? That’s a real Fender
guitar, hollowed out in the back and
reftted with electronics that let it serve
as a controller for Rock Band. It is awe-
some and it is mine.
So, yeah, I get a little crazy about
video games in much the same way I
get crazy about books — that’s why I
have shelves and boxes full of both.
They are a way for me to relax, to get
excited, to get emotional, to do all the
things that art and entertainment are
supposed to do.
and I am among those who consider
some video games to be art, the same as
some movies, music and books are art
(even if much of the rest is dreck). That
wasn’t the viewpoint I held as a 6-year-
old playing Pong in my living room,
when video games were still in their
pixellated infancy. and it wasn’t the
viewpoint I held in my 20s, when I was
memorizing my frst round of Mortal
Kombat fatalities.
It wasn’t until I played Final Fantasy
VII that I began to understand games
as art. It was the frst game that made
me cry, because it was the frst game
that got me emotionally involved. It’s
the reason, I believe, that I have such
a passion for games that tell stories —
real stories, not just the animated fller
some games throw in between shooting
sessions so you have a convenient time
to grab something from the fridge or hit
the bathroom.
But being a gay gamer has often been
an awkward thing to be. For most of
their history, video games have been a
pretty heterosexual male playground,
where fghting games were sold on
the basis of the realistic breast physics
that programmers created for scant-
ily clad female fghters. happily, that
playground has changed — although
the fxation with unhealthily oversized
breasts remains.
These days, I can play games where
gay characters take the lead. Dragon Age
is among the head of the pack — you can
check out my interview with the game’s
head writer, David Gaider, exclusive-
ly on MetroWeekly.com — where the
fantasy-based gameplay also allows the
player to form romantic attachments to
other characters, regardless of gender.
Gay themes pop up all over, from role-
playing games to action epics.
That’s not to say that these things
come without controversy. as always,
there are people who complain and pro-
test every time a gay, lesbian, bisexual
or transgender life is acknowledged in
any entertainment or art form. But the
best news is that gay gamers continue
to come out, in person and online, and
show that we are as much a part of this
community as we are any other.
While video games are still a young
form, advances in technology and pro-
gramming mean that they will play an
ever-greater role in our lives, perhaps
every bit as important as television and
movies have already become. Which
means if you haven’t started playing yet,
you’d best get started.
Oh, who am I kidding? you’ve
already got Angry Birds on your phone,
don’t you? l
The Big Game
Being a gamer has been an adventure, even more so now
that gay gaming has grown
by Sean Bugg
21 METROWEEKLY.cOM
23 METROWEEKLY.cOM
LGBTopinion
The OuTCOMe
of the tea party’s
invented crisis over
the national debt
ceiling remains
uncertain as I write
on Monday morn-
ing, but one thing
is clear: republican
house members have only been encour-
aged in their hostage taking. They talk of
denying President Obama a blank check,
as if Congress had not appropriated every
dollar he spends. These are the days of
wonder, when ideology trumps reality.
Maybe I should just give in to it. Who will
be my guide to this strange new world?
Of course: GayPatriot on Twitter!
GayPatriot is a sharp-tongued warrior
of the gay right, the avatar of GOProud
board member Bruce Carroll. he tends
to be factually challenged, as when he
pretends that Obama was unwilling to
compromise on the heavily compromised
health care reform law. he calls our
inveterate dealmaker-in-chief a tyrant;
but if Obama (who incidentally won 9
million more votes than John McCain
in 2008) is a tyrant, why hasn’t he made
GayPatriot disappear?
Mostly, between numbingly detailed
updates on his daily itinerary, Carroll
tweets a steady stream of snark. recently
he touted Sen. rand Paul’s reply to tea
party critic McCain, “I’d rather be a hob-
bit than a troll.” he seconded GOProud’s
slam against “@logCabinGOP’s disgust-
ing and shameful smear campaign against
@annCoulter.” (yes, how dare log Cabin
drag the debate down from Coulter’s
elevated level?) and he tastefully joked,
“Dang. I guess I won’t be able to sell these
amy Winehouse concert tickets now…”
I found common ground with Carroll
when he mentioned not wanting to hear
further from newt Gingrich. I was also
relieved when he tweeted, “I’m very glad
I cashed out my stocks & bonds two weeks
ago, and locked my mortgage rate last
week.” after all, there is nothing sadder
than an impoverished right-wing tool.
two wars and huge tax cut for the rich
were also paid with borrowed money.
republicans are fne with the redistribu-
tion of income, as long as it is upward.
you have to understand that win-
ning control of one house of Congress
— and being able to flibuster the other
into paralysis — entitles republicans
to prevail on everything, just as they
graciously gave way to liberal policies
after Democrats swept the 2008 election.
What? you don’t remember it that way?
how unpatriotic of you.
In Washington, it is said, if you repeat
a lie often enough, it becomes true. Thus
the nativist zealots among us chant “Take
america back” as if that renders the more
moderate majority illegitimate. The tea
party, it turns out, is run by the Mad
hatter, who has won by ransom what he
could not win by election. It’s time for
sane adults to wake up and govern. l
GayPatriot is a great champion of
civility, so he must have been appalled
when lawrence O’Donnell banned fresh-
man tea party Congressman Joe Walsh
from his MSnBC program on charges
of hypocrisy. Walsh had said, “I won’t
place one more dollar of debt upon the
backs of my kids,” despite having failed
to pay $117,437 he owes in child support.
Walsh did manage to loan $35,000 to
his own 2010 campaign. let’s hear it for
republican family values.
GOProud is eager to meet GOP
presidential contender rep. Michele
Bachmann, who shakes one fst at big
government while pocketing federal
subsidies with the other. GOProud fnds
this homophobe, like all republicans, far
preferable to Obama. after all, Obama
only saved the american car industry and
prevented a second Great Depression —
as opposed to George W. Bush, whose
Snark on a Sinking Ship
Amid the debt debate, the tea party and its gay allies are more insults than sound ideas
by richard J. rosendall
AUGUST 4, 2011 24 METROWEEKLY
25 PURcHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.cOM/ScENE/
Duplex Diner’s
Reopening
Thursday, July 28
PhotograPhy by
Ward Morrison
scene
26 SEE PHOTOS fROM THiS EvENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.cOM/ScENE
X
AUGUST 4, 2011 28 METROWEEKLY
X
29 METROWEEKLY.cOM
Game
Theory
PHOTOGRAPHY BY JULIAN VANKIM / MODEL:DANIEL MARK
S
With gay characters, players and creators,
video games aren’t just for straight guys anymore
ome
people play to escape.
Some people play to belong.
Some people play to experience virtual
worlds of fantasy, others play to explore realistic rec-
reations of history.
There are nearly as many reasons to play video games as there
are games themselves. But one thing is certain: More people are play-
ing than ever. and more of those people playing are lGBT gamers.
not so long ago, if the topic of “gay” came up in conjunction with video
games, it was to focus on a negative — the invisibility of lGBT characters in
games; the taunting and harassment of gay players online; the stereotypes that
seemed to carry over from old entertainment forms into this new, virtual one.
But that’s changed.
Gay and lesbian storylines and characters have started to play important
roles in video game stories. Online players have their own guilds and groups for
friendly games among themselves or competing against the world at large. and
while the subject of gays and gaming may still raise the occasional tempest in a
teapot — mainly from those anti-gay quarters that have a surplus of tempests
and teapots, no matter the entertainment medium — for those who play,
create and market video games, lGBT lives and stories are simply a part
of their world.
So whether you’re looking to frag a few space marines on your
Xbox or target some snorting pigs in Angry Birds on your
phone, you’re not alone. There’s a big gay world of gaming
waiting for you to explore. u
X
INDUSTRY
INSIDER
X
31 METROWEEKLY.cOM
P
ICTure The aDOleSCenT BOy, GaMe COn-
troller in hand, sitting in front of his TV. In some vir-
tual world of impossibly large-breasted women and
explosive gore, he’s fxated. Possibly for hours upon
hours. The blinds are drawn to shut out the screen-glaring
natural light, and whatever nutrition that might come his way
is probably a product of PepsiCo.
That is the cliché. although, there might be a kernel of
truth if you’re applying that stereotype to young Dan hewitt.
“nintendo was doing an american tour with one of their
games, where you could go and compete,” says hewitt. “My
mom actually let me take two days off of school so I could
practice video games. She said, ‘you’re doing fne in school.
a couple days isn’t going to set you back. This is something
that’s important to you, and I’m supportive.’ It was a great
opportunity.”
Turns out his mother’s support was actually a sort of
investment. roughly 20 years later, that game-playing adoles-
cent boy is the 35-year-old vice president for media relations
and management at the D.C.-based entertainment Software
association (eSa), the entity representing the bulk of video
game producers. and part of his job is to point to the data
that illustrates that the cliché he once embodied is so very
outdated.
“The thing that surprises most folks is when we start
talking about the average age of a computer and video game
player,” hewitt shares, statistics at the ready. “What folks are
shocked to fnd out is that the average age of a game player
is 37 years old. and that almost 30 percent of computer and
video game players are over the age of 50. So this notion
that video games are just for teenage boys just isn’t accurate
anymore. In fact, more adult women play video games than
teenage boys.”
Beyond the demographics, there are also more immediate
examples, like hewitt himself. When you think of “gay” and
“video game,” one might be inclined to think of the Grand
Theft Auto game series installment, “The Ballad of Gay Tony.”
at least, it’s likelier that such a game would come to mind,
rather than hewitt. But there he is, the openly gay logan
Circle resident, often representing the face of the industry. It’s
an industry welcoming of diversity.
“The people who create games are incredibly passion-
ate, and they’re incredibly talented,” hewitt says of the folks
behind the virtual curtain who craft the sometimes breathtak-
ing arenas where people electronically entertain – and edu-
cate to an ever-greater degree – themselves. “They’re not only
great artists with drawing, sound and storylines, but they’re
great in science and technology, in engineering and math.
“The video game community, writ large, is incredibly wel-
coming and appreciative of anyone who wants to come in and
talk about games, play games. It’s a welcoming environment,
despite what some news headlines may say. There really are
video games out there for every taste. Someone might think
they’re too cool to play video games, but it’s simply because
they haven’t tried some of the new titles out there.”
Those new offerings might be the traditional – killing zom-
bies, say – or the world of smart phone games, such as Angry
Birds. But hewitt also points to “games” that put students
in the Darfur war zone or that surgeons train with as they
delicately explore the virtual maladies of computer-generated
patients. among these varied platforms, gamers work with
industry to keep things civil. Going to war in an online com-
munity’s game can certainly get the adrenalin pumping, but
that’s no excuse for hateful insults, hewitt says, explaining
that console companies and players themselves will take
actions against repeat offenders, sometimes leading to suspen-
sion of online-gaming accounts.
and the breadth of what’s available has evolved so far that
there’s even a movement stirring to replace the possibly out-
dated phrase “video game” with “interactive entertainment
software.” But hewitt isn’t jumping on that tiny bandwagon.
“I just don’t think I’m going to be able to get a whole lot of
journalists to write ‘interactive entertainment software,’” he
laughs. “especially when you’re worried about column inches,
I think ‘video games’ gets them in there a little faster.”
Though the language may not be perfect, everything else
comes pretty close as far as hewitt is concerned. So much so
that the nintendo-loving adolescent has to stop and catch his
breath when he thinks about the dream job he landed.
“I know how blessed and lucky I am,” he says. “I would
never in a thousand years have ever thought this possible. you
hear about jobs in the entertainment industry, in hollywood,
in nashville, in new york…. But to work in Washington, the
city that I love, and to work in the entertainment industry?
I’m incredibly lucky because those jobs are few and far
between.” l
Dan Hewitt, one of gay D.C.’s own,
operates at video games’
highest levels
by Will O’Bryan
Photography by Julian Vankim
INDUSTRY
INSIDER
X
AUGUST 4, 2011 32 METROWEEKLY
PUTTING THE GAY IN GAMES
For LGBT gamers, GayGamer.net is the online home for a growing
community of out and proud players
by Sean Bugg
A
MOnG PeOPle WhO DOn’T Play VIDeO GaMeS, There are
plenty of misconceptions about gamers. and among lGBT people who
don’t play games, David edison says one misconception stands out: “That
gay people don’t play games.”
edison, an editor for GayGamer.net, jokes that lGBT gamers have to come out
twice – frst there’s the traditional coming out, then there’s the coming out as a
gamer.
“Often the second one was just as weird or tense,” laughs the 33-year-old, who
got his frst nintendo console in 1987, the start of his 23 years of solid gaming. “I
remember telling a date that I played video games and the look on his face was just
like, ‘What?’”
But those misconceptions are changing, in part because of the network of gay
players that GayGamer has helped bring together. It’s not just about discussing
which game characters are gay – though that’s always a near and dear topic. For
edison and the website’s writers, it’s about building a community.
METRo WEEKLy: Why does the world need GayGamer.net?
DAViD EDiSoN: When we began in 2006, there were no places where it was safe to
talk about something as simple as, for a gay gamer, “This male character’s hot.”
If you tried to have that conversation, you’d have a furry of angry, homophobic
replies. That is really the kernel of what GayGamer was created for, to be a safe
space and community for a population that already existed.
MW: What have you learned about both the video game industry and the game-playing
community?
EDiSoN: The industry was confused at
frst and understandably so – I don’t
necessarily think that gayness had ever
been a part of their world before. It cer-
tainly wasn’t a part of their job descrip-
tion to have a gay journalist show up
and start asking gay questions. [Laughs.]
But they’re trying to sell their game, so
the industry was always really welcom-
ing because that’s their job. and they’re
lovely, intelligent people.
The gaming community is a more
fractured critter. We instantly found a
great reception among those who were
hungry for what we could provide. But
in the frst couple of years, and even
now to a certain extent, whenever gay
topics were brought up on mainstream
gaming sites that are friendly with
us, the comments were always awful.
There was a lot of nasty, nasty stuff
written about us, just not necessarily on
our site proper.
MW: It’s probably kind of a dead horse, but
online games on services like XBox Live
can have a lot of hateful and homophobic
language thrown around. Is that some-
thing that’s solvable or is it here to stay?
EDiSoN: It’s not a dead horse, it’s some-
thing that I feel super passionate about.
My basic principle for making the
world better is visibility. If gay people
are seen, it makes it harder to hate
them. and in the six years I’ve been
at GayGamer, it has grown increas-
ingly uncool to be homophobic online.
The tenor of the ecosystem has really
changed, I think following the tenor of
society. But Microsoft, for instance, is
tremendously aware that they have an
image problem when it comes to people
being awful online, and has worked
very hard to change that.
also, because of sites like GayGamer
you don’t have to go online and throw
yourself on the mercy of a bunch of
strangers. Our forums keep track of
gay friendly guilds and gamers so you
can go online and play with them. So,
half of the answer is being visible and
making it harder for somebody to say
something against you. The other part
of it is taking your toys and playing with
your real friends.
MW: My perception is that a lot of the
progress in the inclusion of gay charac-
ters and themes in games has focused on
gay men, and not very much on lesbian or
transgender themes. Is that the case?
EDiSoN: That’s a frustrating question
K
e
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a
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33 METROWEEKLY.cOM
to answer, and part of the reason it’s
frustrating to answer is because I only
know my world as a gay man. I think
that because most of the people in the
game industry are men, it might be
easier to address gay men as a separate
issue than it is to wholesale challenge
your view of the world and where sex
and gender ft into it.
MW: What are some games that you think
stand out for gay inclusiveness?
EDiSoN: I think rockstar Games always
does a fantastic job of including reality
in their games, in subtle, fun ways. The
Ballad of Gay Tony, a game named after
a gay character that you don’t play but
that you work for, is a brilliant way of
getting gay visibility without disrupting
the gaming experience for people who
might otherwise be resistant. I don’t
know that I would play it and feel warm
and cuddly about the gay people in the
game, but I think it’s really something
to be proud of.
Dragon Age cannot be understated.
It’s important because it is side-by-side
with Bioware’s sci-f role-playing game,
Mass Effect, which has a total absence
of the kind of cultural awareness that
makes the gender play in Dragon Age
so wonderful. Mass Effect comes along
in this sort of lumbering, oafsh, jockish
manner, and the best that they can do
towards diversity is have an african-
american character giving awkward
fst-bumps even though the game is set
in the future and in space. It’s the same
studio putting out two different games
that are almost bookends of each other
– one sci-f, one fantasy. One is sensitive
and dear and beautifully crafted; the
other is beautifully crafted and brutal
and not sensitive.
MW: With GayGamer, what are you most
proud of accomplishing for gay gamers
themselves?
EDiSoN: establishing a community pres-
ence online where issues pertinent to
gay gamers could not only be voiced,
but explored, is really important to me.
The other thing that I’m very proud
of is that our traffc was pretty much
instant and, for as long back as I’ve got
metrics, it’s been the same — there was
an audience waiting there for us, they
glommed onto us and they haven’t left
us. Our traffc has remained remarkably
constant over the years. That’s some-
thing that anybody who runs a website
can feel good about. l
GAMING THE COURT
Lawmakers try to regulate content in
video games, but Paul Smith’s
opposing arguments
often win the day
by Chris Geidner
P
aul SMITh, One OF The leaDInG SuPreMe COurT lITIGaTOrS
in the country, has a history with video games. That history, however, has
come from working on a series of cases protecting the Internet and video
games from government regulation.
Smith’s experience in the video game arena may be less well known to some than
his experience in advancing gay equality in the courts. Smith is, after all, the gay
attorney who was key in successfully arguing Lawrence v. Texas before the Supreme
Court in 2003, which resulted in ending sodomy laws.
Smith began his video game and Internet work on a prominent First amendment
case about the Communications Decency act – Reno v. ACLU – which he described
as the “granddaddy” of Web cases. The law, he says, “required all communica-
tions on the Internet, even like email, to be suitable for young children unless …
screened away from children.” But the law “was thrown out by the Supreme Court
ultimately unanimously in 1997,” and Smith has spent a signifcant part of his career
since arguing against other similar regulations – including those applying to video
games.
Because of his work on the Reno case, Smith “ended up doing cases for the
video game industry for about 10 years, all around the country,” including the case
decided earlier this year, Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Association, in which
the Supreme Court struck down a California law that would have restricted the sale
or rental of violent video games to minors.
“States and cities have tried to pass laws limiting which games can be sold to
minors based on their content,” he says. “Our position has always been, ‘There’s a
ratings system, and people should be able to make choices about these things them-
selves. It’s not obscenity, it’s protected speech.’
“and we had always succeeded in having the laws thrown out under the First
amendment, including in California, which is the case that went to the Supreme
Court. The alarming moment was when they took the case at the Supreme Court.
There was no apparent reason why they should.
“But it led to quite a First amendment confrontation...which had the attention
of not just the video game manufacturers, but the moviemakers and the television
producers and all sorts of people who were worried that we were suddenly going to
have a new exception to the First amendment for violence and kids.
But, Smith adds, “It didn’t turn out that way.”
On June 27, the court struck down the law, with Justice antonin Scalia writing
for the court, “California’s effort to regulate violent video games is the latest episode
in a long series of failed attempts to censor violent entertainment for minors.”
and Smith’s decade-long advocacy continues. l
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THE RULES OF WARCRAFT
Sometimes it’s not the action but the fellowship that’s addictive
by Yusef Najafi
Photography by Todd Franson
H
e DOeSn’T Care aBOuT FanTaSy TheMeS Or The STOrylIne BehInD WORLD OF WARCRAFT — FOr
Mike larson, it’s the social aspect of the game, the camaraderie, that keeps him coming back.
“I have played with [these people] for the past fve years,” he says of his co-combatants in the massively multiplayer
online role-playing game. “I’ve met some of them, we’ve had gatherings a couple of times. a lot of them I’ve never met,
but I know them from playing with them.”
If you’ve never played Warcraft, you probably don’t know that the game has more than 11 million subscribers to its online
realm, according to the game’s publisher, Blizzard entertainment.
Some of its lGBT subscribers play as part a “gay guild,” such as the one that goes by the cheeky moniker “The Spreading
Taint.” But while The Spreading Taint claims thousands of members, larson prefers playing on a much smaller scale with his
own guild, the Corps Walk heroes. They’re mostly larson’s friends, including three other gay players.
larson and his fellow guild members have met on several occasions at real-world gatherings all across the country. But the
real action happens online.
“We’re doing what’s called ‘raids,’ where we go in fghting [the game’s high-level] bosses. That’s the second thing I like about
the game: fguring out how to accomplish our goal.”
he laughs about the voluminous history and lore that forms the background to the game: “I could care less about the whole
story. I hate science fction. I’m like,
lord, get rid of it!”
Instead, larson uses the game in a
completely social way. he began play-
ing the game in 2000 when his two
best friends, a straight couple, moved
from the D.C.-area to Detroit. They
introduced him to Warcraft as a way
to stay connected.
“I had never played any type of
game before,” he says. “They got me
turned on to it.”
Warcraft characters encompass
a range of “races,” from traditional
human to pointy-eared troll, from sul-
try elves to bullish Tauren. larson’s
main character is of the horn-headed
Draenei; his role is a priest, who serves
as a healer to his party.
“I don’t actually do much damage,
but I’m healing the other players so
they can continue to kill the boss.” l
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marketplace
AUGUST 4, 2011 36 METROWEEKLY
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AUGUST 4 - 11, 2011
SPotLiGht
ALiSoN KRAuSS & uNioN STATioN
Alison Krauss has famously collaborated with Robert
Plant among other solo pursuits, but she’s best
known for fronting one of the best bluegrass bands
in the business. Together 24 years, Alison Krauss &
Union Station offer a refned style of Americana, and
while the band mixes in some pop and folk elements
on its latest release Paper Airplane, the resulting
sound is still pure and pristine. Sunday, Aug. 7, at 8
p.m. Wolf Trap, 1645 Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are
$30 to $48. Call 703-255-1900 or visit wolftrap.org.
ARLo GuTHRiE WiTH THE NSo
Emil de Cou conducts the National Symphony
Orchestra in a Wolf Trap performance with folk
legend Arlo Guthrie along with the eclectic ensemble
Time for Three. Violinists Zachary De Pue and
Nicolas Kendall and bassist Ranaan Meyer merge
classical, country, gypsy and jazz. Good mornin’,
America, how are ya? Saturday, Aug. 6, at 8:15 p.m.
Wolf Trap, 1645 Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $20
to $52. Call 703-255-1900 or visit wolftrap.org.
BiRDS oF A FEATHER
Right now, a small, relatively new theater in Fairfax
County is going where larger, more established the-
aters have refused to tread: Virginia’s Hub Theatre is
one of the frst to stage noted gay humor writer Marc
Acito’s play Birds of a Feather, which explores the
recent, real-life controversy over gay penguins — and
by extension gay marriage. Acito told Metro Weekly
the play “looks at the unvarnished truth of what it
is to be in a long-term relationship, gay or straight”
— but with a humorous twist. “For Christ’s sake,
we’ve got actors playing birds,” he laughs. Closes
this Sunday, Aug. 7. John Swayze Theatre, the New
School of Northern Virginia, 9431 Silver King Ct.
Fairfax. Tickets are $25. Call 703-674-3177 or visit
thehubtheatre.org.
DANcETHoS WiTH SPEciAL GuESTS
iNcLuDiNG THE Dc coWBoyS
The DC Cowboys will share the stage with Ari-den
Dance Company and the West Shore Piano Trio, all
as guests of a concert by D.C.’s new modern dance
company DancEthos. The evening will feature new
works by company members. Saturday, Aug. 6, at 8
p.m., and Sunday, Aug. 7, at 7 p.m. Dance Place, 3225
8th St. NE. Tickets are $20. Call 202-269-1600 or
visit danceplace.org.
DEATH cAB FoR cuTiE
For a decade now, Seattle-based Death Cab for
Cutie has been an enormously popular alt-rock band
whose silly name actually captures its sound: cute but
creepy, funereal yet festive, with pristine melodies
pre-washed in slightly ragged production. The band,
fronted by the pleading tenor Ben Gibbard, tours
in support of its new seventh set, Codes and Keys.
Sunday, Aug. 7. Doors at 6 p.m. Merriweather Post
Pavilion, 10475 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia,
Md. Tickets are $35 to $45. Call 800-551-SEAT or
visit merriweathermusic.com.
AUGUST 4, 2011 38 METROWEEKLY
compiled by Doug Rule
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Pack Mentality
Annual Dog Days Sale makes MidCity even hotter
P
IXIe WInDSOr STarTeD her BuSIneSS In aDaMS MOrGan, anD
still loves living in that neighborhood. But....
“MidCity is just really what’s happening right now,” says the proprietor of
Miss Pixie’s Furnishings and Whatnot. and who could argue? MidCity is the
neighborhood encompassing the u Street and logan Circle areas, with 14th
Street as its main artery. and this weekend, MidCity is the place to be, for its
12th annual Dog Days Sidewalk Sale.
“Dog Days is far and away the most incredibly busy day of the year,” says
Windsor, who’s serving as this year’s Dog Days coordinator. now participating
in its third Dog Days, Miss Pixie’s will offer 20 percent off everything.
“When I was in adams Morgan,” Windsor says, “nothing compared to Dog
Days.”
even Greg link, the owner of home rule, marvels at how big the annual
event has become since he founded it as a way to generate excitement during
the summer retail doldrums.
“We started with just six people, six stores,” he says. “We put our stuff on
the sidewalk, and people loved it. even though it’s been just 12 years, [Dog
Days] has really encompassed a lot of history on that street. Just a lot of players
have come and gone.” a lot has certainly changed: When home rule opened,
there were few places to eat other than fast food joints. “We had no restaurants
involved in the beginning,” link says.
By contrast, DC noodles, Vinoteca, Cork and aCKC Cocoa Bar are just a
few of the many food spots offering Dog Days specials this year.
But if you’re looking for anything in particular, or the best deals, Windsor
advises you start as early as possible.
“We actually open an hour early,” she says. “and we will have people lined
up outside the door.” — Doug Rule
MidCity Business Association’s Dog Days Sidewalk Sale is Saturday, Aug. 6, and
Sunday, Aug. 7. Visit midcitylife.com for more information.

DHS PiNAFoRE
Every summer the Capital Hill Arts Workshop pres-
ents a different Gilbert and Sullivan production in
partnership with the GLBT Arts Consortium. This
year brings a slightly modern twist on the classic
HMS Pinafore, with the Royal Navy being usurped
by the Department of Homeland Security in man-
ning the ship. But classic tales and tunes, includ-
ing “When I Was A Lad” and “I’m Called Little
Buttercup,” are still part of the show, directed by
Peter DiMuro and Barbara Schelstrate. Net pro-
ceeds beneft CHAW and the Consortium. Opens
Thursday, Aug. 4, at 7 p.m. To Aug. 13. CHAW, 545
Seventh St. SE. Tickets are $20. Call 202-547-6839
or visit chaw.org.
HARRy PoTTER
AND THE DEATHLy HALLoWS PART 2
HHHHH
On his fourth tour of Potter duty, director David
Yates spares no time for newcomers. Not that any-
one can blame him, with all the unfortunate exposi-
tory work, done plod-by-plod, in Part 1. But by
sparing an introduction, Yates gives himself plenty
of room to create a deliberately paced send-off for
the world’s favorite scarred, bespectacled wizard.
Deathly Hallows Part 2 has all the elements of a
traditional summer hit. Now playing. Area theaters.
Visit fandango.com. (Chris Heller)
MoBy
Mary J. Blige’s inaugural concert next month at the
Live Nation-owned Fillmore in Silver Spring sold
out in minutes last Friday. The venue just announced
another slate of concerts this fall, including Moby.
It’s unlikely tickets to hear the electronica artist and
DJ will sell as quickly as Blige’s, but chances are it
will sell out. Tickets go on sale Friday, Aug. 5, at 10
a.m. for the Oct. 26 concert. Fillmore Silver Spring,
8656 Colesville Road, Silver Spring. Tickets are
$89.50. Visit fllmoresilverspring.com.
NEKo cASE, My MoRNiNG JAcKET
Singer-songwriter Neko Case may be just the open-
ing act, but she has every bit as much, if not more,
appeal than Kentucky hippie rockers My Morning
Jacket. The Alexandria native has become a super-
star in indie/hipster circles, and the appeal is easy
to hear, whether on her solo work, such as 2009’s
Middle Cyclone, or her work in the Canadian alt-
pop collective New Pornographers. Friday, Aug.
12. Doors at 5:30 p.m. Merriweather Post Pavilion,
10475 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia, Md.
Tickets are $35 to $45. Call 800-551-SEAT or visit
merriweathermusic.com.
o.A.R.
This fve-piece rock band from Rockville has a
devoted national following — selling out New
York’s Madison Square Garden twice, for start-
ers — even if it’s lacked in mainstream recognition.
The Washington Post’s Chris Richards suggests the
under-the-radar notoriety is on account of the band’s
non-buzzy roots-oriented sound: “easy, breezy, pop-
ulist rock.” It’s defnitely disarming, even charming,
in today’s pop landscape. Saturday, Aug. 13. Doors at
5:30 p.m. Merriweather Post Pavilion, 10475 Little
Patuxent Parkway, Columbia, Md. Tickets are $35
to $45. Call 800-551-SEAT or visit merriweather-
music.com.
ScREEN oN THE GREEN:
GENTLEMEN PREFER BLoNDES
The annual Screen on the Green series is now in the
middle of its annual four-week run on the National
Mall. Up next: 1953’s Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, the
brightly colored, campy musical comedy starring
Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell, which features
Monroe singing “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend”
of course, but even better is Russell performing the
39 METROWEEKLY.cOM
campy “Anyone Here For Love?” amid a gaggle of
disinterested chorus boys. Monday, Aug. 8, at sunset,
generally 8:30 p.m. National Mall, between Eighth
and 14th Streets NW. Free. Call 877-262-5866.
SiGNATuRE’S SizzLiN’
SuMMER cABARET SERiES
Signature’s ffth annual Sizzlin’ Summer Cabaret
offers a full slate of traditional cabarets by some of
Signature’s bright lights to two bona fde Broadway
stars. The series draws to a close this weekend
with solo shows by Julia Murney and Erin Driscoll,
and an enticing fnale dubbed “Revenge of the
Understudies,” in which singers including Gia Mora
(Sunset Boulevard), Rachel Schur (And The Curtain
Rises) and Jonathan Atkinson (Chess) will perform
numbers from their understudied shows from the
past season at Signature as well as others of their
choosing. Closes this Saturday, Aug. 6. Signature
Theatre’s ARK Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave.,
Arlington. Tickets are $25 for each show, or $125 for
a special All-Access Pass. Call 703-820-9771 or visit
signature-theatre.org for a complete schedule.
SMiTHSoNiAN AMERicAN ART MuSEuM
“The Great American Hall of Wonders” examines the
American ingenuity that energized all aspects of 19th
Century society, from the painting of landscapes and
scenes of everyday life to the planning of scientifc
expeditions and the development of new mechanical
devices. Included in the exhibit are paintings and
drawings by John James Audubon, Albert Bierstadt,
Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, as well as sculp-
tures, prints, patent models and engineering dia-
grams. Through Jan. 8, 2012. Smithsonian American
Art Museum’s 3rd foor North, 8th and F Streets NW.
Free. Call 202-633-1000 or visit americanart.si.edu.
uNcLE VANyA
After 2009’s blockbuster production of A Streetcar
Named Desire, the Sydney Theatre Company returns
to the Kennedy Center. This time it offers an exclu-
sive U.S. engagement of Andrew Upton’s new
adaptation of Anton Chekhov’s tragicomedy Uncle
Vanya — starring a few people you may have heard
of: Cate Blanchett, Richard Roxbourgh and Hugo
Weaving (yes, of Priscilla!). Opens Thursday, Aug. 4,
at 7:30 p.m. To Aug. 27. Kennedy Center Eisenhower
Theater. Tickets are $59 to $135. Call 202-467-4600
or visit kennedy-center.org.
FiLM
ALFRED HiTcHcocK’S RETRoSPEcTiVE
The American Film Institute’s Silver Theatre pres-
ents the fnal in a three-part series this year explor-
ing the works of the great flmmaker. Part III focuses
on his later Hollywood pictures, a time by which
Hitchcock had become revered for his commercial
and artistic success. Up next: 1955’s To Catch A
Thief, starring Cary Grant and Grace Kelly, and
winner of an Oscar for cinematography, and 1963’s
The Birds, considered Hitchcock’s high water mark
for controlled atmosphere and mastery of cinematic
technique. To Catch A Thief is Friday, Aug. 5, and
Saturday, Aug. 6, at 7:20 p.m., and Sunday, Aug. 7,
at 2:45 p.m. The Birds is Friday, Aug. 12, at 7 p.m.,
Saturday, Aug. 13, at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 16, at
6:45 p.m., and Thursday, Aug. 18, at 6:45 p.m. AFI
Silver Theatre, 8633 Colesville Road, Silver Spring.
Tickets are $11 for each screening. Call 301-495-6720
or visit af.com/Silver.
ATLAS’S GAy FiLM SERiES
The Atlas Performing Arts Center and Metro
Weekly team up to present a gay, summer-long flm
series based on the magazine’s list of “Gay Films
Everyone Should See.” The series continues this
Thursday, Aug. 4, with 1992’s The Crying Game.
AUGUST 4, 2011 40 METROWEEKLY
Jaye Davidson’s portrayal of a sexy, transgender
seductress brought gender issues to the fore as few
movies have before or since. Next Thursday, Aug. 11,
offers John Cameron Mitchell’s wildly imaginative
comedy/drama/musical 2001 flm Hedwig and the
Angry Inch. Above and beyond its infectious punk
score and many cinematic treats, the story, which
began life as an Off-Broadway production, subtly,
even slyly, captures the ongoing struggle for recogni-
tion of the transgender community in a mainstream
society confused by black-and-white cultural norms
about gender and sexuality. Thursday nights at 8
p.m. through Sept. 4. Atlas Performing Arts Center,
1333 H St. NE. Tickets are free, except for a $2 book-
ing fee. Call 202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org for a
full schedule.
ATLAS’S MoViE MuSicALS SERiES
Atlas presents another series every bit as gay — the
Friday night “Movie Musicals” series. This Friday,
Aug. 5, offers West Side Story, the 1961 flm that has
won more Oscars than any other musical flm. The
flm looks dated today, but it’s still entertaining none-
theless. Next Friday, Aug. 12, brings a much more
contemporary flm, 2007’s Hairspray, the movie
musical based on a Broadway musical based on a
straight play — well, as straight as a John Waters’s
flm gets. Friday nights at 8 p.m. through Sept. 2.
Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets
are free, except for a $2 booking fee. Call 202-399-
7993 or visit atlasarts.org for a full schedule.
RiSE oF THE PLANET oF THE APES
James Franco stars as a mad scientist who threatens
humans’ dominion on Earth all by virtue of exposing
a chimp to an experimental drug, originally intended
to cure Alzheimer’s. Chances are, this sci-f fick, also
starring John Lithgow, won’t cure anything. Opens
Friday, Aug. 5. Area theaters. Visit fandango.com.
THE cHANGE-uP
In this male version of Freaky Friday, Jason Bateman
and Ryan Reynolds switch bodies and fnd out that
they like their original lives better. We’re already
fantasizing about what we’d do if we inhabited
Ryan Reynolds’s body. But because it was directed
by David Dobkin (The Wedding Crashers) and writ-
ten by the team behind The Hangover, our fantasies
aren’t likely to be realized. Talk about a jagged little
pill. Opens Friday, Aug. 5. Area theaters. Visit
fandango.com.
THE SMuRFS
God no, god no, god no, god no. Neil Patrick Harris
and Glee’s Jayma Mays star opposite our blue, three-
apple-tall friends who take over New York City in
this live-action-meets-animation flm. Hank Azaria
plays Gargamel, the evil wizard who chases the
Smurfs out of their village and into Central Park.
Jonathan Winters, George Lopez, Alan Cumming,
Paul “Pee Wee” Reubens, even Katy Perry contribute
to the flm, from director Raja Gosnell. God no. Area
theaters. Visit fandango.com.
StaGe
cLyBouRNE PARK
Woolly Mammoth reprises its production of Bruce
Norris’s play, after having won a couple Helen Hayes
Awards and this year’s Pulitzer Prize. As Metro
Weekly’s critic Kate Wingfeld noted in her four-star
review last year, Clybourne Park is an “exceedingly
clever, high-octane piece on neighborhood race rela-
tions past and present. Even if we have seen many
similar scenarios on stage and screen, Norris deliv-
ers his version with a sophistication of wit, insight
and emotional honesty — not to mention humor and
entertainment — that takes it head and shoulders
above the rest.” To Aug. 14. Woolly Mammoth, 641 D
41 METROWEEKLY.cOM
AUGUST 4, 2011 42 METROWEEKLY
St. NW. Tickets range from $30 to $65. Call 202-393-
3939 or visit woollymammoth.net.
GuyS AND DoLLS
Frank Loesser’s Tony-winning musical from 1950
is packed with hits, from “Luck Be A Lady” to “Sit
Down, You’re Rocking the Boat.” Wolf Trap presents
a production of the show, set in New York during
the Great Depression. Thursday, Aug. 11, through
Sunday, Aug. 14, at 8 p.m. Also Saturday, Aug. 13,
and Sunday, Aug. 14, at 2 p.m. Wolf Trap, 1645 Trap
Road, Vienna. Tickets are $20 to $80. Call 703-255-
1900 or visit wolftrap.org.
oKLAHoMA!
After snagging four Helen Hayes Awards, including
Outstanding Musical, Arena Stage revives the show
that christened its new Mead Center complex last
fall and now becomes its frst summer production,
lasting all the way into the start of fall. Oklahoma!
became the best-selling show in Arena’s 60-year
history, serving as a fne launch to what turned out
to be a fne season at the fne Southwest Waterfront
complex. To Oct. 2. The Fichandler at Arena Stage,
1101 6th St. SW. Tickets are $76 to $106. Call 202-
554-9066 or visit arenastage.org.
PoP!
HHHHH
Billed as a “musical murder-mystery extravaganza,”
Pop! takes as its jumping-off point the real-life,
non-fatal shooting of Andy Warhol. Pop! is played
to the hilt as a fun, escapist night out at the theater.
Considering that it’s about a man whose controver-
sial “pop art” rarely scratched below the surface,
it’s ftting the play would have no grand meaning to
impart, either. Maggie-Kate Coleman’s story doesn’t
really draw you in. Anna K. Jacobs’s score, on the
other hand, is lively and appealing, a multi-genre
approach that fts right in with hit musicals of recent
vintage. Ultimately, Pop! gets its pizzazz from a
strong cast and several knockout performances. The
women in particular sing their strong soprano hearts
out. Extended to Aug. 14. Studio Theatre’s 2ndStage,
14th & P Streets NW. Call 202-332-3300 or visit
studiotheatre.org. (Doug Rule)

STEEL MAGNoLiAS
HHHHH
The local color is as colorful as ever in Robert
Harling’s 1987 play Steel Magnolias, an off-Broadway
hit that became a box-offce smash on the big screen
in 1989 with Sally Field, Julia Roberts, Olympia
Dukakis, Shirley MacLaine and Dolly Parton. But
alas, Keegan Theatre’s revival of Steel Magnolias
doesn’t make a convincing case that Louisiana’s
Chinquapin Parish is a place that bears revisiting.
Once these broad Southern caricatures (and their
hoot-y dialogue) have made an indelible impres-
sion, the memories are enough to sustain you and
allow time for other destinations on your theatri-
cal itinerary. Unless, that is, you’re a comfort-food
junkie. In which case, Keegan has whipped up a
confection that’s about as complex and favorful as
Clairee’s recipe for “cup-a cup-a cup-a” (you know,
a cup of sugar, a cup of four and a cup of fruit cock-
tail — “with the juice” — baked till golden brown
and served with ice cream “to cut the sweetness”).
To Aug. 21. Church Street Theater, 1742 Church
St. NW. Tickets are $35. Call 703-892-0202 or visit
keegantheatre.com. (Jonathan Padget)
ViSiT To A SMALL PLANET
Gore Vidal lampoons the Cold War and humanity’s
self-destructive preoccupation with world domina-
tion in this 1956 satire originally written for televi-
sion, a precursor to alien series such as Mork and
Mindy and 3rd Rock from the Sun. It’s perfectly ftting
that Virginia’s The American Century Theater now
offers a production of the play, since it’s set in nearby
Manassas and references the famous Battle of Bull
Jersey Boys
Flag footballers offer 24 months of muscle
W
hen WIllIaM WayBOurn TOOK The PhOTOGraPhS
for the D.C. Strokes 2008-2009 calendar, he was able to pose
the rowers — or at least keep a safe distance. But with the D.C. Gay Flag
Football league, hazardous duty was involved.
“I did get hit by one guy who forgot
that I was standing there,” he says of shoot-
ing a scrimmage for the DCGFFl’s calen-
dar, launching Tuesday, aug. 9 with a hugo
Boss-sponsored release party at Waybourn’s
longview Gallery. “They play very seriously.
Some would show up with bruises or cuts.”
While Waybourn is no worse for wear
from the experience, the league’s Sean Bartel
confrms that – fags or not – these boys can
get rough.
“We’ve had two concussions, a broken
hand,” he recalls. “a spleen had to be taken
out.”
and it’s not just the boys. There’s a siz-
able contingent of women and straight folks
mixed into the teams, as well. and through
the calendar, this rough-and-tumble crowd is
aiming to harness their sense of fellowship for a greater good.
“It’s more than just football,” he says. “Our job here is also to give
back to the community.”
To that end, proceeds from the $20 calendar will help support the
league’s scholarship effort, which has already seen nearly $4,000 raised
for the Team DC Scholarship Fund. With the attention the league’s cal-
endar has already gotten – even before its offcial release – the sky may
be the limit. Bartel, who handles the league’s media and social networks,
says they’ve already been felding interest on a global scale.
“I never dreamed there would be this explosion,” he says. “a guy from
Germany wants to order 50 to 100 calendars.” — Will O’Bryan
The DCGFFL calendar release party is Tuesday, Aug. 9, from 6-8:30 p.m.,
at Longview Gallery, 1234 9th St. NW. Advance tickets are $10 and are
available at dcgff.org, or $15 at the door. The calendars are $20 and are
available at the party or at dcgff.org.
43 METROWEEKLY.cOM
Run. Bruce Rauscher, John Tweel, Steve Lebens,
Kelly Cronenberg and Megan Graves are part of the
cast. Closes this Saturday, Aug. 6. American Century
Theater — Gunston Theater II, 2700 South Lang St.
Arlington. Tickets are $30 to $35, or just $16 during
opening weekend as part of TACT’s 16th anniversary
celebration. Call 703-998-4555 or visit
americancentury.org.
MuSiC
cRyFEST:
THE cuRE VS. THE SMiTHS DANcE PARTy
The Black Cat reprises one of its popular DJ-driven
battle-of-the-bands theme parties, one that will cer-
tainly be a true cry fest if you don’t like mopey ‘80s
rock. Everyone else can cheer on DJs Steve Ep,
Missguided, Killa K and Krasty McNasty as they spin
tunes featuring Robert Smith’s forlorn croons and
whine as they play the whines of Morrissey — or vice
versa, depending on if you prefer The Cure or The
Smiths. Saturday Aug 13. Doors at 9 p.m. Black Cat,
1811 14th St. NW. Tickets are $10. Call 202-667-4490
or visit blackcatdc.com.
iNXS WiTH BERLiN
The Australian pop-rock group INXS has been try-
ing to rekindle its ‘80s-era hitmaking magic for years
now. In 2005 they even appeared in a reality series
to pick a new permanent lead singer, to replace
Michael Hutchence, who died in 1997. But Canadian
singer J.D. Fortune hasn’t managed to take our
breath away, to paraphrase the big hit from Berlin,
the ‘80s band now opening for INXS. So if you go, be
sure to get there early: You could say Berlin’s Terri
Nunn is still something of a suicide blonde. Monday,
Aug. 8, at 8 p.m. Wolf Trap, 1645 Trap Road, Vienna.
Tickets are $25 to $42. Call 703-255-1900 or visit
wolftrap.org.
JiLL ScoTT
Scott performs a Summer Block Party — albeit
indoors — and will be joined by an all-star R&B slate,
hosted by Doug E Fresh: Anthony Hamilton, Mint
Condition, DJ Jazzy Jeff. Sunday, Aug. 7, at 7 p.m.
Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW. Tickets are $39.75 to
$109.75. Call 202-628-3200 or visit
verizoncenter.com.
ART SHERRoD JR., cHANTE MooRE
Smooth jazz saxophonist Art Sherrod Jr. performs
a show featuring vocalist Chante Moore, who had a
few R&B/pop hits in the ‘90s and was featured on hit
movie soundtracks, from How Stella Got Her Groove
Back to Waiting to Exhale.
Thursday, Aug. 11, at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Blues Alley,
1073 Wisconsin Ave. NW. Tickets are $35, plus
$10 minimum purchase. Call 202-337-4141 or visit
bluesalley.com.
SouL REBELS BRASS BAND
A seven-piece ensemble from New Orleans, the Soul
Rebels Brass Band blends Mardi Gras funk and jazz,
soft rock, reggae and hip hop to create an infectious,
danceable style of its own. Friday, Aug. 12, at 9 p.m.
The State Theatre, 220 North Washington St., Falls
Church. Tickets are $15. Call 703-237-0300 or visit
thestatetheatre.com.
STEVE EARLE, ALLiSoN MooRER
Shelby Lynne’s sister Allison Moorer will open for
her husband Steve Earle and his bluegrass band
The Dukes. Expect a night of politically charged
roots and country, with a dollop of sweet har-
mony. Saturday, Aug. 13, and Sunday, Aug. 14, at
7:30 p.m. The Birchmere, 3701 Mount Vernon Ave.,
Alexandria. Tickets are $59.50. Call 703-549-7500 or
visit birchmere.com.
AUGUST 4, 2011 44 METROWEEKLY
dining
45 METROWEEKLY.cOM
AUGUST 4, 2011 46 METROWEEKLY
TiM McGRAW
Mr. Faith Hill will make the Virginia outdoor arena
once better named Nissan Pavilion safe for coun-
try — at least for one night, and for his particular
mass-appeal brand of country-rock. Saturday, Aug.
13, at 7 p.m. Jiffy Lube Live, 7800 Cellar Door Drive,
Bristow, Va. Tickets are $29.75 to $89. Call 703-754-
6400 or visit livenation.com.
WoLF TRAP oPERA:
THE TALES oF HoFFMANN
The Wolf Trap Opera Company presents a new pro-
duction of Jacques Offenbach’s uncompleted opera
Les contes d’Hoffmanni, focused on three women
who broke the poet Hoffman’s heart: the perfect doll
Olympia, the sensitive artist Antonia and the danger-
ous seductress Giulietta. Offenbach was a powerful
infuence on later composers of the operetta genre,
including Johann Strauss Jr. and Arthur Sullivan (of
Gilbert and Sullivan fame). In French with super-
titles. Friday, Aug. 5, at 8 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 7, at 3
p.m., Thursday, Aug. 11, at 8 p.m., and Saturday, Aug.
13, at 7 p.m. The Barns at Wolf Trap, 1645 Trap Road,
Vienna. Tickets are $32 to $72. Call 703-255-1900 or
visit wolftrap.org.
danCe
STEP AFRiKA!
The Washington Performing Arts Society presents a
Summer Steps program with young members of Step
Afrika! showcasing the traditions of stepping and
other percussive dance styles. Sunday, Aug. 7, at 6
p.m. Kennedy Center Millennium Stage. Tickets are
free. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
readinGS
JoNATHAN yARDLEy
Second Reading: Notable Neglected Books Revisited
collects some of the essays the esteemed Washington
Post book critic Jonathan Yardley wrote between
2003 and 2010, revisiting and reviewing books from
the archives worth going back to. It’s great reading
on great reading, you might say. Monday, Aug. 8, at 7
p.m. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW.
Call 202-364-1919 or visit politics-prose.com.
GaLLerieS
LoNG ViEW GALLERy
Long View Gallery’s “Refresh: New Works by Some
of Long View’s Best” exhibit offers new works by
Mike Weber, Scott Brooks, Tony Savoie, Michelle
Peterson-Albandoz, Anne Marchand, Paula
Crawford and others. Through Aug. 28. Long View
Gallery, 1234 9th St. NW. Call 202-232-4788 or visit
longviewgallery.com.
NATioNAL GEoGRAPHic MuSEuM
“Race To The End of the Earth” follows the race to
reach the South Pole a hundred years ago between
Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen and British
Royal Navy Capt. Robert Falcon Scott. Through
photographs, historical artifacts, vivid dioramas and
interactive exhibits, the exhibit explores the ardu-
ous journey the two faced. To Aug. 21. National
Geographic Society, 1145 17th St. NW. Tickets are $8.
Call 202-857-7588 or visit ngmuseum.org.
THE PHiLLiPS coLLEcTioN
“Kandinsky and the Harmony of Silence: Painting
with White Border” provides a fascinating, in-depth
look at Wassily Kandinsky’s creative process during
the fve months leading up to his 1913 masterpiece
“Painting with White Border (Moscow).” In con-
Anson
Book It
The Center toasts LGBT literature on Saturday
I
T’S SO rare TheSe DayS ThaT We haV e ha e ha e The OPPOrTunITy
to celebrate lGBT literature,” says David Mariner of The Center, D.C.’s
lGBT Community center. “We’ve seen so many of the lGBT bookstores
close down in recent years.”
under Mariner’s direction, The Center will launch its inaugural
OutWrite Book Fair this Saturday, aug. 6. It’s part of The Center’s growing
arts program, and builds on the regular OutWrite author events The Center
has hosted over the past couple years.
The fair was partly designed with people like aaron anson in mind. The
self-published author of Mind Your Own Life, anson says OutWrite and
other events like it help fll a void.
“The gay black male portion of the gay community as a whole — I think
that part has been consistently underrepresented,” says anson, who will
read from Mind Your Own Life.
all told, the day-long OutWrite Book Fair will feature seven author
readings, plus poetry events and literary discussions, including a chat about
D.C.’s lGBT literary history with, among others, Deacon McCubbin and
Jim Bennett of the former lambda rising bookstore.
Mariner also singles out the Saturday night celebration of Jewish les-
bian poetry, based on a new poetry collection by local editor Julie enszer.
and then there’s “the naughty adventures of Mullah nasruddin and his
hairy ass” — The Center’s playful title for a reading by ron Suresha, who
will share bawdy, queer Turkish folk tales and jokes.
Book vendors from around the country will be selling lGBT-themed
books, in addition to used books on offer from The Center. Fairgoers are
also encouraged to bring their own books to donate to The Center’s lending
library, or a food item to donate to the Wanda alston house.
“It’s [already] bigger than I was expecting,” says Mariner. “We’re all
going to be packed into the D.C. Center.” — Doug Rule
The Center’s OutWrite LGBT Book Fair is Saturday, Aug. 6,
starting at 11 a.m. The Center, 1318 U St. NW. For more information,
call 202-682-2245 or visit thedccenter.org or outwritedc.org.
junction, the Phillips presents “Stella Sounds: The
Scarlatti K Series” featuring contemporary works
by American artist Frank Stella, a longtime admirer
of Kandinksy’s ideas. Through Sept. 4. The Phillips
Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. Tickets are $12. Call
202-387-2151 x247 or visit phillipscollection.org.
WASHiNGToN PRiNTMAKERS GALLERy
“The 14th Annual National Small Works” competi-
tion contains 30 prints from artists across the nation,
all approximately 13x13 in size. Running concur-
rently is the solo exhibition by the Washington
Printmakers’ 2010 winner Kiyomi Baird. Now to
Aug. 28. Opening reception and awards program
is Saturday, Aug. 6, at 1 p.m. Pyramid Atlantic Art
Center, 8230 Georgia Ave. Silver Spring. Call 301-
608-9101 or visit washingtonprintmakers.com.
aBoVe & Beyond
SouTHWEST Dc WATERFRoNT
BoAT HoME TouR
Ever wonder what a lived-in foating boat looks like
on the inside? Well, here’s your chance to take a
peek. Twenty-three houseboats, housebarges, cabin
cruisers, tugs and more will be open for touring next
Saturday. A 60-minute Potomac cruise can be added
on to complete the waterfront experience. Proceeds
beneft the Alice Ferguson Foundation and Earth
Conservation Corps. Tour the foating residences on
the Washington Channel. Saturday, Aug. 13, from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Gangplank Marina, 600 Water St. SW.
Tickets are $11, or $25 with a DC Harbor Cruises
cruise. Visit dchouseboat.org for more information.
WASHiNGToN ANiMAL REScuE LEAGuE’S
ADoPT-A-THoN
The Washington Animal Rescue League is hosting
a special nonstop adoption event this weekend as
a way to kick off its participation in the national
ASPCA’s $100K Challenge. Potential adopters may
offer what they wish for available ready-to-adopt
cats and dogs; the regular adoption fees — starting at
$50 for cats and $100 for dogs — have been waived.
Event starts Saturday, Aug. 6, at 11 a.m., and runs
until Sunday, Aug. 7, at 8 p.m. Washington Animal
Rescue League, 71 Oglethorpe St. NW. Call 202-726-
2556 or visit warl.org.
eLSeWhere
FiRE iSLAND’S AScENSioN DANcE BENEFiT
The largest party of its kind on Fire Island, Ascension
benefts the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force,
among other charities, and attracts 5,000 partiers
from around the world to the relatively secluded gay
paradise of Fire Island Pines. A full weekend of activi-
ties is on tap, including a Saturday afternoon pool
party and evening tea dance complete with freworks,
plus concerts nightly by Kristine W, Crystal Waters
and Martha Wash. The main Ascension party right
on the beach Sunday offers DJs Brett Henrichsen and
Lee Dagger, better known as one-half of duo Bimbo
Jones. DJ Drew G closes the offcial events with a
Sunday tea dance, while later that night DJ Paulo
closes the weekend with what will surely be a sweaty
set at the resort’s storied Pavilion Nightclub. Friday,
Aug. 19, through Sunday, Aug. 21, in New York’s Fire
Island Pines. A beach pass to the main events starts
at $200. Visit ascensionparty.com for more details,
including information on places to stay. l
47 METROWEEKLY.cOM
FoR MoRE ouT oN THE ToWN LiSTiNGS
PLEASE ViSiT
WWW.METRoWEEKLy.coM
AUGUST 4, 2011 48 METROWEEKLY
K
elly rOWlanD IS
a tease.
Take a few head-
lines over the past
year as evidence. “Kelly rowland
Tries Disco for Third album.”
“Kelly rowland’s album Set to
Cement Move to Dance Music.”
“Capital Pride alliance announces
headliner Kelly rowland.”
In the end, none of those things
happened. rowland, of course,
bowed out as this year’s Capital
Pride headliner weeks before
the festival — she just couldn’t
pass up the opportunity to be a
judge on the British reality show
X Factor. I don’t begrudge her for
that — anyway, Jennifer holliday
was more than fne in her stead —
but it didn’t exactly increase the
gay love for her, either.
as for the other headlined teas-
es: rowland may have tried disco,
but there’s little trace of it on her
new third album, Here I Am. and
that move to dance music? Well,
the good news is she hasn’t moved
away from dance music. yet her
4/4 passion is hardly written in
stone. as she put together Here I
Am, rowland teased the public by
previewing a couple of new dance
tunes. But in the end dance music
only powers the last two tracks on
the new album, and only one of
them is new. The David Guetta-
produced rouser “Commander”
was a Song of Summer contender
last year, for God’s sake.
If only rowland had appeased
and not teased us, we’d be singing
her set’s other dance track right
back to her: “I’m down for what-
ever, when it comes to you.”
In “Down for Whatever,” pro-
duced by lady Gaga’s right-hand-
man redOne, rowland also sings:
“I’m amazed, by you all. you bring
out a side I didn’t know.” Sadly,
whatever side that is remains a
mystery to listeners.
Despite her beginnings in bois-
terous hip-hop-favored pop and
her more recent run as a lovely,
lusty dance SweeTart, rowland’s
real inclination seems to be as
a low-boil r&B singer. Despite
its declarative title, Here I Am
is ultimately not that different
from rowland’s last set, 2007’s
Ms. Kelly — or even her 2002 solo
debut, Simply Deep. her lyrics
may be a bit more sexual, and the
tempo is generally faster, but the
majority of Here I Am is the same
sort of steamy r&B that didn’t
quite work for her before.
This time around, rowland
took at least a year longer than
intended, and saw many produc-
ers come and go. She also shucked
two r&B tunes that fopped when
previewed as lead singles (the
ne-yo-penned “Grown Woman”
and “rose Colored Glasses”). But
the constant tinkering is succeed-
ing: rowland has already scored
one of her best-charting hits ever
in the u.S. as a solo artist, with
the slinky “Motivation” featuring
lil Wayne. She may yet repeat the
process with the lively, rihanna-
esque “lay It On Me” featuring
newcomer Big Sean. So maybe
she’s fnally on the right track.
Still, the return to r&B seems
bizarre after rowland’s success
with David Guetta over the past
two years — “When love Takes
Over,” for example, wasn’t just
overplayed in gay clubland, it was
in regular rotation even on pop
radio. It’s also strange given that
we’re at a point in time when
dance music is fnally charting big
in the u.S. and not just in the u.K.
Oddly though, rowland decided
to forgo the clear dance opportu-
nity before her.
Which is not to suggest all of
Here I Am is a miss. rowland con-
sistently produces music that is
diffcult to dislike. all of it — every
track — is likeable enough. you
just wish for more. and you can’t
help but feel teased. again. l
Kelly Rowland doesn’t want to become a dance diva, so Here I Am
instead offers the same sort of steamy R&B as before
Sexier, but still a tease: Rowland
KELLY
ROWLAND
Here I Am
HHHHH
Motown
$11.99
Kelly’s Dilemma
Doug Rule MuSic
49 METROWEEKLY.cOM
night
life
51 METROWEEKLY.cOM
listings
Destinations on page 58
THURSDAY, 08.04.11
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4pm-
7pm • $4 Small Plates,
$4 Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis •
Upstairs open 5-10pm
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail mar-
garitas, rail drinks and
domestic beers • $3.95
Cuervo margaritas •
Chuck Smith on piano,
7:30pm-close • $3 off
Mojitos after 7:30pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
$1 Rail Vodka • Best
Package Contest hosted
by Lena Lett and Ba’naka,
Midnight • $200 in prizes
• DJ MadScience • DJ
Chord Bezerra • No Cover
• 21+
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • Power Hour:
$1 off Rail and Domestic,
4-6pm • Gear Night: Men
in full gear get extra spe-
cials, 2nd foor • Leather,
Shirtless, Uniform, Hanky
Code Specials • DC Boys
of Leather • Boys Night
Out
DIK BAR
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • Rail
Drinks and Select Beers,
$3 • Absolut and Premium
Beers, $4
FIREPLACE
Rail Vodka $2, 9-11pm
• VJ Dina Valentine,
downstairs • DJ Brooklyn,
upstairs
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
t
PHASE 1
Karaoke starting at 7pm •
DJ LS or Drag King hosted
• 21+ • No cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the Lounge
SO ADDICTIVE LOUNGE
733 Elden St.
Herndon, Va.
The L Night • Karaoke, all
night • Burger Specials •
No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Shirtless men drink free
(rail & domestic), 10-11pm
and Midnight to 12:30am
• All nude male dancers •
Dancing w/ DJ tim-e, 9pm-
close • Cover
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm • “Best Of”
Contest, 11:30pm • DJ
Back2bACk
HIPPO
1 W. Eager St.
Baltimore, Md.
Hip Hop in dance bar,
10pm • DJ Kuhmeleon
JR.’S
Happy Hour, 4-8pm • $11
All You Can Drink Rail
(upgrade to a better liquor
for $20) • Power Hour,
8-9pm • $4 Rail $2 JR.’s
drafts, 9pm to close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Active Duty Military Night
• Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover
FRIDAY, 08.05.11
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail mar-
garitas, rail drinks and
domestic beers • $3.95
Cuervo margaritas •
Gordon Kent on the Piano,
8:30pm-12:30am
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Baltimore Tag Team: DJ
Shawn Q and Leni K •
DJ Keenan Orr • Special
appearance by Johnny
Hazzard • Free vodka
drinks, 11pm-midnight •
Doors at 10pm • $8 • 21+
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town
Bear Happy Hour,
6-11pm • $3 Rail, $3
Draft,
$3 Bud Light, $7 Pitchers
• Free Pizza, 7pm • DJ
Christian Gerard • Hosted
by Charger Stone • No
cover before 9:30pm • 21+
DC EAGLE
Power Hour, $1 Off Rail
and Domestic, 4-6pm
• People in Leather,
Uniform or Rubber get free
Kamikazes, 9pm-midnight
• Beer Bar: Carl Vogel
Outreach
DIK BAR
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • Rail
Drinks and Select Beers,
$3 • Absolut and Premium
Beers, $4
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
All-U-Can-Drink Smirnoff
Buffet, $16, 10pm-11:30am
• Raw, 10pm
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
Deep in the Game, 10pm
• Karaoke in Karaoke Bar,
9pm-2am
JR.’S
Happy Hour, 5-9pm • $4
Corona $6 Red Bull and
vodka, 10pm-close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Della Volta • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Luz • Dancing, 9pm-
close • $5 cover • 21+
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge •
Half price burgers and
fries
SO ADDICTIVE LOUNGE
733 Elden St.
Herndon, Va.
Music, Videos and
Dancing • No Cover •
soaddictivelounge.com
TOWN
Downstairs: DJ
BacK2bACk • Upstairs:
DJ Wess • Doors open
10pm • Drag Show starts
at 10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and Ba’Naka
• $3 rail drinks from
10-11pm • For 21+, $5
from 10-11pm and $10
after 11pm • For 18-20,
$10 all night
53 METROWEEKLY.cOM
For addresses, phone numbers and locations of individual clubs, bars, parties, and special events, please refer to our Destinations on page 58.
t
Raja at Town
Saturday, July 30
PhotograPhy by
Ward Morrison
scene
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
in Secrets • DJ Don T
in Ziegfeld’s • Ladies of
Illusion with host Kristina
Kelly, 11pm • Cover
SATURDAY, 08.06.11
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail mar-
garitas, rail drinks and
domestic beers • $3.95
Cuervo margaritas •
Gordon Kent on the Piano,
8:30pm-12:30am
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Rumba Latina: Underwear
Party, 10pm • DJ Manny
El De-mente • DJ
MadScience • Clothes
check available • $10
• 21+
DC EAGLE
Happy Hour Leather
Specials • Power Hour
$1 off Rail and Domestic,
4-6pm • Beer Bar: SigMa
DIK BAR
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • Rail
Drinks and Select Beers,
$3 • Absolut and Premium
Beers, $4
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Breakfast buffet, 10am-
2pm • Crazy Hour, 4-8pm
• Karaoke, 10pm
FUEGO
@Aqua
1818 New York Ave. NE
Live performances by Gigi
Paris Couture • $3 Vodka
& Miller Lite until 11:30pm
• Male Dancers • Shooter
Boys • Free private park-
ing • Cover
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm with
Beat the Clock Specials
on Rolling Rock and Rail
Vodka starting at 50 cents
• All-U-Can-Drink Bacardi
Buffet, $18, 10pm-2am •
Code, 9pm
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
DJ Keith Hoffman, 10pm •
Karaoke, 10pm-2am
JR.’S
$3 Coors Light, $4 rail
vodka highballs, all day
and night • Showtunes
from 4-8pm
NELLIE’S
Zing Zang Bloody Marys,
Nellie Beer, House Rail
Drinks and Mimosas, $4,
11am-5pm • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ LS • Dancing, 9pm-
close
AUGUST 4, 2011 54 METROWEEKLY
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the lounge •
Charity Bingo with Cash
Prizes 3rd Sat. of Every
Month
SO ADDICTIVE LOUNGE
733 Elden St.
Herndon, Va.
College Night • VJ Q •
Dancing • 18 to enter,
21 to drink • No Cover
over 21
TOWN
DJ Bill Bennett •
Downstairs: Wess • The
Ladies of Town at 10:30pm
• Hosted by Lena Lett
and featuring Tatianna,
Shi-Queeta-Lee, Jessica
Spaulding Deverreoux
and Ba’Naka • $3 rail
drinks, 10-11pm • $8 from
10-11pm and $12 after
11pm • 21+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All nude male dancers •
The Ladies of Illusion host-
ed by Ella Fitzgerald, frst
show at 11pm • DJ Spyke
in Ziegfelds • Cover
SUNDAY, 08.07.11
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail mar-
garitas, rail drinks and
domestic beers • $3.95
Cuervo margaritas •
Karaoke, 6:30pm-close •
Emceed by Zoe
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Martini Madness, 4-9pm
• $5 Any Martini •
Homowood Karaoke, 9pm
• PopLife: 5 Decades
of Pop Hits, 10pm • DJ
MadScience • $4 rail
drinks, $4 Miller Lites,
$4 Jameson shots • No
Cover • 21+
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • Torn jeans,
shirtless and underwear
specials, 9pm-midnight •
Potomac Cookout and Beer
Blast, 5pm
DIK BAR
Happy Hour, all night •
Rail Drinks and Select
Beers, $3 • Absolut and
Premium Beers, $4
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Champagne Brunch Buffet,
11am-3pm • Crazy Hour,
4-8pm • Drag Show host-
ed by Destiny B. Childs,
featuring performances
by a rotating cast, 9pm •
Karaoke • No cover
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm with
$3 Smirnoff (all favors) •
Trailer Park Karaoke with
Mama, 9:30pm
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
Lure presents Spin, 7pm •
DJ Rosie
JR.’S
$2 SKYY Highballs and $2
Coors Light Bottles, all day
and night
NELLIE’S
Drag Brunch, hosted by
Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-
3pm • $20 Brunch Buffet
• House Rail Drinks, Zing
Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets
of Beer, $15 • Guil-Tea
dance by DJ Shea Van
Horn
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover •
www.numberninedc.com
OMEGA
Church Lady Bingo with
Chanel Devereux • Doors
at 7pm • $3
PHASE 1
Live Music all night •
$3.50 Coronas and Bud
Lights • Drag King show
every second Sunday, 9pm
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Happy Hour all night
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Retro Night • Retro videos
• Complimentary drinks
with trivia quiz • All nude
male dancers upstairs in
Secrets • Drink and Beer
specials • Cover
MONDAY, 08.08.11
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Open Mike, 7pm-close •
Emceed by Zoe • $3 off all
Mojitos after 7:30pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour, $1 rail
drinks, $2 beers, $5 call
drinks, 4-7pm • $3 rail
drinks and beers, $5 call
drinks, 7-10pm • Martini
Mondays, 10pm • $5 any
martini • 21+ • No cover
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • New Specials
• $3 Margaritas, 9pm-
midnight
DIK BAR
Happy Hour, all night •
Rail Drinks and Select
Beers, $3 • Absolut and
Premium Beers, $4
FREDDIE’S
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Singles Night, 8pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4pm-close
• Karaoke, 9:30pm •
Bears Do Yoga, 6:30pm
(Upstairs)
HIPPO
Eager Street Saloon, 4pm-
2am • Three drafts for $5
• $2.25 Rails
55 METROWEEKLY.cOM
JR.’S
Happy Hour, 5-7pm • $1
Vodka Highballs and $1
JR.’s Drafts • Buy 1 Get 1
Free, 7-9pm
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag BINGO hosted by Shi-
Queeta Lee, 8pm
OMEGA
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • Bear
Encounters • $2 Drafts
and $5 Cosmos • Real
Men of Omega, 9:30pm
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
75 cents off bottles and
drafts • Movie Night
SO ADDICTIVE LOUNGE
733 Elden St.
Herndon, Va.
Drag Bingo 8pm with
Ophelia Bottoms • Pizza
Specials • No Cover
JR.’S
Happy Hour, 5-7pm • $1
Vodka Highballs and $1
JR.’s Drafts • Buy 1 Get
1 Free, 7-9pm • Monday
Night Showtunes
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Poker Texas Hold’em, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover •
www.numberninedc.com
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Buzztime Trivia competi-
tion • 75 cents off bottles
and drafts
TUESDAY, 08.09.11
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour, all
night • $3 rail margaritas,
rail drinks and domestic
beers • $3.95 Cuervo mar-
garitas • Gordon Kent on
the Piano, 7:30pm-close
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour, $1 rail drinks,
$2 beers, $5 call drinks,
4-7pm • $3 rail drinks
and beers, $5 call drinks,
7-10pm • Treatment (new-
est pop) in 30 Degrees
with DJ MAJR, 10pm •
Flashback, 10pm • DJ
Kuhmeleon • 2-4-1 rail
drinks • $2 Millers and
drafts • 21+ • No cover
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • Power
Hour: $1 off Rail and
Domestic, 4-6pm • New
Specials • $2 Absolut
Drinks, 9pm-midnight
DIK BAR
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • Rail
Drinks and Select Beers,
$3 • Absolut and Premium
Beers, $4
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices, 4pm-
close • FUK!T Packing
Party, 7-9pm
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
Showtune Video Madness,
8:30pm-12:30am •
Hollywood and Broadway
Showtunes
WED., 08.10.11
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
BANANA CAFÉ
Happy Hour, all night •
Gordon Kent on the Piano,
7:30pm-close
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour, $1 rail drinks,
$2 beers, $5 call drinks,
4-7pm • $3 rail drinks
and beers, $5 call drinks,
7-10pm • Karaoke, 10pm
• No Cover • 21+
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • Power
Hour $1 off Rail and
Domestic, 4-6pm •
2-4-1 Rail and Domestic
Specials, 9pm-midnight •
Highwaymen TNT • Hot
Jock Contest, midnight
DIK BAR
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • Rail
Drinks and Select Beers,
$3 • Absolut and Premium
Beers, $4

FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm • Drag
Bingo, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices, 4pm-
Close • POZ DC Happy
Hour, 9pm-Midnight
(Upstairs)
HIPPO
Baltimore, Md.
Gay Bingo, 8:30pm • Cash
prizes • Progressive cash
jackpot • Proceeds beneft
GLCCB • $3 Domestics
JR.’S
Happy Hour, 5-7pm • $1
Vodka Highballs and $1
JR.’s Drafts • Buy 1 Get 1
Free, 7-9pm
AUGUST 4, 2011 56 METROWEEKLY
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
SmartAss Trivia, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover •
www.numberninedc.com
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Free Pool • 75 cents off
Bottles and Drafts
RETRO*FIXE
@Tattoo Bar
1413 K St. NW
Madonna v. Michael Party
• ‘80s and ‘90s Dance
Party Music Mash-Up •
Video by DJ Benny C •
Host: Nikolas Groshans
• $1 Ketel One, 10-11pm
• Champagne Open Bar,
12-12:30am • $5 Cover
after 11pm
SO ADDICTIVE LOUNGE
733 Elden St.
Herndon, Va.
Drag Show with
LaCountress Farrington at
9pm • No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
New Meat Night • Dancer
auditions • Happy Hour
Prices, all night • All nude
male dancers • DJ tim-e,
9pm-close • Drink and
Beer Specials • Cover
THURSDAY, 08.11.11
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour, 4pm-
7pm • $4 Small Plates,
$4 Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis •
Upstairs open 5-10pm
BANANA CAFÉ
Piano Bar Happy Hour,
4-7:30pm • $3 rail mar-
garitas, rail drinks and
domestic beers • $3.95
Cuervo margaritas •
Chuck Smith on piano,
7:30pm-close • $3 off
Mojitos after 7:30pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour, $1 rail
drinks, $2 beers, $5 call
drinks, 4-7pm • $3 rail
drinks and beers, $5
call drinks, 7-10pm • $1
Vodka Drinks, 9-11pm •
Underwear Contest w/
Lena Lett, midnight • DJ
Chord Bezerra • DJ Mad
Science • No Cover • 21+
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • Power Hour:
$1 off Rail and Domestic,
4-6pm • Gear Night: Men
in full gear get extra spe-
cials, 2nd foor • Leather,
Shirtless, Uniform, Hanky
Code Specials • Beer Bar:
DC Eagle Poster Project
DIK BAR
Happy Hour, 4-9pm • Rail
Drinks and Select Beers,
$3 • Absolut and Premium
Beers, $4
FIREPLACE
Happy Hour, $2.50 Rail
and Domestic, 1-9pm •
Rail Vodka $2, 9-11pm
• VJ Dina Valentine,
downstairs • DJ Brooklyn,
upstairs
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm • Royal
Bachelor Party, 8pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour, 4-9pm •
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm • “Best Of”
Contest, 11:30pm • DJ
Back2bACk
HIPPO
1 W. Eager St.
Baltimore, Md.
Hip Hop • DJ Rosie
JR.’S
Happy Hour, 4-8pm • $11
All You Can Drink Rail
(upgrade to a better liquor
for $20) • Power Hour,
8-9pm • $4 Rail $2 JR.’s
drafts, 9pm to close

NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Active Duty Military Night
NUMBER NINE
1435 P St. NW
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Drinks,
5-9pm • No Cover •
www.numberninedc.com
PHASE 1
Karaoke starting at 7pm •
DJ LS or Drag King hosted
• 21+ • No cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the Lounge
SO ADDICTIVE LOUNGE
733 Elden St.
Herndon, Va.
The L Night • Karaoke, all
night • Burger Specials
• No Cover • soaddic-
tivelounge.com
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Shirtless men drink free
(rail & domestic), 10-11pm
• All nude male dancers •
Dancing w/ DJ tim-e, 9pm-
close • Cover l
57 METROWEEKLY.cOM
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AUGUST 4, 2011 58 METROWEEKLY
TOWN
2009 8th Street NW
(202) 234-TOWN
U Street / Cardozo Metro
m d v t
ZIEGFELD’S /
SECRETS
1824 Half Street SW
(202) 863-0670
Navy Yard Metro
m d v t gg
CAPITOL VIDEO
SALES
1729 Connecticut Ave. NW
(202) 265-9226
Dupont Circle Metro
HRC
ACTION CENTER
& STORE
1633 Connecticut Ave. NW
(202) 232-8621
Dupont Circle Metro
Destinations
m mostly men w mostly women m&w men and women r restaurant l leather/levi
d dancing v video t drag cw country western gg go-go dancers o open 24 hours s sauna
DELTA ELITE
3734 10th Street NE
(202) 529-0626
Brookland Metro
m d

THE FIREPLACE
22nd & P Streets NW
(202) 293-1293
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
FREDDIE’S
BEACH BAR
555 South 23rd Street
Crystal City, VA
(703) 685-0555
Crystal City Metro
m&w r
FUEGO
1818 New York Ave. NE
www.clubfuegodc.com
m d t
GLORIOUS
HEALTH CLUB
2120 W. VA Ave. NE 20002
(202) 269-0226
m o s
GREEN LANTERN
1335 Green Court NW
(behind 1335 L St.)
(202) 347-4534
McPherson Square Metro
m l
18th & U
DUPLEX DINER
2004 18th Street NW
(202) 265-7828
Dupont Circle Metro
r
BACHELOR’S MILL
1104 8th Street SE
(202) 546-5979
Eastern Market /
Navy Yard Metro
m d
COBALT/30 DEGREES
17th & R Street NW
(202) 462-6569
Dupont Circle Metro
m d t
CREW CLUB
1321 14th Street NW
(202) 319-1333
McPherson Square Metro
m o s
DC EAGLE
639 New York Ave. NW
(202) 347-6025
Convention Center /
Gallery Place /
Chinatown Metro
m l
JR.’S
1519 17th Street NW
(202) 328-0090
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
LACE
2214 Rhode Island Ave. NE
(202) 832-3888
w r d
NELLIE’S
SPORTS BAR
900 U Street NW
(202) 332-6355
U Street / Cardozo Metro
m&w r
NUMBER NINE
1435 P Street NW
Dupont Circle Metro
OMEGA
2122 P Street NW (rear)
(202) 223-4917
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
PHASE ONE
525 8th Street SE
(202) 544-6831
Eastern Market Metro
w d
REMINGTON’S
639 Pennsylvania Ave. SE
(202) 543-3113
Eastern Market Metro
m cw d v
BARS & CLUBS
RETAIL
59 PURcHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.cOM/ScENE/
Raja at Town
Saturday, July 30
PhotograPhy by
Ward Morrison
scene
60 SEE MORE PHOTOS fROM THiS EvENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.cOM/ScENE
Prom Night
Saturday, July 23
Cobalt
PhotograPhy by
dylan CoMstoCk
scene
61 PURcHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.cOM/ScENE/
AUGUST 4, 2011 62 METROWEEKLY
WILL LADY GAGA OR
Britney Spears dethrone
Madonna in the 9:30 Club’s
diva dance battle this
Saturday, Aug. 6? They just
might.
“I don’t know about
Madonna because she hasn’t
put out anything new for a
while,” says the event’s host
Erin Myers, who goes by DJ
lil’e. “But she has a huge leg
up on everybody because her
career is so long.”
Despite its title — “Lady
Gaga vs. Madonna vs.
Britney Dance Party” — the
event isn’t technically a con-
test. “It just sounds more
interesting to put it that way
than to say, ‘DJ lil’e Playing
the Music of…,’” says
Myers. In fact, the triumvi-
rate will be played in roughly
equal measure.
And anyway, only the
third spot ever rotates;
Gaga and Madonna both
have a lock on the mar-
quee. Kylie Minogue,
Rihanna, even international
electro-punker M.I.A. have
all warmed the third spot
slot, which Myers says
rotates “to keep it from get-
ting stale.”
Myers, who works by
day in human resources for
a liberal-leaning interactive
media company, is best
known as a DJ throwing
‘80s-themed and alt-pop
parties, most notably the
Black Cat’s nine-year-old
monthly party Right Round.
She got her start as a DJ
a decade ago after teas-
ing her husband about his
two turntables, and then
co-opting them once she
learned how to use them.
She spins for private events
and weddings in addition to
club parties.
Her diva dance party was
essentially a dream come
true. “It sounds hokey, but
I had a dream that I did
the Gaga/Madonna/M.I.A.
party at 9:30,” Myers
says. “When I woke up, I
thought, ‘Oh my god, that’s
such a great idea.’” The
9:30 Club liked it so much,
they asked her to throw
the first one less than two
weeks later.
Myers brings in dancers
for the party, and works
with Kylos to provide light-
ing and visuals. DJ lemz
will guest with her this time
out. The party, which sold
out the 9:30 Club in July
2010 and again last March,
attracts “a real mix.”
And Myers will likely
mix it up with the crowd
too. “I dance a lot while I
DJ,” she says. “I come out
from behind the decks and
dance with the dancers. For
me, it’s like, who wouldn’t
love dancing around and
lip-synching onstage to
some great music in front
of a bunch of people that
are cheering and having a
blast?”
Hey, it works for Britney.
DJ lil’e spins Saturday, Aug.
6. Doors at 9 p.m. Nightclub
9:30, 815 V St. NW. Tickets
are $15. Call 202-265-0930
or visit 930.com. l
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63 METROWEEKLY.cOM
The popular diva dance party at the 9:30 Club is a dream come true for DJ lil’e
being termed as “clarifica-
tion.” At Comic-Con, execu-
tive producer Brad Falchuk
said, “They are seniors, so
they’re graduating. But just
because they’re graduating
doesn’t mean they’re leav-
ing the show.”
Addressing the short-
lived career of Chord
Overstreet, he said, “For
reasons Chord is aware
of, we decided not to
make him a regular” —
which sounds a lot like
the way Joan Crawford
disinherited Christina and
Christopher Crawford,
“For reasons that are well
known to them.” And
forget the rumors about
Overstreet returning for a
few guest spots to tie up
his storyline. Falchuk says,
“We invited him back. He
declined. We were disap-
pointed.” Chord was asked
to appear in some episodes
for the first half of the
season with the possibility
of eventually becoming a
regular. Allegedly, he felt
this was a demotion and
declined — for reasons well
know known to them.
Meanwhile, with Darren
Criss’s increasing presence
on Glee, you’d think he’d
be pretty busy. His sched-
ule may soon become
even busier. He’s currently
in negotiations to take
over the lead in How To
Succeed in Business... on
Broadway. Daniel Radcliffe
is slated to stay with the
musical until the end of the
year. Producers hope that
Criss will take on the role
for a few weeks in January,
which is when he’ll be
on a break from Glee. It’s
an ironic bit of casting
as Darren first sprung to
attention by playing Harry
in a series of online vid-
eos called A Very Potter
Musical....
LESLIE’S NEW PLAY...
Leslie Jordan has put
together yet another one-
man show, and will be
trotting it out on Aug. 11 at
Town Hall in Provincetown.
Stories I Can’t Tell Mama
promises to be more risqué
than ever, which is intrigu-
ing since the last time he
was in P-Town, he actu-
ally brought his mother!
He never disappoints, and
you can get more informa-
tion and tickets for this
one-night-only event at
OnlyAtTheCrown.com....
HAIRSPRAYING...
Remember all of that
hoopla about Hairspray star
Nikki Blonsky working in a
shoe store? And then she
said she wasn’t working
there, but only dropped in
to help a friend? And then
the owner of the store
said Blonsky was most
certainly working there
and was on the schedule?
Well, now Nikki’s got a gig
that’s more appropriate.
On July 31, she’ll be host-
ing a Hairspray sing-along
screening of the flick at
the Hollywood Forever
Cemetery in Los Angeles.
Maybe her career is dead...

ASK BILLY... We turn
to Rodney in London: “I
don’t know if you watch
Torchwood but I’m pissed
off. The third episode
was to include a sex
scene between John
Barrowman and a sexy
bartender. But the BBC
censored it! Did you get it
in the States? Will you post
it? I love you more than I
love Pippa Middleton!”
I don’t believe I’ve ever
received a higher compli-
ment — and it should go
without saying that I’d
look fabulous in that back-
less dress! Be that as
it may, let’s turn to Mr.
Barrowman’s bare back-
side, which predictably
turns up in this video. The
scene in question shows
Captain Jack picking up a
bartender (a very hunky
Canadian actor named
Dillon Casey). We see
the beginnings of a sexual
encounter — with Jack
insisting on using protec-
tion. See? It’s almost like a
PSA! Then he “coaxes” the
willing bartender to perform
oral sex on him. We then
see the twosome in bed,
in flagrante delicto as we’d
say here in Italy if this were
a couple thousand years
ago. The BBC decided that
the scene was too sexually
charged to run just past
the family hour so they cut
it — because the last thing
they’d want to do is spread
a message of safe, respon-
sible sex. So instead, they’ll
leave it up to BillyMasters.
com to fulfill the dreams of
every Brit.
Speaking of Barrowman,
he was involved in one of
the highpoints of Comic-
Con. During the panel
discussion for Torchwood,
he sang Happy Birthday
to a mega fan dressed
as Captain Jack. But that
wasn’t all — after the song,
he gave the bloke a full-on
kiss! Not only did the guy
lose his mind, but the gals
in the hall went nuts cheer-
ing. It’s so easy to get a
rise out of a spinster.
When I’m more respon-
sible than the BBC, it’s
definitely time to end
yet another column.
Fortuitously, just this
week I got a message on
Facebook which said (in
part): “Thanks for being
a great light for the com-
munity!” My God, if I am
a light for any community,
then we’re all in big trou-
ble. I’m just here to enter-
tain, enlighten and perhaps
titillate. And that’s exactly
what you’ll find on billymas-
ters.com. And if you have
any questions that you’d
like me to shed some light
upon, simply send a note
to Billy@billymasters.com
and I promise to get back
to you before to you before
Nikki gets another gig in a
cemetery.... l
WEDDING PLANS?... It’s
becoming increasingly clear
that Neil Patrick Harris
hangs on my every word.
When it was announced
that NY would initiate
same-sex marriages,
NPH Tweeted how he
and David Burtka had
proposed to each other
and couldn’t wait to set a
date — which prompted
me to wonder why a NY
decision was affecting this
Californian couple. I guess
this gave Neil pause. When
One-Eyed Andy on Watch
What Happens Live asked
if the duo set a date, Harris
said, “We have no plans
to. We’ve had rings on our
right hands for five years.
We proposed to each
other separately at differ-
ent times ages ago. We
were gonna get married in
California and then Prop 8
happened. We have con-
templated it here, but the
problem is if you say, ‘Yes,
we’re planning a wedding’
then it becomes a big, giant
thing. We’re certainly not
planning a wedding, but we
think it’s amazing that 800
and some odd people got
married yesterday.” Some
odd ones, indeed....
Speaking of backtrack-
ing, we have more on
the revolving door of cast
mates over at Glee. As
you’ll recall, it was recently
announced that Chord
Overstreet would not be
returning, that Darren Criss
and Harry Shum Jr. would
become series regulars,
and that Lea Michele,
Chris Colfer and Cory
Monteith would be leaving
when they graduate at the
end of next season. This
type of long-range plan-
ning is usually meant to
gauge public reaction. And
the public was not happy
— particularly when Chris
Colfer said that leaving
“was not my choice” and
that he learned the news
via Ryan Murphy’s tweet.
This likely prompted what’s
AUGUST 4, 2011 64 METROWEEKLY
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65 METROWEEKLY.cOM
What’s this crap about, ‘hate the sin, but love the sinner?’
That doesn’t even make any sense! either you love somebody or you’re judging them. you can’t have it both ways.
— Out comedian WANDA SyKES, speaking on an LGBT issues panel at the NAACP’s annual convention in Los Angeles. The panel
was moderated by CNN anchor Don Lemon, who recently came out, and civil rights pioneer Julian Bond.
(naaCP)
[W]here does it say in the bible to judge others? Oh right. It doesn’t.
GOD is the only judge honey.
‘GOD is love’
— Pop star MiLEy cyRuS responding to fans on Twitter who had criticized the singer’s new fnger tattoo that reads, “All LOVE
is equal.” She later came to the defense of one of her followers who had set off a Twitter fght by telling Cyrus to “look up
Leviticus.” Cyrus told her followers, “Everyone is entitled 2 opinions! ‘if u don’t stand 4 something you’ll fall for anything.’ :)”
(Twitter)
again, what I think is the most important thing, and what I think any responsible mayor looks at is,
‘What is in the best interest of Portland?
how can I best serve the people of this great city
that I love so much?
— Portland, Ore., Mayor SAM ADAMS announces his decision not to seek re-election. Adams was the frst gay mayor to lead a
large U.S. city, but he was embroiled in an early scandal about his affair with an 18-year-old intern for his campaign. While not
mentioning that scandal directly, Adams said, “I am under no illusion of how challenging the race for re-election would be.”
(KaTu)
I’ve only been [to Fire Island] a couple of times, but my experience is that a lot of
the guys there, they combine
desperation with ruthlessness.
and it’s just not a winning combination....
Whereas in P-Town I just feel like the guys are much more comfortable in their own skin.
— Mo RoccA, satirist and commentator on The Daily Show and many other media outlets, comparing and contrasting two gay
vacation meccas, New York’s Fire Island and Massachusetts’s Provincetown.
(The Six Pack)
Bradlee Dean is a renowned and accomplished
hard metal rocker who came to Jesus Christ
after a diffcult and sinful youth resulting in part to an absent father who was imprisoned and largely absent Mother.
— From the $50 million defamation lawsuit fled by Minnesota Christian heavy metal preacher Bradlee Dean against
Rachel Maddow. Dean, who has received support from GOP presidential candidate Rep. Michele Bachmann, has a long history
of opposing the “gay lifestyle.” Maddow’s network, MSNBC, calls the suit “baseless.”
(City Pages)
AUGUST 4, 2011 66 METROWEEKLY









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