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Charles Drew's Pulse: The Unofficial Lifeline Guide for Columbia's Pre-Meds

Charles Drew's Pulse: The Unofficial Lifeline Guide for Columbia's Pre-Meds

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Published by cucharlesdrew
PULSE: THE UNOFFICAL LIFELINE GUIDE FOR COLUMBIA’S PRE-MEDS

About “Pulse”:

The Charles Drew Pre-Medical Society’s “Pulse: The Unofficial Lifeline Guide for Columbia’s Pre-Meds” was completed in the Spring 2011 semester as an online publication written by over forty Columbia pre-medical students, current and former. This publication aims to provide open and honest advice by Columbia pre-meds for Columbia pre-meds based upon their own experiences, discuss mistakes they feel they have made along the way that might help their peers, and leave a legacy for future generations of pre-meds to follow.

Its completion is due to the hard work and endless dedication of creator Princess Francois, CC’11 and co-collaborators Antoinette Allen, CC’12 and Jasmine Alves, CC’13 along with editors Christina Ortiz, CC’12 and Kwanza Price, Post-Bacc, 11.

We hope this guidebook will be updated periodically as we anticipate that both the needs of students and the premed curriculum will change. Treat this guidebook as a window into these other resources and think of Pulse as your student-written survival guide to navigating—and excelling at—your pre-med career and a stepping stone to your ultimate dream: the M.D.

If you have any questions or concerns, please email cucharlesdrew@gmail.com.
PULSE: THE UNOFFICAL LIFELINE GUIDE FOR COLUMBIA’S PRE-MEDS

About “Pulse”:

The Charles Drew Pre-Medical Society’s “Pulse: The Unofficial Lifeline Guide for Columbia’s Pre-Meds” was completed in the Spring 2011 semester as an online publication written by over forty Columbia pre-medical students, current and former. This publication aims to provide open and honest advice by Columbia pre-meds for Columbia pre-meds based upon their own experiences, discuss mistakes they feel they have made along the way that might help their peers, and leave a legacy for future generations of pre-meds to follow.

Its completion is due to the hard work and endless dedication of creator Princess Francois, CC’11 and co-collaborators Antoinette Allen, CC’12 and Jasmine Alves, CC’13 along with editors Christina Ortiz, CC’12 and Kwanza Price, Post-Bacc, 11.

We hope this guidebook will be updated periodically as we anticipate that both the needs of students and the premed curriculum will change. Treat this guidebook as a window into these other resources and think of Pulse as your student-written survival guide to navigating—and excelling at—your pre-med career and a stepping stone to your ultimate dream: the M.D.

If you have any questions or concerns, please email cucharlesdrew@gmail.com.

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Published by: cucharlesdrew on Aug 05, 2011
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11/29/2012

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Name: Lindsey Hastings-Spaine, CC’13
Major: Neuroscience and Behavior
Extracurricular Activities: Charles Drew Pre-medical Society;
STRIVE; CU Global Health
Random Fact: of Sierra Leonean decent; First Generation College
Bound; A Neo-Soul and Jazz fiend; A free-Spirit and Lover of the
people; in my next life, I want to be a creative director for a

major Fashion magazine or at least a hippy…

If there was one‖word‖that‖I‖could‖use‖to‖sum‖up‖my‖sophomore‖year‖I‖would‖use description of sophomore year as such, it is not to discredit any other year as a pre-med at Columbia.
Truth be told, every year is difficult. However, sophomore year has been extremely challenging.

First‖and‖foremost,‖as‖a‖sophomore‖you‖are‖expected‖to‖‘double-up‖in‖your‖sciences’.‖This‖means‖
either enrolling in Physics and Biology, or Physics and Organic. Chem., or Biology and Organic Chem.
(for the really brave souls!). I opted to take the Physics and Biology combination. I made this decision

mainly‖because‖I‖am‖a‖science‖major‖and‖Professor‖Mowshowitz’s‖Biology‖class‖serves‖as‖a‖

prerequisite for future classes I will need to take in my major.

As a freshman, I would constantly hear upperclassmen pre-meds‖refer‖to‖sophomore‖year‖as‖the‖‚hell‖
year;‛they‖rarely‖had‖something‖positive‖to‖say‖about‖their‖second‖year‖at‖Columbia.‖‖Personally,‖I‖
felt that I had already endured my‖‘hell‖year’‖as‖a‖freshman‖at‖Columbia.‖How‖could‖it‖possibly‖get‖
worse? To make a long story short, I had been naive. The main difference between freshman year as a
pre-med‖and‖sophomore‖year‖is‖that‖in‖your‖first‖year‖you‖are‖‘learning’‖a‖lot‖of‖things for the first
time, for example, how to actually study, how to balance a social life with your studies, etc. But the

work‖aspect‖of‖freshman‖year‖is‖not‖terribly‖difficult.‖As‖a‖sophomore,‖you‖already‖have‖your‖‘friend‖
base’‖established,‖and‖your‖overall focus on school and study habits have improved greatly. But the
workload, and difficulty, increase exponentially in sophomore year. CC readings and responses,

Professor‖Mowshowitz’s‖Biology‖Problem‖Sets,‖and‖Physics‖Homework‖alone‖can‖have‖you‖feeling‖
overwhelmed.‖And‖these‖are‖just‖3‖classes!‖As‖I‖recollect‖on‖sophomore‖year’s‖midterm‖and‖finals‖
weeks, chills run down my back (no exaggeration, lol).

—Despite the hell of sophomore year, it is a necessary stepping stone. If you can survive sophomore
year, you can survive anything the pre-med‖track‖at‖Columbia‖throws‖your‖way.‖I’d‖say‖the‖best‖
advice I can give to any incoming pre-med sophomores is to stay ahead and stay on top. When I say
‚stay‖ahead‛‖I‖mean‖coming‖to‖lecture‖already‖having‖a‖good‖idea‖of what is going to be covered by
the instructor. This means reading lecture notes and slides, or skimming, the day before. With this

Academics: Different Roads, Same Destination

24

approach, I found that I got so much more out of going to lecture. The material stuck more and
reduced the time I needed to re-learn.‖Now‖when‖I‖say‖‘stay‖on‖top’,‖I‖am‖referring‖to‖assigned‖work.‖
For example, Professor Mowshowitz does a nice job of detailing exactly what problems should be
completed in relation to where she is in lecture. Do everything you can to stay on her schedule. Trust
me; it will be to your benefit.

As I stated earlier, sophomore year is a beast. But if you stay ahead and on top, the beast is not so

scary.‖‖In‖conclusion,‖I’ll‖leave‖you‖with‖this‖quote:‖

‚Keep your dreams alive. Understand to achieve anything requires faith and belief in yourself, vision,
hard work, determination, and dedication. Remember all things are possible for those who believe.‛‖-
- Gail Devers

Academics: Different Roads, Same Destination

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