-

',.; -

, ."~"fi

~SUGGESTIONS ON FEEDING IN A DISASTER

THEA.MEIUCllRNATIONAL WASHINGTON.

RED CROSS lD. C.
~

/

'l'HE

ARe 994 C@P'YRIGHT iFEBRIJ_~R¥ 1942 AMiERICAlN NA'l'I@NA:L RE])) CR.QSS

10 ,"-",.

Suggestions on Feeding in a Disaster

THE AMERICAN NATIONAL RED CROSS
Washington, D. C.

1;;

Foreword
FEEDING
sponsibility. in a disaster situation is a highly important Shock and exposure lower resistance and Safeguarding reIn-

crease susceptibility to infection and disease. health of a community vision of adequate and satisfying food.

the

disrupted by disaster involves the pro-

T he groups responsible for mass feeding in disaster must plan, prepare, and serve food in large quantities under emeraency conditions. They must frequently work with limited supplies equipment. and with inadequate or even largely improvised

Both stationary canteens at certain designated points and mobile canteens which can move from point to point in the affected areas may have to be set up. As many of the problems in mass feeding under emergency conditions are special and difficult problems, the following suggestions are offered to aid those upon whom the responsibility falls. They are designed primarily to guide Red Cross Chapters, but they may also serve the needs of other community groups who are today concerned with the grave task of civilian defense.

Table. of Contents
SECTION I. General Duties of the Canteen Corps in a Disaster
Chart Showing Relationship of the Canteen Units to the Chapter Disaster Organization. General Duties of the Canteen Committee. General Duties of the Chairmen of Canteen Units. General Regulations for the Members of the Canteen Corps.

SECTION II. Setting up a Canteen
Stationary Canteens. Mobile Canteens. Some Policies of Canteen Operation in Disaster Relief.

SECTION III. Organization Procedure for the Work of the Canteen Uni t SECTION IV. The Food Supply
Procedure for Requisitioning of Food Supplies by the Canteen Committee. Procedure for Purchasing of Food Supplies by the Canteen Committee. A Guide for the Requisition and Purchase of Food. Information Concerning Canned Goods. Emergency Menus. Large Quantity Recipes.

SECTION V. Housekeeping

Procedures

Preparation for Dishwashing, Sanitary Regulations. A Check List for the Sanitary and Safe Operation of a Canteen.
[3]

Relationship of the Canteen Units to the Chapter Disaster Organization THE AMERICAN NATIONAL RED CROSS
Chairman Red Cross Chapter

I

Disaster

Chairman Preparedness

I

and Relief

Chairmen Subcommittees

I

Survey

I

Rescue

I

Transportation and Communica tion

I

Registration and Information

I

Shelter

I

I I Food

'Clothing

I

Cen tral Purchase and Supply

I

Medical and Nursing Aid

I

Fund Raising and Public Information

I

Chairman Canteen Committee

I
Canteen Units
I

Canteen Units

I

Suggestions ·on Feeding In a .Disaster
SECTION GENERAL DUTIES I

General Duties of the Canteen Corps in a Disaster
OF THE CANTEEN COMMITTEE
1. To clear immediately day or night with the chairman of the Subcommittee on Food. 2. To call out the chairmen of Canteen Units, assign units to the centers designated by the Subcommittee on Food, and arrange with the Subcommittee on Transportation for their transportation in accordance with previously arranged plans. 3. To plan the rotation of units for the proper staffing of stationary canteens, should conditions make canteens necessary. The number of canteen units needed at a stationary canteen depends upon the feeding capacity of the center and the number to be fed. 4. To centralize menu making where practicable. A lack of centralization may cause undesirable competition and may run the cost of feeding unnecessarily high. ~ To requisition food supplies and equipment through the Subcommittee on Food and to arrange with the Subcommittee on Transportation for the transportation of supplies to canteens. 6. To inspect canteens. To keep records on the assignments of the Canteen Units, the requisitions for supplies, the number of meals served, the number of persons fed, and meal costs.

GENERAL DUTIES CANTEEN UNITS

OF THE CHAIRMEN

OF THE

1. To clear immediately with the chairman of the Canteen Committee. to the canteen station designated by the Canteen Committee. 3. To assign canteen workers to specific duties at the canteen. 4. To requisition supplies through the Canteen Committee. ~ To check the supplies received. 6. To keep a record of supplies received and requisitioned, the number of meals served, the number of persons fed, and meal costs.

2. To call out the members of their unit for transportation

[ 5]

GENERAL REGULATIONS CANTEEN CORPS

FOR THE MEMBERS OF THE

1. Report promptly when assigned to duty. Do not report if suffering from a cold or other infection. 2. Report on arrival at the canteen and at the time of departure. 3. Wear the canteen uniform and coif while on duty. The men should wear cook's caps and butcher's aprons while on duty. 4. Observe cleanliness and neatness of person and uniform. 5. Refrain from smoking while preparing or serving food.

SECTION

II

Setting up a Canteen
A. STATIONARY
Location

CANTEENS

The location of stationary canteens is determined by the Subcommittee on Shelter of the Disaster Preparedness and Relief Committee of the Chapter. A stationary canteen may be set up in one of the following places: 1, In Chapter kitchens, church or community halls, school lunchrooms, clubs, and other existing centers which are not in continuous use. 2. In vacant buildings which have adequate space and which are safe, well-lighted, and well-ventilated. Cooking equipment may be installed. 3. Out of doors by means of: a. A field kitchen (Army type) with a roof to cover ranges, equipment, and a waiting line of people, b. A fireplace made with bricks or stone. The bricks can be arranged in two rows, piled 3 or 4 bricks high. An iron grill or improvised grill can be laid across the bricks to hold containers. c. A camp fire. The ground should be cleared, and the fire should not be built within ten feet of standing trees or against logs or tree roots. Precautions should be taken to put the fire completely out when it is no longer needed. The cooking should be done over a small fire of coals, not a bonfire or open flame. To start' a fire in wet weather, dampen a small amount of sawdust with kerosene. Use one or two tablespoonfuls of this mixture to start a fire.
[6]

d. An oil stove sheltered from the wind by a sheet of tin or other tireproof SCf(lIlP.
ARRANGEMENT AND EQUIPMENT SERVICE 1. ArrangeITlent FOR PROLONGED EMER(;ENCY

Kitchen equipment moved into a vacant building should be so arranged that efficient work is possible with a minimum or labor. Convenience and compactness in arrangement are most important for a work center, regardless of space. Equipment relating to a single activity should 'be grouped together. The routine work to be performed involves:

1. The preparation of food 2. The service of food 3. The clearing and washing of dishes.
The washing and paring of foods and the washing of dishes center around the sink. A flat surface for the stacking of dishes should be provided on right side of the sink and a drain board on the left. Space above or below it is convenient for the storage of knives, pans, utensils, and brushes used in washing foods and dishes. The storage place for washed dishes and the counter or table from which the rood is to be served should be convenient to the kitchen. Storage space for washed dishes under the counter or table is convenient. A work table for mixing foods in preparation for cooking and baking is essential. It should have shelves or space underneath for utensils and for frequently used supplies such as flour, sugar, and seasonings. The stove Is the cooking center. The work table should be near it. Around the stove should be arranged the pots and pans used on the stove and in the oven. If a refrigerator or an ice box is installed for a longtime feeding operation, it should be convenient to the sink and work able. A place which Can be kept locked is important for the storage of food. It should be conveniently accessible to the kitchen.
2.
EquipITlent

The Central Purchase and Supply Committee may find it necessary o buy kitchen and dining equipment secondhand from salvage firms and restaurants, Since the feeding operation is a temporary one, mexpensive utensils will suffice. Stoves with oven space permit more variety in food preparation. Pans for cooking on top of the stove should set flat and should be suited to the size of the stove. Careful consideration must be given to the material
[7]

of which they are made. No zinc pans or pails should be used except for carrying water. Copper equipment is hazardous to use in emergency cooking, for unless it is kept scrupulously clean it may give rise to poisonous combinations. It is not safe, either, for use with certain acid foods. Much of the equipment ~an be improvised. Perforated pails can be used for scalding dishes. Stack the washed dishes into the pails and dip them in and out of scalding water. Tubs can be used for a makeshift sink and for dishwashing. Where economy in the use of gas, electricity, or oil is necessary, a fireless cooker may be used. It is suitable for the cooking of cereals, dried beans, dried fruits, and the tougher cuts of meat. Often large coffee, oil, or lard cans can be converted into satisfactory cooking utensils. Empty food cans can be used as dishes if their covers are carefully removed. It is usually possible to borrow coffee urns or other kitchen equipment.

B. MOBILE CANTEENS
Two general types of Mobile Canteens may be set up:
Mobile Canteens for transporting and serving food prepared in stationary canteens.

1. Station wagons, trucks, and trailers, may be used to transport foods in insulated containers and urns from central kitchens or stationary canteens. Folding tables may be carried and set up outside the vehicle to hold containers of food and eating utensils, or hanging shelves from which food can be served may be arranged on the outside of the vehicle.
Mobile Canteens for preparing and serving food.

2. A truck may be equipped with an oil stove, water tank, folding tables, shelves, and racks for eating equipment and food supplies and used to prepare and serve food upon arrival at a designated point. A fireless cooker may be used to conserve fuel. It would prove practical and useful for keeping foods hot and for the cooking of certain foods.
A Food Convoy consists of the following: 1. A truck or trailer carrying water, fuel, and food supplies to stock

the food preparation unit. 2. A truck equipped with oil stove or other cooking range, food preparation equipment, shelves, and cupboards to prepare food III sufficient quantities to supply individual canteens. 3. One or more station wagons or mobile canteens to serve foods at designated points in the area.
[ 8]

EQUIPMENT
Equipment

FOR A STATIONARY

CANTEEN

for Food Preparation

FOR 50 PERSONS Burner gas, blue flame oil stove, and portable oven or camp range for coal or wood, with oven Simple coffee urn with bag, Jing and faucet (9 gal.) Stock pot (6 gal.) Dish pan 18/1 Saucepan (1 qt. lipped) Saucepan (2 qt.) *Frying pan Baking pan to fit oven (2U/l deep) Water pails (3 gal.) Mixing bowls (9 qt.) Colander (13%;/I x 5%;") Covered garbage can or pail Graduated 1 qt. measure Graduated 2 qt. measure Water tank Knives Bread ....................... Butcher .................. Paring (some with loop hand! es)..
~-.

FOR 200 PERSONS 6 burners

FOR 500 PERSONS 8 burners (two 4 burner units) 6 covers 2 2 4 2 2 2

FOR 1000 PERSONS
12 burners

4 burners

(two 6 burner units) 8 covers 2 4 4 2 3 4

6 covers 1 1 2 1 0
1

2 2 3 2 0 2

Number and size depend on size of oven. 2 2 1 2
1

3 3 1 2 1 1

3 4
1

4 6 2 4 2 2

3 2 2

0

If water is to be brought in.
1

2 2
4

2 2 6 4

3 4
8

1 2 2

Sandwich spreader ....
*9" for oil burner, 14" for coal stove.

4

6

[9]

EQUIPMENT FOR A STATIONARY CANTEEN~(Cont.)
Equipment for Food Preparation-(Cont.)
FOR SO PERSONS Food chopper capacity) Measuring Basting (3 pound FOR 200 PERSONS FOR 500 PERSONS FOR 1000 PERSONS 2

spoons and cups

1 set each

1 set each
--===----=~

2 sets each

2 sets each 4
--,. __ .'_. ,.........,....=

spoons 14"

2

~~

3

---------Cook's Pancake fork IS" turner 14"

Split spoon

------1·-----_··_·----~----2 2 2
------

2

4

--_--_---_--Wire whip 14-16" Cutting board' for sandwiches 2" x 18" x 24" Can opener type) Vegetable (wall or table

---_--- -----._
2

2

-----.
3

4

~.-

2

2

brush

2

3

4

Equipment for Food Service
Coffee pot (8 qt.) for serving coffee Pitchers (1 gal.) for beverages (for table use) Trays (cafeteria style) 2 4 4 6

2

4

8

10
--.-...,........,.--~
-.

--.-.-.-.2 4 2
-

6 -.3 ----6 on size of table

----~
4
..

8

Deep ladle 8 oz. (for soup) Bowls for sugar Folding or trestle table with legs 2 Number depends

-- ,.----

4

8 and space.

Equipment for Cleaning
Mop wringer tached with pail at2

[ 10 ]

EQUIPMENT

FOR A STATIONARY

CANTEEN...,...(Cont.)

Equipm.ent for Cleaning-(Cont.)
FOR 50 PERSONS Mop Broom Dustpan Scrubbing brushes 1 1 1 1 FOR 200 PERSONS 1 1 1 1 FOR 500 PERSONS 1 1
-...

FOR 1000 PERSONS 2

----~
2 2

2

1 2

---.---

for sterilizing Compound dishes Dishcloths Chon; boys or steel wool Cleaning cloths Paper or cloth hand towels, soap, soap powder for dishes, scouring powder

(As needed)

" " " "

Miscellaneous
Bread box or covered metal with holes container punched in the cover
-_
.. ,-

(As needed) , Number depends on stock to be kept on hand.

S terilized new garbage cans for storing of staple foods Oil can wi th screw top filler Hammer Knife sharpener Shears
-

Number 1 1 1 1 1

depends 1 1 1 1 1

on size of Clilstove. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Box for knives Clock Matches Ladder Kitchen stool

(As needed)
-----.-

(If needed) Number depends on number
"~-.- ."

-_
of workers

.

and space,

[ 11 ]

EQUIPMENT
Miscellaneous-(Cont.

FOR A STATIONARY
) FOR 50 PERSONS FOR 200 PERSONS

CANTEEN-(Cont.)

FOR 500 PERSONS

FOR 1000 PERSONS

Scales for weighing preparation Pulley for hanging

food for

clothes 4 for

Pot holders Cooks' caps and aprons men

8

8 of workers

12 and laundry

Number depends on number facili ties.

Bamboo pole and Red Cross flag Equipment for Accident Prevention . One or more dependent One or more dependent on size of canteen. on size of canteen.

First Aid 16-unit kit Fire Extinguisher

EQUIPMENT

FOR A MOBILE CANTEEN

E"quipment for Food Preparation FOR 50 PERSONS Oil stove or trailer stove 2 burner FOR 200 PERSONS 2 burner FOR 500 PERSONS 2-2 burner

Simple coffee urn with bag, ring and faucet made to sit on single burner, hot plate (9 gal.) or gas stove Stock pot (6 gal.) may be used for making soup. If unable to obtain coffee urn, stock pot can be used for making coffee Dish pan 18" Saucepan (1 qt.) for dipping (lipped)

1

2

2

--~--1 2 2

2 1 2

3 2 3

4 2 3

Water pails (3 gal.) to be used for water only Mixing Frying bowls (9 q t.) pan 9"

2 2

3
2

-----2

4

[ 12 ]

EQUIPMENT FOR A MOBILE CANTEEN-CCont.)
Equipment for Food Preparation-(Cont.) FOR 50 PERSONS Covered Graduated garbage can or pail 2 1 FOR 200 PERSONS 2 1 2 2 FOR 500 PERSONS

3
1 2 2

1 quart measure

Knives-bread butcher paring (some with loop handles) Sandwich spreader 8" Cook's fork 18" (3 pound capacity)

1 1
2 2 1 1 1 set each 2

4 4
2 1 1 set each

6 4

-----1 1 set each

2

Food chopper Measuring

spoons and cups

Big spoon for stirring Cutting board for sandwiches 2"x18"x12"

3
2 1 2

4
2 1 3

1 1 1

Can opener Vegetable

(wall or table type) brush

Equipment

for Food Transportation

Water

tank

If it is necessary
additional supply containers

to carry an of water.

Milk cans or insulated

1 or more depending on size of can and amount of food to be transported.

Dish towels (for covering Baskets (for transporting sandwiches. Dish pans, also be used.) Equipment

sandwiches) and serving and pails may 2 4 6

for Food Service 2 1 4 2

Coffee pot (2 gal.) for serving coffee Pi tchers (1 gal.) for cream

4
2

[ 13 ]

EQUIPMENT FOR A MOBILE CAN'l'EEN-(Cont.)
Equipment fo:r: ood Service-(Cont.) F FOR 50 PERSONS Deep ladles g oz. (tor soup) Bowls for sugar Folding tables with legs from which to serve Equipment for Cleaning Compound for sterilizing dishes Dishcloths, hand towels (cloth or paper) Soap Scouting powder Soap powder (for dishes) Floor and other cleaning cloths Miscellaneous Hammer Shears Oil can with screw top filler Bamboo pole and Red Cross flag Camp stools Knife sharpener Pot holders Matches Wooden boxes for packing small equip" ment r Accident Prevention First Aid 16.unit kit Fire extinguisher
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

FOR 200 PERSONS
2

FOR 500 PERSONS
------

1 1
------

2
------

2
-----

2 2

1

2

(As needed)
" u

u

"
"

"

I
I

1 1

1 1

Number depends on size of oil stove _.
1 2 1 4 1 1 4 1 8

3
1 8

(As needed) (As needed)

[ 14 ]

SUGGESTED

LIST OF ESSENTIAL EATING UTENSILS FOR CANTEEN SERVICE

A minimum supply of 50 eating utensils of each type should be provided. If dishwashing facilities are adequate, a third as many utensils as there are persons to be fed will meet the need for large groups. The following figures may be used as a guide:

FOR 200 PERSONS Cups (10 or 12 oz.) tin or enamel Plates (9") tin or enamel Bowls (2" deep-8" diameter) to be used for cereal, soup, or sauces Forks Knives
----

FOR 1000 PERSONS 340 340 340 340
-----

FOR 2500 PERSONS

_--- ----65 65 65 65 65
---

65

-----

830

830
---"---

830 830
--"---

-_
..

_--_.

340

830 830 830

Teaspoons Soup spoons

340 340

65

If dishwashing facilities are restricted, paper plates, cups, forks, spoons, and bags may be used.
Some Policies of Canteen Operation irt Disaster Relief

1. Meal tickets are issued by the Subcommittee on Registration and Information as quickly as possible to persons entitled to food relief. However, during the early emergency period it is almost impossible to determine who is entitled to food relief. All of those who are referred to the canteens by the Red Cross representative in charge should be fed. Persons requiring special dietary attention should be referred to the medical department and the dietitian. 2. The Subcommittee on Food may allow refugees to assist in the work at stationary canteens. This practice is desirable for it provides the refugee with a useful activity to occupy his time.

[ 15)

---'-------------~~~-

-~-

~---.

SECTION

III

Organization Procedure for the Work of the Can teen Uni ts
The chairman and assistant chairman of the Canteen Unit should organize the work of the canteen for efficiency in food preparation and
service.

PROCEDURES:
1. List the work to be done. 2. Plan the order of the food preparation activities. 3. Plan the food preparation to take advantage of the surface and oven space of the stove and to save fuel. 4. Assign canteen workers to specific duties. Rotate the duties. 5. Check food supplies. Assemble supplies and utensils. 6. File a collection of recipes which are simple to prepare and serve and which require simple equipment. 7. Tack up the menu and recipes with directions as to the number of times the recipe is to be repeated. 8. Inspect the condition of the canteen. 9. Hold the unit in readiness for serving night shifts of rescue workers, firemen, or refugees.

SECTION

IV

The Food Supply
Procedure for Requisitioning teen Committee of Food Supplies by the Can-

The Central Purchase and Supply Committee has the responsibility for the purchase of food supplies and equipment. In placing orders for food supplies with the Central Purchase and Supply Committee, the Canteen Chairman should use Form 2000 B. A change may be made in the requisition by the Central Purchase and Supply Committee if food donations have been received. The donated foods may be substituted for some of the specified items. 1. The requisition for supplies should be made as far in advance as possible. 2. The menus should be made up and supplies ordered according to the availability of foods and current market prices.
[ 16

1

3. The kinds and amounts of food should be listed with indications as to the quality or the grade desired. In general, medium grades are wholesome products. 4. The requisition should include supplies for a small emergency stock of food at the canteen in order to care for an unexpected increase in the number to be fed. Procedure for Purchasing of Food Supplies by the Canteen Committee in Small Emergency Feeding Operations In a small emergency feeding operation the Canteen Corps may be given the direct responsibility by the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Food for the purchase of food supplies. Where the Canteen Committee is permitted to purchase food, it should know how to do so economically. 1. Specifications of quality and quantity should accompany all purchase orders. Cost and use of the product must be considered. 2. Purchases should be distributed among local merchants. 3. Records of purchases should be kept and submitted to the Subcommittee on Food.

[ 17 ]

A GUIDE FOR THE REQUISITION
pt. -pint qt. -quart

AND PURCHASE OF FOOD
doz. -dozen pkg. -package bx. -box
sq. -square

Table of Abbreviations
lb. T.
c.

-pound -tablespoon
-cup

tsp, -teaspoon

gal. -gallon oz. -ounce

bu. -c-bushel bbl. -e-barrel 'II: -number

Measure

of

Amount Amount Per
Serving Per Person

to

Order for-:" 500 1000
General Specifications for Purchase

Food Items

Weight

Weight and Number of
Servings

Unit of
Purchase

Unit of
Purchase

for Family

for Group

50
Servings

I

100 Servings

I

200 Servings

I

Servings

I

Servings

MILK
Fresh

8U oz.

=

1 c. or U pt., 1 serving 2 c. I gal. or
32 servings

~pt.

bottle or paper container

can or loose, 8-40 qt. case of ij! 10 or I gal. cans (6 cans)
or 8 lb. can

127" qt.

pt., qt.
Evaporated, unsweetened

67:( gal. or 25 qt. 3 gal.

127" gal. or 50 qt. 6 gal.

317:( gal. or 125 qt. 16 gal.

627" gal. or 25'0 qt. 31 gal.

Grade A Pasteurized; Grade B Pasteurized is most
acceptable for most purposes. consistency; Good tlavor.; Free from granulation or sedimen t.

lIb. I i! 10 can I gal. lIb.

= = =

c. with c. of water

7f U

case of $1 or 14U oz. cans

17" gal.

Uniform

(48 cans) I lb., 5 lb., or 10 lb.

~~--~~Dry powdered, skimmed. or = 2,% c. or 14 servings

IVa oz.

whole

50 lb. bx., IDa lb. keg, 200 lb. bbl., 10 lb., 25 lb, or 50 lb. tin

4 lb.

71b.

14 lb.

36 lb.

71 lb.

Standard quality; Uniform -compoaition Good flavor; Free from sediment.

;

CHEESE
American

I lb.

=

I qt. grated

I oz.

lIb.

loaf

or sq.,

3 lb.

61b.

12}, lb.

31 lb.

62 lb.

3 lb., 5 lb., 10 lb.,or bx. (I cheese) 65-66 lb.

American made from

cheddar
whole milk.

type,

I

* Refer to Section IV, INFORMATION CONCERNING CANNED GOODS, for number of dozen cases to b s ordered.

EGGS
Fresh or
storage Canned:

-J
I crate=360 eggs 1 case =360 eggs 16 100 16 100 I egg carton (I doz.)
case

(30 doz.) 30 lb. can 31 lb. can; 30 lb. can (with or without 10%
sugar)

50 eggs or 4 doz. 3 lb. 3 lb.

100 eggs or Sy,' doz. 61b. 6 lb.

200 eggs or 16y,' doz. 12 lb. 12 lb.

500 eggs or 42 doz. 31 lb. 31 lb.

1000 eggs or 84 doz. 62 lb. 62 lb.

Grade A, U. S. Extra Grade B, U. S. Standard.
satisfactory for general ing and table use. cook-

Egg whites Egg yolks

lIb. 61b. lIb. 61b.

= = = =

portions portion'> portions portions

I oz. I oz.

Whole eggs

lIb. 13 lb.

= =

8 portions 100 portions

2 oz.

30 lb. can (with or without 5%
sugar)

61b.

13 lb.

26 lb.

65 lb.

130 lb.

FRUIT, fresh
Apples lIb. lIb. lIb. 48 lb. 135 lb. = = = = = 3-5 apples 4y,' c. diced 2 c. cooked for
sauce
"

1 medium apple

3{ bu. or

10 lb. or I pk.

I bbl. (approx. 3
bu. baskets) or 1 box

y,' bx.

I bx.

2 bx.

I bbl. and Iy,' bx. (or 4y,' bx.)

3 bbls. (or 9 bx.}

Apples packing

113-138 -to

I bu. I bbl. I bx. =113138 apples I bbl. =3 bx. 2-4 bananas 2y,' c. diced I hand 140 bananas 5-7 hands 6-8 hands 9-12 hands 1 medium hand 4-6 lb.

or lug-I bu. tub-I bu. basketI bu. bunch 9-12 hands (4-6 lb. each hand); 5-7 hands (4-6 lb. each hand) bulk;
mesh open mesh bag or standard commercial

the box are most desirable The best for general use. way in buying quantities of them apples is to sample first; apples slightly less ripe

are good for cooking and will keep better than fully
matured apples.
tlHI1-

Bananas

I lb. I lb. 4-6 lb. 80 lb. bunch 30-42 lb. 36-48 lb. 54-72 lb.

= = = = = = =

16 lb. y,' bunch (5-7 hands)

33 lb. 1 bunch (5-7 hands)

66 lb. I bunch (9-12 hands)

166 lb. 3 bunches (9-12 hands)

333 lb. 6 bunches (9-12 . hands)

Should be fully ripe or
ing ripe, yellow, bright,

firm,

and plump.

Grapefruit

7y,'-8y,' oz. = 80 lb. = 60 lb. =

U grapefruit
I bx. Fla. I bx. Calif.

U grapefruit

bulk;
open

bag-S lb., 8 lb., 10 lb.

y,' bx. (54 per bx.)

I bx. (54 per bx.)

2 bx. (54 per bx.)

5 bx. (54 per bx.)

10 bx. of (54 per bx.)

Well·shaped,

well-colored heavy for size, with smoothly Round or skin. textured are slightly flattened shapes superior to misshapen.

bx. 54,64, 70,80

A GUIDE FOR THE REQUISITION AND PURCHASE OF FOOD-continued
Table of Abbreviations
pt. -v-pin t qt. -quart

lb.

-c-pound

gal. -gallon
oz. -ounce

tsp. -teaspoon T. -tables poor. c. -cup

doz. -dozen pkg. -package bx. -box
sq. -square

bu. -bushel bbl. -barrel fi* -number

Food Items

Weight

Measure of Weight and Number of
Servings

Amount Per Serving Per Person

Unit

or

Amount

to Order for

Unit of
Purchase for Group

Purchase

General Specifications 50 Servings

for Family

I

100 Servings

200

500

100U

for Purchase

I

Servings

I
I

Servings

I

Servings

FRUIT, fresh-Cont.
Oranges

lIb. 1 lb. 70 lb. 90 lb.

= = = =

tv

<=>

2 oranges 4 oz. of juice 1 bx. Calif. I bx. Fla. 1 bx.=14 20 qt. of juice

1 medium

bulk; bag (open mesh-e-S lb. 6 lb., 10 lb.)

bulk;
open mesh

bag; bx. of 150, 176, 200, or 216

(176 per bx.)

Y, bx.

Y, bx. (176 per bx.)

11/5 bx. (176 per bx.)

3 bx. (176 per bx.)

6 bx. (176 per bx.)

Mature, well-colored, firm, heavy, well-formed, fairly smooth- skinned for the variety. Size 176 for general use, size 216 for juice and general use.

FRUIT, canned
Applesauce

lIb. 1 lb. lIb. 3 lb. 6 lb.

4 oz. 13 oz. 10 oz. 11 oz.

= = = = =

2 c. 1!12can 11231 can 1!15can I!IIO can or 26-32
servings

3y,'-4 oz. (y,' cup)

'I/: 2 can ~ 2;-f can

case of 12 '1/:5 cans or 61!110cans

z s io
cans

4 1!11O
cans

8 I!II0
cans

19 1!I10
cans

38 I!II0
cans

A blend of several varieties is desirable.

Apricots

1 lb. 14 oz. 6 lb. 12 oz.

= =

1!12y,' can (42 halves or 7 servings) 11110 can (146 halves or 28 servings)

4 oz. or 6 halves

fJ2y;can

case of 6 '11110 cans

2 1!11O
cans

4 l!l1O
cans

8 I!II0
cans

18 I!II0
cans

36 I!II0
cans

Prepared from fresh, ripe, clean, sound apricots of latest crop; properly pitted

and halved.
Standard I grade.

!

FRUIT, canned-Cont.
Cherries Royal Ann I lb. I lb. 14 oz.

= 2Y. C. = fj2;1 can
(90-105
cherries Of servings) fI, 3 can or 9 servings tiS can or 15 servings

4 oz. (10-15
cherries)

iii 2Y, can iii 3 can

case of 6 iii 10 cans

2 iii 10 cans

3 iii 10 cans

7 iii 10 cans

17 iii cans

10

32 iii cans

10

7

2 lb. 3 oz. 3 lb. 10 oz. 6 lb. 12 oz.

= =

Prepared from fresh, ripe, clean, sound fruit; from latest crop. Type and variety specified. free from dirt, grit, and other foreign matter. Standard grade.

= # 10 can
servings)

(300-365 cherries, Of 30-32 3-4 oz.
iii 3

Gr-apefruit

I lb. 13 oz. 2 lb. 2 oz.

= fi,2;,£ can or = = =

can

case of

,_.
N

3 lb. 9 oz. 6 lb. 9 oz. Peaches lib. I lb. 4 oz. 1 lb. 13 oz. 2 lb. 3 oz. 6 lb. 12 oz.

7-10 servings fJ 3 can or 8-9 servings $5 can or 14-19 servings fit 10 can or 26-35 servings Portion determined by

6 # 10 cans

2 iii 10 cans

4 #10
cans

8 iii 10 cans

19 # 10
cans

38 # 10
cans

Relative absence flavor.

uniformity of size, of defects, good

= 2 c. = *2 can = ~ 2.%' can = ~3 can = #10 can

1,{231 can

case of

6 # 10 cans

2 #10
cans

4 # 10
cans

8 iii 10
cans

20 #10
cans

40 iii 10
cans

size (4 oz.)

(6-15 halves) (18-54 halves or 18-76 halves)
4 oz. or

Prepared from fresh, sound, firm peaches of latest crop; well-peeled, cleaned, and pitted, neatly sliced, and free from foreign matter.

Choice or Standard

Grade.

Pears

lib. I lb. 13 oz. 2 lb. Z oz. 3 lb. 9 oz. 6 lb. 10 oz.

= 2Y, c. (diced) = '/f2.%' can
6 servings)

2 halves

# 2Y, can iii 3 can

case of 6

3 # 10
cans

5 # 10
cans

# 10 cans

10 iii cans

10

25 # 10
cans

50 #10
cans

Prepared from mature, sound
Bartlett evenly

(6-21 halves or

well-peeled,

pears of latest crop; cored, cleaned; halved; free from grit.

= #3 can = #5 can = # 10 can

(36-65 halves or 18-32 servings)

A GUIDE FOR THE REQUISITION AND PURCHASE OF FOOD-continued
Table of Abbreviations
pt. qt. gal. oz. -e-pin t
-e-quar-t

lb.

-pound

-gallon
--ounce

tsp. -teaspoon T. -tablespoon c. -cup

doz. -dozen p kg. -package bx. -c-box
sq. -square

bu. -e-bushel bbl. -c-barrel '# -number

Measure

of

Amount to Order for: Amount Per Serving Per
Person

Food Items

Weight

Weight and
Number of Servings

Unit of Purchase for Family

Unit of Purchase
for Group

General Specifications 50
Servings

I

100 Servings

I

200
Servings

I

500
Servings

I

1000
Servings

for Purchase

FRUIT, canned-Cont.
Plums lIb. 14 oz.

= = = =

2 lb. 3 oz. 3 lb. 10 oz. 6 lb. 12 oz.

;j!2;/,canof 12-15 plums $3 can ;j!5 can ;j!10 can (19-27 servings)

4 oz. or 5 plums

'fJ 3 cans

case of 6 jfJ 10 cans

3 ;j!10
cans

5 ;j!10 cans

10 ;j!10
cans

25 ;j!10
cans

50 ;j!10 cans

Reasonably free from blemisbes, reasonably uniform in
appearance, of good and proper sweetness. flavor

Choice or Standard Grade.

FRUIT, dried
Aeples lib. 12Y, lb. lib. lIb. 12Y, lb.
Peaches

= = = = = = =

1y,fqt.or 2;4 qt. as sauce 1 UU s ervi ngs raw or 5 c. cooked 85-100 halves
100 servings 8 servings 100 servings

2 oz.

lib. pkg. 21b. pkg.

bxs. of 25 lb. or 50 lb.

6y,flb.

12;/, lb.

25 lb.

62;/, lb.

125 lb.

Prepared

from

clean,

fresh fruit; sulfured sufficiently to retain
fruit's characteristic

sound, only

the

color.

Apricots

3 c.

2 oz.

1 lb. pkg. 2 lb. pkg.

bxs. of 25 lb. or 50 lb.

6)1i lb.

12;/, lb.

25 lb.

62Y, lb.

125 lb.

Smaller
expensive.

unpeeled

are

less

lib. 12Y, lb. lib. 12Y, lb. lib.

2 oz.

lib. pkg. 2 lb. pkg. bulk per lb. or lib. 2 lb. container 14 or 15 oz.
cartons

bxs. of 25 lb. or 50 lb. bxs. of 25 lb. or 50 lb. bxs. of 20 lb., 25 lb., or 30 lb.

6)1i lb. 6)1i lb.

12Y, lb. 12;/, lb.

25 lb. 25 lb.

62;/, lb. 62;/, lb.

125 lb. 125 lb.

Unpeeled

are less expensive.

Prunes

= 40-60 prunes = 100 servings =
16 servings or 3 c.

2 oz.

Graded

according

to number grades.

per pound;
are satisfactory

40-50 or 50-60 and of good

Raisins

1 oz.

3 lb.

61b.

12;/, lb.

31 lb.

62Y, lb.

Firm, flavor.

tender,

FRUIT JUICES, canned
Orange, Grapefruit,

or Tomato

I 1 pt. 15 oz.
3 qt.

1 pt. 10 oz. = =

1 qt. 20 oz. = =

'# 2Jtf can or 8 servings 'Ii 3 can or 10 servings W5canor 17-19 servings 'II: 10 can or 32-36 servings

3 oz. or %c.

W2;{ cans ill3 cans

case of 6 $10 cans or case of 12 illS cans

3 illS
cans

3 ;lilO
cans

6 ill10
cans

16 ill10
cans

31 ill 10
cans

Must conform in name to fruits from which they are made.

VEGETABLES,
Beans, string

fresh
= = 3 c. or 4-5 servings
bu. or hamper

Ilb. 30 lb.

3-4 oz.

lb. or bu.

hamper or

12Y, lb.

25 lb.

50 lb.

125 lb.

250 lb.

Firm,

bu.

should
broken; separate

crisp, snap

tender

readily

beans; when

of 24-40 qt. or 120 servings waste per lb. = 10z.

break beans and in halves to deterstrmgmcss. Good. straight, even color, not rusty, spotted, twisted, or withered. mine
1 beet

Beets

lib. lib. .lY, lb.

= = =

~
50 lb. 40-100. lb. 52 lb. 83 lb. 78 lb. = = = = =

I

4-5 servings or 2 U c. diced 4-5 medium beets 5-8 small beets or 1 qt. cooked & sliced 1 bunch =3 large or4 medium beets 200. servings sack bu. J3 /' bu. = 1 crate hamper or lY, bu. Waste 27% of weight of bunched beets,

(3-4 oz.)

bunch lb. Of bu.

.

by lb., qt., sack; bu. basket; bunched (if early or new crop); topped (if late crop)

winter beets

12Y, lb.

25 lb.

50 lb. (sack or bu.}

125 lb. (2 hampere)

250 lb. (3 crates)

Choose medium size, firm,
tender, reasonably and clean. smooth

A GUIDE FOR THE REQUISITION
pt. -e-pin t qt. -quart

AND PURCHASE
doz. -dozen
pkg. -package

OF FOOD-continued
bu. -bushel bbl. -barrel -number

Table of Abbreviations
lb. -pound
tsp. -teaspoon

gal. -gallon oz. -e-ounce

T. -tablespoon
c. -cup

bx.
sq.

-box
-square

*

Measure Food Items

of

Amount Amount Per Serving Per Person

to Order for: General Specifications for Purchase

Weight

Weight and Number of
Servings

Unit of
Purchase

Unit of
Purchase

for Family

for Group

50
Servings

I

100
Servings

200
Servings

I

500
Servings

I

1000
Servings

VEGETABLES, fresh-Cont.

.....
......

Cabbage,
green

lIb.

....
N

=

1 U c. cooked or 8 servings, shredded 1 qt. shredded 1 head
hamper

~c. shredded

lb. or bu.

bu., crate, or hamper

7 lb.

13 lb.

25 lb.

62Y, lb.

125 lb.

12 oz. = lY,-3 lb.~ 2-5 lb. = 3-6 lb. 50-55 lb. = 40 lb. of ~ ZY,-3 Ib.' = heads 100 lb. = 75 lb. = Carrotsj] lIb.

Heads should be solid, crisp, and well trimmed, hard of core, no decay (2-6 per lb. range of weight head).
heavy,

1 bu. 1 bag 1 crate
carrots, or 1 bunch, or 3Uc.raw, ground; or 3 c. diced cooked

=4

4-5 oz.

bunch,

bunch,
crate, or bag

lZ bu.,
bunches

Y, bu.

1 bu.

Zy, bu.

5 bu.

Firm,

lb., bu.

Wilted carrots able.

well-colored, well-formed and are

fairly
smooth.

undesir-

45-50 lb. = 50 lb. 100 lb.

= =

1 bu. or 1922eO servings 1 basket 1 bag

VEGETABLES, fresh-Cont.
Celery

y,

lb.

= 1 medium stalk
or

To be used as
flavoring

lIb.
(untrimmed)

= = =

8-12 lb. 35 lb.
Greens

2 c. diced or 17f c. cooked 3-4 servings or 1 medium stalk bunch
crate (soup)

crates or doz. bunches

Medium length, and solidity,
branches br-ittle snap easily.

thickness,

Stalk
enough

or to

lIb. 18 lb. 30-40 lb. lIb.

= 4--6 servings = 1 bu. = 1 crate = 6-8

4 oz.

I Jb. or bu.

bu. basket

y, bu. (12Y, lb.) y, bu.
basket

1Y, bu. (25 lb.) 1 bu. plus 1, 3 lb.
splint

3 bu. (50 lb.) 2 bu. plus 1,3 lb.
splint

7 bu. (125 lb.) 5 bu. plus Y, bu. basket

14 bu. (250 lb.) 11 bu.

ance. yellow

Clean and of fresh appearAvoid plants with
or wilted leaves. to

Lettuce

30-40 salad
garnishes

s

servings or c. shredded or

3 leaves

head

crate or basket

May be more economical purchase trimmed lettuce.

10 lb. = 15 lb. = 3 lb. or 10 lb. = Onions 25 lb. 50 lb. 50 lb. lIb.

Y, bu .. basket 1 bu.
basket

basket

basket

splint

= 100 s ervi ngs = 200 servings = 1 bu. =
4 medium or 2 c. diced, creamed or

4 oz.

lb.,
peck,

1 bu.

Of ~

bu.
I medium

12Y, lb. bu.

25 lb.
Of

Yz bu.

50 lb. or 1 bu. 1 bu. or 50 lb.

Potatoes, white and

sweet 4--6 oz. 15 lb. 60 lb. 110,112,116, 120, 150, and 165 lb. 160,165, and 1801b:
Turnips, white or yellow and rutabagas

bulk, lb., bu.,
or sack

---bu.,
I carton or 2 cartons sack, crate,

125 lb. or 2y.( bu. 2 bu. or 125 lb.

250 lb. or 4Y, bu. 4 bu. plus 1 car-ton or 250 lb.

Mature, well-shaped, from rot and damage.

free

mashed

or 12Y, lb.

or 25 lb.

= 1 potato = I carton = 1 bu. = 1 sack = = =
1 bbl. 1 Y, c. mashed 2-3 turnips 1 bu.
4 oz.

bbl.

White-avoid wilted and discolored potatoes. Should be of one variety, good shape, smooth, medium to large in size, clean, 'firm, free from decay and skin. unbroken. Swul-c!ry, shrivelled, discolored and sunken areas indicate decay. Should be
firm, free from bruises, cuts, and scars; not badly miashapen and of-one variety.

lib. 55 lb.

lb.,
bu., or sack

bu.,
sack

12Y, lb.
or

or

J4

25 lb.
or

bu.

U bu.

50 lb. or 1 bu.

125 lb. or 2Y, bu.

250 lb. or 5 bu.

Firm, fairly well-shaped.

smooth,

fairly U. S. No. 1

Grade.

A GUIDE FOR THE REQUISITION
pt. qt. gal. oz. -e-pinr -quart -e-gallon -r-ounce

AND PURCHASE OF FOOD-continued
doz. -dozen
pkg. -r-package

Table of Abbreviations
lb. -e-pound
tsp. -teaspoon T. -s-tablespoon c. -cup

bu. -e-bushel bbl. -e-barrel

bx.
sq.

-c-box
-c-squ are

*
Amount
to

-number

Food Items

Weight

Measure of Weight and Number of Servings

Order for: 500 Servings
\ \

Amount

Per

Unit of
Purchase

Serving Per Person

for Family

Unit of Purchase for Group

50 Servings \

100 Servings

\ 200 , Servings

1000 Servings

General' Specifications for Purchase

VEGETABLES, canned
Beans,
N c-,

string

lib. 3 oz. 1 lb. 12 oz .. 2 lb. 31b: 7 oz. 61b. 5 oz. lib. 4 oz. 1 lb. 14 oz. 2 lb. 3. oz. 3 Lb. 10 oz. 6 lb. 12 oz. 4 oz. lib. 4 oz. lib. 12 oz. 21b. 1 oz. 3 lb. 8 oz. 61b. 8 oz.

= fi 2 can = '#2U can = '#3 can = fi 5 can 10 can or =

3-5 oz.
or

Ys-:%

c.

11:2 can f/: 234 can fit 3 can

case of

6 fi 10 cans

4 fi 10
cans

8 fila
cans

16 fila
cans

41 fi 10 cans

83 fi cans

10

Prepared from fresh, sound
beans of latest crop.

12-22 servings 4)/,-5 oz.
()/, c.) fi2, fi2)/" ,if 3 cans

*

Extra Standard or Standard Grade.

Beans,

canned
with or without

pork Beets, diced

= s : can = fi 2)/, can = il3 can = '# 5 can = '# 10 can or

or

case of 6 fi 10 cans

3 fi 10

5 fi

10

cans

cans

10 ;(0.10 cans

24 fi 10 cans

48 filO cans

Prepared from clean, sound beans'. If with pork" the pork should be. sound side, or jowl U. S. inspected and passed. Prepared from fresh, sound, cleaned tender beets of latest crop, prepared with best commercial practices. Standard Grade.

21-24 servings 4 oz. or 2-4 slices i'fr!2 can jJl2~ can 1j 3 can case of 6 fi 10 cans 2 filO cans HilO cans
7 fi 10

= ~ c. = fi2 can = fi 2}1 can = fi 3 can = #5 can = # 10 can or

cans

17 ilI0 cans

33 fi 10

cans

30-34 servings or 22 servings quartered or 30 servings diced.

II

VEGETABLES, Canned-Cont.
Carrots,

sliced

23 oz. S lb. 10 oz. 1 2 3 6

= =

rn y, can Iii 10 can or 18-23 servings
Iii 2 Y, can iii 3 can jfiS can Iii 10 can or 21-30 servings 2 c. Iii 2 can 1/3 can 115 can
1/10 can or

4-S oz. (y, c.)
4 oz. (Y, c.)

mzU

can

case, of

6 Iii 10 cans

3 Iii 10
cans

6 Iii 10
cans

11 Iii 10
cans

28 Iii 10
cans

SS :'!I 10
cans

Prepared from fresh, sound, tender carrots; well cleaned.

Standard 11 2;1 can or Iii 3 can
case

Grade.

Corn

lb. 14 oz. = lb. 3 oz. = lb. 10 oz. = lb. 12 oz. =

of 6 Iii 10 cans

3 iii 10
cans

5 Iii 10
cans

10 Iii 10
cans

24 :'!I 10
cans

48 :'!I 10
cans

Cream style, standard grade very satisfactory for corn soup.

Peas

3;4 1Y.lb. I lb. 4 2 lb. 2 3 lb. 9 6 lb. 9 1 lb. 1 lb. lib. 3 lb. 6 lb.

oz.

oz. oz. oz. oz.

= = = = =

75 c.

3 y,-4 oz.

1ft 2 can or ~3 can

6 Iii 10 cans
case of

2 Iii 10
cans

4 Iii 10
cans

8 jfi 10
cans

19 :'!lID cans

38 1110
cans

Grade choice.

B, extra

standard

or

=

26-30 servings
Sauerkraut,

barreled or bulk

3 oz. 11 oz. 6 oz. 4 oz.

=
=

= =

= = =
=

112 can 112 Y, can 113 can I;IS can 1110 can or 20" servings }f-U c 112 can 1;12Y, can or 7 servings 113 can jfi 5 can 1110 can or 17-25 servings
lid can

4-S oz.
(Kc.)

112 can or fj 2;,4 can or '#3 can

6 1110 cans or 12 I;IS
case of cans

3 :'!I 10
cans

S :'!I 10
cans

10 :'!I 10
cans

2S # 10
cans

SO :'!I 10
cans

U. S. Grade A, barreled bulk.

or

Tomatoes

4-6 oz. 1 lb. 3 oz. lIb. 12 oz. 2 lb. I oz. 3 lb. 7 oz. 6 lb. 6 oz. 2 lb. 1 oz. 3 lb. 8 oz. 6 lb. 8 oz.
~

4-6 oz.

~ 2 can or
fl27f_canor

case of

6 jfi 10 cans

3 iii 10
cans

6 :'!I 10
cans

12 # 10
cans

=
= =

'# 3 can liS can

29 I> 10 calls

58 1110 cnns

Of

U S. Grade A, fancy, most desirable and economical; more bulle, better color and taste.

Tomato

='

Puree, light

= liS can = :'!I 10 can
~

Depends- on use

case of

6 :'!I io cans

Reasonably good red color;
good grit,
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

flavor;

free

from

dirt.

and other foreign matter. Standard Grade.
~

________

L_

~

~

A GUIDE FOR THE REQUISITION AND PURCHASE OF FOOD-continued
Table o£ Abbreviations
pt. -pint qt. -quart

lb.

-pound

gal. -gallon
oz. -ounce

tsp. -e-teaspoon T. -tablespoon c. -cup

doz. -dozen pkg. -package bx. -c-box
sq. -square

bu. -bushel bbl. -barrel 'II: -number

Food Items

Weight

Measure of Weight and
Number of Servings

Arnaun Amount Per Serving Per Person

t

to Order for: General Specifications for Purchase

Unit of
Purchase

Unit of
Purchase for Group

for Family

50
Servings

100

200

500

1000

I

Servings

I

Servings

I

Servings

I

Servi-ngs

SOUPS, canned
Tomato, Pea, etc.

11 .1 2 3 6 1 1 2 3 6

lb. 4 oz. lb. 13 oz. lb. 2 oz. lb. 9 oz. lb. 9 oz. lb. lb. lb. lb. lb.

= = = = = = = = = =

1;12 can
jj

* 2.U can 3 can
1;15 can 1;110 can 12-13 c.

U

pt. or

1 c.

1;12 can I;IZY, can

case of

6 1;110 cans

41;110
cans

81;110
cans

17 1;110
cans

421;110
cans

83 1;110
cans

Vegetable

40z,

13 oz. 2 oz. 10 oz. 11 oz.

/i$ 2 cau I;IZY, can *3 can

1 c.

U

pt. or

-----#2 can #Zy, can 1;13 can

case of

6 1;110 cans

4 #10
cans

8 #10
cans

17 1;110
cans

42 ;j! 10
cans

83 ;j! 10 cans

1;15 can 1;110 can 1Z-13 c.

SOUPS, dried
1-2 oz. l-Z oz. 1 lb.

y,;-J4

c. dry

l-Z oz.
according directions to

1 lb. bag

1 lb. bag
most common pkg.

6 lb.

12Y,.Ib.

Z5 lb.

6ZY,

lb.

125 lb.

1 c. liquid Z qt.

on pkg.

1, Z lb. bgs. or 5 lb. can

VEGETABLES,
Beans. Lima

dried
= 1 qt. = 271 c.
10
Depends on

Zib. lib. (raw) Z lb. 9 oz. (cooked)

1 lb. pkg.

100 lb. bag

5 lb.

ID lb.

ZOlb.

50 lb.

100 lb.

Well screened
color.

and of good

or servings

use
4
OZ.,

cooked

= 6 c. = Z% c. or = 7 c. = Zy, c. or
9 servings

Kidney

lib.

(raw)

10 servings

Z lb. 6 oz. (cooked) Navy lib. (raw)

2 lb. 3 oz. = 6 c.
(cooked) Peas I lb. after
cooking

= Sy, c.

Depends

on

1 lb. pkg.

100 lb. bag

use
I

(ZY, lb.)

CEREAL PRODUCTS
Bread, loaf lib. 2 lb.
= =

16 slices 24 (Y,") slices

1 slice 6-8 slices
per day

Family loaf

Sandwich
or restaurant size

1-3 lb. sandwich size

3 sandwich size loaves

6 aandwich size loaves

8 (4Ih.) sand wich size loaves

16 sandwich size loaves

Prepared
material.

from
Each

first

class

loaf wrapped

individually
container.

in a sanitary

Sandwich loaf Restaurant size
Cornmeal

4 lb. lib. 9 lb. lib. (uncooked) lib. (cooked)

36-40 (U") slices = 64 slices
=

= 3 c. uncooked = 187 servings 3 c. 8 lbs. or 3% qt.

1 oz. raw or % c. cooked 1 oz. raw or % c. cooked

or

I lb., 20 oz. 24 oz. pkg. 14 oz. or 24 oz. p kg.

sack 10 lb. SO lb., or 100 lb. 24 oz. pkg.

3 lb.

6 lb.

IZ lb.

31 lb.

62 lb.

Yellow 'cornmeal HOld Process" better in flavor and

food value. 2 (24 oz.)
pkg.

Farina

= =

4 (24 oz.)
pkg.

8 (24 oz.) pkg.

Zl (24 oz.)
pkg,

41 (24 oz.)
pkg.

A GUIDE FOR THE REQUISITION AND PURCHASE OF FOOD-continued
Table of Abbreviations
pt. -pint qt. -r-qu ar t

lb.

-pound

doz. -dozen
pkg. -package

gal. -gallon oz. -ounce

tsp. -teaspoon T. -tablespoon c. -cup

bx.
sq.

-box
-c-square

bu. -bushel bbl. -barrel # -number

Food Items

Weight

Measure of Weight and Number of
Servings

Amount Amount Per Serving Per Person

to Order for:

Unit of
Purchase

Unit of
Purchase

for Family

for Group

50
Servings

100

I

Servings

I

Servings

200

.

I

500
Servings

I

1000 Servings

General Specifications for Purchase

CEREAL PRODUCTS-Cont.
Hominy grits

lIb. (uncooked) lIb. (cooked) lIb. (cooked) lIb.

= 3 c. = 6Y, lb. =3).i qt.
or

1 oz. raw or ?i c. cooked

24 oz. pkg 20 oz. pkg.

5 lb., 10 lb., 25 Ib.,50 lb., or lOa lb. bx.5 lb., 10 lb., 20 lb.• 22 lb., or 25 lb.
broken

3 lb.

6 lb.

11 lb.

28 lb.

56 lb.

-

Should be good bright, sound, from smut. in color, and free

18 servings

Macaroni

= 2Y. qt. = 18
servings

1 oz. raw or % c. cooked

8 or 9 oz. pkg. or I lb. pkg.

3 lb.

61b.

11 lb.

28 lb.

56 lb.

Oatmeal

lIb. (uncooked) lIb. (cooked) lIb. 6 lb. 1 c. raw

= 4Y. c. = 3 Yz
c. or

1 oz.-% cooked

c.

16 servings 1 oz. raw or 4 oz. cooked 1 oz.

20 oz. pkg., 48 oz. pkg., or 55 oz. pkg. lib. pkg. 2 lb. pkg. 3 lb. pkg. 12 oz. container

90 lb. sack, 98 lb. sack, or S5 oz.
pkg.

3 lb.

6 lb.

12 lb.

31 lb.

62 lb.

Rice

= 2 c. or 2 qt. = = =

cooked 100 servings 4 c. cooked I c.

50 lb. or roo lb. bag or bulk 12 oz. container

3 lb.

61b.

12 lb.

31 lb.

62 lb.

The cheaper satisfactory.

grades

are

Grapenuts

3}1

oz.

4 pkg.

9 pkg.

17 pkg.

142 pkg.

84 pkg.

CEREAL PRODUCTS-Cont.
Shredded Wheat

4/5

,,'

oz.

I pkg. I lb. 13 oz.

Cornflakes

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

1 biscuit 12-15 biscuits 15-16 " 17 c. or 26 servings

l;,{ oz. (2 biscuits)

12 oz. container 13 oz. -8 oz.1 oz. containers

12 oz. container 13 oz.
container

8 pkg.

16 pkg.

33 pkg.

83 pkg.

166 pkg.

7f

oz.

2 pkg.

4 pkg.

8 pkg.

19 pkg.

38 pkg.

Flour.
graham white

I lb. lIb.

3 Yo c. 3 U c. unsifted

determined by use

bag, 10 lb., 12 lb., 24 lb., or 48 lb. 1 lb.

bbl. (98 or 196 lb.) or 98 lb.
sack

Crackers, graham plain,

1 lb. lib.

58 108

2"x2"

MEAT
Beef, fresh

y, lb. with bone y, lb. lean

cut by lb.

25 lb. or 17 lb.
lean

50 lb. or 33 lb. lean

100 lb. or 67 fb. lean

250 lb. or 166 lb. lean

500 lb. or 330 lb. lean

Choice (i!i I) and good (iii 2) are most commonly used and are economical. U. S. medium (iil3) is good quality grade for steer or cow.

Mutton

y, lb. with
bone

cut by lb.

7i lb. without

Yearling 40-60 lb. (Yearling
mutton usually

25 lb. or 17 lb.
lean

50 lb. or 33 lb. lean

100 lb. or 671b. lean

250 lb. or 166 lb.
lean

500 lb. Or 330 lb. lean

bone (lean)

12-20 mo. old) Pork

y, lb. with
bone

7i lb. without

25 lb. or 17 lb.
lean

50 lb. or 33 lb.
lean

-

100 lb. or 67 lb.
lean

250 lb. or 166 lb. lean

500 lb. or 330 lb.

iill grade recommended
use.

for

bone (lean)

I

A GUIDE FOR THE REQUISITION AND PURCHASE OF FOOD-continued
Table of Abbreviations
pt. -pint qt. -quart

lb.

-pound

doz. -dozen
pkg.

gal. -gallon
oz. -ounce

tsp. -e-teaspoon T. -tablespoon c. -cup

bx.
sq.

-package -box -square

bu. -bushel bbl. -barrel 'If -number

Measure

of

Amount

to Order for: General Specifications

Food Items

Weight

Weight and Number of
Servings

Amount Per
Serving Per Person

Unit of
Purchase for Family

Unit of
Purchase for Group

50
Servings

100

200

500

1000

for Purchase

I
MEAT-Cont.
Frankfurters, sausage style

I

Servings

I

Servings

I

Servings

I

Servings

lIb.

=

4 servings

'4 oz.

I

lb.

i
Hearts, beef or pork heart =

5, 6, IS lb. bxs.; bundles5 lb.; bx. 25 lb. 50 lb., 100 lb.
carton heart

12y,' lb.

25 lb. (1 bx. 25 lb.)

50 lb. (1 bx. 50 lb.)

125 lb. (2 bx. 50 lb., I bx. 25 lb.) 2-50 lb. bx., 1-25 lb. bx. 100 lb.

250 lb. (5 bx. 50 lb.)

16-20 servi ngs

4 oz.

whole

(4-5 Ib. beef)

bx. 25 lb. 50 lb.

y,'-25 lb. bx.

bx. 25 lb.

bx .. 50 lb.

5-50 lb. bx.

Should be of good quality, thick, firm, strictly fresh,
free from blood good condition. clots, and in

Liver, beef or pork

lib.

=

5 per lb.

3--4 oz.

whole

0,

by lb.

lb., whole liver, 10 lb.
carton

10 lb.

---20 lb.

40 lb.

200 lb.

Best quality. Strictly fresh, trimmed free of all external attachments, gal! bladder removed. Free from blemishe s, good in color, plump, thick, and short.

Sausage. Bologna

Llb.
style

=

4 per lb.

4 oz.

lb.

bx. 25, 50, 100 lb.

12y,' lb.

I (25 lb.) bx.

1 (50 lb.) bx.

I

2 (50 lb.) and I (25 lb.) bx.

5 (50 lb.) bx.

MEAT-Cont.
Chicken,
dressed, roaster

3 lb. bird

=

4 servings

X-I lb. as
purchased

I

medium I roasters

I

u ndrawn, min.

medium roasters drawn, per doz. bx., crate

37
Ul1-

y,

lb.

75 lb.

150 lb.

375 lb.

750 lb.

3Ib.9oz.
each; each max.

43-54 lb.

4 lb. 8 oz. Fow I, dressed,
undrawn, fresh

3 lb. bird

=

4 servings

¥,-1 lb. as
purchased

min. 3 lb.
9 oz. each; max. 5 lb. each

-J{ doz. or
doz. per bx.

37 y, lb.

75 lb.

150 lb.

375 lb.

750 lb.

labeled

Large fowl more economical to buy. Should be welt fleshed; fat-covered on both sides and back bones; odorless.

Canned, Corned Beef

12 oz. 24 oz. 96 oz. 31 lb.

= = = =
=

~ 1 tin or

4 oz.

4 servings :fi2 can '#6 can 1UO servings 12-16 servings I oz.

ill or :fi2
cans

case of '#6 cans

12

2 :fiG
cans

4 il6
cans

8 i!l6
cans

21 i!l6
cans

42 i!l6
cans

12 lb.

25 lb.

50 lb.

125 lb.

250 lb.

Dried Beef

lIb.

3 lb., 5 lb.
cartons

3 lb.

61b.

12 lb.

31 lb.

62Y, lb.

(case of 6)
Corned Beef

hash

16 oz. tin, 23-24 oz. tin, 5 lb. 8 oz. tin, or 6 lb. tin

6 oz.

24 oz. tin

12 5 lb. 3 oz. tins or 6 lb.
case of tin

3 (6 lb.)
tins

6 (6 lb.) tins

12 (6 lb.)
tins

31 (6Ib.) tins

62 (6 lb.) tina

FISH
Fresh

Ys-75

lb. as

whole
pieces, slices, or steaks lb.

whole
pieces, slices, or steaks lb.

25 lb.

50 lb.

100 lb.

250 lb.

500 lb.

purchased, depending on size and use

Best quality, properly dressed and packed.

CANNED FISH
Codfish, Haddock, flaked 11175-16 oz. =1 ill call i'¥ 1 can (case 48) 113 cans 125 cans 150 cans

i

125 cans

1250 cans

I

A GUIDE FOR THE REQUISITION AND PURCHASE OF FOOD-continued
Table of Abbreviations
pt. qt. -e-pin t -quart

lb.

-pound

gal. -gallon
oz. -ounce

tsp. -teaspoon T. -e-t ablespoon c. -cup

doz. -dozen pkg. -package bx. -box
sq. -square

bu. -bushel bbl. -barrel '# -number

Measure

of

Amount Amount Per Serving Per Person

to Order

for: General Specifications for Purchase

Food Items

Weight

Weight and Number of
Servings

Unit of
Purchase

Unit of
Purchase for Group

for Family

50
Servings

100

200

500
Servings

1000

I

Servings

I

Servings

I

Servings

CANNED FISH-Cont.
Salmon lib.

~ ~

4 servings or 6 for salad or fJ 1 tall can
~ 1 can or

4 oz.

lib. can

I lb. can case (iii I tall) 48
iii

13 cans

25 cans

50 cans

125 cans

250 cans

Coho (silver) or Humpback (pink) are inexpensive varieties.

Tuna fish

13 oz.

4-5 servings

3 y. oz.

'# 1 can

I can (case 48)

13 cans

25 cans

50 cans

125 cans

250 cans

I
~
lY, lb. 3 lb. 6 lb. 15Y, lb. 31 lb.
butter scoring not less than 92. Look for certificate of quality. Select brand of oleomargarine containing vitamin A. Creamery

FATS
Butter, Oleomargarine, Nut margarine with

Vitamin A

!lb. 10, or 30-33 30-50 60-65

20 lb. lb. lb. lb.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

32 servings tub (small)
tub cube

U

oz.

butter, print,

1 lb. brick.

Yz

2 lb. roll or Oleo.-Ilb. or 2 lb. pkg.

tub or cube

tub or 19202080 servings

0Ieo.-5 lb., 10 lb. can, tub 60 lb. Lard-tub 55-65 lb. Bacon strip
or slab Oil-vegeta-

Lard,

I lb. lard lIb. bacon I lb. salad
oil

2 c. 18-20 strips 2Ys c.

Salt Pork,
Bacon,

y, oz. (cooking only)

Oil

Lard 2 lb., 4 lb., 8 lb. pail; or lib. pkg. Uil-I qt. tin.

lib.

IY, lb.

3 lb.

8 lb.

16 lb.

ble, and salad,S gal.
I tins

Lard-Finished product should be pure, sweet, and clean. Bacon-Cured in accordance with best commercial practices.

Salad Oil-Must
clear, and limpid.

be brilliant.

CANNED-Cont.
Peanut" Butter

Llb. 25 lb.

=

1~ c. or 16 servings
servings

2 T.

= 600

or

1 lb. jar, 1 lb., 2Ib., 5 lb. tins

20 lb., 25 lb. or 50 lb.
tin

3 lb.

6 lb.

12 lb.

31 lb.

62 lb.

Finished
have

product a good flavor. prepared from peanuts.

should Should
sound

be

SUGARS
Jellies, Fruit

AND SWEETS
"

------Molasses, Corn Syrup

24 oz. 4 lb. 12 oz. 8Y, lb. 3 qt. 1 pt. 2 oz. 1 pt. 10 oz. 1 pt. IS oz.

= ;f{ 2 can = '# 5 can = f;!10 tin
f;!10 tin *2 tin '#231 tin '# 3 tin

1 oz.

8 oz., 10 oz., 12 oz., 16 oz.
jars

case of 6 '# 10 cans or

3 lb.

6 lb.

12Y, lb.

31Y, lb.

62Y, lb.

30 lb. pail f;!10 tin
or Jar Fancy choice grades of molasses are usually bright amber. The standard grade

= determined = by use = 'l oz. =

pt. f;!2, f;!2Y" or 3 lb.
syrup, 1 pt., 1 qt. tin or beetle

molasses,

and

10 gal.,
drum

is dark brown.

Preserves

Sugar, granulated

24 oz. 4 lb. 8 oz. 8 lb. 8 oz. 1 lb.

= 2 c. = '#5 can = '# 10 can = 2Yse.

1 oz.
or

case of

1 f;!5
can

12 f;!5 tins
or case of

1 f;!10 can

1 f;!10
can and

7 ;',i 5 cans

7 f;!10
cans and

1 III5 can

1 f;!5 can

136 servings 2 tsp. (y,' oz.) 1 T. (Y. oz.) bulk, 2 lb., 3Y, lb., 5 lb. or 10 lb.

6 iii 10 cans bulk by lb.,
bag, or sack

Pure; properly prepared under clean, sanitary cenditions from properly rnatured "fruit.

of 25 lb., 100 lb. or bbl. 350 lb.

I

MISCELLANEOUS
Baking Powder Baking Soda lIb.

I
Y, pkg. = 272 c. = 174' c.

determined by use

I

12 oz. or Yz lb. tins 1 lb. pkg. or Y, lb. pkg.

I

5 lb. or 10 lb. tins 61b., 10 lb. or 24 lb. bx., or 100 lb. bag

I

I

I

I

I

I

A GUIDE FOR THE REQUISI'TION AND PURCHASE OF FOOD-continued
Table of Abbreviations
pt. -pint qt. -quart Ib tap. T. c. -r--pound -r-t.eaapoon -e-t ablespoon -cup

gal. -gallon oz. -ounce

doz. pkg. bx. sq.

-dozen -e-pack age -box -square Amount to Order for:

bu. -r--buahel bbl. -e-burrel # -number

.
Food Items Weight

Measure of Weight and Number of Servings

Amount Per Serving Per
Person

Unic of
Purchase for Family

Unilof

Purchase
for Group

General

Specifications

, MISCELLANEOUS-Cont.
Coffee Use

50 Servings

I

Servings

IOU

2UO

I

Servings

I

500 Servings

I

1000 Servings

for Purchase

;1-Ys oz. for y,;_ oz. for 1 lb. coffee
(coarse

1 c. coffee 1 c. water

1 c. water with 7;i-"3-5 oz. coffee

I lb. p kg. bag, or tin, or 2 lb. tin

grind) 1 lb. (pulverized) 1 lb. makes
Cocoa Uoz.

= = = = =

5-5Y, c. 5 c. 50-60 c. 1 T. 4 c.
100 servings

bulk 15 lb., 25,30,50, 60,100 lb. or 125 lb. bag; or 150 lb. bbl.

1 lb.

2 lb.

41b.

10 lb.

20 lb.

Medium roast. Coarse grind Bulk for boiling method.
coffee is cheaper than packed should be its quality assured.

but

U oz.r-I T.

I 1 lb. tin
I

lib. 134 lb.

10 lb., 25 lb., tin; 30 lb., 50 lb., 100 lb. drum; or bx., SO lb.; or bbl. 100, 175, or 200 lb. 6 lb., 20 lb.
carton; 5

Y.lb.

lY, lb.

3 lb.

734 lb.

15 lb.

Should

be

a good
brown

rich reddish free from filler.

grit

grade , in color> and other

Tea

lib.

=

250-300 c.
of tea

1 tsp . per c. I
I ,

75 or 1 lb. p kg.

1/0 lb.

'/0

lb.

';' lb.

2 lb.

41b.

Select good grade, or blended.

straight

lb., 10 lb., 25 lb. tins; half chest of 45-80 lb.
or chest of

I

85-100 lb.

MISCELLANEOUS-Cont.
Pepper
determined by use

4 oz. pkg. or tin y, lb. pkg.
or tin

lIb. pkg.
or tin

21b. can 1 gal. bottle, or keg of 5 gal., 10 gal., or 15 gal. pt., qt., 2
qt., or gal. Cider vinegar is usually expensive and is very factory. less

Vinegar

determined by use

1 qt. bottle

saris-

Extracts:

determined

VanilIa
Lemon

by use

4 oz. or 8 oz. bottle

(case of 6) or keg of 5, 10 gal.
container

Yeast

determined

by use

of 18, 24, 36, or 72-3
oz. cakes

dried Salt
determined by use

26 oz. pkg.

bag 25 lb., 50 lb., 100 lb., 200 lb., bbl.,280 lb. bulk

SOURCES:
1. Bryan, Mary de Garmo, THE SCHOOL CAFETERIA, F. S. Crofts Co., New York, 1938. 2. Fowler, S. F. and West, B. B., FOOD FOR FIFTY, John Wiley & Son Inc., New York, 1937. 3. New York State College of Home Economics, Cornell University. AIDS FOR MARKETING, Ithaca, 1934.

INFORMATION

CONCERNING

CANNED FOODS

Net Weights of Various Size Containers Per Dozen
1. Determine number of pounds of canned food needed.

2. Use table to determine number of dozen cans to be purchased.

No.2 can Amounts 1 dozen 2
3

No. 272 can

No.3 can

No.5 can

No. 10 can

20 OZ.-272C. 28 OZ.-372C. 33 oz.-4c. 15 lb. 30 45 60 75 90 105 120 135 150 300 375 750 1500 21 lb. 42 63 84 105 126 147 168 189 210 420 525 1050 2100 25 lb. 50 75 100 125 150 175 200 225 250 500 625 1250 2500

31b. 80z.-7c. 6lb. 10 oz.-13c. 42 lb. 84 126 . 168 210 252 294 336 378 420 840 1050 2100 4200 80 lb. 160 240 320 400 480 560 640 720 800 1600 2000 4000 8000

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 20 25 50 100

CANNED GOODS

Size of Can

No. Cans to Case [2 doz. \4 doz. 2 doz. 2 doz. 2 doz. 1 doz. 72 doz.

Average Net Weight 16 oz. 20 28 33 3 .6 oz. oz. oz. lbs. 8 oz. (56 oz.) lbs. 10 oz. (106 oz.)

Average Number of Cups to Can 2 272 372 4 7 13

No.1 tall ... No.2 .... No. 272. No.3 . No.5 No. 10 .

.

[ 38 ]

L~

~~

____

EMERGENCY
Emergency Menus for One Meal

MENUS

7
Potato Soup Ham and Pickle Sandwiches Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk Washington Chowder Peanut Butter and Pickle Relish Sandwiches . Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk

*

*
2

*

*

*
8

*

Corn Chowder Salmon Salad Sandwiches Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk

Bean Soup Fruit and Vegetable Sandwiches Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk

*
3

*

*

*
9

*

Carrot and Peanut Sandwiches Creole Dried Beef Sandwiches Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk

Baked Beans Cabbage and Apple Salad Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk

*

*
4

*

*

*
10

*

Fish Chowder Bread and Butter Sandwiches Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk

Macaroni, Italian Cabbage, Carrot, and Celery Salad Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk

*

*
5

*

*

*
11

*

Vegetable Soup Cheese Sandwiches Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk

Tuna Fish Salad Dried Fruit and Raw Apple Sandwiches Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk

*

*
6

*

*

*
12

*

Baked Bean Sandwiches Creamed Mixed Vegetables Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk

Pot Cheese and Jam Sandwiches Tuna Fish Salad Sandwiches Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk
[ 39 ]

13 Ground Meat Sandwiches Shredded Cabbage Sandwiches Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk

16 Prune and Peanut Butter Sandwiches Lettuce Sandwiches Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk

*

*
14

*

*

*
17

*

Egg Salad Sandwiches Salmon and Horse Radish Sandwiches Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk

Cottage Cheese and Pickle Sandwiches Raw Carrot and Raisin Sandwiches Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk

*

15

*

*

Corned Beef Sandwiches J am Sandwiches Coffee, Cocoa, Tea, or Milk EMERGENCY MENUS FOR THREE MEALS The foods needed for the following menus are readily available, require little or no cooking, and are not too bulky for easy transportation. Ready-to-serve cereals and canned foods involve no preparation. Canned foods require no refrigeration, and their preparation takes little time or fuel. They may be served directly from the can. Dried fruits can be eaten raw. Where there is danger of contamination, the use of canned foods and of packaged dried foods and cereals is extremely important. Raw fruits and vegetables may be used if a plentiful and safe water supply is available.
Breakfast
Fruit-canned fruit juice Cereal-cooked or ready-to-serve Bread Butter or margarine Coffee-(for adults) Milk-(for children)

Dinner
Canned beef, salmon, or mackerel Canned peas Canned spaghetti Dried prunes, raw or cooked Bread Butter or margarine Coffee- (for adults) Milk-(for children)

Supper
Canned navy beans Canned tomatoes Cheese Bread Butter or margarine Cocoa [40 ]

PATTERN

MENUS

FOR AN EXTENDED PERIOD

EMERGENCY

FEEDING

Three rather evenly provided meals are best. They help to break a long monotonous day for the refugee. Meals are looked forward to with interest and the enjoyment of satisfying food occupies time and thought.
Breakfast
Fruit-fresh, canned, or stewed Cereal-cooked or ready-to-serve Eggs-at least 3 or 4 times a week Bread Butter or margarine Fruit butter, jelly, or sirup Coffee (for adults) Milk (for children)

Dinner
Meat, poultry, or fish Potatoes One or two other vegetables Cornbread, biscuits, or bread sirup Butter or margarine Milk (for children) Coffee or tea (for adults)

with

Supper
One of the following as 'the main dish: Baked beans Macaroni and cheese Spanish rice Italian spaghetti Cream soups or chowder A chopped raw vegetable salad Fruit-fresh, canned, or stewed Bread or rice pudding Bread Butter or margarine Cocoa

If labor, equipment, and food supplies are limited, only two meals may be provided. Where a two-meal plan is used, a midday lunch should be served the children.
Breakfast
Fruit-fresh, canned, or stewed Cereal-cooked or ready-to-serve Eggs, dry smoked pork butt, or bacon Bread Butter or margarine Fruit butter, jelly, or sirup Coffee (for adults) Milk (for children)

Dinner
Meat, poultry, or fish Potatoes, navy beans, rice, spaghetti, or hominy Two vegetables Chopped raw-vegetable salad Cornbread, biscuit, or bread with sirup Butter or margarine One of the following desserts: Bread or rice pudding Fruit-fresh, canned, or stewed Fruit cobbler Cocoa

Lunch for Children
Fruit-fresh, Peanut-butter Milk canned, or stewed sandwiches

[41 ]

LARGE QUANTITY
1. Soups and Chowders Z. Main Dishes 3. Salads In some instances

RECIPES

4. Sandwiches 5. Beverages 6. Miscellaneous Foods

the recipes suggest the use of green pepper, celery,

parsley, and comparable ingredients. These contribute to the flavor of the finished product, but they may be omitted in an emergency situation when they are not easily obtained.

SOUPS AND CHOWDERS
BEAN SOUP(3) Ingredients
4 cans baked beans bunch chopped celery omitted) 2 medium chopped onions 2 4t20 cans tomatoes Yield: 40 servings (1 cup)

%

4t2

(can

be

6 quarts water 17::1 cup butter 17::1cup flour teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon pepper

o

Procedure
1. 2. 3. 4. Boil beans, celery, onions, and tomatoes in water Strain through a sieve. Thicken with mixture of butter and flour. Season to taste. Yield: one half hour.

CREAM OF LIMA BEAN SOUP(2) Ingredients
quarts dried lima beans (37::1 pounds) 3~ gallons cold water 2 medium carrots, sliced

50 servings

(1 cup)

20

20

2 large onions, sliced tablespoons whole 5 tablespoons salt 1};1 gallons evaporated

peppers milk

Procedure
1. 2. 3. 4. Wash beans, cover with water, soak for several hours, drain. Add water and cook slowly until tender (about 1 hour). After cooking 30 minutes, add vegetables, whole pepper, and salt. When' beans are tender, rub through a sieve or mash. There should 70 quarts of pulp and liquid. If not, add water. 5. Combine bean pulp and milk just before serving. Yield: 50 servings (~ cup)

be

POTATO SOUP(3) Ingredients
4 1 4 1 pounds potatoes medium onion' quarts boiling water tablespoon salt 73 pound butter or fat

o
[42 ]

73 pound flour 6 quarts milk tablespoon salt 7::1teaspoon pepper 7::1cup parsley (can be omitted)

Procedure
1. Pare potatoes and onions and put both through food chopper. 2. Cook in the boiling salted water. 3. Make a white sauce of remaining ingredients by melting butter and adding flour; stir until smooth and well blended; add milk; stir until thick. 4. Combine potatoes and sauce. 5. Add parsley and serve.

POTATO SOUP, WITH ROLLED OATS (OR ROLLED WHEAT)(S) Ingredients
2 quarts rolled oats 3 gallons water 1J;l gallons diced potatoes 12 chopped onions Yield: 50 servings (~ cup) (2 ~ pound (lJ;l cup) fat 2 quarts canned tomatoes 6 tablespoons salt

#3

cans)

Procedure
1. 2. 3. 4. Sprinkle rolled oats slowly into boiling water. Boil 5 minutes. Add diced potatoes and cook slowly until tender. Brown onions in fat and add with the tomatoes and salt to the soup. Cook for about 10 minutes and serve.

VEGETABLE Ingredients
2 1 2 4 2 quarts quart quarts quarts gallons

SOUP (Without meat stock)(S)
Yield: 50 servings (1 cup) fat 2 quarts sliced or chopped onions 2 cups salt pork dripping or other 4 quarts chopped cabbage IV, tablespoons salt

diced carrots (2 #3 cans) diced turnips diced potatoes tomatoes (4 # 3 cans) water

Procedure
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Mix all vegetables except onions and cabbage with water. Boil gently until vegetables are nearly tender. Brown the onions in the fat. Add onions, fat, and cabbage to other vegetables and cook a little longer. Season. Serve before vegetables are soft.

CREAM OF VEGETABLE Ingredients

SOUP(3)

Yield:

4 gallons-64 (1 cup)

servings parsley

1y,( pounds celery, diced (can be omitted) J;l gallon whole tomatoes (2 # 3 cans) Y:l pounds onions (1 cup chopped) 2-4 tablespoons salt 1 teaspoon pepper

IJ;l ounces, J;l cup, chopped (can be omitted) IJ;l cups of butter IJ;l cups flour 6 cups of milk 1 qt. cooked kidney beans

Procedure
1. Cook celery, onions, and tomatoes in water until tender. 2. Add parsley and kidney beans. 3. Combine with white sauce made by melting butter, adding flour, stir ring constantly until well cooked and then adding milk and stirring constantly until thick. 4. Season. [43 ]

_l

CREAM OF TOMATO Ingredients
4 #10 cans tomatoes 3 #10 cans tomato puree Salt (74 cup) 20 quarts soup stock

SOUP(3)

Yield:

50 quarts-200 (1 cup)

servings

11 quarts thick white (11 quarts of milk) (11 cups of flour) (50 cups of butter)

sauce

Procedure
1. Cook tomatoes, tomato puree, and seasonings, in stock 20-30 minutes. 2. Make white sauce; melt butter; add flour, stirring constantly until well cooked and smooth; add hot milk gradually, stirring constantly until well blended. 3. Add white sauce to tomato mixture. 4. Strain.

SALMON BISQUE(3) Ingredients
g #1 cans salmon g quarts water

Yield:

60 servings

(1 cup)

2 medium chopped pound butter

o

onions

4 cups flour g quarts milk 20 tablespoons salt 20 teaspoons pepper

Procedure
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Remove skin and bone from salmon. Heat in water with onions. Make a thin white sauce of butter, flour and milk. Strain salmon stock into it. Add salmon if desired. Season to taste.

WASHINGTON Ingredients

CHOWDER(3)
sliced

Yield:

20 quarts-l00 (4/5 cup)

servings

30 medium potatoes, 20 onions, sliced g quarts water cup salt 5 quarts tomatoes (5 #3 cans)

o

5 quarts corn (5 # 3 cans) 5 quarts milk 5 quarts of top milk or evaporated milk

Procedure
1. Cook potatoes and onions together in boiling water. 2. When tender, add salt, tomatoes, and corn and bring to boiling point. 3. Heat the milk and top milk or canned milk and add to vegetables just before serving.

CORN CHOWDER(3) Ingredients
174 quarts diced celery (can be omitted) 1 cup chopped onion 10 gallons diced potatoes 12 #2 cans corn 6 tablespoons salt

Yield: 10 174 40 3:)4 474 [44 ]

6 gallons-120 (0 cup)

servings

teaspoon pepper gallons water cups flour cups melted fat gallons scalded milk

Procedure
1. Cook an 2. Mix 3. Cook 4. Add celery, onions, potatoes, corn, and seasonings hour. flour with fat and add to corn mixture. 15 minutes. milk. Yield: in water for ;,-:; to y,( of

FISH CHOWDER(3) Ingredients
4 ounces salt (8Y, tablespoons) 4 gallons cold water 10 pounds diced salt pork 40 pounds diced raw potatoes (5 gallons) 4 gallons boiling water -20 pounds sliced onions (12;'-:; cups) 50 pounds fish

35 gallons--420 large servings (1y,; cups)

10 gallons milk 5 ounces salt-l0;'-:; tablespoons y, ounce pepper-Z tablespoons Z pounds butter--4 cups y, bunch parsley(can be omitted)

Procedure
1. 2. 3. 4. Remove bones from fish and cut fish into pieces. Add salt, and cold water; bring slowly to boil and simmer 30-45 minutes. Strain, reserving stock. Saute the diced pork until golden brown, add the onions and fry these to a light yellow color. 5. Add the potatoes and boiling water and simmer 15 minutes. 6. Add the fish stock and the fish (broken into flakes) and simmer 15 minutes. 7. Add milk, salt, pepper, butter, and parsley.

MAIN DISHES
BOSTON BAKED BEANsm Ingredients
20 3 1% 1 pounds pea beans pounds salt pork cups salt cup sugar 1 cup mustard Z cups molasses quart boiling water Yield: ZOO servings (Y, cup)

Procedure
1. Soak beans 1Z hours or overnight. Z. Drain, cover with fresh water and bring to boiling point. 3. Let simmer just below boiling point Z% hours or until skins roll off when tested. 4. Drain, put in three (3 gallon size) Dutch ovens with one-half pound piece of salt pork in bottom of each Dutch oven, and another piece, same size, in the middle of the beans. 5. Mix salt, sugar, mustard, and molasses. with boiling water. 6. Pour this mixture over beans and then add enough boiling water to cover beans well. 7. Cover and bake in oven at 300 degrees F. 7 hours, adding more boiling water about every Z hours as the beans become dry. 8. Remove cover the last Z hours to brown. [ 45 ]

BAKED BEAN DELIGHT(3)
Ingredients 2 #10 cans pork and beans with tomato sauce, or the equivalent in home baked beans 12 small onions, grated

Yield:

2 (12" x 18") servings

pans-50

6 green peppers, finely cut 1Yz pounds grated cheese Yz cup butter

Procedure 1. 2. 3. 4. Mix beans, onions, and Put in two baking pans Bake in slow oven, 250 Spread butter over top peppers. and top with grated cheese. degrees F. and brown under broiler. Yield: 50 servings

BEANS,

TOMATOES,

AND RICE(S)

Ingredients 2 quarts dried beans 1Yz gallons water 2 pounds (1 quart) diced salt pork 1 quart chopped onions Procedure 1. Wash beans thoroughly. Soak them overnight in water; simmer in same water until almost tender. 2. Fry salt pork until crisp; remove and cook the onions in the fat, stirring frequently. 3. Wash rice; add to the beans, boil gently for about 10 minutes. 4. Add tomatoes, onions, and salt. 5. Continue to boil until beans and rice are tender. 6. Just before serving, stir in the crisp, diced pork. 2 cu ps uncooked rice 3 quarts canned tomatoes (3 #3 cans) 2 tablespoons salt

CREOLE OF LIMA BEANS(4)
Ingredients 5 pounds dried lima beans (12 cups) 1Yz gallons water 1 pound bacon, chopped 1 pound onions, chopped (4-5 onions) Yz pound green peppers, chopped (2-4 peppers ) Procedure 1. Wash and soak lima beans water in which they have 2. Fry bacon. 3. Mix onions, green peppers, 4. Add molasses. 5. Bring all to a boil and add 6. Bake at 350 degrees F. until water may be added.)

Yield:

6;,4 quarts-50

servings (Yz cup)

;,4 pound pimentos, chopped (9 tablespoons) Yz cup molasses 1Yz ounces salt (2 tablespoons) Yz tablespoon pepper

in water overnight. been soaked. pimentos,

Steam

lima

beans

in the

and bacon with beans.

seasonings. beans are tender.

(If beans

seem too dry, more

r 46

]

IRISH STEW(3)
Ingredients 15 pounds 6 pounds 10 pounds Procedure boneless lamb, diced bacon, diced peas (or 2 #10 cans)

Yield:

230 servings

(Yz cup)

12 pounds 5 pounds 10 pounds

potatoes (6 quarts) onions (13 cups, chopped) carrots (or 2 # 10 cans) until almost tender.

1. Cook lamb and bacon together and allow to simmer 2. Add vegetables and cook until tender. NOTE: Half bacon and half salt pork may be used. Yield: in

BEEF STEW(3)
Ingredients 9 pounds bottom round beef cut small pieces pound salt pork quarts water pounds diced, pared potatoes Procedure

50 servings

(}4 cup)

4 bunches (16) diced carrots Yz pound peeled onions, chopped flour to thicken (about 1}4 cups) 4 tablespoons salt 1 teaspoon pepper

1. Brown meat in shortening. 2. Cover with water and simmer until tender. 3. Cook diced potatoes, carrots, and onions, each separately, saving all cooking liquids. 4. Combine all liquids with broth from meat; thicken with flour and add salt. 5. Combine meat, vegetables, and gravy; cook 5 minutes.

CREAMED
Ingredients

MIXED

VEGETABLES

WITH EGG OR CHEESE(S)
Yield: 50 servings (1 cup) quarts milk 3 to 4 tablespoons salt 4 quarts chopped cabbage 50 hard cooked eggs or 3 pounds American cheese

1Yz quarts turnips, sliced or diced 1Yz quarts carrots, sliced or diced 4 quarts potatoes, diced 2 quarts water Yz pound (1 cup) butter, melted 1 cup flour Procedure

1. Boil carrots, turnips, and potatoes in the water in a covered pan. 2. Prepare a sauce of butter, flour, and milk. 3. Add the cooked vegetables, salt and cabbage. Simmer 10 minutes or until the cabbage is tender. Stir frequently. 4. Slice the hard cooked eggs and mix gently with the creamed vegetables and serve. If cheese is used instead of eggs, shave the cheese and add it at the very last. Stir gently until it is melted.

MACARONI,
Ingr@dients

ITALIAN(3)

Yield:

50 servings

(1 cup)

2 quarts macaroni 2Yz cups chopped onions 2 cups chopped green pepper (may be omitted) 1Yz cups bacon fat

1Yz cups flour 4 quarts strained tomato, heated 4 teaspoons salt 1 pound (1 quart) grated cheese, if desired [47 ]

Procedure 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Cook macaroni. Cook onion and pepper in bacon fat until tender but not brown. Add flour, stir until smooth. Add tomatoes and stir until mixture boils. Add salt and macaroni. Reheat over hot water to prevent burning. Serve at once with grated cheese or put into baking dish, sprinkle with cheese, and bake until brown.

VEGETABLES
Ingredients

AND MACARONI(6)

Yield:

100 servings

(1 cup)

10 pounds diced carrots (2 #10 cans) 10 pounds string beans (2 #10 cans) 5 quarts water 5 pounds diced salt pork Procedure 1. 2. 3. 4.

7 pounds chopped onions (4l1z quarts) 2l1z pounds macaroni (2l1z quarts) 5 quarts bread crumbs peas with liquid (1 #10 can) % cup salt 1 tablespoon pepper

Fry salt pork until crisp and brown. Remove pork and fry onions in fat. Cook macaroni in boiling salted water until tender and drain. Mix all ingredients, season with salt and pepper, and serve.

MACARONI
Ingredients 12 2 8 8

WITH TOMATO

SAUCE

(7)

Yield:

100 servings

(liz

cup)

cups macaroni gallons water onions cups grated cheese

liz

cup butter 8 quarts canned tomatoes (8 #3 cans)

Procedure 1. Cook macaroni 2. Drain. 3. Remove onion; in boiling reheat salted water with butter add and onion.

with

tomato

and

cheese.

SPANISH
Ingredients

RICE(4)

Yield:

(liz

6;4 qua rts-s-Sn cup)

servings

1;4 pounds salt pork pound onions, sliced (2-3 onions) pound green peppers, chopped (2-4 peppers) (may be omitted) 3;4 quarts canned tomatoes 2 bay leaves (may be omitted) liz ounce sugar (1 tablespoon)

liz liz

lY; teaspoons cloves 1Y; teaspoons peppercorns be omitted) 2 tablespoons salt 1 teaspoon pepper 2 pounds rice (4 cups) [48 ]

(may

Procedure 1. Wash rice and cook in 20 gallons boiling salted water. Blanch cold water. 2. Cook salt pork until a delicate brown, drain. 3. Saute onions and green peppers in drained fat. 4. Heat tomatoes with bay leaves, sugar, and other seasonings. 5. Combine all ingredients and reheat. rice with

SALMON
Ingredients

WIGGLE(4)

Yield:

6;,4 quarts-52 (0 cup)

servings

4 # 1 tall cans salmon 30 quarts white sauce Procedure

10 quarts cooked peas 1 tablespoon salt

1. Pick over salmon, remove skin and bones, and flake. 2. Add salmon and liquid from cans to white sauce. 3. Add peas, season to taste, and heat. 4. Serve .on crackers.

SWEET POTATO AND APPLE, SCALLOPED
Ingredients 15 pounds sweet potatoes (45-60 potatoes) pounds apples, peeled and sliced (3Y:3 quarts) pound brown sugar (3 cups) 20 tablespoons salt Procedure Yield:

(3)

50 servings

(0

cup)

8 ounces butter (1 cup) 2 quarts water pound marshmallows (if desired) 8 ounces sugar (1 cup)

1. Cook potatoes in skins, peel, and slice. 2. Place alternate layers of sweet potatoes and apples in baking pan. 3. Add a sirup made of brown and white sugar, salt, butter, and water. 4. Bake at 350 degrees F. 45 minutes. During the last 5 minutes place marshmallows on top.

SCRAMBLED
Ingredients Powdered whole Milk or water Salt White pepper Fat . Procedure

EGGS(8)
eggs

Yield:

50 servings

100-105 servings 4 2 3 2 pounds (4:}4 quarts) gallons tablespoons teaspoons pound (1 cup)

2 pounds

(90 cups) 1 gallon 2 tablespoons 1 teaspoon ;,4 pound

o

1. Put powdered eggs in large bowl. 2. Add salt and pepper, mix well. 3. Pour in small amount of liquid, stir to a smooth paste. Add more liquid gradually, stir smooth each time. (When mixture becomes thinner, a whip may be used while adding liquid to help dissolve the egg.) 4. Heat pan, melt fat, and pour in scrambled egg mixture. Stir while cooking. Serve at once. NOTE: A large batch may be made in advance in refrigerator for 3-4 days. [49 ] and kept in a covered glass jar

SALADS
CABBAGE SALAD (SLAW)
Ingredients 2 to 2V, gallons cabbage, chopped . shredded (pressed measure) 2 quarts salad dressing Procedure 1. Thin the salad dressing with milk. 2. To the crisp cabbage add sufficient dressing Variation Diced raw apple or cut celery combines well in flavor with cabbage, and may be used in this salad. Reduce the cabbage to two-thirds the amount called for above and add diced apple or cut celery to make up the full measure. to season well. or Onion juice or (if desired) celery seed to taste
(5)

Yield:

50 servings

(~

cup)

APPLE AND CABBAGE
Ingredients 2 quarts apples, lV, gallons raw Procedure

SALAD(5)

Yield:

50 servings

(:xl

cup)

dried, or apples, diced

2 gallons raw cabbage, 1 quart salad dressing

shredded

1. If dried apples are used, soak them in a small quantity cut into small pieces. 2. Mix apples with the cabbage. 3. Add the salad dressing. 4. If nuts are available, add 1 quart for 50 servings.

of water.

Drain

and

CABBAGE,
Ingredients

CARROT,

AND CELERY SALAD(4)
Yield: 50 servings (~ cup)

7 pounds cabbage chopped (5 qts.) 4 pounds celery chopped (1 gal.) 3 pounds carrots, grated (2V, qts.) IV, ounces salt (;4 cup) Procedure 1. Combine all ingredients and serve

quart cooked dressing pint mayonnaise dressing heads of lettuce

on lettuce.

TUNA FISH SALAD(3)
Ingredients 3 (4 lb.) cans tuna fish 8 bunches celery, finely chopped 2 medium onions, finely chopped pint cucumber pickles, finely chopped

Yield:

100 servings

(U

cup)

2 heads Iceberg lettuce, finely chopped 1V, quarts mayonnaise ;4 cup prepared mustard Lettuce leaves for garnish [ 50 ]

Procedure
1. 2. 3. 4. Break up tuna fish and drain well of oil. Add the celery, onions, pickles, and lettuce, and mix all together. Add mayonnaise to which mustard has been added and mix' thoroughly. Serve on lettuce leaves.

SANDWICHES
GROUND Ingredients
4 pounds cold, boiled, finely chopped meat 4 hard-cooked, chopped eggs 4 ounces celery, chopped fine (1 cup) 8 ounces pickle, chopped fine (1V, cup) pint mayonnaise )4 cup vinegar 3)4 cup boiled dressing 1 teaspoon salt 100 slices bread (6)4 loaves)

MEAT SANDWICHES(l)

Yield:

50 sandwiches

one-pound

Procedure
1. Mix ingredients well and spread on bread. Yield: 100 sandwiches

CORNED BEEF .SANDWICH(3) Ingredients
3 pounds cooked corned 24 hard cooked eggs 6 onions 1 teaspoon salt beef

mayonnaise as needed (1:U cups) 200 slices cracked wheat raisin bread (12V, one-pound loaves) 1)4 cups butter

Procedure
1. Chop the corned beef, hard cooked eggs, and onions together, 2. Moisten slightly with mayonnaise. 3. Spread bread with creamed butter and then with the mixture. add salt.

HAM AND PICKLE SANDWICH(3) Ingredients
2 pounds ground cooked ham V, pound ground pickles (1V, cups) 14 ounces mayonnaise (1:U cups)

Yield:

50 sandwiches

2 ounces prepared mustard ()4 cup) 100 slices bread (6)4 one-pound loaves) 1)4 cups butter

Procedure
1. Combine first 4 ingredients. 2. Spread on slices of buttered bread. 50 sandwiches

CREOLE DRIED BEEF SANDWICH(4) Yield: Ingredients 1 Y, pounds chipped
beef 1Ys quarts tomato soup or puree 10 ounces butter (1)4 CUPS1

% 1'3

pound cheese, grated (3 cups) cup milk 100 slices bre ad (6)4 one-pound loaves)

[ 51 ]

Procedure 1. Grind and cook chipped beef with to spread. 2. Cream butter with milk. 3. Spread butter on one slice of bread 4. Put together and cut. tomatoes and cheese until thick enough

and filling on the other.

TUNA FISH SANDWICHES
Ingredients

(4)

Yield:

50 sandwiches

26 ounces (2 # 1 cans) tuna fish 1 pound celery, chopped fine y,; quart combined cooked and mayonnaise dressing 1 teaspoon salt Procedure 1. 2. 3. 4.

Z tablespoons vinegar 10 ounces butter (1;4 cups) 75 cup milk 100 slices bread (6;4 one-pound loaves)

Drain and flake tuna fish. Mix with celery, dressings, and seasonings. Cream butter with milk. Spread Dutter on one slice of bread and filling and cut.

on the other,

put together,

TUNA FISH SANDWICH(3)
Ingredients 4 cups tuna fish flakes (3 # 1 cans) 8 hard cooked eggs, chopped 2% tablespoons salt Z cups chopped bread-and-butter pickles Procedure

Yield:

48 sandwiches

Z% cups sandwich mayonnaise 96 slices of bread loaves) 1;4 cups butter

spread (6 one-pound

1. Mix fish, eggs, salt, pickles, sandwich spread, and mayonnaise. Z. Spread a thick layer of mixed ingredients between 2 slices of buttered

bread.

SALMON AND HORSERADISH
Ingredients pounds (Z0 #1 1 cup horseradish 1 pint mayonnaise 1 tablespoon salt Procedure

SANDWICHES
Yield:

(4)

50 sandwiches (1;4 (6~ cups) one-pound

20

cans)

salmon

10 ounces butter 75 cup milk 100 slices bread loaves)

1. Remove bones and skin from salmon. Break up and mix with horseradish, dressing, and salt. Z. Cream butter with milk in mixer. 3. Spread butter on one slice of bread and filling on the second, put together, and cut. [ 52 ]

CHEESE SANDWICH
Ingredients

(I)

Yield:

50 sandwiches

pounds ground cheese (3 quarts) 1 can evaporated milk 2 teaspoons salt few grains cayenne pepper Procedure 1. Mix ingredients well and spread

4 ounces butter (0 cup) 100 slices bread (6;;'; one-pound loaves)

on bread.

POT CHEESE AND JAM SANDWICH(9)
Ingredients 1 pound cheese (2 cups) 1;;'; loaves sandwich bread Procedure 1. 2. 3. 4. Combine cheese and jam. Cream butter. Spread filling on one slice of bread, Put together and cut. Yield: 25 sandwiches butter (1 cup) jam (1 cup)

o

pound :)4 pound

and butter

on a second slice.

EGG SANDWICH(3)
Ingredients 1;;'; quarts chopped eggs eggs) ;;,; bunch chopped parsley (can be omitted) 1 pint mayonnaise Procedure 1. Combine eggs, parsley, mayonnaise, 2. Spread on slices of buttered bread. (10-2 doz.

Yield:

50 sandwiches

100 slices bread (6;;'; one-pound loaves) 1 teaspoon salt teaspoon pepper 1;;'; cups butter

o

and seasonings.

BAKED BEAN SANDWICH(10)
Ingredients cup butter 1;;'; quarts baked beans 40 slices bread (20 one-pound Procedure 1. 2. 3. 4. Mix beans and pickle. Cream butter. Spread filling on one slice of bread, Put together and cut.

Yield:

20 sandwiches pickle relish (10 cups)

o

o
loaves)

pound

butter

on second

slice.

PEANUT
Ingredients

BUTTER

AND PICKLE RELISH SANDWICH(4)
Yield: 50 sandwiches (6;;'; one-pound

20 pounds peanut butter (4 cups) 1 pound pickle relish (3 cups) cup mayonnaise 10 ounces butter (1;;'; cups )

YJ

o

cup milk 100 slices bread loaves) [ 53 ]

Procedure 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Combine peanut butter with pickle relish and mix with mayonnaise. Thin with hot water if necessary. Cream butter with milk. Spread butter on one slice of bread and filling on the other. Put slices together and cut.

CARROT PEANUT
Ingredients

SANDWICH(3)

Yield:

48 sandwiches

3 cups chopped raw carrots 3 cups peanut butter :y,; cup mayonnaise Procedure 1. Combine carrots, peanut butter, 2. Spread on buttered bread.

96 slices of bread loaves)

(6 one-pound

and mayonnaise.

DRIED FRUIT AND RAW APPLE SANDWICH
Yield: Ingredients 2 cups butter or peanut butter teaspoon salt 3 cups dried fruit, ground (raisins or prunes) Procedure 1. When butter is used, cream it well first. 2. Add the salt and fruit, and mix well. 3. With the exception of the creaming, combine way when peanut butter is used. 4. Spread on bread. Variation Chopped nut 2 cups for 50. meats may be added to a sandwich

FILLING(5)

50 sandwiches raw (chopped

cups apples, ground)

Or

the

ingredients

in the

same

filling

made

with

butter.

FRUIT

AND V~GETABLE

SANDWICHES(4)
Yield: 50 sandwiches

Ingredients

y,;

pound apples, chopped-(2 10 ounces carrots, chopped-(2 y,; pound celery, chopped-(2 1 pound raisins-(3 CiJPs) 1 pint mayonnaise

cups) cups) cups)

1 Y, teaspoon salt 10 ounces butter (1y,f cups) 73 cup milk 100 slices bread (6}4 one-pound loaves)

Procedure '1. Combine first 6 ingredients. 2. Cream butter with milk. 3. Spread butter on one slice of bread and cut.

and

filling

on the other,

put together,

[ 54 ]

BEVERAGES
TEA(l)
Ingredients 4 ounces tea 2 gallons water Procedure 1. 2. 3. 4. Place tea in a loose bag. Place bag in an enamel or earthenware container. Add boiling water. Steep for 3 minutes. Remove bag. The tea leaves may be placed in a sieve and boiling water poured slowly over them. The amount of tea to be used may vary with the quality. Yi~ld: 50 cups

BOILED

COFFEE

Yield:

994
cup)

quarts-52

servings

(%

Ingredients

2Yz-3

1 pound coffee (coarse gallons water 1 cup cold water

grind)

Yz

teaspoon salt 1 egg with shell

Procedure 1. Mix the coffee, salt, 1 cup cold water, egg and shell. 2. Put mixture in cheese cloth bag large enough to let coffee swell and to allow free circulation of water through it. Tie the bag tightly and leave a string long enough to lift it out of the container. Put the bag in hot water and bring to a boiling point. Let stand 20 minutes over low heat without boiling.

COFFEE IN URN(3)
Ingredients pound coffee, medium grind 2 to 2Yz gallons boiling water Procedure

Yield:

to 2Ys gallons--40-50% servings

Us

cup

1. Fill water jacket of urn so that glass gauge registers about three-quarters full. Heat to boiling point, but do not allow water to boil. Replenish whenever gauge shows less than one-half full. 2. Put coffee in urn bag or basket. Pour or siphon fresh and briskly boiling water evenly over coffee. Cover and let water drip completely through once; then remove bag or basket, as seepage from grounds impairs delicacy of flavor and aroma. Repouring over grounds is unnecessary and may result in harsh flavor. If urn is not equipped with mixer, draw off onethird of coffee and repour (after removing bag) in order to mix the coffee uniformly. Replace the cover of urn and serve. [ 55 1

COCOA(3)

Yield:

5 gallons-100

servings

Yield:

31 gallons-600

servings

Ingredients
Cocoa Sugar 'Salt Cold Water Milk 17,4 pounds (5 Yz cups) 1 pound, 14 ounces (3)1,( cups) )I,( teaspoon 2Yz quarts 4Yz gallons 6 pounds (27 cups) 22 pounds (44 cu ps) 1 tablespoon 3 gallons 28 gallons

Procedure
1. 2. 3. 4. Mix cocoa, sugar, salt and water. Add water gradually and bring Boil until thickened. Add to hot milk. to a boil, stirring constantly.

MISCELLANEOUS
CORN BREAD(8) Ingredients
Powdered Flour whole egg Yield: 50 servings

FOODS
Yield: 96 servings

Corn meal Baking powder Salt Granulated sugar Melted Milk fat

2 5 2 1 6 4

ounces (1 cup) pound, 10 ounces ( 5)1,( cups) pounds (6 cups) ounces (% cup) teaspoons pound, 6 ounces (2)1,( cups) ounces ()I,( cup) pounds, 6 ounces (2 qts.)

6 ounces (2 cups) 3 pounds, 4 ounces (11 Vs cups) 4 pounds (3 qts.) 10 ounces (13i cups) 4 teaspoons 2 pounds, 12 ounces (5Yz cups) 12 ounces (lYz cups) 8 pounds, 8 ounces (4 qts.)

Procedure
1. Weigh or'measure and sift all dry ingredients. 2. Add melted fat and milk and mix until smooth. 3. Pour into oiled pans and bake in hot oven 450 degrees or until done.

F. about

30 minutes.

COOKED DRESSING(4) Ingredients
Salt Mustard Sugar Cayenne Flour Eggs Butter Milk Vinegar 1 tablespoon 3 tablespoons 7,4 cup few grains VB cup 6 or 12 egg yolks )I,( cup 1% quarts Yz pint

Yield:

2 quarts

pepper

[ 56 ]

Procedure
1. 2. 3. 4. Mix dry ingredients. Add egg, butter, milk, and vinegar very slowly. Stir and cook over boiling water until mixture begins Strain and cool. Yield: 5 quarts Group III 6 eggs, beaten 2 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons salt V, tablespoon paprika Yz tablespoon dry mustard 5 quarts oil cup vinegar

to thicken.

MAYONNAISE WITH COOKED BASE(3) Ingredients
Group 2 tablespoons flour V, teaspoon salt IV, teaspoons dry mustard V, teaspoon sugar 4 tablespoons cold water Group II teaspoon melted butter egg 74 cup hot vinegar }.:i cup hot water

Procedure
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Combine ingredients in Group I; stir until smooth. Add ingredients in Group II, stirring well. Heat and cook, until thick. Cool. Combine ingredients in Group III and beat, adding Combine the two mixtures, stirring continually. Yield: Thin cup 1 cup 1 gallon 4 teaspoons V, teaspoon 1 gallon Thick 1 V, to 2Yz cups 4 cups 1 gallon 4 teaspoons Yz teaspoon

oil and vinegar

slowly.

WHITE SAUCES(3) Ingredients
Butter Flour Milk Salt Pepper

Medium 1 V, cups 2 cups 1 gallon 4 teaspoons Yz teaspoon

Procedure
1. 2. 3. 4. Melt Add Add Add butter. flour, stirring constantly until well cooked and smooth. hot milk gradually, stirring constantly until well blended. salt and pepper.

SOURCES
All of the recipes th~t are numbered (1) are reprinted by perrrussron, from Food for Fifty by S. F. Fowler and B. B. West, published by John Wiley and Sons; (2) from Quantity Recipes for Quality Food, published by the Evaporated Milk Association, 307 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago; (3) from Quantity Food Service Recipes of the American Dietetic Association, published by J. B. Lippincott Company; (4) from Recipes at Moderate Cost, by Constance Hart, published by F. S. Crofts and Company; (5) from School Lunches Using Farm Surpluses, published by the U. S. Department of Agriculture; (6) from unpublished data, Bureau of Home Economics, U. S. Department of Agriculture; (7) from Spring Menus for School Lunches, Quantities and Recipes for 25 to 100, Massachusetts Department of Public Health; (8) from Recipes published by Armour and Company, Chicago, Illinois; and (9) from Practical Home Economics, 1934; (10) School Lunch Bulletin, Montgomery Co., Maryland.

r

57 ]

GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR USING DRIED WHOLE EGG
To reconstitute dried whole egg, use equal measure of egg and water. Put the powder into a bowl, add the water, push the dried egg down under the water, and let stand for about 5 minutes for the egg powder to absorb moisture. Then beat with a rotary egg beater until the mixture is smooth; work out lumps with a spoon against the sides of the bowl, if necessary. The reconstituted mixture is perishable, and should either be used at once or kept in a cold place. When dried egg is being used consistently in place of fresh eggs, it may be desirable to make up at least a cup of the reconstituted egg at one time, provided this amount can be used the same day and can be kept cold in a closely covered container.
Approximate Equivalent of Fresh and Dried Whole Egg Fresh Egg 1
2

Dried Whole Egg and Water Tablespoons (T.)
2 4 6

Approximate Measure of Reconstituted Egg Scant 74 cup Scant Yz cup About % cup About 1 cup

3 5

10

GENERAL DIRECTIONS

FOR USING DRY SKIM MILK

If properly stored, dry skim milk can be kept without refrigeration for several weeks. If exposed to air, it absorbs moisture, becomes lumpy, and changes in flavor. It should be kept in a tightly covered container. If it is purchased in a specially prepared bag, the bag should be closed after each use. Storage in a cool place, preferably a refrigerator, lengthens the keeping time. In many products, dry skim milk may be used in the dry form, as it comes from the package. This is a convenient method of adding powdered milk in preparing bread, muffins, biscuits, puddings, and cereals. In such recipes, the powder is mixed with the other dry ingredients, and water is used as the liquid. In beverages, soups, gravies, sauces, and such dishes as scrambled eggs and custards, dry skim milk should be made into fluid milk by mixing it with water. The fluid milk is used exactly as fresh skim milk. Three and one-half ounces (seven-eighths of a cup) of dry skim milk made into a liquid with 3 % cups of water equals about a quart of fresh skim milk in nutritive value.
[ 58 )

SECTION

V

Housekeeping Procedures
DISHWASHING
Dishwashing must be properly done to prevent the spread of infections. The regulations of the Department of Public Health for dishwashing in public eating places should be carefully observed. The following procedures should be practiced: 1. Collect dishes and utensils; scrape and prerinse them for washing. 2. Use hot soapy water and scouring powder. frequently. 3. Use clean dish cloths. 4. Rinse dishes in clean hot water. Stack them in a perforated pail or drain basket with handles and immerse them in boiling hot water for two minutes to sterilize. A tub of water may be kept over the fire for this purpose. If this arrangement cannot be made, the. dishes may be sterilized with a compound recommended by the Department of Public Health. 5. Stack dishes for draining arid drying. Do not wipe them. 6. Put them away in a clean place protected from sources of contamination. Cover carefully, if proper storage is not available. 7. Clean the work and serving tables and equipment. 8. Dispose of garbage and refuse. 9. Put the canteen in order. Change the dishwater

SANITARY

REGULATIONS

For maintenance of proper standards of sanitation at canteens, the following details must be rigidly observed: 1. Thorough and frequent washing of the hands. Keeping the hands off the face and hair while working with foods. 2. Disposal of garbage in watertight containers with tightly fitting covers. Daily washing and scalding of garbage cans. 3. Thorough scrubbing and scalding of all containers of food, and all other utensils and equipment. 4. Cleanliness of all storage space, shelves, boxes, cupboards. 5. Thorough washing of fruits and vegetables which are to be served raw.
[ 59 ]

6. Storing of utensils and containers of food in clean, dry places protected from flies, dust, and other sources of contamination. 7. Caution in use of all perishable food. Avoid leftovers by giving larger or second helpings. If this does not dispose of the surplus, it may be better to discard the food than to run the risk of spoilage. This applies especially to milk, eggs, meat and fish mixtures, and soups which may sour easily. 8. Examining of all canned foods for evidence of leakage. If cans are rusted or discolored on surface only, no danger is involved in their use. 9. Tasting of food from spoons which are being used in cooking and mixing food should not be permitted. 10. Use of spoons and forks wherever possible to avoid use of hands in working with foods. 11. Avoidance of handling the inside of dishes and utensils. 12. Permitting no animals in canteens.

r

601

A CHECK-LIST FOR THE SANITARY AND SAFE OPERATION OF A CANTEEN
Check 1. Health of food handlers:
a. Are the requirements of the local health department met?

2. Cleanliness of staff:
a. Are clean aprons and uniforms worn? b. Are hands washed thoroughly and frequently?

3. The condition of the kitchen, dining room, and storage space where food is prepared, served, or stored:
a. Do these rooms have an orderly and clean appearance? b. Is there good ventilation d. Is there adequate natural for removal of odors? screened? and artificial lighting? c. Are doors and windows properly

e. Are the floors clean? Are they cleaned after food preparation and service, not during these operations?

4. Cooking and eating equipment:
a. Are utensils thoroughly washed, scalded, dried, and put away in a clean place after each meal? Are the eating utensils either stored in a cupboard free from dust or kept covered between meals? b. Are work tables, serving counters, orderly? c. Is the refrigeration d. Is equipment equipment used? properly and shelves kept clean and clean and orderly?

thoroughly

e. Are utensils and food supplies easily accessible? f. Are health department regulations complied with regarding the avoidance of chipped enamelware and chipped or cracked dishes in preparing and serving food?

5. The water supply:
a. Has the water been checked by the Department b. Is it accessible to the ki tchen? c. Is hot water available equipment? for washing and scalding utensils and of Health?

6. The protection

of food supplies:
flies, rodents, foods? manner? vermin, and

a. Are foods protected from dust, other sources of contamination? c. Are food supplies covered?

b. Is there proper storage of perishable

d. Are food supplies handled in a sanitary [ 61 ]

A CHECK.LIST FOR THE SANITARY AND SAFE OPERATION OF A CANTEEN
Check 7. The disposal of garbage and refuse:
a. Are garbage covers? b. Are garbage daily? cans free from leaks? and waste materials Do they have tightly removed fitting from the canteen

8. Lavatory facilities:
a. Are they adequate and convenient? towels provided? b. Are soap and sanitary

9. Toilets:
a. Are they properly located, constructed, and maintained?

10. Accident hazards:
a. Are broken dishes; bottles, and tin carts promptly and carefully disposed of? b. Is there a place provided with care? c. Does the can opener for sharp knives, cleared out and are they used

cut clean? that their handles do not project of pots and pans filled with

d. Are pots and pans so arranged over the front of the stove?

e. Is care exercised in the handling hot liquids or foods? g. Are doorways kept clear? used for reaching

- f. Are floors kept clean of refuse, water, boxes, and equipment?
h. Are step ladders
1.

top shelves?

Are poisons for rats, roaches, and other vermin, and poisonous or inflammable cleaning materials kept in labeled containers and stored separately from food supplies? Are matches kept in a covered tin can? Is there a noninflammable container in which to drop burned matches? up coal fires and

j.

k. Is the use of inflamtnable fluids for speeding wiping off tops of stoves prohibited?

11. First Aid equipment:
a. Is a standard First Aid Kit easily accessible?

12. Fire Extinguish~r:
a. Is a fire extinguisher easily accessible?

[ 62 ]

Addlless of NatieRal Headquarters and Jurisdictions and:Adcillesses o£ Al'eaOfHces

Insular and Fereign Op~rC1:ti(ms-171ft and D Stputs, N. W., Washingt@ifl, D. C. Canal Zane, Guam, Hawaii, Philippine Islands, irU(l[tQ Rico, Sarnea, 'Virgia [slands.

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