TIBCO™ BusinessWorks Concepts

Software Release 2.0.0 November 2002

Important Information
SOME TIBCO SOFTWARE EMBEDS OR BUNDLES OTHER TIBCO SOFTWARE. USE OF SUCH EMBEDDED OR BUNDLED TIBCO SOFTWARE IS SOLELY TO ENABLE THE FUNCTIONALITY (OR PROVIDE LIMITED ADD-ON FUNCTIONALITY) OF THE LICENSED TIBCO SOFTWARE. THE EMBEDDED OR BUNDLED SOFTWARE IS NOT LICENSED TO BE USED OR ACCESSED BY ANY OTHER TIBCO SOFTWARE OR FOR ANY OTHER PURPOSE. USE OF TIBCO SOFTWARE AND THIS DOCUMENT IS SUBJECT TO THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF A LICENSE AGREEMENT FOUND IN EITHER A SEPARATELY EXECUTED SOFTWARE LICENSE AGREEMENT, OR, IF THERE IS NO SUCH SEPARATE AGREEMENT, THE CLICKWRAP END USER LICENSE AGREEMENT WHICH IS DISPLAYED DURING DOWNLOAD OR INSTALLATION OF THE SOFTWARE (AND WHICH IS DUPLICATED IN THE TIBCO BUSINESSWORKS CONCEPTS DOCUMENT). USE OF THIS DOCUMENT IS SUBJECT TO THOSE TERMS AND CONDITIONS, AND YOUR USE HEREOF SHALL CONSTITUTE ACCEPTANCE OF AND AN AGREEMENT TO BE BOUND BY THE SAME. This document contains confidential information that is subject to U.S. and international copyright laws and treaties. No part of this document may be reproduced in any form without the written authorization of TIBCO Software Inc. Technologies described herein are covered by existing patents and pending patent applications. TIBCO technology is protected under US patent number 6,003,011. TIB, TIBCO, Information Bus, The Power of Now, TIBCO Rendezvous, TIBCO AlertServer, TIBCO Adapter SDK, TIBCO AdapterAdministrator, TIBCO Repository, and TIBCO Hawk are either registered trademarks or trademarks of TIBCO Software Inc. in the United States and/or other countries. EJB, J2EE, JMS and all Java-based trademarks and logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the U.S. and other countries. All other product and company names and marks mentioned in this document are the property of their respective owners and are mentioned for identification purposes only. THIS DOCUMENT IS PROVIDED “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR NON-INFRINGEMENT. THIS DOCUMENT COULD INCLUDE TECHNICAL INACCURACIES OR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. CHANGES ARE PERIODICALLY ADDED TO THE INFORMATION HEREIN; THESE CHANGES WILL BE INCORPORATED IN NEW EDITIONS OF THIS DOCUMENT. TIBCO SOFTWARE INC. MAY MAKE IMPROVEMENTS AND/OR CHANGES IN THE PRODUCT(S) AND/OR THE PROGRAM(S) DESCRIBED IN THIS DOCUMENT AT ANY TIME. Copyright © 2001-2002 TIBCO Software Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. TIBCO Software Inc. Confidential Information

| iii

Contents

Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Related Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TIBCO BusinessWorks Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conventions Used in This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Typeface Conventions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How to Contact TIBCO Customer Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x x x xi xi xii

Chapter 1 Business Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
The Challenge of Application Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Integration Benefits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Integration Platform Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Business Integration Scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Problem Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Addressing the Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Example Scenario Runtime Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 The TIBCO BusinessWorks Integration Platform. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 TIBCO BusinessWorks Key Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 TIBCO Administration Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Design-Time Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Run-Time Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 TIBCO BusinessWorks Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Messaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Business Process Modelling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Schemas and Data Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Manual Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Deployment Configuration and Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Run-Time Management and Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Chapter 2 TIBCO BusinessWorks Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Phase 1: Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 6: Consider Domain Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installation Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Invocation Modes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TIBCO Administration Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exceptions . . Step 3: Identify Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Introduction: TIBCO BusinessWorks Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing Adapters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts 56 56 56 57 58 59 60 . . . . . . . . Step 4: Describe Business Events and Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 1: Installing the Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing TIBCO BusinessWorks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TIBCO Run-Time Agent. . Adapter Service Configuration Steps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 50 51 52 53 54 Chapter 5 Phase 3: Services Configuration. . . . . . . . . . Installing TIBCO BusinessWorks Components . . . . . . . . . Phase 5: Deployment Configuration and Deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 30 31 32 33 33 34 34 35 35 36 37 38 Chapter 3 Phase 1: Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adapter Configuration Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phase 3: Services Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Web Services Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 2: Setting up the Design-Time Adapter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Planning the Domain . . . . Planning and Configuring User Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 2: Identify Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Step 1: Define and Delimit the Problem . . . . . Shared Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phase 4: Process Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transitions and Conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 5: Design Business Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ManualWork Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv | Contents Phase 2: Domain Setup and Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Phase 6: Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Services and Corresponding Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 TIBCO Administration Domain . . . . . . . . . Services Used by the Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 41 42 42 42 43 43 44 44 45 46 47 Chapter 4 Phase 2: Domain Setup and Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Activities Used by the Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Process Design Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 2: Create and Test Your Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 74 75 76 77 Chapter 7 Phase 5: Deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What Happens When You Deploy A Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contents v | Step 3: Configuring the Run-Time Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 1: Create and Populate the Administration Domain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Domain Monitoring and Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 81 82 83 83 84 85 86 89 89 90 Chapter 8 Phase 6: Production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 8: Optionally. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 3: Add Deployment Configuration Information. . . . . Deployment Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 3: Add a Process Starter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 7: Perform Mapping and Transformation for Each Activity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 5: Optionally. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring and Management Options . . . Step 6: Create Transitions Between Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Authorization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Group Activities As Needed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . User Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Chapter 6 Phase 4: Business Process Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TIBCO BusinessWorks Project Phases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Authorize Users for Different Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assign Software to Different Hardware Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 1: Define Shared Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Step 4: Accessing the Adapter Service From the Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 9: Test the Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Add Manual Work Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 4: Deploy Your Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Step 2: Create Process Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deployment Monitoring and Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Architecture . Machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inventory . . . . 92 92 93 94 94 94 95 95 96 96 98 98 98 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . . . . . . . Step 4: Add Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deploying and Undeploying Projects . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vi | Contents Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Resources in project tree and design panel . 16 Process instances created from a process definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Adding a service to an adapter . . . . . . 6 Example scenario run-time implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Adding activities that access adapter services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Adding activities . . 23 Components Option in TIBCO Administrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Domain setup for example program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Adapter data flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Figures vii | Figures Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 TIBCO BusinessWorks communication throughout the enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . 81 TIBCO administration domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 TIBCO BusinessWorks project and resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Adding a deployment configuration to the project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Installing an adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Adding a process starter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Example process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Adding an adapter to the project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Components of a TIBCO administration domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Adding process definitions to your project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Business process flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Project development phases . . . . . 22 XML files conforming or not conforming to XSD . . 66 Shared resources in your project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Installing TIBCO BusinessWorks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 TIBCO BusinessWorks components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Example scenario components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Example scenario data flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 TIBCO Designer main window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Adding recovery options . . . . . . . . . . 98 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . . . . . . . 93 Machines Option in TIBCO Administrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Inventory Option in TIBCO Administrator . . . . . . . . . . 88 Communication inside a TIBCO administration domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Viewing Process Definition information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Components Option in TIBCO Administrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .viii | Figures Figure 29 Figure 30 Figure 31 Figure 32 Figure 33 Figure 34 Figure 35 Adding a process engine to the deployment configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

page xi How to Contact TIBCO Customer Support. page x Conventions Used in This Manual.| ix Preface This preface gives some information on the TIBCO™ documentation set. and on conventions used in TIBCO manuals. related documentation. page xii TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Topics • • • Related Documentation.

TIBCO BusinessWorks Release Notes Read the release notes for a list of new and changed features. • • • • Other Documentation TIBCO BusinessWorks is bundled with other products. TIBCO BusinessWorks Business Palette Reference This manual describes each of the palettes available in TIBCO BusinessWorks. TIBCO Administrator documentation. the following documents are part of the TIBCO BusinessWorks documentation set: • TIBCO BusinessWorks Quick Start This manual steps you through a very simple example of designing.x | Preface Related Documentation TIBCO BusinessWorks Documentation In addition to this manual. You will therefore find the documentation for those products useful: • TIBCO Designer documentation. TIBCO Designer is an easy to use graphical user interface for design-time configuration of TIBCO applications. This document also contains lists of known issues and closes issues for this release. deploying. TIBCO Designer includes online help for each palette. edit. TIBCO Administrator is the monitoring and managing interface for new-generation TIBCO products such as TIBCO BusinessWorks. TIBCO BusinessWorks Installation Read this manual for information on installing one or more components of TIBCO BusinessWorks and setting up a TIBCO BusinessWorks domain. TIBCO BusinessWorks Business Process Design Guide This manual describes how to create. TIBCO Adapter product documentation • • TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . and monitoring a TIBCO BusinessWorks process. and test business processes using TIBCO BusinessWorks.

The accompanying text describes a condition that severely affects the functioning of the software. for example. and literal programming elements in running text. Menu>Submenu.bat". Italic text is used in three ways: • • • In code examples. For document titles For emphasis monospace bold Italic Bold Bold text indicates actions you take when using a GUI. Tip. Typeface Conventions This manual uses the following typeface conventions: Example monospace Use This monospace font is used for program output and code example listings and for file names. Submenus and options of a menu item are indicated with an angle bracket. etc. for example.. This bold monospace font indicates characters in a command line that you must type exactly as shown. commands. for text that should be replaced with an actual value. Note. configuration file parameters. The accompanying text may be especially helpful. click OK.Conventions Used in This Manual xi | Conventions Used in This Manual This manual uses the following conventions. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . For example: "Select homedir/runexample. Warning. file names. Be sure you read the accompanying text for important information. or choose Edit from the menu. This font is also used for emphasis in code examples.

com Entry to this site requires a username and password. If you do not have a username. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . you can request one. You must have a valid maintenance or support contract to use this site.xii | Preface How to Contact TIBCO Customer Support For comments or problems with this manual or the software it addresses.tibco. please contact TIBCO Product Support at: http://support.

|1 Chapter 1 Business Integration TIBCO BusinessWorks is a scalable. and how TIBCO BusinessWorks meets these requirements. extensible. page 12 TIBCO BusinessWorks Features. and run integration projects. and a web-based GUI for monitoring and managing run-time components. page 8 Architecture. This chapter discusses what is required of an integration platform. page 4 The TIBCO BusinessWorks Integration Platform. page 19 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . and easy to use integration platform that allows you to develop. page 2 Business Integration Scenario. Topics • • • • • The Challenge of Application Integration. an engine that executes the process. TIBCO BusinessWorks includes a graphical user interface (GUI) for defining business processes. deploy.

) TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . This return increases as the company grows.2 | Business Integration The Challenge of Application Integration Application integration is one of the most pressing challenges of today’s enterprise. Integration Benefits The integrated enterprise works seamlessly. that is. File. databases. Different departments and groups share communications and can together respond quickly to customer needs. a purchase order management system with the customer service management system. CORBA. etc. the flow of data. etc. An enterprise may need to integrate back-office systems with the Internet. Figure 1 TIBCO BusinessWorks communication throughout the enterprise . database ERP applications (SAP R/3. trading partners and exchanges. The illustration below shows how TIBCO BusinessWorks connects to applications of different types. With less time spent on administrative and manual tasks. Siebel. or any of the above with legacy or ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) systems.NET J2EE Trading partners Legacy and custom applications Exchanges Mainframes EJB. An integration platform should allow you to design the business process. The business process should transparently receive and send data throughout the enterprise and beyond. employees become more productive and the integrated system yields a significant return on investment. This capability allows you to use TIBCO BusinessWorks to integrate all aspects of your enterprise.

your integration platform must meet the following requirements. Cost of ownership is greatly reduced because the expertise is already there. and employees usually face a steep learning curve.The Challenge of Application Integration 3 | Integration Platform Requirements To be successful. Extensibility also means that the project must be flexible and adaptable so you can potentially adapt it to multiple departments in the same company. When the project is complete. Ease of use—Integration projects are often developed by outside companies or consultants. the company itself becomes responsible for maintenance and updates. • Short deployment cycle—The integration project must be ready to go to production within a realistic timeframe and deploying from development to a running project must go smoothly. the project can be developed in house. Scalability and extensibility—The project must be scalable (respond to increasing demand) and extensible (allow integration of new applications or addition of new business processes). • • TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . If the integration platform is easy to use.

The customer service department uses the information in the PeopleSoft system as well. then extracting the shipping information from the shipping log using the Order ID. Problem Definition EasyWare Incorporated is a manufacturer of computer hardware. Add a Siebel customer service system that receives information about each purchase order. The section starts with a problem definition.4 | Business Integration Business Integration Scenario To illustrate some of the functionality available as part of TIBCO BusinessWorks. The information should be retrieved interactively from the shipping company’s web site via the Internet. An additional concern is that shipping information is not included in the Order Management system. the rest of this manual uses a simple example scenario presented in this section. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Management decides to make the following changes: • • • • Make order entry possible via a secure web server outside the firewall which communicates with an application server that supports JMS. require approval by a credit check specialist for orders over $10 000. Before order fulfillment. customer satisfaction becomes an issue. Customer service representatives can then have easy access to all ordering information. add information about shipping date and time to each item. So far. Before the order is entered into the Siebel system. customers do not receive notification when items are shipped and customer service representatives must access the shipping information in a two-step process: first extracting the Order ID from the PeopleSoft system. As a result. Individual aspects of the integration project are discussed in later chapters. and because currently information available to the customer service department is incomplete. but finds that not all information they need is available there. Because a high volume of sales cannot be handled efficiently with this setup. then discusses the run-time implementation. the department responsible for purchase order management has received orders by telephone and has manually entered them into a PeopleSoft Order Management system.

Business Integration Scenario 5 | Addressing the Challenge The challenge faced by EasyWare is to add the new capabilities to the business process while. The business process accesses the shipping schedule by connecting to the shipper’s web site using SOAP. • • • Figure 2 shows the components that are needed. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . This results in the following components of the integration project: • • At the center is the business process. the IT department decides to prepare a prototype using TIBCO BusinessWorks. at the same time. The process is on hold until approval has been made. reducing complexity for the end user. A ManualWork activity sends the order to the credit check specialist. The PeopleSoft Order Management system continues to be used. In addition. the system must integrate with the Siebel customer service system. A Siebel adapter enters the complete order. Design The goal of the integration project allow EasyWare to receive orders either by telephone—with direct access to PeopleSoft as before—or from an application server. After careful deliberation. including the PeopleSoft Order ID and the shipping information. A PeopleSoft adapter enters the web order into the PeopleSoft system and receives an order from the PeopleSoft system that includes an Order ID. This part of the process is a request-response service. which interacts with the different services using the appropriate messaging protocol. but data can be entered manually as before or can arrive from the Internet via the application server. into the Siebel system.

the project would proceed as follows (numbered steps match the numbers in Figure 3): 1. A TIBCO BusinessWorks JMS order document. 6. Orders arrive from the distributors on the Internet. 3. The PeopleSoft system accepts or rejects the order.6 | Business Integration Figure 2 Example scenario components Siebel (Customer Service) Adapter Peoplesoft (Order Management) WWW Adapter Internet Order Entry Application Server Business Process Internet Shipping Schedule SOAP Service Credit check manual step Example Scenario Runtime Implementation At run-time. it includes an Order ID. 5. if approval arrives. which was supplied in XML to a format PeopleSoft expects and the PeopleSoft adapter submits the order to the PeopleSoft Order Management system. the customer is informed immediately and the order placed on indefinite hold. TIBCO BusinessWorks transforms the order. Otherwise. When it accepts the order. the order is sent out for credit check. The orders are processed by a customized order capture system built on top of an application server. Queue Receiver activity receives the incoming 4. 2. If the order amount is greater than $10 000. the process continues. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . When the credit check is not successful.

Figure 3 Example scenario run-time implementation WWW Siebel (Customer Service) Peoplesoft (Order Management) Sales order + ID 5 Internet 2 Application Server JMS 1 Order Entry Sales order 4 Adapter Adapter RV 7 Messaging system 6 RV 7 SOAP Internet Business process (coordinator) Credit check manual step RV 3 Shipping Schedule TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . including the Order ID and the shipping information. to a Siebel adapter. 8. TIBCO BusinessWorks sends the information about the order. TIBCO BusinessWorks checks the shipping schedule using a web service activity and adds the ship date to the order. The Siebel adapter adds a new customer service record to the Siebel system.Business Integration Scenario 7 | 7.

TIBCO Administrator consists of the TIBCO Administration Server and the web browser based TIBCO Administrator GUI. You can use TIBCO Designer in test mode to incrementally verify your design during development. Optionally. As a result.8 | Business Integration The TIBCO BusinessWorks Integration Platform This section introduces the TIBCO BusinessWorks integration platform by discussing the following topics: • • TIBCO BusinessWorks Key Components TIBCO Administration Domain TIBCO BusinessWorks Key Components TIBCO BusinessWorks key components work together as follows: • The TIBCO Designer graphical user interface (GUI) supports adapter configuration. plug-in modules can be added to TIBCO BusinessWorks. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . and performs recovery as specified. sends alerts. deployment configuration. and deployment of the integration project in one easy to use interface. Rapid development and deployment are the results. process design. TIBCO BusinessWorks interacts with TIBCO InConcert in its implementation of ManualWork activities. • • • • TIBCO BusinessWorks was designed using a plug-in architecture. The TIBCO BusinessWorks engine runs the business processes in test mode and at run-time. TIBCO Administrator supports security administration as well as monitoring and management of processes and machines. The illustration below shows how the components work together. The TIBCO Runtime Agent (TRA) runs on each machine and executes scripts.

Components within an administration domain can communicate with systems outside the domain. the associated security implementation. and TIBCO BusinessWorks components that a TIBCO Administration Server monitors and manages. This section discusses the TIBCO administration domain. TRA Machine2: Siebel publisher Process engine 2 proc3 proc4 . and how you monitor and manage the domain. Administration Domain Overview A TIBCO administration domain is a collection of users. but the administration domain is the administrative boundary of an enterprise integration project. Note that when the Administration Server goes down. There is only one Administration Server for each administration domain. machines.. Mon ito Man r and age TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts y plo De . TIBCO Administration Server Development Runtime TIBCO Administration Domain The TIBCO administration domain combines the benefits of a distributed run-time environment with centralized design-time deployment.... Figure 5 illustrates an administration domain and its contents. all process engines and adapters continue to run.The TIBCO BusinessWorks Integration Platform 9 | Figure 4 TIBCO BusinessWorks components TIBCO Designer GUI Runtime environment TIBCO Administrator GUI TRA Machine1: PeopleSoft subscriber Process engine 1 proc1 proc2 . and run-time monitoring and management.

You can. Components—Component software includes the TIBCO BusinessWorks engine and adapters. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .10 | Business Integration Figure 5 Components of a TIBCO administration domain Domain Machine A 3 TIBCO Administration Server 1 User & Access Information 4 Projects 5 Machine & Component Information Process Engine 2 PeopleSoft Adapter 2 Machine B 3 Siebel Adapter 2 Machine C 3 A TIBCO administration domain consists of these elements. Projects—A project is created and deployed with the TIBCO Designer GUI. See Projects on page 15. Once deployed. TIBCO Administration Server—Each administration domain has one and only one TIBCO Administration Server. 3. User and Access Information—User and authorization information is specified with the TIBCO Administrator GUI and stored in the domain data store. See Security below. A machine can be added to an administration domain when a TIBCO BusinessWorks component or adapter is installed. 5. set up your system to use TIBCO Rendezvous rvrd and can then use TIBCO BusinessWorks across subnets. however. 2. Machines—Each TIBCO administration domain contains one or more machines. all machines within an administration domain are expected to be in the same network subnet. 4. By default. numbered correspondingly in Figure 5: 1. stopped. the project becomes visible in the TIBCO Administrator GUI and its components can be started. and monitored from there.

and delete users and assign access privileges to each user. • • • • View. An administrator gives users access rights to the functionality of the product they need. Manage deployments. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . access rights are given to view or to write to projects at design time from TIBCO Designer or to view or to manage modules from the TIBCO Administrator console. Using the TIBCO Administrator GUI. TIBCO BusinessWorks supports authentication and authorization for both data stores and components (process engines or adapters) in the administration domain. For example. add. only authorized users may create and save a server-based project to the domain data store. This includes stopping and starting process engines and adapters. Monitoring and Managing the Domain The TIBCO Administrator GUI allows you to monitor and manage the different elements of the administration domain if you are authorized to do so. which can also be exported to a file. This includes viewing component status and throughput and looking at traces.The TIBCO BusinessWorks Integration Platform 11 | Security The TIBCO Administration Server supports centralized authentication and authorization. The TIBCO Administration Server controls that access. Only authorized users may start or stop process engines or adapters. For example. • • Authentication—The verification of the identity of a person or process. Authorization—Permission to view or execute. Monitor deployments. This fine-grained user authorization scheme allows you to customize the system to your company’s needs. users with full administrative privileges can define which users should have access to which part of the system. Monitor and manage the machines in the administration domain.

TIBCO Rendezvous Data Description—Native support for DTD. and TIBCO AE Schema Data Representation and Expressions—Native support for XML. TIBCO BusinessWorks supports the most widely used standards for the different aspects of an integration project: • • • • • • J2EE Compliant—JMS. page 17 Fundamentals The TIBCO BusinessWorks architecture is based on the following set of fundamentals: • • • Support for Standards Your integration platform must support standards for several reasons. A standards-based integration platform supports you best as you add applications to your enterprise or need to communicate with new business partners. Support for standards also removes dependency on one company’s services and makes applications from different companies interact more easily. EJB. Standards are essential as you are planning for the future of the project because standards facilitate updates. It discusses these topics: • • • Fundamentals Design-Time Architecture. Some the applications you use may already be using standards. and integration development will be faster and easier. page 14 Run-Time Architecture. HTTPS Messaging—JMS. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . XSD. JNDI Protocols—Web services (SOAP.12 | Business Integration Architecture This section explains the TIBCO BusinessWorks architecture at design time and run-time. XPath Data Transformation—XSLT Support for Standards on page 12 Integrated Development Environment on page 13 Extensibility and Scalability on page 13 TIBCO BusinessWorks also supports a plug-in for B2B interactions. WSDL). HTTP.

You can use the TIBCO Designer deployment palettes to deploy processes to process engines and to deploy adapter services to adapters on the individual machines. Extensibility and Scalability As your enterprise grows. With TIBCO BusinessWorks. TIBCO BusinessWorks has been designed to be extensible and scalable. such as adapters. As you acquire new applications for your enterprise. The TRA also updates the TIBCO Administration Server with information about the new configuration. the TIBCO BusinessWorks TRA component sends scripts and other information about the processes to be run to the individual machines. and design your business processes. modify your process definition. you use TIBCO Designer to configure services. 2. 1. You can start the processes using the TIBCO Administrator GUI. Working in a distributed fashion. that information is then used by InConcert. You configure the adapter. When you deploy the project. you deploy the different adapter services and business processes on different machines in the administration domain. You can then monitor and manage all processes using TIBCO Administrator. 5. Optionally. then deploy the adapter service on the machine of your choice. 4. deployment. You can use the TIBCO Designer in test mode to debug the process definitions in your integration project. you install the appropriate adapters into the domain. that is. then exported to TIBCO InConcert. Scalability to support higher volume and extensibility to support additional applications or a larger number of process engines or adapter instances become paramount. At design time. When the business process applications’ volume increases.Architecture 13 | Integrated Development Environment Your integration project must be supported by an integrated development environment that spans all phases of the project. 3. which process runs on which engine and which service accesses which adapter instance. and run-time environment are tightly integrated even though the run-time environment supports a distributed architecture. you can configure manual activities using TIBCO Designer. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . the process design. new applications are added and volume of data increases. you add machines to the domain. When you deploy the project. The users authorized to handle the manual activities can be specified in TIBCO Administrator.

14 | Business Integration Design-Time Architecture At design time. The TIBCO Designer test mode allows you to debug the business process. supply values for variables. The TIBCO Designer GUI is discussed in more detail in the TIBCO Designer User’s Guide. See the TIBCO Designer User’s Guide for more information. Read File or Send Mail) into the design window and joining the activities using transitions. Figure 6 TIBCO Designer main window Project tree panel Design panel Palette panel Configuration panel TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . you work with the TIBCO Designer GUI to configure adapter services and design business processes. TIBCO Designer Layout The TIBCO Designer main window has four panels. and so on. which contain the design-time components of an integration project. add breakpoints. You design a business process by dragging activities (e.g. You can provide input.

shown in the project tree panel in Figure 7. you click the project folder to display the project’s resources. and deployment information. consists of several components: • • • • • A JMS shared resource (JMS Connection) Two process definitions (ProcessOrder and ProcessSoap) A shared resource used by the SOAP activity (ShippingSchedule) A Siebel adapter and a PeopleSoft adapter (SBLAccount and PSoft_ReqRep) A deployment configuration for the project (Deployment Configuration) For a description of the example scenario that was used as the basis for this project. This includes services (producers and consumers of information). The ProcessNewComputer project. see Business Integration Scenario on page 4. Figure 7 TIBCO BusinessWorks project and resources ProcessNewComputer project TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . any business logic that may be applied to that information.Architecture 15 | Projects A project consists of resources that contain the functionality needed for your integration. In TIBCO Designer.

Figure 8 Resources in project tree and design panel i Resources in project tree Resources in design panel Palettes Context-sensitive palettes organize resources into related groups. Deployment The Deployment palette allows you to add a deployment configuration to the project tree. Which palette is displayed depends on the currently opened resource and on your preferences. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . You drag and drop resources from the palette into the design panel to add them to your project. you can deploy the project from TIBCO Designer and the appropriate information is sent to each machine. A TIBCO Designer resource corresponds to an object in a TIBCO application. such as an FTP activity. a process definition.16 | Business Integration Resources Resources are the components of a project. You can assign different processes to different process engines and and adapter services to adapters installed on machines in the administration domain. Afterwards. or a specific adapter instance. The main window shown in TIBCO Designer Layout on page 14 has eight palettes in the palette panel.

for example. In Figure 9. the different process engines and adapters are ready to run on the machines in the administration domain. For the example discussed in this manual. and can collect tracing information for later analysis. the TIBCO Administrator GUI allows monitoring of the running project at different levels of detail. the process engine could perform these tasks: • Receive data from an application server via JMS. When data arrives. data from a PeopleSoft Order Management System via the appropriate adapter. You start each component individually from the TIBCO Administrator GUI. Users can access TIBCO Administrator using the TIBCO Administrator GUI. In addition. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Enter data into a PeopleSoft Order Management system and data into a Siebel customer service system via the appropriate adapters. • • All components are monitored and managed via TIBCO Administrator. a File Poller or an Adapter Subscriber activity waiting for incoming data. Figure 9 Process instances created from a process definition Process Definition 1 Process Instance 1-1 State Process Instance 1-2 State Process Instance 1-3 State Event Source Engine JMS Queue Receiver While different process instances are running. process instances are created by process starters. any alerts that were scheduled during deployment configuration are sent to the specified recipient by the TIBCO Administration server. After all adapters and process engines have been started. and the activities in the process are executed in sequence. Send certain orders out for credit approval and receive approval or refusal. and data from a shipping service via SOAP. which also provides security and repository management.Architecture 17 | Run-Time Architecture When the integration project is deployed. a JMS Queue Receiver activity creates an instance of the process definition to which it belongs each time it receives input. A process starter could be. the process starter creates a process instance using the process definition to which it belongs.

18 | Business Integration Figure 10 Example scenario data flow Siebel Customer Service Adapter Publication Service PeopleSoft Order Management Adapter Subscription Service Business Process Shipping Information Web Service Credit Check ManualWork actvity InConcert Administration Server Security Repository Monitoring TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .

TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Supported protocols include TIBCO Rendezvous. If a message cannot be delivered because the recipient was unavailable. loosely coupled system is much more likely to support the fault-tolerance you require than a monolithic system that depends on one centralized server. The messaging system must support this scalability. The queued message must then be redelivered as appropriate. the messaging system must queue that message and continue to operate. you need a messaging system that can reliably handle the volume of messages that will be sent and received. Distributed architecture—A distributed. Furthermore. JMS. Requirements vary throughout the day and throughout the business year. you want to be able to update your business integration in a simple and cohesive way. The system should have these characteristics: • Guaranteed delivery and fault tolerance—Message delivery must be guaranteed. High throughput—High throughput without performance degradation is needed. • • • TIBCO BusinessWorks is based on messaging standards with proven track records. Scalability—As your business grows. • • • • • • Messaging Adapters Business Process Modelling Schemas and Data Mapping Deployment Configuration and Management Run-Time Management and Monitoring Messaging To support your integration project at run-time.TIBCO BusinessWorks Features 19 | TIBCO BusinessWorks Features This section discusses some TIBCO BusinessWorks features. you want to be able to connect your integration project with other departments using a similar system. and you cannot afford performance degradation at the time when business increases. and HTTP. and the system must be fault tolerant.

Adapters can also be set up to work in a client/server mode (using remote operations. Adapters help make this information available to the business process by "adapting" the applications to a common messaging system.20 | Business Integration Adapters Business information is distributed among different business applications (such as SAP R/3 or PeopleSoft) or available from databases or files. What are Adapters? Adapters translate information into the appropriate format: • • • Adapters receive information from a source application and publish it to the business process in a shared format. adapters provide services to activities inside the business process. Figure 11 Adapter data flow I Siebel Customer Service PeopleSoft Order Management Adapter Publication Service Adapter Subscription Service Business Process In TIBCO BusinessWorks.) The illustration below shows how a Siebel customer service system communicates with the business process using an adapter publication service and the business process communicates with the PeopleSoft Order Management system using an adapter subscription service. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Adapters subscribe to information from a business process and translate it to a format the target application can understand.

the TIBCO Designer deployment palette allows you to assign each adapter to its own machine. For more information. see Phase 3: Services Configuration on page 55. and others. be installed into the administration domain or monitored and managed via TIBCO Administrator. Other TIBCO Adapters can be loaded into TIBCO Designer and configured using the Generic Adapter Configuration resources. For example. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . • • TIBCO BusinessWorks Adapters A fully integrated TIBCO BusinessWorks adapter can be installed into a TIBCO administration domain and later monitored and managed from the TIBCO Administrator GUI. These adapters can then be used in process design and run as part of the integration project. A Design-Time Adapter allows you to directly access the source application from the TIBCO Designer GUI and specify the data the business process needs. Easy Deployment and Monitoring—When you are ready to deploy your project. however. Siebel. These activities interact with each of the standard adapter services. Application adapters—Includes adapter for PeopleSoft. the TIBCO Administrator GUI monitors each adapter in its own panel.TIBCO BusinessWorks Features 21 | Adapter Features Companies in a wide range of industries have successfully used TIBCO adapters to integrate different packages and custom applications. You can therefore easily see if one of the adapters is a bottleneck in the business process flow. the Publish to Adapter activity sends a message to an adapter subscription service. SAP R/3. TIBCO BusinessWorks fully integrates with the following adapters: • • Technology adapters—Includes adapters that access files or databases. They cannot. At run-time. TIBCO BusinessWorks includes second-generation adapters that are based on the same technology but have the following new features: • Easy Configuration With Design-Time Adapter—All adapters included with TIBCO BusinessWorks use a unified GUI that simplifies adapter configuration. Easy Inclusion in Business Processes—The business process can communicate with adapters by using activities found in the adapter palette.

Write. A complete set of commonly used activities such as File Read. An easy-to-use design-time process debugger. File and File Create. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . See Phase 4: Business Process Design on page 65. a set of email activities. timers. TIBCO BusinessWorks allows you to view and manipulate the data coming from and going into each service or activity using XML schemas. FTP activities. Figure 12 Example process Schemas and Data Mapping Different applications in your enterprise use different data representations. For example. you use the TIBCO Designer GUI to design and test your processes. The illustration below shows a simple process that is part of the example scenario in the design window. Grouping of activities. Conditional transitions supporting XPath syntax.22 | Business Integration Business Process Modelling The business processes describe the actual flow of data inside the enterprise. A transformation tool that lets you map the output of one activity to the input of subsequent activities. Features include: • • • • • • Configuration of adapter services. and the TIBCO BusinessWorks Process Design Guide. In TIBCO BusinessWorks. etc. a purchase order in a PeopleSoft system differs from a purchase order in a Siebel customer service system.

0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <oderid>ACME25 </orderid> Schemas are especially useful if you are deploying a complex system.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <oderid>350187 </orderid> <?xml version="1. The process data is the list of available data for that activity. Schemas are used by the running application but are not included in the code.w3. The use of schemas makes it possible to enforce that outgoing and incoming data strictly comply with the prespecified data description.org/2000/10/XMLSchema" targetNamespace = "http://www. Schemas in TIBCO BusinessWorks In the TIBCO Designer GUI. Incoming XML documents that use integers for the Order ID are allowed..TIBCO BusinessWorks Features 23 | This section first gives a brief introduction to schema (Understanding Schemas).0" encoding = "UTF-8"?> <schema xmlns = "http://www.. The input schema (required or optional) defines input values for an activity." Understanding Schemas The example below shows a simplified XSD (XML Schema Definition) that includes an Order ID element restricted to integer data. you can view the available process data and define the input schema for each activity. XML XML XML <?xml version="1. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . while an alphanumeric Order ID is rejected.. For business process activities.com/namespaces/AESchema" . <element name = "OrderID" type = "integer"> . then discusses "Schemas in TIBCO BusinessWorks.tibco. Figure 13 XML files conforming or not conforming to XSD XSD <?xml version = "1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <oderid>345</orderid> <?xml version="1.. you can define the schema for adapters and view and manipulate the schema for each activity in the business process.

download documents associated with a task. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . TIBCO BusinessWorks allows you to: • • • • • assign a task to a pool of users. 2. the work is marked as not approved and the process completes. Identify the machines that implement the integration project. an additional credit check is required. change the status of the task. See Step 7: Perform Mapping and Transformation for Each Activity on page 75 (Chapter 6). An activity that assigns work creates a TIBCO InConcert job. and you do not need detailed knowledge of XPath for simple conditions. orders under $10 000 were processes automatically. Data mapping is discussed in detail in the TIBCO BusinessWorks Process Design Guide. Users and groups are defined either in TIBCO InConcert or TIBCO Administrator (and then later exported to TIBCO InConcert). Deployment Configuration and Management The TIBCO Designer deployment palette allows you to perform deployment configuration and deploy your project. The job can be viewed and modified using TIBCO BusinessWorks web interface to manual tasks. In our example. and then the status of the request is checked. You perform deployment configuration with the TIBCO Designer’s easy to use drag and drop interface as follows: 1. the manual approval times out. or wait for the completion of a task. If no errors were returned. so the process waits for the completion of the manual work. and approves or rejects it. In that case. You can specify conditional mapping using XPath. then the work is still in the users’ queue. The ManualWork palette works with TIBCO InConcert.24 | Business Integration You can map the process data to the input data using a drag and drop interface. Manual Activities TIBCO BusinessWorks includes a ManualWork palette with activities that you can add to your business processes when the process requires user interaction for completion. Assign services and process engines to these machines. check the status of the task. One user accepts the request. For orders over 10 000. If no one accepts the request. the order is assigned to a pool of users for approval. If errors were reported in the manual work.

The TIBCO Administration Server supports security. both engines are started and one runs in standby mode. • Systems management. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .TIBCO BusinessWorks Features 25 | 3. Run-Time Management and Monitoring After your integration project has been deployed. which means prepare it to run. TIBCO BusinessWorks allows you to deploy multiple engines as part of a fault-tolerant group. If required. This includes the following features: • • • User authorization and authentication. TIBCO BusinessWorks combines the advantages of running in a distributed environment without a single point of failure with the advantage of monitoring and managing the different components in a centralized fashion. Only authorized users should have access to management functions. and an interface that allows comprehensive access to the current state of the project. Component management. and process and system management via the TIBCO Administrator GUI. restarting a machine or process). processes. — Create customized logs that could include number of business processes. You then monitor and manage the processes using a web-browser based GUI that you access remotely. throughput. — Automatically restart failed processes. and so on. — Monitor system performance. The engines in the group should be configured for JDBC-based checkpointing. and network status. 5. run-time monitoring. Specify failure recovery options. This is discussed in more detail in Phase 5: Deployment on page 79. some auto-correction upon failure (for example. in which different processes run on different machines. At runtime. — Track components such as adapter services or process engines. — Receive alerts if parts of the project are overloaded or if a failure occurred. End-to-end business process monitoring. management and monitoring are key factors for its success. including starting and stopping adapter instances and process engines. Deploy the project. the engine running in standby mode can take over if the primary engine experiences problems. Specify alert conditions and recipients. TIBCO BusinessWorks supports a distributed deployment environment. Facilities must include a notification mechanism. 4.

Figure 14 Components Option in TIBCO Administrator See Phase 6: Production on page 91 for more information.26 | Business Integration • Tracing. Privileged users can view additional information or stop or start the component. debug.). TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Each deployed component in the domain is displayed. etc. view any log file. The screen below shows the TIBCO Administrator Components option. after a certain time. — Specify which information you want to view (info. — From any machine in the administration domain. regardless of the machine on which the associated component is running.

page 38 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Having a well-defined methodology helps new users come up to speed quickly and allows different developers to work together more easily. page 30 Phase 3: Services Configuration. Topics • • • • • • • Introduction. page 33 Phase 4: Process Design. page 29 Phase 2: Domain Setup and Installation. page 35 Phase 5: Deployment Configuration and Deployment.| 27 Chapter 2 TIBCO BusinessWorks Methodology A TIBCO BusinessWorks integration project is developed in phases. page 37 Phase 6: Production. This chapter gives an overview of TIBCO BusinessWorks methodology. page 28 Phase 1: Analysis.

installation. and services configuration only once. After you’ve configured adapter services and business processes. Note that as a rule. you can use TIBCO Designer to assign adapter services to adapters and processes to process engines. This section gives an overview of each phase. • Following the phases in sequence results in a fast deployment that closely meets the specifications. Analysis Define & analyze problem Domain Setup Install software & configure domain Services Configuration Configure adapters Process Design Implement & test business processes Deployment Deploy to runtime engine Production Manage & monitor deployments TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . for example. then iterate through the other phases until you have arrived at the optimal configuration. You can then access the adapter service from activities inside the business process.28 | TIBCO BusinessWorks Methodology Introduction TIBCO BusinessWorks components are designed to support development in phases and to let you seamlessly move from one phase to another. you configure services. • • • Using TIBCO Designer. you perform analysis. You assign each adapter and process engine to a machine in the administration domain and deploy the project to the run-time environment. using examples from the example scenario as appropriate (see Business Integration Scenario on page 4). an adapter service. A more detailed discussion for each phase is then given in a separate chapter. You can then start and the adapters and process engines using the TIBCO Administrator GUI and manage and monitor them from there.

most expansions are straightforward. you avoid pursuing dead-end design paths and the steps to solve the problem become apparent. detailed problem analysis results in a faster over-all development process. etc. The application service is accessed via JMS. which states your project’s goals clearly. By clearly identifying and analyzing the problem. Here are some questions that are commonly asked during analysis: • What are the services my business process will access? In the example. • TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . the adapter services are accessed using TIBCO Rendezvous. The analysis should include consideration of expansion possibilities. TIBCO BusinessWorks implicitly supports analysis and design by offering a set of objects representing services and activities as the basis for the project flow.Phase 1: Analysis 29 | Phase 1: Analysis Problem definition and analysis is the critical first phase in an integration project. The web service is accessed via SOAP. Because the TIBCO BusinessWorks graphical user interface is so easy to use. The design team can use these objects during project design. and an application server. it makes sense to start with a business analysis that includes a problem definition. the web service that supplies shipping information. the process flow. In the example scenario. See Phase 1: Analysis on page 39 (Chapter 3). one could consider expansion to include direct communication with a business partner. it is tempting to start development right away. As a rule. error handling. However. An engineering analysis goes a step further and identifies the components of the integration project. What are the transports being used? In the example. the process is accessing two adapter services (PeopleSoft and Siebel). Because of the TIBCO BusinessWorks distributed architecture.

set up your system to use TIBCO Rendezvous rvrd and can then use TIBCO BusinessWorks across subnets. Before installing the software. Ask yourself these questions: • For development environments. you must specify the administration domain to which a machine belongs. Which components (adapters or process engines) should run on which machine? Where should I run my TIBCO Administration Server? Who are the users that need to make changes to the project? For which component does each user need to make changes (e. You can. Only authorized users can create and save projects or start and stop processes. If not. however. you should therefore determine what resources should belong to a administration domain. do I need to share work with other developers? If so. What machines do I need to run my project? By default. this machine can have its own administration domain. one TIBCO Administration Server manages the project and the ACL (Access Control List). each developer may install an Administration Server and set up an administration domain on their machine and develop and test the project there. This section gives an overview of planning the administration domain setup and installing the components. start or stop an adapter)? Who are the users that need to view information about the running project? Which component(s) does each user need to view? • • • • • TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . See TIBCO Administration Domain on page 9 for an overview.30 | TIBCO BusinessWorks Methodology Phase 2: Domain Setup and Installation A TIBCO administration domain is the set of software and hardware resources used by your integration project. all machines that need to share work should be part of the same administration domain. During deployment testing and production.g. • During development. all machines within an administration domain are expected to be in the same network subnet. • Planning the Domain When you install a TIBCO BusinessWorks component. Domain setup is different during development and during deployment testing and production.

This includes both architecture of your project and cost projections as the project grows. you should plan your administration domain to support those features when they become available in the near future. Install adapters into the administration domain. Install other TIBCO BusinessWorks components such as process engine(s) or TIBCO Designer instances into the administration domain. The PeopleSoft and Siebel systems run outside the administration domain. The process engine runs on machine 3. Install the TIBCO Administration Server and specify the administration domain name.Phase 2: Domain Setup and Installation 31 | • How will the project handle load balancing and fail-over? While the current release of TIBCO BusinessWorks does not explicitly support load balancing and fail-over. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . and the administration user and password. 3. The illustration below shows a possible administration domain setup for the example scenario: • • • • The TIBCO Administration Server runs on machine 1. Figure 15 Domain setup for example program PeopleSoft system PeopleSoft adapter Siebel adapter Process engine Siebel system Administration Domain TIBCO Administration Server Installing TIBCO BusinessWorks Components A flexible installer allows you to install one or more TIBCO BusinessWorks components on each machine following these steps: 1. 2. The PeopleSoft and Siebel adapters run on machine 2.

From TIBCO Designer. From TIBCO Administrator. you can select any of machine in the administration domain and include it in a deployment configuration. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . You add users to the administration domain and specify access privileges for each user via the TIBCO Administrator GUI. Planning and Configuring User Access It may also be useful at this stage to plan which users should be allowed access to which components.32 | TIBCO BusinessWorks Methodology The administration domain is used by the different TIBCO BusinessWorks components. authorized users can monitor machines. components (adapters and process engines). and process instances in the administration domain.

and accessed using the SOAP Request-Reply activity. from a database. With configuration complete. SAP R/3. Adapter client service—Acts as a client in a request-response interaction. Each type of adapter has its own DTA. Only one DTA needs to run in a network. You then configure a service with the appropriate adapter and save it as part of your project. their location. A Design-Time Adapter (DTA) allows you to access the metadata provided by the adapter at design time. you save the adapter service configuration. Web services can be configured from TIBCO BusinessWorks or externally. or from the Internet. This includes connection parameters such as the names of the host application. for more information. from an application such as PeopleSoft. The following service types are supported: • • • • Adapter publisher service—Sends data from the source application to the business process.Phase 3: Services Configuration 33 | Phase 3: Services Configuration TIBCO BusinessWorks uses different types of services that can be accessed from within the process: • Adapter services are configured using TIBCO Designer and the Design-Time Adapter (DTA). The services can then be accessed from the TIBCO BusinessWorks process. The adapter service can then be used by the activities in your business process and later be invoked at run-time. It then discusses the services used by the example. even if several users access different adapter instances of that adapter type. • This section gives an overview of adapter configuration see Phase 3: Services Configuration on page 55. Adapter Configuration Overview Adapters services send data to and receive data from your business process. When designing and implementing the integration project. from a legacy source. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . for example. For example. Data can come. a Publish to Adapter activity expects an adapter subscriber service that receives the data being published. you must identify the adapter services precisely. and so on. To configure an adapter first provide connection information. Adapter subscriber service—Receives data from the source application and sends them to the business process. and so on. Adapter server service—Acts as a server in a request-response interaction.

It is accessed via a JMS Receiver. you configure a Siebel adapter subscriber service. The adapter is accessed via an Invoke an Adapter Request-Response Service activity. see the SOAP palette activities and the WSDL file activity in the TIBCO BusinessWorks Process Design Guide. The User’s Guide for each adapter contains detailed set-up information for that adapter.34 | TIBCO BusinessWorks Methodology For more introductory information. see Phase 3: Services Configuration on page 55. Queue To access the PeopleSoft Order Management system. The Shipping web service is configured externally. Services Used by the Example The example needs to access four services from which it retrieves or to which it sends information: • • The application server is configured externally. you configure a PeopleSoft request-response adapter. It is accessed via a SOAP Request Reply activity. A Publish to Adapter activity can then connect the process to the adapter subscriber service. • • TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Web Services Overview TIBCO BusinessWorks can function both as a server and a client in a web services interaction. For additional information. To access the Siebel customer service system.

approval of certain orders. or adding content to a file. Activities are added to the process. You can also see the values of variables as they are passed through the different activities in the process. See Phase 4: Business Process Design on page 65 (Chapter 6) for more information. Grouping allows you to create loops. and send the data elsewhere. Different activities. Activities can access data from an adapter service. you could add an additional credit check. see the TIBCO BusinessWorks Palette Reference. it is possible to use the activities in the Manual Work palette. for example. for example. Manual Activities interact with TIBCO InConcert and allow a pool of users to accept outstanding tasks. For example. to have one error condition for the group. You can set breakpoints and provide required input as needed. querying a database. Most processes have one main process. manipulate the data. • • • • An integral part of process design must be testing. An process can call different subprocesses as it executes. It then briefly discusses the activities used in the example scenario. which starts with a process starter activity. Examples include sending email. Overview The TIBCO Designer GUI supports defining business processes with these major elements: • • Each process has a starting and ending point. The process can choose from different execution paths depending on certain criteria. This section starts with an overview. or to group activities as transactions that commit to a database only when all activities in the group are completed. These loops can be used. if the amount of a purchase order exceeds a certain number. for example. Activities can be grouped. TIBCO Designer includes a test mode that allows you to run any of the processes in your project at design-time.Phase 4: Process Design 35 | Phase 4: Process Design The flow of business data in your enterprise can be captured by business processes. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . a SOAP Event Source activity or a Receive Mail activity can function as process starters. For additional information. If the business process requires user interaction.

36 | TIBCO BusinessWorks Methodology Activities Used by the Example The example includes all the services (see Services Used by the Example on page 34). In addition • • A Send Mail activity sends an email to the customer if shipping the order is delayed. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . A Manual Work activity handles the credit check approval.

— Specify recovery options and alerts for engines and adapters. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . The project data store (repository) and the TIBCO Administration Server are updated with the new deployed components. discusses deployment in more detail. The component or adapter is then visible and accessible at design-time via the TIBCO Designer GUI and at run-time via the TIBCO Administrator GUI. you deploy the project. — If desired. • When deployment configuration is complete. The secondary engines will run in standby mode until they are needed. which should be running on different machines and use JDBC for checkpointing. As part of that process. Specify more than one process engines. Deployment configuration is performed using TIBCO Designer and includes these tasks: — Assign processes and adapter services to different process engines and adapters installed on the machines in the administration domain. — Specify startup options for each component (command-line process starter or NT service). set up your deployment for fault tolerance.Phase 5: Deployment Configuration and Deployment 37 | Phase 5: Deployment Configuration and Deployment The TIBCO administration domain supports a simple installation and deployment paradigm: • During installation. After you have installed the TIBCO Administration Server. startup scripts and other information about the different components are sent to the machines to which the components were assigned. • Phase 5: Deployment on page 79 (Chapter 2). any machine on which you install a TIBCO BusinessWorks core component or an adapter can be added to the administration domain. you install all components into the same administration domain.

create users for the administration domain and assign them permissions to perform certain activities. Authorized users can monitor the administration domain. Start and stop process engines and adapters. all machines. see the TIBCO BusinessWorks Administrator’s Guide. For detailed information. Domain Monitoring—View the machines in the administration domain and their CPU and disk usage. Deployment Monitoring and Management—View the status of components and generate tracing information. gives an overview of the most important components of the GUI. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . TIBCO Administrator can be used for these tasks: • User Management—Manage the ACL. View a domain inventory of all TIBCO products installed in the administration domain. your project’s components are running on the different machines in the administration domain. for example. • • Phase 6: Production on page 91. and all processes. using the web browser based TIBCO Administrator GUI. Recovery is performed automatically as previously specified as part of the deployment configuration. Change the ACL as needed.38 | TIBCO BusinessWorks Methodology Phase 6: Production In the production phase.

page 47 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . page 40 Step 2: Identify Processes. page 42 Step 4: Describe Business Events and Objects. the different departments participating in the integration project must come to a clear understanding of the requirements. Analysis Define & analyze problem Domain Setup Install software & configure domain Services Configuration Configure adapters Process Design Implement & test business processes Deployment Deploy to runtime engine Production Manage & monitor deployments Topics • • • • • • Step 1: Define and Delimit the Problem. This chapter gives a brief introduction to elements of the analysis phase that typically require special attention.| 39 Chapter 3 Phase 1: Analysis During the analysis phase. page 45 Step 5: Design Business Processes. page 41 Step 3: Identify Components. page 46 Step 6: Consider Domain Setup.

and the deployment parameters. including the generated Order ID and the shipping information. the components involved. EasyWare receives orders for computer hardware. The Siebel system creates a new customer service record based on the information. it is therefore critical that you have a definition of the problem that is as clear and precise as possible. 5. it includes an ID for the order. a working definition of the example scenario could be the following: 1.40 | Phase 1: Analysis Step 1: Define and Delimit the Problem The ultimate success or failure of your business integration depends on how clear you are about the problem you are trying to solve. For example. If shipping is delayed. Before you start. The business process receives the incoming order document via JMS. is entered into a Siebel system. The goal is to allow customers to place orders through a web site. When the PeopleSoft Order Management system acknowledges acceptance of the order. the business process checks the shipping schedule. which is available from an external vendor’s web site. 4. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Otherwise. 2. an email is sent to the customer. 7. and to allow later expansion for other ways to place orders. Next. 3. 6. Conversion to PeopleSoft format is required. Each order is processed by a customized order capture system built on top of an application server. 8. Each order is automatically entered into the PeopleSoft Order Management system. You can only succeed if you understand the scope of the problem. the order is sent and all order information.

3. The main process listens for incoming data from the application server. When a purchase order arrives.Step 2: Identify Processes 41 | Step 2: Identify Processes A clean design of a complex process consists of a main process that calls subprocesses as needed. The CheckShippingSchedule process accesses the web site of the shipping company and sends an email to the customer if shipping is delayed. 2. 1. The AddtoCustMgmt process enters the order. The problem defined above lends itself to the creation of a process for each task that is performed. including the Order ID generated by PeopleSoft and the shipping information. 4. The AddtoOrderMgmt process enters the order into the PeopleSoft Order Management system. in the company’s Siebel customer service system. It returns the purchase order and the Order ID to the main process. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . This process could also update the status of the order in the Order Management system. the main process calls the other processes in sequence. You can use TIBCO Designer to create the four processes and have the main process call the other processes in the appropriate sequence.

Web services—Web services are external to TIBCO BusinessWorks but are supported by several activities that are part of TIBCO BusinessWorks. a WSDL File shared resource is used by SOAP activities and a JDBC Connection shared resource is used by JDBC activities. Adapters can be configured using TIBCO Designer. you can use TIBCO adapters. A complete list of all activities is included in the TIBCO BusinessWorks Process Design Guide. For the problem at hand. you must understand the components of the process. A PeopleSoft adapter receives a request and sends data back to the process. • • • • • Shared Resources Services and Corresponding Activities Transitions and Conditions Mapping Exceptions Many components are activity resources. • The example discussed in this manual requires the following activities: • • An application server sends the incoming orders over JMS. This section discusses some potential components. The business process uses a JMS Queue Receiver activity that receives the order. To enable this communication. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . a request-response adapter service is well suited.42 | Phase 1: Analysis Step 3: Identify Components After you have identified the processes. For example. There are two kinds of services: • Adapter services—The source and target applications your enterprise uses cannot directly talk to each other or to TIBCO BusinessWorks. Shared Resources Some activities use shared resources. Services and Corresponding Activities The business process uses services to retrieve or send data. You can also access documentation for an activity from TIBCO Designer using the What is This option from the right-button menu of the corresponding resource’s menu.

Mail Other activities include a Send if shipping is delayed. Add Manual Work Activities on page 72 for some additional information. if a credit check were included in a business process. • • Request-Response A web service provided by the shipping company is invoked through a SOAP Request Response activity. Transitions and Conditions Transitions go from each activity in the process to the next activity. See Step 5: Optionally. including the Order ID assigned by PeopleSoft. Each activity must have at least one incoming and at least one outgoing transition. In order to use the activities in the Manual Work palette. the result of the credit check outcome could determine the next activity. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . TIBCO InConcert must have been installed and users must have been created with TIBCO Administrator and exported to InConcert. activity that sends an email to the customer ManualWork Activities The activities in the ManualWork palette are useful for automated business processes that have a few steps which require user interaction. In many cases. A negative credit check could result in an email to the customer. the Assign Work activity is appropriate for implementing the interaction. For a detailed discussion. Other activities in the palette include.Step 3: Identify Components 43 | The business process uses an Invoke an Adapter Service activity to interact with the adapter. a Modify Work activity that allows administrators to perform actions on a work item. see the TIBCO BusinessWorks Palette Reference. for example. A positive credit check could result in a different email and placement of the order. Each activity can potentially be called from several other activities or can conditionally call several activities. For example. into the Siebel customer service system. A Siebel subscriber adapter service receives the order from a Publish to Adapter activity and enters the order.

Very often. you can make them part of the business process. Decide on exception handling standards across business phases to make it easier to identify exceptions and understand how they are related. If exceptions are included in your initial design. graceful exception management will result in a noticeable increase in productivity. or data may need to be modified. however. and ultimately deliver a more robust system faster. Exceptions As you analyze your business problem. If exception handling is flawed. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . the output of one activity directly maps into the input of the next activity in the process. an activity requires a subset. For example. integration automation might actually result in decreased productivity because a lot of time is spent on dealing with exceptions. or a superset of the incoming process data.44 | Phase 1: Analysis Mapping For each activity in the process there is an appropriate input. At times. For the employees of your company. the Send Mail activity needs input that includes information about the customer and the Order ID. TIBCO BusinessWorks lets you map the process data to the input of the activity. To give each activity the appropriate input. For example. the Send Mail activity uses the customer email address and the Order ID but ignores the shipping address which is also part of the order. you should include as much information about exceptions as possible.

you identified the business objects and events. you must describe the events and objects in more detail. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Know the required data content (and how to get information that is not directly available). Understand what appropriate actions in case of a business or system-level error could be. This includes: • • • Know the required data format at each place in the process (and how to get it). At this stage of the analysis.Step 4: Describe Business Events and Objects 45 | Step 4: Describe Business Events and Objects Early in the analysis.

Data flow. You can set up transformation using the mapper included with TIBCO Designer. • Exception flow. • TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . you determine what the system should do in case of an exception. PeopleSoft may store phone numbers in a 10-digit format. while Siebel may use parentheses or dashes as part of the phone number. It could also involve transformation. that is. This includes: • Activities involved. putting the value from one field into another. the purchase order is received from a JMS Queue Receiver activity and a Publish to Adapter activity sends the purchase order to a PeopleSoft adapter subscriber service. translating data from one format to another. Custom java activities can be used to perform more complex transformation. For example. After you have identified the possible exceptions. For example. that is. Part of massaging the data for each system requires transformation. you can prepare the actual design of the business process.46 | Phase 1: Analysis Step 5: Design Business Processes After you have identified and described the components of the process. Data flow includes both flow of data for the non-exception case and for exception cases. Data flow may involve mapping.

For example: • • What hardware is required to run the project? Is security an issue that might influence platform choice? What TIBCO software components to you expect to install? — How many versions of TIBCO Designer and the TIBCO BusinessWorks engine during design time. you should plan on appropriate hardware resources to support it.Step 6: Consider Domain Setup 47 | Step 6: Consider Domain Setup After you’ve completed the design of your business process. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . — How many versions of the TIBCO BusinessWorks engine at runtime? If you want to run in fault tolerant mode. you should consider the domain setup required to support it.

48 | Phase 1: Analysis TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .

Analysis Define & analyze problem Domain Setup Install software & configure domain Services Configuration Configure adapters Process Design Implement & test business processes Deployment Deploy to runtime engine Production Manage & monitor deployments Topics • • • TIBCO Administration Domain. page 50 Installing TIBCO BusinessWorks. To guarantee that the transitions will be trouble-free.| 49 Chapter 4 Phase 2: Domain Setup and Installation TIBCO BusinessWorks allows you to progress from project design to deployment and production with minimal configuration and setup. For more information. see TIBCO BusinessWorks Administrator’s Guide. it is important that you understand setup of a TIBCO administration domain and installation of different TIBCO products into the administration domain. This chapter gives an overview of domain setup and installation. page 52 Installing Adapters. page 54 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .

including the TIBCO Administration server. access to both processes and data stores. each developer typically installs the complete TIBCO BusinessWorks package. Security. The server is installed only on one machine in the environment and can be accessed with the browser-based TIBCO Administrator GUI. Start an stop process engines and adapters. TIBCO Administration Server The TIBCO Administration Server manages the administration domain. Understanding the domain before installing the software is important because the domain is set up during installation. Typically. Manage engines or adapters running in fault-tolerant mode if fault-tolerant setup has been performed. which is assisted by a TIBCO Runtime Agent running on each machine in the domain. that is. the set-up depends on the phase of the project: • During early stages. TIBCO Administration Domain on page 9 gives an overview of a domain’s elements.50 | Phase 2: Domain Setup and Installation TIBCO Administration Domain A TIBCO administration domain is a set of hardware and software resources. They can be monitored as a group. on one machine and develops and tests the project there. Send appropriate information to each machine’s TIBCO Runtime Agent when a project is deployed. Manage registration. and pick up alerts sent by those Runtime Agents. The administration domain is managed by a TIBCO Administration Server. add deployed projects and machines to a domain. the development team uses one TIBCO Administration Server which manages different components (engines and adapters) running on different machines. that is. for final testing and production. Manage storage for server-based projects. The Administration Server’s main responsibilities are the following: • Enforce security for the domain. Later. • The advantage of an administration domain is that the components of your integration project automatically know about each other. is shared across the administration domain. TIBCO BusinessWorks supports both authentication and authorization of users that want view access or full access to the run-time components. • • • • • TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .

TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . • Supplies the run-time environment. That information is then visible via TIBCO Administrator. all shared libraries including third-party libraries. that is.TIBCO Administration Domain 51 | TIBCO Run-Time Agent When you install a TIBCO BusinessWorks component or a fully integrated TIBCO ActiveEnterprise adapter on a machine. a TIBCO Runtime Agent (TRA) is automatically installed. — The agent is responsible for starting and stopping processes that run on a machine according to the deployment information. The TRA has two main functions: • Supplies an agent that is running in the background on each machine. — The agent monitors the machine.

you are prompted for the name of the domain. If you install two Administration Servers into the same domain. You can either join an existing domain. If you want to create a new domain. and adapters. Each time you install either a TIBCO BusinessWorks component or a fully integrated adapter on a machine. The following diagram illustrates this. During installation. you assign the machine on which you install the component or adapter to the domain. on a second machine. After that. be sure to deselect the administrative component. you can install design-time components. When you install TIBCO BusinessWorks components. Figure 16 Installing TIBCO BusinessWorks Install Admininistration Server No Install component Install software Admininistration domain exists? No Want to join? Yes Yes Install component Add component to domain TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .52 | Phase 2: Domain Setup and Installation Installing TIBCO BusinessWorks When you install TIBCO BusinessWorks. failures at design-time and run-time will result. the TRA is installed automatically on that machine. run-time components. you must first install the administration component on one machine to establish a TIBCO administration domain. or create a new domain. you must install an Administration server on the machine from which you create it. such as TIBCO Designer. and install components there. During installation.

the TIBCO Designer GUI is installed. you are prompted to choose one or more of the following components: Administration Component The administration component consists of the TIBCO Administration Server and the tomcat engine. you are prompted for the name of the administration domain and the name and password for the administration user.Installing TIBCO BusinessWorks 53 | Installation Components When you install TIBCO BusinessWorks. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Runtime Component When you select the run-time component. When you install the administration component. Each machine can belong to only one TIBCO administration domain. failures at design-time and run-time will result. Design-Time Component When you select the design-time component during installation. Selecting the design-time component also installs TIBCO Designer Process Design and Deployment palettes. If you install two TIBCO Administration Servers on one machine and attempt to create two separate domains on that machine. the TIBCO BusinessWorks engine is installed. The GUI allows you to configure adapters and business processes and to deploy projects.

There are two types of integration between adapters and TIBCO BusinessWorks: • Fully integrated adapters can be installed into a TIBCO administration domain. Figure 17 Installing an adapter Yes No Want to create one? No Install TIBCO BusinessWorks Run standalone Install adapter Administration domain exists? Want to join? Run standalone Yes Yes Install adapter Add adapter to domain No TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .54 | Phase 2: Domain Setup and Installation Installing Adapters The TIBCO BusinessWorks process engine can work together with any TIBCO adapter. Each adapter is shipped separately. At run-time. you can choose to install it stand-alone or as part of a TIBCO administration domain. You must install a TIBCO Administration Server and that server must be running before you install the adapter into an administration domain. and password. • When you install a fully integrated adapter. the adapter interacts with the running process and can be monitored using TIBCO Administrator. If you select to join a domain. They are configured with a custom TIBCO Designer palette. When you install a fully integrated adapter. you have the option of installing TIBCO Designer as part of the installation. you are prompted for the domain name. Any TIBCO adapter can be configured using the TIBCO Designer Generic Adapter palette and can interact with TIBCO BusinessWorks at run-time. The illustration below shows how you must install TIBCO BusinessWorks to create an administration domain if none exists or if you do not want to join the one that is currently available. It also shows that you can run the adapter in standalone mode if desired. user.

page 62 Step 4: Accessing the Adapter Service From the Process. page 60 Step 3: Configuring the Run-Time Adapter. Analysis Define & analyze problem 2. Adapters ensure that the different applications in your enterprise can communicate in real time. Production Manage & monitor deployments 3. Process Design Implement & test business processes 6.Configuration Configure adapters Topics • • • • • Introduction: TIBCO BusinessWorks Services. page 56 Step 1: Installing the Adapter. page 63 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .| 55 Chapter 5 Phase 3: Services Configuration The first phase in the actual business integration development is configuration of adapter services. page 59 Step 2: Setting up the Design-Time Adapter. 1.Domain Setup Install software & configure domain 5. Deployment Deploy to runtime engine 7.

Each service is configured separately and can be deployed on a different machine. Service Characteristics The following characteristics are associated with a service: • • • • Service interface. Service descriptions are stored with the TIBCO Administration Server. HTTP. databases. If the server goes down. where all components of a business process are running on one server. For example. for example. TIBCO Rendezvous Data syntax. all components of the business process stop. A request-response operation is executed once and waits for one response. In contrast. services are responsible for publishing or subscribing to business data in a decoupled yet reliable manner. If one machine goes down. XML or ActiveEnterprise message format Data schema. In a request-response service. The business process receives data from a service and routes data to a service. for example WSDL/SOAP or AE Services Transport. a process could contain a Publish to Adapter activity that accesses an adapter subscriber service. all other parts of the process can still run. • • A one-way operation is executed once and does not wait for a response. the system no longer works. TIBCO BusinessWorks supports web services for interaction with the Internet and adapter services for interaction with files. This loosely-coupled architecture makes it easy to change individual components as needed. or different ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) applications. Enterprise integration platforms typically use a tightly coupled architecture. If any component in the system changes.56 | Phase 3: Services Configuration Introduction: TIBCO BusinessWorks Services In TIBCO BusinessWorks. communication flows in both directions. for example. for example DTD or XSD schema Invocation Modes Services can be invoked in several ways. a service-centric architecture supports self-contained services. Examples of services are could be a SendPurchaseOrder activity or a RequestShippingInformation activity. The complete interaction consists of two point-to-point messages—a request and a TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . JMS. The business process coordinates the services in the appropriate way.

and PeopleSoft. Adapter services are accessed by activities available in the TIBCO Designer ActiveEnterprise Adapter palette that you can add to your business process. SAP R/3. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Adapter services allow you to communicate with enterprise applications or interact with other incoming and outgoing data. or WSDL. • • Publication (notification) means an operation sends information on an as-needed basis. Adapter Services Adapter services allow your business process to publish data or subscribe to data used by the enterprise. Communication is in one direction (publisher to subscribers). Web services are accessed by SOAP activities. a subscription service receives data from the business process. Enterprise application adapters—Allow you to interact with enterprise applications such as Siebel. The activities you need are included in the SOAP palette. Service Types TIBCO BusinessWorks includes both web services and adapter services. Publication and subscription are driven by events. The interaction is only considered complete after the response has arrived. potentially multiple times.Introduction: TIBCO BusinessWorks Services 57 | response. usually the arrival or creation of data. A publication service sends data to the business process. WSDL is an XML-formatted language used to describe a Web service's capabilities as collections of communication endpoints capable of exchanging messages. Web Services TIBCO BusinessWorks supports Web Services Description Language. Subscription means incoming information is processed on an as-needed basis. potentially multiple times. You can use TIBCO BusinessWorks both to set up a web services server or to set up a web services client. They include: • • Technology adapters— Allow publication to and subscription from files and databases.

discussed in this chapter: • • • • Step 1: Installing the Adapter on page 59 Step 2: Setting up the Design-Time Adapter on page 60 Step 3: Configuring the Run-Time Adapter on page 62 Step 4: Accessing the Adapter Service From the Process on page 63 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .58 | Phase 3: Services Configuration Adapter Service Configuration Steps Configuring an adapter service consists of these steps.

The administration domain is set up to include one or more machines. You must establish the TIBCO administration domain and it must be running and accessible before you install the adapter. 2. a palette for that adapter becomes available from TIBCO Designer the next time you start it. TIBCO BusinessWorks therefore does not include adapters in its base package. specify the (already existing) TIBCO administration domain and the administrative user and password. A TIBCO administration domain is a set of hardware and software resources. See TIBCO Administration Domain on page 50. As part of the installation. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . specify the name of the TIBCO administration domain and specify the administrative user and password for the administration domain. During installation.Step 1: Installing the Adapter 59 | Step 1: Installing the Adapter Different business processes have to connect to different enterprise applications. Instead. After installation. you install the adapter you need separately and add it to the TIBCO administration domain during installation. Install the adapter. Adapter installation therefore consists of these steps: 1. Install TIBCO BusinessWorks.

4. In the project tree panel. Figure 18 shows how you would drag a Siebel Adapter Configuration into the design panel.60 | Phase 3: Services Configuration Step 2: Setting up the Design-Time Adapter The TIBCO Designer GUI allows you to connect with the source or target application for the adapter at design time using a design-time adapter. 2. Launch the TIBCO Designer GUI. you can use the TIBCO Designer GUI to specify schema information from the adapter. The appropriate adapter palettes should now be included. To set up the design-time adapter. The adapter service has been named SiebelPublisher. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . In the palette panel. the Services palette is displayed. After you have established design-time connection parameters. then select its Adapter Services folder to open it. Figure 18 Adding an adapter to the project Drag the adapter resource into the design panel 3. double-click the adapter. follow these steps: 1. Specify connection information for the application you want to access so your design-time adapter can connect. Select the adapter palette and drag an adapter resource from the palette panel into the design panel and name the adapter service.

8. Drag an adapter service.Step 2: Setting up the Design-Time Adapter 61 | 5. Specify the data the adapter should publish or subscribe to interactively. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . from the palette panel into the design panel. start the design-time adapter. a publisher service. 7. Save the adapter. The configuration panel is updated to allow you to configure the service. for example. From a command prompt. Figure 19 Adding a service to an adapter Drag the adapter service into the design panel 6.

• Specify tracing information if desired. you can configure the run-time adapter. you can configure them using the Advanced folder of the adapter. you can specify a different host machine or user name or password. You configure each adapter service separately using the tabs in the configuration panel as follows: • Specify run-time connection information using the Runtime Connection tab. For example. The exact process for defining services may vary slightly depending on the adapter you are using. such as Advisory activities. You can either specify the same information as that used by the design-time adapter.62 | Phase 3: Services Configuration Step 3: Configuring the Run-Time Adapter With the design-time adapter running. For additional information about adapter configuration. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . such as tracing to a network sink. TIBCO Designer allows you to specify simple tracing to a file or standard out using the configuration panel directly. available via Help > Help For from TIBCO Designer. see the documentation for that adapter. Define adapter services and choose schema from the pop-up list provided via the design-time adapter. or different information. You can also specify advanced tracing. • If your adapter uses advanced features.

Creating a process is explained in Phase 4: Business Process Design on page 65. you can access adapters as follows: 1. you can access it from the process definition. Select the process definition.Step 4: Accessing the Adapter Service From the Process 63 | Step 4: Accessing the Adapter Service From the Process After you have configured the adapter service. Once a process is part of your project. You have the following choices: — Publish to Adapter—Publishes data from the process to an adapter. which subscribes to data coming from the process and passes the data to the target application. Invoke an Adapter Request-Response Service—Communicates client) with an adapter request-response service. then open the ActiveEnterprise palette. a Publish to Adapter activity interacts with a Siebel subscriber. In the example above. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Adapter Subscriber—Subscribes — — to incoming data published by the (as a adapter. Drag the activity that accesses the service you need into the design panel. Figure 20 Adding activities that access adapter services Adapter 2.

3.64 | Phase 3: Services Configuration — — — — Adapter Request-Response Server—Starts a process based on the receipt of a request from an adapter. Wait for Adapter Request—Waits for the receipt of a request from a request-response invocation service. Save your project. Wait for Adapter Message—Waits for the receipt of a message from the publication service of the specified adapter. Specify the adapter information in the configuration panel. Respond to Adapter Request—Sends a response to an adapter for a previously received request. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . 4.

page 75 Step 8: Optionally. you create your business process using predefined activities and add conditions and mapping as appropriate. page 66 Step 1: Define Shared Resources. You can also display information about each resource by choosing its What is This right-button menu command in TIBCO Designer. page 72 Step 6: Create Transitions Between Activities.| 65 Chapter 6 Phase 4: Business Process Design This chapter discusses business process design. page 69 Step 3: Add a Process Starter. Analysis Define & analyze problem Domain Setup Install software & configure domain Services Configuration Configure adapters Process Design Implement & test business processes Deployment Deploy to runtime engine Production Manage & monitor deployments Topics • • • • • • • • • • Introduction. Group Activities As Needed. page 77 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . page 71 Step 5: Optionally. page 68 Step 2: Create Process Definitions. page 74 Step 7: Perform Mapping and Transformation for Each Activity. Using the TIBCO Designer GUI. Add Manual Work Activities. page 76 Step 9: Test the Process. page 70 Step 4: Add Activities. Business process design is discussed in more detail in the TIBCO BusinessWorks Process Design Guide.

66

| Phase 4: Business Process Design
Introduction
In an integrated enterprise, business processes manage the flow of information between different data sources and destinations. The business processes receive information, process it if needed, and hand it off as appropriate.

Business Processes
In many companies, the business rules that tie enterprise applications together are handled by custom-written code or even by manual processes. TIBCO BusinessWorks allows you to establish this data flow using activities available in the TIBCO Designer process design palettes. You design the process using predefined activities and can execute your process without writing a lot of custom code. The following diagram illustrates a business process flow that describes the business rules between the various systems in an enterprise. Figure 21 Business process flow
Process Order
IF arrived, THEN IF order ID returned, THEN IF shipping available, THEN SHIP ORDER ELSE hold order & send email update Cust Mgmt system

Manage Order Entry
IF arrived, THEN return order ID ...

Manage Shipping Update Cust. Mgmt System
IF order, THEN enter order enter order ID enter shipping information IF request, THEN IF schedule < 2 days THEN return OK IF schedule > 2 days THEN return HOLD

TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts

Introduction 67

|

Process Design Steps
Process design consists of a number of steps discussed in this chapter. • • • • • • • • • Step 1: Define Shared Resources on page 68 Step 2: Create Process Definitions on page 69 Step 3: Add a Process Starter on page 70 Step 4: Add Activities on page 71 Step 5: Optionally, Add Manual Work Activities on page 72 Step 6: Create Transitions Between Activities on page 74 Step 7: Perform Mapping and Transformation for Each Activity on page 75 Step 8: Optionally, Group Activities As Needed on page 76 Step 9: Test the Process on page 77

The steps discussed in this chapter do not necessarily have to be performed in this order. For example, you could define shared resources as needed or add transitions each time you add an activity

TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts

68

| Phase 4: Business Process Design
Step 1: Define Shared Resources
Shared resources allow activities to share information. For example, you can define a JDBC Connection resource, then use it in any of the JDBC activities in your business process. You may also choose to define the process and create shared resources as needed. Shared resources are available in the Shared palette and include and so on.

Configuration

Rendezvous Transport, JDBC Connection, JMS Connection,

To define a shared resource, follow these steps: 1. In the palette panel, select the Shared
Configuration

palette.

2. Drag and drop the icon for the resource you need from the palette panel to the design panel. 3. Name the resource and specify its configuration information in the configuration panel, then click Apply. You can now use the shared resource in any activity that requires it. For example, the JMS Queue Receiver activity the example uses to connect to the application server requires a JMS Connection shared resource. Figure 22 Shared resources in your project

TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts

For complex business processes. the main process first interacts with the Order Management system. a JMS Queue Receiver waits for input. then calls the ShippingSchedule process: The ShippingSchedule process retrieves information about the shipping schedule from the Shipping web site and adds shipping information to the order. it makes sense to design a main process and several subprocesses. activities are added in sequence. Using subprocesses makes your process easier to understand and debug. You name each process definition and give the process a description. otherwise enters the order into the Siebel system right away. Subprocesses also potentially allow reuse of business process components. which is called ProcessOrder. then transitions are added as appropriate. you create process definitions by dragging Process Definition resources from the palette panel to the design panel. • TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Figure 23 Adding process definitions to your project For simple business processes.Step 2: Create Process Definitions 69 | Step 2: Create Process Definitions In TIBCO Designer. It sends an email to the customer if shipping is delayed. When it arrives. Our example program includes several different processes: • In the main process. then add activities to the process.

follow these steps: 1. then click Apply. the process could be waiting for a document that arrives from an application server using JMS. Figure 24 Adding a process starter Note that the default Start activity that is included with each process you instantiate is not a process starter. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . For example. Choose the process to which you want to add the process starter 2. The process starter activity replaces the default Start activity.70 | Phase 4: Business Process Design Step 3: Add a Process Starter A process starter waits for input from an external process and creates a process instance each time the input arrives. Select the palette for the process starter in the palette panel. the JMS Queue Receiver is the process starter. A Start activity must be called explicitly from another process. 3. In our example. A process starter could also be polling a directory and start whenever a file is added. To add a process starter. Drag the process starter into the design panel. Specify configuration information. 4.

When you select a process definition. the ActiveEnterprise Adapter palette has activities that can publish messages to a specified adapter or invoke an operation by way of an adapter. Activities are generally operations that interface to external systems. for example. 2. Select the appropriate palette. Drag the activity into the design panel. The JMS palette includes activities such as JMS Queue Sender and JMS Queue Receiver. the originator and address for a Send Mail activity. 3. For example. Select the activity and specify configuration information about it. Figure 25 Adding activities TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . To add an activity to the process definition in TIBCO Designer. make sure you have selected the appropriate parent resource and make sure the palette has not been closed. If the palette is not visible. follow these steps: 1. A general-purpose Java Code activity allows you to write and execute standard Java code to perform custom processing within your process definition.Step 4: Add Activities 71 | Step 4: Add Activities Activities are the individual units of work within a process definition. but activities can also perform internal processing. Each palette has a set of activities that can be performed for that palette. activities become available on the various TIBCO Designer palettes.

and document data types.72 | Phase 4: Business Process Design Step 5: Optionally. views the data supplied by the activity. The functionality is implemented by two shared configuration resources and four activities: Shared Configuration Resources • Workflow Schema—The data associated with a ManualWork task. This activity allows you to download a document from an existing manual work task into a process variable. A workflow schema supports string. and completes the work. The user can change any of the data associated with a task. date. Workflow Connection— The connection to the TIBCO InConcert workflow server. This could include handling of unexpected situations or other activities such as credit approval or handling of customers from abroad if the company usually deals with local customers. The process definition can either wait for the user to complete the work or it can continue processing and later query for the status of the task. Normally you use this activity to determine if the task has been completed or if there are any errors. This is the data a user needs to complete the task. This server is used to track and manage manual tasks. int. PDF. • Download Document—Manual work schemas can contain elements to hold documents. and so on. An example of a document is a loan application that must be attached to a credit request. Microsoft Word. • Manual Work Activities • Assign Work—Creates a new task (with associated data) and assigns it to the specified pool of users. Add Manual Work Activities The activities in the Manual Work palette are useful for automated business processes that have a few steps that require user interaction. • Get Work Status—Retrieves the current status of a task that was previously created with the Assign Work activity. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . The document may be any type. Documents can be uploaded or downloaded to a manual work task by way of the web interface TIBCO BusinessWorks provides for managing manual work tasks. for example. A user then acquires the task.

Step 5: Optionally. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . This is useful if the timeout for the Assign Work activity has passed and you wish to wait for an additional amount of time. Add Manual Work Activities 73 | • Modify Work—This activity allows administrator users to change the status of an existing task created with the Assign Work activity to one of the following: — Update — modifies the data associated with an uncompleted task — Complete — completes the task — Reassign — reassigns the task to a pool of users • Wait for Completion—Waits for the completion of the task for the specified period f.

Control flow in a process definition must proceed sequentially beginning with the starting activity and ending with the End activity. all transitions whose conditions are met are taken. For example. Conditions A transition can optionally specify a condition. Arrows are unidirectional. and you cannot draw a transition to a previously executed activity. Adding Transitions To add transitions. you want to notify the customer and enter the information into the customer service system. After an activity completes. The condition determines whether a transition is taken when an activity completes processing. if the shipping schedule indicates a delay in shipping the order.74 | Phase 4: Business Process Design Step 6: Create Transitions Between Activities You use transitions to connect activities to form a process flow. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . You can have transitions from one activity to many other activities. you can group them using the GUI. A transition is represented by an arrow between two activities. click the transition tool on the menu bar to draw transitions between activities. If your process definition includes cyclical subprocesses (loops). You use XPath syntax to define conditions. you just enter the information into the customer service system. If it does not.

the specification is represented internally as Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) code. You do not need detailed knowledge of XPath to create simple expressions.Step 7: Perform Mapping and Transformation for Each Activity 75 | Step 7: Perform Mapping and Transformation for Each Activity As data flow through your business process. For example. you can right-click on any node in the input schema and choose Copy from the popup menu. and the correct XPath expression appears automatically. When you specify the input schema for an activity. You can conditionally map the process data to the input using XPath expressions. Each item in the activity input schema has an expression field for specifying the contents of the item. you do not need to examine the XSLT code generated by the mappings. different activities require different components of the data. an email is sent upon return to the main process. Normally. On the Input tab of each activity. However. • The process data is the list of available data items within the process at the point where the activity is located (an activity has access to all output data from any activity that is executed before it in the process definition). if you are familiar with XSLT and you wish to see the actual code. you can drag and drop items from the process data schema to the activity input schema. The XSLT is displayed in your text document. when the ShippingSchedule process fails. The email address information could be mapped from the original order to the mail activity’s input fields. The activity input is the list of input values that are required or optional for the activity. TIBCO Designer displays the available process data and the activity’s input represented as schema trees. • For each activity. For the most part. Then open a blank text document and choose Paste. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . you map the process data to the activity input.

. or if an error occurs. Create sets of activities that are to be repeated. This type of group is similar to a try. Create sets of activities that participate in a transaction.76 | Phase 4: Business Process Design Step 8: Optionally. The main uses of groups are the following: • Create a set of activities with only one condition for the group. Grouping allows you to create loops. until a condition is true. depending upon whether the transaction commits or rolls back. Activities within the group that can take part in a transaction are processed together or rolled back. • • TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . This allows instead of trying to individually catch errors on each activity. You can repeat the activities once for each item in a list..catch block in Java. Group Activities As Needed Groups are used to specify related sets of activities.

in more detail.Step 9: Test the Process 77 | Step 9: Test the Process Once the process definition is complete. The testing environment displays the running process definitions and highlights the currently executing activity. 7. select the desired process instance from the list of processes in the toolbar. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Examine the process data by selecting any of the activities in the process. the next step in your integration project. For example. supply input data to the process starter. 4. In test mode. This starts a TIBCO BusinessWorks engine that will execute the processes. Start a process by creating an event that the process starter is expecting. If your started multiple process instances. Once you are in test mode. The TIBCO BusinessWorks testing environment allows you to step through your process models and find sources of errors. You must exit test mode to make changes. Click the Start/Resume Testing icon to create a process instance from the displayed process definition. you cannot change your process definition. Testing a process definition typically involves these steps: 1. Entering the testing environment starts a TIBCO BusinessWorks engine. 8. Once the engine is started. which is discussed in Phase 5: Deployment on page 79 and. If necessary. 2. publish a message on the expected subject. 3. Step to Next Activity. a TIBCO BusinessWorks engine is started to perform the processing specified in the process definition. you can go on to deployment. in the TIBCO BusinessWorks Administrator’s Guide. Select the process definition you wish to test in the project panel. When your process definition operates as expected. Start/Resume Testing) to either continue through the process instance or to stop the current process instance. 5. The engine starts process instances based on the process definitions stored in your project. the test mode icon displays on the toolbar to let you know you are in test mode. you can perform preliminary testing from TIBCO Designer. Step Into SubProcesses. 6. The activity’s current data is displayed on the Input and Output tabs. if the process starter is listening for a TIBCO Rendezvous message. Stop Testing. Use the toolbar buttons (Pause Testing. Click the Start Test Mode icon on the toolbar. Set breakpoints in the process definition at points where you wish to stop a running process and examine its state.

78 | Phase 4: Business Process Design TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .

page 85 Step 3: Add Deployment Configuration Information. page 83 Step 2: Create and Test Your Project. page 86 Step 4: Deploy Your Project. Because TIBCO BusinessWorks uses the TIBCO administration domain and allows you to perform deployment configuration from the TIBCO Designer GUI. For more information. page 89 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . page 80 Step 1: Create and Populate the Administration Domain. This chapter gives an overview of the deployment of a TIBCO BusinessWorks integration project. see the TIBCO BusinessWorks Administrator’s Guide. ease of deployment is at least as important as ease of design. Analysis Define & analyze problem Domain Setup Install software & configure domain Services Configuration Configure adapters Process Design Implement & test business processes Deployment Deploy to runtime engine Production Manage & monitor deployments Topics • • • • • Introduction. deployment is a relatively simple task.| 79 Chapter 7 Phase 5: Deployment For the success of your integration project.

The administrator must tweak the configuration files for different components on different machines. In a traditional business integration project. allows you to use the TIBCO Designer GUI to create a deployment configuration and then deploy the project. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .80 | Phase 5: Deployment Introduction When you have completed and tested the first prototype of your integration project in the development environment. TIBCO BusinessWorks. To optimize the configuration. you are ready to deploy it to a testing environment. • • You use the TIBCO Designer GUI to assign process engines and adapters to the different machines in the administration domain. administrator must manually keep a record of the different configurations that were tested. domain configuration is a labor-intensive process that is likely to require multiple iterations before all components are in place. You then click the Deploy button and TIBCO Designer saves the project and sends scripts and other information to each machine that has been assigned a component. in contrast.

All components now become visible in the TIBCO Administrator GUI (but are not started). processes. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . At this stage. Using TIBCO Designer. all process starters are waiting for the events that cause them to create process instances. Using TIBCO Designer. the developer deploys the project. Using TIBCO Designer. which now includes process definition(s). As a result.Introduction 81 | TIBCO BusinessWorks Project Phases When process design is complete and all testing from the TIBCO Designer GUI results in success. 3. The built-in test mode is used for preliminary testing and debugging of the business process(es). the developer configures activities for the business process(es) and saves the project. 4. From TIBCO Designer. The TIBCO Administration Server sends all necessary information to the individual machines. the developer starts each component (adapter and process engine). the developer moves from the TIBCO Designer development GUI to the TIBCO Administrator run-time GUI and performs these tasks: 1. 2. the developer configures adapter services and saves the project with configured adapters. From TIBCO Administrator. Different adapters could potentially be configured by different developers and included in one project. the project is ready for deployment. Figure 26 Project development phases 1 Services Configuration 2 Process Design project with adapters and processes 3 Deployment Configuration project with adapters. and deployment info 4 Deployment project with adapters deployed project 1. The illustration below shows how a project moves through the development and deployment phases. the developer prepares the deployment configuration by assigning each adapter and each business process engine to a machine in the administration domain.

which uses the associated process definition to process the incoming data. the TIBCO BusinessWorks engine creates a process instance. Deployment Steps The rest of this chapter discusses all steps required for a successful deployment in more detail: • • • • Step 1: Create and Populate the Administration Domain on page 83 Step 2: Create and Test Your Project on page 85 Step 3: Add Deployment Configuration Information on page 86 Step 4: Deploy Your Project on page 89 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . 3. Each time an event arrives that triggers a process starter. the developer can monitor the different processes running on the different machines. In that case. you stop and start the modified process to have the changes take effect. the project can be modified and saved from TIBCO Designer. If appropriate. Instead. redeployment is not required. you undeploy the project and redeploy it from TIBCO Designer.82 | Phase 5: Deployment 2. If you make changes in the deployment configuration. Using TIBCO Administrator.

The administration domain is set up when TIBCO BusinessWorks is installed to include one or more machines. you should set up a TIBCO administration domain that is similar to the administration domain you expect to use during production. TIBCO Administrator. A TIBCO administration domain is a set of hardware and software resources. and can be changed as business increases.Step 1: Create and Populate the Administration Domain 83 | Step 1: Create and Populate the Administration Domain A project is always deployed to machines in one administration domain. TIBCO BusinessWorks engine) and adapters integrated with TIBCO BusinessWorks. and the business processes on a third machine. • TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . You can then deploy the project from TIBCO Designer onto your own machine and perform early testing there. A project cannot be deployed to machines in two different TIBCO administration domains. During development. Assign Software to Different Hardware Resources Software components include the TIBCO BusinessWorks components (TIBCO Designer. • During development and early testing. you may decide to install all software components on one machine. and a machine cannot belong to two different TIBCO administration domains (just as it cannot belong to two network domains). the adapters on a second machine. projects are saved inside the domain. The number of machines you choose depends on the processing power your project needs. When you are ready for production testing. You may decide to run the TIBCO Administration Server on one machine.

TIBCO BusinessWorks supports authentication and authorization for both data stores and components (business processes or adapters) in the administration domain. Only authorized users may view. or stop process engines or adapters from the TIBCO Administrator GUI. That means: • • Only authorized users may access or save a server-based project to the domain data store from the TIBCO Designer GUI. start.84 | Phase 5: Deployment The picture below illustrates a sample TIBCO administration domain. A user with full administrative privileges can create users and authorize them for different components of the system. Figure 27 TIBCO administration domain Domain Machine A TIBCO BusinessWorks Engine TIBCO Adapter for PeopleSoft Machine B TIBCO Adapter for Siebel Machine C TIBCO Administration Server TRA TRA TRA Authorize Users for Different Tasks The second part of administration domain configuration is user management. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .

Step 2: Create and Test Your Project 85 | Step 2: Create and Test Your Project You create and test your project using the TIBCO Designer GUI. When you are satisfied with your project and want to test it in a distributed environment. It is recommended you save your project as a server-based project. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . it is then administered by the TIBCO Administration Server and available throughout the administration domain. You must save your project as a server-based project for deployment. you can prepare a deployment configuration using the TIBCO Designer deployment palette. as discussed in the previous chapters.

When you drag a machine into the design panel. You do so using the TIBCO Designer Deployment palette. This information helps you decide which processes to assign to which machine. drag a Machine resource into the design panel.86 | Phase 5: Deployment Step 3: Add Deployment Configuration Information After you have created and tested the project. From the Deployment palette. 3. Using TIBCO Designer. 1. you can add additional Machine resources the same way. The Administration Server updates the configuration panel so all machines in the administration domain become selectable from a pop-up menu. 2. Choose a machine from the pop-up menu and click Apply. Figure 28 Adding a deployment configuration to the project If other machines are registered in your administration domain. its characteristics are displayed in the configuration panel. you must assign each component (adapter or business process) to a machine. drag a Deployment Configuration resource from the Deployment palette into the design panel. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Select the Deployment Configuration resource.

Figure 29 Adding a process engine to the deployment configuration 5.Step 3: Add Deployment Configuration Information 87 | 4. On second failure. the process should be restarted and an email should be sent. 6. or disabled) if you run the component as a service. you can select a startup type (automatic. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . For each adapter or process engine. — Specify which engine should be the primary and secondary servers. a process should just be restarted. — Set up a JDBC Recovery Storage for each engine. Fault-tolerant setup is discussed in the TIBCO BusinessWorks Palette Reference and also available via online help. Optionally. manual. you could specify that on first failure. For example. You can also specify recovery options. Select an adapter or process engine from the project tree and assign it to a machine by dragging it into the design panel. you can set up the deployment in Fault-Tolerant mode: — Set up process engines on multiple machines.

TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .88 | Phase 5: Deployment Figure 30 Adding recovery options 7. Save your project. which now includes configuration information. You are now ready to deploy your project.

in the TIBCO What Happens When You Deploy A Project When you click the Deploy icon. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . If you do. you deploy the project from TIBCO Designer.Step 4: Deploy Your Project 89 | Step 4: Deploy Your Project After you have configured the deployment configuration. TIBCO BusinessWorks registers the deployed project with the Administration Server. — Monitoring for the state of each component starts. DO NOT modify the script and other files. TIBCO BusinessWorks performs these tasks: • • TIBCO BusinessWorks saves the project as a server-based project. your deployment may become inconsistent. As a result: — An icon for this deployment becomes visible from the TIBCO Administrator GUI. the machines in the domain are updated to show the components that were deployed. Select the deployment configuration and click the Deploy icon Designer toolbar. you can start the project components from the TIBCO Administrator GUI. After this information has been sent to each machine. — In the TIBCO Administrator GUI. • TIBCO BusinessWorks prepares and distributes to each machine: — A startup script to launch the process on that machine. — Rulebases that describe the error recovery and alert behavior.

Just save the project from TIBCO Designer and stop and start the component in which the change was made. Click the Undeploy icon in the toolbar. You can a undeploy project to remove it from the display. Before you uninstall or reinstall TIBCO BusinessWorks. Select the Deployment Configuration for the project in TIBCO Designer. you must stop all TIBCO BusinessWorks processes and must undeploy all projects. 2. To undeploy a project: 1.90 | Phase 5: Deployment Deploying and Undeploying Projects A deployed project can be monitored and managed from TIBCO Administrator. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . You do not need to undeploy and redeploy a project unless you have made changes to the deployment configuration changed the authorized user of a component.

Analysis Define & analyze problem Domain Setup Install software & configure domain Services Configuration Configure adapters Process Design Implement & test business processes Deployment Deploy to runtime engine Production Manage & monitor deployments Topics • • • • Introduction. page 92 User Management. The TIBCO Administration Server and the TIBCO Administrator GUI together support your deployed TIBCO BusinessWorks products at run-time.| 91 Chapter 8 Phase 6: Production During the production phase. you monitor and manage TIBCO BusinessWorks deployments. page 95 Deployment Monitoring and Management. page 98 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . page 94 Domain Monitoring and Management. This chapter gives an overview of available functionality.

The TIBCO Administrator GUI allows users to start and shut down components. • • TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . • The Administration Server receives information about CPU and memory usage. administration domain monitoring and management. • The illustration below shows an administration domain with 3 machines in the domain. The TRA starts and stops the adapter and also sends information about component and machine status to the Administration Server for access via the GUI. Just like the adapters. The Administration Server includes an application server component for HTTP communications and a repository server component for data store management. • The first machine runs the Administration Server. For more detailed information. The second machine runs two adapters. see the TIBCO BusinessWorks Administrator’s Guide. the process engine is managed by the Administration Server via the TRA. alerts. All three server components run as a single process. Architecture TIBCO Administrator consists of the TIBCO Administration Server and the TIBCO Administrator GUI.92 | Phase 6: Production Introduction After the integration development team has configured and deployed the integration project. The information entered in the GUI is sent by the Administration Server to the TRA on the machine running the adapter. and deployment management options. which in turn starts or stops the process. you can use the TIBCO Administrator GUI for monitoring and management. The third machine runs a process engine. Start and shutdown commands are sent from the Administration Server to the appropriate TRA. This chapter gives an overview of the architecture and of the user management. The Administration Server interacts with each machine in the administration domain via the TIBCO Runtime Agent (TRA) running on that machine. which contains an embedded Repository Server for managing data stores. Machines outside the administration domain can view the TIBCO Administrator GUI using a web browser. Each user sees only the components for which s/he is authorized. The adapters are started via the TIBCO Administrator GUI. and the process instances and components running on each machine and makes them available via the TIBCO Administrator GUI.

Domain Monitoring and Management—View the status of machines and components running on machines in the domain. which includes the TIBCO Administration Server and the TIBCO Administrator GUI. • User Management—Add users and passwords to the administration domain for authentication. Deployment monitoring—Monitor the status of each deployment component (process engine and adapter) and process instance and the status of the machines executing them. View trace files and throughput.Introduction 93 | Figure 31 Communication inside a TIBCO administration domain Process Engine Administrator GUI WWW HT TP Administrator GUI WWW Repository Server Administration Server TRA HTTP Adapter 1 TRA Adapter 2 Monitoring and Management Options At run-time. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . • • • These aspects of monitoring and management are supported by TIBCO Administrator. then give each user view or execute privileges for TIBCO Administrator GUI elements or project repositories (data stores). Deployment management—View all running components and stop and restart them as needed. Depending on your security privileges. Start and stop components as needed. you may be able to perform one or more of the following tasks. TIBCO Administrator allows you to remotely access all deployments in your administration domain.

94

| Phase 6: Production
User Management
The TIBCO Administrator User Management module allows authorized users to specify security options for a TIBCO administration domain. Security has two components: Authentication. Specify users and passwords. Authorization. Give users access to individual components in the TIBCO administration domain. By default, the administrative user for the administration domain has privileges to create users and assign privileges. That user can create additional users with the same full access privileges if appropriate. TIBCO Administrator also allows you to export users to TIBCO InConcert for manual activities management.

Roles
TIBCO Administrator allows you to create a roles tree and assign users to one or more roles. You can then perform authorization on a per-role basis. This capability is critical, for example, if a large number of users need read access to information about running projects but only a few users should be authorized to start and stop the project.

Authorization
TIBCO Administrator allows privileged users to authorize users for GUI Access or Data Access (or both). • GUI access is given on a per-tab basis. For each tab you can select in the TIBCO Administrator GUI, you can specify which users are allowed read or write privileges. Data access is given on a per-data store basis. A repository data store is associated with each project. You can set various levels of access (read, write, variables) for data stores of each deployed project and for the system data store.

TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts

Domain Monitoring and Management 95

|

Domain Monitoring and Management
The Domain module allows you to monitor and manage the administrative domain. You have these choices: Machines—Lets you view the machines in the domain, any alerts for each machine, and processes running on each machine. Inventory—Lets you view the currently installed TIBCO products and product versions. Components—Lets you view deployed components and associated information and start and stop components

Machines
The Machines option allows privileged users to view all domains in the administration domain. Privileged users can monitor all machines, services, and processes in the administration domain at the same time. This allows administrators to see overloaded or underutilized machines and potentially reassign processes to different machines. Information for machines includes Max uptime and operating system. Alerts are included at each level of the display, so the administrator knows with one glance that, for example, one part of your system is experiencing a problem. Privileged users can select individual machines to view additional, more detailed information such as virtual memory usage, CPU usage, etc., all TIBCO processes running on the machine, or all processes running on the machine. Here’s an example screen for a domain that includes only one machine: Figure 32 Machines Option in TIBCO Administrator

TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts

96

| Phase 6: Production
Inventory
The Inventory option allows privileged users to view all installed TIBCO products in the administration domain and product version, when and where the products were installed, etc. Here’s an example screen for a domain that includes only one machine: Figure 33 Inventory Option in TIBCO Administrator

Components
The Components option allows privileged users to view each component deployed in the administration domain and includes information about the component, such as its status and Fault-Tolerant Group (if any). Privileged users can also stop and start components. Components include, for example TIBCO BusinessWorks process engines or TIBCO Adapter instances deployed to the TIBCO administration domain.

TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts

Domain Monitoring and Management 97 | Figure 34 Components Option in TIBCO Administrator TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .

you can choose from these options: Business Processes—Allows you to view process engines and associated active (running) processes. The module displays a separate icon for each deployment. You can configure tracing to include or exclude selected activities. you can view the activities in the process definition and information about them. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .98 | Phase 6: Production Deployment Monitoring and Management The TIBCO Administrator deployment module allows privileged users to monitor and manage components on a per-deployment basis. TIBCO Administrator tracing facilities allow for detailed analysis and provide debugging and throughput information. Here’s a simple example: Figure 35 Viewing Process Definition information Components Allows you to view component details and set up tracing. In each deployment. Components—Allows you to view component details and set up tracing. You can also save tracing information to a log. you can view all active processes. Business Processes The Business Processes option of each deployment allows you to select the process engine and each process definition associated with the engine. If you select a process definition. If you select the engine.

When you install TIBCO BusinessWorks. querying a database. Activity An activity is a specific task in a business process definition. you assign the various project components (process and services) to the physical locations where they will run for test or production purpose.| 99 Glossary A ActiveEnterprise One of the three product families from TIBCO Software Inc. and other process instances will be distributed across the production platform. writing a file. Configuration Panel In TIBCO Designer. sending information to an SAP adapter. XPath which allows you to specify a custom condition using an XPath expression. Later. you specify a TIBCO Administration Domain. Adapter Adapters make it possible to communicate and update business information that originates from diverse sources and resides on diverse host systems within an organization. the configuration panel allows you to fill in values for the fields in the objects of your project. the domain contains the services and process engines running on those machines. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . TIBCO BusinessWorks adapters interact with enterprise applications such as PeopleSoft. SAP R/3. as well as databases or files. each activity is represented by a resource and can be added to the process definition from its palette.tibco. a set of deployed projects. after production deployment. In TIBCO Designer. You can monitor the components of all deployed projects in a domain from the TIBCO Administrator console. Examples are sending e-mail. The domain initially contains one or more machines. CRM Customer Relationship Management system. See also Process Definition. Conditions are specified on transitions to determine whether to take the transition to the next activity or not. One of the applications in your enterprise. OracleApps and Siebel. and otherwise.com for details). Condition types include: always. and a single database for authentication and authorization. For example. The other two are ActivePortal™ and ActiveExchange™ (see www. C Condition A condition can be used to control the flow of activities in a process diagram. the adapter service instances. Administration Domain Consists of a set of machines on which TIBCO software components are deployed. and to perform mapping. D Deployment During the deployment phase of your integration project. Multiple projects can be in the same domain.

Some groups specify process control logic. and processes business data in a decoupled yet reliable manner. A TIBCO BusinessWorks service retrieves. Resource In TIBCO Designer. transport. The project tree shows a hierarchy of all objects (adapters.100 | Glossary Design panel In TIBCO Designer.g. Process definition Specifies the business process flow using activities. and data schema. Process instance Running instance of a process definition Process starter Starts a process based on an external event. use an adapter palette to add an adapter and a publisher to a project. You create and save projects using TIBCO Designer and later deploy the project. G Activity Group A grouping of activities in a process definition. Project tree panel One of the panels in TIBCO Designer. DTD Document Type Definition. For example. etc. Project A TIBCO BusinessWorks project is a collection of all the components of your EAI solution. resources are the objects you can drag and drop into the design panel. A process definition is just a special type of activity. DTDs serve the same function as XML schema documents (XSDs). A DTD may also provide some content information. S Service P Palette A TIBCO Designer palette is a collection of resources that you can use to populate your project. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . A non-XML schema file that contains a formal description of the vocabulary and structure of the elements in an associated XML file. Associated with a service is a service interface. This includes components like business processes. activities. The business process receives data from a service and sends data to a service. data syntax.) in your project. The DTD for an XML document is the combination of the internal and external subsets described by the document type declaration. machines. generates. you drag resources from the palette panel into the design panel to create instances of that resource for your business process definition. Each machine may belong to only one TIBCO Administration Domain. e. engine instance(s). adapter services. R M Machine A computer on which TIBCO Software components are installed. arrival of a file or a message from an adapter. you can therefore use a process definition as an activity.

Related concrete endpoints are combined into abstract endpoints (services). additional tabs become available. As components are installed. XPath XPath is a scripting language developed by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) for addressing parts of XML documents. a set of encoding rules for expressing instances of application-defined datatypes.org/TR/SOAP/) W WSDL Web Services Definition Language.org/TR/xpath. their security. and then bound to a concrete network protocol and message format to define an endpoint. Transition Transitions indicate the flow of processing. It is an XML based protocol that consists of three parts: an envelope that defines a framework for describing what is in a message and how to process it. The operations and messages are described abstractly. In TIBCO Designer. It provides basic manipulation functions for strings.xsd. WSDL is an XML format for describing network services as a set of endpoints operating on messages containing either document-oriented or procedure-oriented information. TIBCO Administrator organizes the information using tabs. TIBCO Designer A GUI tool that allows you design your integration project.Glossary 101 | SOAP Simple Object Access Protocol. You use TIBCO Designer for adapter configuration. a transition is represented by an arrow between activities. and a convention for representing remote procedure calls and responses. An XSD file defines the structure and elements in a related XML file.w3. SOAP is a lightweight protocol for the exchange of information in a decentralized. (See http://www.w3. XSLT is a recommendation of the World Wide Web Consortium TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .org/TR/wsdl) T X Tab A related set of entities and functions that are visible when you select one tab in the TIBCO Administrator GUI. and deployment. process design. TIBCO Administrator TIBCO Administrator is a browser-based interface for monitoring and managing TIBCO deployments. (See http://www. or the activity is not executed when the process executes. numbers and Booleans. The suffix of an XSD document is . TIBCO Designer uses XPath as the language for defining conditions and transformations. Each activity in a process definition must have a transition to it. distributed environment.w3. and administration domains. XSL Transformations (XSLT) is a standard way to describe how to transform (change) the structure of an XML (Extensible Markup Language) document into an XML document with a different structure. XSLT XML Stylesheet Language Transformation. A complete description of XPath is available at http://www. XSD XML Schema Definition.

102 | Glossary TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .

TIBCO Software Inc. End User License Agreement 103

|

TIBCO Software Inc.
READ THIS END USER LICENSE AGREEMENT CAREFULLY. BY DOWNLOADING OR INSTALLING THE SOFTWARE, YOU AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THIS AGREEMENT. IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO THESE TERMS, DO NOT DOWNLOAD OR INSTALL THE SOFTWARE AND RETURN IT TO THE VENDOR FROM WHICH IT WAS PURCHASED. RETURNS BY THE ORIGINAL PURCHASER WITHIN THIRTY (30) DAYS OF THE PURCHASE DATE WILL RECEIVE A FULL REFUND. Upon acceptance, the following shall govern your use of the Software except to the extent all or any portion of the Software (a) is subject to a separate written agreement, (b) includes a separate “click-on” license agreement as part of the download or installation process, or (c) is provided by a third party under the terms set forth in an addendum at the end of this Agreement, in which case the terms of such addenda shall control over inconsistent terms with regard to such portion(s). License Grant. The Software is the property of TIBCO or its licensors and is protected by copyright and other laws. While TIBCO continues to own the Software, TIBCO hereby grants to Customer a limited, non-transferable, non-exclusive, license to use the number of Permitted Instances set forth in the Ordering Document, in machine-readable, object code form and solely for Customer’s internal business use. Restrictions. Customer agrees not to (a) make more copies than the number of Permitted Instances plus a reasonable number of backups; (b) provide access to the Software to anyone other than employees, contractors, or consultants of Customer; (c) sublicense, transfer, assign, distribute to any third party, pledge, lease, rent, or commercially share the Software or any of Customer’s rights under this Agreement; (d) use the Software for purposes of providing a service bureau, including, without limitation, providing third-party hosting, or third-party application integration or application service provider-type services, or any similar services; (e) use the Software in connection with ultrahazardous activities, or any activity for which failure of the Software might result in death or serious bodily injury to Customer or a third party; or (f) directly or indirectly, in whole or in part, modify, translate, reverse engineer, decrypt, decompile, disassemble, make error corrections to, create derivative works based on, or otherwise attempt to discover the source code or underlying ideas or algorithms of the Software. Beta and Evaluation Licenses. Notwithstanding the foregoing, if the Software is being provided for demonstration, beta testing, or evaluation purposes, then Customer agrees (a) to use the Software solely for such purposes, (b) that the Software will not be used or deployed in a production environment, and (c) that such use shall automatically terminate upon the earlier of thirty days from the date Customer receives the right to install the Software, or Customer’s receipt of notice of termination from TIBCO. Additional Licenses. If Customer desires to increase the number of Permitted Instances, Customer may request the same by submission of an additional Ordering Document and upon acceptance by TIBCO, Customer shall be permitted to deploy such additional Permitted Instances, all of which shall otherwise be subject to the terms of this Agreement. Technical Support. Provided Customer has paid applicable support fees (not included with Software fees unless separately listed), TIBCO shall provide support for generally available TIBCO Software on an annual basis commencing on the Purchase Date, as follows (“Support”): Customer shall designate as technical support contacts

End User License Agreement
that number of Customer’s employees as are permitted under the level of Support purchased (contacts are changeable upon 48-hours prior written notice to TIBCO). Each contact may contact TIBCO for problem resolution during TIBCO’s published support hours corresponding to the level of Support fees paid. Upon notice from a contact of a Software problem which can be reproduced at a TIBCO support facility or via remote access to Customer’s facility, TIBCO shall use reasonable efforts to correct or circumvent the problem according to its published support objectives. TIBCO reserves the right to make changes only to the most currently available version. TIBCO will use reasonable efforts to support the previously released version of the Software for a maximum of six months. Software may be transferred to another site or operating system only upon written notice to TIBCO and subject to TIBCO’s transfer policies and fees then in effect. Software may be transferred without notice or additional cost from one machine to another at the same site if the second machine runs the same operating system software and otherwise there is no increase in the Permitted Instances. TIBCO shall have no obligation to support the Software (i) for use on any computer system running other than the operating system software for which the Software is approved (as set forth in the Software documentation) and licensed hereunder, or (ii) if Customer has modified the Software in breach of this Agreement. TIBCO shall have no obligation to modify any version of the Software to run with any new versions of any operating system, or any other third party software or hardware. If Customer purchases Support for any Software, Customer must purchase the same level of Support for all copies of the Software for which it is licensed. Support may be extended for one year periods on the anniversary of each Purchase Date at the standard amounts set forth in its price list, for as long as TIBCO offers Support. Customer may reinstate lapsed support for any then currently supported Software by paying all Support fees in arrears and any applicable reinstatement fee. Upgrades, patches, enhancements, bug fixes, new versions and/or new releases of the Software provided from time to time under Support shall be used only as replacements to existing Permitted Instances, and shall not be deemed to increase that number, and use thereof shall be governed by the terms of this Agreement, except for the first paragraph of the Limited Warranty and any right of return or refund. Consulting Services. Customer may request additional services (“Services”) either in an Ordering Document, or by a separate mutually executed work order, statement of work or other work-request document incorporating this Agreement (each, a “Work Order”). Unless otherwise expressly agreed to in a Work Order, all Services and any work product therefrom shall be (a) performed on a time and materials basis, plus meals, lodging, travel, and other expenses reasonably incurred in connection therewith, (b) deemed accepted upon delivery, and (c) exclusively owned by TIBCO (except for confidential information of Customer identified to TIBCO in the Ordering Document), including all right, title and intellectual property or other right or interest therein. Each Work Order is intended to constitute an independent and distinct agreement of the parties, notwithstanding that each shall be construed to incorporate all applicable provisions of this Agreement. Fees for Services shall be due and payable in United States dollars net30 from the date of TIBCO’s invoice.

TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts

104

| TIBCO Software Inc. End User License Agreement
Limited Warranty. If Customer obtained the Software directly from TIBCO, then TIBCO warrants that for a period of thirty (30) days from the Purchase Date: (i) the media on which the Software is furnished will be free of defects in materials and workmanship under normal use; and (ii) the Software will substantially conform to its published specifications. This limited warranty extends only to the original Customer hereunder. Customer’s sole and exclusive remedy and the entire liability of TIBCO and its suppliers under this limited warranty will be, at TIBCO’s option, repair, replacement, or refund of the Software and applicable Support fees, in which event this Agreement shall terminate upon payment thereof. This warranty does not apply to any Software which (a) is licensed for beta, evaluation, testing or demonstration purposes for which TIBCO does not receive a license fee, (b) has been altered or modified, except by TIBCO, (c) has not been installed, operated, repaired, or maintained in accordance with instructions supplied by TIBCO, (d) has been subjected to abnormal physical or electrical stress, misuse, negligence, or accident, or (e) is used in violation of any other term of this Agreement. Customer agrees to pay TIBCO for any Support or Services provided by TIBCO related to a breach of the foregoing on a time, materials, travel, lodging and other reasonable expenses basis. If Customer obtained the Software from a TIBCO reseller or distributor, the terms of any warranty shall be as provided by such reseller or distributor, and TIBCO provides Customer no warranty with respect to such Software. EXCEPT AS SPECIFIED IN THIS LIMITED WARRANTY, THE SOFTWARE, SUPPORT AND SERVICES ARE PROVIDED “AS IS”, ALL EXPRESS OR IMPLIED CONDITIONS, REPRESENTATIONS, AND WARRANTIES INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OR CONDITION OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, NONINFRINGEMENT, SATISFACTORY QUALITY OR ARISING FROM A COURSE OF DEALING, USAGE, OR TRADE PRACTICE, ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED TO THE EXTENT ALLOWED BY APPLICABLE LAW. NO WARRANTY IS MADE REGARDING THE RESULTS OF ANY SOFTWARE, SUPPORT OR SERVICES OR THAT THE SOFTWARE WILL OPERATE WITHOUT ERRORS, PROBLEMS OR INTERRUPTIONS, OR THAT ERRORS OR BUGS IN THE SOFTWARE WILL BE CORRECTED, OR THAT THE SOFTWARE’S FUNCTIONALITY OR SERVICES WILL MEET CUSTOMER’S REQUIREMENTS. NO TIBCO DEALER, DISTRIBUTOR, AGENT OR EMPLOYEE IS AUTHORIZED TO MAKE ANY MODIFICATIONS, EXTENSIONS OR ADDITIONS TO THIS WARRANTY. Limitation of Liability. IN NO EVENT WILL TIBCO BE LIABLE FOR ANY LOST DATA, LOST REVENUE, LOST PROFITS, DAMAGE TO REPUTATION, BUSINESS INTERRUPTION, OR ANY OTHER INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, SPECIAL, PUNITIVE, EXEMPLARY OR ANY SIMILAR TYPE DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THIS AGREEMENT, THE USE OR THE INABILITY TO USE THE SOFTWARE, OR THE PROVISION OF ANY SUPPORT OR SERVICES, EVEN IF TIBCO HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. IN NO EVENT SHALL TIBCO'S LIABILITY TO CUSTOMER, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, TORT (INCLUDING ACTIVE OR PASSIVE NEGLIGENCE), BREACH OF WARRANTY, CLAIMS BY THIRD PARTIES OR OTHERWISE, EXCEED THE PRICE PAID BY CUSTOMER UNDER THE APPLICABLE ORDERING DOCUMENT. THE FOREGOING LIMITATIONS SHALL APPLY EVEN IF THE ABOVE-STATED REMEDY OR LIMITED WARRANTY FAILS OF ITS ESSENTIAL PURPOSE. BECAUSE SOME STATES OR JURISDICTIONS DO NOT ALLOW LIMITATION OR EXCLUSION OF CONSEQUENTIAL OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY NOT APPLY TO CUSTOMER. Confidentiality. Aspects of the Software, Support and Services, including the specific design and structure thereof, constitute trade secrets and/or copyrighted material of TIBCO and Customer agrees not to disclose, provide, or otherwise make available the same in any form to any third party. Customer agrees to implement reasonable security measures to protect trade secrets and copyrighted material and to affix to all copies of Software or other confidential or trade secret information, appropriate TIBCO copyright, confidentiality, and proprietary notices. Export. TIBCO SOFTWARE CONTAINS ENCRYPTION TECHNOLOGY. You may not download or otherwise export or reexport the Software or any underlying information or technology except in full compliance with all United States and other applicable laws and regulations. None of the Software or underlying information or technology may be downloaded or otherwise exported or reexported (i) into (or to a national or resident of) Cuba, Iraq, Libya, Sudan, North Korea, Iran, Syria or any other country to which the U.S. has embargoed goods; or (ii) to anyone on the U.S. Treasury Department's list of Specially Designated Nationals or the U.S. Commerce Department's Table of Denial Orders. By downloading or using the Software, you are agreeing to the foregoing and you are representing and warranting that you are not located in, under the control of, or a national or resident of any such country or on any such list. Government Use. If the Customer is an agency, department, or other entity of the United States Government ("Government"), the use, duplication, reproduction, release, modification, disclosure or transfer of the Software, or any related documentation of any kind, including technical data or manuals, is restricted in accordance with Federal Acquisition Regulation ("FAR") 12.212 for civilian agencies and Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement ("DFARS") 227.7202 for military agencies. The Software is commercial computer software and commercial computer software documentation. Use of the Software and related documentation by the Government is further restricted in accordance with the terms of this Agreement, and any modification thereto. Interoperability. To the extent required by law, at Customer’s request, TIBCO shall provide Customer with the interface information needed to achieve interoperability between the Software and another independently created program, on payment of TIBCO's applicable fee. Customer agrees to observe strict obligations of confidentiality with respect to such information. Acceptance; Integration. An Ordering Document shall be deemed accepted only by issuance of a TIBCO invoice and solely for purposes of administrative convenience. None of the terms of the Ordering Document (other than the Software product name, number of Permitted Instances, level of Support, description of Services, and fees due in connection therewith), shall apply for any reason or purpose whatsoever, regardless of any statement on any Ordering Document to the contrary, unless countersigned by TIBCO. This Agreement constitutes the entire agreement between the parties with respect to the use of the Software, Support and Services, and supersedes all proposals, oral or written, and all other representations, statements, negotiations and undertakings relating to the subject matter hereof. All future orders of Software, Support or Services by Customer from TIBCO shall be deemed to occur under the terms of this Agreement (with or without reference to this Agreement), unless expressly superseded by a signed written Agreement between the parties.

TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts

TIBCO Software Inc. End User License Agreement 105

|

Term and Termination. Customer may terminate this Agreement at any time by destroying all copies of the Software. This Agreement will terminate immediately without notice from TIBCO if Customer fails to comply with any of its provisions if not cured within fifteen days of such failure, or and, upon such termination, Customer must cease using and return or destroy all copies of the Software. Customer’s obligation to pay accrued charges and fees as well as the sections entitled “Confidentiality”, “Limited Warranty” and “Limitation of Liability” shall survive any such termination. Authority. You hereby represent and warrant that you have full power and authority to accept the terms of this Agreement on behalf of Customer, and that Customer agrees to be bound by this Agreement. General. Fees on the Ordering Document (all to be paid on the latter of thirty days from Invoice by TIBCO or the date set forth in the Ordering Document) do not include sales, use, withholding, value-added or similar taxes, and Customer agrees to pay the same, excluding therefrom taxes related to TIBCO’s income and corporate franchise tax. Customer agree to pay all reasonable costs incurred (including reasonable attorneys’ fees) in collecting past due amounts under this Agreement. No delay in the performance of any obligation by either party, excepting all obligations to make payment, shall constitute a breach of this Agreement to the extent caused by force majeure. Customer hereby grants TIBCO and its independent auditors the right to audit Customer’s compliance with this Agreement. If any portion of this Agreement is found to be void or unenforceable, the remaining provisions shall remain in full force and effect. This Agreement shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of the State of California, United States of America, as if performed wholly within the state and without giving effect to the principles of conflict of law. The state and/or federal courts in San Francisco, California, shall have exclusive jurisdiction of any action arising out of or relating to this Agreement. The United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods is excluded from application hereto. If any portion hereof is found to be void or unenforceable, the remaining provisions of this Agreement shall remain in full force and effect. Definitions. In connection with this Agreement, the following capitalized terms shall have the following meaning: “Agreement” means this End User License Agreement; “Customer” means the original purchaser or licensee of the Software and any permitted successors and assigns; “Development” means used for software development purposes only; “Enterprise” means an unlimited number of Permitted Instances for a period of one year from the Purchase Date (unless otherwise set forth in the Ordering Document), at which time existing licenses convert to perpetual and Customer may not thereafter deploy additional Permitted Instances, and in any event, shall (during the one-year unlimited deployment period) exclude any entity which acquires, is acquired by, merged into, or otherwise combined with Customer if, upon such combination, the combined annual revenues or head count is greater by ten percent (10%) than exists as of the Purchase Date (and Customer hereby agree to provide TIBCO with notice of the number of Permitted Instances deployed at the end of such one-year period within thirty days thereafter); “Fab” means unlimited use for shop-floor manufacturing applications at a Site; “Workstation” shall mean a single end-user computer that is generally intended to be accessed by one person at a time; “Ordering Document” means any purchase order or similar document or agreement requesting Software, Support or Services; “Permitted Instance(s)” means the number of copies of Software running on a Server Instance, Workstation, User, or Development basis, on a designated Platform, as set forth in an Ordering Document, including, without limitation, Enterprise, Site and Fab licensing; “Platform” means the operating system set forth in an Ordering Document; “Purchase Date” means the date of the Ordering

Document; “Server Instance” means a computer performing common services for multiple Desktop machines; “Site” means an unlimited number of Permitted Instances at a specific physical address set forth in the Ordering Document (or, in the absence of any address, at Customer’s corporate headquarters); “Software” means the software products listed in an Ordering Document (except as provided in the second paragraph hereof), in whole and in part, along with their associated documentation; “TIBCO” means TIBCO Software Inc.; and “User” means the number of named users with access to the Software. Copyright © 1997-2002 TIBCO Software Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

ADDENDA: Third Party License Agreements NOTICE: Included with the TIBCO Software is certain source and/or object code software developed and licensed by third parties ("Third Party Software"). Third Party Software is licensed and supported exclusively under the terms and conditions of the license terms which accompany such Third Party Software, as set forth next.

TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts

3. non-transferable.S. Upon Termination. UNLESS SPECIFIED IN THIS AGREEMENT. REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES. or reverse engineer Software. or other communication between the parties relating to its subject matter during the term of this Agreement. No right. service mark. If Software is being acquired by or on behalf of the U. No choice of law rules of any jurisdiction will apply.101 and 12. Section 2 (Java(TM) Technology Restrictions) of these Supplemental Terms. 9. limited license to reproduce internally and use Java(TM) 2 SDK Enterprise Edition Version 1. the "Agreement"). 2. You acknowledge that Software is not designed. LICENSE TO USE. CONSEQUENTIAL. Termination. SELECT THE "DECLINE" BUTTON AT THE END OF THIS AGREEMENT. Inc. DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTY. Software is provided "AS IS". Any action related to this Agreement will be governed by California law and controlling U.3_01. unless in writing and signed by an authorized representative of each party. Governing Law. Sun Microsystems. INDICATE YOUR ACCEPTANCE OF THESE TERMS BY SELECTING THE "ACCEPT" BUTTON AT THE END OF THIS AGREEMENT. EVEN IF SUN HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. These Supplemental Terms shall supersede any inconsistent or conflicting terms in the Agreement. BY OPENING THE SOFTWARE MEDIA PACKAGE. If any provision of this Agreement is held to be unenforceable. 6. 4. Binary Code License Agreement READ THE TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT AND ANY PROVIDED SUPPLEMENTAL LICENSE TERMS (COLLECTIVELY "AGREEMENT") CAREFULLY BEFORE OPENING THE SOFTWARE MEDIA PACKAGE. Export Regulations. then the Government’s rights in Software and accompanying documentation will be only as set forth in this Agreement.7202-4 (for Department of Defense (DOD) acquisitions) and with 48 CFR 2. as evidenced by a copy of the receipt. INDIRECT. INCLUDING ANY IMPLIE WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY. The foregoing limitations will apply even if the above stated warranty fails of its essential purpose. Government Restricted Rights. in which case this Agreement will immediately terminate. Sun grants you a non-exclusive and non-transferable license for the internal use only of the accompanying software and documentation and any error corrections provided by Sun (collectively "Software"). No modification of this Agreement will be binding.106 | Third Party Software License Agreements Third Party Software License Agreements The following are the software licenses for the Third Party Software provided in connection with the software. 5. It supersedes all prior or contemporaneous oral or written communications. INABILITY TO USE SOFTWARE. operation or maintenance of any nuclear facility. whether in contract. the media on which Software is furnished (if any) will be free of defects in materials and workmanship under normal use. Sun disclaims any express or implied warranty of fitness for such uses.212 (for non-DOD acquisitions). U. Government or by a U. you may not make copies of Software. Unless enforcement is prohibited by applicable law. LIMITATION OF LIABILITY. exceed the amount paid by you for Software under this Agreement. IF THE SOFTWARE IS ACCESSED ELECTRONICALLY. proposals. Integration. or otherwise. Except as specifically authorized in any Supplemental License Terms. other than a single copy of Software for archival purposes. unless omission would frustrate the intent of the parties. 10.S. This Agreement is the entire agreement between you and Sun relating to its subject matter. ALL EXPRESS OR IMPLIED CONDITIONS. 8. Software Internal Use and Development License Grant. Severability. Sun grants you a non-exclusive.x. logo or trade name of Sun or its licensors is granted under this Agreement. Your exclusive remedy and Sun’s entire liability under this limited warranty will be at Sun’s option to replace Software media or refund the fee paid for Software. IN NO EVENT WILL SUN OR ITS LICENSORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY LOST REVENUE. LIMITED WARRANTY.7201 through 227. Except for the foregoing. 1. tort (including negligence). Enterprise Edition (J2EE). YOU AGREE TO THE TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT. this Agreement will remain in effect with the provision omitted. Software is confidential and copyrighted. Reference Implementation SUPPLEMENTAL LICENSE TERMS These supplemental license terms ("Supplemental Terms") add to or modify the terms of the Binary Code License Agreement (collectively. You agree to comply strictly with all such laws and regulations and acknowledge that you have the responsibility to obtain such licenses to export. TO THE EXTENT NOT PROHIBITED BY LAW. This Agreement is effective until terminated. RESTRICTIONS. order. PROFIT OR DATA. construction. In no event will Sun’s liability to you. Java(TM) 2. federal law. PROMPTLY RETURN THE UNUSED SOFTWARE TO YOUR PLACE OF PURCHASE FOR A REFUND OR. including. this is in accordance with 48 CFR 227. FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR NON-INFRINGEMENT ARE DISCLAIMED. EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THAT THESE DISCLAIMERS ARE HELD TO BE LEGALLY INVALID. ARISING OUT OF OR RELATED TO THE USE OF OR TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . OR FOR SPECIAL. INCIDENTAL OR PUNITIVE DAMAGES.S. you may not modify. IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO ALL THESE TERMS. Title to Software and all associated intellectual property rights is retained by Sun and/or its licensors. All Software and technical data delivered under this Agreement are subject to US export control laws and may be subject to export or import regulations in other countries. but not limited to. This Agreement will terminate immediately without notice from Sun if you fail to comply with any provision of this Agreement. you must destroy all copies of Software. or in any license contained within the Software. Subject to the terms and conditions of this Agreement. HOWEVER CAUSED REGARDLESS OF THE THEORY OF LIABILITY. decompile. Version 1. Sun warrants to you that for a period of ninety (90) days from the date of purchase. 3. by the number of users and the class of computer hardware for which the corresponding fee has been paid. title or interest in or to any trademark. Capitalized terms not defined in these Supplemental Terms shall have the same meanings ascribed to them in the Agreement. re-export. 1. 7. Government prime contractor or subcontractor (at any tier). 11. or import as may be required after delivery to you. IF YOU ARE ACCESSING THE SOFTWARE ELECTRONICALLY. You may terminate this Agreement at any time by destroying all copies of Software. licensed or intended for use in the design. representations and warranties and prevails over any conflicting or additional terms of any quote.S. acknowledgment.

INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY. you may not make copies of Software. INDICATE YOUR ACCEPTANCE OF THESE TERMS BY SELECTING THE "ACCEPT" BUTTON AT THE END OF THIS AGREEMENT. You may not modify the Java Platform Interface ("JPI". CONSEQUENTIAL. OR FOR SPECIAL. 4. 1. complete and unmodified. ARISING OUT OF OR RELATED TO THE USE OF OR INABILITY TO USE SOFTWARE. Export Regulations.0. Except for the foregoing. Upon Termination. Except as specifically authorized in any Supplemental License Terms.S. JAVA. INDIRECT. You agree to comply strictly with all such laws and regulations and acknowledge that you have the responsibility to obtain such licenses to export. If Software is being acquired by or on behalf of the U. 2. Binary Code License Agreement READ THE TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT AND ANY PROVIDED SUPPLEMENTAL LICENSE TERMS (COLLECTIVELY "AGREEMENT") CAREFULLY BEFORE OPENING THE SOFTWARE MEDIA PACKAGE. EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THAT THESE DISCLAIMERS ARE HELD TO BE LEGALLY INVALID.com/policies/trademarks. construction. Trademarks and Logos. Either party may terminate this Agreement immediately should any Software become. This Agreement will terminate immediately without notice from Sun if you fail to comply with any provision of this Agreement. tort (including negligence). LIMITED WARRANTY. UNLESS SPECIFIED IN THIS AGREEMENT. Government prime contractor or subcontractor (at any tier). or authorize your licensees to create additional classes. This Agreement is effective until terminated. FORTE.java.S. the subject of a claim of infringement of any intellectual property right. Sun warrants to you that for a period of ninety (90) days from the date of purchase. you may not modify. All Software and technical data delivered under this Agreement are subject to US export control laws and may be subject to export or import regulations in other countries. LICENSE TO USE. service marks. FORTE. JAVA. Software is confidential and copyrighted. You acknowledge that Software is not designed.sun. YOU AGREE TO THE TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT. EVEN IF SUN HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. other than a single copy of Software for archival purposes. Source Code. 901 San Antonio Road. re-export. decompile. RESTRICTIONS. exceed the amount paid by you for Software under this Agreement.html) for the availability of runtime code which may be distributed with Programs.1 Sun Microsystems. Inc. Sun disclaims any express or implied warranty of fitness for such uses. You may not create. or in either party’s opinion be likely to become. or import as may be required after delivery to you. 6. or reverse engineer Software. then the Government’s rights in Software and accompanying documentation will be only as set forth in this Agreement. TO THE EXTENT NOT PROHIBITED BY LAW. or subpackages that are in any way identified as "java". IF THE SOFTWARE IS ACCESSED ELECTRONICALLY.sun. for the sole purpose of designing. LIMITATION OF LIABILITY. logos and other brand designations ("Sun Marks"). Your exclusive remedy and Sun’s entire liability under this limited warranty will be at Sun’s option to replace Software media or refund the fee paid for Software. In no event will Sun’s liability to you. REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES. "sun" or similar convention as specified by Sun in any naming convention designation. PROFIT OR DATA. you must destroy all copies of Software. operation or maintenance of any nuclear facility. Unless enforcement is prohibited by applicable law. You acknowledge and agree as between you and Sun that Sun owns the SUN. PROMPTLY RETURN THE UNUSED SOFTWARE TO YOUR PLACE OF PURCHASE FOR A REFUND OR. either separately or included with any Programs. SELECT THE "DECLINE" BUTTON AT THE END OF THIS AGREEMENT. as evidenced by a copy of the receipt. 6. 8. JINI. 5. 3. by the number of users and the class of computer hardware for which the corresponding fee has been paid. or otherwise. U. Title to Software and all associated intellectual property rights is retained by Sun and/or its licensors. IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO ALL THESE TERMS. 5. FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR NON-INFRINGEMENT ARE DISCLAIMED. identified as classes contained within the "java" package or any subpackages of the "java" package). and iPLANET-related trademarks. Any use you make of the Sun Marks inures to Sun’s benefit. provided that you do not redistribute the Software in whole or in part. Software may contain source code that is provided solely for reference purposes pursuant to the terms of this Agreement. you must promptly publish broadly an accurate specification for such API for free use by all developers. title or interest in or to any trademark. interfaces.Third Party Software License Agreements 107 | internally the binary form of the Software. licensed or intended for use in the design. Inc. Sun grants you a non-exclusive and non-transferable license for the internal use only of the accompanying software and documentation and any error corrections provided by Sun (collectively "Software"). Termination. In the event that you create an additional class and associated API(s) which (i) extends the functionality of the Java Platform. whether in contract. developing and testing your Java applets and applications ("Programs"). California 94303 (LFI#100107/Form ID#011801) JavaTM APIs for XML Processing (JAXP) 1. Java Runtime Availability. SOLARIS. "javax". Software is provided "AS IS". by creating additional classes within the JPI or otherwise causing the addition to or modification of the classes in the JPI. The foregoing limitations will apply even if the above stated warranty fails of its essential purpose. For inquiries please contact: Sun Microsystems. 3. BY OPENING THE SOFTWARE MEDIA PACKAGE. IN NO EVENT WILL SUN OR ITS LICENSORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY LOST REVENUE. You may terminate this Agreement at any time by destroying all copies of Software. Source code may not be redistributed unless expressly provided for in this Agreement. the media on which Software is furnished (if any) will be free of defects in materials and workmanship under normal use. HOWEVER CAUSED REGARDLESS OF THE THEORY OF LIABILITY. 4. Government or by a U. SOLARIS. logo or trade name of Sun or its licensors is granted under this Agreement. DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTY. ALL EXPRESS OR IMPLIED CONDITIONS.S. this is in accordance with 48 CFR TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . Termination for Infringement. INCIDENTAL OR PUNITIVE DAMAGES. Refer to the appropriate version of the Java Runtime Environment binary code license (currently located at http://www. Government Restricted Rights. and iPLANET trademarks and all SUN. service mark. and you agree to comply with the Sun Trademark and Logo Usage Requirements currently located at http://www. Java Technology Restrictions. No right. 2. IF YOU ARE ACCESSING THE SOFTWARE ELECTRONICALLY. Palo Alto.com/jdk/index. 7. JINI. and (ii) is exposed to third party software developers for the purpose of developing additional software which invokes such additional API.

jar" ("XML JAR Files") to third party end users solely as a component of your Programs provided that you: (a)(i) distribute the XML JAR Files complete and unmodified in their original Java Archive file. All rights reserved. hold harmless. Inc.jar" and "parser. or authorize your licensees to create. b." "javax" or "sun" packages. proposals. (i) You may not modify the Java Platform Interface ("JPI". (iii) You may not create.108 | Third Party Software License Agreements 227.sun.0 SUPPLEMENTAL LICENSE TERMS These supplemental license terms ("Supplement") add to or modify the terms of the Binary Code License Agreement (collectively. and (b) is exposed to third party software developers for the purpose of developing additional software which invokes such additional API. that arise or result from the use or distribution of any and all Programs. 901 San Antonio Road. 9. except with respect to the Service Bundles. you must promptly publish broadly an accurate specification for such API for free use by all developers. 11. 5. including attorney’s fees. It supersedes all prior or contemporaneous oral or written communications. No choice of law rules of any jurisdiction will apply. Java Platform Interface. unless omission would frustrate the intent of the parties.7201 through 227. and defend Sun and its licensors from and against any claims or lawsuits.com/policies/trademarks. and (ii) is distributed to third party software developers for the purpose of developing software which invokes such additional API. the "Agreement"). or other communication between the parties relating to its subject matter during the term of this Agreement. California 94303 JAVA(TM) DEVELOPMENT OPTIONAL PACKAGES JAVA(TM) API FOR XML PARSING. and (e) agree to indemnify. 3. by creating additional classes within the JPI or otherwise causing the addition to or modification of the classes in the JPI. federal law. Any use you make of the Java Marks inures to Sun’s benefit. VERSION 1. (ii) In the event that you create an additional class and associated API(s) which (a) extends the functionality of a Java Environment. Sun grants to you a limited license to view only the source code included in Software for purposes of internal evaluation only. as specified by Sun in any naming convention. 10.212 (for non-DOD acquisitions). logos and other brand designations including the Coffee Cup logo and Duke logo ("Java Marks"). Limited License for Source Code. representations and warranties and prevails over any conflicting or additional terms of any quote. Integration. or subpackages that are in any way identified as "java". Trademarks and Logos. 4.101 and 12. or authorize your licensees to create additional classes. 6. royalty-free limited license to reproduce and distribute the classes Java(TM) API for XML parsing classes. Any action related to this Agreement will be governed by California law and controlling U.S. 1. Version 1.1 Copyright (C) 1999 The Apache Software Foundation. you must promptly and broadly publish an accurate specification for such API for free use by all developers. Capitalized terms not defined in this Supplement shall have the same meanings ascribed to them in the Agreement. contained in the Software in the archive files "jaxp. These Supplement terms shall supersede any inconsistent or conflicting terms in the Agreement. "javax" or "sun" or similar as specified by Sun in any class file naming convention designation.1. are permitted provided that the following conditions are met: TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .jar Version 1. and do not distribute additional software intended to replace any component(s) of the XML JAR Files. settlement amounts and/or expenses (including attorneys’ fees) incurred in connection with any claim. You may not modify. additional classes. Sun grants you a non-exclusive. (c) only distribute the XML JAR! Files pursuant to a license agreement that protects Sun’s interests consistent with the terms contained in the Agreement. You acknowledge and agree as between you and Sun that Sun owns the Java trademark and all Java-related trademarks. For inquiries please contact: Sun Microsystems. non-transferable. you agree: a. in which case this Agreement will immediately terminate. Sun grants you a non-exclusive. unless in writing and signed by an authorized representative of each party. 2 and 3 above. non-transferable. alternatively (ii) distribute the archive file "jaxp. In exchange for the licenses granted in Paragraphs 1. acknowledgment. If any provision of this Agreement is held to be unenforceable. or in any license contained within the Software. or.3 The Apache Software License. in the event that you create an API(s) which: (i) extends the functionality of a Java platform. liabilities. hold harmless. this Agreement will remain in effect with the provision omitted. that. (d) agree to incorporate the most current version of the XML JAR Files that was available from Sun no later than 180 days prior to each production release of your Program. in binary form. Severability. order. either separately or included in any Program except as authorized for the Java(TM) API for XML parsing JAR Files as specified in Section 2 below. or similarly named package. Palo Alto. 2. and you agree to comply with the Sun Trademark and Logo Usage Requirements currently located at http://www. including attorney’s fees. and defend Sun and its licensors from and against any claims or lawsuits. that arise or result from the use or distribution of any and all Programs. and (ii) agree to indemnify. costs. Requirements. Redistribution and use in source and binary forms.jar".jar" without the archive file "parser.7202-4 (for Department of Defense (DOD) acquisitions) and with 48 CFR 2. log4. identified as classes contained within the "java" package or any subpackages of the "java" package). distribute or use the source code for any other purpose. This Agreement is the entire agreement between you and Sun relating to its subject matter. License to Develop. No modification of this Agreement will be binding. and (b) do not remove or alter any proprietary legends or notices contained in or on the Software. service marks. to defend and indemnify Sun and its licensors from and against any damages. interfaces or subpackages that are contained in the "java. and c. with or without modification. royalty-free limited license to use the Software in binary form for the development of Java(TM) API for XML Parsing compatible parsers (the "Programs") and reproduce and distribute the Programs to third party end users provided that you: (i) do not redistribute the Software in whole or in part. lawsuit or action by any third party that arises or results from the use or distribution of any and all Programs and/or Software. not to create.jar" but with a parser implementation that is compliant with the JAXP specification and do not distribute additional software intended to replace any components of the archive file "jaxp. License to Distribute. Governing Law. interfaces.

apache. International Business Machines.apache. without prior written permission of the Apache Software Foundation. WHETHER IN CONTRACT. 5.jar Version 1." Alternately. OR PROFITS. BUT NOT LIMITED TO. without prior written permission of the Apache Software Foundation. Redistribution and use in source and binary forms. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice. this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution. All rights reserved.2. OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY. EXEMPLARY. this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution. INCLUDING. Products derived from this software may not be called "Apache". The names "log4j" and "Apache Software Foundation" must not be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without prior written permission. INDIRECT. OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING. For written permission. please contact apache@apache." TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . please contact apache@apache. DATA. OR PROFITS. LOSS OF USE. The names "Xerces" and "Apache Software Foundation" must not be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without prior written permission. EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE. This software consists of voluntary contributions made by many individuals on behalf of the Apache Software Foundation. 4..Third Party Software License Agreements 109 | 1. if and wherever such third-party acknowledgments normally appear. pertools." Alternately. STRICT LIABILITY. if and wherever such third-party acknowledgments normally appear. DATA. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice. THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ‘ ‘ AS IS’’ AND ANY EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES.org/>. 5. nor may "Apache" appear in their name.org/). STRICT LIABILITY. must include the following acknowledgment: "This product includes software developed by the Apache Software Foundation (http://www. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE APACHE SOFTWARE FOUNDATION OR ITS CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT. PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES. this acknowledgment may appear in the software itself. nor may "Apache" appear in their name. 3. Version 1. are permitted provided that the following conditions are met: 1. BUT NOT LIMITED TO.org/). Alternately. OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE. SPECIAL.D10 The Apache Software License. please see <http://www. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE APACHE SOFTWARE FOUNDATION OR ITS CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT.apache.1 Copyright (c) 1999-2000 The Apache Software Foundation.com.org/). WHETHER IN CONTRACT. The end-user documentation included with the redistribution. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice. PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES.org. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice. 4. THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. EXEMPLARY. BUT NOT LIMITED TO. if and wherever such third-party acknowledgments normally appear. if any. if any. this acknowledgment may appear in the software itself. LOSS OF USE. 3. OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY. this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.1 Copyright (c) 2000 The Apache Software Foundation. this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.org. =============================================== This software consists of voluntary contributions made by many individuals on behalf of the Apache Software Foundation and was originally based on software copyright (c) 1999. The end-user documentation included with the redistribution. For more information on the Apache Software Foundation. Xalan-J 2. Products derived from this software may not be called "Apache". Redistribution and use in source and binary forms. please see <http://www. 2. please contact apache@apache. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice. For more information on the Apache Software Foundation. if any. INDIRECT.org/>. The names "Apache" and "Apache Software Foundation". THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ‘ ‘ AS IS’’ AND ANY EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES. All rights reserved. 3. OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING. must include the following acknowledgment: "This product includes software developed by the Apache Software Foundation (http://www. 4.2. with or without modification. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice. BUT NOT LIMITED TO. Inc. 2.org.ibm.0a The Apache Software License. this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution. The end-user documentation included with the redistribution. with or without modification. are permitted provided that the following conditions are met: 1. http://www. EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE. 2. For written permission.apache. "Jakarta-Oro" must not be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without prior written permission. this acknowledgment may appear in the software itself. SPECIAL. INCIDENTAL. this list of conditions and the following disclaimer. Version 1. must include the following acknowledgment: "This product includes software developed by the Apache Software Foundation (http://www. For written permission. OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE. INCIDENTAL.apache. INCLUDING.

INCIDENTAL. =================================================== This software consists of voluntary contributions made by many individuals on behalf of the Apache Software Foundation. EXEMPLARY. DATA.Redistributions of source code must retain the copyright notice. INDIRECT. this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution. INDIRECT. WHETHER IN CONTRACT. We appreciate his contributions. WHETHER IN CONTRACT. INCLUDING. OR PROFITS. PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES. THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE CRYPTIX FOUNDATION LIMITED AND CONTRIBUTORS ``AS IS'' AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES.110 | Third Party Software License Agreements 5. 2.2.0 Cryptix JCE Cryptix General License Copyright © 1995-2001 The Cryptix Foundation Limited. Products derived from this software may not be called "Apache" or "Jakarta-Oro". IN NO EVENT SHALL THE CRYPTIX FOUNDATION LIMITED OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT. EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.apache. OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY. Redistribution and use in source and binary forms. For more information on the Apache Software Foundation. THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES. OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE. nor may "Apache" or "Jakarta-Oro" appear in their name.Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice. without prior written permission of the Apache Software Foundation. STRICT LIABILITY. BUT NOT LIMITED TO. BUT NOT LIMITED TO. OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY. are permitted provided that the following conditions are met: 1. EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE. SPECIAL. DATA. INCLUDING. THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ‘ ‘ AS IS’’ AND ANY EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES. OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING. STRICT LIABILITY.org/>. OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE. OR PROFITS. Cryptix 3. with or without modification. EXEMPLARY. INCIDENTAL. SPECIAL. Savarese. this list of conditions and the following disclaimer. OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING. LOSS OF USE. LOSS OF USE. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE APACHE SOFTWARE FOUNDATION OR ITS CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT. please see <http://www. TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . All rights reserved. THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. BUT NOT LIMITED TO. Portions of this software are based upon software originally written by Daniel F. BUT NOT LIMITED TO.

59 overview 20 run-time adapter 62 adding activities 71 adding deployment configuration information 86 adding process starter 70 adding transitions 74 administration component 53 administration domain 9. 21 accessing from process 63 configuring 62 design-time adapter 60 features 21 installing 54. 44. 94 analysis 29 business events 45 problem definition 40 application integration 2 architecture 12 design-time 14 run-time 17 assigning software 83 authentication 11 authorization 11 B business integration elements 19 business processes 22. 74 configuration adapter service 58 deployment 24. 86 overview 33 run-time adapters 62 conventions used in this manual xi creating administration domain 83 creating process definitions 69 creating projects 85 creating transitions 74 customer support xii D data mapping 22. 83 administration server 50. 63 configuration steps 58 adapters 20. 75 data transformation 75 debugging projects 85 deployed projects management 11 monitoring 11 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts . 50. 66 design 46 modelling 22 C components identifying 42 run-time 53 conditional transitions 74 conditions 43.| 111 Index A activities accessing services 42 adding 71 data mapping data 75 data transformation 75 grouping 76 transitions 74 adapter service 57.

75 messaging 19 methodology introduction 28 modelling of business process 22 monitoring introduction 92 projects 11 run-time 25 E exceptions 44 extensibility 13 F fault tolerance 37 fault-tolerance 25 features adapters 21 P palettes overview 16 populating administration domain 83 problem definition 40 process definitions 69 process modelling 22 process starter 70 processes 66 design 35. 13. 24 mapping 22. 46. 50 creating 83 setup 30 installation adapters 54. 44. 59 overview 30 TIBCO BusinessWorks 52 integrated development environment 13 integration 2 benefits 2 platform requirements 3 invocation modes 56 M management run-time 25 managing deployed projects 11 manual activity 5.112 | Index deployment 37 configuration 24 configuration information 86 introduction 80 steps 82 design 35 business processes 46 steps 67 design-time adapter 60 design-time architecture 14 development environment IDE 13 domains 9. 66 design steps 67 identifying 41 starter 70 testing 77 G grouping activities 76 I identifying components 42 identifying processes 41 InConcert 13 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .

50 TIBCO administration server 50. 94 TIBCO Administrator 8 TIBCO BusinessWorks adapters 21 installing 52 introduction 8 TIBCO BusinessWorks services introduction 56 TIBCO Designer 8 TIBCO InConcert 8. 74 R resources 16 shared 68 software 83 run-time agent 51 run-time architecture 17 run-time components 53 run-time management 25 run-time monitoring 25. contacting xii U user management 94 W web services 57 workflow 5. 23 security 8. 11 user management 94 sending messages 19 server 50. 52 tracing 98 transformation 75 transitions 43. 98 S scalability 13 schema 22. 51. 24 TIBCO Runtime Agent 8 TIBCO run-time agent 51 TRA 8. 94 services activities 42 adapter 63 characteristics 56 configuration 33 introduction 56 types 57 web services 57 setting up design-time adapter 60 shared resources 68 software resources 83 standards 12 starter 70 support. 13.Index 113 | production 38 projects 15 creating 85 extensibility 13 life cycle 81 scalability 13 testing 85 T technical support xii testing processes 77 testing projects 85 TIBCO Administration Domain 52 TIBCO administration domain 9. 24 TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .

114 | Index TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts .