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Window Shopping

Window Shopping

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³STUDY OF STUDENTS¶ PERCEPTION TOWARDS WINDOW SHOPPING´

MAJOR RESEARCH PROJECT SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTERS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Research Guide:

Submitted By:

Student¶s Declaration
I Nitin Garg hereby declare that the Project Work titled ³A study of students¶ perception towards window shopping´, is the original work done by me and submitted to DAVV, Indore in partial fulfillment of requirements for the award of Master of Business Administration under the supervision of Dr. Gupta of Indore.

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Further I hereby declare that the work done by me can be used for academic purposes.

Roll No: 09160334

Date:

Signature of the Student

CERTIFICATE

This to certify that the report of the project submitted is the outcome of the project work entitled ³Study of Students¶ Perception Towards Window Shopping ´ carried out by Nitin
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Garg carried by under my guidance and supervision for the award of Degree in Master of Business Administration of Devi Ahilya Vishwavidhyalya Indore (MP). To the best of the my knowledge the report i) ii) Has duly been completed, Fulfils the requirement of the ordinance relating to the MBA degree of the University and iii) Is up to the desired standard for the purpose of which is submitted.

Dr. Gupta

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

It gives me immense pleasure to acknowledge and thank all those who have given consistent guidance, advice and encouragement in our endeavor. I would also like to thank all those persons who have spent their valuable time to contribute the required information to me and
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gave me support while preparing this report.

I gratefully acknowledge our sincere gratitude to Dr. Gupta for his kind guidance and helpful suggestions in every stage of the preparation of this report.

TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter-1: Abstract Chapter -2: Introduction
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Chapter-3: Aim and Objective Chapter -4: Theoretical Framework Chapter -5: Literature Review Chapter-6: Methodology Chapter-7: Analysis and Interpretation Chapter-8: Finding and Conclusions Chapter-9: Limitations Chapter-10: Bibliography

APPENDIX

LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES

Serial. No 1

Title Table no. 1 & fig no.1.1

Page No. Page no.29
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6 & fig no.2.12 & fig No.1.3 Page no.1.34 Page no.1.40 Page no. 11 & fig no.33 Page no. 3 & fig no.2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Table no.32 Page no.1. 2 & fig no. 1.2 Table no.2 Table no.2. 1.12 & fig No.7 Table no.1. 4 & fig no. 7 & fig no.2. 8 & fig no. 10 & fig no.1.31 Page no.9 Table no.1. 5 & fig no.8 Table no.4 Table no.3 Table no.1. 9 & fig no.38 Page no.1.6 Table no.1.39 Page no.37 Page no.30 Page no.1 Table no.41 6|P a ge .3 Table no.2.36 Page no.5 Table no.35 Page no.

Chapter ± 1 ABSTRACT Abstract This research describes student¶s perception towards window shopping. through its innovative practices. 7|P a ge . It has been primarily responsible.

Various kinds of perceptions of students on window shopping is involved in this survey. sampling region. This study lead to ‡ successfully find out students perception about Merchandising. sample size. Lighting system 8|P a ge . Then the findings of the research that has been conducted is mentioned. Then suggestions & recommendations regarding the topic is given. pie charts etc to record perception and analyze the data. The inputs were analyzed using Charts. sampling procedure is described. graphs. In this research efforts are put to understand the perception of students towards window shopping. Point of Sale.This paper draws various lessons that would be useful to cooperatives globally as well as firms that are interested in doing business in large emerging markets like India and China. In this report. the sample unit. a brief review about retailing industry sector as a whole is given.. The sample size for the survey is 100. Then findings of the survey are stated. All the respondents were students of undergraduate and post graduate level.e. Research methodology i. Then Analysis of data collected by Questionnaire is done. The study involved a survey in city of Indore in few colleges and coaching institutes.

‡ Successfully find out differences in perception about Merchandising. 9|P a ge . Point of Sale. Lighting between male and female.‡ Successfully find out differences in perception about Merchandising. and Lighting between UG and PG Students. Point of Sale.

Main Body 1. Introduction Perception: 10 | P a g e .Chapter ± 2 INTRODUCTION B.

However. organizing. Instead. or to plan a later purchase. In order to receive the full benefit. It represents the psychological process whereby people take information from the environment and make sense of their world. interpret and respond to information to the world around them. retrieve. Perception. it is important to pursue windows shopping at a leisurely pace. is ³the process by which people select. True window shopping is an activity that is never hurried. Perception allows people to formulate impressions about themselves and others. interpreting. This information is gathered from the five senses. taste and smell. It is the process of interpreting what information our senses provide to us as to give meaning to the environment we are in. organize. Hunt. the focus is on enjoying the wares displayed in the windows. hearing. possibly just to pass the time between other activities. Many factors influence perception. It is the way that we organize information about people and things. as described by Schermerhorn. checking and reacting to sensory stimuli and data. and Osborn (2000). organize. and perceptual responses differ from person to person. selecting.sight. Perception is the psychological process of creating an internal picture of the external picture. Perception is an important mediating cognitive process through which persons make interpretations of the stimulus or situation they are faced with.Perception is the process by which individuals organize and interpret their sensory impressions in order to give meaning to their environment. as 11 | P a g e . touch. interpret. what we perceive can be substantially different from objective reality. and respond to information from the world around them´). the attribution of properties to them on the basis of the information and the way we make cause/effect attributions about them. Perception is the process by which people select. Perception can be defined as the process of receiving. The typical window shopper is not concerned with how many window displays are observed or how much time is spent enjoying each of the displays. "Window shopping" is an activity that shoppers engage in by browsing shops with no intent to purchase.

12 | P a g e . all these jobs can be performed at the same time. TV programs. people had to make a choice among shopping. under the same roof and that too with a wonderful experience. This means that anyone. And it is basically the experience and not the intention that counts when it comes to malls. science. books. One of the greatest attractions of window shopping is that the activity does not cost anything. get ideas for displays that can be used at home. window shopping primarily involves observations leading to intelligent choices---selected topics on relationships. or to collect some inspiration for future gift giving. regardless of current financial status. culture. movies or hanging out on a holiday but thanks to our malls. films and a lot more. The process involves walking through a shopping district or mall with the express purpose of looking at the window displays for each retail store in the area. People find these malls to be the best place to shop or hang out in summer heat as they offer free entry to a completely air conditioned complex with good music playing all around and loads of window shopping opportunity which is appreciated by one and all. Retailers are sprucing up their store window displays in a bid to stand out from the crowd. Just a few years back. beliefs. music. in that people on limited budgets are much less likely to make impulse buys if they remain outside the store. can go on a window shopping expedition. The activity is generally considered to be safer. People may choose to window shop as a way to pass the time.well as making note of the way each shop owner chooses to display all the items included in the presentation. home deals. travel. Mall culture in India and especially in metro cities has grown with an incredible pace.

13 | P a g e .Chapter ± 3 AIMS & OBJECTIVES Aim:  To know the perception of students towards window shopping.

Point of Sale. Lighting between UG and PG Students. 14 | P a g e . Lighting between male and female. Lighting system  To find out differences in perception about Merchandising.  To find out differences in perception about Merchandising. Point of Sale. Point of Sale.Objective: The main objectives of the study are:-  To find out students perception about Merchandising.

At a retail in-store level. In the broadest sense. practices. merchandising is any practice which contributes to the sale of products to a retail consumer.Chapter ± 4 THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK Theoretical frame work Merchandising Merchandising is the methods. and operations used to promote and sustain certain categories of commercial activity. merchandising 15 | P a g e .

visual display merchandising means maximizing merchandise sales using product design. mobiles. 16 | P a g e . They are intended to draw the customers' attention to products.refers to the variety of products available for sale and the display of those products in such a way that it stimulates interest and entices customers to make a purchase. or next to a checkout counter (the "point of sale"). skylights. Day lighting (through windows. This includes disciplines in pricing and discounting. dummy packs. In retail commerce. or on special offer. and banners. which may be new products. physical presentation of products and displays. packaging. e. etc. on.) is often used as the main source of light during daytime in buildings given its high quality and low cost. and the decisions about which products should be presented to which customers at what time. Lighting includes use of both artificial light sources such as lamps and natural illumination of interiors from daylight. seasonal or holiday-time sales. pricing. display stands. and are also used to promote special events. Lighting system Lighting or illumination is the deliberate application of light to achieve some aesthetic or practical effect. selection. and display that stimulates consumers to spend more. display packs.g. Point of sales A point-of-sale display (POS) is a specialized form of sales promotion that is found near. posters. POS displays can include shelf edging. POS can also refer to systems used to record transactions between the customer and the commerce.

but gas lighting. and a key part of interior design. while there can be energy wastage and adverse health effects of poorly designed lighting. and still are used in certain situations. Proper lighting can enhance task performance or aesthetics. Indoor lighting is a form of fixture or furnishing. Artificial lighting is most commonly provided today by electric lights. 17 | P a g e . candles.Artificial lighting represents a major component of energy consumption. Lighting can also be an intrinsic component of landscaping. or oil lamps were used in the past. accounting for a significant part of all energy consumed worldwide.

systematically switching between various modes of inquiry to understand and evaluate evidence of student learning in interdisciplinary courses.Chapter ± 5 LITERATURE REVIEW Review of Related Literature Window Shopping: Fashioning a Scholarship of Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning (Colleen M. Because interdisciplinary by nature is epistemologically flexible and often yields fluid 18 | P a g e . Tremonte) [1] Tremonte proposes the practice of window shopping.

Before then. In addition. This essay addresses this problem. Tower Records 19 | P a g e . Eventually the practice of window shopping gives way to the critical shopper: a scholar adapt and rehearsed in identifying.subject matter content. and the Apple store all embody the magic. consumer owned. These cathedrals of consumption create enticing experiences that the consumer cannot resist. search engines. particularly in respect to the issue of µnovice-stry¶. merchant owned. fantasy. rather it is a practice for systematically. is not an act of cavalierly embracing multiple disciplinary or interdisciplinary methods in the study of practice. it can complicate (and dissuade) scholars from undertaking SoTL(Scholarship of Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning). URLs. interactive window shopping is the key keeping enchantment alive within cathedrals of consumption. A matrix proposes four different categories of searching: partnership. and controlled or uncontrolled. window shopping makes available to those of us who may feel constrained by our (inter)disciplinary expertise²and who fear novice-stry²the means by which we can approach and undertake SoTL. µWindow¶ shopping and browsing opportunities in cyberspace (Jennifer Rowley. however. from the consumer's perspective. Browsing may be both intentional and unintentional. and no-one's land Interactive window shopping: enchantment in a rationalized world(Julie Marshall) [3]: In a world mediated by technology. Borders. Window shopping. thus.) [2] Professor Rowley reviews in his article that the integral nature of browsing to the shopping experience and then explores the different types of browsing and searching that are supported in the online environment. documenting and publically disseminating evidence of interdisciplinary learning and understanding across contexts. on the merchant's part. it offers window shopping as a practice that can support instructors grappling with what constitutes actual µdata¶ of substantive interdisciplinary learning intimately connected to local contexts and pedagogic reasoning. Tower Records. Browsing contexts and episodes occur when consumers use browsers. and mystery found in traditional cathedrals of consumption but with the rise of technology and a more efficient means of consumption consumers are now more likely to visit treat these locations as an interactive advertisement ± a playground for adults. menu categories and shopping bots to identify merchants and products.

M.symbolizes an oasis of consumption. and Internet window-shopping. Internet distrust. While the technology to target consumers with product choices is developing. Swinyard ) [5] Online surveys in the US and Belgium were conducted to cross-culturally validate the Internet shopper lifestyle scale (Smith and Swinyard. Tower Records expects people consumers to purchase their products however. it¶s now more important than ever that online retailers focus on human psychology rather than analytics if they are to get their share of the online consumer¶s wallet. ethnographic observational research and the application of insights gained from traditional psychology. 2001). This should take the form of online user surveys. Internet offer. Online retailers should be developing a deeper understanding of their customers¶ motivations. Internet logistics. Except from having the same basic meaning and structure in Belgium as in the US. (Brengman. S. technology creates new locations of consumption that are more efficient. Bert Weijters. Segmenting Internet shoppers based on their web-usage-related lifestyle: a cross-cultural validation. But abandonment rates should not be held as a primary indicator of an online store¶s success rate. In both countries. and closely resembles a traditional location of consumption where the consumption of goods is expected. the Web-usage-related-lifestyle scale also 20 | P a g e . Maggie Geuens. Shop µtil they drop.An insight into shopping basket abandonment (Karen Renaud & Tunde Cockshott) [4] Karen Renaud concluded that customers become more savvy online. creating methods of identifying them in order to implement tools and techniques specifically for their behavior model to dissuade abandonment. While window shoppers will remain a fact of life in the real and virtual world. construct and measurement equivalence. online retailers should be looking at the psychology of shoppers rather than just relying on technology related to behavioral targeting. perceived self-inefficacy. Special attention was devoted to sample. it seems inevitable that all customers will eventually abandon. the same six basic dimensions were found to underlie the scale: Internet convenience. Smithand R. navigating easily around a variety of online stores.

in many successful firms. but may be directly linked to their human resource policies and practices. an overall score is available. helping them in building and sustaining competitive advantages. has been developed according to the ranking principle. According to Internet and Mobile Association of India (IAMAI) " Window shoppers demonstrate how widespread this phenomenon is: while 55% of the 3. where firms and organizations are trying to gain a competitive advantage and to succeed in global markets. and since human resources¶ issues is a very significant section in every business plan. In other words. In this context. It's only a matter of time before they begin to buy online following their online 21 | P a g e . Four online shopping segments (Tentative Shoppers. This approach. Window shopping is very common. Shopping Lovers and Business Users) and four online non shopping segments (Fearful Browsers. Internet attitude. the most valuable strategic advantages may not involve technology or marketing strategy. In the challenging and rapidly changing economic environment. which is a relative one. it is inexpensive to be developed and to be applied.led to the same segments in both countries. Suspicious Learners. nothing is more important than planning and specifically developing a business plan. Turkish consumers who score on this factor enjoy shopping and perceive shopping as recreational activity. On the other hand. presenting the basic features of this kind of techniques: it is based on general factors with few specifics. 45% visited online shopping sites without buying anything. the present work aims to provide an approach for the appraisal of human resources performance that could be deployed in business plans development. Positive Technology Muddlers. themes of Internet Usage. A business plan is an integral part of strategically managing businesses. In Turkey most stores are small and people enjoy doing ³window shopping´. the role of all levels employees in organizations¶ effectiveness is apparent.099 respondents we surveyed had indeed bought something online. Negative Technology Muddlers and Adventurous Browsers) are profiled with regard to their Web-usage-related lifestyle. They might feel the pressure of overcrowding but at the same time enjoy shopping. psychographic and demographic characteristics Considering Organization¶s Effectiveness in Business Plans: An Approach for Human Resources Performance Evaluation (Dimitrios Georgakellos) [6] According to Georgakellos. while it is usually consistent.

Malls which have entertainment zones and/ or promotional activities have larger foot falls and more percentage of impulse buyers. The window shoppers enjoy shopping offline. generally there are two types of consumers who visit malls ± focused buyers and impulse buyers. The extent to which cyber window shopping has become commonplace is clearly revealed by this report where more than 69% of consumers would like to shop online". Statement of Hypothesis 22 | P a g e . It's also an opportunity for online advertisers.research. Point of Sale and Lightning System. Statement of the Problem The key objective of the research study is to know what are the prospects which turns window shopping into real transaction. This research framework is helpful in providing insight into window shopping with students¶ perception. The other thing which is important to know how window shopping can be beneficial for students. According to Uma Avantsa (Business Writer). but have spent as much time online as shoppers who have already purchased something via the Net. A. Purpose The purpose of this study is to identify factors which help to turn window shopping purposeful into purchase of goods.e. B. C. Merchandising. The behavior of students towards window shopping was analyzed with the help of three variables i. The time spent by focused buyers inside the mall is relatively lower as compared with impulse buyers who spend a lot of time window shopping.

There is no significant difference between perception about Point of sale in UG and PG.There is no significant difference between perception about merchandising in UG and PG. Ho: .Ho: . Ho: . Ho: .There is no significant difference between perception about merchandising in male & female Ho: .There is no significant difference between perception about Point of sale in male & female Ho: . 23 | P a g e .There is no significant difference in perception towards merchandising between male and female students Ho: .There is no significant difference between perception about lighting system in male & female.There is no significant difference between perception about lighting system in UG and PG.

method or concepts. One can also define research as scientific and systematic search for pertinent information on a specific topic. It is based on some given principles. Design of the Study The Study The research in common parlance refers to a search for knowledge.Chapter .6 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 3. It 24 | P a g e . In fact research is an art of scientific investigation.

and UG/PG students) Y stands for perception about window shopping (Merchandising. Fundamental research Quantitative vs. lighting system) The questionnaire was filled up by students of different institutes. Also. All the respondents were students of undergraduate and post graduate level. The study will be mainly based upon the primary data collection. coaching centers and the data was filled in excel sheet on different criterion and was analyzed using pie charts graphs etc B Sources of Data The responses were taken up by students of Indore in few colleges and coaching institutes. in this research it was proposed to evaluate the students¶ perception towards Window Shopping. describing and analyzing the facts related to the study. Further. 25 | P a g e . These responses were taken up by personally meeting them and convinced them to fill up the questionnaire made. The Design was descriptive in nature and an attempt was made to analyze how students perceive the Window Shopping. As such there are various types of research viz: Descriptive vs. Empirical research The study undertaken provides insights into and an understanding of student¶s perception towards Window Shopping. Point of sale. Analytical research Applied vs. The questionnaire was designed to know the opinion of students towards Window Shopping. the research identified and study the factors which influences to buy products while Window Shopping. Qualitative research Conceptual vs. where X Stands for Students (Male/Female. Two variables X (Independent Variable) and Y (dependent Variable) were taken.mainly involves collection. Finally it was lead to find out the prospects of turning window shopping into real transactions to meet the above mentioned objectives.

For example products on top of a box of parts may be a different quality from those at the bottom. An effort was made in this research to analyze the perception of students on Window Shopping. For survey. Use of Convenience sampling will be done to select the Sample Units. The total sample size of this research was 200 from Indore region only. It was selected as the mode of survey to make the study more meaningful & so that maximum information could be collected. It is a sampling method in which units are selected based on easy access/availability. the selection of units from the population is based on easy availability and/or accessibility. 26 | P a g e . For achieving the objectives of study. The respondents were asked to fill some necessary personal information also and the results will be obtained by using standardized likert scales for the measurement which have high reliability and validity. The Sample Size:y The sample consists of 100 graduating students. point of sale. It is also called as Accidental Sampling. C. survey was conducted. In convenience sampling. Sampling Procedures The focus group for this study was student of different colleges/coaching institutes from Indore region only. lighting system variables was created for collecting the primary data to conduct this research. people who are at home when the market researcher calls may not be representative of the entire population. Sampling Technique  Sampling is the process of systematically selecting that which will be examined during the course of a study. The disadvantage of convenience sampling is that the units that are easiest to obtain may not be representative of the population. questionnaires were filled by the engineering students. The questionnaire was structured with open ended and close ended questions.Questionnaire consisting of scales on students and their perception towards merchandising.

That is. a sample population selected because it is readily available and convenient. 27 | P a g e . It may be through meeting the person or including a person in the sample when one meets them or chosen by finding them through technological means such as the internet or through phone.Convenience sampling (sometimes known as grab or opportunity sampling) is a type of non probability sampling which involves the sample being drawn from that part of the population which is close to hand. The researcher using such a sample cannot scientifically make generalizations about the total population from this sample because it would not be representative enough.

CHAPTER 7 ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION GRADUATION STATUS RESPONSES 28 | P a g e .

UG PG 37 63 4. Analysis of data Q. 1. Maximum number of youth visits malls. of responses Fig.I am UG Or PG? TABLE NO. 1 y y y y Most of the respondents are falling in 18-28 years. Students were either pursuing their UG or PG / were just passed out.1:. Sample was selected in a way that there were no respondents in above 30yrs category. 29 | P a g e .1 No.

So. 2 y y y Major portion of respondents are males. NO. 30 | P a g e .I am MALE or FEMALE? TABLE .2 :. There were only 33 female respondents out of 100. 1. of respondents Fig.Q. results will be guided by this factor. 2 GENDER RESPONSES % RESPONSES MALE 67 67 % FEMALE 33 33% No.

Personnel interaction with respondents stated that it is usually on weekends. 1. 24 % go twice in a month and 17% ones in a month. 3. 3 No.:-How many times in a month you go to shopping mall?? Fig. NO.Q. y y y Almost 50% of respondents go out for shopping thrice a month at least. 3 TABLE . of visits to mall RESPONSES % RESPONSES ONCE 17 % 17 TWICE 24% 24 THRICE 10% 10 MORE THAN THREE TIMES 49 49% y This question is being added to know the frequency of students going to shopping in a month¶s time. 31 | P a g e .

y 35 % respondents are neutral towards discount. Only 10 % need a very low discount 32 | P a g e . NO. 1. Very High 2. 4 y It¶s important to understand what kind of promotion attracts maximum number of people into retail stores. Neutral 4. very low Responses 28 19 35 8 10 % Responses 28 19% 35% 8% 10% Fig.Q. This shows they are fully fashion conscious . discounts generally doesn¶t affect their buying decision y y 28 % of students have high affinity to discounts.4 ( a):-Please tick the level of attraction of following features of the mall ± Discount TABLE .High 3. Low 5. 4 Scale 1.

Neutral 4. 5 y It¶s important to understand what kind variety of goods attracts maximum number of people into retail stores.4 (b):-Please tick the level of attraction of following features of the mall variety of goods TABLE . 33 | P a g e .Q. Low 5. y y Although 25 % students have affinity to very high range of variety of goods. 14 % are neutral to this feature. very low Responses 39 25 14 16 6 % Responses 39 % 25% 14% 16% 6% Fig. High 3. 5 Scale 1. NO. y 39 % of students say they are attracted to that stores which have large range of variety of goods. Very High 2. 1.

y This question was designed to know the perception of students towards outside displays in the shopping mall.e. Low 5.Q. 6 Scale 1. very low Responses 16 33 26 14 11 % Responses 16 33 26 14 11 ] Fig 1.e. Neutral 4. They have a high attraction by outside displays. High 3. y Maximum respondents i. 33 % of the respondents have maximum affinity to outside displays.6 y Its important to know that how outside displays in malls attracts students i.VeryHigh 2.4 (C):-Please tick the level of attraction of following features of the mall outside displays TABLE . 34 | P a g e . NO. the level of attraction by outside display.

1. Low 5. Most of the consumers go to these stores because they believe in quality provided by these store in The form of products and services. Neutral 4. very low Responses 9 33 39 14 5 % Responses 9% 33% 39% 14% 5% . NO.4(d):-Please tick the level of attraction of following features of the mall staff service TABLE . High 3.Q. 2 FIG. y y Price is not a matter for those who go to these branded stores. of respondents are neutral to this respect they are hardly attracted by this feature Of the shopping mall y However 33% of the respondents says they are highly attracted by staff service. Maximum no. Very High 2. 7 Scale 1.7 y y This questions talks about how staff service plays an important role in making actual sales. 35 | P a g e .

NO.8 y y y This question was designed to check whether the product which the customer is looking for is easily accessible to him or not 44% Of respondents says they agree to the statement However 35 % are neutral to this statement 36 | P a g e .5:-Do u find your product easily accessible you are looking for? TABLE . 1. 8 Scale Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Responses 4 10 35 44 7 Fig.Q.

Q. 37 | P a g e . 9 y It¶s important to understand how displays outside showrooms attract maximum number of people into retail stores. y This question was designed to understand the perception of students towards outside displays. 1. y y 55 % students agree to the fact that the outside displays attract them to enter the store. Only a few % disagree this hard fact.6:-Window displays attract me to enter the store TABLE 9 Scale Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Responses 6 6 23 55 7 Fig.

7:-I get proper knowledge of the product by seeing point of purchase advertisement TABLE 10 Scale Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Responses 1 19 39 35 6 Fig.8:-Good lighting in the store attracts me to enter the showroom 38 | P a g e .Q. 1. 39 % of the total respondents are neutral to this respect 35 % agree that they get the proper knowledge buy seeing pos advertisement. Q. y y y Maximum students i. Only very few amongst all respondents disagree to this. 10 y Point of purchase advertisements are the advertisement where the product is palced and where actual sales takes place y The question was designed to know about student¶s perception that he / she gets the proper knowledge of the product or not by seeing pop advertisements.e.

TABLE 11 Scale Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Responses 4 26 30 28 12 Fig. y 30 % of the total respondents are neutral to lighting.1 y This question was designed to know about how the lighting system affects the students in a shopping mall. by personal questioning it has been found out that sometimes it affects but the frequency is very low. y 26 % of the total respondents disagree in this regard y However 28 % agrees that lighting attracts them. 1. Q. 2.9:-I get quality products when there are special discount at stores TABLE 12 Scale Responses 39 | P a g e .

22 This question was designed to know students perception that they get quality products during discounts or at discounted stores or not 39 % respondents are neutral to this question However 30 % students agree to this. 1.10:.Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree 6 21 39 30 4 Fig. y y y Q.Displays motivate me to go for unplanned purchase? 40 | P a g e .

1. y From the responses it has been found that 43 % of the total respondents agrees that the displays attract them to go for unplanned purchase y 24 % amongst them are neutral in this regard 41 | P a g e .TABLE 13 Scale Strongly disagree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Responses 3 15 24 43 15 Fig.3 y This question was designed to know the perception of the students that how displays affects their mind to go for unplanned purchase. 2.

Neutral 4. FEMALE) defined in Nominal Scale. 2. EDUCATION = (UG. INDEPENDENT VARIABLE GENDER = (MALE. 42 | P a g e . Disagree 2. DEPENDENT VARIABLE MERCHANDISING defined in ordinal scale. Now the whole data was entered and put to compare means of independent sample t ± test The following comparison was given by the software for all individual hypotheses. Strongly disagree 3.Hypothesis testing procedure and analysis For testing all the stated hypothesis . The dependent variable scale was on Five Point Ordinal Scale which is 1. POINT OF SALE defined in Ordinal Scale. PG ) defined in Nominal scale. Strongly agree The variables were defined in SPSS software and the responses recorded earlier were converted according to the defined scale . Agree 5.SPSS software was used in which the variables 1. LIGHTING SYSTEM defined in ordinal scale.

174 From the comparison of means by t test it has been found that the standard deviation of males and females for the dependent variable. Error Mean .988 . HYPOTHESIS 2 Ho: .121 . no hardly any difference So the above hypothesis is accepted.875 Std.59 3.57 3.192 .166 . Deviation 1.110 From the comparison of means by t test it has been found that the standard deviation of UG and PG Students for the dependent variable Merchandising is similar i. no hardly any difference So the above hypothesis is accepted.998 Std. T-TEST GROUPS=EDUCATION ('UG' 'PG') VARIABLE=MERCHENDISING Group Statistics EDUCA TION MERCHENDISING UG PG N 37 63 Mean 3.61 Std. Deviation .There is no significant difference between perception about merchandising in UG and PG. 43 | P a g e .There is no significant difference in perception towards merchandising between male and female students T-TEST GROUPS=GENDER ('MALE' 'FEMALE') VARIABLE=MERCHENDISING Group Statistics GENDER MERCHANDISING MALE FEMALE N 67 33 Mean 3.57 Std.e. merchandising is similar i.e.HYPOTHESIS 1 Ho: . Error Mean .

There is no significant difference between perception about Point of sale in UG and PG. Deviation .30 Std.967 .There is no significant difference between perception about Point of sale in male & female T-TEST GROUPS=GENDER('MALE' 'FEMALE') VARIABLE=POS Group Statistics GENDER POS MALE FEMALE N 67 33 Mean 3.975 .159 .108 44 | P a g e .119 .858 Std.25 3.e. Error Mean .127 From the comparison of means by t test it has been found that the standard deviation of males and females for the dependent variable Point of sale is similar i.32 Std.HYPOTHESIS 3 Ho: . Deviation .728 Std.19 3. HYPOTHESIS 4 Ho: . T-TEST GROUPS=EDUCATION ('UG' 'PG') VARIABLE=POS Group Statistics EDUCA TION POS UG PG N 37 63 Mean 3. Error Mean . there is some difference but it can be considered as no difference So the above hypothesis is accepted.

HYPOTHESIS 5 Ho: .e. Error Mean . Deviation 1. 45 | P a g e .09 Std. no hardly any difference So the above hypothesis is accepted. T-TEST GROUPS=GENDER('MALE' 'FEMALE') VARIABLE=LIGHTING Group Statistics GENDER LIGHTING MALE FEMALE N 67 33 Mean 3.114 .18 3. there is some difference but it can be considered as no difference So the above hypothesis is accepted.From the comparison of means by t test it has been found that the standard deviation of UG and PG students for the dependent variable Point of sale is similar i.165 From the comparison of means by t test it has been found that the standard deviation of males and females for the dependent variable lighting system is similar i.There is no significant difference between perception about lighting system in male & female.e.947 Std.136 .

132 From the comparison of means by t test it has been found that the standard deviation of UG and PG Students for the dependent variable lighting system is similar i.045 Std. no hardly any difference So the above hypothesis is accepted.HYPOTHESIS 6 Ho: .090 1. T-TEST GROUPS=EDUCATION ('UG' 'PG') VARIABLE=LIGHTING Group Statistics EDUCA TION LIGHTING UG PG N 37 63 Mean 3.e. Error Mean .19 Std. 46 | P a g e .There is no significant difference between perception about lighting system in UG and PG.08 3.179 . Deviation 1.

CHAPTER 8 FINDINGS AND CONCLUSION 47 | P a g e .

e. or to collect some inspiration for future gift giving. we have built on current knowledge and outlined a series of research proposition that can move us towards a more comprehensive understanding of students¶ view on window shopping. y Most of the consumers go to these stores because they believe in quality provided by these store in y Price is not a matter for those who go to these branded stores. Retailers are sprucing up their store window displays in a bid to stand out from the crowd. y Maximum respondents i. 33 % of the respondents have maximum affinity to outside displays. The research framework is one of the very first studies incorporates direct variables i. They have a high attraction by outside displays. discounts generally doesn¶t affect their buying decision y y 35 % agree that they get the proper knowledge buy seeing pos advertisement 55 % students agree to the fact that the outside displays attract them to enter the store CONCLUSION The process of Window Shopping involves walking through a shopping district or mall with the purpose of looking at the window displays for each retail store in the area. lightning system. This shows they are fully fashion conscious . 35 % respondents are neutral towards discount. y 39 % of students say they are attracted to that stores which have large range of variety of goods. In this study. Personnel interaction with respondents stated that it is usually on weekends. It¶s important to understand what kind variety of goods attracts maximum number of people into retail stores. get ideas for displays that can be used at home.FINDINGS y y y Almost 50% of respondents go out for shopping thrice a month at least. In this study the perception of students¶ on window shopping is evaluated whether window displays attracts customers to go for spontaneous purchase or not.e. 48 | P a g e . People may choose to window shop as a way to pass the time.

merchandising and point of sales.e. To conclude all. lightning system. 49 | P a g e . 43% of respondents attracted towards store window display. merchandising and point of sales. quality of product and outside displays matters to customer which is possible with proper lightning system. helps initiate to analyzed and evaluate students¶ view on window shopping. The results about students¶ purpose on going for window shopping are they get proper knowledge about products and get variety of goods at one place. research study states that discount attracts only few i. point of sales and merchandising which make them to go for unplanned purchase. 30% respondents.

CHAPTER 9 LIMITATIONS 50 | P a g e .

It was conducted in Indore only. However all efforts have been made to present an unbiased report on the study and it is hoped that this study will contribute albeit its limitations. Focuses only about the perception of UG and PG students. The coverage of the study has been limited to the students of few colleges and coaching institutes of Indore. Only 100 students were taken. Only few colleges were taken. 51 | P a g e .Limitations of the study Being a management research the study is not free from limitations. to undertake the study of students' perception on window shopping. y y y y Sample size was very small.

Chapter 10 Bibliography 52 | P a g e .

Professor Jennifer Rowley. Julie Marshall. Volume 1. Considering Organization¶s Effectiveness in Business Plans: An Approach for Human Resources Performance Evaluation 53 | P a g e . 3. Finance and Administrative Sciences. Issue 4. Tremonte. ISSN: 1198 3655. Interactive window shopping: enchantment in a rationalized world 4. pages 369±378. 1 (January 2011) ISSN 1931-4744 @ Georgia Southern University. European Journal of Economics. No. Window Shopping: Fashioning a Scholarship of Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning 2. 5. µWindow¶ shopping and browsing opportunities in cyberspace. Electronic Journal of Sociology (2006). 2008. Bert Weijters. University of Glasgow. Brengman. Colleen M. ISSN 1450-2887 Issue 9 (2007).REFERENCES 1. Journal of Consumer Behaviour. Swinyard. Smithand R. June 2002. Dimitrios Georgakellos. S. Segmenting Internet shoppers based on their webusage-related lifestyle: a cross-cultural validation 6. 79-88. M. Journal of Business Research. 58 (1). M. The research paper was conducted as a joint project with Karen Renaud from the Department of Computing Science. Vol. Maggie Geuens. 5. Karen Renaud & Tunde Cockshott.

in/Research.nielsen.edu/projects/materialworld/2010/12/practising_display_window_shop.wikipedia.google.html http://www.com 54 | P a g e .iamai.Webliography http://blogs.shtml www.nyu.com www.aspx?Fileid=r4_home.com/news/20061009.htm&rid=4 http://th.

Appendix QUESTIONNAIRE Dear Respondents. For the partial fulfillment of my MBA (Marketing & Operations) Full Time degree program I am conducting a research on ³Students Perception towards window shopping´. 1 UG PG MALE FEMALE 55 | P a g e . For the sake of successfully completing out this research I am hoping your generous support.

Low 5 Window display attracts me to enter the store? Strongly disagree. Very High 2. Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree 56 | P a g e . Neutral 1 A) Discount B) Variety of goods C) Outside display D) Staff service Do you find your product easily accessible you are looking for? Strongly disagree. Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree 2 4.How many times in a month you go to shopping mall? ONCE TWICE THRICE MORE THAN THREE TIMES Please tick the level of attraction of the following features of mall? 1. High 3. Very Low 3 4 5.

Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Good lighting in the store attracts me to enter the showroom? Strongly disagree.:- 57 | P a g e . Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree I get quality products when there are special discount at stores? Strongly disagree. Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree Displays motivate me to go for unplanned purchase? Strongly disagree. Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly agree NAME:COLLEGE:COURCE: CONTACT NO.I get proper knowledge about the product by seeing point of purchase advertisement? Strongly disagree.

58 | P a g e .

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