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places to be
FRIDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL
teams to see
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
ABERDEEN HIGH SCHOOL
100 Bulldog Blvd., Aberdeen
662-369-8933
ALICEVILLE HIGH SCHOOL
417 3rd St. SE, Aliceville
205-373-6378
AMORY HIGH SCHOOL
1006 Sam Haskell Circle, Amory
662-256-5753
CALEDONIA HIGH SCHOOL
111 Confederate Drive, Caledonia
662-356-2001
CENTRAL ACADEMY
300 Hale Street, Macon
662-726-5846
COLUMBUS HIGH SCHOOL
215 Hemlock Street, Columbus
662-241-7200
EAST OKTIBBEHA COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
178 Moor High Road, Crawford
662-272-5603
EAST WEBSTER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
195 Old Cumberland Road, Maben
662-263-5321
HAMILTON HIGH SCHOOL
40201 Hamilton Road, Hamilton
662-343-8307
HEBRON CHRISTIAN SCHOOL
6230 Henryville Road, Pheba
662-494-7513
HERITAGE ACADEMY
625 Magnolia Lane, Columbus
662-327-5272
IMMANUEL CENTER FOR CHRISTIAN EDUCATION
6405 Military Road, Steens
662-328-7888
LAMAR COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
43880 Hwy. 17 S, Vernon
205-695-7129
LOUISVILLE HIGH SCHOOL
200 Ivy Avenue, Louisville
662-773-3431
NEW HOPE HIGH SCHOOL
3419 New Hope Road, Columbus
662-244-4701
NOXUBEE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
16478 Hwy. 45, Macon
662-76-4428
OAK HILL ACADEMY
800 N. Eshman, West Point
662-494-0301
PICKENS ACADEMY
225 Ray Bass Road, Carrollton
205-367-8144
PICKENS COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
205 4th Ave. SE, Reform
256-375-2344
SOUTH LAMAR SCHOOL
300 Sls Road, Millport
205-662-4411
STARKVILLE ACADEMY
505 Academy Drive, Starkville
662-323-7814
STARKVILLE HIGH SCHOOL
603 Yellowjacket Drive, Starville
662-324-4130
SULLIGENT HIGH SCHOOL
661 Elm Street, Sulligent
205-698-9254
VICTORY CHRISTIAN ACADEMY
374 Mill Road, Columbus
662-327-7744
WEST LOWNDES HIGH SCHOOL
644 South Frontage Road, Columbus
662-244-5070
WEST OKTIBBEHA COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
2459 Holland Street, Maben
662-263-8106
WEST POINT HIGH SCHOOL
950 S. Eshman Avenue, West Point
662-494-5083
WINSTON ACADEMY
111 Richardson Road, Louisville
662-773-3569
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Players from West
Point, New Hope,
Columbus, Heritage
Academy, Caledonia,
West Lowndes,
Starkville, and Noxubee
County high schools
came together at
Columbus High to take
the picture. Kelly
Tippett/Dispatch Staff.
FOOTBALL
2011
A publication of
THE DISPATCH
P.O. Box 511
Columbus, MS
39703
(662) 328-2424
Editor and
Publisher
Birney Imes
Sports
Adam Minichino
Matt Stevens
David Miller
Gary Estwick
Cover Design
Jackie Taylor
Photographers
Luisa Porter
Kelly Tippett
Graphic Artists
Jackie Taylor
Jay Armstrong
Production
Tina Perry
Matt Garner
ABOUT
THE COVER
WHAT’S INSIDE
Aberdeen Bulldogs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Caledonia Confederates. . . . . . . . . . . 5
Central Academy Vikings . . . . . . . . . 21
Columbus Falcons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
East Oktibbeha Titans . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Hamilton Lions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Hebron Christian Eagles . . . . . . . . . 17
Heritage Academy Patriots . . . . . . . . 8
Immanuel Rams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
New Hope Trojans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Noxubee County Tigers . . . . . . . . . . 20
Oak Hill Academy Raiders . . . . . . . . 19
Starkville Academy Volunteers. . . . . 14
Starkville Yellow Jackets. . . . . . . . . . 13
Victory Christian Eagles. . . . . . . . . . . 7
West Lowndes Panthers . . . . . . . . . 11
West Oktibbeha Timberwolves. . . . . 16
West Point Green Wave . . . . . . . . . . 18

BY ADAM MINICHINO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
Finish.
It sounds so simple.
Try to finish in 100-
degree heat, or with a heat
index that eclipses triple
figures.
The Columbus High
School football team can
do it.
Try to finish a game
when you’re already
shorthanded due to a host
of injuries.
The Falcons need only
look back at their victory
against Starkville High
last season to know they
can do that, too.
Turn the page to 2011.
Can this be the year
Columbus High silences
the skeptics, realizes its
potential, and records its
first winning season since
2007?
“It is going to be the
year,” Columbus High
senior linebacker Beau
Edwards said. “A lot of
people say it could be the
year and Columbus hasn’t
been consistent. I say
they’re wrong. This is the
year we’re going to win
the whole thing. South
Panola anybody who steps
in the way is going to get
broken down.”
Edwards and classmate
Byerson Cockrell have
heard the talk from previ-
ous classes that they were
going to be the group to
change the program’s for-
tunes. But while the team
has matured and has
grown stronger it has won
only eight games in the
past three years.
Last year, Columbus
ended a season of ups and
downs and what could
have beens with a 34-32
victory at Starkville. Not
only did the Falcons deny
the Yellow Jackets a
chance to earn a playoff
berth, but they also deliv-
ered a goal-line stand at
the 1-yard line that pre-
vented the tying points
from scoring.
Past Columbus High
teams might not have
been able to deliver.
Edwards and Cockrell
know that all too well. But
they don’t intend to let
their senior season be
another one to forget.
Their goal is to make
surer the feeling from that
Nov. 5, 2010, game sticks
with the Falcons and moti-
vates them to finish when
games are on the line this
season.
“We can make a change
for Columbus,” said
Cockrell, who played in
only one game in 2010
before suffering a season-
ending injury. “This can
be a turning point for
Columbus. We really have
a chance to build. We need
to get serious and do it.”
Columbus High coach
Tony Stanford and his
staff have matched that
attitude and have given
the players more chances
to experience winning in
practice. They have made
two-minute drills a fixture
in practices to help pre-
vent late-game collapses
that have plagued the pro-
gram in recent years. The
feeling is the players have
responded well to the
pushing and the prodding
and all of the lessons.
Stanford feels the team
has answered the call in
part because of Edwards
and Cockrell.
“We feel (Beau’s) lead-
ership comes from his
work ethic,” Stanford said.
“He has worked hard to
get to a leadership role.
“Byke is a quiet leader.
He is not going to be out-
spoken, but he is going to
make plays on the field.
The kids respect him and
look to him to do things
out on the field.”
Stanford took over last
year late in the summer
after head coach Bubba
Davis retired. He felt the
transition from defensive
coordinator to head coach
affected the players, but
that everyone is on the
same page and realizes
this group, which includes
seniors like running back
Damian Baker, quarter-
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 3 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
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Make sure your Grandma and Grandpa have a safe and enjoyable
Football Season by keeping these things in mind when they’re in the stands:
• Many Elderly take medication that can impair the body’s ability to
regulate its temperature
• Make sure they stay hydrated and carry an umbrella for extra shade
• Keep an eye out for signs of heat exhaustion: a throbbing headache,
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• For more information, or to learn how our trained staff can help your grand
parents safely attend your games, please give us a call or visit our website
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Columbus, MS
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Have a
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G
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Class 6A
Region 1, District 2
Columbus
DeSoto Central
Grenada
Horn Lake
Olive Branch
Southaven
South Panola
Tupelo
NOTE: Top four qualify for
playoffs. South Panola is
two-time defending 6A state
champion.
COLUMBUS HIGH FALCONS
1-Jimmy Cockrell, 2-Damian Baker, 3-Rashad Meeks, 4-Cedric Jackson, 5-Justin Tate, 6-Keith Brooks, 7-Kevin Jackson, 8-Iziah Jones, 9-Jabari Edwards, 10-Jamarcus Jones, 11-Martavious McKinney,
12-DeMarcus Vance, 13-Devonta Petty, 15-Deonta Jones, 16-Trace Lee, 17-Quavis Sherrod, 18-Gemriah Williams, 19-Jarcquarius Clark, 20-George Lowery, 21-Tyler Sanders, 22-Jamie Taylor, 23-Darius
Deloach, 24-Quan Latham, 25-Byerson Cockrell, 26-Damian Moore, 27-James Hayes, 28-Jordan Dean, 29-Eric Roberts, 30-Marques O'Neal, 31-Kendric Conner, 32-Josh Thomas, 33-Tupac O'Neal,
34-Ramadus Beasley, 35-Brian Osby, 36-Larr y Williams, 37-Tim Hudgins, 38-Deon Taylor, 39-Bennie Harris, 40-Horatio Buchannan, 41-Bylonn Johnson, 42-Jarvis Ellis, 43-Devontess Harris, 44-Corey Brown,
45-Tobia McCoy, 46-Terrance Turner, 47-Chris Conner, 48-Tyler Calvert, 49-Tyler Davis, 50-Kaderreon Hood, 52-Justin Verner, 53-T.J. Robinson, 54-Orlando Taylor, 55-Jamel Grant, 56-Kenny Averhart,
57-David Porter, 58-Jarvis Glenn, 59-Jeremy Morgan, 60-Kenneth Miller, 62-Broderick Trimuel, 64-Jerome Monroe, 65-Cedric Jones, 67-Channon Harris, 68-John Wiley, 69-Chris McCullough, 70-Austin
Andrews, 71-Aaron Stanton, 72-Tyris Brooks, 73-Greg Sykes, 74-Tremarcus Monroe, 75-Martavious Mitchell, 78-Jake Thomas, 79-Josh Tate, 80-Charlie King, 81-Keshawn Adams, 82-Dalon Moore, 83-Chris
Cockrell, 85-Anthony Liddell, 85-Meunta Verner, 86-Greg Giles, 87-Michael Sturdivant, 88-Kris Reliford, 89-Javaris Johnson.
2011
SCHEDULE
Aug. 19 At Aberdeen
Aug. 26 Open
SEPT. 2 WEST POINT
SEPT. 9 NEW HOPE
Sept. 16 At Louisville
SEPT. 23 TUPELO
Sept. 30 At Southaven
OCT. 7 SOUTH PANOLA
Oct. 14 At Desoto Central
OCT. 21 HORN LAKE
Oct. 28 At Olive Branch
NOV. 4 GRENADA
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
IS THIS YEAR CHS LEARNS HOW TO FINISH?
Columbus High School will look to the return of a healthy Byerson Cockrell, left, and the emergence of senior linebacker Beau
Edwards to help the Falcons have a breakthrough season. Kelly Tippett/Dispatch Staff
See COLUMBUS, 9

BY ADAM MINICHINO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
Programs are built on
legacies.
Initial classes might not
realize it, but their hard work
and sacrifice often are the ele-
ments that establish a foun-
dation on which future
groups can build.
Once that cast is set, it
takes focus and diligence to
ensure the identity that has
been forged lives and grows
in each subsequent class.
No school in the Greater
Golden Triangle area epito-
mizes that mind-set more
than the New Hope High
School football team.
With only one major
Division I signee in the past
five years (Jonathan Guerry,
Southern Miss), New Hope
has thrived thanks to a team
approach and an attitude that
it is going to outwork oppo-
nents and it is never going to
give up.
That mentality has
pushed the Trojans to the
Mississippi High School
Activities Association Class
5A North State title game in
2009 and the second round of
the playoffs last season.
This year, 15 New Hope
seniors will try to pick up
where last year’s group left
off.
“We just have to keep up
the work ethic, the continu-
ous work ethic like the guys
who set the standard for us,”
senior lineman Lee Pegram
said. “Our goal is to over-
come that standard. We try to
make that the classes below
ours job. We want every year
every senior class to work
harder than the last senior
class.”
Pegram and classmate
David Richardson epitomize
the energy that drives New
Hope. Neither player has
been blessed with the most
athletic gifts, but both players
prefer to work as hard as they
can to maximize what they
can do.
In a sense, their heart and
guts fuels them and sets an
example for the younger
classes.
“If we show leadership
and show we can go hard and
give everything we have, I
think everyone will see it,”
Richardson said.
This group of seniors has
matured watching players
like defensive lineman Seth
Stillman play with one arm
after separating his shoulder.
They have followed the
example of Franklin
Richardson Jr., who has
remained humble and contin-
ue to push himself to be the
best.
Those are things coach
Michael Bradley tried to
introduce when he took over
the program. It took him a
year to get the message out
that New Hope wasn’t going
to be outworked and that he
didn’t need or want prima
donnas to win football games.
“We coach every day
doing the little things, and
our kids respond to it,”
Bradley said. “We coach
working hard, we coach
starting something and fin-
ishing it, and our guys
respond to that. Our guys
believe in what we’re doing
and what we’re teaching.
They believe what we’re
doing is going to give us the
best chance to be successful.
If you have leaders who
believe you’re going to be
successful, they can pass it
on the younger kids and it
creates a culture.”
Earlier this week, Bradley
reinforced that point when he
singled out the efforts of 140-
pounder Preston Davis for
fighting his way onto a kick-
off coverage group and near-
ly making a play against 11
players. Bradley encouraged
his players to follow the
example of Davis because he
would like to see more play-
ers take charge of a situation
rather than watch players not
give their best effort.
Senior tight end
Lawrence Brown said that
thinking has become second
nature to the Trojans.
“We take a lot of pride in
it,” Brown said. “That is what
we have been doing and prac-
ticing since we were in mid-
dle school.”
Now, though, there isn’t
another class to serve as the
buffer from the front line.
Brown said he and the other
seniors have to lead from the
front not from behind this
season if they want to raise
the bar again for the 2012
class.
Richardson said New
Hope has another reason to
display that style of leader-
ship.
“We want to prove that
because we lost all of those
seniors that we’re still good
and we can still compete with
everybody else,” Richardson
said. “If you give all you got
something good is going to
happen.”
Brown knows New Hope
won’t enter this season with
the preseason expectations
last year’s team did. Still, that
doesn’t decrease the respon-
sibility these seniors will feel
for maintaining what the first
classes established.
“We don’t have the
biggest kids or the strongest
kids or the fastest kids. We
just have the heart,” Brown
said. “Being the underdog is
what we like. We like for
nobody to give us a chance.
We have shown that in the
playoffs. At playoff time we
always have been the under-
dog and we always found a
way to win. That is just how it
is at New Hope.”
And if one class doesn’t
follow through, they will get a
reminder of just what it is
supposed to do.
“Last year, Jeremy Wells
came back after a game we
did real horrible in and didn’t
play with much heart and
said we were messing up
everything they started,”
senior JoJo Reeves said. “He
said we have to continue that
tradition. Since then, we have
stepped it up a little bit.”
That’s a legacy any New
Hope class would be proud to
leave for future classes to
eclipse.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 4 SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
BAPTIST GOLDEN TRIANGLE offers convenient
locations and skilled, caring staff to treat sports
injuries big and small. Whether you need outpatient
diagnostic services, physical rehabilitation, or just a
bandage, our team will have you back with your team
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1120 Gardner Blvd
Columbus, MS
328-5776
Have a
Great
Season!
G
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!
2011
SCHEDULE
Aug. 19 at Louisville
Aug. 26 Open
SEPT. 2 NOXUBEE
Sept. 9 at Columbus
SEPT. 16 CALEDONIA
Sept. 23 at Saltillo
SEPT. 30 OXFORD
Oct. 7 at Hernando
OCT. 14 LAKE CORMORANT
Oct. 21 at Clarksdale
OCT. 28 CENTER HILL
NOV. 4 AT WEST POINT
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
NEW HOPE TROJANS
2-Trae Collins, 3-James Hill, 4-Daniel Gregory, 5-Horace Carr, 6-Victor Deloach, 7-Jemarqus Brooks, 8-Q Newby, 9-Jaquin Weatherspoon, 10-Darius Petty, 11-Howard Petty, 12-Preston Davis, 14-Javontay
Lewis, 15-Nathan Sprouse, 16-Ryan Lee, 17-DeAngelo Hamilton, 18-Lonnie Stephenson, 19-E.J. Jenkins, 20-Dalton King, 21-Jameel Johnson, 22-Devin Walton, 23-M.J. Shirley, 24-Todd Harris, 25-Brandon
Spann, 26-Tre Townsel, 27-Ryan Lowe, 28-Shontae Miller, 30-Austin Oswalt, 31-Fred Harrison, 32-Quinton White, 34-David Richardson, 35-Dylan Tribolet, 36-Jeremy Washington, 37-Ben Veazey, 38-Tyler
Faris, 40-Hunter Harris, 42-Ryan Forrester, 44-Terrence Payne, 45-Jacob Bowen, 49-Dustin Owens, 50-Joseph Hreish, 52-Joseph Reeves, 53-J.C. Redden 54-Kearick Patterson, 55-Jace Caldwell, 56-Derek
Pierce, 57- Justin Sherrod, 58-Lee Pegram, 59-Morgan Franks. 60-Matt Barnes, 61-Eric Romans, 62-Nate Saint, 64-Dalton Gray, 65-Juan Cedano, 70-Allen Harvey, 72-Drew Hoyt, 74-Andrew Vasser, 75-
Thomas Fisher, 76-Brodi Owens, 77-Leebo Davis, 78-Marcus Johnson, 79-Rashaud Terr y, 80-Ryan Dye, 82-Tavoris Crowell, 86-Lawrence Brown, 88-Wesley Roland.
SENIORS WILL TRY TO CREATE THEIR LEGACY
Front row, from left: New Hope High School seniors David Richardson, Darius Petty, Lee Pegram, and
“Roc” Carr and back row, from left: Lawrence Brown and JoJo Reeves will try to take what they
have learned from past classes and play with heart and guts. Adam Minichino/Dispatch Staff

BY GARY ESTWICK
sports@cdispatch.com
CALEDONIA — It
starts with Ben
Marchbanks, who takes
the snap from under cen-
ter.
He backpedals before
turning to his right for a
handof f to Tyler
Armistad. Or does he give
the football to Ontario
Lowery, who cuts by Luke
Eads?
Or does Marchbanks
keep it himself?
This is the challenge
Caledonia’s Wing-T
offense plays to offer its
2011 opponents.
One season after
installing the deception-
filled system, second-year
coach Ricky Kendrick
expects his young team to
be better prepared to uti-
lize it. That in itself, he
believes, is a win.
“People like to throw it
around,” Kendrick said,
“but it gives us a chance to
be more competitive. We
try to control the tempo of
games, try to slow it
down, get first downs,
move the sticks, play good
on special teams and on
defense.”
For now, Caledonia will
continue to mount these
types of small victories
until their play on the field,
their strength in the weight
room, and their mental
endurance with their play-
book can equal or surpass
their opponents.
“We just came in and
we told them, ‘Hey, our
goal this year is to be com-
petitive. We don’t know
how many ballgames
we’re going to win,’
Kendrick said. “I’m not
worried about Ws and Ls
right now. I’m worried
about learning the game,
getting better at playing
the game, and the Ws will
begin to take care of them-
selves.
That doesn’t mean
Caledonia, which went 1-
10 last season, won’t com-
pete Friday nights. In fact,
the Confederates will go
out to win every Friday,
just like any other team.
They won’t play to lose.
But players and coach-
es recognize the baby
steps involved with build-
ing a foundation for a pro-
gram that ended a 25-
game losing streak last
season with an overtime
win against Amory.
“We want to build on
what we did last year,
which was a good thing,”
senior tight end Cole
Carter said. “Coming
together as a team during
the summer workouts,
and in the spring. Building
on that and hopefully, a
good playoff run.
“Obviously get more
than one win, which would
be nice.”
Actually, it would be
great.
“Not having a steady
coach —since I was a
freshman we’ve had the
revolving coaches,” senior
guard Hunter Griffin said.
“Stability this season has
helped, so we’re excited.
We get to keep the same
offense, not learn a new
one again.”
On defense, linebacker
Will Breen said his unit
must do a better job of
establishing its place on
the line of scrimmage so
linemen aren’t able to
focus on getting to him as
he attempts to fill in holes.
“We would like to get
more parallel to the line of
scrimmage,” said Breen, a
senior. “We want to run
more downhill and attack
the football, which we did-
n’t do much of last year.”
That area will be vital to
the Caledonia’s success
because the secondary is
the team’s biggest ques-
tion mark entering its sea-
son opener against
Nettleton. The athletes
are there, but they need to
do a better job of cover-
age, Kendrick said.
Improvement is what
Kendrick is targeting.
Sure, no team shows up
Fridays not to win. But he
knows his squad has to
learn a few more lessons
before its players are
ready to challenge every
week without mental let-
downs.
“That doesn’t mean
we’re not going to com-
pete,” he said.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 5 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
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personal banking
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investment services
insurance
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1120 Gardner Blvd
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328-5776
Have a
Great
Season!
G
O
C
O
N
F
E
D
E
R
A
T
E
S
!
2011
SCHEDULE
AUG. 19 NETTLETON
AUG. 27 WEST LOWNDES
Sept. 2 at Heritage Academy
SEPT. 8 EAST WEBSTER
Sept. 16 at New Hope
SEPT. 23 ACKERMAN
Sept. 30 at Carthage
OCT. 7 HOUSTON
Oct. 14 at Louisville
OCT. 21 KOSCIUSKO
Oct. 28 at Noxubee County
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
CALEDONIA CONFEDERATES
1-Randy Randle, 2-Jon Jon Phinizee, 3-Jarrett Winston, 4-Ben Marchbanks, 5-Jason Bryant, 6-Gary Walden, 7-Trey Lancaster, 8-Brandon Henry, 10-Jonathan Pagaduan, 11-Peter Pagaduan, 12-James
Longmire, 13-Joshua Kugel, 14-Ryan Unruh, 15-Sage Kangas, 16-Joshua Betts, 18-Lucas Eads, 20-Onterrio Lowery, 21-Chris Griffin, 22-Quavis Betts, 23-Nathan Brauer, 24-Jordan Anderson, 30-William
Breen, 31-Tyler Armistad, 32-Christian Champion, 33-Cole Reed-Wood, 34-Dale Castle, 35-Orlandis Smith, 46-Anthony Brewer, 48-Cole Carter, 50-William Rushing, 53-Randy Weeks, 54-Jeremy Reedwood,
55-Hunter Griffin, 57-Cody Cliett, 58-Casey Staples, 59-Jacob Smith, 60-Tyler Blaine, 61-Stephen Sykes, 62-Andrew Phillips, 63-Darr yl Williams, 64-Jarrett Hopper, 66-Will Mainka, 67-Zachery Harrell,
68-Stephen Black, 69-Colton Gilbreath, 70-Garrett Wester, 72-Tristan Nessell, 74-Reed Schoon, 77-Shane Chadwick, 78-Nicholas Moore, 79-Daniel Cunningham, 80-Jacob Rhodes, 83-Nathan Kendrick, 84-
Hunter McBride, 86-Xavier Hill, 88-Telvin Shinn.
KENDRICK FEELS CONFEDERATES WILL BE BETTER PREPARED
CLASS 4A
REGION 4, DISTRICT 4
Caledonia
Houston
Kosciusko
Leake Central
Louisville
Noxubee County
From left: Caledonia High School’s Cole Carter, Randy Weeks, Will Breen, and Hunter Griffin will be the core group second-year head
coach Ricky Kendrick looks to to help the program makes strides. Gary Estwick
“We want to build on what we did last year,
which was a good thing. Coming together as a
team during the summer workouts, and in the
spring. Building on that and hopefully, a good
playoff run.”
Caledonia High School
lineman Cole Carter
INSIDE
I MORE CALEDONIA: A
position by position look at
the Confederates. Page 9

BY ADAM MINICHINO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
STEENS —Confidence
is only one part of the equa-
tion.
Every team needs lead-
ers to implement the lessons
the coaches are teaching
and to reinforce the belief
that their squad can accom-
plish anything it sets its
mind to.
Greg Watkins didn’t
know if he was going to have
any players like that when
he left Hebron Christian to
become the new head foot-
ball coach at Immanuel
Christian.
It didn’t take him long to
discover — much to his
delight — that he had a solid
core of leaders who were
ready to help their coach
transition into a new role.
The leadership of return-
ing players Jeremy
Davidson, Norris Harris,
Michael Tate, and James
Wriley and newcomer Jason
Davis have helped Watkins
introduce a new offense and
a new way of doing things at
Immanuel Christian.
“You can strategize and
you can talk to the players,
but a coach isn’t going to win
a championship. You have to
have leaders, and I have got
some pretty good leaders,”
Watkins said. “That is one
thing I was hoping for when
I came here is that I would
have some guys step up as
leaders. I know Norris and
Jeremy Davidson are two
senior leaders as good as
you’ll find.”
Watkins has relied on that
leadership because the Rams
have faced a series of
changes since last season’s
history-making season.
Shawn Gates, who led the
team to a 6-6 record and its
first trip to the Mississippi
Association of Independent
Schools 11-man playoffs,
resigned, as did assistant
coaches Bubba Davis, who is
now at Starkville Academy,
and Daniel Merchant, who is
now at Nettleton.
Those coaches not only
helped Immanuel Christian
get back to the playoffs, but
they also guided the team to
a 14-13 victory against
Houlka on Oct. 1 that was
the program’s first against
an 11-man team.
The MAIS “rewarded”
Immanuel Christian for its
success by moving it from
Class A to Class AA, where it
will be paired with Canton
Academy, Leake Academy,
Manchester Academy, Oak
Hill Academy, and Winston
Academy in District 2AA.
“We have moved the ball
on them,” Tate said. “It is not
like we haven’t played these
teams. We moved the ball on
them in jamborees. It isn’t
going to be an issue of mov-
ing the ball and getting
yards. It is going to be a mat-
ter of stopping other teams’
offenses.”
Tate’s attitude reflects
the confidence Watkins has
worked to instill. Earlier in
the preseason, he posted a
message on the door to the
field house that stressed that
everyone in the locker room
needed to believe that Rams
could accomplish their
goals. It said players and
teams were defeated if they
didn’t believe in what they
were going to do when they
left the locker room.
Harris, who transferred
from Caledonia High before
the start of the 2010 season,
has tried to be proactive in
getting his teammates to
believe.
“If you walk out there
thinking you will get beat
you will get beat,” Harris
said. “If you walk out there
thinking you are the tough-
est one on the field, you will
play like that.”
Watkins said Harris has
tried on occasion to pump
his teammates up when they
have lost their energy due in
part to fatigue or the hot
weather. He is excited about
working with Tate, Harris,
and Davis in a misdirection
offense that will force
defenses to pick their poi-
son.
“They are two real good
running backs,” Watkins
said of Tate and Harris.
“They are like what we’re
going to face. If you don’t
wrap them up, they’re not
going to go down. They are
both strong and they both
have big tree-trunk legs and
they have the speed. Then
you throw in a Jason Davis,
and he is faster than both of
those guys, and it really
gives us a triple threat.”
Davis is a transfer from
Columbus High. His pres-
ence will help he Eagles
overcome the loss of Ross
Moore, who was the team’s
quarterback last season. An
injury will keep Moore out of
action this season.
Sophomore Darius Jones
will take his place.
Watkins coached at
Winona Christian and at
East Holmes Christian
before moving to Hebron
Christian. He spent the past
two seasons as football
coach at Hebron Christian,
which is in Pheba, and guid-
ed the team to a 5-15 record.
Rob Barron, the school’s
new baseball coach, will join
Watkins on the football staff
as an assistant coach.
Watkins hopes he has
addressed tackling, which
was one of his biggest con-
cerns early in the preseason.
“My big philosophy in
coaching is practice makes
habits,” Watkins said. “In the
league we’re in and against
the backs we’re going to
face, if we don’t tackle it is
going to be a long year.”
Harris and Tate are
focused on making an
impact in their final high
school season. They
acknowledge the step up in
classification will be a chal-
lenge, but they are invested
and eager to see how they
stack up.
“We have a good enough
team to make the playoffs
again,” Tate said. “We have
more talent this year than we
did last year.”
Said Harris, “We have the
talent and the speed and a lot
of leaders on the team. We
have a great coach, too. I
think we can get something
done.”
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 6 SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
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1120 Gardner Blvd
Columbus, MS
328-5776
Have a
Great
Season!
G
O
R
A
M
S
!
Susan G. Taylor
MD, FCCP
425 Hospital Drive, Suite 1
Columbus, MS
662-327-8455
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2011
SCHEDULE
AUG. 19 WINONA CHRISTIAN
Aug. 26 at Leake Academy
SEPT. 2 MARSHALL ACADEMY
Sept. 9 at New Site
SEPT. 16 CANTON ACADEMY
Sept. 23 Open
Sept. 30 at Carroll Academy
OCT. 7 POTTS CAMP
Oct. 14 at Manchester Academy
OCT. 21 WINSTON ACADEMY
Oct. 28 at Oak Hill Academy
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
IMMANUEL RAMS
2-Norris Harris, 5-JD Dantzler, 7-Michael Tate, 8-Brendan Bailey, 9-Bruce Baudoin, 10-KC Cunningham, 11-Darius Jones, 15-Douglas Keys, 17-Brennen Bowen, 24-Jason Davis, 25-Zach Ferguson, 41-BJ
Shirley, 51-Zac Johnwick, 52-Zach Kimbrell, 53-James Wriley, 54-Josh Davidson, 56-Logan Shackelford, 58-Cody Dunn, 63-Josh Hughes, 65-Luke Hudson, 66-Will Harmond, 74-Jeremy Davidson, 79-Chris
Randazzo.
MAIS
Class AA
District 2AA
Canton Academy
Immanuel Christian
Leake Academy
Manchester Academy
Oak Hill Academy
Winston Academy
RAMS WILL RELY ON LEADERS IN MOVE UP
Back, from left: Immanuel Christian players Jason Davis, James Wriley, Norris Harris, and Jeremy Davidson and Michael Tate, front, will
be the leaders coach Greg Watkins will look to in his first season as a head coach at the school. Adam Minichino/Dispatch Staff

BY ADAM MINICHINO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
Kaleb Holliness and
Jay Pace don’t have a
problem with doing more.
Whether it means help-
ing a classmate with their
studies or spending extra
time after football practice
to sharpen timing, the
players know the rewards
are worth the extra time.
If the rest of the
Victory Christian football
team takes that same
approach the Eagles
could have a successful
season.
But Victory Christian
will have to do all of that
with a new look.
Standouts Landon Ellis
and Tyler Jones have
moved up, while senior
quarterback Marcus Sims
will miss the season to
recover from a near-fatal
car accident.
The openings have cre-
ated positions Holliness,
Pace, and the rest of the
Eagles are ready to
embrace.
“We just have to pull
together and pick up pret-
ty much where we left off
even though we don’t
have Marcus,” Holliness
said. “We have to encour-
age people who have to
step up to be in new spots.
There is no other way.
You just have to keep
going forward.”
Said Pace, “We just
have to step up the game,
work harder, practice
harder, and just give it 100
percent. People have to
step into new roles and
new responsibilities.”
Pace, who also plays
linebacker, is taking the
lead, moving into full-
back. He will be the lead
blocker for Holliness,
who will step into a bigger
role on offense.
A year ago, Landon
Ellis and Tyler Jones took
the lion’s share of the
snaps. The time and ener-
gy they invested in the
program played a key role
in Victory Christian win-
ning the Christian
Football Association titles
in 2008 and 2009 and 30
games in a row. That
streak ended Nov. 5, 2010,
when Tuscaloosa
Christian defeated
Victory Christian 24-20.
“It’s going to be hard to
step in for Landon
because usually when he
touched the ball it was an
automatic touchdown,”
Holliness said. “We’re just
going to pick up where he
left off and trying to cre-
ate new stuff.”
Holliness will step into
a bigger role on offense.
He also will continue to
play a key role in the sec-
ondary. The 5-foot-8 1/2,
135-pounder will team
with Pace and junior quar-
terback Bryer Bolton, a
transfer from Vernon, Ala.
It remains to be seen
how many weapons
Victory Christian will be
able to develop to com-
pensate for the loss of
Ellis, but everyone agrees
about the way the team
should arrive there.
“It is a team effort this
year,” Pace said. “I think
we will do just fine. As
long as everybody does
their job, we should have
a good team.”
Hamm shares the opti-
mism. He admits the fact
that the team is in a
“rebuilding type of year is
of fset by the fact that
there are young players in
the program who are hun-
gry to play football.
Hamm said the days
when the Eagles would
feature a wide-open attack
have given way to a more
physical brand of football.
The loss of Sims dictat-
ed the Eagles were going
to change direction on
offense. Hamm said the
team already had a good
amount of size up front, so
it was easy to change
schemes and go with a
power running game.
“We’re probably work-
ing even harder on the
passing game this year
even though we want to
be more of a physical
team because we know if
we can establish the run,
get the defense sitting on
a run and then hit the
pass, that play will be suc-
cessful when we need it,”
Hamm said. “I think we’re
going to have to be more
of a ball-control, eight- to
10-play drive team. We’re
going to have to control
the ball, not make mis-
takes, not fumble the ball,
not commit penalties, all
of the things that kill
drives.”
Hamm said the best
participation in the team’s
offseason program creat-
ed added depth that he
hopes will be able to con-
tribute in future classes.
For now, though,
Hamm will look to
Holliness, Pace, and the
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 7 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
1120 Gardner Blvd
Columbus, MS
328-5776
Have a
Great
Season!
G
O
E
A
G
L
E
S
!
2011
SCHEDULE
Aug. 12 at Russell Christian
AUG. 19 VICTORY BAPTIST
Aug. 26 Open
SEPT. 2 NEW LIFE
SEPT. 9 TABERNACLE
Sept. 16 Open
Sept. 23 at Heritage Christian
Sept. 29 at Flint Hill
Oct. 7 Open
Oct. 14 at North River
OCT. 21 TUSCALOOSA CHRISTIAN
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
VICTORY CHRISTIAN EAGLES
1-Austin Richardson, 2-Will Jones, 3-Bryer Bolton, 5-Reed Fulgham, 11-Shane Bradford, 12-Hunter Austin, 13-Will Porter, 14-Tayler Frye, 19-Roy Boden, 21-Anthony Sharp, 22-Cody Bolton, 23-Will Pitts,
32-Jay Pace, 33-Charlie Price, 34-Kaleb Holliness, 48-Paul Blair, 52-Joshua Foxworthy, 54-Chase Austin, 55-Bo McCrary, 56-Brandon Shaw, 64-Aaron Ott, 75-Clinton Spencer, 80-Nick Hairston, 88-Sam
Fisher, 99-Michael Elliott.
MORE IS ONLY WAY TO GO
New leaders excited for chance to move into bigger roles for Eagles
“It is a team effort
this year. I think we
will do just fine. As
long as everybody
does their job, we
should have a good
team.”
Victory Christian senior
Jay Pace
rest of the upperclassmen
to set the tempo.
“It is not necessarily
rebuilding the program as
much as it is rebuilding
certain positions on the
team,” Hamm said. “They
have done a good job. We
have been lifting weight
since school ended last
year. Jay has worked hard,
and Kaleb, as long as he
has been playing, he has
worked on his own to try
to get bigger. They both
worked hard in the offsea-
son and look good in
terms of conditioning,
strength, and leadership.”
Both players say they
feel a lot stronger than
they did last year and are
ready and willing to do
more to help the team
accomplish its goals.
“These guys seem to
want to do well because
the bar has been set
where it has,” Hamm said.
“We have talked about
why were doing what
we’re doing, as far as two-
a-days in 100-degree
weather because we have
to get through the suffer-
ing before we experience
the glory.
“If we expect to suc-
ceed, we have to prepare
ourselves so we can
expect it, not just hope it
happens.”
ABOVE, RIGHT: Victory
Christian running back/
linebacker Jay Pace, left, and
senior running
back/safety/corner back Kaleb
Holliness stand in in the middle
of shoulder pads hanging from
the rafters of the third-base
dugout on the baseball field at
the school. Both players are
expected to play important
roles for a team that lost
several of its key performers
from last season.
Adam Minichino/
Dispatch Staff

BY ADAM MINICHINO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
Brad Butler believes in
positive thinking and pos-
itive energy.
He isn’t sure if those
things have any actual
medicinal value, but the
Heritage Academy foot-
ball coach is convinced
good things will happen
as a result of an approach
that sees the glass as half
full.
But as much as Butler
believes in positive think-
ing, he understands it is
ineffective if it isn’t put
into action.
This season, Butler
plans to do his best to
make a positive impres-
sion on his players. He
hopes they will respond,
stay focused through
adversity, and push the
team to realize its poten-
tial.
“I think we have high-
er goals,” Butler said. “I
think those guys realize
that if you keep pushing
things can get better, but
they’re just not going to
get better. Somebody has
to do something different
to make it better. Good
things don’t all of a sud-
den come to you. If you
keep working, keep
working good things will
happen. If you just sit
back and wait for good
things to happen it proba-
bly isn’t going to hap-
pen.”
Heritage Academy is
coming off a four-win sea-
son in which injuries
played a key role. The
Patriots lost starting
quarterback Brandon
Bell, a transfer from
Caledonia High School in
the fifth game of the sea-
son, and senior running
back John Laws
Ferguson in the third
game of the year. Both
players were fixtures in
the lineup, and their
absence forced the team
to go through a rebirth
that took several games.
When the Patriots
emerged, they defeated
Washington School and
showed the fight and
tenacity Butler had
hoped to see earlier in
the year.
“Well, as bad as we
struggled at one point
last year we were still a
few points away from
making the playof fs,”
Butler said. “We kind of
went through a lull there
and lost (senior running
back) John (Laws
Ferguson) about the
third game and Brandon
in the first game. It took
us a while to get back
going. We took a step
back. I tell these guys all
of the time you’re always
going to face adversity.
Things pop up that you
don’t count on and some-
body has to step back up
and get the boat headed
back in the right direc-
tion.
“It just took a few
games for us to get that
done. We went into the
Washington game and it
felt right again. From that
point, we used that to
build on. I hated that we
waited until two games
before the end to get that
done. If we start having
some adversity we have
to right the ship pretty
quick and get the ball
rolling back in the right
direction.”
This season, Butler
hopes a healthy Bell will
stay healthy for the entire
season and be part of a
group of seven seniors he
is counting on the set the
tone. While the Patriots
have greater depth in
their junior and sopho-
more classes, Butler feels
all seven players — Bell,
Blake Sharp, Tyler
Knight, Clint Markham,
Mark Adams, Hayden
Higginbotham, and Tyler
Marchak — are quality
young men who can con-
tribute a lot of things this
season.
Even though
Higginbotham, who has
transferred from
Starkville High, and Bell
are from other schools,
Butler likes the fact that
that group has been
through lean times as
recently as 2009, when
the Patriots won their
first three games and
then closed the season
with eight consecutive
losses.
“We have come a long
way since I have been
here,” Sharp said. “I
thought we were going to
be good when I first start-
ed playing because of our
size. I think we have a lot
of speed and playmakers
in our junior group. Last
year, they were young. I
think they have grown up
a little bit and that they
will help us out.”
Said Adams,
“Everybody has a good
attitude, and we have a
lot of returning players
(16). I think everybody
knows what we want to
accomplish. If we put our
heads together and focus
on it I think we can do it.
It is our job as leaders to
help us do that and to
keep everybody in line.”
Sharp is a three-year
starter on the defensive
line. Knight will see time
at fullback and at Mike
linebacker and Markham
will play defensive end.
Marchak also is a two-
year starter, while Butler
feels confident
Higginbotham will find a
place to make a contribu-
tion.
“He is eager to learn
and doing everything we
ask him to do,” Butler
said. “We feel he is good
for the team as a leader. I
saw some leadership abil-
ity out of him the first day
he was here. Normally
you don’t see that out of a
guy on his first day. He
does know some guys,
but he showed some
leadership abilities on his
first day on campus.”
Higginbotham said it
has been a huge change
and that his teammates
show a lot of promise.
“We’re coming hard
and fast and we’re going
to be mean,”
Higginbotham said.
Higginbotham also
has heard a lot about the
potential of the junior
class. He said he has
seen Miller Puckett’s
speed and Cade Lott’s
ability to make plays. But
he also knows that it will
take more than a few
players to help the
Patriots realize their play-
off dreams.
“It’s in our hands,”
Higginbotham said. “It is
as far as we want to go
with it and how hard we
want to work is how far
we can go.”
Butler will get a
chance to see just how
his team responds to
adversity starting Friday,
when it travels to Lamar.
He hopes he will see a
team that makes a state-
ment in its opener and
one that will fight back
when it is faced with
adversity.
Until then, Butler is
counting on his seniors
being proactive to help
the team bounce back
after it is knocked down.
“We’re counting on
that so we don’t start
heading in the wrong
direction,” Butler said.
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 8 SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
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Three Locations For Your Convenience!
1120 Gardner Blvd
Columbus, MS
328-5776
Have a
Great
Season!
G
O
P
A
T
R
IO
T
S
!
2011
SCHEDULE
Aug. 19 at Lamar
AUG. 26 STARKVILLE ACADEMY
SEPT. 2 CALEDONIA
Sept. 9 at MRA
Sept. 16 at Lee
SEPT. 23 JA
SEPT. 30 MAGNOLIA HEIGHTS
Oct. 7 at Oak Hill
Oct. 14 Open
Oct. 21 at Washington
OCT. 28 PILLOW
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
HERITAGE ACADEMY PATRIOTS
PATRIOTS LIKE CHANCES TO HAVE BIG YEAR
The Heritage Academy football team will rely on its seniors this season to help it get back to the playoffs. Front row, from left: Clint
Markham, Tyler Knight, and Mark Adams. Back row, from left: Brandon Bell, Blake Sharp, Hayden Higginbotham, and Tyler Marchak.
Kelly Tippett/Dispatch Staff
MAIS
CLASS AAA,
DISTRICT 1AAA,
DIVISION II
Heritage Academy
Lee Academy
Magnolia Heights
Washington School
Jackson Academy
Madison-Ridgeland Academy
Pillow Academy
NOTE: Jackson Academy, MRA, and
Pillow Academy are Division I. All
regular-season games count toward
determining the teams that will
advance to the playoffs.
“If we put our heads together and focus on it
I think we can do it. It is our job as leaders to
help us do that and to keep everybody in
line.”
Heritage Academy senior Mark Adams

THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 9 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
back Cedrick Jackson,
and wide receiver
Deontae Jones, just to
name three — can be spe-
cial.
“We have been looking
for that bunch to step up
and take over for two
years,” Stanford said. “It is
time for them to finish this
year. Every year we have
finished the season we
have felt like we should
have won two or three
more ballgames if we had
finished, and we didn’t fin-
ish.”
Edwards would like
nothing better to help
Columbus finish. As a
sophomore, he bounced
from quarterback to full-
back and didn’t really have
a position. It wasn’t until
the coaches moved him to
linebacker that he found a
home, and he has spent
the past year making it his
home.
Stanford said Edwards
worked through typical
growing pains and under-
stands how to play the
position well enough to
dictate to others.
“It’s a lot dif ferent
(from last season)
because we didn’t have
any leadership,” Edwards
said. “My being a junior, I
was still getting the posi-
tion down. I still could
have been a leader, but not
being confident in myself
to play the position, I start-
ed getting confident later
on in the year, which is
when I started to step up
as a leader and directing
guys in what to do and not
to do. We didn’t have that
powerful leadership that
we have this year.”
Cockrell, a safety, said
it was painful to stand on
the sidelines with an
injured shoulder and not
be able to help his team-
mates. He said the injury
motivated him to come
back and affect a change
in the program. He feels
he is back to where he
was last year and is ready
to do whatever needed to
get the Falcons on the
playoff track.
Edwards feels
Columbus is already close
to that goal. He said the
inability to finish games
last season has been a
nagging reminder that has
pushed him through
sprints at the end of prac-
tice. He sees the same
effort from his teammates
and feels the team is only
going to improve if every-
one is giving their all so
they’re capable of doing
their best.
Only then, he said, will
the Falcons be able to fin-
ish.
“I can’t really talk that
much, but I want every-
body to come out to the
games and see,” Edwards
said. “We’re going to show
them. We feel great.
Everybody is in shape,
and most of the people
who were key players last
year are back. You put
those little pieces in the
puzzle and we’re going to
complete that puzzle. That
is why we feel this is going
to be the year. There are
no letbacks or setbacks.
We’re just going to go for-
ward. We’re going to fin-
ish the puzzle and glue it
together and make sure it
is stuck.”
Columbus
Continued from Page 3
OFFENSE
QUARTERBACK
Ben Marchbanks, So
Jarrett Winston, So
Marchbanks excelled at the position in the
spring game, despite never playing it before.
He's a converted tailback. Winston was the
backup in 2010.
"We're going to run the football,” Caledonia
coach Ricky Kendrick said. “I have to have
somebody that can operate the offense. The
wing-t has to be smooth. Both of these kids
give us a chance to do that."
FULLBACK
Tyler Armistad, Jr
Cole Reed-Wood Jr.
Both players complement the other, although
Reed-Wood is a better receiver out of the back-
field. He will also see time at wingback.
"The fullback is the main back in the wing-t. We
have to establish the running game, so it's a
big load to carr y. The ball will be equally shared
between all four of the backs. We want to keep
those kids as fresh as we can. I'd consider
them both starters."
TAILBACK
Ontario Lowery, So
Quavis Betts, So
The Confederates place two of their fastest
players at this position.
“Lowery saw his first action last season against
Hamilton and ended up leading the team in
rushing. (Lowery) had a great spring. He had
256 yards rushing in the spring game. So we're
real pleased with that. He's a real down hill
runner. Betts hasn't seen much time, but has
good speed."
WINGBACK
Luke Eads, Jr
Cole Reed-Wood Jr.
Randy Randall, Jr
Eads will earn extended playing time after play-
ing in reserve role in 2010.
"(Randall), he's a little fellow, but he'll get after
you. He's a
really tenacious guy. He's not the best blocker,
but he can go. He gives us a little speed in the
passing game."
WRS
Trey Lancaster, Jr
Peter Pagaduan, Jr
Jonathan Pagaduan, Jr
Justin Beats, So
Count on Caledonia receivers to concentrate on
creating running lanes in the secondary for their
backs. But don't be surprised by the occasional
pass.
"The main thing we're looking for out of our
split ends is that we want them to block."
OL
CENTER
Garrett Wester, jr
Cody Cliett, Fr
"(Wester) did a good job in spring, graded really
high. He had the best grade this spring game on
the offensive line.
GUARD
Hunter Griffin, Sr
Jarrett Hopper, Jr
Colton Gilbreath, Jr
The guard position is vital to the wing-t. The
guards must have fast feet in order to get out in
front of blocks. They can't let their backs beat
them to the hole or the offense is in trouble.
"(Griffin offers) great leadership. Has really
risen to what you'd
expect out of a senior, to pull those young kids
with him."
OT
Tyler Blaine, Jr
Will Mainka, So
Reed Schoon, So
Zach Harrell, Jr
Caledonia is inexperienced at the position and
need to learn the system quickly.
"Reed played really good in the spring with the
limited amount of snaps we had. He graded the
second-best on the offense line."
TE
Cole Carter, Sr
Ryan Unruh, Jr
Josh Kugel, Jr
Carter is being heavily recruited at offensive
tackle, a position he
will likely play on the next level. He and Unruh
split time at the position last season.
"When we go two tight end set, both of those
guys will be on the field at the same time."
DEFENSE
ENDS
Randy Weeks, Sr
Ryan Unruh, Jr
Tyler Blaine, Jr
Josh Kugel, Jr
Not a very experienced group. The group will be
small across across the front and will rely on
their mobility to get off the ball.
"Ryan is a returning starter. Weeks hasn't
played football, but he has looked good through
the spring and we think he'll be a big help to
us."
TACKLES
Cole Carter, Sr
Hunter Griffin, Sr
Jeremy Reed-Wood, So
Casey Staples, Fr
ILB
Will Breen, Sr
Tyler Armistad, Jr
Colton Gilbreath, Jr
Christian Champion, Fr
Other than Breen and Armistad, the other play-
ers are inexperienced.
"We want to see some better run play out of
this group. We think we got some pretty skilled
people."
OLB
John Phinezee, Sr
Trey Lancaster, Jr
Jarrett Winston, So
Cole Reed-Wood Jr.
The Confederates are pleased with the their top
two linebackers.
"We like John's leadership. He's very knowl-
edgeable. Helps us get lines up, makes sure we
have correct defensive alignment. Lancaster
played a good bit last year as well.
SECONDARY
Luke Eads, Jr
Randy Randall, Jr
Peter Pagaduan, Jr
Jonathan Pagaduan, Jr
Justin Beats, So
Ben Marchbanks, So
Ontario Lowery, So
The position group is perhaps the biggest ques-
tion mark on the team. The secondary players
did not cover well during the spring. Because of
this, offensive players like Lowery and
Marchanks will be available if other players
struggle.
"It's almost like we're staring over there. We
feel like we have good athletes, but we've got
to get the right fit."
SPECIAL TEAMS
KICKER
Josh Kugel, Jr
PUNTER
Will Breen, Sr
LS
Zach Harrell, Jr
Insi de Cal edoni a
we
IF
can
fit
t
h
i
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m
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STUFF
i
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t
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i
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SKINNY
AD
,
just
think
w
h
a
t
you
could fit in a
10’ x 10’
FRIENDLY
CITY
Mini-Warehouses
2 Convenient Locations
662-328-2424

THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 10 SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
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Reader’s Choice
2011
Best
Triangle
of the
The votes
are in...
and we’re still
counting!
Thanks for your participation.
We had the largest response ever.
Look for the results,
coming Sunday, September 18

BY GARY ESTWICK
sports@cdispatch.com
Starting this fall,
Antonio Wilson will make
some new friends.
So long Hamilton High
School. Nice to meet you
West Oktibbeha.
It’s been nice
Ackerman. Noxapater,
we’ve heard a lot about
you.
Hope things work out,
Eupora, but we’ve got an
October date against Weir.
Wilson, a senior running
back at West Lowndes High
School, plans to offer mem-
orable first impressions to
his new Friday night oppo-
nents now that the Panthers
have switched from Class
2A to 1A in the Mississippi
High School Activities
Association and longtime
coach Bobby Berry has
retired. One of his former
lettermen, Anthony King
(Class of 1988), will take
over.
Accomplishing this task
will place the Panthers
closer to the playoffs, clos-
er to advancing past the
first round for the first time
in more than a decade.
Wilson is capable of
leading the effort. He is
coming off a junior season
in which he rushed for
more than 2,000 yards.
The problem for oppo-
nents in 2011?
“I want to do more,”
Wilson said. “I want to get
my teamto the state cham-
pionship.”
A year later, the 5-foot-8,
160-pound playmaker is
stronger. A year later, the
same 260-pound bench
press he considered his
max now feels light. So
defenders, if you get a hand
on him, you better make
sure it’s two hands, and you
better hang on for a ride.
He’s faster —even
faster than last season
when he could reach the
end zone faster than you
could say The Dispatch
2010 Small Schools All-
Area co-offensive Player of
the Year.
“We’re pretty much
going to lean on Antonio
Wilson,” offensive coordi-
nator Todd Stanley said.
“There’s no doubt about it.
He’s got some things you
just can’t coach. He’s quick
and he’s shifty. He sees
things on the field other
kids just don’t see. He
knows how to step off
blocks, when to accelerate,
and when to go slow.”
All Wilson needs is his
inexperienced offensive
linemen to mature in time
for the season opener Aug.
19 against Montgomery
County. Senior DeMarcus
Hill, who will move from
right guard to left tackle, is
the lone returning starter.
Because of this, he is
preparing for a season of
playing as well as teach-
ing.
“It’s a challenge
because I’m a senior, so I’m
going to have to push peo-
ple to do better,” Hill said.
“Hopefully they can push
me, too.”
Hill knows if they can
create even the smallest
running lane for Wilson, if
they can hold their blocks
just a little better, a little
longer than last season,
Wilson can sprint out the
trenches, into defensive
secondaries and often-
times, reach the end zone.
“I like to see him bust
out and make touch-
downs,” Hill said. “It feels
good blocking for him.”
West Lowndes (6-5 last
season) will again run a
spread offense, its way of
keeping defenses guessing
with formations ranging
from two tight ends to the
Wing-T, a new look for the
Panthers.
While the Panthers
want to improve on the
field, perhaps the top item
on their 2011 wish list will
be improved player leader-
ship. Last year, depth and
mental breakdowns caused
another late season let-
down.
Too many times the
Panthers had the depth
and focus to keep games
close in the first, second,
and third quarters — even
early in the fourth quarter
—but not in the final min-
utes. Too many players lost
their focus late in the sea-
son, including their 58-24
loss to Baldwyn in the first
round of the playoffs.
“It wasn’t as far as I want-
ed to go, but we had some
success last year,” said
Gerald Sanders, who is
entering his senior season
as starting quarterback. He
also plays defensive back.
“We just didn’t have the
leadership. This year, we
have it. We’re going to have
our heads in the game this
year. We have friends that
listen to the players. They
talk to the players, motivate
them to do better. We don’t
have anyone trying to be
selfish.”
King was hired in July to
take over for Berry, his for-
mer football coach.
“I think he’s done a
heck of a job at West
Lowndes,” King said of
Berry, who coached foot-
ball at the school since
1998 and spent more than
four decades involved in
high school sports. “I could
tell from the first condition-
ing workout with that kids
that they were real likable
and he had done a good job
with discipline. They’re all-
around good kids.”
Wilson is a member of
that group. He is going to
do his best to focus on the
scoreboards. Sure, he’ll
take as many yards as he
can get, but he’s more con-
cerned about making a
memorable first impres-
sion in Class 1A.
“Some of my teammates
are looking up to me,” he
said, “so I have to step up
this season.”
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 11 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
Proud to
support the
West Lowndes
Panthers!
Priscilla King
940 Tuscaloosa Road
Columbus, MS
662-328-9988
2011
SCHEDULE
Aug. 19 at Montgomery Co.
Aug. 25 at Caledonia
SEPT. 2 SHANNON
SEPT. 9 ETHEL
Sept. 16 Open
Sept. 23 at East Oktibbeha
SEPT. 30 NOXAPATER
Oct. 7 at Pelahatchie
OCT. 14 WEST OKTIBBEHA
Oct. 21 at Nanih Waiya
OCT. 28 WEIR
Nov. 4 at Sebastopol
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
WEST LOWNDES PANTHERS
1-Jermaine Thomas, 2-Eric Harris, 3-Bryant Smith, 4-Quantavis Snell, 5-Deion Ames, 6-Gerald Sanders, 7-Darius Farmer, 8-Justin Stephenson, 10-Antonio Wilson, 11-Dominique Kelly, 12-Cody Crawford,
13-Brandon Malone, 14-Phytrel Williams, 15-Henry Mayfield, 20-Trevor Stowers, 21-Jamal Lasker, 22-Javarious Ellis, 23-Jonathon Mixon, 24-Kendrick Sanders, 25-Roy Miller, 30-Tyler Brown, 32-Marquise
Miller, 34-Jevontrae Williams, 38-Dexter Farmer, 50-Krayveon Harris, 52-Demarcus Hill, 54-Ladarius Jackson, 55-Breshon Brooks, 58-Ronnie Porter, 59-Katzman Rogers, 60-Korey Wilson, 65-Sean Smith,
66-Raheem Brewer, 68-Dontavious Riley, 70-Dalen Sanders, 70-Jaboris Davis, 74-Levonte Campbell, 75-Martin Lyons, 80-Daniel Davis, 81-Tyshon Rogers, 82-Kovi Rice, 83-Jacobie Burnett, 88-Eddie
Pippins.
CLASS 1A
REGION 3, DISTRICT 4
East Oktibbeha
Ethel
Nanih Waiya
Noxpater
Pelahatchie
Sebastopol
Weir
West Lowndes
West Oktibbeha
WILSON WILL LEAD PANTHERS INTO NEW BATTLES
West Lowndes High School senior running back Antonio Wilson
rushed for more than 2,000 yards last season. He likely will get
just as many chances to rush for the same total this season.
Gary Estwick
I nsi de West Lowndes
QUARTERBACK
Gerald Sanders, Justin
Stephenson.
I The Panthers need
Sanders, now in his sec-
ond season as starting
quarterback, to take on
more running duties. While
he played well last year,
Sanders wasn’t the rush-
ing threat he needed to
be.
“He’s going to have to
take a bigger load,” West
Lowndes coach Anthony
King said. “Our offense is
designed for our quarter-
backs to step up and run
the ball. He’s going to
have to take some of the
pressure off of Antonio.”
RUNNING BACKS
Antonio Wilson,
Jevontrae Williams, and
Trevor Stowers.
I Stowers earned playing
time last year after Wilson
and the offense had sever-
al games in hand. Williams
was brought up late last
season after the junior
high season. He’s bringing
brought up slowly behind
the older backs.
“Antonio is our starter. He
was a big part of our
offense last year and a lot
of teams know it. Behind
him, Trevor has the most
experience. He’s just a
hard nosed player. He’s a
little guy, but his
motor is wide open. If we
put him at center, he’d
play center.”
RECEIVERS
Deion Ames,
Darius Farmer,
Jermaine Thomas,
Henry Mayfield,
Quantavis Snell, and
Marquise Miller.
I Farmer is the lone
receiver/tight end with
experience, a cause for
concern early this fall.
“We’ve had a lot of
dropped balls in practice. I
know it’s early, but,
we definitely have to get
better in that area. They’re
going to have
to step up.”
OFFENSIVE LINE
DeMarcus Hill,
Ladarius Jackson,
Breshon Brooks,
Levonte Campbell,
Korey Wilson, Jaboris
Davis, and Martin Lyons.
I Hill and Jackson are
three-year starters. The
Panthers are hoping to
add more depth early this
season.
“Hill and Jackson, they
know what to do, and
hopefully, they will
bring the other two guys
along. Wilson started on
the line as a
sophomore and last year,
came off the bench on
defense. This year,
he’s back on the offensive
line.”
DEFENSIVE LINE
Korey Wilson,
Ladarius Jackson,
Breshon Brooks,
Jaboris Davis,
DeMarcus Hill,
Darius Farmer, and
Raheem Brewer.
I West Lowndes will uti-
lize a five-man front, simi-
lar to the defensive line
coach King utilized at
Noxubee County.
“At nose guard — the
least-experienced position
on the defensive line —
we will rotate Brooks and
Davis and Brewer. We’re
going to do a lot of shuf-
fling because those guys
are going to get tired.
Linebacker
Ronnie Porter,
Trevor Stowers,
Phytrel Williams, and
Marquise Miller.
I This fall will mark
Williams’ first season as a
starter, while Porter
and Stowers are returning
starters.
“Trevor, he pretty much
calls the defense, gets
everybody lined up.
He’s going to run to the
football. Ronnie Porter is
the same way. He
doesn’t say a lot, but he
doesn’t mind sticking his
nose in there.”
SECONDARY
Jamal Lasker, Eric Harris,
Justin Stephenson,
Jermaine Thomas,
Deion Ames, and
Gerald Sanders.
I Two new players will
start at cornerback. They
will get the first shot
at the job. Behind them,
four or five players could
be called on to
step in.
“Lasker and Harris, both of
them are fast. They’re not
that tall (5-foot-7), but
they’re fast with good
cover skills, lose hips and
can turn and run with any-
body.”
KICKER / PUNTER
Trevor Stowers
“I think we just need to
develop a little bit more
depth and get them play-
ing in a big cohesive unit.
After all, we lost about
half the starters from last
year. There’s a lot of new
faces out there, so it’s
going to take some time
to jell. But the talent is
out there.”
—Coach Anthony King

THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 12 SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
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after playing right guard
last season.
“It all comes with get-
ting older and knowing
you have to have the right
mind-set,” Rogers said.
“Sometimes your mind is
stronger than what you
feel like when you’re tired.
I’m still working on that.
There was a time I pulled
the wrong way just
because I used to play
right guard. You got to be
mentally strong, play well
and play right.”
Cannon has seized the
moment of his senior year,
too, after missing spring
practice due to academic
ineligibility. He took sum-
mer school and correspon-
dence classes to complete
his work in time to join
Starkville High for camp.
Cannon said talking
with coach Jamie Mitchell
about his academic situa-
tion was “intense.”
“It wasn’t nice at all,” he
said, smiling. “But I knew
what I had to do after that.
I knew how important I
was to the team.”
The of fensive line, a
worry spot before Mitchell
took over, has benefited
from a simple approach.
While the skill players
must learn a dearth of
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 13 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
Adam Davis
Field Representative
Starkville Area
662-574-3741
Jerry Hemphill
Special Representative
Louisville Area
662-803-7323
Heath Simpson
Field Representative
Columbus Area
662-425-1944
2011
SCHEDULE
Aug. 19 at Noxubee County
AUG. 26 MADISON CENTRAL
SEPT. 2 TUPELO
Sept. 9 at West Point
Sept. 16 Open
SEPT. 23 LANIER
SEPT. 30 PROVINE
Oct. 7 at Ridgeland
OCT. 14 CANTON
Oct. 21 at Yazoo City
OCT. 28 CALLAWAY
Nov. 4 at Neshoba Central
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
STARKVILLE YELLOW JACKETS
BY DAVID MILLER
dmiller@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE — One
look at Starkville High’s
roster shows tremendous
losses from its breakout
squad of 2010.
Quarterback and 30-
touchdown scorer Jaquez
Johnson is gone, as are pri-
mary receiving targets
Shaquille Hill and
Martavious Foster.
Running backs Jakarta
Agnew and Garrett Smith
are gone, too.
So how will the Yellow
Jackets score this year?
The answer isn’t in the
backfield or out wide; it’s
up front where three
starters return.
Cory Cannon and Eric
Rogers plan to carry the
of fense on their backs.
Their mind-set is simple: If
they create lanes and keep
quarterback Gabe Myles
clean, everything else will
take care of itself.
“You’re never gonna
know how young players
are going to react, and
we’ve got a lot of them
around us,” Cannon said.
“But, at the same time,
they’re all good players.
We’ll continue doing what
we’re doing just like we did
last year.”
Cannon and Rogers will
Cory Cannon, left, and Eric Rogers are expected to play key roles for a Starkville High School
football team that needs to replace several key losses. David Miller/Dispatch Staff
CLASS 5A
REGION 2, DISTRICT 6
Callaway
Canton
Lanier
Neshoba Central
Provine
Ridgeland
Starkville
Yazoo City
JACKETS STRONG UP FRONT
Cannon, Rogers expected to be fixtures on offensive line, to carry team
start at right guard and left
guard, respectively, this
season. Both started last
season, and Rogers enters
his third year as a two-way
starter for the Yellow
Jackets.
Entering his senior
year, Rogers said he’s bet-
ter prepared to deal with
the fatigue that comes with
playing both ways. He also
has had to learn left guard
See STARKVILLE, 24
I The Volunteers welcome
two transfers and are
excited about their starting
five.
“Angus is our anchor and
is the best all-around
player on our line.”
just be competitive, but
win — Ryan has to excel.
He’s going to have to
show a little more maturi-
ty and composure in the
heat of battle, too.”
McKell said learning
and playing multiple posi-
tions can be tiring, but
after a summer of working
with coach Bubba Davis in
the weight room he feels
his body is prepared. He
lauded Davis’ work in
increasing the team
strength and speed
through summer camps
and campus workouts.
“I played wing back and
receiver last year, so really
I’m just having to learn
one more position (quar-
terback),” said McKell,
who was clocked at 4.6
seconds in the 40-yard
sprint this summer at
Mississippi State. “But
wherever I’m at, I’m going
to feel even more confi-
dent because of how much
coach Davis pushed us in
the weight room. It’s night
and day around here as far
as how much stronger we
are.”
Catchot has experi-
enced the same strength
gains as McKell, which
will be even more vital
playing guard and defen-
sive tackle. Catchot is
Starkville Academy’s best
lineman and most physi-
cally imposing.
What sets him apart,
though, is his feet.
“His feet are much
quicker than last year,”
Terrill said. “He also uses
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 14 SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
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2011
SCHEDULE
AUG. 19 ST. ANDREWS
Aug. 26 at Heritage
SEPT. 2 MAGNOLIA HEIGHTS
Sept. 9 at Leake
Sept. 16 at Hillcrest
Sept. 23 at J. Prep
SEPT. 30 COPIAH
OCT. 7 PARK LANE
Oct. 14 at Winston
OCT. 21 ERA
Oct. 28 at Pres. Chr.
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
STARKVILLE ACADEMY VOLUNTEERS
CATCHOT, McKELL WANT TO HELP PUSH VOLS HIGHER
BY DAVID MILLER
dmiller@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE — Ask
anyone who the two most
vital players to Starkville
Academy’s offense are and
they’ll quickly point to
Angus Catchot and Ryan
McKell.
The seniors — Catchot
is a starter at right guard
and McKell is a do-it-all
athlete — don’t carry the
burden of ending a two-
season losing skid. They
are, however, responsible
for making sure the
Volunteers don’t fall of f
after winning three of four
to end 2010 season.
One glance at the duo
and it’s clear: They’re big-
ger, stronger, and ready to
get Starkville Academy to
the Mississippi
Association of
Independent Schools play-
offs.
Starkville Academy
coach Jeff Terrill doesn’t
hide the fact he must have
his offense’s two best play-
ers perform at a high level
each week to alleviate any
growing pains first-year
starting quarterback Drew
Pellum might have.
“Both of those guys pro-
vide so much to us,” Terrill
said. “They’re going to
have to play well and then
some.”
McKell will be the
Volunteers’ go-to threat in
the running game,
whether he’s at A-back or
at quarterback. Terrill said
McKell runs hard and is
quick to the edge, which
makes him an ideal fit at A-
back. But like any talented
athlete — McKell is 6-foot-
1, 200 pounds and has
good quickness — coach-
es want to get the most out
of him, so expect to see
McKell all over the field
this season.
“He’s got the ability to
play at the next level,”
Terrill said. “When we got
the ball to Ryan last year,
we scored points. For us to
take the next step — not
MAIS
CLASS AAA, DISTRICT 2
Copiah Academy
East Rankin Academy
Hillcrest Christian
Starkville Academy
Jackson Prep
Parkland Academy
Presbyterian Christian
NOTE: Jackson Prep, Parklane
Academy, and Presbyterian Christian
are Division I. All regular-season
games count toward determining the
teams that will advance to the
Division I and Division II playoffs.
Starkville Academy will look to starting right guard Angus Catchot, left, and to do-it-all performer
Ryan McKell to help the team build on a strong ending to the 2010 season.
David Miller/Dispatch Staff
See VOLUNTEERS, 24
See SA CHART, 24
“We’re going to see
some great lines, but
we’re bigger and
stronger than we were
last year. We’ve just
got to stay healthy.”
Starkville Academy
coach Jeff Terrill
37
I Number of players on
the Starkville Academy
roster compared to 28 last
year.
QUARTERBACK
Drew Pellum,
Ryan McKell.
I Pellum, a junior has
been named the starter
and takes over for Kyle
Henson.
“You’ll see Ryan in there,
too, for a change of pace,”
Starkville Academy coach
Jeff Terrill said. “But
Pellum will be critical in
our offense.”
RUNNING BACKS
Ryan Mann, John Michael
Robinson, Colby Runnells,
James Mapp, Ryan McKell,
and Brandon Sharp.
I Starkville Academy’s
triple-option attack
employees multiple
running backs.
“We like our speed to the
perimeter this year. We’ve
also got more depth.
Those two together make
a coach smile.”
RECEIVERS
Hunter Bolin,
Jordan Bright.
I The passing offense was
sorely lacking last season,
but Terrill thinks the
Volunteers will be able to
keep defenses honest this
year.
“We’re real excited about
these two, especially
Jordan, who has the height
and strength and catches
the ball well. We think
we’ll be able to stretch a
defense.”
OFFENSIVE LINE
Cody Smith, Colin Stokes,
Angus Catchot,
Tripp Janessen, and
Cole Phelps.
Insi de Starkvi l l e Academy
Posi ti on
Breakdown

THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 15 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
2011
SCHEDULE
AUG. 19 LEAKE COUNTY
AUG. 26 MCADAMS
SEPT. 2 NORTH PONTOTOC
SEPT. 9 SEBASTOPOL
Sept. 16 at Ethel
SEPT. 23 WEST LOWNDES
Oct. 7 at Noxapater
OCT. 14 PELAHATCHIE
Oct. 21 at West Oktibbeha
OCT. 28 NANIH WAIYA
Nov. 4 at Weir
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
EAST OKTIBBEHA TITANS
CLASS 1A
REGION 3, DISTRICT 4
East Oktibbeha
Ethel
Nanih Waiya
Noxpater
Pelahatchie
Sebastopol
Weir
West Lowndes
West Oktibbeha
TITANS COMMITTED TO CHANGE
BY DAVID MILLER
dmiller@cdispatch.com
CRAWFORD —
There’s renewed spirit
and dedication in the East
Oktibbeha County High
football camp.
Naturally, much of it
can be attributed to the
leadership of the team’s
seniors. For the Titans,
defensive back Arthur
Gillespie and do-it-all play-
er Kortland Petty are
spearheading the move-
ment to transform East
Oktibbeha.
Both players have
started each of the past
three years and have won
Class 1A state track
medals.
But success in football
has been limited to a pair
of four-win seasons in the
past three years. Gillespie
and Petty haven’t beaten
rival West Oktibbeha in
their high school careers.
Things had to change
on the field, but more
important the Titans
needed to commit to the
cause in the offseason and
in the summer.
“No one wants what
happened last year,” Petty
said. “These guys know
we’re better than 4-7, and
we’re finally starting to
act like it.”
Gillespie said player
attendance to summer lift-
ing sessions improved
this year, and teammates
started to lift with the
intent of becoming better
players.
“It’s been all of us get-
ting bigger and stronger,”
he said. “We’ve got good
guys with good skill, but
what we were able to do
this summer is really
going to show.”
The weight room has
also been a way for sen-
iors to regulate detrimen-
tal behavior or poor
effort.
“There’s no more
horseplay,” Gillespie said.
“This team is dif ferent
from the ones we’ve had
in the past.”
Gillespie is about 95
percent recovered from
anterior cruciate ligament
surgery last fall. He said
the summer workouts
were essential to prepar-
ing him for the season.
Though Gillespie is
near full fitness, Titans
coach Randy Brooks
believes he’ll be twice as
good because of his
knowledge of the defense.
The three-time state
track champion is also the
most athletic member of
East Oktibbeha’s veteran-
led secondary.
“He’s going to be
directing traf fic more
there than he has in
recent years,” Brooks
said of Gillespie. “He
reads sets well and gets
us lined up. He’s going to
“We’re not carrying
dead weight around
here.”
East Oktibbeha County
High School coach
Randy Brooks
Insi de
East Okti bbeha
2006
I The last time East
Oktibbeha beat rival West
Oktibbeha. The players are
motivated to break the
skid.
Posi ti on
Breakdown
QUARTERBACK
Davalyn Bell, Kodi Petty
I Bell enters his first year
as a starter, replacing
two-year starter Chris
Hunter.
“Davalyn has speed and
work ethic in the weight
room,” East Oktibbeha
County High coach Randy
Brooks said. “He hasn’t
been challenged quite yet
in terms of a scrimmage,
though.”
RUNNING BACK
Terrence Rice, Justin
Williams, and
Juwan Roberts.
I In the Titans’ single-wing
offense, Rice, a four th-year
starter, will be the feature
back.
“They’ve all worked hard in
the weight room this
summer. We’ll be bigger,
faster and stronger there
than last year.”
RECEIVERS
Kodi Petty, Jamal Halbert.
I Petty and Halbert will
play tight end in the
system and will be used to
block primarily.
“They’re flex enough that
when we run spread they
can go out to receiver.”
OFFENSIVE LINE
Jalen Peterson,
Justin Williams, and
Jamarquiz Page.
I Peterson, a guard, is the
strongest person on the
team and was an All-
District selection last year.
“Jalen’s going to have to
do (Demonte) Horsley
(former two-way starter)
type work this year.”
DEFENSIVE LINE
Jalen Peterson,
Justin Williams, and
Jamarquiz Page.
I Like Peterson, the
Titans’ other top linemen
play both ways.
“I expect Jalen to be
double-teamed. If not,
they’ll just eat people
alive.”
LINEBACKER
Lanathan Brown,
Jamarquiz Page.
I Brown and Page will be
the tackling machines in a
5-2 system.
“I also feel like we have
several others to play
linebacker for us in other
combinations.”
SECONDARY
Arthur Gillespie,
Juwan Roberts,
Jamal Halbert, and
Terence Rice.
I Gillespie is the leader of
the unit at free safety.
“Our best athletes are
back there, so we’re going
to be strong.”
East Oktibbeha County High School’s Arthur Gillespie, left, and Kodi Petty will try to help the Titans beat West Oktibbeha for the first
time since 2006 and help the team get back to the playoffs. David Miller/Dispatch Staff
be very valuable.”
Petty is likely to see
time at receiver, defen-
sive back, and quarter-
back. East Oktibbeha’s
utility player will be vital.
He led the Titans with
434 receiving yards and
five touchdowns last sea-
son. Still, he had just 15
total touches last season.
“We’re trying to get
the ball into his hands as
much as possible,”
Brooks said. “He’s just
one of those athletes who
is so flexible for us. He’s
also improved his ability
to let the game come to
him. He doesn’t panic
when something goes
wrong, which allows him
to step up and be a better
playmaker for us.”
This summer, East
Oktibbeha skill players
did something they rarely
do: Go to a passing camp.
The Titans camped at
East Mississippi
Community College and
got valuable on-field
experience, Brooks said.
The time was also impor-
tant in building relation-
ships and camaraderie.
“I’m feeling better and
better about our depth
and this team because of
how hard the kids
worked this summer,”
Brooks said.
To ensure the team-
first message covers all
bases, Brooks is adamant
every player on the roster
will play. He even hinted
at the idea of making cuts
to make sure the team
won’t have “bench-warm-
ers.”
“It’s like I told the boys
in track, we won’t carry
dead weight,” Brooks
said. “The ones I’m keep-
ing will have a defined
role.”
“It’s been all of us getting bigger and
stronger. We’ve got good guys with good skill,
but what we were able to do this summer is
really going to show.”
East Oktibbeha County
High School senior Arthur Gillespie
1-Bryton Conley, 2-Davalyn Bell, 2-Curtis Randle, 4-Terence Rice, 6-Jamal Halbert, 7-Kortland Petty, 8-Juwan Roberts, 10-John Outlaw, 14-Arthur Gillispie, 20-Nate Brown, 22-Jawon Brown, 24-Lanathan
Brown, 32-Dion Clanton, 50-Jalen Peterson, 55-Jeremi Staples, 60-Jamarquiz Page, 62-Langston Spencer, 65-Justin Williams, 78-Jacorey Brown.

don’t practice it, but some
teams don’t have the tools
we have,” Smith said. “We
have great receivers, and I
go through my reads
quick. This year, we want
to have our offense
majored-out. We want to
run it almost to perfection.”
Now entering his junior
year, Smith returns with
the standout receivers
Dwight Quinn and Drake
Powell. But there’s a twist
to how potent the offense
will be: The running game.
Confident teams will still
struggle to prepare for West
Oktibbeha’s passing attack,
Lowrey believes the team
can take a greater step —
making a playoff run — if
teams have to respect the
run and the pass.
“When we went to five-
wide, coaches thought it
was crazy,” Lowrey said.
“We commit to throwing
to all five, too. It put so
much strain on the
defense that mid-season
last year, people didn’t
blitz us. Now imagine how
defenses will have to play
us if we can run the ball.”
Though Smith may
have less opportunity to
sling the ball around the
field, he’s excited about the
idea of running more
because of how lethal the
team will be. As the quar-
terback, he’s involved with
read and zone option plays.
“Coach says we’re
gonna be 50-50,” Smith
said. “I’m still gonna get my
touches; I’m involved in
about 20 percent of the
runs, so you know, how
could you not be excited
about it? Plus, it gets that
many more guys involved.”
The Timberwolves went
6-5 and narrowly missed a
playoff spot last year. For
Lowrey, it’s the first time he
has started preseason with-
out having to make whole-
sale changes.
He expects Smith and
the offense to take the
next step and to operate at
a quicker tempo and to
eliminate penalties.
“To walk into a season
knowing we’re polishing is
a great feeling,” he said.
“We’ve actually trimmed
back the plays, running
less to be more efficient.
Last year, our emphasis
was speed and how quick
we can run the next play.
As soon as the ball is
down, we’re running the
play this year. That’s what
we’re aiming for.”
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 16 SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
2011
SCHEDULE
Aug. 19 at Univ. Christian
AUG. 26 MONTGOMERY CO.
SEPT. 8 EUPORA
Sept. 16 at Nanih Waiya
SEPT. 23 WEIR
Sept. 30 at Sebastopol
OCT. 7 ETHEL
Oct. 14 at West Lowndes
OCT. 21 EAST OKTIBBEHA
Oct. 28 at Noxapater
Nov. 4 at Pelahatchie
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
WEST OKTIBBEHA TIMBERWOLVES
Posi ti on
Breakdown
QUARTERBACK
Von Smith
I The junior passed for
2,900 yards and 29
touchdowns last season.
“He’s a leader and student
of the game,” West
Oktibbeha County High
coach Adam Lowrey said.
“He knows when to do it.”
RUNNING BACK
Tiberias Lampkin,
Shun Fair.
I The Timberwolves are
dedicated to balancing the
offense this season, which
means more action for
Lampkin and Fair.
“Both of these guys have
great hands, are strong,
and dedicated.”
RECEIVERS
Dwight Quinn, Drake
Powell, and Aaron
Brownlee.
I Quinn is the most
experience and explosive
of the group.
“People will have to double
Dwight every play, but
Drake is a great
complement.”
OFFENSIVE LINE
Johnny Chambers, Sharrod
Stafford, Donovan
Henderson, and Alex
Chambers.
I Two juniors and two
seniors make up the group.
“I look for a lot out of
Donovan, who is quick off
the ball and dependable.”
DEFENSIVE LINE
Johnny Chambers, Sharrod
Stafford, Donovan
Henderson, and Alex
Chambers.
I Like most of the roster,
West Oktibbeha’s linemen
will play both ways.
“Sharrod is a big, strong
player who’ll really help
this group.”
LINEBACKER
Tiberias Lampkin, Shun
Fair, and Bishop Robinson.
I Fair and Robinson are
experienced seniors.
“This group is strong and
everyone loves contact.”
SECONDARY
Von Smith, Dwight Quinn,
Drake Powell, and
Jonathon Love.
I The defensive backs are
experienced at running
Cover 2.
“Some of our best athletes
are back there. They’ll be
just as productive as they
are on offense.”
CLASS 1A
REGION 3, DISTRICT 4
East Oktibbeha
Ethel
Nanih Waiya
Noxapater
Pelahatchie
Sebastopol
Weir
West Lowndes
West Oktibbeha
BALANCED T’WOLVES TARGET PLAYOFFS
BY DAVID MILLER
dmiller@cdispatch.com
MABEN — Two years
ago, Von Smith was the
scrawny freshman with the
big arm.
Thrust into a starting
role midway through the
season, the West
Oktibbeha County High
School quarterback was at
the center of a newly
installed passing offense.
The diminutive Smith
struggled that year, toss-
ing twice as many intercep-
tions than touchdowns.
The ups and downs Smith
had, though, were exten-
sions of the team’s rebuild-
ing process under coach
Adam Lowrey.
Lowrey knew he had a
special talent in Smith and
that it wouldn’t take long
for his quarterback to light
up Class 1A.
Smith wasted no time
living up to his coach’s
presage his sophomore
year, finishing with 2,910
passing yards and 29
touchdowns to just 10
interceptions. He complet-
ed 57 percent of his passes
and averaged 264 passing
yards per game.
“You have no idea how
much better he’ll be this
year,” Lowrey said.
Smith, though, is an
anomaly, as most 1A pro-
grams have traditional or
option rushing attacks as
their base offense.
Passing offenses often
take more time to perfect
because of the timing
needed between a quarter-
back and receivers. Then,
a team has to have a quar-
terback who not only can
throw, but who also can do
it accurately.
For Class 1A teams that
often have less than 30
players on the roster, stick-
ing with a run-based sys-
tem typically yields higher
gains.
That’s to Smith and the
Timberwolves’ advantage
because most teams can’t
simulate what they do in
practice.
“Not only the fact they
Bishop Robinson, Dwight Quinn, Shun Fair, Drake Powell, Aaron Brownlee, Richard Richmond, Sharrod Stafford, Alex Chambers, Darrius Clark, Von Smith, Tiberias Lampkin, Donovan Henderson, Jonathan
Love, Kelsey Jefferson, Johnny Chambers, Michael Graise, Lavontae Tate, DeShun Brown, Lamorris Cunningham, Ty Smith, Deontae Smith.

BY GARY ESTWICK
sports@cdispatch.com
PHEBA — Seniors Ben
Pearson and Harley
Thompson, both new to
the Hebron Christian foot-
ball team, took distinctive
paths to their new locker
room.
Three years ago,
Pearson was a 5-foot-4,
120-pound freshman at
Oak Hill Academy. He
played quarterback on the
junior varsity team and
was a member of the spe-
cial teams unit on the var-
sity squad.
“I was getting
smashed,” he said. “I was
like, ‘This is not for me.’
That just really made me
hate the game so much.”
So he quit.
At Hebron Christian,
Thompson wanted to play
varsity football, but wasn’t
allowed. His parents didn’t
want him to get hurt. After
his eighth-grade year, he
was forced to hang up his
cleats.
“It was hard because
everybody else wanted
me to play,” Thompson
said. “It was rough. I want-
ed to be out there.”
Entering their senior
seasons, the roadblocks
have disappeared just in
time to help the Eagles
rebound from a 1-9 record
in 2010.
Pearson is now 5-10,
181 pounds and enjoying
his new-found girth on the
offensive line. It should
allow him to protect quar-
terback Will Corbin and to
open holes for running
backs Marquez Robinson,
Taylor Coggins, and Cody
Tatum.
“Never imagined being
one of the bigger people
on the team,” he said.
And Thompson finally
got permission to play
from his parents.
How’d he do it?
“I really don’t know,”
Thompson said. “They
said, ‘Yes’, so I didn’t ask
them any questions.”
Both players — two of
eight seniors on the team
— are a part of the foun-
dation first-year coach
Gerald “Tri” Nason is
trying to build. Yes,
they’re new to the team,
but leadership is about
ef fort and motivation
more than years of experi-
ence.
“We don’t have a lot of
guys, but the guys that are
here are here to work
hard, give me what
they’ve got, and try not to
make any excuses. I like
that,” said Nason, a gradu-
ate of Starkville Academy
and a former football play-
er at Mississippi State
under Sylvester Croom.
“If we build off of that
mentality, once we can
learn how to win, we’ll be
doing a whole lot better.”
So far, it has worked.
Attendance was high for
voluntary workouts this
summer, with Thompson,
Coggins, Robinson, and
Tatum leading the way.
Nason hopes success
this season will lead to
increased participation.
The roster size this season
forced Hebron Christian
to move from 11- to eight-
man football this season.
On of fense, Hebron
Christian will run a spread
formation and try to con-
fuse defenses. Nason
described Corbin, his
quarterback, as an athlete.
He can run, he can throw
and, more importantly,
he’s smart with the foot-
ball. Last season, he was
the varsity backup and
started at receiver.
Nason believes Corbin
will have a greater impact
at quarterback because he
can makes plays and touch
the ball on every play. It
probably helps Corbin is
good friends with Pearson,
his new center.
The Eagles were shut
out three times last season
and scored 20 or more
points just four times.
Their lone win was a 20-15
victory Sept. 3 at West
Memphis Christian.
On defense, Hebron
Christian will utilize a
defense that plays to its
strength. The unit,
coached by David Foster,
has more linebackers than
linemen.
Sophomore Troy
Arnold, new to the varsity
squad, is an example.
“He’s just real aggressive,
he likes to punish his
opponents, whether it’s at
practice or at games,”
Nason said. “He likes to
deliver the big hit.”
Then there’s the two
senior newcomers.
Pearson said he doesn’t
miss being under center.
“It’s pretty cool,” said
Pearson, said of playing
center. He sat out of
sports after transferring
midway through his soph-
omore season.
“There’s a lot more you
have to do, being a center
than just being on the
team. It’s a lot of responsi-
bly. You and the quarter-
back have to have that
connection, and me and
Corbin do.”
Thompson, who is 6-1,
235 pounds, will play right
guard and on the defen-
sive line. Unlike Pearson,
he hasn’t played any other
high school sports.
Returning to football has
proved to be physically
challenging, but mentally,
he said he never left the
field, dating back to his
eighth-grade team.
“It would be great if I
could set that example and
that’s what starts it off,”
Thompson said of starting
a winning tradition. “It
would be great to get that
accomplished.”
QUARTERBACK
Corbin Rogers,
Taylor Coggins.
I The Eagles are hoping
smart play at quarterback
helps them ease back
into eight-man football.
Corbin Rogers is entering
his first season as a
starter at the position.
“(Corbin) is an athlete.
Throw, run, catch. He fits
in just right,” Hebron
Christian coach Tri Nason
said. “A lot of what we’re
going to do —shotgun,
running options —that fits
into what he can do. And
of course, he can make
the passes.”
RUNNING BACK
Taylor Coggins, Cody
Tatum, Marquez Robinson,
and Cody Tatum.
I The rushing game is one
of the team’s strengths,
led by some of Hebron
Christian’s most dedicated
players.
“Marquez is your quick,
slashing running back.
Taylor, he’s just a hard
runner, whether he’s
getting around the corner
or he’s going to run over
somebody. Cody, he’s the
big boy. He’s the pounder.”
RECEIVERS
David Kinard, Marques
Robinson, Ryan Moore,
and Taylor Coggins.
I The Eagles need this
group to produce. The
more of a threat they are,
the better off the running
game will be.
“David, he’s a tall lanky
kid (6 feet). He can run
real good. Ryan,
he can catch anything
thrown to him. If he can
touch it, he’s going to
catch it. We need this
group to produce in order
to keep the offense
balanced.”
OFFENSIVE LINE
Troy Arnold, Jacob Ware,
Ben Pearson, Jacob Ware,
Harley Thompson, and
Jacob Ware.
I Even though the group
has two seniors, it’s one of
the most inexperienced
positions on the team. But
if they figure things out, it
could transform into an
offensive strength.
“With the size they have,
they’re going to be plenty
big to handle the
defenses they’ll be playing
against.”
DEFENSIVE LINE
Cody Tatum, Troy Arnold,
Ben Pearson, and Jacob
Ware.
I Defensive coordinator
David Foster would love to
add another one or
two capable players to the
rotation, helping the
Eagles keep fresh
legs in the game, especial-
ly on passing downs.
“They’ve got some
potential,” Hebron Christian
defensive coordinator David
Foster said. “They just need
to reach it. We’ve got low
numbers, so we’re playing
both ways, so we have to
beat people by being in
shape.”
LINEBACKERS
Harley Thompson,
Taylor Coggins, and
Ryan Moore
I Coggins and Moore will
adjust to the eight-man
game, while Thompson,
who hasn’t played football
since the eighth grade, will
re-adjust to playing
football, which includes
starting on offense and
defense.
“Both of those guys
(Thompson and Coggins)
are capable of being hard
hitters,” Foster said.
“They’re quick to get to
the ball. Both of those
guys want to hit
somebody. They’re going
to seek somebody to hit
on every play.”
DEFENSIVE BACKS
Marquez Robinson,
Ryan Moore,
Corbin Rogers, and
David Kinard
I Foster will stress the
importance of making
tackles, as well as
defending the pass. You
never want to miss tackles
in 11-man football, but in
eight-man, the
consequences can be
worse.
“I’m expecting them to
play physical,” Foster said.
“Most of these guys that
we have back there are
capable of putting big hits
on people.”
SPECIAL TEAMS
KICKER
Cody Tatum
PUNTER
Corbin Rogers
ASSISTANT COACHES
David Foster
(Defensive coordinator),
Hearne Foster
(Offensive/defensive line)
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 17 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
2011
SCHEDULE
Aug. 19 at Strider Academy
Aug. 26 Open
Sept. 2 at Calvary Christian
SEPT. 9 CLINTON CHRISTIAN
Sept. 16 Open
Sept. 23 at Park Place Christian
Sept. 30 at Kemper Academy
OCT. 7 FLINT HILL CHRISTIAN
OCT. 14 CALHOUN ACADEMY
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
HEBRON CHRISTIAN EAGLES
1- Collin Moore, 2-Cameron Smith, 3-Marquez Robinson, 7-David Kinard, 11-Will-Corben Rogers, 15-Cody Tatum, 17-Taylor Coggins, 28-Ben Pearson, 50-Taylor Turman, 52-Harley Thompson, 56-Jacob Ware,
65-Troy Arnold, 87-Ryan Moore.
“We don’t have a lot of
guys, but the guys that
are here are here to
work hard, give me
what they’ve got, and
try not to make
excuses. If we build off
of that mentality, once
we can learn how to
win, we’ll be doing a
whole lot better.”
Hebron Christian coach
Tri Nason
Insi de Hebron Chri sti an
Posi ti on Breakdown
3
I Newcomers this season
for Hebron Christian:
Hartley Thompson, Ben
Pearson, and David Kinard
—all seniors.
30
I Most points scored last
season by Hebron
Christian (in a 38-30 loss
to Calhoun Academy on
Oct. 22).
I Hebron Christian made a
quick switch from 11-man
to eight-man football,
adjusting its schedule of
opponents in late July and
their offensive and
defensive philosophies.
LOW NUMBERS, HIGH WORK RATE
Eagles will rely on eight seniors in last minute move from 11-man to eight-man schedule
Hebron Christian seniors Ben Pearson, left, and Harley Thompson will get a chance to contribute to
coach Tri Nason’s first season as head coach at the school. Contributed
Fast Fact
BY DAVID MILLER
dmiller@cdispatch.com
WEST POINT —
DeQuinten Spraggins has-
n’t been a headliner for
the West Point High
School football team.
He has spent much of
his career as a defensive
back on back-to-back state
championship teams. He
also backed up his cousin,
Justin Cox, at quarterback
and rarely took snaps
there in games.
But as the unques-
tioned starting quarter-
back of the 2011 Green
Wave, he finally will get
his chance to ball out with
the keys to the car.
Spraggins will go to
work with nearly all of the
Green Wave’s of fensive
linemen from last season’s
Class 5A title squad,
including senior class-
mates Alex Hall, Jonathon
Jones, and Romia Wilson.
He’s anxious and excit-
ed to anchor the state’s
top 5A team.
West Point coaches,
though, hope he finds his
balance between playing
loose and playing out of
control.
“The inexperience
won’t be the key,” West
Point coach Chris
Chambless said, “but at
the quarterback spot, the
game management, he’s
gonna have to do a good
job of that. We already
know what kind of an ath-
lete and person he is.”
Spraggins played quar-
terback in junior high, but
he hasn’t taken the
knocks from running the
rock through a Class 5A
season. He hasn’t had to
move an offense in crunch
time of a playoff game. He
hasn’t had to deliver an
on-target pass on what
could always be West
Point’s only pass of the
game.
To boot, his predeces-
sor was a standout who
led West Point to state
titles in 2009 and ’10 as
quarterback and earned a
scholarship to play foot-
ball at Mississippi State
and is now at East
Mississippi Community
College.
With the level-headed
demeanor his coaches
want from him, Spraggins
smiles when reminded of
the enormity of his transi-
tion.
“It’s just my time,”
Spraggins said. “I knew I
was gonna have to play
sooner or later. I’ve been
second string since my
sophomore year.”
Having a quarterback
“locked in” for an entire
game can be challenging
because of the Green
Wave’s style of play.
Whether it’s second-and-1
or third-and-17, West
Point uses its running
game to impose its will on
opponents. Last year, that
bruising strategy pro-
duced a pair of 1,000-yard
rushers last season.
To Chambless,
Spraggins must have an
unquestioned command
of the huddle to run the
offense the way the coach-
es want.
“He’s got a lot of poten-
tial to be able to do that,”
Chambless said. “He han-
dled the spring real well
and he’s very humble.
The big thing is he knows
he won’t have to tote it
every play because of the
talent he has around him.
But there’s always a
chance he might have to.
He’s got the confidence to
do it.”
Through the spring
and summer, Spraggins,
who had six interceptions
last year, has accelerated
through offensive coordi-
nator Lee Grisham’s pres-
sure-packed scenarios.
Spraggins works through
no-huddle situations and
unfavorable down-and-dis-
tances with little time on
the clock. Nearly every
minute of his practice time
is spent with Grisham in
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 18 SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
Go Green Wave
Good Luck and have
a great season!
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2011
SCHEDULE
AUG. 20 SOUTH PANOLA
Aug. 26 Open
Sept. 2 at Columbus
SEPT. 9 STARKVILLE
Sept. 16 at Noxubee
Sept. 23 at Lake Cormorant
SEPT. 30 HERNANDO
Oct. 7 at Clarksdale
OCT. 14 SALTILLO
Oct. 21 at Center Hill
Oct. 28 at Oxford
NOV. 4 NEW HOPE
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
WEST POINT GREEN WAVE
1-Chaddrick Chandler, 2-Stephen Burnett, 3-Ladarius Patterson, 4-Dvanta Randle, 5-Josh Anderson, 6-Tarrence Orr, 7-Jayson Burnett, 8-Nelson Mcintosh, 9-William Harrell, 10-Anthony Johnson, 12-Lagaris
Wordlaw, 13-Diquan Wheeler, 14-Eric Lemus, 15-Dequinten Spraggins, 16-Reshard Deanes, 17-Rashad Jones, 18-Bruce Barclay, 19-Davion Bradshaw, 20-Mario Virges, 21-Jonathan Patterson, 22-Aeris
Williams, 23-Leroy Calvert, 24-Roger Thomas, 25-Makarios Sears, 26-Antreon Bennett, 27-TJ Minor, 28-Tez Lane, 29-Stephon Ivy, 30-Charles Heard, 31-Steve Vance, 32-Brandon Edwards, 3-Roger Price,
34-Eric Johnson, 35-Jerr y Randle, 36-Tyler Witherspoon, 38-Anias Walker, 39-R.J. Tallie, 40-Eddious Webb, 42-Kris Pernell, 43-Bradley Ewing, 44-Freddie Reed, 46-Nathaniel Johnson, 50-Romia Wilson,
51-Chris Williams, 53-Demondtae Donald, 55-Deion Shelton, 56-Ed Brown, 57-Antonio Dent, 59-Travonte Chandler, 61-Ronald Matthews, 62-Carson Miller, 63-Leandrew Hampton, 65-Chris "Swag" Fuller,
66-Tyler Jefferson, 68-Willie Owens, 70-Lyndon Johnson, 71-Thomas Tiffin, 72-Riley Morton, 73-Fredricus Mickens, 74-Alex Hall, 75-Nadarrius Eckers, 76-Jonathan Jones, 77-Martavius Jefferson, 78-Jordan
Johnson, 80-Woodrow Price, 81-Roderick Box, 90-Lederrius Gallion.
CLASS 5A
REGION 1, DISTRICT 2
Center Hill
Clarksdale
Hernando
Lake Cormorant
New Hope
Oxford
Saltillo
West Point
“It is what it is. We
always want to play a
tough non-district
schedule. We’re never
gonna take a back
seat because no one’s
expecting us to be
like we have been.”
West Point High School
coach Chris Chambless
Insi de
West Poi nt
4
I The number of returning
starters on the offensive
line. The team has only
seven returning starters.
Posi ti on Breakdown
QUARTERBACK
DeQuinten Spraggins, Jayson Burnett,
and JA Wyatt.
I Spraggins backed up Justin Cox each
of the last two years and enters 2011 as
the unquestioned starter.
“He’s just got to improve his game
management, and that all comes with
experience,” West Point coach Chris
Chambless said.
RUNNING BACK
Tez Lane, Aries Williams, and
Mario Virges.
I The Green Wave lose their top two
rushers from last season, but Chambless
doesn’t think there will be a dropoff.
“We’ve got good depth and some guys
who’ll run hard. They got to be tough to
play running back here.”
RECEIVERS
Will Harrell, Jerry Randle.
I The Green Wave don’t pass much, but
when they do it’s usually a big gain.
“Harrell is our returning starter and
should have a great senior year.”
OFFENSIVE LINE
Jonathan Jones, Romia Wilson, Alex Hall,
and TJ Minor.
I More players return to the offensive
line than at any position.
“Six of the eight guys who played are
back, too. This is, without a doubt, the
strength of our team.”
DEFENSIVE LINE
Ladarius Gallion, Ed Brown, Freddie Reed,
and Josh Anderson.
I Reed, a junior, is the only starting
defensive lineman back from 2010.
“There’s some inexperience there, but
they’ve got the potential to do good work
for us.”
LINEBACKER
Brandon Edwards,
Trey Bennett.
I Edwards is one of just two returning
starters on defense.
“Now is the time for Brandon to be in a
leadership role.”
SECONDARY
Anthony Johnson,
Rashad Jones, Nelson McIntosh, and
Jonathan Patterson.
I With Spraggins’ move to quarterback,
the secondary is completely rebuilt.
“They’re athletic but inexperienced. Now
they get the chance to step up and make
a name for themselves.
DIFFERENT LOOK ALL AROUND FOR GREEN WAVE
The West Point High School football team will go with a running back by committee approach after losing its top two rushers from last
season. From left: Mario Virges, Tez Lane, Aeris Williams, quarterback DeQuinten Spraggins, Roger Thomas, Makarios Sears, Kris
Pernell, and Fredricus Mickens. Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff
“It’s just my time. I knew I was gonna have to
play sooner or later. I’ve been second string
since my sophomore year.”
West Point High School
quarterback DeQuinten Spraggins
See WEST POINT, 24

BY GARY ESTWICK
sports@cdispatch.com
WEST POINT — If left
up to Reid Posey, the Oak
Hill Academy senior will
retain the positives from
last season’s 3-8 campaign
and disregard the regret-
table moments.
Posey is proud of the
way the 2010 Raiders
played as hard as they
could. Sometimes their
roster size was dwarfed by
the opponents’ depth
chart. Other times they
were physically smaller.
“But I felt like the effort
we put out every game
was our best,” he said. “I
think that’s going to carry
over to this year.”
Then there’s the set-
backs — the mental mis-
takes and turnovers. On
defense, the Raiders’
inability to force a
turnovers coupled with
missed assignments and
tackles and too many big
plays allowed proved to be
a crippling mix.
Oak Hill Academy’s
lack of physicality also
prevented it from reach-
ing the postseason for a
second year in a row. It’s a
problem that can’t be fully
solved in the weight room.
“At the end of the day,
are you going to make the
big hit or not, or are you
going to be scared of it?”
said Posey, a running
back/l i nebacker/ki ck-
er/punter who also plays
on special teams.
Manchester 32, Oak
Hill 20.
The Oct. 8, 2010, loss
served as the biggest
example of what mistakes
can lead to. Despite
Manchester enduring
three first-half turnovers,
Oak Hill Academy trained
17-14 at halftime. The
Raiders fumbled inside
the Manchester Academy
10 and in the end zone,
giving up a safety.
“Had we won, it would
have put us in the playoffs,
but it ended up being the
other way around,” said
Posey, who is looking for-
ward to the rematch on
Sept. 9. “That was one
game where mental mis-
takes killed us. We turned
the ball over numerous
times. I don’t even remem-
ber how many. That was
the game walking away we
knew we should have
won.”
While the Raiders
struggled, J.R. Wilbourne
was on the sideline. He
tore the medial collateral
ligament in his left knee
and missed five games. He
didn’t return until the sea-
son finale against
Winston.
“It made me realize
how much I like playing
football,” said Wilbourne,
who plays right tackle and
defensive end. “It was
weird being over there
and not being able to play.
Practice every day for so
many days, all through the
summer, you kind of start
to get tired of it until
something like that hap-
pens then you realize how
much you like playing it. It
made this year a lot more
fun.”
Because the Raiders
still have a lot to learn,
first-year coach Benjie
Merchant will try to find
the right balance between
keeping his small roster
healthy while teaching the
fundamentals of the game
at practice in preparation
for Friday nights.
“There won’t be much
holding back at practice,”
said Merchant, a second-
generation coach. He
spent part of the offseason
studying film from last
season’s games. The
defense will move from a
3-5 to a 5-3 or 5-2.
“We’ve got to hit,” he
said. “We’ve got to do
more of that this year. I
think they’re lacking more
on that than anything.”
So far, so good for the
Raiders. The players have
responded to Merchant’s
workout challenges, a
mix of fundamentals and
fun. If players appear to
be dragging through
drills, he will quickly
change things. The
Raiders might complete
an offense-versus-defense
bench press challenge, or
the coaching might could
challenge a letterman to
complete a task and
watch his teammates sup-
port him. They also might
try a player-versus-coach
liftoff.
It’s moments like this
that will help Merchant
judge the success of this
fall.
“I think I’m going to
gauge it by how we look as
a team, how we handle
ourselves when we lose —
or win,” Merchant said.
The offense will trans-
form from a pro-style of I
formation. Quarterback
Conner Baird, a junior,
will lead it. His top receiv-
ing options include Curt
Huffman, Bradley Allen,
and Steve Dragoo — all
sophomores.
Chad Moore is a line-
man turned running back.
He spent this offseason
reshaping his body into its
6-foot, 175-pound frame.
“It’s been dif ferent,”
Moore said. “I think we’re
going to do better. It’s a
dif ferent atmosphere.
Been fun, more ener-
getic.”
It all starts Friday
against Newton Academy.
QUARTERBACK
Conner Baird, Jeb Stevens,
and Clay Henley.
I Despite three players at
the position entering the
season, it’s a question
mark for the season.
“The group lacks
experience, so a strong
start to the season is
vital.”
RUNNING BACKS
Reid Posey, Chad Moore,
Rusty Tait, Jeb Stevens,
and Chance Livingston.
I One of the deepest units
on the team, it is also led
by great senior leadership
“Chad is a (former)
lineman last year who
changed his body. He’s
made big strides with that.
He’s now going to be one
of our fullbacks and
linebackers.”
RECEIVERS
Curt Huffman,
Bradley Allen, Steve
Dragoo, Paxton Trull,
Jacob Dickens,
Clay Henley, Jeb Stevens,
Bradley Allen,
Jacob Dickens, and
Paxton Trull.
One of the younger units
on the team.
“The receivers, though, are
full of ability and will work
to create balance with the
offense.” Merchant also
expects a lot of growth
from tight ends Allen and
Dickens.
OFFENSIVE LINEMAN
John Robert Wilbourne,
Max Abner, Cooper Orman,
Josh Guest, Preston Hall,
Joseph Caskey,
Cole Knowles,
Bryan McClellan, and
Palmer White.
I Another position where
Oak Hill wants to
transform a long list of
potential playmakers into
players expected to
perform on weekly basis.
“Starters make this a solid
group, but depth is an
issue if injuries become a
factor.”
DEFENSIVE LINE
Bradley Allen,
Jacob Dickens, Rusty Tait,
Cooper Orman, Josh Guest,
Preston Hall,
Joseph Caskey,
John Robert Wilbourne,
Cole Knowles,
Bryan McCellan,
Palmer White, and
Max Abner.
I Depth, again, is an
issue.
“The more guys that can
find a role in the rotation,
the easier it is for the
defense.”
LINEBACKERS
Chad Moore, Reid Posey,
Rusty Tait, Dale Milican,
Chance Livingston, and
Paxton Trull.
I The same as at running
back, leadership will be
key at this position
“(Reid) he’s the perfect
coach’s the kid you like to
coach, he doesn’t every-
thing you ask of him.”
SECONDARY
Curt Huffman,
Jeb Stevens,
Steve Dragoo,
Paxton Trull,
Jacob Dickens,
Conner Baird, and
Clay Henley.
I Part of the responsibility
of better tackling will fall
upon this group of young
players, the defense’s last
line of defense.
“This is a young group
with a lot of ability.”
KICKERS
Reid Posey, Chance
Livingston.
Assistants: Bradley
Simmons (defensive coor-
dinator/wide receivers),
Carl Middleton (Offensive
line/defensive line), Chris
Craven (Running
backs/defensive backs)
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 19 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
2011
SCHEDULE
AUG. 19 NEWTON
Aug. 26 at Winston
Sept. 2 at Indianola
SEPT. 9 MANCHESTER
Sept. 16 at Winona
Sept. 23 at Canton
SEPT. 30 LEAKE
OCT. 7 HERITAGE
Oct. 14 Open
Oct. 21 at Kirk
OCT. 28 IMMANUEL
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
OAK HILL ACADEMY RAIDERS
Posi ti on Breakdown
MAIS
CLASS AA, DISTRICT 2AA
Canton Academy
Immanuel Christian
Leake Academy
Manchester Academy
Oak Hill Academy
Winston Academy
About Our Prep Coverage
From Special Reports
All fall sports coaches
are reminded to report
their game results to The
Dispatch.
Coaches, scorekeepers,
parents and/or players can
call 662-327-1297, 662-241-
5000 (toll free in
Mississippi), or e-mail infor-
mation to sports@cdis-
patch.com or
aminichino@cdispatch.com.
Please give us the final
score, where the game was
played, the team records,
leading performers, the
team’s next game and any
other notable information.
Since The Dispatch is an
afternoon paper, we will try
the next morning to track
results of all games not
called in to the newspaper.
We will try to call at a rea-
sonable hour and don’t
mean to disrupt any coach,
teacher or professional at
work, but our goal is to rec-
ognize the performances of
as many student-athletes as
possible.
If you are a coach,
scorekeeper or parent who
reports information to us,
please give us the best time
and the best number to
reach you.
If the result of a game
isn’t in The Dispatch, please
work with us to encourage
that coach to contact us so
we can provide the best pos-
sible coverage to this area.
If you have any ques-
tions, call 662-327-1297.
Prep Football Results
High school football
coaches who don’t speak to
a reporter from The
Dispatch are asked to call
the sports department
Friday night with informa-
tion from their games.
This is the first season
we will work with a
Saturday edition. Our dead-
line for reporting scores is
midnight. We will try to get
in touch with as many foot-
ball coaches as possible, so
try to call us with a report
from your game before
then.
Prep Player of Week
Every Tuesday, The
Dispatch will recognize a
standout prep performer.
If you would like to nom-
inate a prep player of the
week, call us at 662-327-
1297, 662-241-5000 or 1-888-
477-1555 or e-mail us at
spor t s@cdi spat ch. com
before 5 p.m. Saturday.
RAIDERS WANT TO GET PHYSICAL
New coach Merchant wants aggressive approach to take hold to help team change fortunes
“There won’t be much
holding back at
practice. We’ve got to
hit. We’ve got to do
more of that this
year. I think they’re
lacking more on that
than anything.”
Oak Hill Academy coach
Benjie Merchant
Class 1A
Region 3, District 4
East Oktibbeha
Ethel
Nanih Waiya
Noxpater
Pelahatchie
Sebastopol
Weir
West Lowndes
West Oktibbeha
Class 2A
Region 2, District 4
Ackerman
East Webster
Eupora
Hamilton
J.Z. George
Williams-Sullivan
Class 3A
Region 2, District 1
Aberdeen
Mantachie
Mooreville
Nettleton
South Pontotoc
Water Valley
Class 4A
Region 4, District 4
Caledonia
Houston
Kosciusko
Leake Central
Louisville
Noxubee County
Class 5A
Region 1, District 2
Center Hill
Clarksdale
Hernando
Lake Cormorant
New Hope
Oxford
Saltillo
West Point
Region 2, District 6
Callaway
Canton
Lanier
Neshoba Central
Provine
Ridgeland
Starkville
Yazoo City
Class 6A
Region 1, District 2
Columbus
DeSoto Central
Grenada
Horn Lake
Olive Branch
Southaven
South Panola
Tupelo
MAIS
Eight-Man / North - District 1
Calhoun Academy
Calvary Christian School
Central Academy
Delta Academy
Kemper Academy
North Sunflower Academy
Russell Christian
Veritas School
Class AA
District 2AA
Canton Academy
Immanuel Christian
Leake Academy
Manchester Academy
Oak Hill Academy
Winston Academy
Class AAA
District 1AAA, Division II
Heritage Academy
Lee Academy
Magnolia Heights
Washington School
Jackson Academy
Madison-Ridgeland Academy
Pillow Academy
NOTE: Jackson Academy, MRA, and
Pillow Academy are Division I. All
regular-season games count toward
determining the teams that will advance
to the Division I and Division II playoffs.
District 2AAA
Copiah Academy
East Rankin Academy
Hillcrest Christian
Starkville Academy
Jackson Prep
Parkland Academy
Presbyterian Christian
NOTE: Jackson Prep, Parklane
Academy, and Presbyterian Chr. are
Division I. All regular-season games
count toward determining the teams that
will advance to the Division I and
Division II playoffs.
Listing of Local Teams’ Classifications

BY ADAM MINICHINO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
MACON — A trip to
the North State title game
isn’t enough for Deangelo
Ballard.
One season after help-
ing lead the Noxubee
County High School foot-
ball team one step short of
Jackson, the site of the
state’s six championships,
Ballard knows nothing
less will do in 2011.
As the Tigers’ quarter-
back, he is accustomed to
that kind of responsibility.
After all, he watched play-
ers like Omarr Conner
and Termarcus Conner
conduct symphonies of
speed, quickness, and pre-
cision on the football field.
He soaked it in when
Termarcus Conner leaned
on Patrick Patterson and
helped Noxubee County
beat D’Iberville for the
2008 Mississippi High
School Activities
Association Class 4A state
title, the school’s first.
If Ballard, a junior, has
anything to say about it,
Noxubee County will have
another championship tro-
phy to keep that one com-
pany in four months.
“I know everybody is
looking to me to take the
team to Jackson,” Ballard
said. “I am ready for that.”
Ballard’s ability to navi-
gate a bumpy road that
likely will include a game
against defending Class
4A state champion
Lafayette will be made
easier by an assortment of
weapons that rivals some
of the most talented teams
in the history of Noxubee
County High.
“This team reminds me
of the team that we had
with all of the talent with
Omarr Conner at quarter-
back and Joey Sanders at
wide receiver and
Brandon Tate and Reggie
Smith,” Noxubee County
coach Tyrone Shorter
said. “We had all that tal-
ent and all of that speed on
of fense. This group
reminds me of that team.
We have the receivers, we
have the backs, we can
rotate four or five backs if
we want to. We have five
receivers I can trust.
There isn’t a receiver you
just want to focus on. I am
comfortable with whoever
the quarterback throws
the ball to. These kids
worked hard all summer
at 7-on-7s and got better,
so they gained my trust.”
Led by Ballard,
Noxubee County will be
able to rely on running
backs Ladarrell Hunt and
Darrell Robinson and
wide receivers Terrence
Barron, Kamal
Chamberlain, Fernando
Phillips, and Starkville
High transfer Charles
Hughes.
That group evokes
memories of the
Patterson-led cast of
receivers that won a state
title. But while Patterson,
who went on to sign with
the University of
Mississippi and to play at
East Mississippi
Community College, out-
shined members of both
groups, the depth of the
weapons on the 2011
squad just might get the
nod.
“We have better
receivers this year and a
better running game,”
said Robinson, a junior,
who rushed for 1,200
yards last season. “We
have more running backs
and a lot of speed. We
added Charles to the
group to make it a better
receiving group.”
Robinson said a key
could be the improvement
of Ballard, who he said
more accurate.
Barron, a senior, is the
team’s go-to receiver. He
saw plenty of double-
teams last season, and
believes he will see even
more this season. He, too,
feels Ballard has
improved, which gives the
Tigers another card to
play if defenses get into a
rhythm.
“(Ballard) is throwing a
little better because he
has got a lot stronger,”
Barron said. “He wants to
run the ball, but we can’t
let him because we need
him bad. We need him
bad.”
Ballard, whose nick-
name is “Tuttie”, attrib-
utes his maturation to the
work he did in the offsea-
son. The Tigers attended
7-on-7 camps at
Mississippi State and at
Ole Miss. Ballard also
went to combines in
Jackson and in Memphis,
Tenn., to work on his
skills. He feels more com-
fortable under center and
is ready to show he can
manage a game and keep
so many weapons happy.
“Sometimes it is diffi-
cult,” Ballard said. “I just
try to spread the ball out
so I am not just throwing
to one person.”
You get the sense
Shorter wishes Noxubee
County could play with
multiple balls to keep its
skill players fresh. The
Tigers get the added
bonus of having to prac-
tice daily against one of
the fiercest and quickest
defenses in the state.
This year, though, the
defense might want to call
in the reinforcements.
“It is unbelievable the
talent we have,” Shorter
said. “We’re excited about
our offense. We think our
of fense is going to be
much more explosive this
year. The speed of our
team is unbelievable.
They are a bunch of kids
you enjoy coming to work
and coaching every day.
“This group wants it.
We had a great turnout all
summer. The kids came
and worked out hard.
They were so close last
year and we have so many
kids coming back, and
they really want it. They
have been working since
that North State champi-
onship game.”
A 20-0 loss was a smack
in the face for a Noxubee
County program that has
built a reputation for hits
high-scoring ways.
Ballard, who shared the
quarterback role with
Jared Johnson last season,
feels he did “all right” last
season but is quick to
point out he “didn’t do the
best he could have done”
because he still was in the
learning stages.
This year, with Johnson
not playing football,
Ballard won’t give himself
the benefit of the doubt.
“I am expecting myself
and I am expected to do
better,” Ballard said.
Shorter also has talked
with Ballard and made it
clear to him his perform-
ance could be the differ-
ence in helping the Tigers
to get back to Jackson.
“Ballard has got to go.
I put a lot of pressure on
him, which I probably
shouldn’t have, but I told
him, ‘If we go to Jackson
(the site of the six state
title games) it is going to
be because of you.’ I
watched all six of the
state championship
games and the quarter-
back was the best player
on the field,” Shorter
said. “I am trying to get
him to be that leader, to
put the of fense on his
shoulders or on his back.
He has the talent. He has
great speed, he is very
smart. He is an Honor
student. He is what you
want in a quarterback.
We have watched him
mature as a player and as
a quarterback. I think he
is taking a little bit more
of a leadership role. He
just needs to show his tal-
ent. If it is not there, he
has the ability to take off
with it.”
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 20 SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
CLASS 4A
REGION 4, DISTRICT 4
Caledonia
Houston
Kosciusko
Leake Central
Louisville
Noxubee County
NOXUBEE COUNTY TIGERS
1-Kamal Chamberlain, 2-Fernando Phillips, 3-Nathaniel Peterson 4-Jared Johnson, 5-Eric Hunt, 6-Antravion Jamison, 7-Ladarrell Hunt, 8-Jarvis Taylor, 9-Charles Hughes, 11-Jessie Bryant, 12-Robert Neal,
13-Anthony Skinner, 14-Lemadric Macon, 15-Alan Clay, 16-Shaquille Taylor, 17-Terrence Barron, 18-Deangelo Ballard, 19-Jacoby Jones, 20-Rodrick Joiner, 23-Davion Pruitt, 24-Javoris Glenn, 26-Dennis
Brooks, 27-Devonte Sanders, 28-Darrell Robinson, 29-Javancy Jones, 30-Malik Sanders, 31-Dequalo Martin, 32-Vernon Scott, 33-Jeremy Hunt, 34-Trevond Miles, 37-Douglass Triplett, 40-Antonio Ryland,
52-Traon Young, 54-Martize Mitchell, 55-Byron Hill, 56-Taiwan Williams, 57-Melvin Lewis, 60-Tamarcus Williams, 61-Ivan Goodwin, 67-Justin Clemmon, 69-Jercovie Stewart, 71-Jonathan Orr, 74-Jared
Farmer, 75-Demarcus Wilborn, 77-Deshawn Hopkins, 78-Ryald Mitchell, 79-Bryce Turner, 81-Miles Ellis, 84-Braxton William, 90-Ralph Franklin, 91-Jose Moran, 92-Antonio Boyd, 94-Dylan Bradley, 95-
Michael Brown, 97-Edrion Rice, 99-Raheem Stewart
TIGERS WILL HAVE CHOICE OF WEAPONS
2011
SCHEDULE
AUG. 19 STARKVILLE
Aug. 27 at Spain Park (B’ham, AL)
Sept. 2 at New Hope
SEPT. 9 ABERDEEN
SEPT. 16 WEST POINT
Sept. 23 at Kemper Co.
Sept. 30 at Kosciusko
OCT. 7 CARTHAGE
Oct. 14 at Houston
OCT. 20 LOUISVILLE
OCT. 28 CALEDONIA
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
Improved Ballard
wants to lead team
back to Jackson
The Noxubee County High School football team has a deep and talented cast of skill players from which quarterback Deangelo Ballard,
back row, far right, can go to at any time. Included in the mix are: front row, from left: Charles Hughes, Lemadric Macon, Terrence
Barron, and Darrell Robinson. Kelly Tippett/Dispatch Staff
“We have better receivers this year and a
better running game. We have more running
backs and a lot of speed.”
Noxubee County High School
junior running back Darrell Robinson

BY ADAM MINICHINO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
MACON — Where’s
the beef?
It may be easy to dis-
miss the Central Academy
eight-man football team
now that the graduation
losses of Will Sciple and
Matt Taylor have left the
Vikings with a smaller
waistline.
Sciple and Taylor
tipped the scales at more
than 300 pounds and were
anchors on an offensive
line that dared opponents
to get in front of it for fear
of getting run down.
But don’t confuse a
slimmed down roster for
one without talent.
If you do, you run the
risk of getting bowled
over by some of the
Vikings’ size that returns
for this season or left in
the wake of some of their
team speed.
“We have a big role to
fill,” senior fullback/line-
backer Drew Pearson
said. “We lost a lot of beef,
we lost a lot of speed. We
have a lot to make up for.
The leaders have to make
a step and take everybody
to the next level.”
In all, Central Academy
lost six seniors, including
leaders like Ferris
McGuire and Rowdy
Rigdon, who is back this
season with Sciple to
assist head coach Ronnie
Sciple. With a roster of
only 14 or 15 players,
Central Academy won’t be
able to use depth to over-
come its size losses. But
the five senior mainstays
who have been with the
program for the past sev-
eral years feel the team
still has enough in place to
help it contend for a divi-
sion title and to make
another playoff push.
Last season, the
Vikings bulled all of the
way to the Mississippi
Association of
Independent Schools
Eight-Man title game. A
56-18 loss to Kemper
Academy doesn’t indicate
how close the game was,
and it shows the kind of
fight this season’s team
will have to match what it
did in 2010.
“People are pushing
themselves a lot harder
because we know what we
have to fill in for,” Newman
said. “Every practice,
everybody is running their
sprints as hard as they
could. It made me feel
good as a senior because
they’re pushing them-
selves for us.
“It’s a good feeling
whenever you see a junior
or a sophomore or a fresh-
man pushing themselves to
even beat a senior in some-
thing. That is great. You
want to see that. You want
to see someone who is
going to push themselves
to be a little bit better every
day. We need that.”
Newman may have to
push himself the hardest.
He is going to have to
transition to quarterback
to run an offense that will
do things a little different-
ly. Coach Sciple said the
Vikings will still run the
football because they do
have some size remaining
with of fensive linemen
Cody Brown and Redmon
Butler back. But he also
knows a smaller front
might lend itself better to
a team that can throw the
football, too. As a result,
the Vikings have incorpo-
rated several new wrin-
kles into the offense to
capitalize on what teams
think they will do.
“We had about 1,000
pounds of beef on the line
last year,” Pearson said.
“We’re going to try a cou-
ple of dif ferent things.
Cole always runs behind
me on kickoffs and stuff,
and I am going to back
there and be his fullback.
He knows I am going to
block for him and all he
has to do is grab my belt
loop and we’re gone.”
Newman said the sen-
iors tried to get a jump
start on the season by
organizing weight training
sessions in the offseason.
The 2010 group didn’t uti-
lize the training time, but
Newman and Pearson said
they knew members of the
2011 team had to come
back to school stronger
and in better condition.
So far, the work has
paid of f as Central
Academy appears to have
fresher legs that will help
it try to improve on last
season’s 10-2 finish.
“Everybody who start-
ed last year as a junior they
played just as hard as the
seniors did,” Newman said.
“We played for them, and
we expect the people under
us to play for us, just like
we did them. We push each
other and try to make each
other better — in the
weight room, on the field.”
Newman is the ideal
player to direct the attack.
He has been playing foot-
ball at Central Academy
since the eighth grade. He
feels comfortable in
Sciple’s of fense and
believes he can handle
any twist Sciple might
work in. If needed, he also
can help a teammate get
into the right position. He
said that kind of teamwork
is going to be essential if
the squad wants to relive
its march to the state title
this season.
“I like people underes-
timating us,” Newman
said. “We have some guys
who have been in here lift-
ing weights non-stop,
including myself. I think
people underestimating
us is going to help us
because we’re probably
going to give a little sur-
prise at the end, or at least
I hope so.”
Pearson, who paced
the team in tackles last
season, said the team still
will line it up and run right
at opponents. He bristles
at the notion that the
Vikings won’t be able to
do that after losing nearly
700 pounds of beef up
front to graduation.
“We’re going to be the
team to try to beat,”
Pearson said. “Everybody
is going to be hard-headed
about it. Everybody thinks
we’re going to be easy
now. I guarandangtee it.
With all we lost, they
thought our backs and our
line was all we had. But
they got anther thing
comin’ when they see us.
It is going to be a different
ballgame for us.”
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 21 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
2011
SCHEDULE
Aug. 19 at Calvary
AUG. 26 CALHOUN
Sept. 2 at Delta
SEPT. 9 MARVELL
Sept. 16 at Kemper
SEPT. 23 VERITAS
SEPT. 30 RUSSELL
Oct. 7 at N. Sunflower
Oct. 14 at Franklin
OCT. 21 CALVARY
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
CENTRAL ACADEMY VIKINGS
MAIS
Eight-man
North District 1
Calhoun Academy
Calvary Christian School
Central Academy
Delta Academy
Kemper Academy
North Sunflower Academy
Russell Christian
Veritas School
Central Academy senior quarterback Cole Newman catches a pass while doing agility drills Aug. 9 at the school. Newman is expected to lead the Vikings this season. Adam Minichino/Dispatch Staff
VIKINGS WON’T BE AS BIG, BUT THEY STILL HAVE TALENT
Central Academy coach Ronnie Sciple talks with senior Drew Pearson about how to run a pass route at practice Aug. 9 at the school.
Adam Minichino/Dispatch Staff
“People are pushing themselves a lot harder
because we know what we have to fill in for.
Every practice, everybody is running their
sprints as hard as they could.”
Central Academy senior quarterback
Cole Newman

BY ADAM MINICHINO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
ABERDEEN — Zero.
That’s a big number for
the Aberdeen High School
football team to set as a
goal for the 2011 season.
But with eight seniors
on defense and nine
returning starters back
from a unit that had four
shutouts and allowed an
average of 7.6 points per
game, it’s easy to see what
the Bulldogs are setting
the bar high for this sea-
son.
“We’re looking forward
to not getting any points
scored on us,” senior
Jalen Bell said. “Zero. It is
a tall order, but everybody
is motivated. We have
been to state two years in
a row and we haven’t
brought it back home.
That is the goal this year.
If you don’t bring the title
home it isn’t a good feel-
ing.”
Aberdeen lost to
Tylertown in the
Mississippi High School
Activities Association
Class 3A state title game
in 2009. Last year,
Aberdeen may have been
one spot away from a
championship, only to see
the spot go against it en
route to a 10-8 loss to
Forest.
This year, multi-talent-
ed and highly recruited
Channing Ward leads a
defense that will rely on
the sting of two title losses
to motivate it through a
tough six-game stretch to
open the season.
“The defense can be
real good,” Ward said. “It
can be a shutout season
this year if we cut out the
little mistakes and play
hard all of the time.”
Ward has done his best
to erase the memory of
last season. He said he
and his teammates who
play defense have dis-
cussed the possibility of
not allowing any points.
He said the sense
Aberdeen still is fighting
for respect is a motivator
for a defense he believes
is faster and more athletic.
“It was frustrating, but
we’re going to get it this
year,” Ward said of losing
to Forest.
Ward, Bell, Demario
Wilson, Braxton
Anderson, Michael
Hodges, Justin Lucas,
Brandon Walker, Jordan
Gathings, Zavia Forshee,
and Sammy Burroughs
will lead a defense that
Aberdeen High coach
Chris Duncan said is the
most experienced he has
had.
“I think this is the best
one we have had,” Duncan
said. “We should have a
good year on that side of
the ball. We should be
dominant.”
Duncan said the
defense played well in the
spring against Class 5A
Lake Cormorant. He said
he knows of no better way
than to rely on the swarm-
ing athleticism of his
defense to help make up
for youth an inexperience
on offense.
The Bulldogs will have
to replace 2,000-yard gain-
er Victor Hodges and the
versatile Brandon Smith.
Freshman Josh Williams
will take over at quarter-
back.
“We’re going to put our
best on defense and do it
that way,” Duncan said.
“That is how you win it.”
“You can do things
offensively that you nor-
mally wouldn’t do if you’re
good on defense. You just
don’t put yourself in bad
situations or make
turnovers or take a lot of
chances.
“I think by midway
through the year when we
get to division play I think
offensively we’re going to
be clicking just as good or
better than we have been.”
As the largest school in
Class 3A, Duncan under-
stands every team will be
gunning for his squad,
which initially looked to
be moving up to Class 4A.
But Duncan put together a
challenging first six
games of the season that
features Columbus,
Shannon, Amory,
Noxubee County, West
Bolivar, and Louisville. He
is confident that slate will
prepare his team well for
district play.
“I try my best not to
them to rank us No. 1
because if you’re ranked
No. 1 everybody wants to
beat you,” Duncan said.
“But the kids know every-
body wants to play us and
everybody wants to beat
us.”
Ward knows the feel-
ing. The defensive line-
man/tight end is being
hotly pursued by
Mississippi State and the
University of Mississippi.
He said in July he likes
Ole Miss because his
brother goes to school
there and that they “make
you feel like home.” But
Ward also said he really
likes MSU defensive coor-
dinator Chris Wilson and
his style of play. He said
he isn’t sure when he
make his college decision,
but that he thinks he will
make his decision before
he goes to the Under
Armour All-American
Game.
Until then, Ward and
his classmates have unfin-
ished business. He and
Bell hope they have what
it takes to get it done.
“It takes a special sen-
ior group to win a state
championship, and this
year, hopefully, we have a
better group than we did
last year,” Duncan said.
“The ball didn’t roll our
way last year. We were
good enough to have a
chance to win it and it just
didn’t go our way. You just
take what worked, go
back to work, and go at it
again.”
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 22 SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
2011
SCHEDULE
AUG. 19 COLUMBUS
AUG. 26 SHANNON
Sept. 2 at Amory
Sept. 9 at Noxubee County
SEPT. 16 WEST BOLIVAR
Sept. 23 at Louisville
SEPT. 30 MANTACHIE
Oct. 7 at Nettleton
OCT. 14 MOOREVILLE
Oct. 21 at Water Valley
OCT. 29 SOUTH PONTOTOC
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
ABERDEEN BULLDOGS
The Aberdeen High School football team will be stacked on defense this season thanks to the return of eight seniors, including defensive end Channing Ward, center, back, one of the most sought after
recruits in the state of Mississippi. The Bulldogs also will look to seniors Jalen Bell, Corino Blanchard, Demario Wilson, Braxton Anderson, Michael Hodges, Brandon Walker, and Jordan Gathings.
Adam Minichino/Dispatch Staff
DEFENSE WON’T REST UNTIL IT HITS ZERO
CLASS 3A
REGION 2, DISTRICT 1
Aberdeen
Mantachie
Mooreville
Nettleton
South Pontotoc
Water Valley
2011 ROSTER
1-Corino Blanchard, 2-
Demario Wilson, 3-Tamarkus
Payne, 4-Trey Mims, 5-
Braxton Anderson, 6-Joshua
Ewing, 7-Aaron Mcmillian, 8-
Michael Hodges, 9-Sammy
Burroughs, 10-Justin Lucas,
11-Channing Ward, 12-
Jeremy Brandon, 13-Jalen
Bell, 16-Josh Williams, 17-
Nic Hodges, 18-Quincey
Crump, 19-Calvin Wyatt, 20-
Brandon Walker, 21-Elliot
Johnson, 22-Jeffery Riddle,
23-Chris McMillian, 24-Levail
McFarland, 25-Dewayne
Word, 26-Rodarius Smith,
27-Devontae Fudge, 28-Tyler
Fields, 29-Moses Gathins,
30-Lamonte Thompson, 31-
Quinton Doss, 32-Damien
Walker 33-Jordan Gathings,
34-Myles Perkins, 43-
Janorris Blanchard, 50-
Brandon Hodges, 51-Bobby
Ward, 52-Tavarus Eckford,
53-James Randle, 54-Zavia
Forshee, 55-Rickie
McAllister, 56-Latherio Cox,
57-Jordan Gathings, 58-
Travia Garth, 59-Jamarkus
Irons, 60-Theodore Boyd, 61-
Devontae Walker, 63-Aaron
Wilson, 65-Jordan Gladney,
66-Jamarcus Tallie, 67-Jahrel
Wilson, 72-Trey Keys, 80-
Juan Davis, 84-Tyree Gates.
Aberdeen High School’s Channing Ward has seen playing time at tight end, but he likely will spend
more time this season on defense terrorizing quarterbacks. Stan Beall/Special to the Dispatch
“The defense can be real good. It can be a
shutout season this year if we cut out the
little mistakes and play hard all of the time.”
Aberdeen High School
senior lineman Channing Ward

BY ADAM MINICHINO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
HAMILTON —
Cojuante McMillian,
Zarrat Sims, and Austin
Welch know their history.
Recent events — like
two losses in the first
round of the playoffs in
their career and five
straight losing seasons for
the program — are easier
to remember.
But those aren’t the
memories that build pro-
grams.
McMillian, Sims, and
Welch prefer to go back a
few more years to the
1970s and early 1980s
when coach Jimmie
Moore’s Hamilton teams
ranked with the best in
the state.
Moore’s Lions went
through the 1977 season
without allowing a point.
Two years later, a winning
streak that grew to 51
games solidified
Hamilton’s place in state
football history.
This season,
McMillian, Sims, and
Welch want to help
Hamilton recapture that
magic. To help them, they
have a picture of Moore’s
juggernauts in the
Hamilton High football
locker room.
“We’re trying to bring
back the tradition because
in the 1970s and 80s
Hamilton was a football
team you did not want to
play,” Welch said. “They
never called the dogs off
and they played football.
They would come out and
hit you every Friday night.
That is what we’re trying
to build back up here, so
teams want to play us, but
they want to play us to
beat us to say they have
done something.”
Hamilton hasn’t stirred
those feelings in many
opponents in the past
decade. The Lions last had
a winning season in 2005,
when they finished 2005.
You have to go back
before 1994 to find the last
time a Hamilton High foot-
ball team won a playoff
game.
Those historical mark-
ers will serve only as moti-
vation for a team that
appears to have the
weapons to make oppo-
nents stand up and take
notice.
Whether it is the
speedy Sims or the strong-
armed Welch at quarter-
back, the Lions have a
potent one-two punch.
McMillian anchors a
cadre of running backs
that is three deep at tail-
back and fullback. Add in
a capable group of
receivers that includes
Welch and Weeks can talk
about realizing expecta-
tions and know his players
agree.
“I think they know we
have a chance to have one
of the best teams we have
had here in a long time,”
Weeks said. “We have a lot
coming back, and they are
confident in their abilities.
I don’t want them to get
too overconfident because
we haven’t done anything
yet. I think they know
what is at stake. I think
they understand what
they can accomplish.”
The latest reclassifica-
tion by the Mississippi
High School Activities
Association might help
Hamilton, too. Even
though perennial power
Eupora remains, the addi-
tion of Williams-Sullivan
to Class 2A, Region 2
gives Hamilton, which
beat Ackerman last year, a
good shot to finish as high
as second in the region.
But those are the
expectations you should
have when you have nine
seniors and eight players
back on offense.
The experience works
well with a new attitude
that has the Lions focused
on identity. Thanks to
assistant coach Devin Hill,
Hamilton has adopted a
“Who Am I?” approach to
the season. The answer —
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 23 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
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2011
SCHEDULE
AUG. 19 SMITHVILLE
AUG. 26 HOULKA
Sept. 2 at Kossuth
Sept. 9 at Hatley
Sept. 16 at Houston
SEPT. 23 WALNUT
SEPT. 30 WILLIAM SULLIVAN
OCT. 7 EUPORA
Oct. 14 at J.Z. George
Oct. 21 at East Webster
OCT. 28 ACKERMAN
HOME GAMES IN CAPS
HAMILTON LIONS
1-Austin Welch, 2-Cedric Bell, 3-Pallas Fair, 5-Quinshay Heard, 7-Cole Robinson, 8-Zarrat Sims, 9-Sequintis Coleman, 11-Cole Richardson, 13-Curr y Smith, 15-Jordan Jackson, 18-Caleb Garvin, 20-Cojuante
McMillian, 21-Deion Howard, 24-Tanner Dement, 32-Michael Roberts, 40-Silas Gill, 50-Kyle Dahlem, 51-Evan Phillips, 54-Dominique Dobbs, 55-Jeremy Howard, 56-Dallas Stockman, 60-Jeremy Lindsey, 61-
Gage Morris, 62-Ken Spruill, 65-Mark Tipton, 66-Davis Hankins, 67-Tyler Jones, 68-Nick Owens, 69-Ryan Gilbert, 73-Reed Dyess, 95-Rudy Trimble.
CLASS 2A
REGION 2, DISTRICT 4
Ackerman
East Webster
Eupora
Hamilton
J.Z. George
Williams-Sullivan
From left: Hamilton High School’s Zarrat Sims, Austin Welch, and Cojuante McMillian should give
the Lions three dangerous weapons that can strike from anywhere on the field this season.
Adam Minichino/Dispatch Staff
OFFENSE WILL GIVE LIONS CHANCE TO RECAPTURE MAGIC
“I think they know we
have a chance to have
one of the best teams
we have had here in a
long time. We have a
lot coming back, and
they are confident in
their abilities.”
Hamilton High School
coach Ray Weeks
See HAMILTON, 24
THE DISPATCH • www.cdispatch.com 24 SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW
Starkville
Continued from Page 13
motions and shifts, there’s
no confusion with the
blocking schemes, even
with new of fensive line
coach Justin Moss.
“He’s a tough guy,”
Rogers said of Moss. “He
gets the most out of us and
keeps us working hard. It’s
been a smooth transition.”
With Myles at quarter-
back, Starkville again will
have a dynamic threat
under center. While
Johnson was effective at
running the ball between
the tackles, Myles is quick-
er to the perimeter. But
he’s also inexperienced.
For success on the
edges, Rogers and Cannon
will provide great pulling
options for Myles and the
running backs to follow.
Neither Rogers nor
Cannon weigh more than
240 pounds, but both play-
ers are exceptionally
quick, Mitchell said.
“When you think of
those two guys, you think
speed and athleticism,”
Mitchell said. “You’ll see
them on the move, in
open space helping us
make plays. They bring a
great dimension to our
offense.”
“The staff didn’t
know a lot about
some players this
spring. But we can
now rest on the fact
that we have them in
the position they
need to be
Starkville High School
coach Jamie Mitchell
44
I Number of players coach
Jamie Mitchell anticipates
playing on offense and
defense each Friday night.
QUARTERBACK
Gabe Myles,
Mike Newman.
I Myles, a junior, takes
over for three-year starter
Jaquez Johnson. Myles
missed most of last
season with a broken
collarbone.
“Gabe has had a good
summer and first week.
We’re finding his strengths
and what he does well,”
Starkville High coach
Jamie Mitchell said.
RUNNING BACK
Devontae Davis, Preston
Backer, Stanley Higgins,
and David Fair.
I Mitchell believes
Higgins and Fair make
fullback the most solid
position on the team.
“Tailback is still unknown.
Preston broke his jaw and
missed six game and
Deontae was ineligible last
year. Both have all the
tools.”
RECEIVERS
Princeton Jones, Kentrell
Spencer, Jimmy Saulsberry,
Fontavious Smith, and
Eddie Brown.
I Saulsberr y impressed in
the spring game and is the
proven playmaker.
“It’s a group that can real-
ly run, but there’s a lot of
faces who didn’t play a
whole lot last year.”
OFFENSIVE LINE
Cory Cannon, Eric Rogers,
Jawon Johnson, Kelvin
Young, and Brian Manner.
I The Jackets return three
starters
“I think there’s five guys
on offense we’re leaning
on and three of them are
on the line.”
DEFENSIVE LINE
Jawon Johnson, Latajah
Bush, Cory Cannon,
Stanley Higgins,
Eric Rogers, Kelvin Young.
I Undersized group that
relies on quickness.
“We’re going to have to be
outstanding here. All six
will play.”
Starkville High School coach Jamie Mitchell is counting on Bryce
Henderson and David Fair to be leaders for the 2011 season.
Kelly Tippett/Dispatch Staff
Insi de Starkvi l l e
Posi ti on
Breakdown
LINEBACKER
David Fair, Taylor Johnston,
Dennis Ware,
Stanley Higgins, and
Marlo Rogers.
I Higgins and Fair bring a
physical presence to the
group.
“I feel like that’s probably
the strength of us. All of
those guys are going to
have to play great for us.”
SECONDARY
Taego Catledge,
Raphael McClain,
Jacoby Smith,
Johnny Smith,
Stanley Childs.
I Safeties Childs and
Johnny Smith are the most
experienced returners.
“We’ve got really good
speed back there. The
competition level is great.”
KICKERS / PUNTERS
Daniel Fumo,
Charlie Henderson,
Mike Newman,
Kelvin Young.
I Newman will punt, while
Fumo and Henderson could
share kicking duties.
"Fumo was out guy last
year, but Charlie is apply-
ing the pressure."
his hands well. He’ll lay
that hat on you.”
Catchot wasn’t always
on board with Terrill’s
rebuilding movement.
Like many of his current
and former teammates, he
wasn’t committed to the
game following a winless
sophomore season.
“When we first got
here, he had a big ques-
tion mark on his jersey,”
Terrill said. “Kids heard
the words that it was going
to be different but they
wanted to see it.”
When Terrill first got to
Starkville Academy,
Catchot was playing on the
of fensive line and was
admittedly “going through
the motions.”
It wasn’t until Starkville
Academy snapped its two-
year losing streak with a
Homecoming win against
Winston Academy that
Catchot bought in.
“Up to that point, it was
hard to say I wanted to
play if we weren’t gonna
be a good team,” Catchot
said. “When we won that
game, something just kind
of clicked. I think it did for
a lot of people. It really
made me want to take
advantage of my senior
year.”
Starkville Academy will
play host to St. Andrews
on Aug. 19 in its season
opener.
Volunteers
Continued from Page 14
DEFENSIVE LINE
Angus Catchot,
Lane McLendon,
Colin Stokes,
Jordan Bright, and
Zack Thomas.
I Under new defensive
coordinator Bubba Davis,
the Volunteers will play
gap defense Davis has
used for 41 years.
“These guys will be
important up front at
reading what’s going on in
the backfield. We’ll be
able adjust to any
formation.”
LINEBACKER
Zach Slaughter,
James Mapp,
Stephen Robertson,
Ryan Mann, JM Robinson.
Ryan Mann
I Robertson and James
Mapp return at linebacker.
“Depth will be key, and a
lot of young kids have to
grow up fast.”
SECONDARY
Ryan McKell, Austin Miles,
Brandon Sharp, and
Drew Pellum.
I McKell is the best
athlete of the group and
will also play a major role
on offense.
"They’ve all had some
good days. Nobody is just
head and shoulders above
the rest, which is a good
thing because they’ve all
done adequate up to this
point.”
KICKERS / PUNTERS
Zach Thomas, Matt Jones,
Jonathon Burton, and
Colby Runnels
I Thomas has locked
down the long snapper
position, while Jones and
Burton will split kicking
duties. Runnels will punt.
"Some good competition
going on with this group."
I nsi de Starkvi l l e Academy
his ear. The one-on-one
work has been vital as
Spraggins is learning the
rhythm of running the
plays and the discipline of
lining everyone up.
“It’s just things you’re
not normally in control of
playing on defense or at
any other position,”
Spraggins said. “But it’s
nothing too challenging
because I’ve been prepar-
ing for this day for a long
time.”
Chambless said
Spraggins will be “well-
versed” in pre-snap
responsibilities and the
playbook, but execution
will be the only question
mark.
To Spraggins, his abili-
ty to be as effective as Cox
remains a lingering con-
cern to people outside the
team.
“All the fans want to
know: Will we have anoth-
er like (Cox)?” Spraggins
said. “I wouldn’t mind put-
ting up those kind of num-
bers, but I don’t have to fill
his shoes. It’s good to look
at it like that if you want
something to compete
against, but I can’t let that
be my motivation. I’ve got
teammates who are count-
ing on me.”
To Grisham, there isn’t
much separating
Spraggins and Cox, other
than proven productivity.
“He may not be as fast,
but he isn’t far behind,”
Grisham said of
Spraggins. “They’re very
similar.”
More so than replacing
Cox, Spraggins has his
attention on West Point’s
schedule. The two-time
defending Class 5A state
champions will open the
season with nationally-
ranked and two-time
defending Class 6A
champs South Panola.
“Anybody can go out
and beat the rooty-poot
teams,” Spraggins said.
“But, seriously, who
wouldn’t want the chance
to play South Panola? The
chance to beat those boys?
That’s where my motiva-
tion comes from.”
West Point
Continued from Page 18
After two years of serving as a backup to quarterback Justin Cox,
DeQuinten Spraggins will take over the position this season for
the two-time defending Mississippi High School Activities
Association Class 5A state champion West Point Green Wave.
Luisa Porter/Dispatch Staff
Hamilton
Continued from Page 23
“I am a Champion” — is
designed to hold the play-
ers accountable to push
them to work harder to
realize championship
dreams.
“Every year I have been
here we have had Eupora
or East Webster in our
division,” Welch said.
“When we get to that
weekend it is like, ‘Oh no,
we have to worry about
that.’ This year it is going
to be the opposite. They’re
going to have to worry
about us because we have
enough talent to push
them on the field.”
Welch said the Lions
might not have a lot of
size and weight up front,
but he said their speed
will be tough to contain.
With Sims, or “Bootie” as
he is known to his team-
mates, running a show,
defenses will have to be
wary to stop a shifty quar-
terback and a stable of
equally slithery running
backs.
“We have weapons all
around on the offense,”
Sims said. “We have two
great running backs, we
have a young fullback —
my brother — we have
experience at wide receiv-
er. The whole team is just
a whole, big chemistry,
and we all know where we
are supposed to be when
the ball is snapped.”
Sims came to Hamilton
in seventh grade and
joined a group that went
on to have special success
in eighth grade. Many of
the players from that team
are still together in high
school. Welch and
McMillian, who have
played together since Pee
Wees, said they used to
talk about what it would be
like to play football togeth-
er in high school.
Now that the time has
finally arrived, it’s time to
back up the optimism and
make this a season to
remember.
“We don’t mean to brag,
but we know what we
have,” Sims said. “That is
why coach pushes us so
hard because he knows
what we got. We have a
great opportunity this
year, and we’re trying to
make the best out of it.”
Said McMillian, “I am
looking for a champi-
onship. First we have to
look to Smithville (first
game of the season). We
haven’t won our district in
a looong time. I am not
sure how long it has been,
but it has been a while. We
have to look to Smithville
first and then we have to
go one by one.”
Looking for local players in college
The Dispatch will feature a former local high
school athlete who has gone on to play a sport in col-
lege.
If you would like to nominate a college player of
the week, call us at 662-327-1297, 662-241-5000 or 1-
888-477-1555 or email us at sports@cdispatch.com
before 5 p.m. Saturday.
Be sure to give us a reason why you are nominat-
ing the player, and be sure to give us as many statis-
tics from the past week’s action.
We also are compiling a list of former local high
school athletes. If you know of any former local high
school athletes playing a sport in college, call us at
662-327-1297, 662-241-5000 or 1-888-329-8937 or e-
mail us at sports@cdispatch.com.
Columbus High
Aug. 19 at Aberdeen
Aug. 26 Open
Sept. 2 West Point
Sept. 9 New Hope
Sept. 16 at Louisville
Sept. 23 Tupelo
Sept. 30 at Southaven
Oct. 7 South Panola
Oct. 14 at Desoto Central
Oct. 21 Horn Lake
Oct. 28 at Olive Branch
Nov. 4 Grenada
Heritage Academy
Aug. 19 at Lamar
Aug. 26 Starkville Academy
Sept. 2 Caledonia
Sept. 9 at MRA
Sept. 16 at Lee
Sept. 23 JA
Sept. 30 Magnolia Heights
Oct. 7 at Oak Hill
Oct. 14 Open
Oct. 21 at Washington
Oct. 28 Pillow
West Lowndes
Aug. 19 at Montgomery Co.
Aug. 25 at Caledonia
Sept. 2 Shannon
Sept. 9 Ethel
Sept. 16 Open
Sept. 23 at East Oktibbeha
Sept. 30 Noxapater
Oct. 7 at Pelahatchie
Oct. 14 West Oktibbeha
Oct. 21 at Nanih Waiya
Oct. 28 Weir
Nov. 4 at Sebastopol
Immanuel
Aug. 19 Winona Christian
Aug. 26 at Leake Academy
Sept. 2 Marshall Academy
Sept. 9 at New Site
Sept. 16 Canton Academy
Sept. 23 Open
Sept. 30 at Carroll Academy
Oct. 7 Potts Camp
Oct. 14 at Manchester Academy
Oct. 21 Winston Academy
Oct. 28 at Oak Hill Academy
New Hope
Aug. 19 at Louisville
Aug. 26 Open
Sept. 2 Noxubee
Sept. 9 at Columbus
Sept. 16 Caledonia
Sept. 23 at Saltillo
Sept. 30 Oxford
Oct. 7 at Hernando
Oct. 14 Lake Cormorant
Oct. 21 at Clarksdale
Oct. 28 Center Hill
Nov. 4 at West Point
Victory Christian
Aug. 12 at Russell Christian
Aug. 19 Victory Baptist
Aug. 26 Open
Sept. 2 New Life
Sept. 9 Tabernacle
Sept. 16 Open
Sept. 23 at Heritage Christian
Sept. 29 at Flint Hill
Oct. 7 Open
Oct. 14 at North River
Oct. 21 Tuscaloosa Christian
Caledonia High
Aug. 19 Nettleton
Aug. 27 West Lowndes
Sept. 2 at Heritage Academy
Sept. 8 East Webster
Sept. 16 at New Hope
Sept. 23 Ackerman
Sept. 30 at Carthage
Oct. 7 Houston
Oct. 14 at Louisville
Oct. 21 Kosciusko
Oct. 28 at Noxubee County
Starkville High
Aug. 19 at Noxubee County
Aug. 26 Madison Central
Sept. 2 Tupelo
Sept. 9 at West Point
Sept. 16 Open
Sept. 23 Lanier
Sept. 30 Provine
Oct. 7 at Ridgeland
Oct. 14 Canton
Oct. 21 at Yazoo City
Oct. 28 Callaway
Nov. 4 at Neshoba Central
Starkville Academy
Aug. 19 St. Andrews
Aug. 26 at Heritage
Sept. 2 Magnolia Heights
Sept. 9 at Leake
Sept. 16 at Hillcrest
Sept. 23 at J. Prep
Sept. 30 Copiah
Oct. 7 Park Lane
Oct. 14 at Winston
Oct. 21 ERA
Oct. 28 at Pres. Chr.
West Oktibbeha
Aug. 19 at Univ. Christian
Aug. 26 Montgomery Co.
Sept. 8 Eupora
Sept. 16 at Nanih Waiya
Sept. 23 Weir
Sept. 30 at Sebastopol
Oct. 7 Ethel
Oct. 14 at West Lowndes
Oct. 21 East Oktibbeha
Oct. 28 at Noxapater
Nov. 4 at Pelahatchie
West Point
Aug. 20 South Panola
Aug. 26 Open
Sept. 2 at Columbus
Sept. 9 Starkville
Sept. 16 at Noxubee
Sept. 23 at Lake Cormorant
Sept. 30 Hernando
Oct. 7 at Clarksdale
Oct. 14 Saltillo
Oct. 21 at Center Hill
Oct. 28 at Oxford
Nov. 4 New Hope
Oak Hill Academy
Aug. 19 Newton
Aug. 26 at Winston
Sept. 2 at Indianola
Sept. 9 Manchester
Sept. 16 at Winona
Sept. 23 at Canton
Sept. 30 Leake
Oct. 7 Heritage
Oct. 14 Open
Oct. 21 at Kirk
Oct. 28 Immanuel
Central Academy
Aug. 19 at Calvary
Aug. 26 Calhoun
Sept. 2 at Delta
Sept. 9 Marvell
Sept. 16 at Kemper
Sept. 23 Veritas
Sept. 30 Russell
Oct. 7 at N. Sunflower
Oct. 14 at Franklin
Oct. 21 Calvary
Aberdeen High
Aug. 19 Columbus
Aug. 26 Shannon
Sept. 2 at Amory
Sept. 9 at Noxubee County
Sept. 16 West Bolivar
Sept. 23 at Louisville
Sept. 30 Mantachie
Oct. 7 at Nettleton
Oct. 14 Mooreville
Oct. 21 at Water Valley
Oct. 29 South Pontotoc
Hamilton High
Aug. 19 Smithville
Aug. 26 Houlka
Sept. 2 at Kossuth
Sept. 9 at Hatley
Sept. 16 at Houston
Sept. 23 Walnut
Sept. 30 Williams-Sullivan
Oct. 7 Eupora
Oct. 14 at J.Z. George
Oct. 21 at East Webster
Oct. 28 Ackerman
2011 LOCAL SCHEDULES

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