FERGUSON MOLDBOARD PLOW

MODEL AO

OPERATING

and ASSEMBLY INSTRUCTIONS
~
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DIVISION
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r.

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I

IS.

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G

II

SON

INC.

Racine, Wis,coi'lsil1

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PRE-OPERA.TING INSTRUCTI'ONS
POINTS

LUBRICATION

CONNECTION

TOP liNK

CROSS -SHAFT U-BOLT

BEAM

WHEEL SCRAPER FU~ROW WHEEL

L

JOINTER

ARM

WHEEL SPRING WH,EEL AXLE SHARE

JOINTER

Fig.

1 The Ferguson

Mold6oord

Plow

LUBRICA TION
Each pressure-type fitting as listed below and as shown in Fig. 1 should be lubricated daily. The fiHingsshould first be wiped cleon and then hove a good grade of presslJre gun lubricant pumped into them unti I some grease is forced out around the bearings. This procedure flushes, out dirt and ,grit which would otherwise cause rapid wear if allowed to accumulate. Lubr iccre the following points, daily with a pressure-type grease gun (See s+ors on Fig. 1). 1. Coulter hubs 2. Furrow wheel hub 3. Furrow wheel bracket

At the end ofeoch dayls plow i nq , or when stori ng the plow I' be sure to app Iy a protective coating of lubricant OF rust inhibitor to all polished, soil engag'ing ports such as moldbocrds , shares, rolling coulters, jointers and furrow whe'e I. Fa iIure to protect these surfaces will resultinrustandpiHing.ofthe metal which could prevent the plow from scouri n9' Such deteriorati on con only be corrected by repeated land polishingor replacement with new parts.

ATTACHING

THE PLOW

CAUTION: Do not put any oi I on connections atcross-shaft, top link, or ball socket joints. Oi I at these points wil'l collect dirt and grit, causing rapid wear.

The Ferguson Moldboard Plow, [ike all other Ferguson Implements, attaches to all Ferguson System Tractors by the three-point ~itch. It is possible to attach or detach this implement in one minute or tess. A simple, easy to follow procedure is outl ined below. II. Back the tractor so that it is centered with the implement, having the lower links

I

2

4. attaching

Attach

right lower

I.inkusing

the

level-

ingcranktobring
backward pinwlth with 5.. clevis tractor backward linch

the ball joint inlinewith the pin, rocking the tractor slightly or forward, if necessary I to 01 ign the
see Fig. 3. Secure wi th pin. upper attach Iink to the implement with I inch the free end pin.

the ball socket, Attach and

pin and secure

Remount

of the upper

link to the tractor

by moving the trocror slowly and forward iiii a.low gear. This wil. I
lI'

Ii ne up the connec+i on

perrni tti ng the

cI ev is

Fig. sli~ghtly socket 2.

2

AttachIng the

Left link Align c ross+shof t. Dismount tracwith

above
Lower the

cross-shaft. lin k with

boll

of I,eft lower

links

by pushingl the hydra-

lever down as for as necessary. tor on left side. 3. linch Attach
I

left

lower

link and secure

pi n see Fig. 2.

Fig.
pin tobeinserted.

4

Attachi

n91 Top Ll nk
See

Securewith!inchpin.

Fig. 4.

RAIS'iING
1.
With

AND

TRANSPORTNG

the tractor engine running raise the hyd ra Ieve r to the top of the· pos it ion c on+ trol range. The plow is now in the fully raised
posi tion.

2. With the level inq cronk odjus ted to the
level slcck mark wiH be on the threaded
from

shcf+

sufficient chain:s

removed

the check

Fig.

3 Attaching

Right link

to preve n t exc essi v e sl de sway d ur ing transport.

3

DETACHING

PLOW

1. Select level ground and Ilevel the plow
bottoms with the ground by turning the level ing crank. 2,. Whi Ie seated on thetrador I detach front end of the top link, moving tractor slightly backward or forward ,if necessary I to free the pin. 3" Dismount the tractorfrom the right side and detach right bottom link, adjusting levelin9 c rank to free any s+roin on ba II socket joi nr , 4,. Detach left bottom Iink. IMPORTANT: Beecreful to putthe linch pins in their proper cllps on the bottom 'Iinkstto prevent the pi ns from bei n9 torn off.

bottom to make sure the cross-shaft rotated.

was not

F i9. 5 Location

of Cross-shaft

ADJUSTMENTS
LOCA

ROLLING
The

COULTER & JOI NTER

nor-

OF CROSS-SHAFT

The locati on of the off-center cross-shaft has been occurore Iy set at the fae tory for optimum stability end to insure on even, full cut by the plow bottoms. If atony time this setting Dim. Dim. Dim. Dim. for for for for 16" Single-Bottom 12" 2-Bottom • . 14" 2-Bottom 16" 2~Bottom • '.
TABtE

coulter should be set approximately 1-1/2 in. above the share at nearest point, see Fig. 6. Fordeep plowingthe coultersmust be

,

• •

.
..

..

.

9-7/8'" 7-1/211 3~1/2!'
4-3/4

1

becomes altered)' the correct dimension as given in Table 1 must be used to conform with the particular plow under consideration. Loosen the tiwo "U" bolts that secure the c ross-she ft to the p low beams. SIide the crossshaft to rightor leftaccording to the dimension shown in Table 1. Thisdimension applies to the left side of the plow from the outside edge of the plow beam to the collar on the cross-shaft .• SeeFig.5. The cross-shaft settings for 12 in. and 14 in. three bottom plows ore identical to those of two bottom plows. of the same size. NOTE: After any lateral adjustment of the c ross-shaft I clhec k the width of cut of the fron t

Fig. 6 Coulter

Setting

rai sed to prevent the hubs from draggi n9 on the ground. They must be raised also in heavy, trashy Hround to permi t them to CUlt through. Set coulters to left of the following londs.lde ,

4

just far enough to leove a clean-cult furrow wall. Toadjustthecoulterloosenthe eye bolt and reposition the shaft, seeFig. 7. The jointer should be turned toward the coulter until the point lightly touches the coulter blade, see Fig. 8, wi th the ti p of the jointer just deep enoug h to roll a 5 Iice of so i I and trash into the bottom of the furrow. Note that these coul rers require no check cha ins as heavy stops are bui I t in to check swing.

the draft, ground and is excessive it replaced

tend to dde the plow out of the do not cuttrash well. If the coulter Iy worn, it wi II be necessary to have with a new one.

When the soil is extremely hard it may be necessary to raise the coulter on the plow frame' to a higher setting them shown in Fig. 6.

NOTE:

Fig. 7 Ad justi ng Coul te-'r
COULTER ST

Fi'g.

9 Adjusting

Width of Cut

WIDTH OF CUT The plow c ross=shcft is offset in such a way rhct roto+i ng the shaft wi II change the width of cut of the fi rst bottom. Tocdjust wldth of cut, loosen the IIIU" bolts which fasten the cross-shaft to the plow. Mark the cross-shctt to beam for a starting point as shown in Fig. 5. A 1/8 in. turn on the crossshaft will changethe width of cut of the front bottom approximately 1 in. To increase width of cut, rotate the top of the shaft forward. To decrease cut I rotate the top of the shaft backward, see Fig. 9. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHOULD THE CROSS-SHAFT BE MOVED ON THE PLOW LATERALLY, other than to conform to tlhe bcslc ser f n9 mentioned in the section under the heading "Loccrlon of Cross-shaft" .

JOINTER-~--J

Fig.

8 Coulter

end Jointer

Setting

Coulters should be kept wel'l sharpened for effective penetration. Dull coulters increase

5

FURROW WHEEL SCRAPER
The furrow wheel of the Ferguson Plow has a pivoting, spring-loaded axle and therefore with regard to location is self adjusting. It will follow in the extreme bottom of the furrow with a constant pressure against the furrow wa II and will maintain correct depth and location in re lnrlon to plowing depth independent of the plow. The Ferguson furrow wheel insures uniform furrow slicing and penetration; the furrow wheel olso takes upside thrust and gives stabHity to the plow.
l

enough clearance to permit the furrow wheel to rotate without interference and at the some time to provide a satisfactory scraping cct lon ,

Adjustment of the furrow wheel scraper is possible by means of a set screw which secures the end of the scraper shaft in the furrow wheel axle I see Fig. i O. Set the scroper to give

Fig.

10 Adjusting

Furrow Wheel Scraper

MAIN'TENANCE
CHANGING SHARES
removable shins of the IiN" Bottom plow may be replaced with the implement in this raised position. See following section on this operation.

When changing plow shares in the' field on 0111 plows, raise the plow with the hydralever (fi nger-tip control on older model tractors) and change shares wi th the implement in the raised position, see Fig. 11. When necessary the

CHANGING

REMOVABLE

SHI'NS

The Ferquson II Nil Bottom Plow is provided with easily removable shins, thus extending the usef u II ife of the molldboord. The removabl e shin is secured to the saddle wi th two plow bolts, the nuts being accessible from the rear side of the moldboard. Raise plow for easy replacement. See preceding section under heading IIChongi'ng Shares". NOTE: Before using new shares or shins remove the protective coating with paint or varnish remover to insure quick scouring.

SH,ARPENING

SHARES

Fig.

11 Changing

Shares

Eoch owner has his own particular ideas on how a share is to be sharpened. Whether it is done by the' owner or in a bllac:ksmith shop, the g:enerall procedure should be the same. listed

6

below are suggestions which should be followed in the shorpenlnq procedure. NOTE: A new and unused shareshouldbe used as a pattern to follow when sharpeni ng and repointing a worn share. Observe that in the case of the "N" bottom plow, sharpening and reshapi n!9 of shares or moldboard sh ins are eJ imina ted as economi ca I replacement has been made possi ble , CARBURIZED, SOFT CENTER AND SOLID STEEL SHARES

1. Heat the' point of the share in 0 blacksmith'sForqe fire, well banked to hold the heat I to a color between bri ght red and dull orange. Heat about one-third of the cutting edge dependi ng upon how badly it is worn, but not more than required. Wi th the use of a blacksmi this hammer and an envl I, or other suitabl e flat steel surface, draw the point of the share to as near the original shape as possible, except for point suction wh ich may be added later. 2. Heat the cutting edge to a color between bright red and dull orange, in sections of about 2-1/2 in. along the edge and 1-1/2 in. back from the edge, and draw the share to the original shape. Themetal should be drawn until it has turned a dark red. Do not continue to draw the metal after it has darkened complete-

3. Set the throat clearance and ground suction, Fig. 12 and Fig. 13, in the poi nt of the share by reheating it to 0 dull red, laying the point over theedgeof the onvi I and hammering it downward. The ground suc+lon, Fig. 13, should be about 3/16 in. measured at the glunnel with the point and heel of the gunnel laying on the anvi I. The throat clearance should be at least 1/8 in. measured from the cutting ,edge to the anvil, Fig. 12. The wing of the share should have no contact with the anvil except at the cutting edge. Inotherwords, the share wing does not neecllwingbearing to make it function properly.

GROUND SUCTION

LANDSIDE

LANDSIDE

HlEEL

Fig.

13 Ground

Suction

ly.

4. To,harden sofr+center or cerburlzed steel shares, heatthem uniformly to, a dull or bright red and ..quench in water at room temperature. I t is suglgestedthat the share be moved in and out of the water as it is cooled until a blue or light purple color persists upon air cooling. Crucible or solid steel shares should not be quenched, buttheated to adull orbrightred and allowed to cool slowly in still air.

CH IU.ED SHARES
SHARE WING

Fig.

12 Throat Clearance

Chilled shares should be ground with any ordi nary emery whee I, on the top side only, to a bevel ad edgle.
I

I

I

7

C,HECKING PLOW ALIGINMENT
If, at any time i't is desirable
plow for 01 ignment or wear, below outl lnes steps to follow , to check the the procedure

TWO OR THREE BOTTOM PLOWS
1,. Select c level surface such as a level cement floor, and block up each plow bottom as shown in Fig,. 14 using blocks of equal height. The blocks are to' be positioned directly under the lower beam bolt wi th only the loncl-

Fig.

15 Squaring

up Plow

WOOD.

BLOCKS OF~ _ EQUAL HEl$Hr

The distances I!XIi and "Y" are to be mea:sured on all bottoms. IIZ" is to be measured on lyon the rear bottom. The reodIng;s token, then are fo be checked against the chart. The chart isalso applicable for the single bottom 16 in. plow. 5. Measure the width of cut by placi 09 a carpenter's square os shown in Fi g. 20. The reading should be the wi dth of cut plus- or mi nus 1/4 in. j .e. 13-3/4 in. to 14-1/4 in. for 14 in. bottoms.

Fig.

14 Blocking

up Plow

side resting on the block. Note that the floor or surface should be as level as possiblle. Any uneveness in the floor will influence the measurements, made. These measurements are colculured wi th tolerances plus or rni nus 1/8 in. ,2. Disconnect the top Iink from the tractor and with the aid of a ccrpenter's square, level the plow wIth the level ing crank unti I the face of the rear bottom landside is perpendicular with the level surface, se-e Figl. 15. 3. Measure the distance from the center I,inc of the lower beam bolt hole to the level surfaceasshownin Fig. 16. Refer to this distance as dimension !lA!!.. 4. Referri ng to Figs. 17, 18 and 1'9 measure the d'istance "XII I "YI! and II ZII .

Fig. NOTE:

16 Dimension

II AI!

See the chart for checking different types of pi ow bo-ttoms:above the iIIustroti oris on the next page. Remember when maki ng any check

8

CHART FOR CHECKING PLOW BOTTOMS For Dimension "A" Refer to Fig. 16 Type Size

&

Share Points
Fig.

Share Wing
Fig.IS. Y Can Vary Between

Landside Heel Fig.19.
Z Cain Vary Between

Botfom

17.

X Can Vary Between

121i 14" 1611 12" 14" 16"

BII "RII
II II

-cNil II Nil II Nil

A-3 ...1/4" A-3-3/8" A-3,-1/4" A-3-1/8" A-3-1/8" A-,3-l/8"

to to to to

A-2-7/8" A-311 A-2-7 /81~' A-3-1/4111 to A-3-1/4111 to A-3-1/4u

A-3" to A-2-1/2" A-3-5/8" to A-3-1/4" A-3-1/S" to A-2-3/4" A-2-5/811 to A-2-3/4" A-2-1/2" to A~2-3/411 A-2-3/8" to A-2-5/81! TABLE 2

A-2-1/4" A-2-3/4" A~2-1/4!1 A-2-3/8"

to A-l-7/8" to A-2-3/8" to A-I-7j8U to A-2-7/8"
ii

-A-2-3j8" to A-2-7j8 A-2-3j8" to A-2-7j811

Fig.

17 Dimension "X"

Fig. 19 Dimension "Z"

Fig. 18 Dimension "V"

Fig. 20 Measuring Width of Cut
9

that the floor surface must be quite 'Ievel, and the points, wings and landsides must be new or in new condition. . Any level cement or wood floor may be used. If convenient it is recommended that the alignment check of the plow should be made at your nearest Ferguson Denler ts Service Shop. 6. Check for bent saddles or beams by measuring the distance between the share-

the same within

a plus or minus 1/4 in.

SINGLE BOTTOM PLOWS
flat, level surface. 2. Block up londside with the block immediately under the lowerbeom bolt that goes through the landside. Disconnect the top link from the tractor. 3. Square up the face of the, landside with the level lnq crank so that it is at right angles with the fl at surface. 4. Measure the distance from the fIIat surface to the center line of the lower beam bol t and call this dimension rlA". See Fi:g. 16.
'0

1. Place plow on

Fig. 21 Bottom Al ignment

(Landsides)

Fig. 23 Checking

Single Bottom

5. Rolse or lower the front of the plow beam until the distance from the center line of the bolt holes in the beam, Fig. 23, to the flat surface is equal to the measurement nAil plus 22 in. Fig. 22 Bottom Alignment (Wing:s)

NOTE:

The above

dimension

is true for the

moldboard joi nt Iines at both the landside of the share, see Fig. 21 and the wing of the share, see Fig. 22. The distance should be

16 in. plow. Refer to Table 2: when checking measurements for the 16 in. lie II end 11 Nil plows.

10

PLOWING WITH lHE FER,G'l/SON SYSTEM
The Ferguson Plow when operating wi th the Ferguson Tractor combines to provide a plowing unit which wi II meet with your highest expectations. Yet, although thisun'it is most efficient and rei ia,ble" a certain omount of know-how, interest, care and operating ski wilt be required to insure scflsfcctory operoflon , Skill will come quickly throvgh familiarity. The Owner's Manual for the Ferguson 35 Tractor will serve as a comprehenslve guide in acquainting yourself wi th the operctlon of the Ferguso,n Hydrculic System, Inl this instance, therefore, the description is more brief and spec iolly adapted to plowi ng wi th the Ferguson 35 Troc+or '. Your integrated Ferguson Tractor and Plow, although far ahead in its field, is sfiUsimple to operate and easy to comprehend. It ts recommended that owners of the earl ier model Ferguson Tractors refer to +helr respective Owner's Manua Is for informa H on on plowing with the finger-tip control. Foll:owing the some hydrol.l~ic principles as incorporated in older Ferguson Tractor models, the Ferguson 35 Hydrcolic System been designed fOfgreoter convenience and range of control and now in'corporeres two controls in two odiaclent quadrants, the hydr,alever and the draft control lever, see Fig. 24. for entering the plowi nto the soil from the transport position and operating the plow is as follows: 1. Select the desi red gear and range for plowing. .2. Locate the draft control lever obout the cenrer por+lon of its quadrant to obtain en initic! depth setti ng of the plow , 3. Set the throttle control lever to obtain suFFicient power to ini tiote tractor forward motion. 4. lower the hydrolever slowly ond deliberately through the position control range to a response setting at or sli ghtly below the halfway posi tion of the response range on the quadrant. While moving the hydralev1er the clutch should be engaged to motivate the tractor. As. the plow enters the soil the thronle:setting wi II have to be increased to compensate for the additional load. Move the throttle control lever until. a desired pl.oOwiril9 speed has been obtained. 5. Observe the plow as itreaches the depth selected by the pcsi+ion of the dra.ft control lev,er.lf the plow depthexceeds or IS less than the desired working depth, the draft control 1ever con be repositioned accordingly. When s.o.tisfactory depth has been obtai ned, locate the finger grip of the sma III aid justable sector ad ja cent to the drof t centro I Iever a nd tighten the knurled nut. This will prevent the operctor from inadvertently raising the draft control iev,er lathe transport position as well as oidi n9 in quickly relocating the original setting of the draft control lever after field adj ustment. CAUTION: The droft control lever should not he u sed for ra is in9 th e pi ow to the hans por t posl ti on. See second poragraph page 14, Fig. 24 Fer'9usan Quadramatic Control

n

The procedure

has

Ferguson 35 Owner's Manual.

Wi th the preceding 5 steps. completed the operation of the plow must be noted. The opera.tionor plowing performance wiU depend on the corre lotlon between plowi'nQi speed, drofr , and response :settings selected. Any 01 terati on in one of these settings wil I materi.olly affect the function of the remaining two. It is deslroble , when plowing, to aHaino smooth operation which 0150 provides sc+lsfactory plowing depth, plowing speed end hydroul ic response to sol I OJ terral n voricflons, This may be determined by observofion and by the operator IS IIfeell1 of the integrated tractor and plow , Ac:cording to the plowing conditions prevo i.1iIiIg further Old iustment of the hyd ro I ever in the response control range of the quadrant may be necessary. Faster response setti ngs are required 'in undulating terrain end on land where frequent variations of draft occur due to stones or changes in soi I texture. As a general ru le the c loser the opera tor can posi t ion th e hyd fa Ieve r to the 5 Iow res ponse position the more smooth the operation of the comb inedtree tal!' o nd pi ow will be. When the best response setti rig of the hydraliever has been determined by trial ,locate the hydro lever stop at th is point I see Fig. 25. Bylocati og and

tightening the stop in position, this same responseselecfloncon bemaintained after rioising a nd ~ owe ri ng th e p low at the ends of the furrow. Where plow~ng depth is an important consideration, it must be remembered that any subsequent increase of plowing speed will tend to increase draft ,. fhe hydrau lie system will rncln+cln the origina.1 draft selected by raising the plow to a shallower working depth. In other words lncrecsed plowing speed will result in shallower worki n9 depth and in order to maintain a desired depth, efter on lncrecse in speed, itwIII be necessary to increase the draft s€!fting on the draft control quadrantaccordingly, The reverse is true when plowing speeds
a re dec reused •

in SQiI texture will 01.50 affect the depth of plowing. When plowing from a light textured soil to a heavier soil, or vice versa, the increase or decrease in draft will cause the hydra.ulic system to raise or lower the plow and maintain the original draft setting. This will neeessl+o+e a chang.e in the d roft setting on the quadrant to mel ntain even, working depth. Variations strongly recommended that, in normal plowing conditions .. the operator should not otrempr to plow using the hydralever in the position control range of the quadrant to control the depth of plowing, Position control makes the tractor and plow a rigid unit, which will, in all probabnity, resuh in a very unso+isfoc tory plowing. job. On the contrary, it wilt be seen that by using the draft control lever to sejeet the depth and the hydralever to select the desired response many lmportont advantages are·gailned. Among the:se are: automoti c flexibili ty of the tractor and pllow to maintain even depth over undulating terrain, cons tant d raft con fro I resu Iting in smoo th operation, and the 9,aining of tractive weight os needed to prevent excessive wheel sl lp , The following conditions or symptoms Indicate unsuitable response selection: bobbing, uneven depth, delay.ed penetration and loss of Itis

Fig.

25

Locati ng Hydralever

Stop

12

traction. A tr1ouble-shooting section of this manua l.under the title Plowing Difficulties and Corrections, page 21', 1 ists a series of fau Ity conditions experienced while plowingl and presentsc summary of their causes and corrections. This section will therefore merit the attention of all Ferguson Tractor and Plow operators.

This delay wi 1,1 permit the Ferguson System to recover the tractive weight and result in possible damage to the implement or tractor. Premature wear of soil ehgpging parts will also result from excessively high speed operation.

!PLOWING CAPACITY
The following plowing capacity charts are (] good indication of performance under norma II plowing conditions. It w'ill be noted these charts are based on engine speeds of 1500 and 1750 RPMI' the recommended speed range for plowing with Ferguson Tractors. The tractormeter I fitted as standard on the Ferguson 35 Tractor, incorporates a tachometer, which aids the operator in accurately selecting any given engi ne speed. On ecrlier mode I tractors notequipped wHh trcctcrme+ers, engine speeds of between 1500 and 175'0 RPM approximately may be obtained by moving the throttle control' lever two-thirds open , See Fig. 26for iIlustration of tractormeter.

Fig,. 26 Ferguson

Tractormeter

PLOWI NG AT EXCESSIVE SPEEDS
Even though your integrated Ferguson Tractor and plow is on excellent performer , do not attempt to plow at foster than recommended speeds, Excessively fast ;"Iowing crecres two undesirable conditions. 1. Pers'Ona I Injury.: Remember that below surface' obs.tructionsare not visible to the operator , At speeds above .4 MPH an unprepared for and abrupt stop may cause the operotcr to be thrown from the sect with serious lnjurles as a result. 2. Breakage alnd Premature Wear: Excessive speeds may result in damage not 'Only to the plow bu to Iso to the free tor. The ac ti en of the outomotlc overllead release built inte the hydraulic system is olmost instantaneous, even at high speeds. Human reaction is slower, however, and the operator wUI have insufficient time to effectively disengage the clutch.

A quick "rule of thumb"
plow capacity below:

determinorlon

of

can be made by using theformulla

(Wid th of cut in feet x speed of tractor i n miles per hour = Acres plowed per TOe-hour day) . charts which follow are for the Ferguson 35 and Ferguson 3'0 models respectively. Width of cut for single, two and three bo ttom p lows ore inc Iuded a nd a IIowa nces have been made for slippage/ and turning 'Iosses .' The se a IIowanc es I howeve rid 0 no t take into considerc+lon the length of field. Short furrows need mere frequent turning than long furrows. Excessive turning losses will therefore be experienced in short fields or furrows. The charts will aid in determining the performance of your plow and also help in selecting the most suitable speed range and gear for the exisfing soil condition. 13

The plow capacity

PLOW CAPACITY CHART For Ferguson TO-35 Tractor (Approx imate Acres per lO-hour Day) Allowing' for Sllippage and Turning Losses LOW RANGE 3rd Gear 15'00 RPM 1750 RPM

HIGH RANGE
Ist Gear 1500 RPM 1750 RPM

2.53

MPH

2.95 MPH

3.68 MPH

4,.3 MPH

Width of Cut 16" (one bottom) 24" (two l' 211 bottoms) 28" (two 14" bottoms) 32" (two 16" bottoms) 36" (three 12" bottoms) 42" (three 1411 bottoms)

Acres per TOe-hcur

Day

3.4
5.1

5.9 6.7
7.5

3.8 5.8 6.9

4.8 7.3
.8.5

8.S
9.9
11.5 12.7 15.0

5.7

7.7
8.8

8.9

10.4

9.7 10.9 12.8

PLOW CAPACITY CHART For Ferguson TO-30 Tractor (Approximate Acres per 1Q-hour Day) Allowing for SlippagJ& and Turning Losses LOW GEAR 2ND GEAR

l500 RPM

1750 RPM
2.9 MPH

1500 RPM

1750 RPM
4.0 MPH

2.48 MPH

3.42

MPH

Width of Cut 1611 24" 28" 32ii 36il 42" (one bottom) (two 1211 bottoms) (two 14"1 bottoms) (two 1611 bottoms) (three 12!! bottoms) (three 14" bottoms)

Acres per 10-hour

Day

3.3

5.,0 5.8 6.6 7.4 8.7

3.7 5.7 6.8 7.6
8.7

4.5
6.8 8.0

5.3 8.0 9.3
10.7

9.0
10.2

11 ,.9
14,.0

10.2

11.9

14

PLOWING

PROCEDURES

LEVELING

THE PLOW

Good plowing methods and chorocterlsfics vary from one port of the country to the other I depending upon the type 0'£ forming, but normally they are all intended for good seedbed prepamtion. Most parts of the country require that trash, or surface residue, be covered completely; while other parts, particularly semi-

During the normal plowingoperati.on, when one tractorrear wheel is in the furrow and the other on plowed ground, turn the leveling crank unti I the cross-shaft of the plow is on a para ll el plane with the ground. Incorrect leveling, will! be' noticable in uneven or improper turning of the soi I and undeslroble furrow walls. Itisadvisable to make a final leveling

Fig.

27

Plowing

Terminollogy

arid areas, require 0 portion of the svrfoce residue to be mixed with the topsoi I. In discuss ing pi ow in9 proc edures therefore this manual will be confined tamore general methods occeptcble in most ports of the country. Fig. 27 Lllustrctes c few of the' well known Terms as applied to the quality of plowing and the pfowing operation.

ad justm:ent during turning the soil.

pllowi ng whi Ie the plow is

When during plowing the tractor's rear wheels are on the same level plane (such as when completing a dead furrow) turn the leveling crank to level the plow with the gmund so that aU bottoms cut at c desired depth.

1S

HEADLAND

FURROW should be cut with the

ENTERING

THE FURROW

)

Head land furrows

)

sol I turned toward the land to be plowed,

Fig.

28. Opening a Iheadland furrow affords an advantage in that it makes possible quick plow penetrc+ion at each entry and also helps keep the ends of the furrows even.

Whem entering the furrow, lower the plow lust as the rear wheels climb out of the headland furrows. Thls will insure a full pl,owing depth from the start. This methcd of entry also helps to make the job of finishing the land easy. See Fig. 29. LEAVING THE FURROW

Fig. 28

Plowing

Headland

Furrow

When leaving the furrow raise the plow just as the rear wheels climb out of thelheadland furrow, see Fig 30. This method wi II prevent jagged furrow ends along the headlands and will make for cleaner and Ibetter plowing when finishing these outside lands. With plows having more than two bottoms the finished furrow ends along the headland furrow wi" have a pronounced saw-tooth appearance due to the staggered positions of the bottoms. For thisreason it is _more diffi cult to fi nish even Iy • The func ti on of the headland furrow, therefore, becomes essential as it is the only clearly visible marker point at which to raise the plow on comple+lnq a pass.
0.

Fig. ,29 Ented ng the FU HOW 16

Fig.

30

Leaving

the Furrow

OPEN FURROW STRIKE-OUT method of opening. lend is by the use of the open furmwstrike out or the Canodian back furrow. This procedure plows all the ground in the opening proce'ss, allowing the ground to be weedfree. This method can be used when the ground mus+be left level air when One

a back furrow is not wonted. The follow in9 steps outline the, procedure in thIs method of plowing. (RefertoFig. 31 through Fig. 34 for these various steps). 1. Tilt the plow to the left with the leveling crank. Make the first eut ocress the field with the rear bottom atabout half the normal plowing depth. See Fig. 31.

F igl. 31

1st Pass - Open Furrow Strike-out

Fig .• 33 3rd Pass +Open

Furrow Strike-out

2,. With the leveling crank in the same pasiti on , make th e return tri p with the Ieft wheel of tn e troe tor in the furrow, 5ee Fi 9 • 32. The location of the tractor wheel in the furrow wil I depend upon the width of the plow being used. This cut will be mode sl'ightly deeper than the first cut to provide a furrow wall for the furrow wheel. 3. The thi rd ti me across the fi el.d place the right wheel in the furrow made in Step 2, I eve I the pl:owcross-shaft and set the' draft control lever (fi n.ger-ti p control ~ever on older model tractors) 'for ·the desired plowing depth.

See Fig. 33.
4.. Plcce the troctor right wheel in the furrow made in Stepl, keeping plow cross-shaft
17

F i9' .32

2nd Pass-

Open Furrow Strike-out

still level. Finish See Fig. 34.,

the opening

of the field.

plow to the left by turning the lev1eling crank. This will keep the center ridge height to a mi Illi-

Fig. 34 4th Pass - Open Furrow Strike-out

Fig. 36 Strike-out

Furrow

Fig. 35 Completed

Open Furrow Strike-out

Fig. 37 Completing

Back 'Furrow

Fig. 35 ll Iustrcres the result of this method. STRIKE~OUT FURROW
<0

When opening up what type of opening

new land, no matter is to be used, tilt the

mum.. The amount of tllr is ~a'rgelydetermined by the numberof bottoms on the plow and experience in the field. See Fig. 36., Fig. 37 i[Iustrates the proper posi tl on of the tree tor for the return pass to complete the bock furrow,

18

FINISHING

A LAND

THREE BOTTOM PLOW
On the next to the last pass through the field, adjust the draft lever for shallower plowing to prevent an unnecessarily deep dead furrow, and ad [ust the plow with the level in9 crank so that the rear bottom plows at about half the normal depth. Leave enouqh space on the unplowed stri p for two bottoms to cut on the last pass. With C 3-12 in. plow leave 24 in. ond leave 28 l n, with 0 3-14 in. plow. See Fig. 38. On the last pass, turn the leveling cronk so that the plow is Ieve led as in norma I plowl n9. SeeFig.39. Plowatnormaldepth. Remember that a furrow wall wi II provide stabil ity on this last run because on the previous pass the plow had been set for shallower plowing depth and the plow hod been leveled so that the rear bottom was plowing about half the normal depth. On this last pass plow with the right wheels in the furrow as in normal plowing. This method will provide a clean finish and a dead furrow of minimum depth.

row. This wi Iii leave a strip of ground for the last pass ncross the field, wide enough for one plow bottom to make a full cut.

Fig.

38

Next

to Last Pass- Three Bot+orn Plow

TWO

BOTTOM PLOW

Finishing a land wah a two bottom plow is basically the some as wi th a three bottom plow. An exception, however, wi II be on the next to last pass when ~he tractor wheels wi II span the unplowed srrl p and the tractor wl II be level or nearly 1 evel . Levie I the plow with the ground. Reduce plowing depth to prevent on unnecessarily deep dead furrow, and to provide a furrow wall for the last poss. Leave sufficient room on the unplowedstripfor one bottom tocut on+he last pass. With a 2-14 in • or 2- 16 in . plow, place the left front wheel of the tractor against the furrow wall. With a 2-12 in. plow the left front wheel should be in the midd Ie of the fur-

F i9' ,39 Last Pass - Three Bottom Plow

When making the lost pass, adjust plowing depth so tho f the rea r bottom will cut at norma I or al little more than normal depth. 19

PLANNING

FIELD LAYOUT

The plan cs illustrated in Fig. 40 shows thalt the field is lci d out in lands and plowed out in straight furrows. First, plow 0 headland furrow the full distance across both ends ofthefield, leavingampleroom tomake turns. Then fol low the procedure shown in Fig. 40.
.

BACK

tt

--~

~

-----~

_ ---

See Fig. 41. Start with a short back furrow in the opproxirnete center of the field. Back furrow a few rounds until the' distance IIX" is equal to the distance "Y'", then start plowing furrows across the ends/ making complete turns at the corners by looping to the left. I nl th is way I the plowed land gradually !grows outward and the dead furrows are left at the extreme outsIde of the field •

rURJeOJII

Another method of plowlnq using square corners is to plow around the field from the
outside,
J

2.

Df:110 FURROW

BACK

--F i9' 40 Rectangular

------

l

the p1low at the corners. See Fig. 42. When the distance across the end of the field becomes too short I discontl nue plow-

raising

FURROW

or Square Field

____
------------~--'\;,,/

1'<~
l
I

shaped fields may require transverse pi ow ifl9 of very short Iands for reasons of drainage, or top soi I displacement. In such cases where furrows are very short I turni n9 may become troublesome. For these short furrows, raise the plow and back the frncfcr after each furrow slice, rather than turningl.

Irrequlorly

\...

..._

Fig. 42 Finishing

at the Center

illlg the ends. To close the field, comers of the field, os shown.

plow out the

CONTOUR

PLOWING

Fig. 41 Starti'ngi at the Center

Contour pi ow ing can be successfu Ily card ed out with the Ferguson Tractor and Plow. The use of a survey map indicating elevotlons is however recommended.. If in any doubt regarding existing changes in elevation or the soil condition and the drainage requirements when contour plowing, consult your local County Agrkultural Ag,ent, who wi II advise yOUi regarding elevations and also put you in touch with experts on soil.

PLOWING USING SQUARE CORNERS
L, This plan is often used when dead furrows ln the center of the field are not desirable.

NOTE: All of the loyout plans discussed and
illustrated in this section should be reversed occasionally in order to ovoid excessive displacement of top soi I.

20

PLOWING AND

DIFFICULTIES

CORRECTIONS

Llsted below are some of the more common d iffi cul ti es whic h may be encou ntered d uri ng the plowing operation. Keep these in mind wh iI e operating and correct difficul ties as they occur. Fi g. 43 ill ustrates some of the more common difficulties and the type of plowing whkhshould not bedone. Fig. 27, page 15, ill ustrotes a good plowi n9 job.

Cause C. Coulters not in adjustment. Correction: See adjustment on coulters, page 4. Cause D. Excessive moisture content: The pocked soil from the tractor wheel tracks made on the precedi ng pass, preventi ng proper penetroion and pulverization. Correction: When plowing, the moisture content of the sol I should be such that proper pulverization can be obtai ned. III this case I plow i ng should be delayed unti I the sol I rnols= tu re content is lowe r • Cause E. Irregular tractor speeds , Correction: Maintain constant forward speeds. One trip at low speed followed by a trip at high speed, will show definite ridging. BOBBING Cause A. P lowing at excessive speeds in hard or rapidly varying soil texture. Correction: Reduce speed unti Ismooth operationis obtained. Cause B. Excessive draft settingl. Plow work ing too deep. Correction: Reduce draft setting for less depth and smoother operation. Couse C. Excessive FAST RESPONSE setting of hydralever in RESPONISE range of quadrant when plowing in rapidly varying sci I texture. Correction: Move hydra lever down to slower RESPONSE setting. The FAST RESPONSE position is not generally recommended for plowing. Cause D.. Plow out of adjustments, causing bottoms to suck or penetrate excessively. Correction: Check and correcr rhe adjustments of plow.

Fig. 43

Poor' Plowi ng

RIDGING Cause A. The front plow bottom narrower than the rear plow bottom. cutting

Correction: 1. Set tractor rear wheels alt correct setting of 52 •n. recr, 48 in. front. 2. Make the correct setting of the crosss hoft I see page 4. 3. Make the correct cdlustment for width of cut, see page 5. Couse B. One plow bottom not plowinq on the same Ieve I, as th e other. Correction: Level the plow with the leveling crank until satisfactory results ore obto ined, see page 15 •

U NEVE N DEPTH OR DIFFICULT PENETRATION
Cause A. Rolling coulters set too low. Correction: In extremely hard soil conditi ons the cou Iter shou ld be raised to about ha If the depth of plowing. If thecoulter is set too low over the point of the shore in hard soil

21

cond iti ons, it may tend to Iead the plow out of the ground causing lnsuffl ci ent penetration. However, too high a setting may cause a ragged furrow wall due ito inadequate cutting of the plant roots. Cause B. Plow shares badly worn or incorrectly sharpened. Correction: Resharpen and/or reshape the plow shares to conform as nearly as possible with a new share. Repl ace excess ive ly worn shares with new shores , If there is insufficient stock in the share to resharpen, a new share must be i nstal [ed, 1t is suggested that the owner keep a spare set of shares in stock at all times. "N!I bottom II throw away" shares should be replaced when badly worn. Couse C. Plow bottoms not level. Correction: level the pi ow bottoms with the leveling crank, page 15. Cause D. Hydradever in POSITION CONTROL range. In this range the Hydraulic System will hold and maintain plow in fixed posl+lon except when thrown into Overload Releose , Correction: Move hydralever into correct setting iin RESPONSE RANGE and use draft control lever to select des ired depth. Cause E. Loss of Flexlbl lity: RESPONSE serf og too slow for undulati n9 land or varyi ng soll texture. Correction: Adjust hydralever in RESPONSE range for faster response. Cause F . Too wide plow bottoms for parti cular soi IIcondition. Correction: Thewiderthe plow bottom, the Iess chance it has to penetrate the ground. Where penetration is difficult, clipped wing shares can be used to an advantage, see Figs. 58 and 59. Consult your Ferguson Dealer. If plowing must be done under ex.tremely hard, dry and rocky conditions with wide bottoms, penetration may be aided by cutting off a portionoftheshareatthewing. This type of share is usually known as a clipped wing share.

PLOW NOT SCOURI NG Cause A. Paint, rust', ororiginal protective coati ng on the moldboa rd or share. Cerrec tjon: See reference under ~ubricaticn, page 2, concerning use of lubricant to protect soi I engaging parts. Remove rust by buffing, or if rust is not severe it may be removed by 'a few rounds of plowing ina sandy, dry soil. Remove protective coating on new pi ows. Cause B. Rolling coulters, incorrectly set. Correction: See coulter adjustment I page 4. Set the coulters just to the left of the following landside. LOSS OF TRACTION Cause A. Hydraulic System has been thrown into Overload Release by plow strlkingebstruction. Reduced weight on reor wheels causes them to spin. Correction: Dhengage clutch. Back tractor, raise plow, poss over or remove obstruction and then resume plowing. Cause B. Excessive RESPONSE setting of hydraul ic system incurri n9 fast reaction to draft variations, when plow meets small obstructions or sudden and extremeclhonges in soil texture. Correction: Move hydralever to a lower response setti ng • Cause C. Wheel spin due to worn tires or need for tiire fi II • CorrecflonConsul t yOU' Ferguson Dealer.

PLOW NOT COVERING

TRASH

Cause A. Rolling coulter and jointer incorrectly set. Correction: See Adjustment Sec+ion , Cause B. Plow not level. Correction: Level with leveling crank. Cause C. Excessive amount of trash. Correction. Large tall weeds" sweer clover , (]Ifa Ifa, etc. may be turned under and covered satisfadorily with the use of weed hooks" see Fig. 57. These may be purchased from your local Ferguson Dealer.

22

PLOW CLASSIFICATION
PLOW BOTTOMS

AND A'CCESSORIES
liNn BOTTOM
Good, all-round gener,al purpose bottom wi th low cost share and replaceable moldboard shin, see Fig. 44. Under most operati ng conditions the new Ferguson 1I,N1I Bottom Plow will provide a satisfactory bottom for economical and ol l-round general purpose plowing. The II Nil bottoms are avai lable in 12, 14, and 16 in. sizes and are adaptable toa variety of soil conditions as well as to those areas which require deep plowing. Your Ferguson Dealer can give you more information regarding these new IIIN" bottoms. IIRI. BOTTOM Conventional type genera I purpose bottom suitable for a vorlety of soils. The Igenera I purpose II R II bottom, as shown in Fig. 45 incorporates a long moldboard which resul ts in slow turning for sad turf 1 such as clover 1 timothy I a Ifa Ifa and young tame sods. It is also more adaptable for faster plowing speeds.

Different plowing conditions sometimes re-quire vorious shcpes andsizes of plow bottoms, as well as different kinds of material from which they are made. These conditions wi II vary with the type of soi I, moisture content and the surface coverage. Types of soil will vary From c lose-fextured heavy clay, gumbo, black loam, muck lend, to sandy soi Is. Clay and gumbo soils require good penetration and good scouring '. Sandy soils require moldboards made from abrasiveresistant materials. Good penerrction depends largely upon the adjustment and condi+ion of the plow but may be improved with the use of the smaller bottoms. r n general a greater degree of pulverization is obtained through the use of bottoms which incorporate quick-turning moldboards. These moldboards also provide better trash coverage in corn, oat, wheat or rye stubble. It has been found thct the gr1eatest resistance to soil abrasion is obtained through the use of chilled cast iron materials. This material is extremely herd, has long life in abrasive sol Is, but has low resistance to shock. For greater convenience there are ovol lable the foillowi ng plow bottoms which wi II meet your plowing needs.

!!

BII BOTTOM
type sad or clay bottom for plowi ng.

Conventional moderate depth

Fig. 44 "N'' Bottom

Fig. 45 IIRII Bottom 23

The sod and clay BI'I bottom as shown in Fig. 46 has simi lor characteristics as the general purpose "'R" bottom, however it is more adaptable for plowing sod or very sJiff clay where penetratIon or pulverization is a problem. The narrower "8" bottom has been de'signed to provide greater suck.
II

PL,QW SHARES
For your convenl ence to meet the varying

soil conditions, there are also available plow shares manufactured from different materials. When ordering service shores first consult your Ferguson Dealer concerning the type of shares needed. Always keep 'sufficient shares on hand for replacement purposes in order to avoid any delay during the plowing season. CH ILLED CAST IRON In extremely abrasive soi Is such as sandy and vol cani cash soi Is, cast iron shares wi II wear better than steel and are more inexpen-

IMPORTANT:

"e"

BOTTOM

Conventional type general purpose bottom for extro deep and trashy plowing. The g,eneral purpose "CII bottom as shown in Fig. 47 is adaptable to a wide range of sol ] corditions and is consequently useful in 0111 'parts of the country. The bottomi 5 especi a IIy cdeptcble for deep plowing conditions. l+o lso incorporntes exce] l ent trosh cover in9 characteristics.

Fig. 48 Chilled

Cast I ron

Flq , 4'9 Corburized

Alloy

Steel

sive.

They should net be used in stony soi I.

Ch illed iron is grey cast iron wh ich has been
chilled at the time it was poured into the molds. This couses a very hard and brittle iron to, form ln the crec ccoled . Ifbroken, this chi ll ed iron wi II appear 'as a bright and 9 I itteri ng meta I, see

(

Fig. 47 "C" Bottom
24

Fig. 48.

CARBURIZED ALLOY STEIEL
These shares are highly resistant to wear and moderate Iy resi stant to shock. They are provided with d good pol ish to-scour exceptionally well in sticky soils. Low carbon alloy steel put into a carburiz'ing furnace and heated to a hi gil temperature absorbs carbon on its outer surfaces, This Increased carbon content in the outer surfaces provides a hard, wearresistantsurface, while the center remains soft to absorb shock, see Fig. 49.

a verv hard surface and a soft, ductile core w hich he Ips to absorb shoe k. Th is share is not recommended for rocky conditions.

CRUCIBLE OR FORGED

STEEL

These shares Ore used where scouring is not a problem, They are tough and highly resistant to shock, but are not exceptionally wearresistant to abrasive soils. Crucible or forged steel shares ore made of one moterio l , see Fig. 51, without the hard and soft layers, This steel has a slightly lower carbon content than the hard oreos of the other two types of shares.

SOFT-CENTER

STEEL

These shares are pri mari Iy used in cliffi cult scour! ng areas . The soft-center shares cons ist of three sep-' arate layers of steel. The two outer layers hcve a high carbon content and the center layer has a low carbon content. The three layers are hot-rolled together, which fuses them into a single sheet of metal. D uri '1g the heat treotl n9 pwce.ss the two outer layers harden due to the

Fi9. 51 Crucible or For'9cd Steel end High Carbon Through Heat Treated Steel

HIGH CARBON THROUGH HEAT-TREATED " STEEL
This material shares. It is heat i ng surface yet shock resisting Fig. 50 Soft Center Steel is used only in the IINIt bottom treo ted to prov ide a hard wearat the some time to retai n good chcrocteri sflcs , see Fig. 51.

high carbon content , and the middle layer re'mains soh, see Fig. 50. This steel provides

Cruc ible or forged steel and high carbon through heat-:treated steel ere simi lor in appearance. Fig. 51 illustrates a typical cross-section of either of these types of steel.

NOTE:

25

ACCESSORIES
MOLDBOARD EXTENSIION

Certain moldboards may require moldboard extensions when plowing in prairie or old sod sol 15 in which it is difficult to rollover the Furrowsliceorto tum furrows uphill. Arnoldboord extension, illustrated in Fig. 52, is ovci lcble , Extendi ng beyond the moldboard, it controls the furrow slice after it passes the moldboard. Some Ferguson Plows are provided with two plow bolts in the moldboard to permit installation of this extension.

eithera 16 in. or 18 in. diameter. If difficulty is encountered with coulter cutti ng trash, the notched or cutaway roll ing coulter, Fig. 54, should be used, Two sizes of this model are else available I the 16 in. and 18 in. diameters. The cculters ere evollcb!e either with or without jointers.

c

Fig.

52

Moldboard

Extension

COUl TERS
Vari ous models of caul tel's are cve iloble which con be used on the moldboard plow. Fig. 53 il lustrotes the plain rol,ling coulter made in Fig.

54 Notched Coulterwith

Plain Jointer

The notched cutting edge of this coulter permits rotation under adverse plowing conditions, the notches acting as teeth. Where trash is thick ond deep rooted the notched coul ter may prove more efficient. Locol experience and consultation with your Ferquson Dealer will help you to decide on the advisabilityof using coulters togetherwith jointers or jointers without coulters.

JOINTERS
There are two types of jointers available, the plain blade, shown in Fig. 54, and the winged blade, shown in Fig. 55. It is recornmended that the plain blade jointer be used on 12 and 14 in, bottoms in normal plowing conditions. The wi'nge,d blade jointershould be used

;

Fig., 53 26

Plain Roliling Coulter

This is especially true in mellow soils where surface trash is light and easy to cover , A special standing jointer, see Fig. 56, is. available which can be used to replace the coulter and jointer ossembly cnd is por+i culor ly adaptable to these soil conditions. The 'jointer is the same as used on the coulter and jointer assembly, butan extended jointerstem IS used to allow clamping to the plow beam.

Fig.

55 Winged

Blade Jointer

on the 16 and 18 in. bottoms in all plowing conditions where a jointer is desirable.

STANDING

JOINTERS

In sci I condi tions I where the use of 0 cou Iter is not necessary, it may still be desiroble to provide a slight opening of the furrow slice.
/

Thissecti'on which describes available· accessories has been designed to aid you, the owner of a Ferguson Moldboard Plow, in the selection of any extra equipment that may be needed nccordl nq to the soil conditions prevai'l ing. It is strongly recommended, however, in case of diHicultiesexperienced when plowing land to consult your Ferguson Dealer .. Wide experience with Ferguson equi pment and ex.tensive knowlledg,e of the local soil problems encountered make you'r Ferguson Dea ler competent to give sound advice reg;arding any individual problem and the selection of the most suitable accessory for satisfactory plowing.

NOTE:

Fig.

56 Plow EquIpped with Standing Jointers

27

WEED HOOKS Under extremely trashy plowing conditions, it may be found that the plow will not make a satisfactory covercqe of weed and trash. This is, especially true in sweet clovers, rye, and toll 'grasses, etc. Special weed hooks ore available to attach to the plow to assure adequate

from the trac tOI" when backing. The clamp should be placed on the becrn so it is parallel with the ground.

CLIPPED WING

SHARES

When operating 'in extremely rocky soils or in 50i I condi ti ons where penetrati on is diffi-

Fig.

57 Plow EqllJipped with Weed Hooks

I

Fig.

58 Conventional

Clipped

Wing Shore

Fig.

59

II

Nil CI ipped Wing Shore

covercqe ,

F19. 57.

In mounfing the weed hooks to the plow beam, the curved ti ne should be on top of the straight tine to properly swing the hooks away

cult, it may be helpful to use clipped wing shcres , These are ovoiloble from your Ferquson Dealer. See Figs. 58 and 59 for examples of cl ipped wi ng shares together wi th the i r stonderd c.oun terparts .

28

ASSEMBLY
All plow ossembly should preferably be performed on or

INSTRUCTIONS
THREE BOTTOM PLOW CONVERSION

a flat, level floor, cspho It surface.

a concrete

KITS
Conversion and 14 in. kits plows to change to three two bottom bottom plows 12 are

1 • To assem bl e the two bottom plow, attach the frame and' beam assembly to the tractor and mise it to the desired height wi th the tractor
Hydraulic System. Install all bolts

avai lable.
the existing sequentlyonly are included. The eosi tractor kit parts illustration, NOTE: performed flat cement

The installation those

of these ki ts uti I izes
plow; connecessary are

ports on the two bottom partswlhich

2.
unti

and nuts finger

tight

third

bottom when the shown see Figs.

conversion plow below.

kit

may

be

I the assembly
Thiswill permit of the

'is complete.
easier plow visual before alignment tightening operation. and the

Iy added
are

is attached The third shade 62.

to the bottom in the

as outl ined

adjustment bolts

in a darker ,60 through

or completing

the assembly

3.

Attach the plow bottom with

the shorter

Assembly

of the third level surface.

bottom

should

be a

I a ndside to the front beam.

on a flat, or asphalt .. bolts

floor,

preferably In assembly,

4.
landside wheel

Assemble assembly. Mount

the plow bottom

with the long the furrow

tighten

only finger

tigJht until assembly

to the rear

beam and attach

is completed

5.
blies,

the coul ter and
on the plow.

jointer

ossern+

as required,

It is necessary to use the third

bottom
r

COn-

versi on kit to assemble
To ossernbl e a three third beam, brace and

a three pi ow strut

bottom plow.
assemble the in the

bottom

as outlined

following "Third Bottom Kit" sec tion , Assemble the plow bottom with the long landside and the
furrow wheelan the third as above. the plow to the floor resting jointer 4 , and and make on the all Fig. point plow or varnish coaflng bottoms remover from the to insure parts. beam and complete the assembly 6. sure floor. see bolts 7. to coulters, quick Lower that Figs. and all Adjust nuts. REMOVE THESE BOLTS _~~~'~"~ level ......

bottoms are
the coulter 8, page

assemblies,
tighten

6 and

060 Remove lBottom From Second Beam

Use a suitable the jointers and

remove

protective of these

l . Lower the plow on a level
remove the three bolts securing 60.

surface

and

the rear bottom

scouring

soi I engaging

to the beam,

see Fig.

29

2. R.aise the plow with the tractor hydrauli c system, lifting the beam out of the bottom, end move the bottom and furrow wlneell assembly to the third bottom location, see Fig. 61. 3. Place the kit bottom in pos i+i on, lower the pllow ond secure the ki t bottom of the second beam wIth the bol ts provided in the kit. Assemble the braces to the second beam with 5/8 x 4-1/8 and 5/8 x 4-3/4 bol ts and the th j rd bea m to the braces with the bo Its removed from. tine second beam and new 5/8
x

assemblies and coulter coultereyeboltandthe5/8x third beam.

stem

seat

with

the

2-1/8 bolt to the

9" Before tightening the bolts make sure the plow is resting with all bottoms level on the fI oor. Adjust combination coulter jointer assembly and tighten 011 nuts and bolts securely, see Figs. 6 and 8, page 4 •. method to the one outlined above is to remove the second beam and bottom assembly complete with furrow whee~. Then install the kit becrn and bottom in the second bottom pos iti on com pi eti ng the assembly by attaching the rear bottom and kit braces. 11. Use a sui rcble paint or varnish remover to remove the protective coating from the coulter I jointer and plow bottom suppli ed with the kit to. insure scouring of these parts. Fig. 62 il lus+rotes bottom plow. the completed tnre'e-

4.

10.

An al ternotive

2~7/8 bolts. 5. Mount the strut brace between the third
ithe strut

beam and the strut. assembly replacing bolt wlth a 5/8 x 3-7/8 bol t.

6. Raise the plow ond position the bottom and furrow wheel under the third beam. 7.. Lower the plow and secure the rear bottom to the third beam using the bolts removed in Step 1. 8. Mount the combination coulter [oin+er

Fig. 61 Position

Kit Assembly as Shown

Fig. 62 Complete

Three Bottom Plow

)
;

30

INDEX
(APnON

OF ILLUSTRATIONS
FIG.

NO.

PAGE NO.

The Ferguson Plow

1

2

Attaching Left link Attaching Right link Attaching Top Link . Location of Cross-shaft . Coulter Setting Adjusting Coulter Coulter and Jointer Setting Adjusting Width of Cut . Adiusting Furrow Whe'el Scraper Changing Shores.
Throat Clearance

2
3 4

5
6

7
8

9
10

3 3 3 4 4 5 5 5 6
6

11
12

7
7

Ground

Suction

'13
14 15 16

Blocki ng up Plow

8
8 8
9 9

Squad ng up Plow Dimension "AII Dimension "XII Dimension "Y" Dimenslon " ZII of Cut Bottom AI ignment {lands ides) • Bottom Alignment (Wings) Checking Single Bottom Ferguson Quadramati c Control Locating Hydrolever Stop Ferguson T rac torrne ter Plowing Terminology Plowing Headland Furrow Entering the Furrow leaving the Furrow • 1st Pass - Open Furrow Strike-out 2nd Poss - Open Furrow Strike-out 3rd Pass - Open Furrow Strike-out 4th Pass - Open Furrow Strike-out Completed Open Furrow Strike-out Strike-out Furrow Completing Back Furrow Next to last Pass - Three Bottom Plow Last Pass - Three Bottom Plow
Measuring Width

17
18 19

9

20
21

9
10 10 10 11

22

23
24

25
26

12
13 15

27
28

29
30
31

16 16 16
17

32 33
34

17
17 18 18

35

36
37

18
18

38

19
19

39

31

INDEX (contd .) FIIG. NO.

)

PAGE
NO.

CAPTION

Rectangular

or Square Field

40

Starting at the Center Finishi'ngl at the Center

Poor Plowing
IINII
II

41 42 43
44

20 20 20
21

Bottom

RI' Bottom
tVI Bottom

II

45 46

23 23
24

"(!! Bottom

47
48

Ch i lied Cast Iron Carburized Alloy Steel Soft (enter Steel Crucible or Forged Steel & High Carbon Through Heat' Treated Steel Moldboard Extension Plain Rolling Coulter r--lotched Coulter with Ploin Jointer Wi'nged Blade Jointer Plow Equipped with Standing Jointers Plow Equipped with Weed Hooks Conven ti one I C lipped Wi ng Shore "Nil CI Ipped Wing Share Remove BoHom from Second Beam • Position Kit Assembly as Shown Complete Three Bottom Plow

24 24
24
25

49
50
51

25

52
53

54
55

56
57

58
59 60
61 62

26 26 26 27 27 28 28 28 29
30

30

32

IMPLEMENT

WARRANTY

For 0 period of ninety (90) days from the date of delivery of a new Ferguson Implement to the originall purchaser thereof from a Ferguson Deol er , Massey-Harris-Ferguson Inc. warrants a II such ports thereof (except tires) which, under normal .uss and service, shall appear to Massey-Harris~Ferguson Inc. to have been defective in workmanship or moterlo.l ,

Th is we rranty is lim ited to sh ipment to the purchase r I wlthout charge except for transportation costs, of the part or parts intended to reploce those acknowledged by Mossey-Harris-Fergusonlnc. to be defectiive.

I f the purchaser uses or allows to be used on a Ferguson Implement parts not made or suppl ied by Massey~Harris~Ferguson Inc. 011 if any Ferguson Implement has been altered outside of its own factories or sources of supply, or if attachments have been used which were unsuited and harmful to the Ferguson Implement, then this warranty shall lmmedlorely become void. Mossey-Harris-Ferguson Inc ..does not undertake respons i-: bility to any purchaser of a Ferguson Implement for Gny undertaking, representation, or wcrrenty beyond those herein expressed.

Massey-Harris-Fergusonlnc. reserves the right to make changes in design or changes or improvements upon Ferguson Implements without any obligation upon it to Install the same upon !Implements theretofore manufactured.

FERGUSON

DIVISION
INC.

MASSEY-HARR~S-FERGUSON

RACINE, WISCONSIN

\
See Y,Gu'r Fer~JIU'sonDe,aler for Information

-

ON ~

'THE
'FERGUSQ,N

F:E:RGUSON

TRACTOR

AND SYS'TEM

IMPLEMENTS

T'HE FE:RGUSON LINE
Of Implemen'ts Indudes
Mo:ldboard p;rows Disc ploW's, Two-WaV Pllo'W5, :Spike Tooth Horr,ows Spring Tooth Harrows Lift type Disc Harrows Tandem IDilsc Harrows Heavy Duty Harrows Spring-Tine Cultivat,ors Rigid-Tine Cultivators Llster C'I,lItivotors AgriC:1.IltUrai Mowers He,avy-[)'uty M'owlus Balers Forage Harves,ten Multi-Purpose Blades Sub Soilers
Mallure Sp,re,aders

Manure Loaders Corn P'i,ckers Corn Planters Lister P'I,anters Grain Drills Side Delivery Rakes R.otary Hoes C:ordwood Saws Rear Cr,anes Tillers Middlebllisters Four-Row W'eetielfs
Four-Wheel Welg:ons

seu

SC'DOPS

FORM

199

004,0 ""91

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