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A Doctorate Thesis on Predicting Work Performance using the Five Factor Model and KYKO (CASES Model) of Personality

A Doctorate Thesis on Predicting Work Performance using the Five Factor Model and KYKO (CASES Model) of Personality

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Published by Bernard A.T.Tan
“Does personality predict work performance” is a question that many researchers have addressed over the past few decades. Prior to the 1990s, personnel selection specialists generally did not use personality testing in employee selection due to the perception it has low validity. However, recent studies using fundamental dimensions of personality have shown the predictive power of personality for work performance. Research on the significance of personality suggests that even though other factors are important in determining the performance of an individual in a given task, personality provides insight on how well a person will perform a given task. Hence, the more recent studies have focused on demonstrating the incremental gain in predicting work performance that can be attained using personality as a predictor.
“Does personality predict work performance” is a question that many researchers have addressed over the past few decades. Prior to the 1990s, personnel selection specialists generally did not use personality testing in employee selection due to the perception it has low validity. However, recent studies using fundamental dimensions of personality have shown the predictive power of personality for work performance. Research on the significance of personality suggests that even though other factors are important in determining the performance of an individual in a given task, personality provides insight on how well a person will perform a given task. Hence, the more recent studies have focused on demonstrating the incremental gain in predicting work performance that can be attained using personality as a predictor.

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  • 1.0. CHAPTER ONE – INTRODUCTION
  • 1.1. THE ROLE OF PSYCHOMETRIC TESTS
  • Table 1 – Predictors of Work Performance (Yancey and Austin, 2000)
  • 1.2. PERSONALITY AND WORK PERFORMANCE
  • 1.3. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
  • 1.3.1. Research Philosophy
  • 1.3.2. Research Design
  • 1.3.3. Survey Instrument
  • 1.3.4. Measurement
  • 1.3.5. Sampling and Sample Size
  • 1.4. ANALYSES
  • 1.5. ETHICS
  • 1.6. LIMITATIONS
  • 2.0. CHAPTER TWO – LITERATURE REVIEW
  • 2.1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2.1.1. What is Personality?
  • 2.1.2. How Stable are Personality Traits?
  • 2.1.3. The Objective of Psychometric Instruments
  • 2.2. THEORIES ON PERSONALITY
  • 2.2.1. Psychodynamic Theories
  • 2.2.2. Humanistic Theories
  • 2.2.3. Traits Theories
  • 2.2.4. Behaviorist/Cognitive and Social Cognitive Theories
  • 2.3. WHY DOES PERSONALITY MATTER TO ORGANISATIONS?
  • 2.4. TYPES OF PERSONALITY MEASURES
  • 2.4.1. The Five Factor Model
  • 2.4.2. Myers-Briggs Type Indicator
  • 2.5. THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF FFM/MBTI ON PERFORMANCE
  • 2.6. SHORTCOMINGS OF FFM AND MBTI MEASURES
  • 2.6.1. Five Factor Model
  • 2.6.2. Myers-Briggs Type Indicator
  • 2.7. THE THEORIES AND CONSTRUCTS OF THE PROPOSED MEASURE
  • 2.7.1. Definition of Behavior
  • 2.7.2. Factors Influencing Behavior
  • 2.7.3. Current Theories of Work Motivation
  • 2.7.4. The Constructs of this Proposed Model
  • 2.7.4.1. The First Premise: Behavior is Motivated by Needs
  • Complexity
  • 2.7.5. Uniqueness of the CASES Personality Measure
  • 2.8. RESEARCH QUESTIONS AND HYPOTHESES
  • 2.8.1. Prediction of Performance by the FFM Personality Measure
  • 2.8.2. Prediction of Performance by the CASES Personality Measure
  • 2.8.3. The Relationships between FFM and CASES
  • 2.8.4. Hypotheses
  • 3.0. CHAPTER THREE – RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
  • 3.1. INTRODUCTION
  • 3.2. RESEARCH PARADIGMS
  • 3.3. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
  • 3.4. RESEARCH DESIGN
  • 3.4.1. Purpose of the Study
  • 3.4.2. Type of Investigation
  • 3.4.3. Research Method
  • Table 5: Four Categories of Non-experimental Techniques (Grace, 1999)
  • 3.4.4. Researcher’s Interference
  • 3.4.5. Study Setting
  • 3.4.6. Time Horizons
  • 3.4.7. Unit of Analysis
  • 3.5. SURVEY RESEARCH
  • 3.5.1. Selection of Survey Method
  • Table 6: Merits of the Four Survey Methods (Grace, 1999)
  • 3.5.2. Selection of Measurement Techniques
  • 3.5.2.1. Personality and Work Performance Measures
  • 3.5.2.2. Self Report
  • 3.5.2.3. Scales
  • 3.5.2.4. Key Variables
  • 3.5.3. Selection of Survey Layout
  • 3.5.4. Selection of Sample and Sample Size
  • 3.5.5. Selection of analytical approach
  • 3.5.5.1. Central Tendency and Dispersion
  • 3.5.5.2. Principal Components Analysis
  • 3.5.5.3. Reliability
  • 3.5.5.4. Validity
  • 3.5.5.5. Hypothesis Testing
  • 3.5.6. Implementation
  • 3.5.6.1. Cost and Time Estimates
  • Table 9: Total Time Estimated for the Survey (developed for this research)
  • Table 10: Breakdown of Costs on Survey (developed for this research)
  • 3.5.6.2. Data Collection
  • 3.5.6.3. Data Entry
  • 3.5.6.4. Categorising
  • 3.6. RESEARCH PLAN
  • 3.7. ETHICAL CONSIDERATION
  • 3.8. LIMITATIONS
  • 3.8.1. Response Distortions
  • 3.8.2. Personality Scales
  • 3.8.3. Stability of Work Performance
  • 3.8.4. Self Rating
  • 3.8.5. Work Performance
  • 3.9. CONCLUSION
  • 4.0. CHAPTER FOUR – DATA ANALYSIS
  • 4.1. INTRODUCTION
  • 4.2. DEMOGRAPHICS
  • 4.2. RESULTS FROM PRINCIPAL COMPONENTS ANALYSIS
  • 4.2.1. Principal Components Analysis of the FFM Personality Measure
  • Table 11: Rotated Component Matrix of FFM
  • Table 12: Items of FFM after Principal Components Analysis
  • 4.2.2. Principal Components Analysis of the CASES Personality Measure
  • Table 13: Rotated Component Matrix of CASES
  • Table 14: Items of CASES after Principal Components Analysis
  • 4.2.3. Principal Components Analysis of RBPS Performance Measure
  • Table 15: Rotated Component Matrix of RBPS
  • 4.2.4. The Relationship between the FFM Dimensions and the CASES
  • Table 16: Correlations between the Components of FFM and CASES
  • 4.3. RESULTS FROM TESTING OF THE HYPOTHESES
  • 4.3.1. Prediction of Performance by the FFM Personality Measure
  • Table 17: Correlations of the Components of FFM and RBPS
  • Table 18: Coefficients of the Regression of the Job Component of RBPS on FFM
  • Table 23: Coefficients of the Regression of Total RBPS on FFM
  • 4.3.2. Prediction of Performance by the CASES Personality Measure
  • Table 24: Correlations of the Components of CASES and RBPS
  • Table 30: Coefficients of the Regression of Total RBPS on CASES
  • 4.3.3. FFM and CASES predicting performance
  • 4.3.3.1. FFM and CASES predicting the Job Component of the RBPS
  • 4.3.3.2. FFM and CASES Predicting the Career Component of the RBPS
  • 4.3.3.3. FFM and CASES Predicting the Innovator Component of RBPS
  • 4.3.3.4. FFM and CASES Predicting the Team Component of the RBPS
  • 4.3.3.5. FFM and CASES Predicting the Organisation Component of the RBPS
  • 4.3.3.6. FFM and CASES Predicting Total RBPS Performance
  • Table 36: Coefficients of the Regression of Total RBPS on FFM and CASES
  • 4.4. CONCLUSION
  • 5.1. INTRODUCTION
  • 5.2. DISCUSSION OF THE MAIN FINDINGS
  • 5.2.1. Main Findings for Research Question One
  • 5.2.2. Main Findings for Research Question Two
  • 5.2.3. Main Findings for Research Question Three
  • 5.3. IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS
  • 5.3.1. Implications on Professional Practice
  • 5.3.2. Implications on Theory
  • 5.4. LIMITATIONS
  • 5.5. FUTURE RESEARCH
  • 5.6. CONCLUSION
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY AND REFERENCES
  • APPENDIX ONE – INFORMATION SHEET
  • APPENDIX TWO – CONSENT SEEKING LETTER TO COMPANY
  • APPENDIX THREE – QUESTIONNAIRE

Predicting Work Performance using the Five Factor Model and the CASES Model of Personality

Chong Chien Fatt B.Sc (Mech. Eng.) Honours, M.Eng. (Ind. Eng. and Mgmt.)

This dissertation is submitted for the Degree of Doctor of Business Administration, University of Newcastle, Australia

January, 2006

STATEMENT OF ORIGINAL AUTHORSHIP
I hereby certify that the work embodied in this dissertation project is the result of original research and has not been submitted for a higher degree to any other University or Institution.

-----------------------------------

CHONG CHIEN FATT January 2006

i

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
I am sincerely grateful to all the following people who have assisted and encouraged me throughout this research programme. My wife, Lee Sock Hiah, sons Ming Hoong and Yao Hoong, my mother and relatives for their support and understanding during this period. Dr Gian Casimir, for his dedication, commitment and friendly supervision of this research programme. Dr Nik Rahimah Yacob for her invaluable advice at any time of the day. Mr Bernard Tan, A.T., for allowing some of the concepts and items of the K.Y.K.O. Instrument to be used in the research. Mark Loon Kong Chew, for his various ideas in my research and assistance in the report preparation. Cik Rohana Haron, for her diligent data entry and report preparation. My numerous friends, who have consented and assisted in the data collection from their organisations and their moral support. The dedicated personnel (Alex, Connie, Grace, Iris, Winnie and others) in Segi.

ii

who always gives her undivided love and care to her 11 children.DEDICATION I dedicated this work to my beloved Mother. May God bless her with good health and happiness. iii . Madam Yew Hor.

.......................................... 25 Traits Theories ........16 What is Personality? ..........3..... ANALYSES ...... Uniqueness of the CASES Personality Measure ................................................... 12 Sampling and Sample Size ...................... 1.............. The Five Factor Model .......... THE THEORIES AND CONSTRUCTS OF THE PROPOSED MEASURE .....................1.....................................3.............................................. 20 Psychodynamic Theories ..............................................2... 2.................................................1 1..................... THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF FFM/MBTI ON PERFORMANCE.......3...........................13 1....................................................................................3.......... Five Factor Model..................................................5...6........ 2............7....................2...........16 2............................2.32 2..59 2.............................................................................. 2.2............. 2...............3.........3........................................... RESEARCH QUESTIONS AND HYPOTHESES ...2...................... 11 Research Design .1................ TYPES OF PERSONALITY MEASURES ................................. 42 Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.......... 50 The Constructs of this Proposed Model.6....................... 1................................................... 1.................................................. 29 2.............3...........3.....................................2....................... 2......2........................................................ 2........................................4............ 19 The Objective of Psychometric Instruments.............................4.............................................7. SHORTCOMINGS OF FFM AND MBTI MEASURES ............................ 2........................................................................................ 2.......6 1.................. 17 How Stable are Personality Traits?..................... 13 1........ 61 Prediction of Performance by the FFM Personality Measure.............................4..0........1........7..56 The Second Premise: The Accuracy of Predicting Behavior Depends on Complexity .. 2......................0.......................... THE ROLE OF PSYCHOMETRIC TESTS......................................................41 2............................................11 1....................................... WHY DOES PERSONALITY MATTER TO ORGANISATIONS? .................................62 2.................................. 2....1................................. 46 Definition of Behavior .............................. 23 Humanistic Theories ..................................1......................................... 66 Prediction of Performance by the CASES Personality Measure ............. 27 Behaviorist/Cognitive and Social Cognitive Theories......... 2.....................15 2................................2 1......................47 2.1.................................. PERSONALITY AND WORK PERFORMANCE ........ 68 2...................................II DEDICATION ........................ 47 Factors Influencing Behavior. 34 Myers-Briggs Type Indicator................. 2...........TABLE OF CONTENT STATEMENT OF ORIGINAL AUTHORSHIP .. LIMITATIONS .......21 2.........................1.....7..8.....................4.... THEORIES ON PERSONALITY ..7............ 12 Measurement....................... 2.2....... RESEARCH METHODOLOGY ...............................5............. 56 The First Premise: Behavior is Motivated by Needs ........................................................... 2....................5......................... CHAPTER TWO – LITERATURE REVIEW ...7................................ INTRODUCTION ........................................................................... 37 2....................................................33 2......................3.........3........14 1.................................7..........4.8............................................. 2.......5.........................2...............................................................6...................8......4........... ETHICS ..1......1.................... CHAPTER ONE – INTRODUCTION .............................2.4.........42 2.................... 11 Survey Instrument.................4............................................................................7............. IX 1..................1.............................................................................................1.... 48 Current Theories of Work Motivation ...... III ABSTRACT........ 2........2..................6...........................2............... 1.............1..........................2...... I ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ..1.2............................................. Research Philosophy.........................................4......... iv .........3.

...............5........... 4. 3.......4..................8......8......................6.....72 3.......................................................................2.........75 3........92 Reliability ........................................... 3...........5......................84 Key Variables ...........92 Validity.............................2..........3..........................................5................8.......... Implementation ....................... 3...... 3........... 71 3............101 4.........................................97 3....... RESEARCH METHODOLOGY ... INTRODUCTION ........................................3............................................................ 94 3.........0............7........3.............................................................. RESULTS FROM PRINCIPAL COMPONENTS ANALYSIS.................2........................... 84 Personality and Work Performance Measures. LIMITATIONS .......................................72 3.........84 Scales...........2......................................................5..........82 3.........5....................................................................................... 4.2........1........ 3..........99 3.............4....103 4..........4.... 3................2.........102 4.................................4.................................... The Relationships between FFM and CASES ....6.........5......2...........................2..5....................4...................................................5.....2.........4.........................5............5...........................................................98 3.................2..1........................ SURVEY RESEARCH .........5................ RESEARCH DESIGN ...... Principal Components Analysis of the FFM Personality Measure .................... 3... 3....... 3...................................................................2...8................4.................92 Principal Components Analysis.................................................................................... 100 Work Performance.. 3................1............................................................................. 3..................5...........3............................................... 81 Unit of Analysis ..............5...............................................2.......................102 4...... 3..... 90 Selection of analytical approach .......................... 3.....8......5.............. Purpose of the Study .......... 99 Personality Scales ....... 3............5.........6.......... 77 Researcher’s Interference ........................................ 4............ Response Distortions ................4..................4.........................................2................................................................................5..........2...1.......... CONCLUSION ...............2........... 107 Principal Components Analysis of RBPS Performance Measure..................5....5..........................1...................................3.2..........3..... 80 Time Horizons ........ CHAPTER FOUR – DATA ANALYSIS ...............................................................................5....................................................................................... 3.........84 Self Report............................... 3......................... INTRODUCTION ........94 Cost and Time Estimates ................5...... 77 Research Method ....................................... 2..........9.................................................... 79 Study Setting.............1........................................................................................... 3............................................1................ CHAPTER THREE – RESEARCH METHODOLOGY.....5..............97 Categorising................... 92 Central Tendency and Dispersion...........................................3.........................................102 4.........8........................................ 3...114 v ....5...........................................93 Hypothesis Testing ......72 3............................6...................6....4.................................. 3........................ 109 The Relationship between the FFM Dimensions and the CASES Dimensions111 4................... 3............ 89 Selection of Sample and Sample Size......................................4.5...........................3.................................................. DEMOGRAPHICS ....................................................2................... ETHICAL CONSIDERATION .............................2........................2..................... 3.................1....... 101 3...........5..4.....74 3....................................................................................8.....................5....3......8.......... Selection of Survey Layout.6.................5.............................. 81 Selection of Survey Method .............96 Data Entry .......... 3..................................................... 3......................1.......... 99 Self Rating ......... RESEARCH PLAN .....86 3.............................................. 75 Type of Investigation .5...........................................3............................................. 3.................... 3.......... 3........................ 3...5...4............... RESEARCH PARADIGMS ....................................4...................................... 103 Principal Components Analysis of the CASES Personality Measure...6....94 Data Collection.............................................................. 69 Hypotheses. RESULTS FROM TESTING OF THE HYPOTHESES .............................................4.5..0.................. 82 Selection of Measurement Techniques ............ 99 Stability of Work Performance .......................................................................98 3....................4.7................

.....................................138 5... CONCLUSION .......2......128 FFM and CASES Predicting the Career Component of the RBPS.......3........... 4.. 120 FFM and CASES predicting performance...................... 4..... 4...184 APPENDIX THREE – QUESTIONNAIRE .... DISCUSSION OF THE MAIN FINDINGS ...... 4.............. FUTURE RESEARCH ..1.3..........3........... LIMITATIONS ........................................3................................ 151 5.................................................................................................2.3................... 4....................................2...............................0........ 149 Implications on Theory....................135 5..........................3........158 APPENDIX ONE – INFORMATION SHEET .154 BIBLIOGRAPHY AND REFERENCES .....138 5......5...................... 114 Prediction of Performance by the CASES Personality Measure ....4...................................131 FFM and CASES Predicting the Organisation Component of the RBPS..3.................................1..............................................3....129 FFM and CASES Predicting the Innovator Component of RBPS.1.................................2.................................................. CHAPTER FIVE – CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS ............3.............................2.......................2.........3.....................................2........3......................................................................3................... 5....................153 5..... Prediction of Performance by the FFM Personality Measure..........4..........1....... 138 Main Findings for Research Question Two ..............................2.......133 4.....138 5.................. INTRODUCTION .. 4........ 4.. 5....................................182 APPENDIX TWO – CONSENT SEEKING LETTER TO COMPANY ..............3... 5...... 147 Implications on Professional Practice............. CONCLUSION ...3..........4..4..186 vi ..........................1...................................................................3..................................................3..............149 5................................................3..........152 5...3................. Main Findings for Research Question One.3........... 128 FFM and CASES predicting the Job Component of the RBPS . 5.........6..........................................132 FFM and CASES Predicting Total RBPS Performance ............ 143 Main Findings for Research Question Three .....................130 FFM and CASES Predicting the Team Component of the RBPS ....5...........3..6.. 4.3... IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS ....

.................................................................................................................................................................................... 1998) ............................................40 Table 4: The Possible Associations of Conscientiousness and Neuroticism of the FFM with Complexity and Self-Actualisation of the CASES .................................................................................................... 1999).......110 Table 16: Correlations between the Components of FFM and CASES.................107 Table 14: Items of CASES after Principal Components Analysis..........................................................88 Table 8: The Breakdown of Companies to be Surveyed Based on Industry (developed for this study) ...........83 Table 7: Role-Based Performance Scale’s Items (Wilbourne et al......................... 2000) ...............109 Table 15: Rotated Component Matrix of RBPS ...................118 vii ......95 Table 9: Total Time Estimated for the Survey (developed for this research)............................................................78 Table 6: Merits of the Four Survey Methods (Grace........................113 Table 17: Correlations of the Components of FFM and RBPS ..............................................................................................................................LIST OF TABLES Table 1 – Predictors of Work Performance (Yancey and Austin......................117 Table 20: Coefficients of the Regression of the Innovator Component of RBPS on FFM........106 Table 13: Rotated Component Matrix of CASES....................................................104 Table 12: Items of FFM after Principal Components Analysis ........................... 1999)...........................................................6 Table 3: The 16 Personality Types with Cognitive Characteristics and Occupational Tendencies ...70 Table 5: Four Categories of Non-experimental Techniques (Grace..........96 Table 10: Breakdown of Costs on Survey (developed for this research) ..........116 Table 19: Coefficients of the Regression of the Career Component of RBPS on FFM ..........117 Table 21: Coefficients of the Regression of the Team Component of RBPS on FFM ........ 2004) ........................................................115 Table 18: Coefficients of the Regression of the Job Component of RBPS on FFM .............................................................4 Table 2: Six of the Most Commonly Used Personality Instruments (Dent and Curd......................96 Table 11: Rotated Component Matrix of FFM ..................................................

...................................130 Table 33: Coefficients of the Regression of the Innovator Component of RBPS on FFM and CASES ..................................................................................123 Table 26: Coefficients of the Regression of the Career Component of RBPS on CASES ...132 Table 35: Coefficients of the Regression of the Organisation Component of RBPS on FFM and CASES ................................................................126 Table 30: Coefficients of the Regression of Total RBPS on CASES...............................................124 Table 28: Coefficients of the Regression of the Team Component of RBPS on CASES ......................................125 Table 29: Coefficients of the Regression of the Organisation Component of RBPS on CASES ...124 Table 27: Coefficients of the Regression of the Innovator Component of RBPS on CASES ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................Table 22: Coefficients of the Regression of the Organisation Component of RBPS on FFM.......................................................131 Table 34: Coefficients of the Regression of the Team Component of the RBPS on FFM and CASES ........134 viii ...........................................................................127 Table 31: Coefficients of the Regression of the Job Component of RBPS on FFM and CASES .........133 Table 36: Coefficients of the Regression of Total RBPS on FFM and CASES ......129 Table 32: Coefficients of the Regression of the Career Component of RBPS on the FFM and CASES .............119 Table 23: Coefficients of the Regression of Total RBPS on FFM ............................................................................................................................................................................122 Table 25: Coefficients of the Regression of the Job Component of RBPS on CASES ............................................................................................................................119 Table 24: Correlations of the Components of CASES and RBPS..........................................................................................................

The results confirmed relationships between the dimensions of the new personality measure (i.e. recent studies using fundamental dimensions of personality have shown the predictive power of personality for work performance. The study explores the predictive utility of a personality measure that is based on the Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and the social cognitive theory of “If-Then” and the Five Factor Model (FFM) of personality with regards to a multidimensional measure of work performance. personnel selection specialists generally did not use personality testing in employee selection due to the perception it has low validity. Research on the significance of personality suggests that even though other factors are important in determining the performance of an individual in a given task. limitations and possible areas for future research are discussed. However. CASES) and the FFM.. Hence. Prior to the 1990s. Practical and theoretical implications. the more recent studies have focused on demonstrating the incremental gain in predicting work performance that can be attained using personality as a predictor. ix . Besides providing a theory-grounded measurement tool which contributes to research on personality measures and the prediction of work-related performance. this new personality measure can be offered as a useful instrument for both practitioners and researchers.ABSTRACT “Does personality predict work performance” is a question that many researchers have addressed over the past few decades. Both of the personality measures support existing literature which claims that personality can predict work performance with several dimensions of the new personality measure predicting work performance over and above the FFM. personality provides insight on how well a person will perform a given task.

For the top companies in the world. The third chapter of this dissertation outlines the research methodology and design of the study that will be 1 . which is a wellestablished personality measure. CHAPTER ONE – INTRODUCTION Companies spend large amounts of money.0. many organisations pay only lip service to the adage that “people are our greatest asset” (Yancey and Austin. The validity of the current measures of personality is questionable given that each of them is based on a single-theory of personality. the efforts invested to identify and select the right employees and to motivate them to give their best to the organisation is an ongoing management initiative. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and Social Cognitive Theory) rather than on a single theory. The first objective of this study therefore is to develop a new measure of personality based on two theories (i.e. will be examined. Nevertheless.. A background of the various perspectives of personality and the rationale for the new personality measure is provided in the second chapter of this dissertation. time and energy to improve their business performance by adopting different management philosophies and initiatives such as SixSigma. people. Basically. and Relationship Management. the incremental criterion utility of the new measure over the Five-Factor Model of personality. 2000). Learning Organisation. A second objective is to examine the criterion utility of this new personality measure with regards to a self-report multi-dimensional measure of work performance. Employees are indisputably the most essential resource in any organisation and are the key to attaining and maintaining competitive advantage. Empowerment.1. all of these have one thing in common. Investors in People. Furthermore.

they are not a panacea for selecting the best candidates (Dent and Curd. cognitive ability test. resume. it takes only a modest improvement in selecting. employment checks and job probation in the recruitment and selection process. the more effective we can manage. 1995). matching and recruiting people to jobs to reduce the possible financial losses incurred by recruiting employees who are incompatible with the organisation. Personality tests only provide an additional tool for recruitment and are not replacements for interviews. Personality tests with no right or wrong answers attempt to measure how little or how much a candidate possesses a specific personality 2 . THE ROLE OF PSYCHOMETRIC TESTS The more we know the people we employ. and honest/integrity tests. 2004). encourage and harness them.000 to recruit one executive or middle manager in United States of America (Melamed and Jackson. recruitment and development processes as they are able to explore a broad range of personality characteristics that are relevant to the workplace. it is estimated to cost an average of US$15. work-samples. The fourth chapter contains the analyses of the survey data. references. Although personality tests rank higher than other employment tests such as job-knowledge tests. taking into account all expenditure. 1. Hence. Moreover.1. implications and limitations of this study are presented in the fifth chapter of this dissertation.used. Table 1 provides a list of various sources of information that are used to predict work performance. The conclusion on the various findings. Personality tests are popularly used by organisations as part of selection.

their significant others and their related job-relevance. Personality tests have been in the market for more than 50 years and their popularity has increased significantly in recent years. individuals would be able to take advantage of the positive aspects of their personalities and/or take steps to mitigate potential problems arising from any undesirable aspects which could affect their relationships. 2001). Non-exempt staff Source of information Interview Resume Application form References Employment check Best Predictor 75% 29 31 35 33 Middle management Best Predictor 67% 42 20 44 40 Senior management Best Predictor 66% 40 22 44 47 3 .characteristic relevant to the needs of the organisation. By understanding their behavior. As part of a development process in organisations. The purpose of conducting personality tests is to gather information and highlight issues for further exploration at interviews.000 million tests are administered annually in the United States of America alone and some 700 of the Times Top 1000 companies use them for personnel selection (Coull and Eary. work performance and careers. Exploring these characteristics during an interview to more closely examine the candidate can provide valid and real evidence to support the final selection decision (Coull and Eary. Psychometric assessment is big business in the 21st century as approximately 2. 2001). personality tests can assist individuals to understand the significant aspects of their personality and behavior in a wide variety of work and social situations.

recruit. From their traditional use as a tool for selection and recruitment. career guidance and training needs analysis (Dent and Curd. 2004). The most commonly used personality instruments are shown in Table 2 but they are not necessarily valid or useful. 1993). develop. and retain critical personnel has fuelled the desire for more information on current employees as well as potential recruits. It looks at an individual’s preferences on four dimensions: • • How you relate to the world How you gather information Common Uses • • • • Raising self –awareness Identifying strengths and development needs Understanding own behavior and that of others Team building 4 . there is no evidence to indicate a positive relation between specific MBTI types with career success (Pittenger.Credit check Job trial/probation Personality tests Job knowledge test Work sample Cognitive ability test Assessment centre Honesty/integrity test Drug screen Perceptual/physical abilities test Polygraph test 13 20 13 11 11 9 4 4 0 0 0 11 20 13 6 2 7 2 2 0 0 0 9 18 11 6 2 2 2 0 2 0 0 Table 1 – Predictors of Work Performance (Yancey and Austin. 2000) The increasing pressure on organisations to identify. Test Name Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Description Probably the most popular and wellresearched personality instrument used in business today. management development programmes. For example. psychometric tests have expanded their functionalities to many other areas such as appraisals.

Designed by Saville and Holdsworth to provide information on personality characteristics.. In particular.Test Name Description • • How you make decisions. and Affection-which is about being close to individuals • • • • • • • • Team building and development Self-awareness Individual development Individual development Leadership development Team development Relationship counselling Career counselling and development Strength Deployment Inventory (SDI) This is an incredibly versatile instrument. and Feelings and emotions • • • • • • • • • • • The Belbin Team Role SelfPerception Inventory Fundamental Interpersonal Relationship OrientationBehavior (FIROB) One of the few UK instruments on the market. which was developed by Elias Porter in the 1960s. Another of the best-researched and most widely used tools available today. and How you organise yourself Common Uses • • • Career development Relationship development Selection Selection Individual development Career development and counselling Leadership development Selection Career development Assessment centres Team building Individual development Change management Relationship awareness 16PF Questionnaire (Equivalent to the NEO PI-R of the Big Five (Rossier et al. Developed by Meredith Belbin to help team members identify their preferred roles in teams This inventory looks at a person’s interpersonal style and how he/she relates towards others in three specific areas: • • • Inclusion-which is the need to be part of a social group Control-which is the need for control or influence over others. it helps individuals to understand the various facets that determine their personality. It provides users with a development tool that helps them to learn about themselves and others in the context of relationship awareness • • • • Individual motivational awareness Team building and development Relationship management Assertiveness training 5 . the feedback from which defines a person’s perception of his/her behaviors at work. Cattell. Developed by Raymond B. the dimensions measured fall into three categories: • • • Relationships with people Thinking style. 2004) Occupational Personality Questionnaire (OPQ) This questionnaire measures an individual’s personality against 16 different personality dimensions.

Jung. and Eysenck. and Rotter. which are biological in nature and based on the premise of the unfolding of stages where the particular behaviors occur. iii) The cognitive perspectives of Pavlov. and emotion that are relatively stable and which form the basic conception of personality (Allport.2. Cattell. and Adler. 6 . thought. 2004) 1. ii) The traits perspectives of Allport. Skinner. 1937). which assume there are dispositional factors that determine behavior in various situations. Individuals display consistent patterns of behavior. 2003). which assume personality is never completely determined and that people are always changing and free to reinterpret their experiences idiosyncratically.Test Name Description Common Uses • • • • Leadership development Sales training Customer relations training Supervisory skills development Table 2: Six of the Most Commonly Used Personality Instruments (Dent and Curd. Personality theories may be classified into five categories (Ryckman. 1997): i) The psychoanalytic perspectives of Freud. PERSONALITY AND WORK PERFORMANCE The fundamental objective of personality psychology is to understand how personality can be used to predict behavior (Mayer.

1993.iv) The existential or humanistic perspectives of Rogers. 2003. De Raad. Maslow. Paunonen and Ashton. Human behavior is a multifaceted phenomenon and any theory attempting to explain normal human behavior must reflect its multidimensionality (Leonard. 1990. de Stadelhofen and Berhoud. 2001. 1996. Paunonen. the social or interaction perspective excludes the growth stages. The psychometric instruments in Table 2 are all based on single theories. 1977b). which is based on 7 . rather than innate as people’s interactions and experiences continually influence each other. 2004). Beauvais and Scholl. Goldberg. 1998. Rossier. Unlike the psychoanalytic and existential perspectives. which assume most behavior is learned and purposive and that people are guided by motives to achieve certain goals. 1999. behavior arises as a result of a complex interaction between environmental influences and inner processes (Bandura. Although the FFM. and McCelland. 1999). McCrae and Costa. This perspective is similar to the trait perspective as it also refers to consistencies and regularities in the behavior of individuals but differs as it asserts that behavior and personality are learned. 1977a. and v) The social behavioristic or interaction perspectives of Bandura and Mischel. In other words. which postulate the presence of an innate need for growth which moves individuals towards achieving their potentialities given the right environmental conditions. There is a large body of evidence that the domain of personality can be well represented by the Five-Factor Model’s (FFM) superordinate constructs (Digman. These traditional models of personality cannot explain the diversity of behavior as human behavior cannot be explained by a single perspective.

the Hierarchy of Needs Theory by Maslow advocates the dynamic processes of need satisfaction. Hence. or has to (Nikolaou. the power of the Hierarchy of Needs Theory is its ability to identify a range of needs. 8 . 1988). 1981). including growth needs. behavioral. which is based on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and social cognitive theories. Social cognitive theory takes into consideration environmental and internal forces that shape behavior (Bandura. Chung. The proposition that human beings exhibit needs for development and growth is generally accepted by practitioners due to the intuitive and face validity of this argument. Interest in the motivation that drives behavior rekindled in the 1990s. which motivate behavior (Wiley. and cognitive factors (Fedor and Ferris. Maslow posited that needs act as motivators (Arnold. which may be classified as deficit or homeostatic theories of motivation. 1999. Variability in responses across situations are not dismissed as errors but are regarded as a distinct characteristic of the individual’s ability to either consciously or unconsciously behave differently simply because the individual wants to. 2003). Motives are only one of the determinants of behavior as behavior is also determined by other factors that are biologically. likes to. 1977a). Individual functioning is a continuous interaction between environmental. attempts to explain human behavior according to key motivators. 1993). The personality measure proposed in this dissertation. 1993). 1969). 1997). Unlike most need theories. is able to describe consistent features of the behavior of an individual it does not address the key drivers or motives of behavior (Fletcher.personality traits. ultimately leading to self-actualisation (Osteraker. culturally and situationally determined (Fletcher.

One of the reasons for this low validity is that many studies focused mainly on personality traits at the molecular.. Prior to the 1990s. Salgado. and v) Social. is based on the social cognitive theory of “IfThen”.The new personality measure proposed in this dissertation is termed CASES because it comprises five dimensions: i) Complexity. this question has received considerable attention in the literature (Barrick. Complexity. There are good reasons to believe that some dimensions of the CASES measure will be related to some dimensions of the FFM. This. which explains the variability of an individual’s behavior in different situations. however. “inventory” level instead of the construct level. Does personality predict work performance? Although there are many factors besides personality that affect work performance. 2003). such as those of the FFM. Kieffer. Stewart and Piotrowski. Nikolaou. Nikolaou. personnel selection specialists generally did not use personality testing in employee selection due to its low validity. ii) Actualisation. It is inevitable and advantageous that researchers will attempt to compare the predictive utility of the FFM with other models of personality with respect to work performance (Robertson et al. Barrick et al.. 2003. does not 9 . iii) Safety. 2003). Schinka and Curtiss. The other four dimensions are based on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs with the exclusion of the physiological needs which are unlearned and assumed to be of relatively low importance in current organisational settings. Recent investigations using higher order personality constructs. 2000. 2002. iv) Ego. have demonstrated that certain aspects of personality are useful predictors of work performance.. 2002. 2003. Personality traits can be conceptually and empirically related without being redundant (Judge et al. The first dimension. 2004).

The following research questions and hypotheses underlie the current research: Research Question 1: Does the FFM predict work performance? The first research question is addressed by the first hypothesis. Research Question 2: Does the CASES measure predict work performance? The second research question is addressed by the second hypothesis.necessarily indicate that some of the dimensions of the CASES measure are the same as some of the FFM dimensions. H2: The CASES measure will predict a significant proportion of variance in performance ratings. H1: The FFM will predict a significant proportion of variance in performance ratings. H3: The FFM and CASES will each explain a significant proportion of unique variance when used concurrently to predict performance. 10 . Research Question 3: What is the relationship between the FFM and CASES measures? The third research question is addressed by the third hypothesis. One way to examine whether or not the dimensions of the two measures of personality are distinct is to examine the incremental criterion validity of the two personality measures.

1. Research Design This study uses hypothesis testing as there is information available on the variables involved to enable hypothesis formulation. 2001). hypotheses can be empirically substantiated which is essential for such psychometric tests (Cavana. need-induced behaviors and performance.3. The study setting is a non-contrived setting. The investigation is a correlational study as the main interest is to examine the associations between dimensions of personality and work performance. and Swartz. Furthermore. Minimal or no interference in a natural environment by the researcher is adopted as analytical research requires precision and the control of extraneous variables is performed via statistical techniques (Gill and Johnson. 1998).3. this survey method is efficient and practical (Saunders. Delahaye and Sekaran.1. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 1.2. This quantitative research method adopts a non-experimental technique of survey research whereby information about the variables is collected from a large number of cases to address the research questions. Williams.3. 1. 1997. Research Philosophy The study uses the positivistic paradigm with the hypothetico-deductive approach as it seeks to explain the relationship between personality. 11 . Remenyi. Money. Furthermore. Lewis and Thornhill.

3. Nikolaou.. Measurement Five-point Likert scales will be used for all of the items related to personality and performance. they allow the targeting of specific respondents in various organisations and are cost effective.4. 12 . 2004.2002). CASES. the new personality measure. Furthermore.3. Although mail surveys tend to yield a relatively low response rate. Salgado. 1999). and the work performance measure of Welbourne.3. 2001). 2003). perceptions and attitudes (Lindell and Whitney. specifically their perceptions of their own behavior. The research also adopts a cross-sectional study and takes a snapshot of the situation like most behavioral studies that focus on individual’s beliefs. The FFM (Goldberg. 2003. 1. Survey Instrument Data will be collected via a mail survey. The unit of analysis is the individual. Johnson and Erez (1998) will be used for this research. mail surveys are the most commonly used survey method in studies of personality (Kieffer et al. 1.

The questionnaire uses the Likert scale to collect interval-scaled data for each of the variables involved in the hypotheses. The minimum targeted number of respondents is 500 as the personality measures have 50 items each (minimum of 10:1 subject to items ratio.5. known to the researcher. ANALYSES Data analyses will be conducted using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 13.4. and years in current job).1. Confirmatory factor 13 . Each participating organisation will be given 40 or more questionnaires to distribute to all or part of their white-collar staff by their respective Human Resource Managers. as recommended by Nunnally. Sampling and Sample Size Convenience sampling is used due to the time constraints placed on this research and to the unknown probability of selecting elements of the population (Cavana et al.e. 1978). Descriptive statistics will be computed for all of the demographic variables (i.. level of education. The respondents will be given a week to answer the questionnaire at a place of their choice and return the questionnaire in the self-addressed stamped envelope. 2001). age.. 1.3. will be invited to participate in this research. A total of 40 commercial organisations of various sizes and from various industries. gender. years of working. which ensures the anonymity and confidentiality of responses.

1978). 1980. stamped and self-addressed envelopes will be provided to the respondents. 1. Cavana et al. Multiple linear regression analyses will be used to test the hypotheses. Cronbach’s alpha is an internal reliability coefficient that shows how well the items belonging to a set are correlated to one another. 2001).5.7 is considered adequate for initial investigations (Nunnally. An alpha coefficient of 0. Finally. Furthermore.analysis is a method for assessing construct validity and will be used to test the structures of the personality and performance measures (Schwab. Anonymity and confidentiality are ensured as the questionnaires have no personal identifiers and only the researchers will have access to the completed questionnaires and data files. Cronbach’s alpha will be calculated for each subscale to test its internal reliability.5 to 0. no demeaning questions will be asked and the respondents will not be subjected to any mental or physical stress in answering the questionnaire as they are given a week to complete the questionnaire at their own free will at a place of their choice. ETHICS It is stated explicitly in the information sheet that is provided to all potential participants that participation is voluntary and that participants can withdraw at anytime during the research without any obligation or disadvantage.. 14 .

1996) and social desirability bias such as “telling the way they like to be seen” (Hogan.. LIMITATIONS The research relies on self-report data that can be affected by response distortion (Barrick and Mount. the stability of work performance as a construct may not be totally valid (Thoresen et al. or different countries. the effect of leniency associated with selfassessment could raise concerns about the legitimacy of the data collected.g.1.. as this study uses a convenience sampling. Finally. its findings may not be generalisable to different types of organisations such as public sector or non-profit organisations. blue-collar and clerical employees). 15 . organisational hygiene. different types of jobs (e. Additionally. Hogan and Roberts.. cognitive ability. motivation level and role clarity may influence self-reported performance ratings (Kieffer et al. 2004). 1996). Furthermore. 2004) as job satisfaction.6.

are not able to explain the diversity of behavior. The increasing pressure on organisations to select/recruit. Although such instruments are traditionally used as a tool in the selection and recruitment processes. and appraisals.2. With some 2. CHAPTER TWO – LITERATURE REVIEW 2.000 million tests administrated yearly and 700 of the Times Top 1. INTRODUCTION Psychometric tests have been used by organisations as part of their development and recruitment processes. which are normally based on a single theory.0. the debate on the reliability and 16 . management development programmes. However.. develop and retain key employees has increased the interest of managers for more information on current employees and potential recruits alike. training needs analysis. psychometric assessment will be a major business sector in the 21st century (Coull and Eary.1. 1999). Many organisations use psychometric testing as part of their recruitment and development processes to select candidates who will excel in their jobs. 2004).000 companies in United States of America using such instruments. The number of such psychometric instruments has increased considerably in the last few decades and has led to confusion and increased complexity in selecting an appropriate instrument (Dent and Curd. the functionality of such personality tests is becoming more widespread and they now have an integral place in many human resources activities such as career guidance. These tests. 2001). as human behavior cannot be fully covered by any one single theory (Leonard et al.

. 43) defined personality as “the pattern of relatively enduring ways in which a person feels. 2000. dispositions and needs (Gelso and Fassinger. 1993).. 45). Hence.e. when using psychometric instruments. Robbins (2001.validity of such instruments and the value of such concepts such as personality traits continues in the academic literature (Fletcher. “caveat emptor” should still be applied. What is Personality? Personality can be broadly defined as the durable characteristics of an individual. The concept of personality can be traced to the work of Allport. beliefs. it does not mean that all such instruments are. p. Also. selects and processes information and generates social behaviors (Mischel and Shoda. traits). The continuing debate may be due to the fact that although some instruments may be found to be valid predictors of work performance. which are the building blocks of personality (Marsella et al. traits.1.1. who assumed the presence of “neuropsychic” structures (i. Personality is conceptualised as a stable system which influences how an individual construes. p. 2. The construct of personality is based on the assumption that an individual can be characterised by distinctive qualities that are relatively invariant over time and across situations. 1992). using well-proven instruments do not confer automatic validity on their application in an organisation. 92) takes personality as “the sum total of ways in which an individual reacts to and interacts with others. p. thinks and behaves”. values. for example. attitudes. George and Jones (2002. 1995). It is most often described in terms of measurable traits that a person 17 .

This aspect is called individual differences whereby we categorise people as neurotic. most personality researchers divide personality into different areas or divisions and try to explain how each area works individually and with others. p. when describing someone’s personality. (ii) individual behavior is relatively stable over time. The four structural divisions of personality which are repeatedly used to classify traits are: (a) Freud (1960)’s structural 18 . introverted. extraverted. we are trying to explain the differences of that person from others. 2001). 1975). and so on. (1996.exhibits. For example. Personality psychologists postulate that personality or individual dispositions are significant determinants of behavior with the following underlying assumptions: (i) there are individual differences in ways of behaving. Hence. 1999). Personality is too vast a field and differentiated for a single approach. and (iii) individual behavior is consistent across situations (Pervin. Personality can also be defined as an organised and dynamic set of characteristics of a person that influence cognitions. 2) defined personality in two ways. one is the “factors” inside a person that explain the behavior while the other refers to the person’s distinctive interpersonal characteristics in a variety of situations. Personality is explained as existing in the individual as opposed to outside the person and focuses on overall psychological trends. motivations and behaviors (Lau and Shaffer.” Hogan et al. personality is explained based on overall motivation rather than the understanding of neural pathways of motives (Mayer. Hence.

that appear to contradict each other (Cervone. genes do not influence behavior directly but instead influence physiological structures (Brody. They display unique patterns of emotions. 1980). Costa and McCrae (1995) posited that personality is heritable and highly stable over time while Jang et al. (2002) posited that the transition during adulthood is often marked by substantial affective and personality changes caused by environmental changes. change and consistency. Yet. These 19 . Pervin. The more developed approaches use traits in the personality structure. 2003. 2001. behavior and thought that are relatively consistent to form the basis of the conception of personality (Allport. 1993. How Stable are Personality Traits? Psychological experience is made up of two features. (c) the five factor model (Goldberg. (2001) revealed that on average.1. 1997). Emotions and actions shift in response to the environment. Another study by Bouchard (1994) showed that about 66% of the reliable variance in the personality traits is due to genetic influence while Zawadzki et al.division of id. 1937). ego and superego. 2. 2004). 2001). (b) the trilogy of mind (Hilgard. Costa and McCrae. 1985). and (d) the systems set (Mayer.2. 40% of the phenotypic variance of given traits is attributed to genetic sources while 60% is accounted for by the environment. The contents of consciousness change rapidly. However. individuals are significantly consistent across time and place. (1998) revealed that some 20%-50% of variation in the dimensions is attributable to genetic sources. Vaidya et al.

1999). The Objective of Psychometric Instruments The field of psychology has tried to define human behavior with the same accuracy that scientists use to describe the motion of atoms and stars. 2. such as a strong peer culture. Nevertheless. Such changes or variations in personality traits can be explained by the fact that we are adapting to life in face-to-face groups (Bouchard. should have at least two features. that is. There is a growing realisation that traditional models of personality do not explain the diversity of behavior found in organisational settings. Human behavior is difficult to describe with such precision since it has a large number of causes. 1996). the measurements are temporally stable and credible evidence linking the measure to meaningful non-test behavior (Hogan et al. Human behavior is 20 . could account for much of the psychological change that occurs during early adulthood. as human behavior cannot be explained by any one factor (Leonard.environmental changes.1.3. however. most organisational and personality researchers agree that individual behavior involves both variable and stable aspects but there still remains disagreement regarding this quantum (Wright. Many theories of personality rely excessively on behavioral models. which conform to statistical theories to explain these complexities rather than on behavioral realities (Wolfe. stimulation for the intellect as well as new outlets for emotions. 1998). A good personality measure.. independence from protective shelter and parental control. Beauvais and Scholl. 2004). 1994). Cropanzano and Meyer.

the typological and trait-factor theories.clearly a multivariate phenomenon and a theory trying to explain normal human behavior must reflect this multidimensionality. the stable components affect our lives. Hunton and Bryant. If personality does change. humanistic. and behavioral doctrines were particularly influential in the past but social-cognitive and trait theories predominate today. the humanistic approaches of the 1950s and almost at the same time. Psychoanalytical.2. Tett and Burnett.. 1992). What people do—their behavior—is a function of their personalities. It will be useful for people to know their personalities so that they can take advantage of the positive aspects of their personalities or steps to mitigate potential problems arising from any undesirable aspects. 2004a). These personality theories 21 . Gruys and Ellingson. 2. In the mid 1950s. et al. which could affect their work performance and careers (Hogan. changing from context to context and from moment to moment but personality is consistent and stable over time. Wheeler. it changes gradually. 1998. 2003). Behavior is like the weather. 2003. Sackett. Behavior is used to interpret and evaluate people’s personalities. 1996. THEORIES ON PERSONALITY The history of personality psychology has been dominated by several theoretical paradigms (Cervone. it is unlikely that any instrument can claim to be the best as the usefulness of an instrument is also situational and contextually specific (Tett and Burnett. Psychoanalytical approaches were the first theories followed in the early part of last century by behavioral approaches. Hence. 2000). the cognitive and the social cognitive approaches were developed (Gelso and Fassinger.

Personality psychologists have to address a wide range of phenomena and it could be impossible to identify an overarching mission in this field. Nevertheless. 1939). 2000).differ from each other in fundamental ways as they have different categories of personality variables. Eysenck emphasised biologically-based disposition variables but excluded abilities. cultural and cognitive factors in the West emphasise the forces within the individual as the important determinant of behavior rather than the forces within the situations. jealous and anxious as dispositions (Saucier. for example. 1997). Levin. behavioral. the various “grand theories” of Allport. Other researchers cast wider nets. In essence. Allport differentiated descriptors of social evaluation and temporary states from those traits descriptors which were considered to be more personality relevant. The various historical. This emphasis on the individual is dominant in the psychodynamic.. and Murray all emphasised the coherence and consistency of normal personality and perceived the individual organism as a complex but organised structure. humanistic and trait approaches (Marsella et al. attitudes and intelligence. they adopt different units of analysis for conceptualising and explaining intraindividual coherence and individual differences in personality functioning (Allport. Cattell. 22 . Murphy. some German personality descriptors contained abilities and temperament terms while others such as Goldberg uses attitude and mood terms like conservative.

2003).2.1. 2001). the ego and the superego. were more concerned with the interplay of conscious awareness and unconsciousness to explain personality (Coan. 2000). It explains our mental activity in which all thought processes occur. The ego does the systematic trial and error thinking and seeks to ensure the survival of the individual. This set represents the struggles among bodily desires.2. Psychodynamic Theories Psychodynamic psychologists (e.. described as a boiling and bubbling cauldron of aggressive and animal-like urges. The conscious level deals with that part of our awareness which is in touch with the reality of our life. two mental processes take place. rational understanding or expectations. Ego is the conscious part and is responsible for the individual’s behavior and understanding of the outside world. Freud’s structural set is the id. The superego is the overseer of the ego which ensures it is morality and strives for ideals (Mayer. the animalistic part of personality. Another takes in the stimuli. These stimuli are subsequently stored as information in the pre-conscious level and they become our experiences. One takes in the stimuli using our five senses. When we 23 . Id. 1987). The pre-conscious level is where information of our past is stored which could be called “available memory”. and social ideals (Mayer. Freud. pre-conscious and unconscious. We select and respond to the stimuli that we perceive can satisfy our personal goals. According to Freud (1960). Adler). Jung. They explained personality in terms of mental mechanisms and drives that seek satisfaction within the boundaries of reality (Cervone. we have three levels of consciousness: conscious.g. processes them and sees many different ways of responding to them. When we select the stimuli.

It is this dynamic and active 24 . 2000).g. they have many choices of responding to it. and crimes) are due to the repression of pain or instinct by the superego contents. child abuse.. The unconscious is believed to be the source of our motivations such as desires for sex or food and neurotic compulsions or ambitions. The psychodynamic psychologists believe that behavior is a function of psychological processes operating within these three levels of consciousness. they agree that personality patterns can be best understood from the dynamics of the psychological processes acting on the unconsciousness within the context of an individual’s phenomenal field. 2002). One is to act on the stimuli using our feelings by retrieving the information from our past experiences at the preconscious level. Hence. Apparently.respond and act on the stimuli two mental activities take place. The other is to use our thinking (intellect) at the conscious level to process the stimuli and see alternative responses to them. which are neurologically represented by the physical needs in the life and death instincts. Freud posits that all human behavior is motivated by instincts or drives. they do not have a choice. when they use their thinking (mental faculty). Freud discovered the unconscious level as a source of motivation and a way of hiding thoughts and desires from awareness (Gabriel and Carr. the distress and miseries in modern life (e. They explain personality in terms of the mental drive mechanisms that try to satisfy the drives within the boundaries of reality (Cervone. Generally. mental illness. The unconscious has all the things that are not easily accessible to the awareness level such as our drives or instincts which originate from there and others that are put there such as bad memories or emotions associated with trauma because we cannot bear to look back. Alternatively. when people act on a particular situation using their feelings.

2003. Mayo’s work paved the path for more humanistic theories. a major contemporary champion was Abraham Maslow with his Hierarchy of Needs Theory whereby he posited that human beings are motivated by basic needs that are species-wide. They believe that people are responsible for their life. 1976). in all forms.view of the unconscious which is the heart of the field of psychology known as psychoanalysis (Gabriel and Carr. 1976). 25 . The joy of living is to prepare oneself for experiencing and progressing towards higher levels of functioning. Abraham Maslow. Humanistic Theories Humanistic psychologists (e. they assume that people will be positively motivated to actualise their potential.g. Carl Rogers. 1998). p. Humanistic psychologists emphasise learning from one’s subjective past experiences to develop and actualise one’s potentials. David McClelland) view existence as a process of learning. apparently unchanging and instinctual or genetic in origin (Kaufman. becoming and being a better person or developing the human virtue. 2.2. The Mayo-Hawthorne studies demonstrated that the hourly paid employee was motivated by other needs besides economic rewards (Gallagher and Einhorn. he must be” (Mele.2. self-actualisation is achieving “what a man can be. For Maslow. 2002).. 2003). becoming and being a perfect person (Franken. Given reasonable and conducive life conditions. Although Mayo may be considered the pioneer of the “humanistic” approach. growing. Self-actualisation can be defined as the process of learning. Mayo showed that an employee’s psychological and social desires play an important role in production efficiency based on social aspects of human behavior. growing. 80). to its fullest extent (Mele.

The hierarchy has five categories, ascending from “physiological” to “safety”, “social”, “social and self esteem” and culminating to “self actualisation”. Maslow enlarged the concept of human personality by capturing the higher levels of needs in human. This model is applicable to any industrial setting (Mele, 2003). Drawing from Maslow’s ideas, Douglas McGregor developed his Theory X-Theory Y model of behavior whereby the “carrot and stick” theory was effective if employees were at the subsistence level of survival. McGregor in Theory Y postulated that human talent and potential are greater than usually assumed. Furthermore, the need for self-actualisation is also an important factor of the Theory Y where the satisfaction of the individual’s needs for self-actualisation is the best method to obtain commitment. He posited that human beings will, under conductive conditions, accept and even seek responsibility and contribute creatively to the organisation (Mele, 2003). Herzberg, another contributor to humanistic theories, made a distinction between rewards to workers that facilitate personal growth and those that alleviate discomfort. They are termed as motivators and hygiene factors respectively. All of these humanistic psychologists believed that human behavior is motivated by needs. This phenomenological approach has contributed immensely to personality psychology in the U.S., which promotes the individual based on the concepts of self-actualisation and oneself (Lombardo and Foschi, 2002).

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2.2.3.

Traits Theories

Trait theories conceptualise personality as an individual-difference construct which explains an individual’s average tendency to manifest one versus another type of behavior (Cervone, 2000). Common traits are produced by both cultural contexts and by biological variation in the population in general using the nomothetic approach while the individual traits or personal dispositions are the domain of the idiographic approach (Lombardo and Foschi, 2002). Traits describe the thematic tendencies of a person: intelligence, emotionality and the like. They tend to omit consideration of other structures such as self-regulation, selfconcept, characteristic adaptation, significant other schemas, and similar entities (Mayer, 2001). Traits are the foundation of individuality. Personality traits are considered as behavioral constants which emphasise individual differences in response to identical situations or stimulation. Trait psychologists normally seek to uncover the psychological dimensions along which individuals differ and the manner in which traits group within individuals. The main focus is on enduring or lasting behavior and attention is on the content of behavior rather than the psychological processes causing the behavior. Hence, its emphasis is on the outcomes instead of the process itself (Buss, 1989). Traits can also be inferred as a quality or dimension that can be used to identify a unique pattern of how a person behaves, thinks, and feels. Narrow behaviors or specific responses of a person define a characteristic mode or habitual response pattern of behavior. Paunonen (1998) defined trait as a combination of several such habitual response tendencies while Marsella et al. (2000) postulated that traits are inferred through observed similarities in behavior across various situations.

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Traits are relatively independent from each other; they can be empirically measured and evaluated; rooted in the “neuropsychic” systems. Hence, traits are useful for describing one’s personality and statistically defining the distribution of these characters in a larger population. Nevertheless, if a trait measure is linked to past behavior, then trait-performance correlations would involve the prediction of current behavior from past behavior. In this case, traits would predict but not explain behavior (Locke and Latham, 2002). Trait psychologists studied what makes us recognisably the same and different from each other; what our unique behavior patterns and their characteristics are and how settings may influence them. Trait theories of Allport (1937) and McCrae and Costa (1996) conceptualise personality as small sets of inferred structures which manifest themselves as behavioral dispositions or tendencies (Cervone, 2000). Cattell (1943) sought to organise and reduce the thousands of personality traits into clusters (i.e., factors) using quantitative methods. The architecture of personality traits postulated by Allport includes cardinal, superordinate, central, and peripheral traits. These structures are domain general which have constructs such as “agreeableness” (McCrae and Costa, 1996), a unit of analysis which does not make any distinction between being agreeable toward one’s date and towards one’s child. Both are agreeable acts. Performing both of them would move the scale up on an inferred structure of agreeableness. Individuals can be characterised in terms of a comprehensive but small set of factors or dispositions which are stable over decades of adult life, across different situations and can explain a wide spectrum of behaviors (Idson and Mischel, 2001). Furthermore, Allport posited that to understand personality, it is necessary to study

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2003). correlations between laboratory behavior and personality traits tend to be modest. Using traits to predict behavior in the past has yielded mixed results partly because of methodological problems. 2002). 29 . strength of excitation. They use classical and operant conditioning to understand animal and human behavior. The famous Pavlovian typology of temperament posits that there are four properties of the central nervous system that are responsible for individual differences in reacting to conditioning: strength of inhibition.4.the inter-relationships of the traits and that the “whole personality” is different from the sum of these individual traits (Lombardo and Foschi.2. they found that there are some similarities in human and animal behavior where “motivation” is externally generated in the form of punishers and reinforcers (Locke and Latham. Based on the deductions from their experiments. 2003).4. One of the problems of the trait theories is that personality is not able to explain all variation in behavior as the environment does have a significant effect on behavior (Sanders. and balance. often not exceeding 0. mobility of nervous processes. This finding has been used to support critics who claim that personality traits are unimportant (Buss. Behaviorist/Cognitive and Social Cognitive Theories Stimulus-Response or Behavioral Theorists posit that behavior is a function of our past experiences. 2000). Behavior can be repeatedly reinforced or diminished through the use of reward and punishment and is one explanation of why certain dimensions of personality are dominant (DeGrandpre. Generally. 2. 1989).

Bauer and McAdams. 2004). The old axiom of StimulusResponse Theory that pleasure begets pleasure and pain begets pain becomes unresolved and mooted. We learn that both pleasurable and painful experiences can lead to positive and negative outcomes. Bargh and Ferguson.This typology has a strong influence on personality psychology (Lombardo and Foschi. learning and experiences. Moreover. 2002. Integrating the behavioral and cognitive perspectives with respect to motivation produces the social cognitive theory (Bandura. cognitive and motivational mediators in the stimulus-response relationship due to the fact that such constructs were not measurable independently by an outside disinterested party (Bargh and Ferguson. We begin to use our intellect to process the stimuli and anticipate the outcomes of our behavior before we respond to pains and pleasures. expectations and goals to guide and direct their behavior. cognitive and 30 . This set of personal standards is unique in each person and grows out of one’s life experiences (Andersen and Chen. Radical behaviorists such as Skinner and Watson ruled out emotional. We learn from our experiences. 2000). Cognitive psychologists view behavior as a function of cognition. 1977a). psychological explanatory mechanisms such as memory. conscious deliberation and perception) which mediate between stimuli and responses. They assert that people organise their values. Behaviorists denied the existence of the complex higher-order factors (e. 2000..g. the intraindividual. individual functioning is considered as a continuous interaction among behavioral. which does not overly emphasise either environmental or internal forces when explaining behavior. 2002).

2000).. social cognitive psychologists have been developing theories in an attempt to explain the complexities by careful observation of the human behaviors with the environment and their relations. expectation and aspirations (Marsella et al. and cognitive constructs used to give meaning to events) possesses a spectrum of possible inputs. how people establish causal linkage over their lives through self-reflective and selfknowledge processes. (i) personality is a complex system. 31 . selfregulatory and goals mechanisms. These mechanisms are contextualised by these social-learning processes. which cause some inputs to become particularly salient to an individual or are grouped with other inputs into an equivalent class and are domain-specific (Cervone. (ii) reciprocal interactionism. how people assign meanings to social information. how people organise disparate and multiple experiences and life events within a larger cognitive framework of goals. 1981). b. social cognitive theorists postulate that the intuitive and perceived sense of coherence and consistency in personality/self/character can arise from three sources: a. 2004). self-reflective capabilities. Over the past few decades. Furthermore. and c.environmental factors (Fedor and Ferris.. The three overarching principles of the social cognitive approach are. 2000).g. and (iii) personality variables (Cervone. They posit that each of the mechanisms (e.

personality measures can predict work performance quite accurately and a given trait value is situational specific (Tett and Burnett. In a Thinking and Judging consulting world. knowledge of the 32 . Martocchio and Thoresen (1997) revealed that conscientious and introverted employees are less likely to play truant or to be absent.3. By paying attention to the psychological processes where traits can be expressed in work performance. Another study by Judge. interest. 2003). are more potent predictors of occupational performance although other factors such as values.2. Meta-analyses have consistently and repeatedly shown that under specific conditions. the selection/recruitment systems would be more beneficial and can provide practitioners greater advantage in utilising trait information in work settings. 2000). personnel selection specialists generally did not use personality testing in employee selection due to pessimistic conclusions drawn by researchers that resulted in a perception that “personality tests have low validity” (Hurtz and Donovan. “Getting Along” and “Getting Ahead”. WHY DOES PERSONALITY MATTER TO ORGANISATIONS? For several decades prior to the 1990s. mental ability. a more beneficial strategy for an organisation is to select relatively more conscientious and less extroverted employees to reduce absenteeism and improve productivity. Hurtz and Donovan (2000) show that the Conscientiousness dimension has a moderate impact on performance and appears rather stable and generalisable across occupations and criteria. As these traits are considerably stable and probably genetic in origin. opportunities and health are also important determinants. Nevertheless. Hogan and Holland (2003) found that the measures of Emotional Stability.

1988). a group of Introverts may benefit from the presence of an Extrovert for better communication. which in turn saves money via the reduction of errors/mistakes and improved morale. certain traits correlate with higher performance for certain tasks.personality types of the clients could be used to enhance communication. 2. Also. Personality theorists began to focus more on the differences within persons. McClelland conducted a study of the phenomenon of constructive activity beyond the physiological or survival requirements and classified the traits as “need for achievement”. 2000). Wheeler. Gordon W. Hunton and Bryant (2004a) found homogeneity of personality types that are attracted and retained in accounting firms. Allport (Nicholson. TYPES OF PERSONALITY MEASURES Historians recognise the year 1937 to be the birth of personality psychology by its founder.4. The satisfaction derived from achievement is what stimulates their performance (Arnold. termed 33 . Groups comprising members with Sensing and Intuition preferences outperformed groups with only Sensing-preference members. He found that extrinsic rewards such as money are only one form or method of “keeping score” for high achievers. the presence of some Thinking types may provide some structure to decision-making in a group of all Feeling types. Such knowledge also assists management on how to understand and express feeling so as to minimise conflicts and to see their differences as an asset instead of as a liability (McCaulley. 1998) with individuality as its object of study (Pelham. 1993). Similarly. jobs and technologies.

and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) which is based on Jungian theory. they are the most researched psychometric instruments according to a search conducted in PsycINFO (981 articles on FFM and 540 on MBTI as at October 2004). Kwiatkowski. These psychometric instruments have been selected as they are the most popular instruments used by commercial organisations for personal development.e. and for developing more effective teams (Dent and Curd. career development.. Furthermore. Conscientiousness. 2004). 2. Nomothetic is the other term that refers to the classical. 2003). No discussion or critique is carried out on the other instruments as there is very little publicly available research on them. 2004. 2001. 2003). also known as the Big Five. 2003). Extraversion. posits that there are five personality dimensions (i. Openness to Experience. Agreeableness and Neuroticism) which represent the highest levels of a personality hierarchy (Paunonen and Ashton. between subject analyses of personality. The anagram of the FFM is 34 . Allport’s idea of personality is a psychology of the mature and normal personality (Lombardo and Foschi. The Five Factor Model The Five Factor Model (FFM). occupational selection.1. Toomela.as idiographic.. which is essentially a smaller set of trait variables derived from the 16-Factor Model of Cattell (1943) (Rossier et al.4. There are many approaches to the measurement of personality (see Table 2)) but this discussion will be restricted to the Five Factor Model (FFM) by Tubes and Christal (1961) and McCrae and Costa (1996).

C. Consciousness is the trait that best correlates with work performance. d. Factor 5. which is the tendency to be anxious.N. where people exhibiting a high.O. assertive. consists of tendencies to be kind. active and excitement seeking. These factors represent a continuum. As defined by Judge and Bono (2000). a. moderate or low degree of each quality. Factor 3. gentle. Agreeableness. Paunonen (2003) revealed that the construct validity of these 35 . is indicated by two facets: achievement and dependability. represents the tendency to be creative. represents the tendency to be outgoing. Openness to Experience (sometimes labelled as Intellectance).E. Factor 4. Factor 2. types of assessment and cultures (Hogan and Holland. (De Raad. 2003). often labelled by its opposite. perceptive and thoughtful. imaginative. Extraversion.A. trusting. 1998). There is considerable debate regarding how many personality factors are needed to understand and predict behavior although the generalisability and robustness of FFM has been shown across different rating sources. languages. trustworthy and warm. Neuroticism. c. e. Individuals scoring high on Extraversion are strongly predisposed to the experience of positive emotions. b. Factor 1. Emotional Adjustment. Openness to Experience is the only trait to display appreciable correlations with intelligence. Conscientiousness. depressed and moody. fearful. Emotional Adjustment is the principal trait that leads to life satisfaction and freedom from depression and other mental ailments.

1997).g. 36 . 1997. Tsaousis. These dimensions are cross-culturally generalisabled (Perugini. Although studies by Jang et al. other researchers are of the opinion that virtually all traits of personality are reasonably contained in the factor space of the FFM (e. these studies also revealed substantial variation due to non-genetic factors (Toomela. Judge. the way one describes oneself and others in everyday life transactions). After five decades of research on personality psychology (i. 2003) and are endogenous and biologically determined (McCrae and Costa. Judge et al. Several studies have shown that the well-known instruments for personality assessment (Eysenck Personality Inventory. 1997). California Personality Inventory) may be assumed to be part of the FFM (Salgado.. It has reached somewhat of a consensus that the FFM is an appropriate taxonomy of personality (Burke and Witt. 2003.. Paunonen and Aston. 2002. MBTI. 2000. 1996. 2000). 2004. Hurtz and Donovan. (1998) and Pedersen et al.. 2004. Allik and McCrae. 2003). 2004). 1993. 2003. 2004).. Gallucci and Livi.. 1999). Martocchio and Thoresen. Saucier and Goldberg.e. (1988) showed that about 20% to 55% of the trait variation in personality dimensions is linked to genetic sources. Hogan and Holland. 2001. McCrae. Ashton et al. the FFM seems to dominate not only the theory but also the evaluation of personality (Goldberg. Although there is no universal agreement among theorists and researchers on the comprehensiveness of the five dimensions (Tett and Burnett. et al. 2003. Toomela.inventories is supported by the consistency and strong convergence in their predictions and measurements. 1998. 1998. Judge and Bono. The identification of these factors is based on principal components analyses (Burke and Witt. Hogan and Holland. 2004).

Allick and McCrae (2004) did not claim that the environment is irrelevant to personality functioning but rather that personality is manifested through culture. descriptive and molar goals of Allport.Allick and McCrae (2004) posited that the FFM personality structure is biologically determined and universal. the traits are rooted in biology and transcultural universals.4. There is still a lack of evidence to support the notion that culture shapes personality. Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Jungian theory (Jung. McKenna.. ethnicity. (2000) claimed that the FFM can only satisfy the nomothetic. Shelton and Darling (2002) posited the FFM model is applicable to all people regardless of the gender.. 2. Hunton and Bryant. and their preferences for four mental functions (i. Sensing/Intuition and Thinking/Feeling).e. explanatory and molecular contextual accounts of personality are still subjects of debate. race. Nevertheless. 2004a). the 37 .2. Extroversion and Introversion. religion. Personality is the mediating and integrating factor in numerous psychological processes (e. Saucier and Goldberg (1996) and Digman (1997) postulated the FFM model to be descriptive summaries while Marsella et al. age. Jung’s typology assumes that people differ in their choice of two attitudes. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is a psychometric instrument developed from Jung’s theory of personality and is designed to sort human beings into different personality types. That is.g. individual development. socio-economic background and country of origin. The idiographic. It postulates three bipolar dimensions and the fourth bipolar. information processing and the role of the unconscious) (Wheeler. 1971) posits that variation in human behavior is due to basic and observable differences when people use their minds to gather and process information.

resulting in four dimensions with 16 distinct personality types as shown in Table 4 (Myers et al. looks inward to their internal and subjective reactions to their environment. The judgmental person uses a combination of thinking and feelings when making decisions whereas the perception person uses the sensing and intuition processes. however. 1993) are: a. People with an intuitive preference rely more on their non-objective and unconscious perceptual processes. The 4 dimensions (Pittenger.. Judgment (J) versus Perception (P): The judgment-perception preferences were invented by Briggs and Myers to indicate if rational or irrational judgments are dominant when a person is interacting with the environment. 1998. 38 . c. Introverts.Judgement/Perception dimension. a later addition by Myers and Briggs. Feeling represents a preference to make decisions that are based on subjective processes that include emotional reactions to events. Sensing (S) versus Intuition (N): People with a sensing preference rely on that which can be perceived and are considered to be oriented towards that which is real. McCaulley. b. 2000). Thinking (T) versus Feeling (F): A preference for thinking indicates the use of logic and rational processes to make deductions and decide upon action. Extroverts are said to react to immediate and objective conditions in the environment. Extroversion (E) versus Introversion (I): This dimension reflects the perceptual orientation of the individual. d.

. Intuition types “see the forest” (i..g. Similarly. 1995). an introvert can become more extroverted when in groups). Metaphorically. its popularity has not diminished despite research which shows it has low validity (McKenna. Although people can develop a complimentary style (e. structured (like Conscientiousness) whereas Perceptive types are adaptable.. 2004a. 1993). Shelton and Darling. logical and rational natures) while Feeling types incorporate personal and group values in the decision-making process (i. Extroversion-Introversion of the MBTI is comparable with McCrae and Costa’s Extraversion. 39 . Although there is insufficient evidence that the MBTI is a valid instrument.e. Hunton and Byrant. one can have only one preference. more insightful and creative) while Sensing types “see the trees” (i. the primary preference always dominates the person’s personality.e. self disciplined. The Judging types are more committed and decisive while the Perceiving types are more questioning and open-minded. (i.e. Similarly. 1987). ThinkingFeeling may not be directly comparable to Agreeableness but it does clearly measure a similar dimension. Lindon.. Sensing-Intuition is comparable to the Openness factor.e. more factual and observant). spontaneous and flexible. 2002). The MBTI does not cater for the neuroticism dimension which is certainly an important variable (McC Dachowski.Since MBTI is a theory of types.. more idealistic and compassionate) (Wheeler. The Judging types are described as organised. The scores from the MBTI test are used to determine the person’s type and labels are attached based on one’s primary preferences for the four dimensions (Pittenger. Thinking types connect ideas and experiences by logic. Extroverted types are more outgoing while introverted types are deemed to be more detached and contemplative.

Table 3: The 16 Personality Types with Cognitive Characteristics and Occupational Tendencies 40 .

1990). (1990). Kreiser et al. Moreover. 1994. Mount and Barrick (1994) found that conscientiousness has the strongest correlation with work performance and is positively correlated with task orientation while neuroticism has a strong negative correlation with task orientation (Burch and Anderson. 1998).2.. Landry et al. Jocoby (1981). Shackleton (1980). Kovar et al.. 2004). 2004). Neuroticism primarily influences performance through motivation while conscientiousness influences performance by being decisive and orderly. Agreeableness via its main effect and extraversion and openness via their interaction are associated with work involvement while openness correlates with support for innovation (Bozionelos. Both of these dimensions are dominant in predicting work performance across a variety of work (Kichuk and Wiesner. A study on the relationship between need for achievement and need for power with six measures of life success revealed that need for achievement had a high correlation with 41 . Sensing type students outperformed the Intuition students in certain subjects and in an overall accounting grade (Nourayi and Cherry. 2003). audit partners and managers are predominantly STJ in the MBTI matrix and another set of studies reveal that the STJ type is dominant in accounting undergraduate students (Laribee. Sensing and Thinking type students perform better with a lecture mode while Intuition and Feeling types prefer and perform better under a computerassisted method (Ott et al. Satava (1996) and Schloemer and Schloemer (1997) found that accountants.. Descouzis (1989). 1993).5. 1996. Otter (1984). THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF FFM/MBTI ON PERFORMANCE Judge and Ilies (2002) found that neuroticism and conscientiousness were the most consistent and most strongly correlated with performance motivation.

Five Factor Model The FFM.6. 1996). 1992). 1989. Hence.success strivings for professional fulfilment. 2001). Hogan et al.1. 1991). 1996. 2. contribution to society and status-wealth. 1989) and hence other good dimensions of 42 . The lexical method hypothesises that the significant individual differences are encoded in single-term descriptors of underlying traits that find their expression in language (De Raad..6. 1998). is unusual as its contents are defined by the lexical hypothesis instead of primary parts (Mayer. personality can provide an incremental validity over ability in picking the optimal candidate (Day and Silverman. Its disadvantages are that numerous traits are motivational in nature (Buss. SHORTCOMINGS OF FFM AND MBTI MEASURES 2. This structure is essentially derived from an atheoretical trait factor approach (Gelso and Fassiinger.. 1998). If personality requirements are derived for an individual job. need for achievement was negatively related to security and personal fulfilment. and Berhoud. which has the advantage of getting around the problem of breaking personality into areas. Furthermore. De Raad. measures of personality based on the lexical method consist of adjectives that are representative subsets of terms describing people in a given language (Cellar et al. de Stadelhofen. a widely used trait group. 2004. Rossier. The need for power was highly correlated with professional fulfilment and status-wealth but was negatively related with family relationships (Parker and Chusmir.

2003. The FFM is not universally accepted as the integrative model of personality (Cellar et al. Cervone. 2003). 2003. Moreover.. Mayer. A better approach is to use noun factors that provide a well-delineated and more coherent description and represents the more extreme meanings of the adjective dimensions (Saucier. Mayer. 2004. Tett and Burnett. the FFM may only be “universal” for that specific stratum of society. 2003) as well as its focus on narrow aspects of personality (Paunonen and Aston. Aston et al. 1997. Digman. 2001. Paunonen. 2004. 1996).. the exceptions which depart from the usual due to situational effects. over-reliance on the adjectival approach may limit the cross-cultural generalisability of the FFM. Digman. It may 43 . 2004. Aston et al. Toomela (2003) finds that due to the scientific word meaning structure used. 1996) and is criticised for its questionable conceptual and methodological assumptions of the lexical hypothesis (Wheeler. Toomela. Digman (1990) highlighted two basic weaknesses of the FFM: (i) it is descriptive in nature and as such does not provide any possible causes to personality.. 2004b. Furthermore. it has nothing to say about personality development. That is. the debate on cultural specificity and the universality of personality structure continues. 1997. It is fair to argue that adjectives are the most appropriate and versatile class of personality descriptors in English and languages linguistically linked to English but many languages do not have a big adjectival word-class.. Moreover.personality may have been omitted (Paunonen and Aston. Hunton and Byrant. Hence. 2001. and (ii) it cannot account for exceptions to the typical behaviors on which it is based. 2001. 2003). Cellar et al.

Chinese respondents. the conceptual equivalence (i. (iii) concern only in giving the right instead of the accurate answer.. for example. (iii) the situations where they are elicited.. in terms of normative equivalence. the norms of a particular instrument that are based on Western culture may give rise to questionable conclusions if applied to.be accepted that there are a relative small number of socially or biological determined behavioral dimensions (e. introversion-extroversion) but cultural variations may shape: (i) their display patterns.g.e. and (v) the value or utility of behavioral descriptions (Marsella et al. For example. many non-Western societies are unfamiliar with linear or graduated scales like the Likert scales as they do not see their world in that fashion. (v) desire to please authorities. 2000). 44 . In addition. and (vii) confusion with the implication of words and terms used in the question as well their perceived meaning (Marsella et al. (ii) desire to conform socially. (ii) the interpersonal responses to them. 2000). The adoption of self-report questions is already a complex task. Furthermore. dependency in Western culture implies childishness.. helplessness. the similarity in the meaning and nature of a concept) may differ. (iv) limited insight and self-awareness. immaturity and many other derogatory terms but can be viewed positively in the Japanese culture. These motivational and perceptual differences are: (i) fear of possible persecution. Some cultural groups have problems with Likert scales and they tend to take the middle position.. (vi) variation in the construction of personality and personhood. It is further complicated when the questions are applied in different cultures since these people may have different reasons to participate and perceptions of the task from those on whom the concept and the scale were constructed. (iv) the meanings they are assigned. Finally.

1997). and (iii) it can advance our understanding of work-related variables (e. Furthermore. 2001). 2003). Nevertheless. Idson and Mischel (2001) postulated that traits cannot provide the psychologist with more than a psychology of a stranger. the FFM does not offer answers to the causes of personality nor accounts for exceptions to the selected dimensions and has no link to personality development (Digman. trait ratings provide only a “first read” on an individual as people seek information which is contextualised as they get to know each other better.The development of a descriptive typology such as the FFM can be done without a clear knowledge of the causal relationships of things but the proof or validation of the structure falls on that theoretical construct (Stelmack. that is.g. the FFM has the following advantages: (i) it has a parsimonious taxonomy. Unfortunately. 1997).. while life stories provide the meaning and integration (McAdams. 1997). 45 . the FFM’s taxonomy has been criticised by some researchers as being incomplete because important relationships may be obscured under the five factor model but not under a seven-factor model (Hogan and Holland. Several studies have found the FFM to be unrelated to cognitive ability (Sanders. 2003). (ii) it provides a structure for integrating results from studies carried out to investigate personality as well as the relationships between personality and other variables such as job performance. performance) by linking them to personality dimensions (Salgado. the FFM does provide an initial structure of human individuality. In the final analysis. characteristic adaptations like developmental tasks and motives fill in the details.

it is not suitable for analysis looking for before and after treatment effects (Wheeler. The notion of estimating reliability is based on the assumption that the reliability indices estimate that part of the variance that is due to true scores.2. 2004a). The most common one is the forced-choice ipsative data (FCID) as employed in MBTI. Hence. no value judgment attached). the true and error scores of the FCID’s ipsative data are contaminated across scales at the outset which do not provide any legitimate justification in conducting factor analysis (Meade. 2004).e. Data are described as ipsative when a given group of responses always add to the same total. Although this hypothesis has received empirical support with temporal stability studies. Reliability is defined as the consistency in measurement of a test while validity tests are for goodness of the measure. 2001).e. Factor analysis will not be appropriate. Hunton and Bryant. Cavana et al.2. 1998). a forced-choice format) (Rings. 2004. The formulae for these reliability estimates based on the 46 . it does not capture the strength of a preference but its direction which is only appropriate for sorting (Wheeler. If the number of traits is large. wrong or right (i. The type preferences are dichotomous (i. The correlations between ipsative factors are negative. Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Jung’s (1971) hypothesis states that types and preferences are invariant and innate in individuals. Each dichotomy is a selection between qualities of equal value. Furthermore. 2004b).6. measuring the concepts the measurement instrument is designed to measure (Dent and Curd. Hunton and Bryant.. the correlations between these orthogonal factors will tend towards zero even though they are highly correlated in the population. that is. with no intrinsic bad or good...

Furthermore. Any single behavior is a narrow bandwidth. there is no data that show certain types are more contented in specific occupations than others or stay longer in one occupation. Behavior is used to evaluate and interpret one’s personality (Hogan et al. Definition of Behavior Behavior is the way organisms like human beings act. Hence. it is regarded as any activity of a human being (The World Book Encyclopaedia) which is partly determined by heredity and environment but can be modified through learning (Plomin. behavior is interpreted as conduct by most people but in the fields of psychology and behavioral science. high fidelity expression of a personality disposition.1. What 47 . 2.classical test theory are simply not applicable or tenable with ipsative data. 1996). ESFPs are neither better nor worse salespeople than INTJs.7. In addition. Pittenger (1993) finds large variances as much as 50% in some “test-retest” personality studies while the “factor analysis” of the four dimensions of MBTI theory identifies six different factors and shows significant correlations of these dimensions which are supposedly independent of each other.7. In general. THE THEORIES AND CONSTRUCTS OF THE PROPOSED MEASURE 2. 1989). there is no evidence to indicate a positive relation between specific MBTI types with career success.. Similarly.

Cesare and Sadri. 2. motivation is a process that moves a person towards some action (Arnold. it would be extrinsic motivation when the person participates in the activity to avoid negative consequences or gain external rewards. Pincus (2004) defined motivation as a desire or an emotion operates willingly and causing it to act. Amotivation is the lack of intent to engage in a specific behavior. Motivation is not behavior itself and is not performance. The word “motivation” suggests energised behavior directed towards some goals that is. the chosen actions are good reflections of performance (Mitchell. An example of an intrinsic motivation is the participation in some activities for the satisfaction and pleasure derived from it. 2003).7. 1988). that is. Karageorghis and Terry. 2004).an individual does is a function of the kind of person he or she is – that is. Behavior is the criterion which is chosen. 48 .2. the motive of participation lies in the process of participation instead of the derived external reward or avoidance of possible negative consequences for non-participation (Pincus. 2000). his or her personality. Factors Influencing Behavior Motivation is fundamental to behavior as most behavior is influenced by it (Mitchell. 1982). intrinsic motivation and amotivation are three distinct motivational forces that can influence behavior (Vlachopoulos. On the other hand. In most cases. 1982. which represents a lack of motivation. The objective of motivation theories is often to predict behavior. Extrinsic motivation.

In this respect. 2004). persistence of voluntary actions and directions that are goal directed. Motivational theorists have different ideas on where the source of energy is derived from and the particular needs which an individual is trying to fulfil. Hence. 1982).e. expectations. “motivations provide the motor for behavior” (Pincus. and can vary over place and time due to environmental influences (Ramlall. Nevertheless. That is. under the individual’s control) (Tubbs and Ekeberg. need theories identify the internal factors which energise behavior. reinforcement histories.Mitchell (1982) postulated motivation as those psychological processes that cause the arousal. attitudes. Contrary to the dispositional view. personality traits accounted for little variance in 49 . As human needs are psychological or physiological deficiencies. (ii) intentional. not the amount. 1991). (i. which arouse behavior. 1982): (i) an individual-level phenomenon. motivation is the degree to which an individual wants and chooses to engage in certain specific behaviors (Mitchell. It is generally accepted that motivation is (Mitchell. others believe that behavior is determined by environmental or situational factors and that similarity in behavior is a result from similarity of environmental or situational circumstances. Motivation is to do with the quality and direction of the effort. 2004). values. Motivational theories are used to predict behavior as motivation is about the actions and the external and internal forces that influence an individual’s choice of action. Different people have different needs. and goals. these needs can be weak or strong. and (iii) multifaceted..

models are developed which can explain why people. The theories proposed by deCharmes.behavior across situations. Katz and Khan. Hence. Current Theories of Work Motivation Work motivation is defined as “the process by which behavior is energised.7.. Deci. Nevertheless. there are no external forces regulating the behavior. 1994. and extrinsic or instrumental motivation. Leonard et al. 1999. and Etzioni point to three sources of motivation: motivation based on goal internalisation. directed and sustained in organisational settings” (Leonard et al.. That is. 970). not personality or dispositions (Marsella et al. 1975). In recent years. The other source of 50 . 2. Furthermore. are able to exhibit different patterns of behavior yet are able to retain a recognisable personality structure (Pervin. intrinsic process motivation... According to this view. the individual enjoys the work and feels rewarded by just performing the task. 2000). 1989. the person has a dynamic reciprocal interaction with the situation/environment. Individuals who perform a behavior because it is “fun” are said to be motivated intrinsically. The trait-situation debate peaked with the works of Mischel (1968) and Mischel and Shoda (1995) which posited that situational factors determine behavior. p. Rothbart and Ahadi. 1999). most researchers have adopted an interactionist view. 1999).3. which assumes behavior is a function of both personality and the environment (Pervin. when shifting from one situation to another. there are some studies that are able to support the predictive validity of the personality/dispositional view (Leonard et al.

Murray posited that human being can be characterised by a set of needs and that individual differences in behavior can be explained by individual differences in the strength of the needs (Franken. Nevertheless. There exist several “mini” theories of individual difference in motivation which suggest the existence of motivational traits (Pincus. 1998). the need for cognition (Cohen et al.. 2004). 1995).motivation stems from external forces. the 51 . (iii) there is inconsistency in the final action taken. 1998). and (iv) the difference in reactions by individuals for the fulfilment of needs. Murray’s “variables of personality” theory adopts motives as the fundamental element of personality (Winter et al. 1961). (iii) the need for affiliation (Atkinson. motivation is complex in that: (i) (ii) the needs of individuals differ. 1958). and (iv) the need for power (Atkinson. 1958). (i) (ii) the need for achievement (McClelland. there is considerable variability in the conversion of needs into action. The more psychologically immature a person is.. Needs can be requested or expressed in immature or mature ways. Such motivation is referred to as legal compliance and external rewards by Katz and Khan (1978) or alienative or calculative involvement by Etzioni (1975).

Hence. which is in the functionalist tradition of James and Dewey. such as changes in behavior across situations when valences and expectancies remain constant. (1999) posited that individual disposition or personality is a significant determinant of behavior. 972). however. These theories are.. most needs can be satisfied or expressed symbolically (Frank. or compromised. our needs determine our behavior or acts (Osteraker. The expectancy and equity theories focus on extrinsic motivational factors and assume that individuals are “rational maximiser(s) of personal utility” (Leonard et al. 1999. These needs are instinctually weak and their effect on behavior can be 52 . Maslow claimed that the five needs are universal and innate. and are termed instinctoid. p. 2003). Values are motivations and the gratification of a need is a value (Jolibert and Baumgartner. Leonard et al. Behavior is motivated by goal internalisation when an individual adopts behaviors and attitudes because they are congruent with one’s value system. Wertheimer and Gestalt Psychology (Chung. Frank (2003) maintained that the characteristics of triebe characterise the vicissitudes of needs. unable to account for the complete range of motivated behavior. denied or turned into the opposite. For the more psychologically mature person.more literal is the gratification of the needs. is fused with the holism of Goldstein. The Theory of Human Motivation postulated by Maslow (1943). Needs can also be sublimated and gratification can be delayed. 1999). needs can be unconscious and repressed or disavowed and conscious. 1997). 1969) and has the dynamism of Adler and Freud. As values determine our needs.

to affiliate with others. (b) safety needs . 1969). The upper levels of the Needs Hierarchy attempt to explain why an individual continue to strive for excellence when the lower needs are met. (d) esteem needs .for hunger. 53 . inhibited or modified by the environment. consisting of: (a) physiological needs . Chung. the higher its strength. Based on the premise that motivation comes from within an individual and cannot be imposed. all other behaviors are learned (Buttle. and (e) self-actualisation needs . safe and out of danger. This may be true for lower-order needs and less so of higher-order needs. 1997. (c) belongingness and love needs . 1989). be competent and gain approval and recognition. only those behaviors that satisfy the physiological needs are unlearned that is. desirability or importance. Maslow proposed a hierarchy of needs. Hence. it is a dynamic model that posits multiple needs operating simultaneously (Herbig and Genestre.to feel secure. and (iii) higher needs are different from lower needs as they can never be completely satisfied. their behavior is determined by unsatisfied needs and satisfied needs do not motivate behavior. be acceptable and belong. 1988). Maslow postulated that an individual’s needs act as motivators and are the centre of motivation (Arnold. thirst and so forth.accelerated. Even though the needs are innate. It is shown that the greater a need’s deprivation. According to Maslow: (i) human beings are demanding beings.to achieve. (ii) the five needs exist in a hierarchy of significance or importance.to find self-fulfilment and realise one’s potential.

Unlike most of the above traditional need theories that can be classified as homeostatic or deficit theories of motivation. move on to the next need. This Hierarchy of Needs is claimed to be a universal theory of human motivation and the needs or motives are identified to human behavior (Iachini. related and growth). an individual may concentrate mostly at one level but at the same time may. For example. 54 . At any instant. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Theory advocates the dynamic processes of need satisfaction which leads towards the ultimate goal of self-actualisation. self-actualisation may mean different things to individuals from collectivistic cultures than it does to individuals from individualistic cultures (Cesare and Sadri.e. Needs are constantly changing within the individual (Osteraker. it must be repeated that an individual does not concentrate all energies on one need and then when that need is fulfilled. 2003). The major difference lies in the definition of need satisfaction. to a lesser degree. 1993). 1999). 2003). existence.. Tests have shown that people across the world are essentially motivated by the same fundamental needs. Maslow’s need hierarchy is generally applicable to all with regards to cultural differences. Alderfer argued that people can move up and down the hierarchy and can be motivated at any time by multiple needs. Maslow’s theory is dynamic in the sense that human beings are postulated as wanting beings that search constantly for the fulfilment of their needs in an expanding needs system (Chung. be concerned with needs on other levels of the primary need (Townsend and Gebhardt. 1969).Alderfer (1969) modified Maslow’s Theory by suggesting there are only three needs (i. More like piano keys than stairways.

1997). biologically and situationally determined. Behavior is almost always motivated by other factors that are culturally. Maslow (1943) postulated that the theories of motivation are not synonymous with theories of behavior. In additional. 1969). the scope of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs is broad and is able to explain a wide range of behaviors. For example. The Needs Hierarchy is also elegant and parsimonious. The power of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Theory is the identification of the needs of each individual that motivate behavior (Wiley. Mustafa (1992) postulated that the significance of the needs hierarchy lies in understanding the motivational factors for the individuals. Motivations are only one group of determinants of behavior. a particular behavior may be caused by many needs. a specific behavior can meet more than one need. Conversely. 1976). The adoption of Maslow’s needs is appropriate for the CASES personality measure as it has face validity with plausible explanatory power. 55 .Maslow proposed that needs must be studied in totality or holistically rather than independently as needs are seldom found in isolation but in a variety of combinations (Chung. Its structure is appealing in terms of its simplicity and apparent completeness (Gallagher and Einhorn. Workplace behavior is posited to be influenced by a person’s existing state of needs in a certain universal needs taxonomy. Although personality-based theories may not necessarily predict behavior or motivation. they do provide an understanding of what motivates or energises the individual. Furthermore.

1. The First Premise: Behavior is Motivated by Needs An analysis of a person’s behavior can produce a range of instrumental motives with end goals.7. 2. Most.2. The Constructs of this Proposed Model Most broad-based personality theories have assumed that specific motivations determine how personality and self develop function. The psychological needs are based on the motivational underpinnings of the Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Theory and the environment/situation interactions are explained by the social cognitive theory. if not all.4. may desire the money to purchase health insurance (instrumental motive) and hopes that the health insurance will benefit the person and family (end goal). Any adequate model must therefore address motivation.7. existing psychometric instruments have personality dimensions which are temporally stable over various situations. The proposed personality model of CASES attempts to explain personality with dimensions from the Hierarchy of Needs theory.4. The end goals are classified as drives and intrinsic motives by social 56 . A person taking up a second job for the extra money (instrumental motive). which complete the “behavior chain”. This model of personality (CASES) postulates that personality is a function of psychological needs and their interactions with the environment/situation. The variability of these dimensions from the Needs theory is explained by the complexity dimension based on the social cognitive theory of “If-Then”.

p.e. expectancies. Although Freud did not elaborate further on the idea of needs. Motives are the “why” of behaviors (Winter et al. triebe) is need” (Frank. incentives. Motives refer to people’s desire.. needs have been equated with “drive” in experimental psychology (Fedor and Ferris. 2004).psychologists (Reiss. They provide the meaning of human behavior. “A better term for an instinctual impulse (i. 2004). 1981). Furthermore. and (iv) the need for a resilient responsiveness by one's love objects. the need for identity. recognition and affirmation. 2003. the need definition should be given more consideration as postulated: (i) (ii) the need for one's physical needs to be deemed legitimate. (v) the need for optimal emotional availability of a love object. Motives can be ends-based or means-based 57 . wishes and goals. 1998). Freud wrote. (iv) the need for understanding the causes of events. A person with a motive to gain social status may behave in ways linked with upper class status. However. skills and other motives. Motives are reasons a person holds for initiating and performing voluntary behavior. 694).. particular actions or behaviors associated with a certain motive may not have high correlations with the motive behaviors because they can vary according to the situation. may enjoy the feeling of self-importance and may think of issues pertaining to wealth (Reiss. (iii) the need for interpersonal boundaries.

2004). their needs are fewer. In these examples.. 2004). 1989). Drive theories define drives as psychological states that move the organism towards a goal whereas needs are physiological states of deprivation (Pincus.depending on the individual’s objective for performing the behavior. 1998). Maslow (1970) posited that the gratification of any need is a value while Murray (1951) claimed that needs operate in the service of values. Human wants can be regarded as specific desires for these deeper needs. the behavior is enacted as it is a means to obtain something else (e. Our values determine our needs and our needs influence 58 . 2003).g. Ends-based motives are indicated when one engages in a behavior because one desires to do so with no other apparent reason. These wants are shaped and reshaped continuously by the institutional and social forces. Similarly. means-based motives are indicated when one performs an act for a specific instrumental value.. a student reading a textbook out of curiosity or a child kicking a ball just for the fun of it. Hence. needs are socially constructed and historically situated (Buttle. While people’s wants are many. For example. Wants and needs are based on both inherited characteristics and environmental conditions and behavior is motivated to satisfy needs and wants (Koltko-Rivera. Needs that people desire and require vary according to the value system in which they are oriented as different values systems induce different needs (Yamaguchi. interactional and societal needs. On the other hand. salary or degree). For example. motives involve wishes. Values are cognitive representations of biological. desires or goals (Winter et al. a professional footballer playing the game for a salary or a student studying diligently to obtain a degree.

system. structure. which represents the needs for power. CASES posits that the needs subsume motives (implicit and explicit). the four dimensions of self are proposed as follows: (i) Self-Actualising self. which represents the needs for growth. and fulfilment. Physiological needs. 1997). Hence. The Second Premise: The Accuracy of Predicting Behavior Depends on Complexity “Complexity” reflects the extent to which people are complex and difficult to understand (Koltko-Rivera. and (iv) Sociocentric self. image. Based on these factors. care. and protection. desires. order. self development. 2. which represents the needs for love. however. the model uses the social cognitive theory to provide an explanation for complexity. (iii) Egocentric self.7. CASES’s first premise is that personality dimensions can be represented by Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. drives and values. which represents the needs for security. Social cognitive theorists postulate that human beings are neither mechanical 59 . Jolibert and Baumgartner. To explain why some individuals are highly predictable and some are unpredictable.our acts (Osteraker. companionship.2. 2004).4. 1999. and affiliation. are not considered as they are unlearned and assumed to be of relatively in low importance in current organisational settings. and control. achievement. (ii) Safety self. progress.

self-regulation is activated by a threat indicating that something is not “normal” and that adjustment may be needed. Complex behavior is believed to be mediated by the individual’s current purposes and intents. “then”) that an individual displays in various classes of situations (i. “if”). 2000). Not all threats require adjustments.e.e.conveyors of animating influences of the environment nor autonomous agents. motivation or thought processes is a unique human characteristic (Bandura. active construal of the environment. The capacity to control one’s action. and by the exercise of conscious decisions and choices based on these purposes and construals (Bargh and Ferguson. The “If-Then” approach defines personality based on different responses (i. such as when the threat is insufficiently threatening or when the individual lacks the motivation or necessary cognitive resources to deal with the threat. Andersen and Chen (2002) posited that personality and self are largely shaped by experiences and personality is a function of the different situations individuals encounter. This self-regulation involves overriding an individual’s responses or modulating them on the basis of some threatening experience such as a disturbing emotional state... This approach assumes that every individual possesses an idiosyncratic constellation of “if-then” relations and the overall pattern of “if-then” responses of the individual reflects the individual unique “personality signature” (Mischel and Shoda. 2002). 60 . 1995: Anderson and Chen. Even though the contents and processes by which self-regulation occur are multifaceted. 1977a). Human behavior is purposive.

CASES’s second premise states that human beings can be placed on a complexity continuum thereby producing a fifth self-dimension known as the Complexity Dimension. a low complexity person would normally manifest the traits of the other four dimensions consistently and persistently over time and across situations. at a particular situation and time. change and be flexible to survive in a turbulent dynamic environment. Complex people have dynamic personalities. For example. The nature of low complexity behavior is conditioned while the nature of high complexity behavior is cognitive.5. CASES postulates that people with a low complexity have relatively static personalities. the person can be soft. representing the need to adapt. 2. Apparently. but at another situation and time. Evidently. a person can be hard.No two human beings are alike. viz. then he/she will tend to be gullible at all times and situations. (i) Complex self.7. if an individual with low complexity is gullible. Low complexity traits describe the characteristics of people who are predictable. Uniqueness of the CASES Personality Measure The notion that humans exhibit needs for growth and development has traditionally enjoyed considerable acceptance by practitioners owing possibly to the face validity and intuitive 61 . The traits of the other four dimensions are dynamic and are manifested on the need to suit a purpose. being hard or soft is a person’s choice and is manifested with intent to achieve a purpose. For example. Complex people are harder to predict.

“inventory” level instead of the construct level. 1995). 2003). CASES posits that an individual is not a “hostage” of his/her traits but rather is an active personality which has stable. 62 . From this approach. These tests. 2000). Furthermore. The CASES model of personality recognises the idiographic differences in how human beings make sense of varying situations and their responses to them. The individual.appeal of the arguments. variability in an individual’s responses across situations will not be dismissed or averaged over. There has been a resurgence of interest in the role of personality in work performance (Robertson et al. however. however. variations in responses are not assumed to be an error. personnel selection specialists did not generally use personality testing in employee selection due to the perception it had low validity. 2. competence. wants to. has the ability either unconsciously or consciously to alter his/her behavior simply because he/she likes to. experience.8. That is. Defining personality with these theories allows for variability in personality across various situations while maintaining stability at the level of the individual’s “personality signature” (Mischel and Shoda. dispositional personality characteristics. or has to (Nikolaou. motivation. RESEARCH QUESTIONS AND HYPOTHESES Prior to the 1990s.. “Does personality predict work performance?” is a question that many researchers have addressed over the past few decades. focused on personality traits at the molecular. There are many other possible factors that influence work performance such as intelligence.

2004).. personality provides very little insight on what and why the person will do in a given job. peer or supervisor reports on the job or failure 63 . Mellissa and Ellington. oral and written communication task proficiency. and motivation). (2000) posited that the core work performance factors are thinking. assessment centre ratings. Mellissa and Ellington. administration. Schmit et al. Research on the significance of personality suggests that even though other factors are important in determining the performance of an individual in a given task. 2004). motivation and satisfaction levels. job-specific task proficiency.. more recent studies are focusing on demonstrating the incremental variance in work performance with the use of personality predictors (Sackett. work attitude. Work performance is affected by role clarity. 2002. self management and motivation. Hence. Sanders. 2003). Recent studies using more fundamental dimensions of personality have shown the predictive power of personality for work performance (Kieffer et al. Burke and Witt (2004) postulated that personality tests account for a certain unique variance in work performance’s measures beyond the variance accounted for by mental ability tests. Several studies have shown that all personality dimensions or factors are valid predictor of work performance (Salgado. 1993. procedural knowledge. leadership. interpersonal. work orientation.e. results from multiplicative combination of declarative knowledge. Performance is often measured as training academy performance. and interviews.. Barrick and Mount. and ability (Carmeli and Freund.satisfaction. and organisation (Barrick et al. 1998). Tett and Burnett (2003) used a work performance taxonomy that had eight categories (i. 1997. Sackett. 1998).

a measure should include variables in citizenship behavior and productivity as well as steps to prevent the “halo” effect. 1994). and the work environment can significantly influence an individual’s behavior. 2000. Furthermore. Schweiger and Sumners. This could be due to the confusion of the two dimensions of personnel performance evaluation: (a) citizenship behavior (social behavior at work) and (b) performance in productivity. There exists some degree of difficulty in measuring work performance and linking specific work tasks to personality dimensions. 1990). 2000). where one person assessing another person’s work tends to rate all aspects of it as good or all aspects as poor (Cook et al. 1993). These two dimensions of performance show little correlation when measured objectively but exhibit high correlation when measured subjectively. Another contributing factor is when supervisors evaluate their subordinates.measures such as being fired or quitting (Sanders.. they also rely on other factors such as pleasant disposition. cooperativeness. Global measures of work performance and personality measures often correlate poorly (Cook et al. and helpfulness. Several researchers have stressed that other factors such as occupational socialisation. 64 . beside the worker’s productivity (Hunter and Schmidt. work performance comprises “will-do” and “can-do” components where the former are best predicted by personality measures (Barrick. Mount and Strauss. work stress. 2003). A contributing factor for the poor correlation between personality and work performance is the “halo” effect.. To ensure a full representation of work performance.

Subjective self-performance appraisal is the performance rating conducted by the ratee. This system of self-assessment of work performance is emerging as a popular trend in performance appraisal although it has not yet gained wide acceptance because of the general unfavourable research findings that individuals generally rate themselves higher than others do. Some studies of self-assessment also showed that self-ratings do not correlate with counter-position ratings and more halo (less differentiation). The strong standing taken by Campbell and Lee (1988) with regards to the limited usefulness of self-ratings as an evaluation tool has elicited doubts on its use in the performance appraisal process. The effect of leniency associated with it raises concerns about its legitimacy. Questions of response bias arise when self-ratings are used (Inderrieden, Allen and Keaveny, 2004). Lester and Kickul (2001) highlighted the concerns of the presence of common method variance. Participants are giving the survey responses to both the outcome measures as well as the psychological contract items. It is likely that these participants may exhibit a social desirability bias when assessing their behavior. This may have a confounding effect on the correlations found between the constructs. However, other researches produced conflicting findings which indicated that the two forms of ratings demonstrated significant correlation and self-ratings are significantly lower than counter position ratings (Nhundu, 1992). Self-rating has one distinctive advantage on the study of work performance and personality as they are less subject to “halo” but more “lenient” than other measures of performance (Cook et al., 2000). Respondents have no obvious reason to “fake good” since the assessment does not have any career implications.

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Self-rating may be skewed towards the favourable end of each dimension. This may restrict the range of responses and thereby reduces correlations with the personality dimensions. This research uses self-ratings rather than ratings by superiors. Although few studies have used self-ratings, they have become popular in more recent research as it has been validated against other work performance measures (Cook et al., 2000). Difficulties such as selfenhancement, reliability and objectivity may be an issue; several studies have shown that such self-evaluation measures are more valid than originally perceived (Carmelli and Freund, 2004). Although self-evaluation may have a bias of general method variance and be susceptible to percept-percept inflation than others, the adoption of usable and validated measures can reduce method variance (Carmelli and Freund, 2004). A study showed correlations of 0.4-0.5 between objective measures of clerical ability and self-ratings while another reported a correlation of 0.5 for self assessment with measures of leadership (Cook et al., 2000). To ensure a relatively good representation of work performance, the Role-Based Performance Scale (RBPS) by Wilbourne, Johnson and Erez (1998) based on self-appraisal is adopted. The RBPS has five variables or components consisting of job, innovator, career, team, and organisation.

2.8.1.

Prediction of Performance by the FFM Personality Measure

There has been a revival of interest in the prediction of work performance using personality measures due to the emergence of the FFM (Barrick and Mount, 1993). Numerous studies

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have validated the FFM in predicting work performance and its cross-cultural generalisability (Burke and Witt, 2004). In general, many studies indicate that Conscientiousness, one of the dimensions of the FFM, is a valid predictor for all job-related criteria and occupational groups (Barrick and Mount, 1993; Barrick et al., 2002; Crant, 1995; Sanders, 2003; Salgado, 1997; Vinchur et al., 1998; Hurtz and Donovan, 2000). Conscientious people are reliable, hardworking, self-disciplined, determined, achievement oriented (Barrick et al. 2002); dependable, persistent, responsible (Barrick and Mount, 1993); and also motivated in goal-directed behavior (Crant, 1995). Over the past few decades, many studies have shown that personality can be fairly represented by the FFM and that the FFM is an effective predictor of work performance (Salgado, 1997; Stewart, 1999; Tett and Burnett, 2003). Hurtz and Donovan (2000) showed that Conscientiousness is stable and generalisable across criteria and occupations and has a moderate influence on performance. Other factors of the FFM have also been shown to predict work performance. Judge, Martocchio and Thoresen (1997) found that conscientious and introverted employees are less likely to be absent or play truant. Hogan and Holland (2003) found that the measures of Emotional Stability are good predictors of occupational performance while Tett and Burnett (2003) revealed that personality measures predict work performance satisfactorily and is situationally specific. This view is further supported by the body of FFM research revealing the existence of a personality-work performance relationship but other factors such as job requirements, personality interactions and aspects of the occupational environment may influence the relationship’s nature and strength (Kieffer et al., 2004). As the FFM reveals the existence of a personality-work performance

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2. people’s high expectations guide their actions to produce high performance (Lau and Shaffer. McCelland identified traits for “need for achievement” and it is this satisfaction of achievement that facilitates high performance (Arnold. have moderating effects on the relationship between personality and performance.relationship in other countries but not done in Malaysia. Beadles II and Krilowicz (2004) revealed that the need for achievement and creativity. Nikolaou (2003) and Lowery et al. 1999). In Bandura’s view. Furthermore.. High performers perceive that events as determined by themselves while low performers perceive events as controlled by chance. which are facets of the complexity dimension based on Vancouver and Scherbaum (2000) and KoltkoRivera (2004). low impulsivity and self-regulation. (2002) and Lowery. The second research question is whether the CASES measure of personality is able to predict work performance. Prediction of Performance by the CASES Personality Measure It is inevitable that researchers will attempt to examine the relationship between the FFM and other personality measures/models. which are facets of self-actualisation.8. Behavior is a function of expectancy of actions which will lead to certain reinforcement. the research question posed is “Does the FFM predict work performance?” 2. Since the CASES model measure contains the dimension of complexity which has facets of volition. and the dimension of self-actualisation which has facets of self 68 . 1988). are predictors of work performance. (2004) postulated that cognitive ability and volition. Studies by Barrick et al.

As personality traits can be conceptually and empirically related without being redundant. and hard working (Costa and McCrae. realisation of one’s potential. persistent. deliberation. low confidence/self esteem. dependable. need for achievement. the research postulates that the CASES model will predict work performance. order. 1992) whilst Neuroticism comprises fearful. planful. persistent. The facets of positive mental health and self -esteem in the self-actualisation dimension and low impulsivity in the complexity dimension of the CASES are inversely related to the Neuroticism dimension of the FFM. and realisation of one’s potential in the self-actualisation dimension and the facets of selfregulation and volition in the complexity dimension of the CASES are related to the facets of achievement-striving. deliberation. 1997). Barrick and Mount (1991) posited that Conscientiousness is associated with volition variables such as persevering and conforming which is similar to the complexity dimension of the CASES. as shown in Table 4. internalisation. Furthermore.. and hostility (Judge et al. creativity. the facets of need for achievement. The Relationships between FFM and CASES The third research question considers how the CASES measure of personality compares with the FFM with respect to predicting work performance. reliable. responsible. and planfulness of the Conscientiousness dimension in the FFM. impulsivity. passion. there are good reasons to believe that the Complexity and Self-actualisation 69 .8. self-discipline. depressed. not resilient. Similarly. passion. Conscientiousness in the FFM comprises competence. determined. anxious.3. and self esteem. positive mental health. determined. achievement-striving.fulfilment. dutiful. 2.

this assumption will be tested and raised in the third research question.dimensions of the CASES are related to the Conscientiousness and Neuroticism dimensions of the FFM. Dimensions of the FFM Conscientiousness Neuroticism i) Reliable ii) Self discipline iii) Deliberation iv) Planful v) Dependable vi) Order vii) Dutiful viii) Perseverance i) Responsible ii) Hardworking iii) Determined iv) Achievement striving i) Fearful ii) Anxious iii) Depressed i) Low confidence ii) Low self-esteem i) Impulsivity Dimensions of CASES Complexity Self-Actualisation i) Self-regulation ii) Volition (persevering. conforming) Realisation of one’s potential ii) Passion iii) Need for achievement i) Positive mental health i) i) Low impulsivity Self-esteem i) Table 4: The Possible Associations of Conscientiousness and Neuroticism of the FFM with Complexity and Self-Actualisation of the CASES This does not necessarily imply that the CASES model includes the Neuroticism or Conscientiousness. However. “What is the relationship between the CASES model and the FFM model?” 70 .

Hypotheses The first research question is addressed by the first hypothesis.2.4. The third research question is addressed by the third hypothesis.8. H3: The CASES and the FFM models will each explain a significant proportion of unique variance when used concurrently to predict performance. H1: The FFM will predict a significant proportion of variance in performance ratings. 71 . The second research question is addressed by the second hypothesis. H2: The CASES will predict a significant proportion of variance in performance ratings.

and on the social-cognitive construct of “IfThen” was used to explain why some individuals are more predictable than others. INTRODUCTION The previous chapter analysed and reviewed the relevant literature on personality theories with respect to predicting work performance. CHAPTER THREE – RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 3. which postulates that behavior is motivated by needs. 3. they do not account for the variations in behavior due to environmental factors and the complexity of an individual. are discussed before proceeding to the research method adopted and the administration and development of the data collection processes. RESEARCH PARADIGMS The structure. A new personality measure with five dimensions based on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. and process of social science are linked to assumptions about ontology. positivism and phenomenology.3. which give rise to various theoretical perspectives or paradigms ranging from phenomenology to positivism. 1980). human nature and epistemology (Morgan and Smircich. The two broad social science perspectives or paradigms of research. It highlighted the shortcomings of various existing personality measures. specifically. This chapter covers the selected research methodology and design that will be used to obtain data to examine the research questions.1.2. 72 . direction.0.

2001). According to phenomenology. positivism views reality as a concrete structure and is objective whereby human beings are rational responders (Morgan and Smircich. 1980). relationships and the precise nature of laws among the phenomena measured. Positivism also provides an objective form of knowledge which specifies the regularities. On the other end of the continuum. Its basic epistemological stance is to obtain information on how individuals interpret the world. The possible shortcomings of this approach would be the apparent loss of richness of concepts due to the mechanisation of variables and concepts. From this point of view. 73 . the knowledge of the social world would imply a need to map out and understand the social structure. causal relationships and predictions. and work performance. this study adopts a positivistic paradigm with a hypothetico-deductive approach. Positivism emphasises empirical facts. 1980). giving rise to positivism which emphasises the empirical analysis of relationships (Morgan and Smircich. The view that the social world is a concrete structure taken by objectivists encourages an epistemological approach that stresses the significance of studying the relationships among those elements forming that structure. humans are transcendental beings and are not restricted by external laws. personality. As this research seeks to explain the relationships between need-induced behavior.Phenomenology views reality as a projection of human imagination. This approach uses a statement of a hypothesis and conclusions may be drawn from it via the analysis of quantitative data (Baker.

The quantitative methods. people always respond to the situation in a lawful manner. 1996). Assessment tools are developed with the aim of facilitating the optimal utilisation and development of human capital where measures of individual differences are the most common criteria of interest.3. It is a structure comprising of a network of finite relationships between constituent parts. The aim of such research is to assess human variations in factors (e. Although human perception or cognition may influence the process. The psychology of individual differences has a number of empirically established foundations on which a more scientific foundation may be built for a better understanding of human behavior (Lubinski. Stimuli from the environment condition them to respond to events in determinate and predictable ways. and abilities) that have real-world significance.3. Reality can be found in the relationships between these components and concrete behavior. which are principally drawn from natural sciences. Causal relationships link all aspects of behavior to the specific context. Lubinski. personality. By manipulating data with various sophisticated quantitative tools. Morgan. vocational preferences.g. the social world can be “frozen” into structured immobility and the role of human beings is reduced to 74 . 1980. with surveys as the main research method (Morgan and Smircich. Human beings are assumed to be products of external forces in the environment. 1996). 1999.. are appropriate to capture a view of the social world or reality as a concrete structure. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Most research in the social science disciplines is conducted using quantitative methodologies. Gliner and Harmon.

Purpose of the Study Studies can be descriptive. various studies. a quantitative methodology has the ability to provide an objective view of the various external factors. the time horizon and the unit of analysis (Cavana et al. the extent of researcher interference.elements which are subject to deterministic sets of forces. the types of investigation. 3.4. adheres to strict rules and uses statistics extensively. Any generalisation is inductive which comprises nomothetic statements.4. promotes value-free inquiry. as mentioned in the previous chapter. exploratory. Based on these grounds.. these activities often interact or occur at the same time. 3. Hence. RESEARCH DESIGN Research design involving a series of logical decision-making steps basically comprises the purpose of the study (descriptive. From the framing of the research questions and hypotheses. a quantitative methodology is adopted and provides the framework for the research design. exploratory.1. the nature of the study depends on how far the knowledge on the research subject has advanced. An 75 . This quantitative methodology based on the positivist paradigm is objective. case study or hypothesis testing). 2001). have used this approach effectively. case study or hypothesis testing. Moreover. Although the processes in research design are depicted in distinct sequential activities.

. 2004). The case study method involves a systematic gathering of in-depth information on an organisation or entity. Morgan et al. critical and revelatory are met (O’Cass. information and variables on the topic to enable the formulation of hypotheses as articulated in Chapter 2.. industry or individual perspective such as age. 2001).. 2001). It is generally qualitative in nature and used as a managerial decision-making tool (Cavana et al. 1999). educational level. 2001. or race. 76 . It provides an enhanced understanding of the various relationships between variables as well as establishing their causalities (Cavana et al. 1999). Such an undertaking is appropriate when the three criteria of uniqueness. Gliner and Harmon. Descriptive studies are carried out to ascertain and describe the characteristics of the variables studied but no associations or comparisons are made as only one variable is considered at a time (Morgan. Hypothesis testing is employed in studies that seek to establish the independence of various factors in a situation or the differences among groups or to explain the nature of relationships. This study uses hypothesis testing as there is extensive knowledge. The purpose of descriptive studies is to describe aspects of the situation from an organisational. Such studies are appropriate to obtain an initial grasp of the phenomena of interest (Cavana et al.exploratory study is carried out when little or no information is known about the subject. gender.

A causal relationship occurs when one variable or concept causes a change in another whereas a correlational relationship only indicates that two variables or concepts are associated.3. as adopted for this research. Type of Investigation There are three approaches of investigation: clarification. Quantitative research methodology.. Research Method When the purpose of the study and the type of investigation has been determined. A causal study delineates the cause of one or more problems whereas a correlational study delineates the variables or concepts that are associated with the problem. Exploratory and descriptive studies using qualitative methods follow this approach as it allows the researcher to be flexible in exploring the issues being studied. Experimental research involves the manipulation of one or more variables in order to study the effects of such manipulations on the subjects 77 . 2001).4. Clarification investigation is used to gain a better understanding of the phenomena or concepts under investigation.4. consists of two distinct collection methods.2. 3. experimental and non-experimental. correlational and causal. the next step is to decide on the type of research method that will be used. that is. With a better understanding of the concepts. This can be done with a correlational or causal approach. Quantitative methods may be used to give a more definite answer.3. the next stage is to determine the relationships between the variables or concepts. The investigation carried out in this study is a correlational study as the interest is to delineate the variables which are associated with the problem (Cavana et al.

case study. and the work performance of individuals. Is case-specific. Similarly. which rules out case study. Table 5: Four Categories of Non-experimental Techniques (Grace. Hence. As shown in Table 5. Survey Research Goal is to collect information about the same variables or characteristics from a number of cases where the end result is a data matrix or a structured or rectangular set of data. Answers How and Why? Archival Research Who. How Much and How Many? Case Study Research Research investigates a particular situation or problem. How Much and How Many? How and Why? Who. Non-experimental research does not involve the manipulation of variables or assigning subjects to groups and requires minimal interference from the researcher. it is not possible to manipulate these variables or assign participants to groups. nor is it 78 . archival. Since the research questions posted for this study are on behavior. Where. this study is not case-specific. Where. Using data that were collected for a purpose other than the problem at hand. What. there are four broad categories of non-experimental techniques: observational. and survey. What. the non-experimental research is considered the more appropriate approach to adopt in this study. 1999) It is clear that observational research is not appropriate as some of the variables are not observable. Method Observational Research Description Observation of subjects in their own environment or researcher participating in naturally occurring groups and recording observations. 1999). personality.under study and is generally applied to answer the questions of why and how (Grace.

For a causal study. The adoption of nil or minimal interference for this study is supported by Gill and Johnson (2002) who postulated that analytical studies require precision and the control of extraneous variables can be handled via statistical techniques.4. 2001). such studies have considerable interference with the normal or natural settings. This study does not require interference as the objective is to collect data on the personality of individuals and their work performance.4. An excessive interference occurs especially in a causal study whereby an artificial setting is created and manipulated in a laboratory environment. moderate to excessive. 3. There is minimal interference in an exploratory or descriptive study conducted in an organisation. Hence. Researcher’s Interference There are varying degrees of interference in research ranging from minimal. Hence. the survey method is the most appropriate method for data collection in this study because of its ability to address the research questions as well as its efficiency and practicality.suitable for archival research as there are new personality variables to be measured. 79 . manipulation of the variables may be done to study the effects of such manipulation on the dependent variables. The extent of interference by the researcher in the flow of work in the workplace has an important bearing on the research decisions. This approach facilitates the external validation and generalisability of the findings within similar environments (Baker.

2001). Hence. In a non-contrived setting.4. Exploratory or descriptive studies usually fall under this category whereas rigorous causal studies are often undertaken in contrived settings.5. the research is conducted whereby the work proceeds normally in the natural environment. This research will be conducted via a survey with minimal researcher interference in a natural environment as the variables under investigation are the personality dimensions of individuals and their perceptions of their own work performance within their 80 . it is more important to capture the variables or concepts in the study than to establish the cause and effect relationships (Saunders. Exploratory or descriptive studies carried out in organisations are known as field studies. may reduce the external validity due to “reactivity” (Baker. Remenyi et al. 1997). A laboratory experiment is one with a contrived setting and considerable interference by the researcher (Cavana et al. Correlational or causal studies which use environmental settings where the employees usually function are known as field experiments. External and internal validities are competing aspects. Efforts to strengthen internal validity will diminish external validity and vice-versa (Cavana et al. 2001).. Study Setting The setting of the study can be either contrived or non-contrived. 2001). A contrived environment. Lewis and Thornhill.3. however. (1998) postulated that the level of control is least relevant for research methods using surveys. Furthermore. there are tradeoffs between internal and external validities. Control imposed on a study gives it better internal validity as the extraneous variables are removed or controlled in order to facilitate investigation of the variables of interest..

Time Horizons This research adopts a cross-sectional study instead of a longitudinal study as it will take a snapshot of the situation under study (Remenyi et al. internal. groups. Moreover. Unit of Analysis The research objective determines the unit of analysis.6. the data collected will be the 81 .4. or cultures. which can be individual. and external validities and plausible explanations of the variances of the independent and dependent variables (Remenyi et al. As this research is on the measurement of personality dimensions of individuals and their work performance. 1998). organisations..normal work environments. 3. Hence.. variables which are reliable. 3.4. 1998).7. valid and unambiguous will be included after proper screening by subject matter experts (SME) to ensure content. This method is appropriate as the objective of this research is to examine whether a new personality measure will provide incremental validity over and above that of the FFM in the prediction of work performance. beliefs and perceptions. dyads. Lindell and Whitney (2001) postulated that most behavioral studies are cross-sectional as such studies focus on individual’s attitudes. the passage of time is inconsequential. To control for extraneous and irrelevant factors.

The personal interview method is not used on topics of personality and work performance as these topics lie in the positivism paradigm (Morgan and Smircich. or computer interviews.. 3. the unit of analysis is at the individual level. 3.1. effort. Together with the inherent costs as well as the time constraints of this research. these data can be obtained by using one or a combination of methods that include personal.5. 82 . The personal interview method provides an excellent response rate but can be costly in terms of finance. The merits of these methods are shown in Table 6. 2001). Hence. SURVEY RESEARCH The survey research consists of several steps as listed below. 1980). and time. Selection of Survey Method As survey research has been selected as the appropriate method for collecting data. and their perceptions of their behaviors and work performance (Cavana et al. telephone.5. and also has the problem of the interviewer’s influence on the interviewee’s responses. this method is considered inappropriate for this study. mail.individuals’ demographics.

Salgado. Nikolaou. the mail survey is considered the most appropriate method for this study. 2002. Mail survey is commonly used in studies of personality and work performance (Robertson et. it is cost effective and allows specific respondents in various organisations to be targeted. Hence. these two interview methods are also considered to be inappropriate for this study. 2003.. 1999) Computer and telephone interviews offer expedient and low-cost options but they are not appropriate for reaching the targeted potential respondents in the organisations.. Although mail survey does not provide a good response rate.. Kieffer et al. 2000. al.Criterion Ability to handle complex questionnaire Ability to collect large amount of data Accuracy of sensitive questions Control of interviewer effects Degree of sample control Time required Probable response rate Cost Mail Poor Fair Good Excellent Fair Fair Fair Good Telephone Good Good Good Fair Excellent Excellent Fair Good Personal Excellent Excellent Fair Poor Fair Good Fair Fair Computer Good Good Good Excellent Fair Good Fair Fair Table 6: Merits of the Four Survey Methods (Grace. 2004). 2003. 83 . Hence. Barrick et al.

Copies of the FFM measure (Goldberg.. Johnson and Erez (1998) were obtained and used in this study.1.2.3. From public opinion surveys to laboratory experiments. Marsella et al. researchers depend on the answers that participants provide in order to learn about the behavior. 1999) and the self-rated work performance measure (RBPS) by Welbourne. 3. 1999. Scales The measures of personality and performance are nebulous and do not lend themselves to precise measurements due to their subjective nature.2. this study uses this method whilst recognising factors and processes that affect self-reports to improve the questionnaire design and data quality (Schwarz. 3. where minor changes in question format. Although self-reports can be a fallible source of data. Self Report Self-report is a primary source of data in social science research.2.5.2. context or wording can cause major changes in the results. and thoughts of participants. Personality and Work Performance Measures Several studies on personality measures and work performance that can be used for this study were identified and the respective authors were contacted for copies of their measures. feelings. The reduction of such abstract concepts 84 .5.5. 2000).3.2. Selection of Measurement Techniques 3.5.

2001). 2004). Neither Inaccurate nor Accurate or Very Inaccurate as the most representative of his/her perceived personality or behavior in terms of direction. the scale adopted is a five-point Likert scale as a seven-point scale or higher can burden respondents with distinctions that are too fine and that do not have significant impact on the overall results (Grace. The work performance measure is categorised from Needs Much Improvement to Excellent with Satisfactory as a neutral response. Hence. The strength or confidence of the measurement is assessed as the distance away from the neutral response (Maurer and Pierce. In using a Likert scale. For this study. Cavana et al. a respondent selects a response category ranging from Very Accurate. 1998). 1998). Likert scales typically have five or seven graduated categories to select from and are anchored with descriptive phases representing the minimum and maximum responses possible (Flynn. 1999. and enable the computation of the means and variances of the measured variables.. A popular interval scale is the Likert scale which is often used to measure psychometric properties such as personality and performance (Maurer and Pierce. A response on the disagree side is equivalent to a no response and the response on the agree side is equivalent to a yes response. Such measures use an interval scale as interval scales are able to group respondents into categories. 2001). strength and confidence. tap the order of such groups. all the measures use a five-point Likert scale 85 . van Schaik and van Wersch.to some form of tangible measurements in a continuum is often used for such measures and is an appropriate choice especially for hypothesis testing (Cavana et al..

Hunthausen et al. administration and cost effectiveness. have alpha values larger than 0. This measure is regarded as the best measure developed to date and is used for this study (Crant.4 to 0. 2003). Egocentric and Socio-centric with each dimension having 10 items. Correlations of 0. Key Variables (i) The independent variables (a) The Big Five The 50 items for the FFM (Goldberg. 1995. Self-appraisals or self ratings have significant validation against other work performance measures. Conscientiousness. CASES. (b) The new personality measure (CASES) The new personality measure. Actualisation. Agreeableness and Neuroticism.79 for all five dimensions.5 are obtained from self ratings of 86 .4.2.because of the above merits as well as its ease of construction. contains five personality dimensions of Complexity.. 1999) measuring Openness to Experience. 3. Safety.5. Extraversion. (ii) The dependent variable The dependent variable is the self-appraised work performance of the respondents.

job-related employee performance measure.. 2000). “halo-effect” tends to obscure the differentiated relationship between the criteria of personality and work performance. al. 87 . The five components of the RBPS are job. with each having 4 items as shown in Table 7.. which is also known as the Role-Based Performance Scale (RBPS). Furthermore. innovator. the self-evaluation work performance measure of Wilbourne et al.clerical ability and measures of leadership (Cook et. Self-rating or selfappraisal also has a substantial advantage in the study of work performance and personality as they are less affected by the “halo-effect” as compared to other measures. team. and organisation. is developed based on identity theory and role theory in contrast to the traditional. In view of the stance taken by the Ethics Committee in favour of maintaining confidentiality and anonymity of respondents. (1998) is used. career. This self-appraisal performance measure.

iv. Table 7: Role-Based Performance Scale’s Items (Wilbourne et al. iii. Quantity of work output Quality of work output Accuracy of work Customer service provided (internal and external) Obtaining personal career goals Developing skills needed for my future career Making progress in my career Seeking out career opportunities (b) My career (obtaining the necessary skills to progress in the company) i. ii. (c) Innovator (creativity and innovation in my job and the organisation as a whole) i. ii. 1998) 88 . iv. Coming with new ideas Working to implement new ideas Finding improved ways to do things Creating better processes and routines Working as part of a team or work group Seeking information from others in my work group Making sure my work group succeeds Responding to the needs of others in my group Doing things that help others when it’s not part of my job Working for the overall good of the company Doing things to promote the company Helping so that the company is a good place to be (d) Team (working with co-workers and team members toward success of the firm) i. iii. ii. iv. ii. iv. iv. ii..(a) My Job (doing things specifically related to my job description) i. (e) Organisation (going above the call of duty in my concern for the firm) i. iii. iii. iii.

Selection of Survey Layout The physical layout of the questionnaire is important as it has influence in inducing potential respondents to participate earnestly and facilitates its administration.3. (iii) The twenty items of the RBPS by Welbourne et al. To minimise error. Q81. Egocentric and Socio-centric) are placed in the same sequence to reduce the influence of the content of the adjacent similar items in the interpretation of a question by the respondents (Schwarz. (iv) Demographic and other classification questions to address over-inflated selfadministrated job performance appraisal are placed at the end of the survey because of their personal nature (Grace. (1998) are placed from Q101 to Q120. questions and quality of reproduction are addressed. The sequence of the instructions. the items are placed in Q51. 1999) are placed from Q1 to Q50 in the same order as per the author’s design. Q86. Q76. 89 . the written instructions are screened for clarity in instructional content and presentation. Q56. 2002). Q61. The four other dimensions with 10 items each (Actualisation. (ii) The second set of 50 items of the new instrument (CASES) is placed as Q51 to Q100.3. Q71.. For the first personality dimension of Complexity (with 10 items).5. Q66. The questions are sequenced in the following manner: (i) The 50 items for the FFM (Goldberg. Q91 and Q96. Safety. 1999).

A total of 40 organisations will be invited to take part in this research by means of personal contact with the president or senior managers of the companies concerned. a nonprobability sampling method such as convenience sampling can be used. convenience sampling is adopted for this study. When time is tight or the probability of selecting elements of the population is unknown and generalisability is not essential or critical. transportation. Selection of Sample and Sample Size Sampling is a process whereby a representative number of elements of the population are selected and through the analysis of the characteristics of the sample subjects. Probability sampling is appropriate when statistical generalisation is required. a generalisation of these characteristics can be made to the population elements (Cavana et al. 3.5.4. 2001). trading and 90 . The elements in the population under study also must have some known probability of being selected as sample. For the above reasons. Richard and Kubany. clarity and specificity for its particular dimension (Haynes. Every element or item is judged on its representativeness... relevance. it will not be carried out due to the study’s time constraints. The wordings of several items were changed to reflect the meaning in the local Malaysian context. legal. The full questionnaire will be given to the two supervisors of this study for their comments and review for face and content validity as the next best alternative (Cavana et al. 1995). 2001). shipping. These firms are in general manufacturing.Although pilot testing is recommended for the items to ensure content validity.

business consulting. Kudisch and Fortunato. 91 . Besides being white-collared staff. Sawin and Carsud. the respondents are also required to fulfil several other essential criteria as follow: (i) Proficient in the English language to ensure that the respondents are able to understand and answer the questionnaires properly. Since English is a second language to many Malaysians. Each company will be given 40 questionnaires or more depending on the size of the organisation and will be requested to distribute the questionnaires to all or part of their white-collar staff. 2002). (ii) Must have been working in the current position for at least one year as personality characteristics show no or little relationship with performance at the initial period of work but significant correlations are found after the probationary or honeymoon period with the job has ended (Helmreich. The researcher hopes to get approval from 50% of the 40 companies and to receive on average 25 successful respondents from each of these companies thereby providing a total sample size of 500. 1986). These companies represent a convenient sample and they are invited because their offices are in the Klang Valley. it would need at least 500 responses (that is. white-collar employees are chosen as they are more likely to be literate in English. As the measures of the FFM and CASES have 50 items each. at least 10:1 subject to items as suggested by Nunnally (1978)) to provide sufficient rigour and statistical reliability in the principal components analysis (Avis.

1. mean.5. The measures for the FFM. Central Tendency and Dispersion The range. variance. 3. Selection of analytical approach Data analysis is performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 13.3.5.3.5.5. standard deviation. range. means. 2001). The frequency distributions of the nominal and demographic variables. 3.5. 2001)..5.5. the measurement of internal consistency.2. and variance for each variable will be computed in SPSS. and RBPS will be analysed to determine their structure.5. The principal-component factor will be varimaxrotated as the dimensions are assumed to be uncorrelated 3. CASES. Reliability Reliability concerns the extent to which a measure is repeatable and consistent (Baker. Cronbach’s alpha. standard deviation and correlation matrix of all the variables will be generated for initial examinations. is one reliability 92 . Principal Components Analysis Principal components analysis will be used to check that the structure of the measures has held true (Cavana et al.

http://0ipip.newcastle. there is no psychometric rationale in using them. 93 . Hunsley and Meyer (2003) stressed that if personality inventories do not produce an increment in validity over other inventories that are obtainable freely in the public domain in the World-Wide-Web (e.5. An alpha coefficient of 0. predictive and postdictive validity.4.au:80). 1978). 2003). Validity Construct validity is the degree to which the assessment instrument measures the proposed construct (Borsboom.7 or more is considered satisfactory (Nunnally.edu.library. Concurrent validity refers to the degree to which a test scores correlates with another test score that is obtained from another source. CASES and RBPS measures will be analysed to ascertain their internal reliabilities. convergent and discriminant validity. Content validity gives evidence on the construct validity of an instrument (Haynes. 2004). Mellenbergh and van Heerden. Construct validity subsumes all validities including concurrent. criterion-related validity.org. Incremental validity essentially means whether a measure adds to the prediction of a criterion above what can be predicted by other variables (Hunsley and Meyer.g.ori. All the predictor variables of the Big Five Factor Inventory. 3.5. 1995).. and factor structure.coefficient that indicates how well items in a cluster correlate positively with one another. Richard and Kubany.

the two measures of personality will be entered simultaneously in a stepwise regression analysis.5.5. 3.5.6. 3. known to the researcher. The findings from the descriptive statistics. The respondents are asked to complete two sets of personality measures and a set of self-appraisal work performance measure.The research design is one of a criterion-related validity and incremental validity (Nikolaou.1.5. are selected for the survey with an average of 40 questionnaires given to each organisation and are targeted 94 . Cost and Time Estimates Some 40 companies from various industries.5. 2003).6. the correlation matrix. Implementation The last stage of the survey research is the implementation stage which consists of time/ cost estimates and data collection/administration. 3. Hypothesis Testing To test the criterion and incremental validities of the new personality measure (CASES) over and above the FFM on work performance. and the stepwise multiple linear regression results will be used to test the hypotheses.

at white-collared workers from supervisory level upwards. The total time estimated for the survey is 35 days as shown in Table 9. A draft letter approving the staff in the organisation to participate is also provided for the companies to complete under their official letter head. The questionnaires will be given to the Human Resource Department to be distributed to all the white collar staff and instructed to collect them in the selfaddressed envelope a week after distribution. Industry 1) Manufacturing 2) Service Total No of companies 27 13 40 Table 8: The Breakdown of Companies to be Surveyed Based on Industry (developed for this study) A wide spectrum of organisations in terms of industry and size is used to attain the required minimum sample size of 500 respondents. The industry breakdown and the number of companies to be surveyed are shown in Table 9. Each organisation will be given the Information Sheet and the Consent Seeking Letter. 95 .

00 Travelling expenses RM20 per trip for 80 RM1600.04 RM256.00 Table 10: Breakdown of Costs on Survey (developed for this research) Item 3.86 per questionnaire based on the breakdown as shown in Table 10.70 RM1120. Printing and collating of questionnaires 2.00 of 2 pages (double-sided) 2 envelopes and RM0.00 trips Total RM2976. Checking for completeness of answers Total Estimated Times (Days) 5 15 10 5 35 Table 9: Total Time Estimated for the Survey (developed for this research) The cost of the survey is estimated at RM1. Collecting answered questionnaires from organisations 4.30 stamp 1600*RM0. which has limitations such as low response rate and the inability of respondents to seek clarification if necessary. Distributing questionnaires to organisations 3.6. Data Collection The survey adopts a self-administered approach.2. Costing and Amount Computation Printing the questionnaire (1600 sets 1600*4*RM0.5. The 96 .Activity 1.

97 .3.5. The items measuring the variables are grouped together to ensure no mistake is made due to omission or wrong inclusion. the scores will be recoded through a Recode program in the SPSS. Hence. Data Entry The data will be entered into SPSS and analysed.researcher will inform the organisations that he will be available in the organisation’s premises at the scheduled time if the need for clarification is required. the survey is partially personally-administered but self-completed and mail-returned to minimise the effects of low response rates and lack of clarity while maintaining confidentiality and anonymity. Incomplete questionnaires will not be considered in the analysis but efforts will be made to ensure the completeness of the questionnaires by conducting briefings in the organisations if permission is granted. 3.6.6.4. 3. Categorising For negatively worded questions.5.

RESEARCH PLAN The research plan is based on the timeline provided by the University of Newcastle for this Doctor of Business Administration (DBA). The research plan is based on completing the five chapters within the six-month time frame. It is estimated that the dissertation can be completed within the time frame based on an average of some three hours of work per day on weekdays and some six hours of work per day on weekends subject to obtaining clearance from the Ethic Committee within the timeframe allowed. no demeaning questions will be asked and respondents are not subjected to mental or physical stress in answering the questionnaire as they are given sufficient time on their own to complete the questionnaire. 98 .6. Participants can withdraw at anytime during the research without any obligation or disadvantage. Anonymity and confidentiality of the answers are ensured as the questionnaires do not have any identifiers. Finally. 3. self-addressed envelopes are provided so the respondents can choose to participate or not.7. Stamped.3. ETHICAL CONSIDERATION It is explicitly stated that participation is voluntary.

it could be likely that some respondents may try to “beat the test” due to self-deception or impression management. several studies revealed that the distortions by these response deceptions do not attenuate the predictive validity of the personality constructs (Barrick and Mount. 1988).3. item endorsements are not self-reports but self-presentations (Hogan et al.1. 3. 1996).2.8.8. one-time measure could lead to erroneous conclusions about the 99 . In that case. This may produce a general method variance (Carmeli and Freund. It is widely acknowledged that the self-report a person gives about his/her own personality traits and behavior are related to his/her perception of the acceptability and the desirability of these traits and behaviors (Kagan.. Personality Scales Personality scales are often described as self-report measures but could be misleading as respondents may use the item responses to tell who they are and the way they would like to be seen. Stability of Work Performance Due to the implicit assumption that performance is a stable construct and the reliance on a cross-sectional.8. 3. However. 2004). 3.3. 1996).8. LIMITATIONS Response Distortions Given the seemingly straightforward nature of the items.

Hence. it will not be possible to correct or adjust the correlations for the restricted range. Self-ratings are known to be more “lenient” than other forms of work performance measures. A rudimentary level of work performance is required for the employees to retain employment in a specific position.4. This will restrict the range and reduce the correlations with the personality measures. Conversely. Bozionelos.. 2000. Thus. 100 . it is possible that some employees are removed from the positions due to their inadequate work performance. This self rating is also subject to the common method variance or the percept-percept inflation problem (Cook et al. Self Rating One limitation is the use of self-ratings and its validity and reliability as an indicator of work performance. The requirement to maintain the anonymity of respondents restricted our ability to match the supervisors with the subordinates. Since there is no way of estimating what the variance should be. These factors may restrict the range of dependent variables and produce attenuated correlations. all information comes from the subordinate. The ratings would be markedly skewed towards the positive end of each item.personality-performance relationships (Thoresen et al. 2004). 2004a).8. it is possible that some employees who could have been in the higher end of the work performance are promoted to other positions outside the parameters of the study. 3..

3. CONCLUSION Attempts to predict work performance using personality measures have been practised in organisational research for decades. There are limitations in this research that may not permit statements of causality. Further studies will need to be conducted to establish the boundary conditions and generalisability of the findings of this study.e.5.9.. Convenience sampling is adopted. These factors have a direct or a moderating influence on work performance. Hence. Barrick et al. ability. Work Performance Studies have found linkages between work performance and job satisfaction. Cook et al. as well as the content and construct validities of the measures. Nikolaou. Also. 2004. the adoption of convenience sampling in this study reduces the generalisability of the findings obtained from this study.. Various relevant statistical tools are used to calculate inter-item consistency (i. 2002).3. 101 . motivation level.8. a positivist paradigm with a survey instrument via a questionnaire is developed to capture observable behaviors that reflect the dimensions of the variables or constructs. 2002.. 2000. role clarity and intelligence (Carmelli and Freund. There is an ample body of knowledge on this subject to derive some theoretical framework for hypothesis testing. internal reliability).

544 were usable. 19. 45. and the remaining 107 (i. 31. 54.e.3%) were diploma holders. Of the 544 respondents. The results of the analyses which were conducted to test the hypotheses are presented in the third section. The second section contains the results of principal components analyses. 170 (i.4. which were used to verify the structures of the various scales. INTRODUCTION This chapter contains four sections.2.. A total of 587 questionnaires were returned (a response rate of 36. 4.0.e. 246 (i.2%) of the respondents were degree-holders.8%) were female. 102 . 49.7%) and. DEMOGRAPHICS A total of 1600 questionnaires were distributed to 40 Malaysian companies of various sizes who were invited to participate in this study.5% rate of participation. The fourth section contains a summary of the main findings. CHAPTER FOUR – DATA ANALYSIS 4.2%) were male and 298 (i.. a 97.e.1.e.. of these. The number of companies that responded was 39.5%) were school certificate holders..e. A total of 267 (i. The descriptive statistics of the demographic variables are presented in the first section..

d... 37. 25.d. Principal Components Analysis of the FFM Personality Measure A principal components analysis with Varimax rotation (with suppressed loading less than .7) while the average number of years that respondents were in their current jobs was 5.. This analysis yielded five orthogonal factors that 103 .1) and the minimum age and maximum age of the respondents were 19 years and 65 years respectively. The recommended cut-off value of . Anderson.2.50) was conducted on the FFM. Tatham.1.e.29 (s.0 years (s.50 or larger on their respective components were eliminated from the solution. RESULTS FROM PRINCIPAL COMPONENTS ANALYSIS Principal Components Analysis with Varimax Rotation was used to examine the structure of the scales.8%) of the respondents were from non-executive or clerical levels while 198 (i. 4.2. = 9. 36. and Black (1998) was used because of the large number of items being analysed.e. = 5.5%) were from lower management or executive levels. The average organisational tenure of the respondents was 7.2).A total of 140 (i. 4.d. Items that did not achieve a primary loading of .8%) respondents were from middle or senior management levels.e. = 6. The remaining 205 (i.6 years (s.50 by Hair. The average age of the respondents was 34. An examination of the skewness and kurtosis statistics as well as the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic was conducted to examine the distributions of the variables.

54 Table 11: Rotated Component Matrix of FFM 104 .54 .61 . Agreeableness and Neuroticism subscales.4% of the variance.71 .74 .60 .62 .59 .65 .accounted for 47.66 .72 .55 .63 . The findings from this analysis are presented in Table 11.67 .60 .50 loading criterion.54 .70 .64 . Using the . Component 1 2 3 4 5 Openness5 Openness8 Openness4 Openness2 Openness6 Conscientious1 Conscientious8 Conscientious7 Conscientious3 Conscientious6 Extraversion7 Extraversion9 Extraversion4 Extraversion2 Agreeableness4 Agreeableness5 Agreeableness9 Agreeableness7 Neuroticism7 Neuroticism1 Neuroticism6 Neuroticism8 .64 .68 .67 .57 . five items were eliminated from each of the Openness and Conscientiousness sub-scales while six items were eliminated from each of the Extraversion.

and 64 respectively.01 level.The Bartlett test of sphericity was significant (p < .01 level. Agreeableness was negatively correlated with Neuroticism at the 0.05 level.. 1997. Openness was positively correlated with Extraversion and Neuroticism at the 0.01 level whilst it was negatively correlated with Conscientiousness and Agreeableness at the 0. Conscientiousness was positively correlated with Extraversion and Agreeableness but negatively correlated with Neuroticism at the 0. . All the components therefore have acceptable internal reliability.59.001) and the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy was greater than the acceptable level of 0.6 is acceptable. Hence. Conscientiousness. The intercorrelations resembled those that have been reported previously. factorability was assumed. The FFM components are distinct but related and “are no more wholly independent than they are redundant” (Judge et al. (1998).01 level. Extraversion. .63. Agreeableness and Neuroticism components were . According to Hair et al. The Cronbach’s alphas for the remaining items in the Openness. 105 . The items that were retained after the principal components analysis are shown in Table 12.60. 8). . a Cronbach’s alpha of .57.73. Extraversion was positively correlated with Agreeableness and Neuroticism at the 0. p.

Big 5 Dimensions Items Openness 2 Openness 4 Openness 5 Openness 6 Openness 8 I am not interested in theoretical discussions I do not enjoy going to art museums I am not interested in abstract ideas I avoid philosophical discussions I do not like art Conscientious 1 Conscientious 3 Conscientious 6 Conscientious 7 Conscientious 8 I am always prepared I pay attention to details I get chores done right away I carry out my plans I make plans and stick to them Extraversion 2 Extraversion 4 Extraversion 7 Extraversion 9 I have little to say I keep a low profile I don’t like to draw attention to myself I don’t talk a lot Agreeableness 4 Agreeableness 5 Agreeableness 7 Agreeableness 9 I believe that others have good intentions I respect others I accept people as they are I make people feel at ease Neuroticism 1 Neuroticism 6 Neuroticism 7 Neuroticism 8 I often feel unhappy I am often depressed I have frequent mood swings I panic easily Table 12: Items of FFM after Principal Components Analysis 106 .

Actualisation. This analysis yielded five orthogonal components that accounted for 57.50) was conducted on the CASES items.51 .79 .4.68 . six items were eliminated from each of the Complexity. Safety.63 .67 .54 . Component Complexity7 Complexity2 Complexity4 Complexity5 Actualisation7 Actualisation2 Actualisation5 Actualisation4 Safety5 Safety3 Safety9 Safety6 Ego8 Ego6 Ego2 Ego1 Social7 Social10 Social6 Social9 1 .56 .68 .72 . The results from this analysis are presented in Table 13.63 .2.61 2 3 4 5 .69 .77 . Principal Components Analysis of the CASES Personality Measure A principal components analysis with Varimax rotation (with suppressed loading less than .61 Table 13: Rotated Component Matrix of CASES 107 .74 .68 .62 .65 .50 loading criterion.0% of the variance.2.55 . Ego and Social sub-scales.68 . Using the .

factorability was assumed. Safety. which had marginal internal reliability. and . Hence.48. The Cronbach’s alphas for the remaining items in the Complexity.74 respectively. .60. all of the CASES sub-scales had acceptable internal reliability. 108 . The items of the sub-scales are shown in Table 14. Ego and Social components were 73. .The Bartlett test of sphericity was significant (p < .001) and the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy was greater than the acceptable level of 0.81. Actualisation.64. With the exception of the Ego sub-scale. .

This analysis yielded five orthogonal components that accounted for 80.50 109 . Principal Components Analysis of RBPS Performance Measure A principal components analysis with Varimax rotation (with suppressed loading less than . Based on the .CASES Dimension Complexity2 Complexity4 Complexity5 Complexity7 Actualisation2 Actualisation4 Actualisation5 Actualisation7 Safety3 Safety5 Safety6 Safety9 Ego1 Ego2 Ego6 Ego8 Social6 Social7 Social9 Social10 Item I am good at interpreting things I can spot opportunities a and make use of them I am good at overcoming obstacles to get what I want I am good at persuading others to support me I love to seek experiences in life I find great satisfaction in doing a good job I seek knowledge and skills to improve myself I work towards improving my quality of life I like to do things following the proper channels I am law-abiding I believe in doing things step by step I do not fight with authority I need security I like living in style I can be easily hurt I like to celebrate in a grand manner I like to assist my friends in time of needs I like to visit my friends I enjoy working in groups I greet my friends with open arms Table 14: Items of CASES after Principal Components Analysis 4.2.0% of the variance.3.50) was conducted on the RBPS measure of performance.

Team component and Organisation component of the RBPS were . Career component.63 .85 . factorability was assumed. Hence.79 Table 15: Rotated Component Matrix of RBPS The Bartlett test of sphericity was significant (p < . Innovator component.85 .loading criterion.78 .76 . only one item was eliminated and this was from the organisation component of the RBPS.001) and the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy was greater than the acceptable level of 0.73 .80 .81 .91.89. . and 110 .81 .77 . The Cronbach’s alphas for the Job component.56 2 3 4 5 .84 .90. .73 . .76 .84 . Component Job1 Job2 Job3 Job4 Career3 Career2 Career4 Career1 Innovator2 Innovator3 Innovator1 Innovator4 Team2 Team1 Team3 Team4 Organisation3 Organisation4 Organisation2 1 .90.76 .60.75 .75 . The results of this analysis are presented in Table 15.

The Relationship between the FFM Dimensions and the CASES Dimensions As shown in Table 16.01 level (one-tailed).2. Agreeableness and Extraversion but negatively correlated with Openness and Neuroticism. The Safety component was not correlated with Openness. The Safety component of CASES was positively correlated with Conscientiousness. Agreeableness and Extraversion but negatively correlated with Neuroticism. 4. The Ego component was not correlated with Openness or Extraversion. The Complexity component was not correlated with Extraversion. Agreeableness. 111 . and Conscientiousness. All of the components of the RBPS were correlated with each other at the 0. the Complexity component of CASES was correlated positively with Conscientiousness and Agreeableness but negatively correlated with Openness and Neuroticism.. The Ego component of CASES was positively correlated with Neuroticism. The five performance sub-scales therefore had acceptable internal reliability.4. The Actualisation component of CASES was positively correlated with Conscientiousness.93 respectively.

The Social component of CASES was correlated positively with Conscientiousness, Agreeableness and Extraversion but was correlated negatively with Openness. The Social component was not correlated with Neuroticism.

112

Conscientiousness Openness Neuroticism Agreeableness Extraversion Actualisation Social Complexity Safety Ego -.10* -.22** .48** .15** .56** .38** .58** .51** .08*

Openness

Neuroticism

Agreeableness

Extraversion

Actualisation

Social

Complexity

Safety

.18** -.09* .29** -.21** -.26** -.10** -.01 .03 -.13** 19** -.16** -.04 -.27** -.17** .30** .22** .59** .50** .33** .46** .14** .12** .08* -.07 .26** -.02 .59** .51** .49** .18** .31** .43** .23** .34** .12** .12**

** Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (1 – tailed). * Correlation is significant at the 0.05 level (1 – tailed).

Table 16: Correlations between the Components of FFM and CASES

113

4.3.

RESULTS FROM TESTING OF THE HYPOTHESES

The findings from the hypothesis testing are presented in the same order as were the research questions/hypotheses in Chapter 2. The assumptions of normality and the absence of outliers and singularity underpinning the use of regression were verified by statistical tables and histogram plots of the respective components. The various components of the FFM, CASES and RBPS were found to satisfy the conditions for regression.

4.3.1.

Prediction of Performance by the FFM Personality Measure

H1: The FFM will predict a significant proportion of variance in performance ratings. The components of the FFM were moderately correlated (the values of the correlation among the five factors are less than .30) with each other at the 0.01 level (one-tailed) except for one correlation of .48. The correlation coefficients did not exceed .70, which indicated that multicollinearity was not a problem (Carmelli and Freund, 2004; Nunnally, 1978). From Table 17, Conscientiousness, Agreeableness and Neuroticism were significantly correlated to all five components of the RBPS and Total RBPS. Openness and Extraversion were negatively correlated with the Team and Career components of the RBPS respectively.

114

46** .42** -.17** Innovator RBPS Team RBPS Organisation RBPS Total RBPS Conscientiousness Openness Neuroticism Agreeablenes s 1 .06 ** Correlation is significant at the 0.20** Career RBPS 1 .74** .01 level (1 – tailed).09* -.87** .35** -.80** .55** .19** 1 .29** 0.70** .13** .82** .53** .82** .03 1 .18** -. * Correlation is significant at the 0.05 level (1 – tailed).63** .0 -.22** Extraversion -.05 -.01 -.50** .79** .64** .13** .08* -.48** . Table 17: Correlations of the Components of FFM and RBPS 115 .22** 1 .02 1 .32** .28** .10** -.33** -.62** .02 -.32** .29** .32** -.Job RBPS Career RBPS Innovator RBPS Team RBPS Organisation RBPS Total RBPS Conscientiousness Openness Neuroticism Agreeableness .30** -.21** .07 -.05 -.03 1 -.25** .54** .32** .22** .41** -.29** 1 -.09* .15** 1 .

238 -6.000 .537 .041 -.246 t 8.Using a stepwise regression analysis.051 . The R-square value was .000 a.469 .445 9.000 . The R-square value was . Error Beta 1. a Coefficients Model 1 (Constant) Conscientous 2 (Constant) Conscientous Neurotic Unstandardized Standardized Coefficients Coefficients B Std. The regression revealed that Conscientiousness and Neuroticism were the only significant predictors of the Job component of the RBPS and had beta values of .539 .502 10.390 .010 10.36 and -.229 .051 .20 respectively (Table 19).23. Dependent Variable: Perform2Job Table 18: Coefficients of the Regression of the Job Component of RBPS on FFM Using a stepwise regression analysis.000 . . The regression revealed that Conscientiousness and Neuroticism were the only significant predictors of the Career component of the RBPS and had beta values of .259 .25 respectively (Table 18). the Job component of the RBPS was regressed on the five components of the FFM.358 -.192 .000 .25 and -.411 2.353 Sig. the Career component of the RBPS was regressed on the five components of the FFM. 116 .12.

045 9. a Coefficients Model 1 (Constant) Conscientous 2 (Constant) Conscientous Neurotic Unstandardized Standardized Coefficients Coefficients B Std.271 .000 .422 .034 -5. Dependent Variable: Perform2Car Table 19: Coefficients of the Regression of the Career Component of RBPS on FFM Using a stepwise regression analysis.285 -.000 a.224 . .456 .16.049 5. Dependent Variable: Perform2In Table 20: Coefficients of the Regression of the Innovator Component of RBPS on FFM 117 .389 .500 7.216 t 7.000 .055 .000 .055 .044 -. The regression revealed that Conscientiousness and Neuroticism were the only significant predictors of the Innovator component of the RBPS and had beta values of .337 Sig.249 .246 -. Error Beta 1.767 7.436 .200 t 7. the Innovator component of the RBPS was regressed on the five components of the FFM.29 and -.453 .000 .965 -4.359 .048 -.993 8. .290 2.237 .000 .683 .655 .188 9.000 .060 .22 respectively (Table 20).000 . Error Beta 1.858 Sig. The R-square value was .235 .000 .332 2.207 .060 .a Coefficients Model 1 (Constant) Conscientous 2 (Constant) Conscientous Neurotic Unstandardized Standardized Coefficients Coefficients B Std.000 a.

242 . The R-square value was .256 .001 a.000 . the Organisation component of the RBPS was regressed on the five components of the FFM.056 .324 1.058 .000 .000 .335 7. Agreeableness and Neuroticism were the only significant predictors of the Team component of the RBPS and had beta values of .936 4.Using a stepwise regression analysis. Error Beta 2. the Team component of the RBPS was regressed on the five components of the FFM.164 4.498 -3.058 .000 .050 .290 4.16.20 respectively (Table 22).197 . 118 .035 .000 .20.040 -.000 . .942 4.405 Sig. Dependent Variable: Perform2Tm Table 21: Coefficients of the Regression of the Team Component of RBPS on FFM Using a stepwise regression analysis.187 .207 2.20 and -.122 .225 .25 and .541 7.138 t 11. a Coefficients Model 1 (Constant) Conscientous 2 (Constant) Conscientous Agree 3 (Constant) Conscientous Agree Neurotic Unstandardized Standardized Coefficients Coefficients B Std.259 . The regression revealed that Conscientiousness.000 .277 .400 .575 .14 respectively (Table 21).137 .056 .203 -. The R-square value was .15.000 .220 . The regression revealed that Conscientiousness and Agreeableness were the only significant predictors of the Organisation component of the RBPS and had beta values of .983 7. .264 .

744 .218 . Error Beta 1.000 .000 .068 .000 .163 .474 -5.000 . . The R-square value was .000 .415 .207 .140 .a Coefficients Model 1 (Constant) Conscientous 2 (Constant) Conscientous Agree Unstandardized Standardized Coefficients Coefficients B Std. a Coefficients Model 1 2 3 (Constant) Conscientous (Constant) Conscientous Neurotic (Constant) Conscientous Neurotic Agree Unstandardized Coefficients B Std.297 .035 .000 .348 .044 -.000 . Dependent Variable: Perform2Total Table 23: Coefficients of the Regression of Total RBPS on FFM 119 .186 .464 .222 .049 -.811 Sig.108 . Dependent Variable: Perform2Org Table 22: Coefficients of the Regression of the Organisation Component of RBPS on FFM Using a stepwise regression analysis.23.058 . Neuroticism and Agreeableness were the only significant predictors of Total RBPS and had beta values of .692 10.198 t 7.065 .044 2. Total RBPS was regressed on the five components of the FFM.283 7.413 . .256 .035 2.504 .335 2.373 9.348 1.031 9.103 -5.188 .210 .12 respectively (Table 23).000 a.000 .196 .121 t 10.324 5.005 a.366 .724 .910 8.595 4.253 . Error 1.000 .370 -.385 Sig.312 -. The regression revealed that Conscientiousness.064 .31.648 4.21 and .000 .630 12. -.050 Standardized Coefficients Beta .000 .000 .364 .

Neuroticism was a significant predictor of the Job component. The Complexity.70.23. The R-square values ranged from . Innovator component. the CASES components were positively intercorrelated. Agreeableness was a significant predictor of Team component. and Total RBPS.12 to . like the FFM components. and Total RBPS. From Table 24.3. Actualisation and Safety components of the CASES correlated significantly with all five components of the RBPS as well as with Total RBPS. which indicated that multicollinearity was not a problem (Carmelli and Freund. The Ego component correlated significantly with only the Job and Organisation components of the 120 . are no more wholly independent than they are redundant. The CASES components are distinct but related and. Prediction of Performance by the CASES Personality Measure H2: The CASES will predict a significant proportion of variance in performance ratings. Nunnally. is supported. Team component. 2004.2. which states that the FFM will predict a significant proportion of variance in performance ratings. Furthermore.Conscientiousness was the best predictor of all of the RBPS components and the Total RBPS. The correlation coefficients did not exceed the value of . Hence. Career component. the first hypothesis. each component of the RBPS as well as Total RBPS had a significant proportion of variance explained by the FFM components. 1978). 4. Organisation component.

121 .RBPS. except for the Career component. and with Total RBPS. The Social component correlated significantly with all of the RBPS components.

53** .10* .55** .64** .12** .19** .01 .12** Ego -.40** .01 level (1 – tailed).49** .51** .23** .46** .36** .31** .62** .37** .34** .82** .07 .32** Career RBPS .74** .25** .34** .37** .40** .11** .28** .43** .45** .59** .79** .Job RBPS Career RBPS Innovator RBPS Team RBPS Organisation RBPS Total RBPS Actualisation Social Complexity Safety .31** .36** .27** .50** .63** .0 -.34** .18** . * Correlation is significant at the 0.14** .46** .24** .05 level (1 – tailed).07 .01 ** Correlation is significant at the 0.08* -0.39** .82** .20** Innovator RBPS Team RBPS Organisation RBPS Total RBPS Actualisatio n Social Complexit y Safet y .37** . Table 24: Correlations of the Components of CASES and RBPS 122 .87** .70** .54** .38** .80** .

397 . a Coefficients Model 1 (Constant) Complex 2 (Constant) Complex Safety 3 (Constant) Complex Safety Ego Unstandardized Coefficients B Std. 123 .429 . Dependent Variable: Perform2Job Table 25: Coefficients of the Regression of the Job Component of RBPS on CASES Using a stepwise regression analysis.234 7.413 . the Career component of the RBPS was regressed on the five components of CASES.149 t 9.051 .394 5.050 1.000 .000 .238 .169 .000 .15. The R-square value was .000 a. The regression revealed that Complexity.215 .050 1.540 .862 Sig.22.499 .991 4. The R-square value was . .128 .15 respectively (Table 25).179 .000 .38 (Table 26).341 . .264 .217 -.22 and -.809 10.328 .044 Standardized Coefficients Beta .994 6.470 8.000 . The regression revealed that Complexity was the only significant predictor of the Career component of the RBPS and had a beta value of .205 .249 .000 . Safety and Ego were the only significant predictors of the Job component of the RBPS and had beta values of .350 -3.Using a stepwise regression analysis. Error 1.052 . the Job component of the RBPS was regressed on the five components of CASES.057 5.000 .049 -.000 .34.755 .

481 Sig.544 .000 .239 .000 a.201 . the Innovator component of the RBPS was regressed on the five components of CASES.101 t 6.127 .822 11. Error 1.000 .10 respectively (Table 27). a Coefficients Model 1 (Constant) Complex 2 (Constant) Complex Safety Unstandardized Standardized Coefficients Coefficients B Std.000 . Error Beta 1.415 .000 .358 .531 . Dependent Variable: Perform2In Table 27: Coefficients of the Regression of the Innovator Component of RBPS on CASES 124 .530 Sig.a Coefficients Model 1 (Constant) Complex Unstandardized Coefficients B Std. Dependent Variable: Perform2Car Table 26: Coefficients of the Regression of the Career Component of RBPS on CASES Using a stepwise regression analysis. The regression revealed that Complexity and Safety were the only significant predictors of the Innovator component of the RBPS and had beta values of .917 .000 .42 and .051 .050 .056 Standardized Coefficients Beta .686 4.013 a.182 .222 . The R-square value was .125 10. .449 .053 .21. .218 2.589 .379 t 6.765 9.

23.172 .202 1.202 .010 . The regression revealed that Actualisation. .298 .127 4. The R-square value was .049 .000 a.000 . the Team component of the RBPS was regressed on the five components of CASES. Complexity and Social were the only significant predictors of the Team component of the RBPS and had beta values of .351 . . a Coefficients Model 1 (Constant) Safety 2 (Constant) Safety Complex 3 (Constant) Safety Complex Social Unstandardized Standardized Coefficients Coefficients B Std. Safety.196 .020 4.17 and .929 4.049 .000 .000 .17 and . 125 .654 6.000 . The R-square value was . .203 .261 .17 respectively (Table 29).000 .657 7.371 .912 4.000 .12.170 .217 .22.000 .26 and .Using a stepwise regression analysis.000 .325 .053 Sig. Complexity and Social were the only significant predictors of the Organisation component of the RBPS and had beta values of . Dependent Variable: Perform2Tm Table 28: Coefficients of the Regression of the Team Component of RBPS on CASES Using a stepwise regression analysis.048 . The regression revealed that Safety.050 .449 .174 t 11.393 1.086 9. Error Beta 1.240 .17 respectively (Table 28).045 .908 .047 . the Organisation component of the RBPS was regressed on the five components of CASES.19.958 6.

767 .233 .199 . The regression revealed that Complexity and Safety were the only significant predictors of Total RBPS and had beta values of .293 .060 .263 . Dependent Variable: Perform2Org Table 29: Coefficients of the Regression of the Organisation Component of RBPS on CASES Using a stepwise regression analysis.056 .062 .166 .116 .281 .908 3.000 .235 .389 .000 .161 4.000 .001 a.217 .296 1.060 .076 .180 3.063 Standardized Coefficients Beta .002 .315 .120 2.a Coefficients Model 1 (Constant) Actualise 2 (Constant) Actualise Safety 3 (Constant) Actualise Safety Complex 4 (Constant) Actualise Safety Complex Social Unstandardized Coefficients B Std.069 .230 .291 .553 .166 t 5.183 5.26.063 .493 .262 .495 Sig.062 .186 .238 .24 respectively (Table 30).314 9.250 .880 3.274 .250 .911 4.220 .000 .000 . 126 .704 1.000 .258 .057 .262 . Error 1.167 .101 4.38 and .000 . Total RBPS was regressed on the five components of CASES.067 6.000 . The R-square value was .000 .391 . .782 3.031 .059 .164 .

and Total RBPS. Actualisation and Safety were the best predictors of the Organisation component and Team component of the RBPS respectively.000 .084 .26.000 .459 1. the Innovator component. Ego was a significant predictor for only the Job component of the RBPS.406 . which states that the CASES model will predict a significant proportion of variance in performance ratings. the Innovator component.239 t 11.247 . Safety was also a significant predictor of the Job component.032 6. the Organisation component. The R-square values ranged from .042 . Error Beta 1.493 . each component of the RBPS as well as Total RBPS had a significant proportion of variance explained by the CASES components.041 .587 12. Furthermore. and Total RBPS.709 .000 .171 9. Dependent Variable: Perform2Total Table 30: Coefficients of the Regression of Total RBPS on CASES Complexity was the best predictor of the Job component.098 Sig.644 6.147 .a Coefficients Model 1 (Constant) Complex 2 (Constant) Complex Safety Unstandardized Standardized Coefficients Coefficients B Std. the second hypothesis. 127 .176 .15 to .000 . Hence. is supported.041 . .000 a. the Career component.378 . Social was a significant predictor for the Team and Organisation components of the RBPS.

20.3. From Table 31.1. Safety. These two factors were from the FFM. and Social -. Conscientiousness explained 16.3. from the CASES. FFM and CASES predicting the Job Component of the RBPS Using a stepwise regression analysis. and Social were the only significant predictors.9% followed by Neuroticism with 5. 4. Neuroticism -.8%.11.22.20.2% of the variance of the Job component of the RBPS. Neuroticism. FFM and CASES predicting performance H3: The CASES and FFM models will each explain a significant proportion of unique variance when used concurrently to predict performance.3. Safety . Complexity. the Job component of the RBPS was regressed on the five components of the FFM and the five components of the CASES. accounted for 4.3. the beta values are: Conscientiousness . Safety and Social. 128 . The regression revealed that Conscientiousness. The factors of Complexity. Complexity .15.4.

000 .537 .000 .3. The regression revealed that Complexity and Neuroticism were the only significant predictors.052 .041 -.297 3.486 4.010 a.a Coefficients Model 1 (Constant) Conscientous 2 (Constant) Conscientous Neurotic 3 (Constant) Conscientous Neurotic Complex 4 (Constant) Conscientous Neurotic Complex Safety 5 (Constant) Conscientous Neurotic Complex Safety Social Unstandardized Standardized Coefficients Coefficients B Std.390 .148 -.233 .041 -.000 .264 .229 .185 .000 .502 10.001 .114 1.000 .000 .263 . .358 -.271 .238 -6.000 .211 .199 .254 -. 129 .411 2.287 . Dependent Variable: Perform2Job Table 31: Coefficients of the Regression of the Job Component of RBPS on FFM and CASES 4.648 6.060 .131 .228 .066 .058 .191 1.051 .302 -2.469 .000 .545 -5.010 10.041 -.3.055 .2.008 .259 .000 .058 .445 9.200 .000 .200 -.065 .058 .881 .051 -.333 .139 .109 t 8.428 4.000 .000 .946 5.248 .041 -.192 .374 -5.947 4.000 .969 .000 .715 .539 .180 .217 .000 .002 2. FFM and CASES Predicting the Career Component of the RBPS Using a stepwise regression analysis.000 .241 .353 7.051 .246 1.176 4.251 .210 .578 4. the Career component of the RBPS was regressed on the five components of the FFM and the five components of the CASES.219 -.581 Sig.113 6.221 . Error Beta 1.026 -5.000 .

208 -3.017 .379 .3.4% followed by Neuroticism from the FFM. Neuroticism and Safety were the only significant predictors. the beta values are: Complexity . the beta value of the Complexity was .996 Sig.4% of the variance. Complexity and Safety were from the CASES while Neuroticism was from the FFM. Neuroticism -.1% followed by Neuroticism (2.38.34 and for Neuroticism it was -.16.048 Standardized Coefficients Beta .531 .530 7.827 8. From Table 33.16.258 .7%) and Safety accounted for 0.09.000 . the Innovator component of the RBPS was regressed on the five components of the FFM and the five components of CASES. The Complexity component explained 20. explained 14.3.201 .469 . Error 1. and Social .000 a.The Complexity component from the CASES model. which explained 2. 130 .191 .358 . The regression revealed that Complexity.163 Model 1 2 (Constant) Complex (Constant) Complex Neurotic t 6.000 .000 . Dependent Variable: Perform2Car Table 32: Coefficients of the Regression of the Career Component of RBPS on the FFM and CASES 4. FFM and CASES Predicting the Innovator Component of RBPS Using a stepwise regression analysis.335 -.765 9. .3.056 2.057 -. Coefficients a Unstandardized Coefficients B Std.6% of the variance in the Innovator component of the RBPS. From Table 32.000 .

109 .272 5.3. The regression revealed that Safety.287 3 (Constant 1.043 -.000 .033 Table 33: Coefficients of the Regression of the Innovator Component of RBPS on FFM and CASES 4.793 Complex . the Team component of the RBPS was regressed on the five components of the FFM and the five components of CASES.000 . Complexity and Social factors were from CASES while Neuroticism factor was from the FFM.185 . From Table 34.000 .376 9. FFM and CASES Predicting the Team Component of the RBPS Using a stepwise regression analysis.5% followed by Complexity (3.822 Complex .141 a.258 Neurotic -.000 . and Neuroticism accounted for 1. The Safety component explained 15.876 . Error Beta t 1 (Constant 1. Social and Neuroticism were the only significant predictors.177 .529 .043 -.161 -4.3% of the variance in the Team component of the RBPS.6%).573 .093 Safety . Social (2. Complexity. and Neuroticism -. Social .054 .686 2 (Constant 1.a Coefficients Unstandardized Standardized Coefficients Coefficients Model B Std.19. Complexity . 131 .051 .000 .182 6. Dependent Variable: Perform2In Sig.493 .000 .086 2.12.070 Complex .14.232 8.239 . .050 .3%).25.168 -4.3.052 . the beta values are: Safety .000 .142 Neurotic -.589 .4.403 10.449 11.000 . Safety.

301 4. The regression revealed that Actualisation.217 .003 a.657 7. Error 1.174 .393 .281 .351 .000 .000 .256 .325 .298 .000 .371 . 132 .002 Sig.048 1.049 . . followed by Safety (4.000 .3%.1%).425 .339 -3.19.053 5.119 Model 1 2 3 4 (Constant) Safety (Constant) Safety Complex (Constant) Safety Complex Social (Constant) Safety Complex Social Neurotic t 11.196 .246 .000 .3.000 .139 .654 6. the beta values are: Actualisation .165 . Safety.449 .203 .958 6.908 .039 Standardized Coefficients Beta .086 9.202 .210 .000 . All of these components were from the CASES.5.048 -.000 .17.000 . FFM and CASES Predicting the Organisation Component of the RBPS Using a stepwise regression analysis.929 4.020 4.Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients B Std.049 1.050 .912 4. and Social . Dependent Variable: Perform2Tm Table 34: Coefficients of the Regression of the Team Component of the RBPS on FFM and CASES 4.050 .12.17. Complexity .3.240 .118 . Actualisation explained 15.170 .202 . the Organisation component of the RBPS was regressed on the five components of the FFM and the five components of CASES. Safety .000 .261 .0%).567 5.001 .000 . and Social (1.674 3.050 .045 1. Complexity (2.127 4. From Table 35.172 .8%).000 .047 . none of the FFM components were significant.010 .186 -. Complexity and Social were the only significant predictors.

000 .001 a.262 .314 9.15.186 .164 .060 .063 Standardized Coefficients Beta . Complexity explained 21.161 4. Neuroticism -. Complexity and Safety were from the CASES and Neuroticism and Conscientiousness were from the FFM.002 .120 2.553 .059 .Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients B Std.180 3.000 . The regression revealed that Complexity.495 Sig.389 .000 .18. Safety .1%).28.060 . 133 .3%).281 .250 .880 3. Safety.1% followed by Safety (5. Error 1.167 .908 3.493 .238 .057 .062 . FFM and CASES Predicting Total RBPS Performance Using a stepwise regression analysis.263 .258 .101 4.166 Model 1 2 3 4 (Constant) Actualise (Constant) Actualise Safety (Constant) Actualise Safety Complex (Constant) Actualise Safety Complex Social t 5.076 . Total RBPS was regressed on the five components of the FFM and the five components of CASES.000 .000 .767 .067 6.296 1.3.031 .391 .220 . Neuroticism and Conscientiousness were the only significant predictors.217 .315 .3.166 .782 3.291 .069 . From Table 36.293 . Dependent Variable: Perform2Org Table 35: Coefficients of the Regression of the Organisation Component of RBPS on FFM and CASES 4.230 .13.000 .199 .704 1.6.235 .911 4.250 .274 . and Conscientiousness .116 .000 .000 .000 .062 . and Conscientiousness (0.056 . the beta values are: Complexity . . Neuroticism (2.262 .233 .183 5.063 .9%).

except for the Career component.562 5.126 Model 1 2 3 4 (Constant) Complex (Constant) Complex Safety (Constant) Complex Safety Neurotic (Constant) Complex Safety Neurotic Conscientous t 11.044 -.176 .000 .709 . Dependent Variable: Perform2Total Table 36: Coefficients of the Regression of Total RBPS on FFM and CASES The Complexity component of the CASES was revealed to be the best predictor of the Career component.186 .613 .000 .048 .040 -.000 .304 .000 .000 .042 . Team and Organisation components of the RBPS.000 .000 .142 .081 2.054 Standardized Coefficients Beta .644 6.000 . Safety component of the CASES was the best predictor of the Team component of the RBPS.034 1.176 6. the Innovator component.159 .472 . 134 .000 . . Complexity was also a significant predictor of the Team and Organisation components of the RBPS.232 .098 7.493 .043 .010 a.459 .138 . Social component of the CASES was a significant predictor of the Job.220 .283 .000 .041 1.271 -4. Error 1.598 Sig.378 .239 .180 -.Coefficients a Unstandardized Coefficients B Std.000 .147 .141 .034 .154 . Safety was also a significant predictor of all five components of the RBPS.522 8.692 6. Actualisation component of the CASES was the best predictor of the Organisation component of the RBPS.271 4. and Total RBPS.214 .225 -.587 12.000 .000 .406 .247 .791 -4.032 6.084 .041 1.365 .340 . and Total RBPS.171 9.

Agreeableness and Neuroticism components each have four items. and Total RBPS. except for the Organisation component. CONCLUSION The principal components analysis of the FFM yielded a five-component measure that accounted for 47. is supported. The original sub-scales had ten items 135 .57 to . Each component of the RBPS as well as Total RBPS had a significant proportion of variance explained by at least one of the components from the CASES and/or the FFM.e.73. The Openness and Conscientiousness components each have five items while the Extraversion. which states that the CASES and FFM models will each explain a significant proportion of unique variance when used concurrently to predict performance. The five factors are all intercorrelated significantly at the 0. Safety.4. The R-square values ranged from . the third hypothesis. Each of the components (i. Complexity.29. Neuroticism component of the FFM was a significant predictor of all the RBPS components.01 level (1-tailed). Hence. Actualisation..0% of the variance.Conscientiousness component of the FFM was the best predictor of the Job component and a significant predictor of Total RBPS. Ego and Social) has 4 items. The principal components analysis of the CASES yielded a five-component measure that accounted for 57. The original subscales had ten items each. The Cronbach’s alphas for the FFM components range from .4% of the variance in the FFM items.17 to . 4.

Career. the first hypothesis. The R-square values ranged from . Actualisation. All of the components retained their original 4items except for the Organisation component. Conscientiousness and Neuroticism of the FFM were significant predictors of the Job. which states that the FFM will predict a significant proportion of variance in performance ratings. Complexity.48 to . Each component of the RBPS had a significant proportion of its variance explained by the FFM components. Complexity and Social were significant predictors of the Organisation component of the RBPS.12 to . and Innovator components of the RBPS. The Cronbach’s alphas for these components ranged from . Conscientiousness. The principal components analysis of the RBPS yielded a five-component measure that accounted for 80.each. for which one item was removed. From the stepwise regression.0% of the variance. Complexity was the only significant predictor of the Career component of the RBPS. Complexity and Social were significant predictors of the Team component of the RBPS. Safety and Ego were significant predictors of the Job component of the RBPS.93.23. Safety. Conscientiousness and Agreeableness were significant predictors of the Organisation component of the RBPS.89 to . Safety. Hence. All five CASES components were intercorrelated significantly at the 0. The Cronbach’s alphas for the CASES components ranged from .81. is supported.01 level (1-tailed). Complexity and Safety were significant predictors of the Innovator component and Total RBPS. The R- 136 . From the stepwise regression. Agreeableness and Neuroticism were significant predictors of the Team component and Total RBPS.

Complexity and Safety of the CASES and Neuroticism and Conscientiousness of the FFM were significant predictors of Total RBPS. Safety and Social of the CASES were significant predictors of the Job component of the RBPS. Each component of the RBPS had a significant proportion of its variance explained by the CASES components. Complexity and Social of the CASES and Neuroticism of the FFM were significant predictors of the Team component of the RBPS. the third hypothesis. Hence.square values ranged from . Complexity and Safety of the CASES and Neuroticism of the FFM were significant predictors of the Innovator component of the RBPS. Safety.26. is supported. Complexity and Social of the CASES were significant predictors of the Organisation component of the RBPS. Each component of the RBPS. Safety. except for the Organisation component which was significantly predicted only by components of CASES.17 to . is essentially supported.29. Actualisation. From the stepwise regression. Conscientiousness and Neuroticism of the FFM and Complexity. The R-square values ranged from .14 to . which states that the CASES and FFM will predict a significant proportion of variance in performance ratings. 137 . Hence. Complexity of the CASES and Neuroticism of the FFM were significant predictors of the Career component of the RBPS. the second hypothesis. which states that the CASES will predict a significant proportion of variance in performance ratings. had a significant proportion of its variance explained by both the CASES and the FFM components.

and finally a conclusion.2. CHAPTER FIVE – CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS 5.1. and suggestions for future research.2.5. 5. The original 50-item FFM measure (Goldberg.1. which revealed a five-component solution consisting of Openness 138 . 1999) was analysed using principal components analysis.0. INTRODUCTION This final Chapter contains a discussion of the main findings from the study as well as a discussion of the theoretical and practical implications of the study. Main Findings for Research Question One Research Question One: Does the FFM model of personality predict work performance? The first research question was addressed by the first hypothesis: H1: The FFM will predict a significant proportion of variance in performance ratings. DISCUSSION OF THE MAIN FINDINGS 5. the limitations of the study.

g. a correlation coefficient of 0. Conscientiousness (e. imaginative and intellectual) was found to be negatively correlated to only the Team component of the RBPS with r = -.30. Barrick and Mount (1991) also argued that coefficients below .30 were questionable. Conscientiousness (5 items). hardworking.30 or greater was therefore considered as indicating a valid predictor of performance. For this research. Agreeableness (four items) and Neuroticism (four items). artistically sensitive. responsible. This finding is not surprising given that conscientious individuals are organised. achievement oriented. 1997). Of the five FFM components. (1984) argued that a correlation of 0. this factor was considered as an inadequate predictor of any of the RBPS components or of Total RBPS.20 was too low to accept personality as a predictor of work performance.20 was considered by Cohen (1988) as meaningful but Schmitt et al. All of these components were intercorrelated as revealed in past research which showed that they were distinct but related factors (Judge et al. A value of 0. The results of the stepwise regression analyses also did not reveal Openness as a significant predictor of any of the RBPS components.. The value of the correlation coefficient that can be considered to indicate a useful predictor has been debated over the years. In view of the cut-off value of 0.09.g. Openness (e. achievement oriented and persistent) had the highest correlations with all of the RBPS components and Total RBPS. dependable.(5 items)... This finding corroborates the finding of Hogan and Holland (2003). purposeful. 139 . responsible. Extraversion (four items).

This finding is consistent with the results of Avis et al.. that have been examined (e. (2002) who posited that the FFM dimensions were better at predicting overall performance measures than those with contextual aspects.. persistent. It makes sense that individuals who have tendencies to be careful.dependable. Extraversion (e. in all occupational groups.. the Conscientiousness component also predicted Total RBPS better than contextual work performance (i. Hence. hard working and thorough will perform better than those who do not have such tendencies. dependable. Conscientious individuals perform better because they set goals which help them to direct their effort and achieve challenging goals over a long period of time. and Sanders 2003)..g.09) with the Career component of the RBPS. and persistent (Barrick et al. From the stepwise regression analysis. the Conscientiousness construct does seem to be logically related to work performance. these results demonstrated that being dependable. Such low values of the correlation 140 . Salgado 1997.g. talkative. the Team and Organisation components of the RBPS). Hurtz and Donovan 2000..e. assertive and sociable) was found to be negatively correlated (r = -. Furthermore. Conscientiousness was found to be the best predictor of the components of the RBPS and of Total RBPS. Conscientiousness has been shown to be a significant predictor of all job-related criteria.e. high in Conscientiousness) were positively associated with work-related performance. From a theoretical perspective. 1993). Crant 1995. achievement-oriented and responsible (i. Barrick and Mount 1993.

Agreeableness was a significant predictor of all the RBPS components and of Total RBPS. Salgado (1997) revealed that Agreeableness was a valid predictor of work performance for skilled labourers. even though it is significant at the 0. trusting. The stepwise regressions revealed that Extraversion as a non-significant predictor of performance. Neuroticism was correlated significantly with the Job component of the RBPS and with Total RBPS. the Career component.05 level. the finding from this study also supported that Agreeableness was a valid predictor of certain aspects of work performance for skilled. and of Total RBPS. cooperative and forgiving (which were facets of Agreeableness) might be more cooperative and compliant and therefore would perform better in highly structured organisations where there was little ambiguity in their jobs (Barrick and Mount. 1993).2%) were from the managerial positions in highly structured jobs. are often disregarded (Barrick et al. Employees in these types of jobs who were courteous. professional and managerial staff. Hence. and managers. 1993). Since the majority of the respondents (404 or 74. and 141 .30 cut-off value for the correlation coefficient. Agreeableness can be a predictor of certain components of job performance for managerial staff in highly structured jobs. Neuroticism was a predictor of the Job component. Agreeableness was only a valid predictor of the Team and Organisation components of the RBPS. soft-hearted.coefficient. Using a 0. In line with the findings of the current study. Hogan and Holland (2003) reported that Extraversion was a poor predictor of performance and claimed that this was due to the Extraversion being too broad a construct. the Innovator component. In the stepwise regression analyses. professionals. the Team component.

agreeableness and neuroticism should predict performance (Hogan and Holland. Hurtz and Donovan (2000) postulated that Conscientiousness. then conscientiousness. was supported. the five components of RBPS have components of “getting along and getting ahead”. Agreeableness and Neuroticism could be considered as valid predictors of work performance in an absolute sense if 0.. individuals with high neuroticism would be likely to develop negative attitudes towards their work hence resulting in poor performance as they devote less time in their jobs (Bozionelos. 1993).. These findings supported Salgado’s (2003) argument that emotional stability (i. tendencies to experience negative emotions and pessimism. Furthermore. Neuroticism encompasses traits such as excessive worry. Hypothesis One.30 was adopted as the standard.e. which states that the FFM will predict a significant of variance of performance ratings. This finding was partially reinforced in this study. 2003). low Neuroticism) tend to be evaluated more positively than those who are panicky. calm and self-confident (i. Furthermore. organisations and countries. Barrick and Mount. the antithesis of Neuroticism) has generalised validity across occupation. criteria. employees who are resilient. Due to their tendency to construe their experiences in a negative light.Total RBPS. 2004a). 2002. Task performance corresponds to getting ahead while contextual performance corresponds to getting along. In the final analysis. If performance criteria are classified as getting ahead and getting along. 142 . Hence.e. low confidence. The emergence of Conscientiousness and Neuroticism as predictors of performance was not surprising as these two Big Five traits have consistently been found to be the most relevant predictors of work performance (Judge and Ilies.

Complexity correlated with the Job component of the RBPS as the facets of volition and self-regulation in Complexity were related with the facets of customer services in the Job component which required tactful interventions.2.. CASES) comprised five components (i.2.. The current study has provided a theoretical argument for the development of a personality measure based on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and the social cognitive theory of “If-Then”..46).e. Complexity.31 to . Actualisation.e. self-regulation or low impulsivity and volition) correlated with all of the components of the RBPS with coefficients ranging from . The Complexity component (e. The new personality measure (i.g. Safety. Main Findings for Research Question Two Research Question Two: Does the CASES model of personality predict work performance? The second research question was addressed by the second hypothesis: H2: The CASES model will predict a significant proportion of variance in performance ratings.5. Complexity correlated with the Career component of the RBPS as self-regulation and volition would enhance the attainment of career 143 .45 and had the highest correlation with Total RBPS (r = . Ego and Social). which were correlated positively to each other but to an extent that they could be considered as distinct but related components.

self-esteem and needs for achievement. Complexity had the highest correlation with Total RBPS arguably because high levels of Complexity enable one to control one’s motivation. The Actualisation component (e. passion. the Career component. action and thought. In support of this argument is the finding that high performers perceive events are determined by themselves while low performers perceive events as controlled by chance (Bandura. This aspect of performance can be linked to passion. growth and progress) was correlated with all of the RBPS components and with Total RBPS. which includes aspects of performance such as ensuring group success and seeking and responding to group’s needs. 1977a). Actualisation correlated with the Organisation component of the RBPS. Complexity correlated with the Team component of the RBPS as facets of persevering and conforming in volition would ensure harmonious team formation and group success.30 for the correlation coefficient. or the Innovator component of the RBPS. which includes doing things outside one’s job scope for the betterment of the company. self-esteem and the need for progress. Actualisation correlated with the Team component of the RBPS..g. all of which are arguably related to the need for growth. Complexity correlated with the Innovator component of the RBPS as low impulsivity would enable the creation of ideas and improvements to how one does one’s work. Complexity correlated with the Organisation component of the RBPS arguably because self-regulation and volition would promote the virtues of the organisation. Actualisation was also correlated with 144 . Actualisation cannot be considered a valid predictor for the Job component. Using a cut-off value of 0.opportunities and the advancement of one’s career.

At this level. From a theoretical perspective.g. the drive is to achieve a sense of fulfilment in balancing one’s work and life responsibilities (Stum. 2001). Team. which included facets of passion.30. Safety correlated with the Job component of the RBPS arguably because orderly and structured facets are antecedents of high quality and high quantity. Safety was correlated to the Organisation component of the RBPS arguably because the existence of a good system and structure in the company would provide a good environment to promote the company. passionate and creative would perform better than those who do not have these tendencies. This finding reaffirmed Arnold’s (1988) claim that Actualisation is a predictor of job performance. It is reasonable that individuals with tendencies to be achievement-oriented.6 years). security. achievement. and progress. The Safety component of CASES (e.Total RBPS. Safety correlated with Total 145 .. the need for growth. Using a cut-off value of . systematic. The stepwise regression analyses revealed that Actualisation was the best and only predictor of the Organisation component of the RBPS. The reason could be the age of the respondents (average age was 34. orderly and structured) correlated with all of the components of the RBPS and with Total RBPS. the Safety component is correlated with the Job. Safety correlated with the Team component of the RBPS arguably because the facets of the Safety component would provide a sense of security to achieve success. such that the respondents were perhaps too young to be highly motivated to realise their full potential. and Organisation components of the RBPS and with Total RBPS. the Actualisation construct does seem to be logically related to organisational citizenship and total performance.

. The Social component of CASES (e. This finding indicates that the Ego component is detrimental to facets of performance (e. predictor of the Job component of the RBPS. Innovator. structured and systematic are antecedents of productivity (Cook et al. Using the 0. and with Total RBPS.30 cut-off value. Social correlated only with the Team and Organisation components of the RBPS.. needs for love. The Ego component of CASES did not correlate significantly with any of the RBPS components or with Total RBPS arguably because its facets of good living and celebrating in style are not relevant to work performance. affiliation. except for the Innovator component. The stepwise regression analyses also revealed that Social was a significant predictor of the Team and Organisation components of the RBPS. is a useful predictor of the various components of the 146 .. Based on the preceding discussion of the main findings. and Total RBPS. these components of performance are related to facets of teamwork and organisational citizenship. but negatively related. quality and quantity of work) that constitute the job component of the RBPS. companionship and care) correlated significantly with all of the components of the RBPS.g. Safety was found to be a significant predictor of the Job. with the exception of the Ego component. the CASES model. 2000). In the stepwise regression analyses.g. The stepwise regression analyses also revealed that Ego was a significant.RBPS arguable because its facets of orderly. Team and Organisation components of the RBPS.

Main Findings for Research Question Three Research Question Three: Do the two models of personality contribute uniquely to the prediction of work performance? The third research question was addressed by the third hypothesis: H3: The CASES and FFM models will each explain a significant proportion of unique variance when used concurrently to predict performance. This finding is consistent with the findings of Barrick and Mount (1993) and Judge and Ilies (2002) that Conscientiousness and Neuroticism were valid predictors of all categories of work performance. Safety and Social components of CASES. both of which are components of the FFM. The stepwise regression showed that Conscientiousness and Neuroticism.2. This finding might be due to the fact that the Complexity component has facets which included volition (i. 5. was therefore supported. Hypothesis Two.e. were better predictors of the Job component of the RBPS as compared with the Complexity.. a component of the FFM. to conform and persevere) whereas the Neuroticism 147 . which states that CASES will predict a significant proportion of variance in performance ratings.RBPS and Total RBPS.3. The stepwise regression revealed that the Complexity component of the CASES was a better predictor of the Career component of the RBPS than Neuroticism.

Actualisation was the best predictor. Complexity was the best predictor followed by Safety. and orderly) that enhance facets of teamwork such as seeking information from others and working with others.g. Complexity. and Social components of the CASES and the Neuroticism component of the FFM were predictors of the Team component of the RBPS. which is the essence of the Organisation component of the RBPS. protection. The stepwise regression revealed that the Safety. Safety.component comprises facets such as fear and low confidence regarding career progress and development. both of which are aspects of Complexity. Complexity.g. Safety was the best predictor due probably to the fact that Safety includes aspects (e. and Social components of CASES were predictors of the Organisation component of the RBPS. Neuroticism and Conscientiousness. This was probably due to the fact that Actualisation includes facets (e. passion and realisation of one’s potential) that facilitate organisational citizenship. Complexity was the best predictor followed by Neuroticism and Safety. structured. The Innovator component addresses behaviors such as finding new ways to do one’s work and requires risk taking and confidence. Complexity includes self-regulation and volition and not surprisingly 148 . The stepwise regression showed that for the Innovator component of the RBPS. The stepwise regression revealed that the Actualisation. The stepwise regression revealed that the Complexity and Safety components of CASES and the Neuroticism and Conscientiousness components of the FFM were predictors of Total RBPS.

Hypothesis Three. 1997. the proposed CASES model. examining the link between personality and work performance appears to have profound implications for organisations. Implications on Professional Practice From the classical perspective.. These results provide evidence that there are specific aspects of personality that predict work-related performance over and above that provided by the FFM (Salgado. which states that the CASES and FFM models will each explain a significant proportion of unique variance when used concurrently to predict performance.. Based on the preceding discussion of the main findings. the various components of the CASES and the FFM are significant predictors of the various components of the RBPS and Total RBPS.was a better predictor than Neuroticism and Conscientiousness.3.3.1. 5. 1998. 2004). which is based on 149 . If researchers are able to affirm that certain personality traits are related significantly to work performance. Sackett et al. was therefore supported. IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS 5. From this point of view. individuals and human resources consultants. Kieffer et al. then people can learn how to modify their personality to improve their work performance and organisations can benefit by recruiting individuals with personality profiles that may render them as preferred employees.

recruiting and promoting personnel.Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and the social cognitive theory of “If-Then”. the CASES model is another useful tool for human resource personnel with respect to designing effective job specifications or roles. has important practical implications. based on personality traits. The knowledge that personality can influence or even be a determinant of work performance is valuable to recruiting agencies. 150 . The CASES model provides a means for individuals to assess their personality so as to develop appropriate strategies to improve their performance and hence their vocational endeavors (Lau and Shaffer. which is a wellestablished model of personality. and formulating effective human resources strategies in training. The results indicate that the CASES model of personality maybe a useful addition to the array of personality or individual difference measures that are used to predict various facets of work performance. organisations and individuals. the CASES model did account for significant variance in work performance over and above that accounted for by the FFM. 1999). The CASES model may also be useful for recruitment consultants in that it may help them to identify effective employees. For organisations. for their client organisations. Although the research methodology and design did not permit statements of causality.

Moreover. In recent years. The need for achievement is also dependent on the fit between environmental factors and personality. values. behavior. Furthermore. There is a lot of debate on whether the role of a person on work performance is sculptor or sculpture. and psychometric measures. Two research problems were therefore identified and these guided the current research. The level of job complexity may have a role in whether an interaction occurs between personality and ability when predicting work performance. it is not surprising other factors such as ability. These instruments have predominantly been developed in the Western countries and the question arises as to the generalisability of these instruments to Asian countries. there has been a proliferation of psychometric instruments that have been used as part of organisational development and recruitment processes. such as Malaysia. Implications on Theory The first Chapter provided an outline of this study in the context of motivation. 2004) 151 . cognition and satisfaction are correlated with work performance.2. Beadles II and Krilowicz.3. where English is a second language.5. personality. Hence. personality interacts with cognitive ability and appears to influence work performance (Lowery. many personality measures are based on single theories and therefore their usefulness for predicting performance in actual workplace settings needs to be examined.

public or private) would increase confidence in its validity and generalisability. the CASES model suggests that certain personality factors or traits have a greater effect on work performance because people can. small or medium or large organisations. there is no way of estimating 152 . However. it seems reasonable to conclude that the measures of personality and work performance were assessing separate constructs (Barrick et al. which brings into question the representativeness of the sample and therefore the generalisability of the findings. This creates range restriction..e. The predictors and the criteria used in the current study were obtained from self-report data using a single questionnaire. maximum r = . Self-ratings are influenced by social desirability such that responses tend to be skewed toward the favourable end of the Likert scale for each item. Furthermore. Given the relatively small correlation coefficients obtained in this study (minimum r = . Common method variance and mono-source bias are potential limitations of the current study as they may produce spurious relationships.Similarly. modify their behavior to improve their work performance.4.46).. consciously or unconsciously. 5. which reduces the correlation between items. 2002). A subsequent study designed to assess personality and work performance over time (longitudinally) using a random sample of the population (i.11. a convenience sample was used. LIMITATIONS The study was a cross-sectional sample of some commercial organisations of various sizes in Malaysia which did not allow an assessment of causality.

Hence. The circumstances of the respondents’ participation did not give any incentive to give inaccurate responses. In regards to instrumentation. FFM and the RBPS is recommended. For the sake of understanding the impact of personality on work performance. This study was the first time these measures have been used together in Malaysia. CASES and RBPS would have differed if incentives were provided. organisations may be willing to include the CASES measure in surveys as a preliminary screening for potential employees. Another impetus for further research is the length of the CASES measure as this personality measure has only 20 items. it would be interesting to explore these relationships using alternative measurements as certain studies had presented evidence that customer.what the variance of the ratings ought to be. 153 . It would be difficult to fathom how the relative validities of the FFM. FUTURE RESEARCH The personality measures of the FFM and the CASES and the RBPS performance measure were self-reports.5. Consequently. further instrument refinement is recommended. it is not possible to adjust the correlations for the effects of a restricted range. due to its brevity. Hence. possible modifications as well as further validation of the CASES. supervisor or co-worker ratings had equivalent or higher levels of criterion-related validity in comparison with employees’ self-reports. 5.

Face validity is always a problem in personality measure. income and educational backgrounds are needed to address concerns about the generalisability of the findings obtained in the current study. The cross-validation of the CASES with other determinants of work performance such as ability. Future research can also be conducted to ascertain whether the results reported in this study are generalisable to different jobs (e. 5. Systematic replication integrating a variety of individuals representing various ages.6. 154 . non-governmental or non-profit organisations) and cultures. it should by all means be subjected to replication in various contexts with various work performance measures.. Although face validity may be defined as a “test which looks good for a particular purpose” (Hogan. CONCLUSION The main objective of the current study was to examine the research question as to whether personality can predict work performance using the FFM and CASES models of personality. self-efficacy. From a more philosophical angle. job complexity. Given that the research on the CASES measure is an initial effort. job satisfaction and other proximal motivation models that include interaction effects should also be encouraged to further enhance the validation of this personality measure. goal-setting motivation. management or clerical). skilled or semi-skilled. validity is a long-term process for any research. sales.Questions about the generalisability of these findings and external validity issues can be addressed through replications of this study. organisational settings (public.g.

Employee performance is basically determined by three things.. and the work environment (Wiley.g. each individual moves through Maslow’s hierarchy at a different rate. The strength of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Theory is its ability to identify those needs which motivate behavior (Wiley. Because needs are met at different stages. 1997). it would be appropriate to explore this relationship using third-party sources (e. 474). That is. changes in one’s life can affect the sequence of meeting these needs. or customers) for information on work performance and personality rather than to rely exclusively on self-report data.. 1997). co-workers. job-related learning and knowledge sharing) that are not included in the RBPS. many seemingly appropriate personality tests fail to predict work performance. While personality-based theories may not necessarily predict behavior or motivation. A 155 . p. The categorisation of work performance dimensions based on the RBPS could be criticised on the same grounds that were used to justify the use of the FFM. it is of no use for decision making. If one is to choose between a test with empirical validity but no appeal to the layman and a test with face validity with no empirical validity.Hogan and Roberts.g. they can provide a basic understanding of what actually energises or motivates individuals. 1996. Face validity would enhance the users’ acceptance of a test method and is definitely desirable but if such a face-valid measure does not predict non-test behavior. Furthermore. there are other dimensions of work performance (e. Personality measures often have empirical validity but commonly are weak on face validity. Furthermore. supervisors. ability. motivation. one should choose the former. to understand the impact of personality on work performance.

promotion may meet the self-actualisation level for an individual but meeting new people and learning new routines may cause the individual to try to fulfil safety and social needs. 1996). it would be beneficial to individuals to be aware of the limitations and advantages associated with their personality profiles. for example. people are not simply reactors to stimuli in their environment in that they can also organise. The traditional personality perspectives are hampered by the mechanistic models which posited that people possess dispositions or traits which lead them to behave consistently under changing circumstances. the individual must balance life and work responsibilities to ultimately achieve a sense of fulfilment. Hogan and Roberts. With this jockeying to satisfy these needs. In reality. If researchers are able to classify jobs by occupation and then consider the performance criteria and the personality dimensional requirements relevant to that occupation. then the predictive relationship between work performance and personality will improve (Hogan. 156 . Although personality is significantly inherited and stable in adulthood. A comment on the usefulness of research on personality and work performance should also be made. select and transform stimuli. neurotic individuals may learn to adjust their negative outlook of life for better personal success and agreeable individuals can recognise their natural tendency to downgrade and compromise their personal interests. Besides their indisputable academic importance. personal development and career advice. Hence. studies that have examined the relationship between personality and work performance can be utilised for recruitment.

Although the FFM is a well established personality measure.The study has contributed to the literature on personality by providing a new personality measure. The researcher hopes that the combination of supportive initial research results and high face validity will encourage use of and research on the CASES model. The study also showed that Conscientiousness and Neuroticism of the FFM are valid predictors for all jobs and criteria in the sample used in this study. Moreover. this personality measure. 157 . some components of the CASES model were found to be better predictors of the Career. 2003). and Total RBPS as compared to the FFM which was a better predictor of only the Job component of the RBPS. Although this is a preliminary study of the validity of the CASES model of personality. CASES can be offered as a useful personality measure for both practitioners and researchers. the researcher believes that it has made a contribution to research on personality measures and the prediction of work-related performance. both situationally and contextually (Wheeler. In addition to providing a theory-grounded measurement tool. the CASES model of personality is relatively unique as it is a two-theory model as compared with many one-theory based personality measures that appear to be able to explain the multivariate phenomenon of behavior in a multidimensional manner. Hence. Team and Organisation components of the RBPS. Innovator. 2004a. CASES. Tett and Burnett. can be added as a new contribution to the body of knowledge for personality measure especially in relation to the prediction of work-related performance. Hunton and Bryant. CASES.

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I am Chong Chien Fatt. 2005 Subject: Predicting Work Performance using FFM and a non-FFM Personality Measure Dear Potential Participant.com September 15. nor your organisation will be named or be able to be identified from the published report. which will be shredded after the data have been entered into a spreadsheet. 182 . a student in the Newcastle Graduate School of Business at the University of Newcastle undertaking a Doctorate of Business and Administration Degree and Gian Casimir is my research supervisor. You are invited to take part in this research project which examines the relationship between work performance and personality. University House Corner King and Auckland Street Newcastle 2300 AUSTRALIA For further information: Dr Gian Casimir Tel: +61 2 4921 6680 Fax:+61 2 4921 7398 Email: Gian.au CHONG Chien Fatt Tel: +60123760133 Fax: +60331602894 Email: chongchienfatt@yahoo. I am conducting a research project titled “Predicting Work Performance using FFM and a non-FFM Personality Measure”.edu. The confidentiality of your responses is assured as only Chong Chien Fatt and Gian Casimir will have access to the completed questionnaires. your Organisation will be provided with a report that will be recommended for distribution to staff. The anonymity of your responses is guaranteed because you are not required to provide your name nor any other information that can be used to identify you. You are required to complete a questionnaire on personality and work performance.Casimir@newcastle. We are therefore not interested in the specific responses of any particular individual. On completion of the study.APPENDIX ONE – INFORMATION SHEET Newcastle Graduate School of Business Faculty of Business and Law Level 3. The findings of this study may be published in a scholarly journal but neither you. As part of my studies. We are interested only in the overall relationships between Personality and Work Performance.

Participation in this study is entirely voluntary.edu. it may be given to the researcher. if an independent person is preferred. the University’s Human Research Ethics Officer. will have no effect on your employment and no one will know whether or not you have participated as completion of the questionnaire will be performed at a location of your choice. The University requires that should you have concerns about your rights as a participant in this research. or you have a complaint about the manner in which the research is conducted. If you want to take part in the study. The questionnaire will be distributed by the Human Resources Managers.edu. Approval No . The University of Newcastle. Chancellery. Yours sincerely. your decision to participate. University of Newcastle. If you would like more information. or.au) 183 . Research Office. Mr Chong Chien Fatt Dr Gian Casimir Complaints Clause: This project has been approved by the University’s Human Research Ethics Committee. email HumanEthics@newcastle. telephone (+61 249 216 333. Thank you for taking time to consider this invitation. Research Branch. or to not participate. Bus-Law/SEGi/1/32:05A). with return of the questionnaire through stamped and self-addressed envelopes to the researcher. The Chancellery.au. University Drive. Callaghan NSW 2308. 2308. to the Human Research Ethics Officer. please contact Chong Chien Fatt or Gian Casimir or if an independent person is preferred. email: HumanEthics@newcastle. please complete the questionnaire and return it to the researchers in the stamped self-addressed envelope provided. However. telephone +61 249 216 333.

edu. If your organisation is willing to participate.APPENDIX TWO – CONSENT SEEKING LETTER TO COMPANY Newcastle Graduate School of Business Faculty of Business and Law Level 3. This study examines the relationship between personality and work performance. After the data have been entered into a spreadsheet. Please see the attached information sheet for participants. 2005 Subject: Predicting Work Performance using FFM and a non-FFM Personality Measure.au CHONG Chien Fatt Tel: +60123760133 Fax: +60331602894 Email: chongchienfatt@yahoo. University House Corner King and Auckland Street Newcastle 2300 AUSTRALIA For further information: Dr Gian Casimir Tel: +61 2 4921 6680 Fax:+61 2 4921 7398 Email: Gian. you will be asked to distribute a questionnaire (see attached) to your staff selected by a stratified random procedure that represents a diagonal slice across levels and functional areas.com September 15. Please note that all potential participants should be informed that participation is voluntary and that they will not be disadvantaged in any way by not participating. Dear Sir.Casimir@newcastle. This questionnaire is a personality and work performance measures and should take approximately twenty minutes to complete. We would greatly appreciate your organisation’s participation. Your organisation is invited to take part in a study which is being conducted by Mr Chong Chien Fatt and Dr Gian Casimir from the Newcastle Graduate School of Business. the questionnaires will be shredded. The confidentiality of responses is assured as only Chong Chien Fatt and Gian Casimir will have access to the completed questionnaires. We are interested only in the overall relationship between personality and work performance and therefore are not interested in the specific responses of any particular individual. Mr Chong is conducting this study as part of his Doctor of Business and Administration Degree and Dr Gian Casimir is his research supervisor. 184 .

University Drive. Callaghan NSW 2308. The findings of this study may be published in a scholarly journal but neither you. to the Human Research Ethics Officer. Mr Chong Chien Fatt and Dr Gian Casimir Complaints Clause: This project has been approved by the University’s Human Research Ethics Committee. if an independent person is preferred. If you agree to take part in the study. telephone (+61 249 216 333. it may be given to the researcher. Yours sincerely. The University requires that should you have concerns about your rights as a participant in this research. please contact Chong Chien Fatt or Gian Casimir.edu. your organisation will be provided with a report. Bus-Law/SEGi/1/32:05A). email HumanEthics@newcastle. which we recommend to be made available to all staff. or you have a complaint about the manner in which the research is conducted.au) 185 . please reply to us in writing stating your department’s willingness.On completion of the study. Research Office. Thank you for taking time to consider this invitation. The Chancellery. The University of Newcastle. nor your department will be named or be able to be identified from the published report. or. For further information. Approval No .

Describe yourself as you generally are now. please do not continue with the survey even though you may have consented to participate. 1 Very Inaccurate 2 Moderately Inaccurate 3 Neither Accurate or Inaccurate 4 Moderately Accurate 5 Very Accurate 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 I often feel unhappy I feel comfortable around people I believe in the importance of art I have a good word for everyone I am always prepared I am very pleased with myself I have little to say I am not interested in theoretical discussions I waste my time I am very direct I dislike myself I make friends easily I have a vivid imagination I am critical of others I pay attention to details I am not easily bothered by things 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 186 . Please tick the answers above and return the full set in the self-addressed envelope.APPENDIX THREE – QUESTIONNAIRE Personality Measure Questionnaire Title: Predicting Work Performance using FFM and a non-FFM Personality Measure Part 1: (i) Are you proficient in English? Yes / No (ii) Have you been working in the same job for more than 12 months? Yes / No If there is a No answer in any one above. Thank you. Part 2: Please use the rating scale below to describe how accurately each of the following statement describes you. not as you wish to be in the future nor what you were in the past.

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 I keep a low profile I do not enjoy going to art museums I find it difficult to focus on work I believe that others have good intentions I seldom feel unhappy I am not interested in abstract ideas I would describe my experiences as somewhat dull I respect others I do just enough work to get by I am often depressed I am skilled in handling social situations I avoid philosophical discussions I insult people I get chores done right away I have frequent mood swings I carry the conversation to a higher level I don’t like to draw attention to myself I accept people as they are I carry out my plans I panic easily I do not like art I get back at others I make plans and stick to them I am the life of the party I get excited by new ideas I avoid carrying out my duties I make people feel at ease I don’t talk a lot I rarely get irritated I don’t see things through I enjoy hearing new ideas I know how to get people’s attention I feel comfortable with myself I suspect hidden motive in others I easily adapt to the needs of the situation I push myself and others to get things done I am a loving person I am careful in my work I like others to empower me to do my work I am good at interpreting things I like living in style I am pleasant to be around with I hold on to traditions and beliefs I love to seek experiences in life I often weigh the pros and cons of a situation before acting I want to take charge of my work 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 187 .

63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 I have a heart for the less fortunate I like to do things following the proper channels I believe in justice I can spot opportunities and make use of them I like to take the lead to get things done I am sensitive to other people’s feelings I prefer to buy things with guarantee I find great satisfaction in doing a good job I am good at overcoming obstacles to get what I want I am good in pressurizing others to get things done I enjoy the company of others I am law-abiding I seek knowledge and skills to improve myself I am flexible in doing things I can be easily provoked I like to assist my friends in time of needs I believe in doing things step by step I do my work enthusiastically I am good at persuading others to support me I am assertive I like to visit my friends I tend to shelter others from harm I work towards improving my quality of life I like to turn issues/situations to my advantage I like to celebrate in a grand manner I can be easily hurt I am serious in whatever I do I am a reasonable person I will do anything to achieve my goals I tend to use more of “I” than “We” I enjoy working in groups I do not fight with authority I am accountable for my mistakes I do not reveal myself too much I am determined to win in any situation I greet my friends with open arms I need security I make decisions based on bottom-lines 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 188 .

What is your last annual increment? Less than 3%. Are you confirm in your job within the normal time frame? 8. How long have you worked in your current job? 6. Gender (please circle) Male/Female ____Years____Months ____Years ___ Months Primary School / High School / College / University 4. For those working for 3 years of more. Between 7% to 10%. the rating scales are: 1 Needs Much Improvement 2 Needs Some Improvement 3 Satisfactory 4 Goods 5 Excellent 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 Quantity of work output Quality of work output Accuracy of work Customer service provided (internal and external) Obtaining personal career goals Developing skills needed for my future career Making progress in my career Seeking out career opportunities Coming with new ideas Working to implement new ideas Finding improved ways to do things Creating better processes and routines Working as part of a team or work group Seeking information from others in my work group Making sure my work group succeeds Responding to the needs of others in my work group Doing things that help others when it’s not part of my job Working for the overall good of the company Doing things to promote the company Helping so that the company is a good place to be 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 Part 3: Respondent’s Demographic Data 1. Between 3% and 6%.For the next 20 items. How long have you worked in this Organisation? 5. Age: ____Years____Months 3. What is your Level in the Organisation? Non-Executive/ Lower Mgmt/Middle Mgmt/ Senior Mgmt 7. 189 . have you been promoted? Yes/No Yes/No 9. Educational level: 2. More than 10%.

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