P. 1
Austrian Foreign Policy 1908-1918

Austrian Foreign Policy 1908-1918

4.0

|Views: 117|Likes:
Published by Druid_ian

More info:

Published by: Druid_ian on Sep 03, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/07/2013

pdf

text

original

objections were also advanced on the German side,

and as a solution it was

proposed to

incorporate

a small

portion of "

Congress Poland "

with

Austrian Galicia, and out of the

greater part of

the rest to create a Polish State

independent in

form, but in

reality under the

protectorate of

Germany. But this

proposal was firmly rejected

by the Vienna Government, which advanced the

idea of a

genuinely autonomous State

comprising

the whole of Polish

territory, which should be

allied

by a

long-term economic and military

agreement with both the Central Powers

equally.

But it was impossible to \vin the consent of the

Berlin Government to this

plan.

Such was the

position when the Austro-

Hungarian troops were defeated at Lutsk. The

result of this was that in

August, 1

9 1

6, the

Germans carried the

day with their

proposal to

found an

independent State, practically comprising

the former "

Congress Poland," under a

hereditary

constitutional

monarchy, but

subject to

far-reaching

restrictions in

military and economic matters. On

the

Austro-Hungarian side the bestowal of the

crown of Poland on a member of the

family of

Habsburg-Lorraine was waived. A more exact

definition of the

sphere of influence of the Central

Powers was reserved for further discussion. But

their

subsequent course showed that the

opposition

of interests was too

deep-seated for it to be

possible to settle matters in a

hurry. In October,

96

AUSTRIAN FOREIGN POLICY

1

91 6, therefore, they came to a settlement for

the

present to shelve the

question of an independent

Polish State. But in order to calm the Poles,

who were anxious about their fate, and to secure

the assistance of their armed forces for the Central

Powers, a

proclamation was issued on November 5,

1916, in which a

prospect was held out of the

restoration of an

independent Poland as a

hereditary constitutional

mon,archy closely attached

to the Central Powers. But the two military

governments at Warsaw and Lublin continued to

administer the country.

Even before this

agreement had been arrived

at, Rumania had gone over to the Entente

camp. The Central Powers had indeed not been

wanting in offers to the Rumanian Government

between Italy's entry into the war and the con-

clusion of the treaties with Bulgaria ;

but

they

had made their concessions conditional on the

active intervention of Rumania on their side.

The leading statesmen of Bucharest would not

agree to this ;

for, in

spite of the

great military

success of the Central Powers, their final

victory

seemed doubtful. They accordingly continued to

insist on

important cessions of

territory in the

Bukovina and Transylvania by Austria-Hungary

in return for a continuance of their

neutrality. To

this, however, Burian, strongly influenced by

Tisza, refused to

agree, although not

only the

German Government but also Conrad von

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->