P. 1
Austrian Foreign Policy 1908-1918

Austrian Foreign Policy 1908-1918

4.0

|Views: 117|Likes:
Published by Druid_ian

More info:

Published by: Druid_ian on Sep 03, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/07/2013

pdf

text

original

his marked sense of the

greatness of his House,

his devotion to

duty and his

personal charm, admit

that he lacked the

stronger qualities which would

have been

necessary to find the

right path.

In his first declarations Charles

emphasized his

firm intention of

doing everything in his

power

to

put an end to the terrible conflict. In this

attitude he was

strongly confirmed by his wife

Zita, by her mother, the influential Maria Antonia

of

Parma, and

by his

brothers-in-law, Sixtus and

Xavier, who, as

early as November, 1

9 1

6, tried

to

get in touch with the Entente Powers. On

December 12 the

peace ofi"er of the

Quadruple

Alliance was made public. It contained a

promise

to submit to a conference of the Powers

proposals

which should aim at

assuring to their

peoples

existence, honour and freedom of

development,

and at

laying foundations calculated to estab-

lish a

lasring peace. In conversations with

Germany, Austria

-Hungary defined her stand-

point. She claimed the

integrity of her

territory,

trifling frontier rectifications as

against Russia,

a more favourable

strategic frontier

against

Rumania, the cession to

Austria-Hungary of a

small

portion of the

territory of the Serbian

monarchy and of

larger portions to

Bulgaria and

Albania, and a more favourable

strategic frontier

against Italy ;

in addition to this the economic

union of Serbia with the

Habsburg Monarchy,

and Albanian

autonomy under an Austro-Hungarian

104

AUSTRIAN FOREIGN POLICY

Protectorate.

Independently of the

peace activity

of the

Quadruple Alliance, Woodrow Wilson, on

December 1

8, invited the

belligerent Powers to

communicate their

peace terms. Both

proposals,

however, were declined

by the Entente Powers.

On December 30, Briand, on the

part of

France,

declared the

peace offer of the

Quadruple Alliance

to be a war manoeuvre, and that all

negotiations

were useless, so

long as no

security was

given

for the restoration of violated

rights and liberties

and the

recognition of the

right of

peoples to

self-determination. In the Note drawn

up in

concert

by the Entente Powers on

January 1

2,

1

91 7, in answer to President Wilson's communica-

tion, all the blame for the outbreak of war was

imputed to the Central Powers, and the demand

was formulated, among other

things, for

compensa-

tion for all war

damages, the restoration of

Alsace-Lorraine to

France, and from Austria-

Hungary proportionate cessions of

territory to

Italy

as well. The German Government, which had

by now fallen into more and more obvious

dependence on the

Higher Army Command, there-

upon resolved to

carry on the war

by the

employment of the most extreme measures, the
most

important and most

promising of which was

indicated in authoritative

quarters to be unlimited

submarine warfare.

Baron Burian, meanwhile, had ceased to be

Austro

-Hungarian Foreign Minister on December

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->