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Chester Amphitheatre Excavations in 2000

Chester Amphitheatre Excavations in 2000

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A report on the small-scale investigative work carried out on the site of the Roman amphitheatre in Chester during the summer of 2000.
A report on the small-scale investigative work carried out on the site of the Roman amphitheatre in Chester during the summer of 2000.

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Keith Fitzpatrick-Matthews on Sep 05, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/16/2013

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text

original

Fabric

Number of sherds weight (g)

Samian

36

180

Fineware

Eggshell

3

1

Black colour coated

1

<1

Red colour coated

2

15

Orange mica-dusted

8

40

Coarseware

Black-on-brown

11

57

Grey

151

991

Orange

146

1059

White-slipped orange

34

201

Black-burnished

7

44

White

3

6

Calcite-gritted

1

143

Mortaria

2

86

Amphorae

21

865

Medieval

Julie Edwards

Six of the seven trenches produced medieval pottery but compared with the
post-medieval; it is a small assemblage, providing only 15% of the post-
Roman assemblage. The sherds are small and mostly abraded although some
single sherds do survive in a good condition. Context (14) contains a group
that appears to have survived better than others but the sherds are still
relatively small in size. Apart from one sherd in Trench IX, which is probably
intrusive, all the pottery is residual to the contexts in which it was found.

The assemblage is quite varied in the range of wares represented. It includes
examples of most of the medieval wares commonly found in the city: red or
grey firing wares made in Cheshire in the thirteenth and early fourteenth
centuries, pink/white firing wares probably made close to Ewloe, Flintshire
and imported Saintonge wares. A few unglazed body sherds appear to be
from cooking pots that are possibly earlier in date than the red/grey Cheshire
wares. Two sherds are uncommon in Chester; one is a piece of Ham Green
ware, made near Bristol, and the other is possibly a Kingston-type ware from
Surrey. No late Saxon or early medieval sherds were identified. Comparison
with the previously excavated pottery is difficult as detailed fabric
descriptions were not published and also the scale of excavation was very
different. However, the range of material appears broadly comparable.

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