USER’S GUIDE

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© 2002 Broderbund Properties LLC, and its licensors. All rights reserved. Professional: Helios32 Radiosity Renderer © 1994-2002 by Hearst Consultants Ltd. All rights reserved. This software contains ImageCELs® texture files from Imagetects. © Copyright 1989 - 2002. All rights reserved. 3D Home Architect® is a registered trademark and Broderbund is a trademark of Broderbund Properties LLC. Windows and Win are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. Pentium is either a registered trademark or trademark of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. The online services advertised as part of this product may be changed or discontinued at any time for any reason.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Preface ........................................................................................................................ix
Contacting Technical Support ..................................................................................ix Satisfaction (sometimes referred to as Smiles) Guaranteed .................................... x

Chapter 1: Quick Basics ...................................................................................... 1
3D Home Architect® 5.0 Interface............................................................................ 2 Examining the Interface ............................................................................................ 3 Starting Work on a Project........................................................................................ 3 Building a Model ....................................................................................................... 4 Project Guidelines .................................................................................................... 5 Direction Angle ......................................................................................................... 6 X, Y and Z Axes........................................................................................................ 6

Chapter 2: Project Setup ...................................................................................... 9
Setting Program Options ........................................................................................ 10 General Program Options....................................................................................... 12 System Options................................................................................................ 12 File Paths ......................................................................................................... 13 Graphics Options ............................................................................................. 14 Setting Up Drawing Aids......................................................................................... 15 Defining Floor Locations......................................................................................... 18 Adding Floor Locations........................................................................................... 20 Deleting a Floor Location........................................................................................ 21 Creating and Using Templates ............................................................................... 21 Using an Existing Drawing to Create a Template ............................................ 22 Using a New Blank Document to Create a Template....................................... 23

Chapter 3: File Management ............................................................................ 25
Opening Drawings at Startup ................................................................................. 26 Begin with a New Project ................................................................................. 26 Begin with a Sample Project ............................................................................ 27

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Begin with a Saved Project .............................................................................. 27 Opening Drawings While Running ......................................................................... 28 Closing Drawings ................................................................................................... 28 Saving Drawings .................................................................................................... 29 Printing Drawings ................................................................................................... 30 Exporting Drawings ................................................................................................ 30

Chapter 4: Catalogs ............................................................................................. 31
How Catalogs Work................................................................................................ 32 External (Master Catalog) ................................................................................ 32 Internal (Current Model Catalog) ..................................................................... 32 Opening a Catalog ................................................................................................. 33 Making Catalog Selections ..................................................................................... 33 Creating a New Catalog ......................................................................................... 34 Saving a Catalog .................................................................................................... 35 Closing a Catalog ................................................................................................... 36 Viewing Catalog Properties .................................................................................... 37 Adding a Group to a Catalog.................................................................................. 38 Renaming a Group in the Catalog Panel................................................................ 38 Deleting a Group from the Catalog Panel .............................................................. 39 Adding Elements to a Catalog................................................................................ 39 Adding Furnishings to a Catalog ............................................................................ 40 Using an Existing Furnishings Element ........................................................... 40 Converting an External File ............................................................................. 41 Editing Elements in External Catalogs ................................................................... 42 Editing Elements in the Current Model Catalog ..................................................... 43 Deleting Elements from a Catalog.......................................................................... 43 Using Automatic Name Generation........................................................................ 44 Modifying the Name Generation Formula .............................................................. 45

Chapter 5: Basic Modeling ................................................................................ 47
Inserting an Element (General) .............................................................................. 48 Pointer Tool ............................................................................................................ 49

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................................................ 51 Shifting from a Point .............................................................................. 50 Commander Buttons........... 79 Inserting Floors........................................................................................................... 66 Flipping a Window ....................................................................................................................................... 71 Inserting Columns............... 56 Drawing Walls with the Commander .............................Table of Contents Measure Command ...................... 60 Breaking Walls..................................................... 66 Inserting Windows ......... 64 Inserting Doors .... 58 Radius and Included Angle of Curved Wall ..................................................................................................... 74 Cabinet Behavior Properties............................................................................................................ 69 Inserting Stairs and Ramps ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 70 Inserting Railings ......................................................................... 67 Chapter 8: Fixtures and Furnishings ................................................................................................................................. 55 Drawing Walls............................................................................................................... 75 Inserting Furnishings .............. 57 Curving Walls .......................... 80 Adding a Floor to a Room ............................................................................................. 73 Inserting Cabinets................................................................. 56 Drawing Walls with the Mouse ....................................................................................................................................... 81 iii ................................................................................................................ 77 Chapter 9: Surfaces .. 65 Flipping a Door ................................................................................................................................................................................... 49 Working with the Commander .................................................................................................................................................... 76 Furnishings Behavior Properties .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 80 Adding a Floor to the Entire Perimeter................................................................................... 61 Chapter 7: Openings ......................................................................................... 63 Inserting Standard Openings ......................................................................... 53 Chapter 6: Walls .....................................................................

...... 85 Inserting Custom Openings in Floors............................................................................................ 82 Adding a Ceiling to a Room ............................................................................................ and Roofs .............................................................................................................................................................. 86 Combining the Two Methods Above .. 83 Adding a Roof to the Entire Perimeter .... 103 Editing Element Properties ............................................................................................................ 87 Removing Floor....................................... 81 Adding a Ceiling to the Entire Perimeter............................................................................................................................................................... 84 Creating a Roof By Picking Points ............................. 86 Removing an Opening................................... 96 Redoing an Undo ........ 101 Selection Filtering by Location ................................................ 99 Selection Filtering by Element. 105 Moving Elements........... Ceilings................ 81 Inserting Ceilings............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 105 Method 2: Editing Elements in the Current Model Catalog ....................................Creating a Floor By Picking Points ...... 87 Creating a Simple Dormer............................................................................................................................................. 95 Undoing the Previous Action ........................................................... 83 Creating a Ceiling By Picking Points ................................................................. 90 Adding a Dormer on Walls .. 96 Selecting Elements.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 87 Editing Roof Support Segments ............................... 105 Method 3: Editing Elements in External Catalogs......... 105 Editing Inserted Elements ................ 106 Dragging .................. 106 iv .. 83 Inserting Roofs ......... 87 Removing Wall Openings Inserted from the Openings Category .... 97 Selection Filtering.................................................................................................................................... 85 Manually Inserting a Custom Opening........................................................................................................................................ Ceiling and Roof Openings You Have Custom Created................................................................. 85 Inserting a Custom Opening Using the Commander ......................................................................................................................................... 91 Chapter 10: Editing ............................................. 104 Method 1: Editing Inserted Elements ........

.. 127 Selecting Display Types .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 110 Arraying Elements ..................................... 119 Viewing in Parallel 3D Mode..................................................................................................................................................................... 113 Deleting Elements ..................................................................................................... 130 Displaying a Ground Plane ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 117 Viewing Open Views ................................................................................................................................................................................... 109 Copying Elements to Other Locations ............................................ 132 Display Filtering by Element ................................. 131 Display Filtering ................................................................................................................... 116 Viewing and Opening Views ... 118 Editing Views ................................. 107 Copying an Element ....................................................................... 112 Rotating Elements Using the Commander ................................... 124 Chapter 12: Display ................................................................................................................................................. 121 Viewing in Perspective 3D Mode ..................... 114 Chapter 11: Viewing ................................................................................................................ 117 Opening and Viewing Closed Views ...................................................................................................................................... 115 Basics of 2D and 3D Viewing . 117 Viewing and Editing the Properties of a View ........Table of Contents Moving with the Commander ................................................... 111 Rotating Elements Manually ................................................................................................................ 124 Creating an Additional Elevation View............................................ 123 Creating an Additional 2D Plan View...... 128 Displaying a Background Behind a Model... 119 Selecting View Modes ......................................................................................................................... 123 Creating an Additional 3D Model View .... 122 Naming Views................................................... 118 Closing a View ..................................................................... 122 Renaming a View ............................................................................................................................................................. 134 v .......................................................................................... 108 Copying Elements on the Same Location ............................ 116 Viewing in 2D Plan View......................

............................................................................................ 148 View Mode ................................................................................. 159 Adaptive Subdivision Rendering Options ............................................................................................. 139 Camera and Target .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 156 Convergence Rendering Options ............................. 148 Angle of View .................... 140 Working with the Camera and Target......................................... 149 Preset Cameras ......... 147 Examining Camera and Target Properties .............................................. 159 Max............................................. 160 Maximum Level............................................ 158 Stopping Criterion .............................. 158 Maximum Steps ........... 141 Dragging the Camera and Target..Display Filtering by Location .................... 148 Position .................................... 141 Viewing in Tile View .................................................................................................................................... 144 Accessing Camera and Target Properties .......................................................................................... 141 Moving the Camera and Target .................... Patch Area ................................... 153 3DTrueView Rendering with Radiosity............................................ 161 Minimum Element Area .............................................. 142 Using the Camera and Target in Tile View....................................... 159 Display Interval ............................................... 155 3DTrueView Rendering Options................................................................................................................................................................................................. 141 Activating the Camera Function.................................................................................................................................. 161 vi .......................................................... 150 Chapter 14: 3DTrueView™ Rendering ................................................................................................................................................... Element Area ..................................................... 136 Zooming and Panning ............................ 159 Max............................................... 154 Specifying the 3DTrueView Rendering Environment .......... 155 3DTrueView Render Controls ....................................................................................... 137 Chapter 13: Camera Work ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 150 Dynamic Camera Viewing ......................................................

............................................................................................................ 182 Adding a Color ......... 163 Chapter 15: Materials and Textures ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 163 F-Stop ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 179 Line Styles .............................................. 187 Importing Line Styles .............................................................................................. 169 Attaching Materials to Elements for Displaying ....................................... 176 Adding a Texture to the Textures List......... 184 Specifying a Lineweight.......................................................................................................................... 183 Customizing a Line Style .............................................. 184 Specifying a Linetype ................................................................................................. 186 Applying a Line Style to an Element................................................................................. 168 Adding a Material to the Materials List .......................................................................... 185 Specifying a Linetype Color................................... 176 Chapter 16: Line Styles ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 173 Exporting Materials to a Library .. 162 Enable Ambient................ 181 Adding a Lineweight .......................... 180 Adding a Line Style................................. 163 Enable Daylight When Rendering .................... 165 Customizing the Materials List................................................................................................................................. 180 Adding a Linetype ... 169 Applying a Pattern to a Material ............................................................................................................................................................... 174 Importing a Materials Library ...................... 162 Enable Antialiasing..................................... 166 Adding a Group to the Materials List ............................................................................... 175 Adding a Group to the Textures List................................ 161 Display and Daylight Rendering Options ................................................................................................................ 170 Applying a Surface Color to a Material ............................................................................................................................................................Table of Contents Threshold ......................................................................... 172 Applying a Texture to a Material... 188 vii .............................................................................................................. 187 Exporting Line Styles .........................................................................................................................................................

................................ 192 Pattern Properties ........................................................................................................................................................................... 201 Adding Dimensions to Your Drawing.................................................................................................................. 223 viii ............................... 194 Adding a Group to the Patterns List .......................................................... 209 Filtering a Quantity Report ................................ 210 Viewing and Editing a Quantity Report............................................................................................................................................................................................... 209 Previewing a Quantity Report........................................................................................................... 213 Index........ 205 Chapter 19: Quantity Report .......................................Chapter 17: Patterns............................................................................... 197 Exporting Patterns............................................................................... 199 Chapter 18: Annotation ................. 197 Adding a Pattern to the Patterns List...................... 202 Selecting Dimension Styles........................................ 203 Adding Text to Your Drawing ....................... 191 Customizing the Patterns List..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 208 Generating a Quantity Report ........ 202 Customizing and Creating Dimension Styles ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 198 Importing Patterns ................ 211 Appendix A: Glossary ................................................................... 207 General Element Properties ...........................................................

then go on to easily insert and manipulate a wide variety of drawing elements like doors and windows from a fully-stocked Master Catalog. 3D Home Architect® 5. In addition. or a new home.0 delivers the results you need—accurately and completely. 3D Home Architect® 5. 24-hour support and information. an addition. your complete software solution for easy home design. Contacting Technical Support Our online technical support system offers 24-hour service and product information.0 is a high-quality. you can use 3D Home Architect® 5.0.0 to quickly lay out a floor plan. 3D Home Architect® 5.com. It frees you to devote your energy to the creative—and enjoyable—aspects of building design. ix . such as Wireframe. Whether you want drawings for a renovation or remodelling. 3D Home Architect® 5. the program's 3DTrueView™ rendering functionality (available only in 3D Home Architect® 5. The program's Camera allows you to inspect your 3D views from an infinite variety of heights and angles while choosing from a number of display modes. the latest software updates and more! For fast. multi-functional tool that provides a comprehensive and easy-to-use software solution for all your home design needs.0 lets you effortlessly generate 2D and 3D drawings. Ultimately. With a few mouse clicks.0 Professional) uses radiosity—a rendering method that simulates light reflecting off one surface and onto another—to achieve extremely photo-realistic images of both the interior and the exterior of buildings.0 eliminates the monotonous labor involved in creating building plans.broderbund. go to http://support. The web site features troubleshooting tools.Preface Preface Congratulations on purchasing 3D Home Architect® 5. Once you've produced a 2D plan. The online services advertised as part of this product may be changed or discontinued at any time for any reason. Note: The contact information provided on this page may be subject to change. Consult our customer web site for the latest contact information. Shaded or Textured.

5:00 PM CST & Wednesday 9:00 AM . Allow 4–6 weeks for refund or replacement title. When you contact technical support. If possible. You can contact technical support in any of the following ways: • Internet – The web site features technical help and the latest information about 3D Home Architect® 5. and the brand name of the video card and sound card you are using. For fast service twenty-four hours a day. SC 29334 U. Phone – The contact center is available via telephone at (319) 247-3333 during the following hours: Monday. Return the complete package to us at: Broderbund Dock Door # 9 120 Hidden Lake Circle Duncan. Please enclose an explanation for the return and specify the replacement title.S.broderbund.) • • Satisfaction (sometimes referred to as Smiles) Guaranteed If you are not completely satisfied with this product. this is a toll call that will be billed to your long distance carrier. Friday 8:00 AM .com. sit at your computer with the program running when you call. x . wholesalers and their immediate families are not eligible. Tuesday. E-mail – Please see our web site for instructions on how to contact us by e-mail.0.5:00 PM CST (Note: Though technical support does not charge for support calls. be prepared to provide information about your computer name and model. Thursday. only questions related to the features of 3D Home Architect® 5.A.Please remember that technical support cannot answer specific questions about your business project. go to: http://support. Limit 1 per household. Make sure you include your store receipt showing the store name and location within 30 days of purchase. Broderbund will gladly exchange it for another title of equivalent value or refund your purchase price.0. Dealers. Be prepared to provide a detailed description of what happens when you try to run the program. Average hold times during peak periods can exceed 20 minutes.

A. xi .Preface Written inquires should be addressed to our corporate address at: Broderbund 500 Redwood Boulevard Novato. CA 94947 U.S.

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Quick Basics 1 1 retpahC .

It includes the following user-friendly components: • • • • • menus toolbars drawing area status bar dialog panels (Catalog and Views) ® 3D Home Architect® 5. This makes designing and editing fast. and easy.0 interface is compatible with Microsoft Windows.0 interface is also completely customizable. The 3D Home Architect® 5. you can: • • • move and dock toolbars and panels resize panels hide selected interface components 2 . As well.0 also makes use of shortcut keys. accurate.0 Interface The 3D Home Architect® 5.0 interface very easy to use. To create a comfortable work environment. 3D Home Architect® 5.0 has an element-interactive interface. You can insert any element in your drawing just by pointing and clicking. Most people who are familiar with Windows-based applications will find the 3D Home Architect® 5.3D Home Architect 5. All you need to do is select the element from the catalog and click in your drawing area.

etc. Grid Snap. Menus cannot be customized. toolbars are located under the menus. The Views panel lists any currently saved views (Plan.Chapter 1: Quick Basics Examining the Interface The interface is made up of a number of components. Elevation. Toolbars are groups of buttons that launch commands. most of which can be customized. It displays helpful information such as prompts. The Status Bar is located at the bottom of the screen. Help Topics • No Topic Available Toolbars • • Moving Toolbars Displaying/Hiding Toolbars Moving Panels Displaying Panels in Tabbed Format Displaying Panels Separately Displaying/Hiding Panels Displaying/Hiding the Status Bar Panels • • • • • Status Bar Starting Work on a Project When you launch 3D Home Architect® 5. Model. The Catalog panel is used for opening and creating catalogs and selecting elements to insert in your drawing.0.) appear in a row at the top of the screen. see the online Help topics listed. By default. etc.). It also contains a variety of drawing aids (Autoinsert.) that you can toggle on and off. Edit. Interface Features Element Menus Description Menus (File. click New Project. the Startup screen appears (unless you have disabled it earlier). • To begin a new project from one of the available templates. For details on customizing. etc. 3 .

This catalog is saved with your model. For suggestions on how to proceed with your project. windows. You can choose elements from this catalog.• • To begin working with one of the included sample projects. or you are working on an existing project and want to start a new one. Elements are intelligent. select it. you begin a model by building its exterior walls. click Saved Project. an opening is created automatically. On-screen dynamic dimensions are usually displayed during insertion. The Insert menu contains everything you need to build a model. ceilings. Building a Model Usually. This will re-launch the Startup screen. you can insert and create other elements like interior walls. Then follow the steps indicated above. If you try to put a door where it won't realistically fit. Every element you insert comes from the external Master Catalog that ships with the program. These form the basic structure and layout of the model. These dimensions let you know the distance between elements and help you place elements correctly. To continue working with a project you have created and saved. As you insert elements in your drawing. when you correctly insert a door or window in a wall. and the roof. depending on the element. If you have disabled the Startup screen. see Project Guidelines on page 5. A door knows it is part of wall. you insert elements by pointing and clicking. click Open on the Standard toolbar or select File > Open. a Current Model catalog is created that contains the elements particular to your drawing. and click . click New on the Standard toolbar or select File > New. If you have disabled the Startup screen. locate the file. This means they know what they are and how they fit into a model. Then. or you are working on an existing project and want to open an existing document. or you can add and edit elements as needed. Most often. click Sample Project. floors. using the Look in box. 4 . you won't be allowed to by default. However. doors. Once you draw the exterior walls.

Generate a quantity report (bill of materials). you start with the exterior walls. display 3D views. 3. Build your model. Annotate the drawing with text and dimensions (if applicable). Select your units of measure (the default is feet-inches). 5. Create and save views of your model—2D plan views.Chapter 1: Quick Basics Project Guidelines Below is a set of guidelines to follow when starting a project: 1. 9. 7. This is especially important if you want to attach assemblies to an element. 8. 4. Set up the model environment (global position. When you insert an element. Define and display a drawing grid (if you want to use one). 5 . 6. Generally. Print views of the model. 2. If using a drawing grid. it is a good idea to check its properties before inserting it. you may also want to enable Grid Snap and match the Grid Snap grid to the drawing grid so your cursor snaps to the drawing grid. date and time. and elevations. Define your floor locations. background).

if enabled. or entering values in the Commander. Y and Z Axes One system used for defining coordinates. It is known as the Cartesian Coordinate system. is based on the X. (See: X. The angle is calculated counterclockwise from the positive X axis. (360 is also the same as 0.Direction Angle Direction in a drawing is specified in degrees of an angle. You will often have to specify direction and/or degree of rotation when creating your model. Y and Z axes. The alternate system used is the Polar Coordinate system in which two numbers locate a 6 .) It is important that you understand how direction is indicated. Y and Z Axes on page 6. and move an element randomly. Tip: -90 is often used as a shortcut for 270.) X. If you disable Ortho and Angle Snap. you will see all the intermediate angle values displayed in the Commander. entering any angle value is possible. The Four Primary Drawing Directions Note: Although the four primary drawing directions are the ones you will probably be working with the most.

0) indicates where three axes meet. A coordinate with X.Chapter 1: Quick Basics point in a plane by its distance from a fixed point on a line and the angle this line makes with the X axis. When the Commander is in Cartesian mode. Positive and negative values are possible. The Three Drawing Axes A coordinate with only X and Y values represents a two-dimensional point. the Commander is in Polar mode. A point of origin (0. or from above in a 2D Plan view). Y and Z values represents a three-dimensional point.0. In the Cartesian system: • • • An X coordinate specifies a horizontal distance. the X/Y button is visible.0) indicates where two axes meet. A point of origin (0. When the Distance/Direction button is visible. 7 . A Z coordinate indicates either elevation or depth. A Y coordinate specifies a vertical or top-to-bottom distance (when seen on the screen.

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Project Setup 2 9 retpahC .

The following table briefly describes the options available on each of the tabbed pages in the Options dialog box: Options Dialog Box Option Page General Description The General options control program features.Setting Program Options The Options settings control how the program operates and how the screen looks. OR Click Options on the Tools toolbar. More Info/Help Topics (See: General Program Options on page 12. where certain files are saved.) 10 . Select Tools > Options. and how your screen responds graphically during a work session. There are seven tabbed pages in the Options dialog box: • • • • • • • General Workspace Drawing Aids Units of Measure Global Settings Site Visuals Rendering To access the program's Options: 1.

) Help Topics: Units of Measure • • Selecting Units of Measure Suppressing Units Global Settings Help Topics: • • • Setting the Date and Time Setting the Global Position of the Model Specifying the Angle of True North 11 .0 Professional). panels. and other factors defining the rendering environment. Global Settings relate to the program's 3DTrueView rendering function (available only in 3D Home Architect® 5. cont. toolbars. and the main window background color. Help Topics: • • • • • • • Selecting a Background Color Displaying/Hiding Panels Displaying Panels Separately Displaying Panels in Tabbed Format Displaying/Hiding Toolbars Displaying/Hiding the Status Bar Working with the Commander Drawing Aids The Drawing Aids options help you position and insert elements in your drawing. (See: Setting Up Drawing Aids on page 15. global location of your model. They allow you to set date and time.Chapter 2: Project Setup Options Dialog Box. The Units of Measure options let you specify different units of measure for different measurement types. You can also choose the desired precision for each type of measure. Workspace The Workspace options control the appearance of tools.

The Rendering options control the speed at which your model is rendered and the amount of detail supplied. cont. Always prompts you. etc. dialogs. For detailed information on each of the options. Help Topics Selecting a Language to Work In Listing Recently Used Files on the File Menu Setting the Automatic Save Option Automatic Save 12 . where various file types are saved. You can set a background texture behind your model and a ground plane below it.0 Professional) Help Topic: • 3DTrueView Rendering Options Tip: You can save your Options in a template file that can be used for future projects. System Options The System options control four general program features (including one sub-feature). Saves your drawing at a specified interval. or click Options on the Tools toolbar and click the General page. see the online Help topics listed.Options Dialog Box. To access the General Options. Help Topics: • • Displaying a Background Behind a Model Displaying a Ground Plane Rendering (available only in 3D Home Architect® 5. and how your screen responds graphically. select Tools > Options > General. System Options Option Language Recently used file list Description Sets the language used in menus. General Program Options The General options control program features. Site Visuals The Site Visuals options affect model Display modes. Number of recently used saved files that will be listed on the File menu.

Save automatically every Interval at which your drawing is saved (if Automatic Save is enabled). By default.Chapter 2: Project Setup System Options. Setting the Save Interval Show Startup Screen Disabling the Startup Screen File Paths The File Paths determine where certain files are saved and provide paths to related directories. Default directory in which drawing files are saved. You can save your own template files here and they will appear in the Available Project Templates window of the Startup screen. Enables/disables the introductory screen which allows you to quickly choose between starting a blank new drawing or working from an existing drawing or a template.Imperial (Feet & Inches).) Projects Directory Help Topic: • Selecting a Default Save Directory 13 . the screen is enabled. More Info/Help Topics (See: Creating and Using Templates on page 21. File Paths Option Templates Directory Description Directory containing program templates such as 1 .bld. cont.

Help Topic: • Setting the Catalog Directory File Path Temporary Directory Default directory in which temporary files are saved. Help Topic: • Selecting a Directory for Temporary Files Textures Directory Lights Directory Directory containing texture catalogs. No topic available No topic available Graphics Options The Graphics options control how your screen responds during a work session. lets your computer take advantage of any installed graphics card that supports hardware acceleration Help Topics Hardware Acceleration 14 . When enabled.File Paths. Catalog Directory Directory containing element catalogs. cont. Directory containing lights catalogs. Graphics Options Option Hardware Acceleration Description Affects the speed of your graphics display.

15 . disabling Display Lists may fix the problems. It can also correct glitches. Display Lists The use of Display Lists may help performance. Select Tools > Options.Chapter 2: Project Setup Graphics Options. If this occurs. Z Buffer Depth sets the depth (16. On compatible machines. No Topic Available Z Buffer Depth Adjusting the Z Buffer Depth Setting Up Drawing Aids Drawing Aids help you position and insert elements in your drawing. To set up Drawing Aids: 1. 24 or 32 bits) of a block of memory used to store the Z-axis value of a pixel on the screen. On some computers with specific video cards. cont. A higher value can improve graphics display. especially on large models. In the Options dialog box. OR Click Options on the Tools toolbar. 2. enabling Display Lists will give the greatest performance increase to navigation commands such as Zoom and Orbit. you may experience problems such as selection difficulties. click the Drawing Aids tab.

and you try to insert an element that is not in your Current Model catalog. Help Topics Disabling the Assistance Prompt Auto-insertion Mode (Enabled) Disabling Auto-insertion Mode Collision Control (Enabled) Disabling Collision Control Object Snap (Enabled) Disabling the Object Snap 16 . Object Snap is enabled. see the online Help topics listed. Allows you to automatically insert an element without clicking Insert Element. Collision Control is enabled. By default. Prevents elements from being inserted where they do not fit. By default. or rightclicking and selecting the Insert command from the Shortcut menu. this option displays a dialog asking if you want to open an external catalog or create an element local to the model. Makes elements you are inserting automatically snap to existing elements in your drawing.The following table summarizes the options available on the Drawing Aids page. Drawing Aids Drawing Aid Enable Assistance Dialog Purpose If you do not have an external catalog loaded. For more information on individual options.

If the Grid is enabled. If the Grid is enabled. This is helpful when drawing walls. the element you are inserting will snap to it. By default. the X and Y spacing determine the horizontal and vertical distance between grid lines. Controls the angle at which elements rotate when Angle Snap is enabled. when your cursor is this distance from an existing element. By default.Chapter 2: Project Setup Drawing Aids. Restricts the element Rotate function to specific angles. If enabled. Ortho is enabled. Setting the Pixel Search Distance Ortho (Enabled) Disabling Ortho Angle Snap (Enabled) Disabling the Angle Snap Snap Angle Setting the Snap Angle Grid (Disabled) Enabling the Drawing Grid X/Y Spacing (Grid) Setting the Drawing Grid Spacing X/Y Limit Setting the Drawing Grid Size 17 . Restricts your cursor movement to 90-degree angles when you are inserting elements. Pixel Search Distance (Object Snap) If Object Snap is enabled. By default. the X and Y limit determine the horizontal and vertical size of the Drawing Grid. cont. a Drawing Grid is displayed on the screen. the Drawing Grid is disabled. Angle Snap is enabled.

Enabling the Grid Snap Match Grid (Grid Snap) Matching the Grid Snap Grid to the Drawing Grid X/Y Spacing (Grid Snap) Setting the Grid Snap Spacing Tip: You can save your Drawing Aids setup by creating a template file.Drawing Aids. it is inserted on the floor location currently shown in the Floor Location list box. Defining Floor Locations Most elements that you insert are in some way related to floor locations. selecting the Match Grid option creates a Grid Snap grid that is identical to the Drawing Grid (if Grid is enabled). Grid Snap (Disabled) If enabled. you are basically doing two things: • • setting the wall height for each floor (level) in your model specifying where each floor is positioned relative to the ground (zero) When you insert an element. By default. Grid Snap is disabled. It is positioned at the height (floor level) defined for that location. the X and Y spacing determines the horizontal and vertical distance between snap points. In general. 18 . floor locations help you organize the elements in your drawing in a logical fashion. They ensure that elements are inserted where they belong and at the correct level. If Grid Snap is enabled. Your cursor then snaps to the Drawing Grid. If Grid Snap is enabled. When you define floor locations. your cursor snaps to points on an imaginary grid. cont.

Press Enter. You can change their properties. 3. Select Tools > Building Locations. The location's name (e. Physical height of the walls on the location. Ground Floor and Second Floor).) 19 . A floor location definition has six properties: Floor Location Properties Property Number Name Floor Level Head Height Ceiling Height Wall Height Definition A reference number for the location. Height of tops of windows relative to the floor level. Click it. To change a floor location property: 1. Type the value you want. (See: Creating and Using Templates on page 21.Chapter 2: Project Setup To define a floor location: 1.g. Ground Floor). You can also add up to 999 locations. Height of floor above ground level (0). The program ships with three default floor locations (Foundation. OR Click Building Locations on the Tools toolbar. Height of underside of ceiling surface relative to the floor level. Floor locations and their settings are saved along with your drawing. Tip: Save your floor location settings in a template file for future projects. 2.

then go back and insert the third. In the Building Locations dialog box. The Building Locations dialog box lets you add one floor at a time.) c. In the Add Floor Locations dialog box. floors do not have to be added in consecutive numerical order. or multiple floors. Floor to Floor Distance 5. of Locations to Add (one or more than one) b. Second Floor Selected in Building Locations Dialog Box 3. Don't worry. 6. click . In the Building Locations dialog box. No. Number Increment (Adding 1 to the floor selected above would add a new floor location numbered 4 and additional floors numbered 5. Click OK. Building Locations on the 2. Select Tools > Building Locations. 4. enter: a. or you can add locations as needed. For example.) Adding 2 would add a new floor location numbered 5 and additional floors numbered 7. Ceiling Height and Wall Height as the currently selected floor. A new location is added to the Floor Locations list. you can add and design the fifth floor. and so on. these and all other Building Location values can be adjusted later. select the floor above which you want to add the new floor location by clicking in the far left column next to it. OR click Tools toolbar. 20 . Also. Note: By default the new location will have the same Head Height. and so on. 9. To add locations: 1.Adding Floor Locations You can set up all floor locations before starting a drawing.

Creating and Using Templates Using a template drawing can save you time and effort when you are setting up a design project.Chapter 2: Project Setup 6. you can now give your floor location a name). Building Locations on the 3. then press Enter. If it does. click OK. To change a property. If necessary. . (To check. Make sure no elements exist on the location you want to delete. etc. define or redefine the properties of your new location (For example. In the Building Locations dialog box. click to the left of the location so that the double arrow prompt points to the location. Deleting a Floor Location You can delete a floor location as long as it does not contain elements (walls. Double Arrow Prompt Showing Second Floor Selected 4. To delete a floor location: 1. OR click Tools toolbar. windows. Select Tools > Building Locations. The location is removed. Once you have defined your floor location. you can use the location. click it. type the value you want.). Click OK.) Display Filter to show elements that may be turned off on that 2. Click 5. A template drawing can contain information about things like Building 21 . the button will be unavailable.

) Templates Folder Selected 4. 22 . give your template file a name. 3. Options (Drawing Aids. (The navigational path will vary depending on where you have installed the program. etc. 2. Global Settings. even regularly used elements. Click OK. 5.Locations. Units of Measure. but it should be similar to the one below. Open the existing drawing.). You can use an existing drawing to create a template or create one from a new blank document. use the Save in list box to navigate to the program's Templates folder. In the Save As dialog box. Select File > Save As. Using an Existing Drawing to Create a Template 1. In the File name box.

choose or define your settings. OR click Building Locations on the Tools toolbar. the element will become part of the Current Model catalog and will be available for use the next time you open the template file. Once you save the template file. Define your locations. 3.Chapter 2: Project Setup The next time you open the program. etc.) Tip: To include regularly used elements as part of your template file. 4. Select Tools > Building Locations.). Global Settings. your template file will be visible in the Drawing Templates pane of the Startup screen when you click the New Project button. 2. (Follow Steps 2 – 5 in Using an Existing Drawing to Create a Template. Click the various Options tabs (Drawing Aids. Select Tools > Options. right-click and choose Insert Element. 23 . then click OK. OR click Options on the Tools toolbar. Open a new blank document either at startup or while running. Template Files in Available Project Templates Pane Using a New Blank Document to Create a Template 1. select the element in the Master Catalog in the Catalog panel. Units of Measure. Finally. then click OK. name and save your template file in the program's Templates folder using the Save as command.

24 .

File Management 3 25 retpahC .

you can also create your own templates. Note: Although the program ships with default drawing templates. they are shown in the Available Project Templates pane when you click New Project.Opening Drawings at Startup There are three possible options you can choose from to begin working with the program: 1. Begin with a New Project You can begin with a New Project based on a default template. 26 . When they are saved in the program's Templates directory.

Begin with a Saved Project Lastly. 27 .Chapter 3: File Management 2.bld file). Begin with a Sample Project You can open a Sample Project and customize it. 3. you can begin with a Saved Project (any saved *.

28 . Opening Drawings While Running If you are already working on a drawing. if you have more than one drawing open. Note: If you open a drawing that has saved views. Tip: If the file you want to open is one you recently worked on. Click Open.Double-clicking More Files will call up the Open dialog box which you can use to navigate to the file you want to open. or saving and closing. you can close the active drawing without exiting the program. It will remain open until you close it. However. they are listed in the Views panel. use the Window menu. To switch between multiple open drawings. make sure the drawing you want to close is the active one. Closing Drawings Drawings remain open until you close them or exit the program. the views are not automatically opened along with the drawing. 2. However. you can open it quickly by selecting it from the list of recent files on the File menu. However. To open a new drawing (when you are currently in another drawing): 1. Select File > New. Select File > Open. locate the file you want to open. OR Click New on the Standard toolbar. In the Open dialog box. OR Click Open on the Standard toolbar. To open a saved drawing (when you are currently in another drawing): 1. you can open an additional drawing without losing. 3. your current drawing.

click Yes or No when you are asked to save changes. How To Select File > Save or click Save on the Standard toolbar. Save All 29 . If you are saving for the first time. To give the drawing a name of your choice. Specify a name in the Save As dialog box. Select File > Save All or click Save All on the Standard toolbar. 2. Saves all currently open drawings.Chapter 3: File Management To close a drawing: 1. Note: If you have not given your drawing a name. a default name is assigned. select File > Save. In the dialog box. Select File > Close. Saving Drawings The program has three save functions: • • • Save Save As Save All Below is a brief overview of each function. you are prompted for a name. Save Functions Function Save Purpose Saves the current drawing under the current name. OR Click Close on the Standard toolbar. Save As Select File > Save As. Saves the current drawing under a name you specify.

2.dxf) Autodesk 3D Studio (*.Printing Drawings The Print function uses the standard Windows Print Setup for printer and paper selection.0 Professional. In the Save as type box. Select File > Export. You can currently export your drawing to three file formats: • • • Autocad DXF (*. 2. 3. 5.wrl files. type a file name. 3.wrl) Note: A variety of VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) viewers can read *. Choose the options you want. In the File name box. Click OK.3ds) VRML (*. 30 . To select a printer and paper for output: 1. Locate the directory where you want to save the exported file. To export your drawing: 1. 4. Select File > Print Setup. Click OK. Exporting Drawings Note: This function is only available in 3D Home Architect® 5. select the file format you want to export to.

Catalogs 4 31 retpahC .

especially if you intend to create or edit elements. It is important to understand the difference. It is saved along with your model. it is available in the current drawing only. This lets you know exactly what is in the drawing. In all external catalogs. Elements are what you insert in your model. When you edit elements in the Current Model catalog. Walls. When you add a new element to an external catalog. If you add or edit elements in an external catalog. You can create new groups as needed. These categories contain groups of elements. the Master Catalog from which these elements originally came is unchanged. Also. then save it. It does not appear in the Master Catalog. if you add a new element to the Current Model catalog. Internal (Current Model Catalog) As you insert elements in your drawing. This makes elements easier to find because they are not just displayed in one long list. If you intend to edit elements in the Master Catalog. it is always added to the currently selected group. it is always added to the currently selected group. External (Master Catalog) The program ships with a Master Catalog that contains categories like Doors. the catalog opens as well. In other words. When you add a new element to the Current Model catalog. elements are organized in groups. the custom elements you create are distinguishable from the defaults. etc. You can create new groups as needed. When you re-open your drawing. the new or edited elements will be available for future projects. This way. they are stored in one place.How Catalogs Work Catalogs contain groups and elements and are displayed in the Catalog panel. you may want to create a new external catalog by saving the altered Master Catalog under a different name. a Current Model catalog is created. 32 . Plus. There are two types of catalogs: external (Master Catalog) and internal (Current Model catalog). The structure of the Current Model catalog is the same as that of the Master Catalog: elements are organized in groups. or add new elements. the change is permanent. The Current Model catalog is a list of all the elements in your drawing.

Click Open. wall exterior) for display. wall interior. 5.Chapter 4: Catalogs Note: The program also contains a large list of materials. see Chapter 15: Materials and Textures on page 165. Add Catalog. You can attach materials to element parts (e. Making Catalog Selections Each time you start the program. Insert > Windows). For more information. 4. click Open Catalog. Open another external catalog that you have created by clicking the Catalog Management button on the Catalog toolbar. In the Catalog panel. In the menu. When you select an Insert command (e. you can export and import materials to and from libraries. The catalog you opened becomes the active external catalog. At this point. As well. you can do one of three things: • • • Select an element from the currently active category. In the Open dialog box. you can access it using To open an external catalog: 1. the category for that element (i. 2.g. the Master Catalog is open and ready to be used.g. click the Catalog Management button toolbar. Make a selection from your Current Model catalog if it contains the element you want to insert. Windows elements) is automatically displayed in the Element pane of the Catalog panel. Opening a Catalog If you have created an external catalog using Open Catalog.e. 33 . on the upper 3. locate the catalog you want to open. You can also customize the Materials list by editing materials or creating new ones.

Elements in catalogs are always arranged in groups for easy navigation and selection. The Element pane displays the groups and elements in a tree structure. To select or create an element, expand the tree below the appropriate group.

Window Groups and Elements

Creating a New Catalog
If you plan to edit elements in the Master Catalog, or add elements, you may want to create a new external catalog instead of modifying the existing one. That way, the custom elements you create are distinguishable from the defaults and are stored in one place. When you create a new catalog, you specify a name and where you want to store the catalog. Note: You must save a new or altered catalog before closing the drawing, otherwise the catalog or changes will be lost.

34

Chapter 4: Catalogs

To create a new catalog:
1. Click the Catalog Management button panel. 2. Click Add Catalog. on the upper toolbar of the Catalog

3. In the Create a new catalog dialog box, type a name (without extension) in the File Name box. 4. Click the Browse button next to the Location box and select a directory in which to store the new catalog. The default is the program's Catalogs directory. 5. In the Name box, type your name. 6. In the Company box, type the name of your company. 7. Click OK. The new catalog is added to the list of open catalogs and becomes the currently active catalog.

To save the catalog:
1. Click the Catalog Management button panel. 2. Click Save Catalog. on the upper toolbar of the Catalog

Saving a Catalog
If you create a new catalog, or change any external catalog, you must save the catalog. Otherwise, the new catalog or changes will be lost.

To save a catalog:
1. Select the catalog you want to save in the drop-down list box. 2. Click the Catalog Management button Catalog in the list. Note: By default the Save Catalog command saves the catalog in the program's Catalogs folder. To save to a different location, use the Save Catalog As command. on the toolbar and click Save

35

Closing a Catalog
To close an external catalog at any time:
1. Click the Catalog Management button 2. Click on the upper Catalog toolbar.

Close Catalog in the Catalog menu.

Note: If you have made changes to an external catalog that you want to keep, make sure you save the catalog before closing.

36

Chapter 4: Catalogs

Viewing Catalog Properties
By clicking Catalog Properties in the Catalog panel, you can view the following

categories and elements:

Catalog Properties Dialog Box
Note: The Appearance buttons link to stock lists of available program components.

37

Adding a Group to a Catalog
In all catalogs—external or model-specific—elements are organized in groups. For example, in the Master Catalog, in the Walls category, there are groups such as Wood, Steel and Brick. Since elements are not displayed in one long list, they are easier to find. Also, you can create new groups as needed.

To add a group:
1. Make sure the catalog you want to add the group to is open. 2. In the Catalog list, select either an external or the Current Model catalog to add your group to.

An External (Master) Catalog Selected
Note: Choosing an external catalog (which can be one you create) will make your group available in all future drawings. Choosing Current Model will make the group specific to the Current Model catalog of the model. 3. Click the Element button OR Right-click in the Element pane. Then click 5. Press Enter. Add Group in the menu. 4. When the new group is added, type the name you want. . Then click Add Group in the menu.

Renaming a Group in the Catalog Panel
In all catalogs—external or model-specific—elements are organized into groups. For example, when you insert the Walls category, you see there are groups such as Wood, Steel and Brick.

To rename a group in the Catalog panel:
1. Select the group in the Element pane.

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A box is drawn around the group and the old name is highlighted. If you add an element to an external catalog. 5. Deleting a Group from the Catalog Panel In all catalogs—external or model-specific—elements are organized into groups. 4. To delete a group in the Catalog panel: 1. select it. Adding Elements to a Catalog All catalogs can be customized. . the element will be available for all future projects. so any element you add must also go into a group. 4. 3. the Doors category has groups like Bi-Fold and Sliding Glass to keep the various door types organized. For example. When you add an element to a catalog. you define it using its Properties page.Chapter 4: Catalogs 2. For example. and Brick. Door Type. then click OR Click the Element button menu. Catalog elements are always arranged in groups. You can add a group if needed. Delete any elements in the group. Press Enter. You can delete a group from any type of catalog provided there are no elements in the group. and save the catalog. 3. a door has properties such as Size. The group is removed from the catalog. 39 . 2. in the Walls category there are groups such as Wood. For example. Elements added to the Current Model catalog are available to the current drawing only. then click Delete Group in the Delete Group in the menu. Type your new name. Right-click and click Rename. This means you can add virtually any made-to-order element to any external catalog or model catalog. Every element type has its own standard set of properties that uniquely define it. and Leaf Type. Steel. When the group is empty. Right-click.

40 . then click OK. Make sure the catalog you want to add the element to is open. However. follow these steps: 1. Select the element by clicking it. If you are adding the element to an external catalog.To add an element to a catalog: 1. Right-click the group and select and select Add Element. if you want to add a custom element to a catalog. You can either base it on an existing Furnishings element or convert a 3D Studio file. A wide variety of elements is supplied in the Master Catalog. Select the group you want to add the element to. 3. and select either Save Catalog or Adding Furnishings to a Catalog The Furnishings category includes elements like appliances. make sure you save the catalog to keep the change before you close the drawing. furniture. OR click the Element button Add Element. 4. click the Catalog Management button Save Catalog As. Define the element's properties. If you want to create and add an element that is similar to one that already exists. there are two ways to do it: • • Use an existing Furnishings element as the basis for a new one. 5. and landscaping items. There should be a picture approximation of the element in the bottom window of the Catalog panel. Note: Adding a Furnishings element to a catalog involves an extra step. It should be selected at the top of the Catalog panel. Using an Existing Furnishings Element The standard Furnishings elements are based on parametric templates that contain sample properties for the particular elements. plumbing and electrical fixtures. 2. To do this. Convert an external file to a Furnishings element.

2. You can now give your element a name and define its properties. Your new element is added to the list in the Catalog panel. in the Categories pane. Right-click the Catalog group you want to add the Furnishings element to and select Add Element from the menu. you can convert it. The Open dialog box appears. in the Categories pane. 7. 3.Chapter 4: Catalogs 2. Click OK. In the Furnishings properties box. 41 . 5. 1. Your new element is added to the list in the Catalog panel. 7. The file opens in the Furnishings properties box. 4. 6. Click OK. give your element a name and define its properties. In the Define Furnishings dialog box. In the Define Furnishings dialog box. When you are finished. 3. 6. 5. Right-click the element and select Add Element in the menu. 4. click OK. open the category group and select the element type. Click OK. open the category group Miscellaneous and select Custom Block. Converting an External File If you have a Furnishings element in an external file format (such as 3D Studio or AutoCAD) that you want to add. Use the Look in box to locate the file you want to convert and click OK.

and an occurrence of it already exists. and then click Properties. Note: If you have already inserted an element into your drawing. open the appropriate catalog by clicking the Catalog Management button and then Open Catalog. 42 . (If you have already opened the catalog during the current work session. Edit the properties. Select the element in the tree and either: a. Make sure the Catalog panel is selected. Click OK. 6. you must delete the old version and insert the new one. Properties. If it is not already open. Click the Element button 5. Use the catalog tree to locate the element you want to edit.Editing Elements in External Catalogs Every element you insert comes from a pre-existing external catalog (like the default Master Catalog). external catalogs are available for use in all drawings.) 3. 4. Elements that you change in external catalogs can be used in any future project. changes you make to it in the external catalog will not affect the inserted element or the Current Model catalog. Unlike Current Model catalogs. you can simply select it from the available catalogs. To edit an element in an external catalog: 1. If you want to add the edited element to your drawing. 2. In order to change an element in an external catalog. you need to open the catalog. Right-click and click OR b.

Click the Element button 5. select Current Model. and then click Properties. 3. To edit an element in the Current Model catalog: 1. Right-click. Properties. this will be the only catalog listed. all appearances of the element in your drawing update automatically. In the Catalog list. 2. Deleting Elements from a Catalog You can delete any element from an external catalog. then click OR Delete Element in the menu. You can select any element in the Current Model catalog and edit its properties. To delete an element from an external catalog: 1. 2. 4. 43 . Click OK. If you change any visible properties. 6. Edit the properties. Select the element. Make sure the Catalog panel is selected. Use the Catalog tree to locate the element you want to edit. such as dimensions or appearance. Note: Any changes you make to an element in the Current Model catalog have no effect on its original definition in the external catalog (Master or custom) where the element came from. a Current Model catalog is automatically created that lists all the elements in your drawing. provided it does not exist in the drawing. Select the element in the tree and either: a. Right-click and click OR b.Chapter 4: Catalogs Editing Elements in the Current Model Catalog As you add elements to your drawing. If no external catalogs are open.

3. Click the Element button menu.

, then click

Delete Element in the

Note: You cannot delete elements from the Current Model catalog. Also, to keep any changes to an external catalog, you have to save the catalog.

Using Automatic Name Generation
Names of elements in the Master Catalog are based on pre-defined formulas. The name 8" Concrete Wall is made up of three variables:

Each variable is separated by a space. These variables and spaces are defined in the name's formula. If you add or change an element, and select Use Automatic Name Generation, the element's name updates automatically in the catalog. For example, if you add a concrete wall, and define a width of 10" on the Size page of the wall's properties page, the name automatically becomes 10" Concrete Wall on the General page. Automatic name generation: • • • Saves typing a name every time you add or edit an element Ensures consistency in catalogs Prevents duplicate entries if you forget to change a name

44

Chapter 4: Catalogs

To use automatic name generation:
1. If you are adding an element, call up the properties page by clicking and selecting right-click). 2. If you are editing an element, select the element, click and choose Add Element (or select the element group and

Properties (or right-click after you have selected the element and choose Properties). 3. On the General page, select Use Automatic Name Generation. Note: If Use Automatic Name Generation is not selected, you can type any name you want in the Name box.

Modifying the Name Generation Formula
When you add or edit a drawing or catalog element, you can modify the formula used to generate the element's name if you enable automatic name generation. Formulas are made up of variables (like manufacturer, supplier, and price) and separators (spaces, symbols or characters).

To modify the formula used for an element's automatic name generation:
1. Select the element in either the Catalog panel or your drawing. 2. Right-click and click 3. Click the General page. 4. Select Use Automatic Name Generation. 5. Click the Browse button next to Use Automatic Name Generation. Properties.

6. The Automatic Name Generation dialog box for that element type is displayed. The right pane (titled Used Variables and Separators) displays the current formula. 7. To remove a component from the formula, select the element and click Remove. 8. To add a component to the formula, select the variable or separator and click Add. 9. To move a component in the formula, select the component and click Move Up or Move Down.

45

10. When you have finished modifying the formula, click OK to close the Automatic Name Generation dialog box. 11. Finally, click OK to close the element's properties dialog box.

46

Basic Modeling

5

47

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Category Groups and Elements Note: If Auto-insertion Mode is disabled. you can manually insert an element three ways. OR 48 . Choose one of the following: a. To manually insert an element: 1. Release the mouse button. you can insert one of the elements contained in the group. Click your selection and drag it into the drawing area.Inserting an Element (General) Once you have loaded a category (like Windows) and opened a group (like Fixed).

OR Click Measure on the Tools toolbar. 2. Measure Command Use the Measure command to measure distances in any direction in your drawing. Insert Element on the toolbar. With the desired element selected. Insert 2. Pointer Tool The Pointer suspends Auto-insertion Mode and allows you to select elements. click OR c. Unit used and degree of precision depend on your settings on the Units of Measure page in the Options dialog box. Windows). 3. Select Tools > Measure. Right-click and click Finish in the menu. and then click to insert it. OR Select Insert > (category). right-click and click Element in the Shortcut menu. When you have finished your selection task. 49 .Chapter 5: Basic Modeling b.g. Click your second point on the screen. Position the element. 3. To use the Measure command: 1. Click a category button on the Insert toolbar (e. Click your first point on the screen. With the desired element selected. to return to Auto-insertion Mode: 1.

Working with the Commander The Commander is a multi-functional tool in which precise values can be entered when drawing walls or manipulating elements (moving. When you have finished measuring. Measurement Shown on Status Bar 5. right-click and choose Finish. or it can be made to float like a moveable dialog box. breaking. 50 . rotating. The Commander is dockable. Therefore. total distance measured is shown at the bottom left on the Status Bar. Measure Command Tape Measure Note: When you are zoomed out. A tape measure with units of measure is displayed. curving. etc. The tape measure disappears.4.). tape measure values can be difficult to read.

Select Tools > Options > Workspace. value options available) varies with the task at hand and how the user has configured the Commander. In the Tools area. 2.Chapter 5: Basic Modeling The appearance of the Commander (buttons visible. select Commander. However. OR Click Options > Workspace. whether or not these buttons are visible depends on the task at hand. Buttons Visible in Wall Drawing Mode 51 . three of which toggle between various states. Commander in Wall Drawing Mode To enable the Commander: 1. For example. they are available for drawing walls but not for curving walls. Commander Buttons The Commander has four buttons.

Appearance & Name Function Button 2 State of Reference Point User Defined Origin Default state. Z may be 5' in relation to the 5th floor level but be 55' from the ground level). Location Defined Origin 52 .e. Commander Buttons and Uses Button Button 1 Reference Point Reference Point Establishes a point at which or from which to perform an action by entering numerical values into the Commander.Y. Either Polar or Cartesian Coordinates can be used.Three of the buttons also deal exclusively with the Reference Point. Reference Point as Visible in the Drawing Window The following table gives a detailed description of each button. and the function or use of each state. Values are read from the point defined by the user. and Z values) can be entered. Only Cartesian Coordinates (X. its states (if more than one). Z value is in relation to floor location (i.

Z value would have to be 55' to be 5' from the 5th floor level). or begin drawing from one. (i.Y.g. Z value is in relation to ground or world location. Enables you to enter X. Button 3 Coordinate System Button Polar Coordinates Enables you to enter Distance and Direction (angle) values into the Commander. World Defined Origin Only Cartesian Coordinates (X. and Z values) can be entered.Chapter 5: Basic Modeling Commander Buttons and Uses.e. cont. you can pick that point by shifting precisely from some other point (e. Fixes the Reference Point at one spot in your drawing. and Z axis values into the Commander. You do this by setting a Reference Point with 53 . Locked Reference Point Shifting from a Point When you want to insert an element at an exact point. insert one window exactly 3' 6" to the left or right of another). Y. Cartesian Coordinates Button 4 Moving/Locking Button Moving Reference Point Updates the Reference Point to an new place in your drawing every time you click the mouse.

type the Z distance that you want to shift (positive value = above.) Commander in Cartesian Coordinate Mode To shift from a point: 1. 3. In the drawing area. 4. (See: X. Y. In the Z box. Y and Z Axes on page 6. negative value = below.the Commander then specifying the desired shift by entering Cartesian X. In the Commander. as seen in actual 3D space). Click in the drawing area or hit Enter. type the Y distance that you want to shift (positive value = up. In the X box. and Z values. click a point to shift from (establish the Reference Point). click to activate the Reference Point function. 5. c. To shift in multiple directions do the following: a. negative value = down. as seen in 2D view on screen). In the Y box. negative value = left). b. type a value in the X or Y or Z box. 54 . Your cursor is now at the precise point you specified. To shift in a single direction. 2. 6. type the X distance that you want to shift (positive value = right.

Walls 6 55 retpahC .

Drawing Walls Using the Commander If you know the exact position. they know when to join other walls and automatically form clean intersections with one another. Each has its advantages. With Autoinsertion Mode enabled. The Commander is particularly useful if you want to start your wall a specific distance from a selected base point. Wood). OR click Walls on the Insert toolbar. running dimensions are displayed alongside the wall (as well as in the Commander. Select an element in the group (e. You can draw walls two different ways. Select Insert > Walls. Once you have selected a wall type from the catalog. Note: Because walls are intelligent elements. length and direction of the wall you want to draw. 3 1/2" Wood Framed Wall). you can manually insert a wall three ways: 56 . if enabled). select the wall group you want (e. select the floor location where you want to insert the wall. 2. When you are drawing a wall. Drawing Walls with the Mouse The easiest and quickest way to draw walls is to point and click.Drawing Walls The program's Master Catalog contains a variety of wall types (like wood. Drawing Walls with the Mouse To draw walls with the mouse: 1. Note: If Auto-insertion Mode is disabled. steel and concrete) that are customizable to your needs.g. you can now begin drawing. 3. In the Catalog. you can draw a wall by selecting a start and end point with the mouse.g. and open it by clicking its + sign. so you can draw the wall exactly the length you want. You can then continue adding walls to the one you have drawn by clicking more endpoints. you may want to use the Commander to draw the wall. From the location drop box. 4. or finish the wall by right-clicking and choosing Finish.

if enabled. OR click Walls on the Insert toolbar. Click the Element button the menu. at the same time.) 7. you can now begin drawing. click to set its endpoint. OR b. 9. From the location drop box. In the Catalog. Select a start point for the wall in your drawing area. Drag the pointer into the drawing area and release the mouse button. 3 1/2" Wood Framed Wall). When the wall is the length you want. 5. Drawing Walls with the Commander To draw walls with the Commander: 1. select the floor location where you want to insert the wall. Wood).Chapter 6: Walls a. Select an element in the group (e. move the mouse in the direction you want the new wall to run. With Autoinsertion Mode enabled. Right-click and click OR c. To finish a wall. Drag the pointer into the drawing area and release the mouse button. and open it by clicking its + sign. (Distance [length] and direction are displayed in the Commander. select the wall group you want (e. For more information. 3. To add another wall to the one you have just drawn. you can manually insert a wall three ways: a.g. Note: If Auto-insertion Mode is disabled. Its length is shown as you draw the wall. and click Insert Element in Insert Element in the menu. Tip: You can shift the start or endpoint of a wall a specific distance and direction from another point. 6. right-click and click Finish in the menu. Move your cursor in the direction you want your wall to run. 2. 57 . When it is the right length.g. 4. see Shifting from a Point on page 53. Select Insert > Walls. click to set its endpoint. 8.

Right-click and click OR c. OR right-click and click Finish to end drawing.) 7. 3. (The Commander. Curve it by entering radius and included angle values in the Commander. 4. Either accept the direction indicated in the Direction box. 5. if enabled. Do not hold down the mouse button.) 58 . or type the direction angle (see Direction Angle on page 6) you want the wall to run. 8. 2. Automatically curve it to a selected point. In the Commander's Distance box. Move your cursor in the direction you want to curve the wall. Click the Element button the menu. 10.OR b. the Tab key (forward only) or by clicking with the mouse. 9. Click the wall. Click in the drawing area or hit Enter. Click to select a start point for the wall in the drawing area. and click Insert Element in Insert Element in the menu. To manually curve a wall: 1. Tip: You can move between boxes in the Commander by using your keyboard’s arrow keys. 6. The wall is drawn. Click the wall to select it. Curving Walls The Curve Wall function lets you curve a wall three ways: • • • Manually curve it with your mouse. You can now go on to draw another connecting wall. shows you the radius and included angle as you curve the wall. (Note: In Imperial measure. Right-click in the drawing area and select Curve Wall from the menu. so be sure to include the feet symbol if applicable. the default setting is inches. type the desired length for the wall.

However. Right-click in the drawing area and select Curve Wall from the menu. 2. The wall automatically curves to the point. click to finish. Also. To curve a wall using the Commander: 1. hit Enter. To automatically curve a wall: 1. 4. and nothing happens. 5. you will probably find it extremely difficult. if you enter a value. Enter a value in the Radius box or Included Angle box. Click a curve point anywhere in the drawing area. Click in the drawing area or hit Enter. Note: Because the Radius and Included Angle values are interrelated. Click to finish. 3. 59 . 4. When you have the curve you want. if you enter one. if not impossible. Right-click in the drawing area and select Curve Wall from the menu.Chapter 6: Walls 5. the program automatically supplies the other. Click the wall to select it. Click the wall to select it. to enter both values. 2. 3. then the value is not valid in relation to the dimensions of your wall.

if enabled. Curved Wall Attributes and Commander Showing Values 60 . The included angle of the curve is the angle formed between two radius lines extending from the center of the circle implied by the curve out to the endpoints of the arc. when you manually curve a wall.Radius and Included Angle of Curved Wall The radius of a curved wall is the distance measured at 90 degrees from anywhere on its arc to the center of the circle implied by the curve. These two values can be entered into the Commander to curve a wall. They are also automatically indicated in the Commander.

Click anywhere along the length of the wall to define your starting or Reference Point (most often this will be an end point). However. then click OK. Select Tools > Options > Workspace. 2. 4. These segments can then be moved. Click in the drawing area or hit Enter. 3. 10. if you roll your cursor over the wall. Type a value in the Distance section of the Commander. Right-click in the drawing area and click Break. To break a wall using the Commander: 1. Make sure the Commander is enabled. Right-click in the drawing area and click Break. Click . By entering precise values in the Commander. you will see that it has been divided into two segments. 61 . It is unnecessary to enter a Direction value (direction angle) when breaking a wall. To manually break a wall: 1. select it. Click the wall to select it. 4. The Commander and the wall selection disappear. You will see all the values in the Commander revert to 0. 7. stretched or otherwise manipulated. you will see that it has been divided into two segments at the point you indicated. You can break a wall two ways: • • Manually. However. The wall selection disappears. or try to reselect it. if you roll your cursor over the wall. 9. or try to reselect it. Click a break point on the wall.) Your break point will be this distance from your Reference Point. 3. If the Commander is not selected. by clicking a point with your mouse.Chapter 6: Walls Breaking Walls The Break function is used to divide a wall into independent segments. 11. Click the wall to select it. The Commander is displayed. (Remember. 5. 6. numerical values are taken to be in inches unless you indicate otherwise. 8. 2.

Note: You could also have broken the wall by entering an X or Y value if the Commander had been in Cartesian Coordinate mode. 62 .

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To insert a opening: 1. OR b. Because openings are intelligent elements. Drag the pointer into the drawing area and release the mouse button. In the Catalog.) 5. (They update as you move the opening back and forth. width. 4. 2. Click the Element button the menu. Right-click and click OR c. all you have to do is click in a wall to insert it. From the Location box. Click to insert the opening. Select Insert > Openings. However. you can edit openings separately from the walls that contain them. the element will now be on the end of your cursor. Position the opening in the wall by using the dimensions shown on either side. 64 . you can manually insert an opening three ways: a. select the opening you want to insert. With Auto-insertion Mode enabled. select the floor location containing the wall in which you want to insert the opening. OR click Openings on the Insert toolbar. and height. Once you have selected an opening from the Catalog. 6. they fit themselves into walls and become part of them automatically. Note: If Auto-insertion Mode is disabled. As you position the opening. running dimensions appear on either side. 3.Inserting Standard Openings A standard opening is a cutout in a wall of a specific shape. and click Insert Element in Insert Element in the menu. Right-click and select Finish from the menu.

6. With Auto-insertion Mode enabled. OR click Doors on the Insert toolbar. Drag the pointer into the drawing area and release the mouse button.) 5. Because doors are intelligent elements. you can manually insert a door three ways: a. In the Catalog. Note: If Auto-insertion Mode is disabled. all you have to do is click in a wall to insert it. Click to insert the door. see Shifting from a Point on page 53. 65 . From the Location box. the element will now be on the end of your cursor. As you position the door. 2. Once you have selected a door. you can edit doors separately from the walls that contain them. However. To insert a door: 1. select the floor location containing the wall in which you want to insert the door. Right-click and click Finish. OR b. Inserting Doors The program includes a wide variety of door types that you can insert by pointing and clicking. Right-click and click OR c. Position the door in the wall by using the dimensions shown on either side. 3. you can shift the insertion point. Openings are also created automatically when you insert doors. they fit themselves into walls and become part of them automatically. running dimensions appear on either side. Click the Element button the menu. and click Insert Element in Insert Element in the menu. Select Insert > Doors. (They update as you move the door back and forth.Chapter 7: Openings Tip: If you want to insert the opening a measured distance from a selected point. 4. For more information. select the door you want to insert.

see Shifting from a Point on page 53. either in or out. the door will be hinged on the opposite side.Tip: If you want to insert the door a measured distance from a selected point. 2. running dimensions appear on either side. (In other words. if it was hinged on the left. Once you have selected a window. Right-click in the drawing area and click Flip Swing. Right-click in the drawing area and click Flip Opening. Inserting Windows The program includes a wide variety of window types that you can insert by pointing and clicking. To flip only the swing: 1. In other words. As you are positioning the window. Click the door to select it. However. Openings are created automatically when you insert windows. Because windows are intelligent elements. Click the door to select it. the swing is also flipped. it now opens in. 66 . Use Flip Swing to flip only the swing.) To flip the entire door: 1. but it will still open in the same direction. Flipping a Door There are two functions associated with flipping a door: • • Flip Opening Flip Swing Use Flip Opening to flip the entire door around. it is now hinged on the right (and vice versa). 2. you can shift the insertion point. For more information. they fit themselves into walls and become part of them automatically. if the door originally opened out. you can edit windows separately from the walls that contain them. all you have to do is click inside a wall to insert it. If the door has a swing.

Note: If Auto-insertion Mode is disabled. you can manually insert a window three ways: a. Right-click in the drawing area and click Flip Opening.Chapter 7: Openings To insert a window: 1. 3. select the floor location containing the wall in which you want to insert the window. To flip a window: 1. the swing is also flipped. 6. Drag the pointer into the drawing area and release the mouse button. Right-click and click OR c. you can shift the insertion point. 2. 67 . Select Insert > Windows. and click Insert Element in Insert Element in the menu. 4. the element will now be on the end of your cursor. From the Location box. OR b. Tip: If you want to insert the window a measured distance from a selected point. Flipping a Window Use the Flip Opening function to instantly flip a window around. Click the Element button the menu. If the window has a swing. see Shifting from a Point on page 53. Click to insert the window. Select the window. 2. With Auto-insertion Mode enabled. For more information. OR click Windows on the Insert toolbar. Select the window you want to insert. Position the window in the wall by using the dimensions shown on either side.) 5. (They update as you move the window back and forth. Right-click and select Finish from the menu.

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Otherwise. Drag it into the drawing area and release the mouse button. You can insert a staircase or ramp with a single mouse click. Position the stairs and click to insert them. OR click Stairs/Ramps on the Insert toolbar. 70 . Insert Element on the Catalog toolbar.Inserting Stairs and Ramps The Stairs/Ramps category contains a variety of stair types (like Notched Stringer and Solid Stair) and two different ramp styles (uniform and non-uniform thickness). 5. Select the staircase or ramp you want to insert. Note: The most important factor to consider when inserting a staircase is its Overall Height definition. you can manually insert a staircase or ramp three ways: a. Once you have inserted a staircase. Select Insert > Stairs/Ramps. you can edit its style and geometry. Right-click and click Insert Element in the Shortcut menu. Make sure this value corresponds to the wall heights and floor levels in your drawing. Right-click and select Finish from the menu. Click OR c. Note: If Auto-insertion mode is disabled. 4. 2. To insert a staircase: 1. the staircase will not be represented correctly in your model. 3. The style and geometry of the staircase depend on the staircase's Properties definitions. OR b. Make sure the Catalog is active and that the location you want to insert the staircase is current. There are also a number of pre-set styles for staircase layout.

This allows you to create a railing of any length. The style and appearance of the railing you insert depend on its defined Properties in the Catalog. they all are customizable to your needs. you can shift the insertion point. Automatic places railings on either side of a staircase with one click of the mouse anywhere on the staircase. widths and spacings). The available properties give you control of posts.) in the railing category. etc. 2. as well as the geometry of these elements (e. see Shifting from a Point on page 53. However. 71 . and see Editing Inserted Elements on page 105. see Editing Element Properties on page 104. For more information.) To insert a railing. and rails. newels. right-clicking in the drawing area brings up the following Shortcut menu: • • • Insert: Pick points inserts a railing at floor level. (For more information. The other options are reasonably self-evident. except for the fact that every time you click the mouse as you draw. a new post is inserted. Once you have chosen a type of railing to insert. you draw it just like a wall by selecting a start point and end point.Chapter 8: Fixtures and Furnishings Note: If you want to insert a staircase or ramp a specific distance and direction from a selected point. in most cases. Guard Rail. Make sure the location you want to associate the railing with is current.g. Select Insert > Railings. Inserting Railings There are a variety of default railing types (like Railing w/Newels. To insert a railing: 1. or click Railings on the Insert toolbar. which you would do around a stairwell.

3. For more information. Right-click and select Finish from the menu. 6. you can manually insert a railing three ways: a. Right-click in the drawing area and choose an insertion option from the Shortcut menu. Right-click and click Insert Element in the Shortcut menu. Insert Element on the Catalog toolbar. Select an end point on the screen (or intermediate post points and then an end point). 72 . OR b. you can shift the start point a specific distance and direction from a selected point by using the Commander. Tip: If the point you want to select is not the endpoint of an existing element. Drag it into the drawing area and release the mouse button. select the start point for the railing. 4. 5. see Shifting from a Point on page 53. Click OR c. If you have not chosen Automatic.Note: If Auto-insertion mode is disabled.

To insert a column: 1.Chapter 8: Fixtures and Furnishings Inserting Columns You can insert a wide range of columns in your drawing using a single mouse click. In other words. OR click 3. you can manually insert a column three ways: a.) Size Page of Columns Properties Columns are inserted at the Floor Level defined for the current location. the base of the column will be flush with the base of the walls. 2. Select the column you want to insert. (See the Size page accessible through the Columns properties dialog box. OR Insert Element on the Columns on the Insert toolbar. With the column you want selected. Select Insert > Columns. click Catalog toolbar. Release the mouse button. Note: If Auto-insertion mode is disabled. Click your selection and drag it into the drawing area. 73 . Make sure the Catalog is active and that the location you want to associate the column with is current. OR b.

and then click OK to close the Properties dialog box. With the column you want selected. they automatically attach themselves (if Collision Control is on). Make any changes you want. Insert 4. 4. From the Location box. Note: Before inserting a cabinet. 74 . Right-click and choose properties. Right-click and select Finish from the menu. you should check its Behavior properties. 5. you can use the Commander. Select Insert > Cabinets. Inserting Cabinets The Cabinets category contains a number of cabinet groups. If you position cabinets near walls. Tip: If you want to insert the column a specific distance and direction from a selected point. each with a variety of styles to choose from. Select the cabinet you want to insert. and the snap edge (the edge that will snap to walls). These properties control the height at which the cabinet is inserted. This eliminates the need to line them up. For more information. Properties to check the cabinet's Behavior Cabinets on the Insert toolbar. right-click and click Element in the Shortcut menu. To insert a cabinet: 1. Click to insert the column. 5. or click 3.c. 2. see Shifting from a Point on page 53. select the floor location where you want to insert the cabinet. They also automatically attach themselves to other cabinets when you are inserting a run. the insertion point on the cabinet.

then click to insert the cabinet. In the Catalog window. In the Position area. a. select the cabinet and right-click. you should check its Behavior properties. 3. type the height you want the base of the cabinet to sit in relation to the floor level. 7. OR b. 6. Right-click and click Insert Element in the Shortcut menu. To set the Cabinet Behavior properties: 1. make sure you indicate feet or inches. Insert Element on the Catalog toolbar. Y and Z axis values or adjusting the slider controls. In the cabinet's properties box. the base of the cabinet will insert at floor level. you can manually insert a cabinet three ways. 2. indicate an insertion point on the element. Right-click and click Finish in the menu. click the Behavior tab. see Shifting from a Point on page 53. Click OR c. Drag it into the drawing area and release the mouse button. Undefined values are taken as inches. In the Insertion Point area. you can use the Commander. Select Properties from the menu.Chapter 8: Fixtures and Furnishings Note: If Auto-insertion mode is disabled. Tip: If you want to insert the cabinet a measured distance from a selected point. Note: If using Imperial measure. Do this either by typing specific X. Cabinet Behavior Properties Before inserting a cabinet. For more information. Place the cabinet where you want it. These determine its insertion height (at or above floor level) and insertion positioning point. 75 . in the Distance above current location box. If this value is 0. Your cursor will be attached at this insertion point when you position the element. 4. 5.

OR b. Select the element you want to insert. you should check its Behavior properties. Make any changes you want. and its snap edge (the edge that will snap to other elements). its insertion point. then the back of the cabinet will snap to a wall. For example. These properties control the height at which the element is inserted. Right-click and click Insert Element in the Shortcut menu. Click OR c. furniture and plumbing and electrical fixtures. 7. select the floor location where you want to insert the element. Click OK. Inserting Furnishings The Furnishings category contains elements like appliances. From the Location box. Select Insert > Furnishings. In the Snap Edge area. Insert Element on the Catalog toolbar. You can insert an element with a single mouse click. Note: If Auto-insertion mode is disabled. To insert a Furnishings element: 1. 76 . A wide variety of standard furnishings and fixtures is supplied. then click OK to close the Properties dialog box. Drag it into the drawing area and release the mouse button.6. Properties to check the element's Behavior Furnishings on the Insert toolbar. Note: Before inserting a Furnishings element. Furnishings elements automatically attach themselves to walls if Collision Control is on. Right-click and choose properties. OR click 3. 2. 5. you can manually insert a Furnishings element three ways: a. if you select Back as the snap edge. 4. select the cabinet edge that you want to snap to a wall edge.

6. To set Furnishings behavior properties: 1. Select Properties from the menu. type the height you want the base of the element to sit in relation to the floor level (or ground level. 2. Right-click and click Finish in the menu. In the Position area. 3. landscaping items. In the Insertion Point area.Chapter 8: Fixtures and Furnishings 6. Then. then click to insert it. select the element and right-click. plumbing and electrical fixtures. A wide variety are supplied in the category in the Master Catalog. Your cursor will be attached at this insertion point when you position the element. you should check its Behavior properties. see Shifting from a Point on page 53. 5. These determine its insertion height (at or above floor level) and insertion positioning point. If this value is 0. if landscaping). In the element's properties box. Place the element where you want it. In the Catalog window. Note: If using Imperial measure. indicate an insertion point on the element. Furnishings Before inserting a Furnishings element. if you are inserting a refrigerator. make sure you indicate feet or inches. Do this either by typing specific X. Furnishings Behavior Properties Furnishings are elements like appliances. For example. you will select Back as the snap edge. select the element edge that you want to snap to a wall. For more information. In the Snap Edge area. Tip: If you want to insert the Furnishings element a specific distance and direction from a selected point. you can use the Commander. Click OK. the back of the refrigerator will snap to a wall (if Collision Control is on). 7. in the Distance above current location box. Y and Z axis values or adjusting the slider controls. Undefined values are taken as inches. 4. the base of the element will insert at floor level (or ground level). and so on. furniture. 7. click the Behavior tab. 77 .

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Adding a Floor to the Entire Perimeter To instantly add a floor to the entire perimeter of your model: 1.Inserting Floors No matter what type of floor you insert. You can: • • • instantly add a floor to the entire perimeter of a model instantly add a floor to an individual room pick points to define the floor boundary When you insert a floor. however. Insert Element on the Catalog toolbar. select Tools > Building Locations or click Building Locations on the Tools toolbar. 2. The Insert Floors function lets you insert floors three (3) different ways. 4. Right-click and click Insert Element in the Shortcut menu. Click OR c. Select the floor you want to insert from the Catalog. you can manually insert a floor three ways: a. Note: If Auto-insertion mode is disabled. the top of the floor is level with the Floor Level defined for the location. The floor is added automatically. Drag it into the drawing area and release the mouse button. OR b. is visually represented to provide a realistic structural representation. 80 . Right-click in the drawing area and click Insert: Auto Perimeter in the Shortcut menu. 3. a common 3D element is used to represent all floors. Click anywhere inside the perimeter of the model. 5. Select Insert > Floors or click Floors on the Insert toolbar. Thickness. Make sure the location that you want to add the floor to is current. To view or edit the properties of a floor location.

Right-click in the drawing area and click Insert: Pick Points in the Shortcut menu. If you have not done so already. 2. Inserting Ceilings No matter what type of ceiling you insert. If the point you want to select is not the endpoint of an existing element. choose one of the solid 3D views to see your floor. 3. 2. Right-click in the drawing area and select Insert: Auto Room from the Shortcut menu. choose one of the solid 3D views to see your floor.(For more information. however. Follow steps 1–3 above. is visually represented to provide a realistic structural representation. you can shift the start point a specific distance and direction from a selected point.) 4.Chapter 9: Surfaces 6. (You do not have to select the start point again because the last point you pick is always closed back to the start point.) 4. The floor is added automatically. If you have not done so already. Right-click and select Finish from the menu. Adding a Floor to a Room To add a floor to an individual room (provided all the perimeter walls are connected): 1. Thickness. Click inside the room that you want to add the floor to. a common 3D element is used to represent all ceilings. 7. If you have not done so already. Continue selecting points until the boundary is defined. 5. 3. Select a start point for the floor boundary. choose one of the solid 3D views to see your floor. Right-click and click Finish in the menu. Follow steps 1–3 above. (If you want. (see Shifting from a Point on page 53). Right-click and click Finish in the menu. 7. Select the next point (corner) of the floor boundary. 81 . Creating a Floor By Picking Points To create a floor of any shape and size by picking points with your mouse: 1. you can continue adding floors to other rooms.) 6. 5.

Select Insert > Ceilings or click 3. Right-click and click Finish in the menu. Adding a Ceiling to the Entire Perimeter To instantly add a ceiling to the entire perimeter of your model: 1. 2.The Insert Ceilings function lets you insert ceilings three (3) different ways. 82 . You can: • • • instantly add a ceiling to the entire perimeter of a model instantly add a ceiling to an individual room pick points to define the ceiling boundary When you insert a ceiling. 4. Drag it into the drawing area and release the mouse button. Right-click in the drawing area and click Insert: Auto Perimeter in the Shortcut menu. Select the ceiling you want to insert. Click anywhere inside the perimeter of the model. 6. 5. the bottom of the ceiling is inserted at the Ceiling Height defined for the location. Ceilings on the Insert toolbar. select Tools > Building Locations or click Building Locations on the Tools toolbar. Make sure the location that you want to add the ceiling to is current. Insert Element on the Catalog toolbar. To view or edit the properties of a floor location. choose one of the solid 3D views to see your ceiling. Note: If Auto-insertion mode is disabled. Right-click and click Insert Element in the Shortcut menu. The ceiling is added automatically. 7. If you have not done so already. you can manually insert a ceiling three ways: a. Click OR c. OR b.

3.Chapter 9: Surfaces Adding a Ceiling to a Room To add a ceiling to an individual room (provided all the perimeter walls are connected): 1. Select the next point (corner) of the ceiling boundary. Right-click and select Finish from the menu. The ceiling is added automatically. Right-click in the drawing area and click Insert: Pick Points in the Shortcut menu. Continue selecting points until the boundary is defined. 83 . Follow steps 1–3 above. or manually by picking points.) 6. 5. If the point you want to select is not the endpoint of an existing element. Creating a Ceiling By Picking Points To create a ceiling of any shape and size by picking points with your mouse: 1. choose one of the solid 3D views to see your ceiling. with a single mouse click. you can continue adding ceilings to other rooms. 3. 2. 7. choose one of the solid 3D views to see your ceiling. Follow steps 1–3 above. (see Shifting from a Point on page 53). If you have not done so already. 2. Inserting Roofs You can insert a wide variety of roofs either automatically. Right-click and select Finish from the menu. Right-click in the drawing area and select Insert: Auto Room from the Shortcut menu. (For more information. 5.) 4. Click inside the room that you want to add the ceiling to. If you have not done so already.) 4. you can shift the start point a specific distance and direction from a selected point. (If you want. (You do not have to select the start point again because the last point you pick is always closed back to the start point. Select a start point for the ceiling boundary.

Make sure that the location you want to add the roof to is current. select Tools > Building Locations or click Building Locations on the Tools toolbar. you can manually insert a roof three ways: a. To view or edit the properties of a location. Insert Element on the Catalog toolbar. 3. select the roof you want to insert. Right-click in the drawing area and click Insert: Auto Perimeter in the Shortcut menu. 5. you can edit each of its support segments to create virtually any configuration. OR b. 6. you can change two ends to gables. Select Insert > Roofs or click Roofs on the Insert toolbar. Note: If Auto-insertion mode is disabled. 2. 4. When you insert a roof. or if you have inserted a hip roof. The roof is added automatically. Click OR c. Once you have inserted a roof. you can control the slope of individual segments. Click anywhere inside the perimeter of the model. 7. Adding a Roof to the Entire Perimeter To instantly add a roof to the entire perimeter of your model: 1. Right-click and click Insert Element in the Shortcut menu. Right-click and click Finish in the menu.The roof inserted depends on what is defined for the roof type you have selected. Drag it into the drawing area and release the mouse button. For example. In the Catalog. If you have not done so already. choose one of the solid 3D views to see your roof. the roof is inserted at the wall height defined for the location. You can also perform various functions that affect the roof as one unit. 84 . Roof definitions can be customized by accessing a roof's Properties.

Ceilings. you can use the Selection Filter (see Selection Filtering on page 99) to turn off elements. like walls. Right-click in the drawing area and click Insert Opening in the menu. and Roofs Once you have added a floor. (For more information. ceiling. you can shift the start point a specific distance and direction from a selected point. There are three ways to insert a custom opening: • • • Draw the opening manually by picking points. Right-click in the drawing area and click Insert: Pick Points in the Shortcut menu. 5. Select the next point (corner) of the roof boundary.) 6. Select the surface by clicking anywhere along its perimeter. that are in the way. (You do not have to select the start point again because the last point you pick is always closed back to the start point. You will probably find this easier in 2D Plan view. Also.) 4. 2. Follow steps 1–3 above. Define the opening by entering values in the Commander. Inserting Custom Openings in Floors. 7. Select a start point for the roof boundary. If the point you want to select is not the endpoint of an existing element. or roof. 3. 85 . Click a spot on the surface to select a start point for the opening. choose one of the solid 3D views to see your roof. Continue selecting points until the boundary is defined. 3. If you have not done so already. 2. Manually Inserting a Custom Opening To manually insert a custom opening: 1.Chapter 9: Surfaces Creating a Roof By Picking Points To create a roof of any shape and size by picking points with your mouse: 1. (see Shifting from a Point on page 53). Combine the two methods above. Right-click and select Finish from the menu. you can insert a custom opening in it of virtually any shape and size by using the Insert Opening function in the right-click Edit menu.

5. You will probably find this easier in 2D Plan view. right-click and select Finish from the menu. Also. Right-click in the drawing area and click Insert Opening in the menu. you can use the Selection Filter (see Selection Filtering on page 99) to turn off elements. 3. Also. enter values in the Commander to define the distance and direction as indicated by angle (see Direction Angle on page 6) for each following point. 2. When you have selected your final point. that are in the way. you can use the Selection Filter (see Selection Filtering on page 99) to turn off elements. Click a spot on the surface to select a start point for the opening. OR Shift from a point (see Shifting from a Point on page 53) if you want to begin a specific distance from some other point (like a corner). Select points to define the opening. As you do. You will probably find this easier in 2D Plan view. 5. Inserting a Custom Opening Using the Commander To insert a custom opening using the Commander: 1. The last point picked is always connected back to the start point to form a closed shape. When you have selected your final point.4. 4. 4. like walls. Combining the Two Methods Above To combine the two methods above: 1. With your start point defined. the opening is created. right-click and select Finish from the menu. Shift from a point (see Shifting from a Point on page 53) to begin a specific distance from some other point (like a corner). Click in the drawing area or hit Enter to confirm each point. 2. that are in the way. Select the surface by clicking anywhere along its perimeter. like walls. 6. 5. 3. Select subsequent points manually to define the opening. When you have selected your final point. Select the surface by clicking anywhere along its perimeter. right-click and select Finish from the menu. Right-click in the drawing area and click Insert Opening in the menu. 86 .

87 . ceiling and roof openings you have custom created Removing Wall Openings Inserted from the Openings Category To remove a wall opening inserted from the Openings category: 1. two opposite sides will do. To remove an opening you have custom created: 1. Click the opening to select it. Select all sides of the opening. 3. 3. Ceiling and Roof Openings You Have Custom Created Note: To select a custom-created opening. you will delete the floor. the surface in which it appears must also be selected. For proper deletion procedure see the following topic: Removing an Opening. This is because there are basically two selection levels when it comes to roofs. Editing Roof Support Segments Roofs can be edited both as one unit or by one or more of their support segments. Removing an Opening There are two different types of openings you might want to remove: • • Wall openings inserted from the Openings category Floor. 2. appears. Click Delete. Right-click to bring up the Shortcut menu.Chapter 9: Surfaces Note: Do not attempt to remove the opening by selecting and deleting. This will remove the surface it is part of as well. (In four-sided openings. Select the surface the opening is part of by clicking on the surface’s perimeter. If you try to remove the opening by right-clicking and clicking Delete. Removing Floor. 2. ceiling or roof surface as well. Hover over one of the grips or control handles till the Move cursor 4.) Use Shift + click to add selections beyond the primary. Drag the opening off the surface until it disappears.

general editing commands in the right-click menu like move. 1 below. The control handle (blue on screen) and solid line (green on screen) show that the right support is the main selection (because the user has clicked one of the hip lines or the fascia edge associated with it). 1: Initial Roof Selection At this point. in Fig. the dashed line (green and purple on screen) indicates that the roof is selected. the main selection. changes to roof Properties (like switching Roof Shape from Hip to Gable) will affect only the right support.For example. and duplicate will affect the roof as a whole. rotate. This is done by clicking one of the roof lines. However. preferably a fascia edge. Fig. 88 .

Fig. Selection is indicated by the two control handles in the middle of each support segment.Chapter 9: Surfaces In Fig. (This has been done by holding down the Shift key and clicking on the dotted line of the second support. 2 below. the left and right support segments of the roof have been selected. in the Shortcut menu. you would convert this Hip roof into one with two Gable ends as seen below in Fig. and by the fact that their lines are solid. you were now to choose Properties > Size and change the Roof Shape from Hip to Gable. 2: Two Support Segments Selected If. 3: Roof with Two Gable Ends 89 . 3. Fig.

Creating a Simple Dormer A dormer is a framed opening that projects out from a sloped roof and forms a vertical wall. In 2D Plan view. (See: Inserting Roofs on page 83. 7. Create a model with a roof. 5. your Ground Floor wall height. To add a dormer to an existing roof. Enter a Support Height at. Pick three points on the existing roof surface to define the dormer support lines. in the Parameters pane. On your existing first roof. 4. 3. right-click. 8. When you have correctly selected the roof. 6. On the Size page. Note that your cursor changes to an index finger pointer . usually to allow for a window. your cursor changes back to a pencil pointer . you use the Insert as Dormer option in the right-click menu of the Insert Roofs command. click in the Support Height box. select a second roof. (The fourth point automatically wraps back to the initial point. 9. or somewhat higher than.) In the Catalog. To insert a simple dormer: 1. Click the arrow and change By Location to Absolute. click a roof line (preferably a fascia [outer] edge) to select it. right-click and choose Properties. 2. A dormer is created.) 10. insert the second roof. and choose Insert as Dormer. 90 .

3. after you’ve drawn your points. usually to allow for a window. OR click Building Locations on the Tools toolbar and set your dormer Head Height and Wall Height. To add a dormer to an existing roof. Using the Floor Locations box Second Floor. draw a model with at least four walls. 2. they will disappear and a dormer will not be created. On the Ground Floor. Tip: The kind of dormer created above could be dragged out to make an intersecting porch roof. .Chapter 9: Surfaces You can now manipulate the dormer by: • • Resizing it by dragging selected supports. To add a dormer on top of walls: 1. Adding a Dormer on Walls A dormer is a framed opening that projects out from a sloped roof and forms a vertical wall. But. you use the Insert as Dormer option in the right-click menu of the Insert Roofs command. switch your location to the 91 . Select Tools > Building Locations. Simple Roof Dormer with Front Gable Note: Your dormer will intersect the roof where the Support Height you’ve chosen meets the slope of the roof line. if you've chosen a Support Height that’s too high. and it doesn’t intersect the roof line anywhere. create a front gable as shown below). Editing the properties of selected supports (e.g.

4. Note: You’ll probably need to click the Selection Filter and turn off Current Location Only so you can select something that is on the Ground Floor. 14. option. 12. go back to the Second Floor location.. In 2D Plan view.. and choose Insert as Dormer. On the Second Floor. 11. On your existing first roof. Choose the Cut an opening. After the roof has been inserted.Note: Set the Head Height lower than the Wall Height so that there will be some room above the window(s) you will insert later. 92 . draw four walls that will support the dormer. Pick four points aligned with the dormer walls to define the support lines of the dormer roof. 10. You’ll probably have to pick two of them well back onto the opposite roof slope to get the dormer roof line to fit properly. Check what you’ve drawn in a 3D View. click a roof line (preferably a fascia [outer] edge) to select it. The following dialog box appears: 7. your cursor changes back to a pencil pointer . right-click. 9. 13. 5. Go back to the Ground Floor and put a roof on your model ((see Inserting Roofs on page 83) for more information). select a second roof to insert. 6. Note that your cursor changes to an index finger pointer . When you have correctly selected the roof. 8.

In either 2D or 3D View.Chapter 9: Surfaces 15. adjust dormer size (by dragging) and add front gable end. You should end up with something similar to the following drawing: Note: Dormer walls will be visible in the interior of your model. 17. 93 . (See Editing Roof Support Segments for more information.) 16. the walls must be deleted and the views modified accordingly. For interior views. Insert window or windows in front gable wall.

94 .

Editing 10 retpahC 95 .

Press Ctrl+Y. 96 . To undo an action: 1. Tip: You can use the Redo command to reapply an action you have canceled using the Undo command. Redoing an Undo The Redo command reapplies a command that you have reversed using Undo. OR 3. Undo on the Standard toolbar. Click OR 2. Select Edit > Redo. Select Edit > Undo. Redo on the Standard toolbar. To redo a task: 1. You can undo as many actions as you have taken since your last Save. Press Ctrl+Z.Undoing the Previous Action The Undo command cancels your most recent action. OR 3. Click OR 2. Redo will only work directly following an Undo.

How To Click the element you want to select. Select Edit > Select Previous. drag a window through any part of the element or elements you want to select. or right to left. Select Edit > Select All. Selects all elements on the current location (as long as they are enabled in the Filter). Any elements touching the selection window will be selected (they do not need to be totally enclosed). You select an element with a single mouse click. Crossing Select an element or group of elements. Select Previous Select All Re-selects the element(s) you last selected. Hold down Shift and click the additional elements you want to select. the most recent selection is green and prior selections are blue. Going from either left to right. This method is particularly useful when you want to select a large element not totally visible on the screen.Chapter 10: Editing Selecting Elements Various methods of selecting elements are outlined below: Selection Methods Method Clicking Purpose The most common method of selection. Selection 97 . Select multiple elements. Shift + Clicking Click the first element you want to select. In most cases.

Shift + Click any element in a series a second time to deselect it. Select Edit > Selection Filter. Prohibits/allows selection of elements and locations. Pointer Disables Auto-insertion Mode.Selection Methods. Shift + Clicking a selection Deselect All Deselects any element in a multiple selection. Click Pointer on the Insert toolbar. You then select by clicking. Deselects all selected elements. For more information see: Selection Filtering. OR Click Selection Filter on the Views toolbar. Select Edit > Deselect All. OR Right-click in the drawing area and select Deselect All from the menu. Selection Filter 98 . cont. OR Click empty space. The Selection Filter is particularly useful when elements become difficult to select because of view size or population density.

Chapter 10: Editing Selection Filtering When your model contains a number of elements. As well. it can sometimes be difficult to select certain ones because of proximity or overlapping edges. Or. Floors. can be very difficult to select. especially in a 3D Model view. mistakenly selecting the wrong element is often a problem. even in 2D. for example. small elements can be hard to select in an extreme zoomed out view. or below. Select Edit > Selection Filter. you could filter out a floor above. For instance. you could “turn off” all other elements. thus making it much easier to select windows. OR 2. You can even filter out entire floor locations from being selected. 99 . To access the Selection Filter: 1. Click Selection Filter on the View toolbar. if you were working exclusively with window insertion. Also. the one you were working on (or both) to make selecting easier on your current location. Use the Selection Filter to stop certain elements from being selected.

The Selection Filter offers complete display control for all locations and elements in your drawing. It offers two types of filtering: Element and Location. Two Views of the Selection Filter 100 .

the Selection Filter dialog box displays a list of all element groups: Element Groups Displayed in Selection Filter 101 .Chapter 10: Editing Selection Filtering by Element If you choose to filter by Element.

Use the lamp icons to prohibit/allow selection at the desired location. meaning it can be selected. OR click Selection Filter on the View toolbar. To filter all instances of an element in your drawing.g. Each has a lamp icon beside it. select Element. 3. The selection filtering will be in effect. d. the element is on. click OK to return to your drawing. 2. Once you have made your choices. To instantly turn all elements off. c. a.You can select: • • • • every instance of a particular element group in your drawing (e. (If the lamp is yellow. This displays a list of locations under the element group.) b. click All On. A list of elements is displayed. all Doors on every location) a particular element group at the Current location only a particular element group at a selected location or locations Text and Dimension Annotation Elements To filter by element: 1. To instantly turn all elements on. In the Selection Filter dialog box. click the element’s lamp icon to prohibit/allow selection. To filter selected elements at a specific location. click All Off. 102 . expand the element group by clicking its plus sign (+). Select Edit > Selection Filter.

Chapter 10: Editing Selection Filtering by Location If you choose to filter by Location. Under each location is a sub-list of the elements on that location. the Selection Filter dialog box displays a list of the locations in your drawing. Locations Displayed in Selection Filter 103 .

it is important that you understand the differences. This displays a list of elements for that location.You can prohibit/allow: • • • an entire location selected elements on that location Text and Dimension Annotation Elements To filter by location: 1. click OK to return to your drawing. There are three ways to edit element properties. Each has a lamp icon beside it. on the View toolbar. select Location. c. To prohibit/allow selected elements at a specific location. Price. In the Selection Filter dialog box. Once you have made your choices. click All Off. such as texture or pattern) Note: Most elements also have a Size page that defines the dimensions and composition of the element. meaning you can select its elements. etc. Click the lamp icons off/on next to the elements you want to prohibit/allow. 3. OR click Selection Filter 2. click the location’s lamp icon. Select Edit > Selection Filter. The locations in your drawing are listed. If the lamp is yellow. click All On. To prohibit/allow selection on an entire location. a. The selection filtering will be in effect. the location is on. b. expand the location by clicking its plus sign (+). Editing Element Properties Every element you insert has its own Properties containing a variety of definitions. To instantly turn all locations off. Manufacturer.) Appearance (material definitions for displaying the element. All elements have the following Properties pages: • • General (information such as Name. Because each method has different results. The Size page varies for every element type. d. To instantly turn all locations on. 104 .

(This is a catalog created as you draw. The Current Model catalog is local to the drawing ONLY and saved along with it. It lists all the elements in your model. two Fixed Windows with the same attributes). once you have inserted an element in your drawing. You can override this if you want. The changes are to the element in the current drawing only. only certain properties (instance variables) can be changed. It lists all the elements in your drawing. either the Master Catalog or a custom catalog that you have created and saved. (Right-clicking a selected element and choosing Properties will display a dialog box containing a 105 . a new element is created in the Current Model catalog.) Method 3: Editing Elements in External Catalogs Every element you insert must come from a pre-existing external catalog. If you edit the properties of an element in the Current Model catalog.g. (See: Editing Elements in External Catalogs on page 42. as long as they are of the same type (e. External catalogs are available for all drawings you create.) Editing Inserted Elements You can select any element in your drawing and edit its properties. The remaining properties (definition variables) are unavailable. Changes that you make to them will affect future projects. a Current Model catalog is created automatically.) You can also edit more than one element at a time. but if you do. (See: Editing Inserted Elements on page 105. all appearances of that element in your drawing are updated.) Method 2: Editing Elements in the Current Model Catalog As you add elements to your drawing.Chapter 10: Editing Method 1: Editing Inserted Elements By default. Other appearances of the element in the drawing will remain unchanged and retain their original catalog definition. Only the elements you select will update. (See: Editing Elements in the Current Model Catalog on page 43. Note: Changes you make in the Current Model catalog do not affect the original definition of the element in the external Master Catalog (where the element came from).

Only the element that you select is changed. 2.g. select Allow Definition Editing on the General page. Other appearances of the element in the drawing remain unchanged and retain their original catalog definition. such as dimensions or appearance. only certain properties (instance variables) are available for editing. you can use the Commander. two Fixed Windows with the same attributes). Select the element or elements you want to edit. you can override the default property settings. 4. Right-click in the drawing area and click Properties in the menu. the selected element is updated in the drawing automatically. However.) 106 . only the elements you select are updated.number of defining characteristics such as dimensions and appearance. If you make changes to visible properties. (See: Moving with the Commander on page 107.) By default.) However. 3. If you do. To edit inserted elements: 1. If you want to edit definition variables (and create a new element in the Current Model catalog). Click OK. 6. The remaining properties (definition variables) are unavailable. You can edit more than one element at a time as long as the elements are of the same type (e. Adjust the values on the pages of the dialog box. The original remains there as well. a new element is created in the Current Model catalog. The selected elements are updated in the drawing. 5. Other occurrences of the element in your drawing remain unchanged. if you want precise control over distance and direction. and edit the definition variables (by selecting Allow Definition Editing on the General page). (Definition variables define the element's dimensions and physical composition. Dragging Dragging is the easiest way to move an element. Moving Elements You can drag selected elements to move them or use the Commander for more exact moving. As with a single element.

if you select a wall and drag it. Select the element you want to move. 3. Walls and Ceilings. Moving with the Commander The Commander provides precise control for moving elements. Once you have selected a base point. or by typing values in the Commander. with Floors. you are in Stretch mode. 4. When the element is where you want it. 2. 107 . Moving an element using the Commander consists of three main steps: • • • selecting the element selecting a base point specifying the move distance and direction To move an element using the Commander: 1. you can shift the element from a selected base point. If the point you want to select is not an element endpoint. Click. 4.) With many elements (like Windows). Move your cursor over the element until the Move cursor 3. Note: If you select a floor or ceiling and drag it. 2. you would pick an element grip point. release the mouse button. it will stretch. Right-click in the drawing area and click Move in the Shortcut menu. You can specify the exact distance and direction (using the direction angle) you want to move the element. you can shift the base point a specific distance and direction from a selected reference point. not move.Chapter 10: Editing To move an element by dragging: 1. Also. Typically. Also. Select a base point for the move. you are in Move/Drag Mode by default once you select the element. (You can select multiple elements if you want. then drag the element to move it. you need to define a second point (the point you are moving TO. However. Make sure the element you want to move is selected.) You can do this by moving the element with your mouse and selecting a point on the screen. walls attached to the selected wall will remain attached and stretch with it. is displayed.

You can then drag the copy to a new location. type the desired values in the x and y edit boxes. Copying an Element You can copy an element three different ways: Copying an Element Options Function Duplicate Access By Select element and right-click. After entering the last value. Duplicate to Locations Select element and right-click.) 108 . click in the drawing area or hit Enter. Description Copies the selected element. Lets you copy the element to another existing location. Using the Commander. the selected element can also be automatically copied a specific distance and direction on the current location. After entering the last value. Then.) (See: Copying Elements to Other Locations on page 110. • If you want to move the element in specific X and Y directions. in the Distance edit box type a distance to move the element. click in the drawing area or hit Enter. More Info (See: Copying Elements on the Same Location on page 109. in the Direction edit box.Note: • If you want to move an element in a single direction from the base point. type the direction you want to move the element.

Select the element to copy. Creates copies of an element in a series of rows and/ or columns. Once you have selected a base point. however. Typically you would select one of the element's grips. The element is highlighted and element grips are displayed. 109 .Chapter 10: Editing Copying an Element Options Array Rectangular (availability of this command varies with element selected) Select element and right-click. You can do this by dragging the copy with your mouse and then clicking to select a point on the screen. OR by typing values in the Commander. The Commander is displayed. (See: Arraying Elements on page 111. Right-click in the drawing area and select Duplicate from the menu. you need to indicate a second point—the point you are copying the element to. if enabled. Select a base point for the copy movement.) Copying Elements on the Same Location When you copy an element. you copy it in the X/Y plane (left or right/up or down) on the current location. To duplicate an element: 1. you can click anywhere in the drawing. 4. You can position the copy by: • • dragging it with the mouse OR typing values in the Commander. Select a base point (the reference point from which you will specify the copy direction and distance). Indicate the distance and direction to place the copy from the base point. 3. The Duplicate command in the right-click menu lets you copy an element in three basic steps: • • • Select the element. 2.

type the distance to move the copy from the base point (if working in Feet-Inches. After you indicate the last value. If you want to copy the element using specific X and Y values: a. Select the elements you want to copy. 5. d. 2. negative values for left and down). In the Direction edit box. Click OK. After you indicate the last value. b. be sure to include the appropriate symbol). click in the drawing area or hit Enter.When using the Commander: 1. Make sure the location you want to copy elements FROM is current. Select the target location(s) you want to copy the elements to. Select the base point. To copy elements to other locations: 1. you can copy the exterior walls on the Ground Floor to the Second Floor and instantly create another story. This is useful if the elements you have already drawn will have the same layout on another location. Right-click and click Duplicate to Locations. In the Distance edit box. click in the drawing area or hit Enter. Copying Elements to Other Locations The Duplicate to Locations command (available in the Shortcut menu when you rightclick a selected element) lets you copy existing elements to other locations. b. Type the desired values in the X and Y edit boxes (positive values for right and up. For example. Select the base point. 4. 3. c. Note: The location you are copying TO must exist in the Building Locations dialog box (Tools > Building Locations). type the direction you want to move the copy. 110 . 2. If you want to copy the element in a single direction: a. For more information see Defining Floor Locations on page 18. c.

2. 111 . 5.You do this using the Array Rectangular function. you can create an array in a single row or column. This determines the distance between elements appearing in columns (vertical spacing). and the array's rotation angle. or a layout of rows and columns. 3. you create multiple copies of an element at the same time. type the number of vertical columns you want or select a value. By entering values in the Array Rectangular dialog box. In the Distance Between Rows box.Chapter 10: Editing Arraying Elements When you array elements. You can also control the spacing between elements in the array. type the spacing you want between rows. In the Number of Columns box. type the number of horizontal rows you want or select a value. In the Number of Rows box. Select the element you want to array by clicking it. 4. Right-click and select Array Rectangular from the menu. Array Rectangular Dialog Box To array an element: 1.

Right-click and select Rotate from the menu. To rotate an element manually around its CENTER: 1. 3.) 112 . Note: If you are working in Feet-Inches. Release the mouse button when the element is where you want it. Click the element to select it. Rotate Cursor Displayed 3. Note: If you want to freely rotate an element. Click the element's grip handle (you will see the rotate cursor displayed when you hover over it). make sure you include the feet or inches symbol. It can be anywhere in the drawing area. Click to define the rotation point. (Note: The point does not have to be on the element. and drag the element in a circular motion. make sure Ortho and Angle Snap are disabled. This determines the distance between elements appearing in rows (horizontal spacing). 7. Click the element to select it. 2. even though you are rotating an element manually. Click OK. Rotating Elements Manually To see your angle of rotation.6. type the degree of rotation for the array. enable the Commander (if it is not already enabled). In the Distance Between Columns box. In the Array Rotation Angle box. type the spacing you want between columns. To rotate an element manually around a USER-DEFINED ROTATION POINT: 1. 2. 8.

You now need to specify your baseline for the rotation by establishing two points. Select the element to rotate. type the angle value you want. 3. The element will rotate around the defined rotation point. 113 . Note: Positive angle values are read in a counter-clockwise direction. To rotate from an AUTOMATIC baseline using the Commander: 1. They are read in a clockwise direction. Click in the drawing area. To rotate an element from a SELF-DEFINED baseline using the Commander: 7. click anywhere in the drawing area to set your first point. click a second point in the drawing area. An automatic baseline is established running through the point at 180°. The element is rotated. Move your mouse in a circular motion. Click anywhere in the drawing area. make sure Ortho and Angle Snap are disabled. the rotate cursor is displayed. It is also possible to enter negative values. Follow Steps 1–2 above.) 11. 2. Follow Steps 4–5 above.Chapter 10: Editing 4. 5. First. Then. click once. 6. Right-click in the drawing area and click Rotate in the menu. or hit Enter. click in the Commander. Rotating Elements Using the Commander The Commander allows you to specify a precise rotation angle. 5. 9. Note: If you want to freely rotate an element. Your baseline is now established between the two points. 4. When the element is where you want it. 8. (Note: Once you click the second point. In the Rotation Angle box of the Commander. Do not hold down the mouse button. 10. Next.

or choose Edit > Undo. OR 2. or press Ctrl+Z. drag a window through any part of the element or elements. Any elements touching the window will be selected (they do not need to be totally enclosed). first select the element. 114 . choose option one or two above. Then. Right-click. then click Delete in the menu. Tip: To quickly delete a number of elements. Press the Delete key on your keyboard. click the Undo button on the Standard toolbar. Note: If you delete an element then change your mind. You can drag either left to right or right to left.Deleting Elements To delete an element from your drawing. Then: 1.

Viewing 11 retpahC 115 .

Shaded Outline. In the Window menu. To display your model in 2D Plan view: 1.Default View). In Views. the default view is 2D Plan.Basics of 2D and 3D Viewing By default. Shaded. Viewing in 2D Plan View When you start a drawing. Rendered and Render Mesh) are available. Hidden Line. Two types of 3D viewing (Parallel and Perspective) and either six or eight—depending on your program version—different display types (Wireframe. You can switch between 2D Plan view and any default 3D view (or create a 3D view of your own) as often as you want during a work session. Note: If the Default View folder is not visible in Views. 2D Plan view is ideal for creating a floor plan. This is the most common view for drawing and creating floor layouts. click the plus sign beside 2D Plan. lets you create extremely photo-realistic results for scenes that contain a number of separate reflecting surfaces.0 Professional). Textured. under 2D Plan. OR 2. click the Default View folder. 116 . which provides the Rendered and Render Mesh views. It shows your model as if you were looking at it from above. Patterned. And. the view in the drawing area is 2D Plan view. the program’s Camera gives you the ability to fine-tune your 3D views. select 1 Drawing Name:1 (2DPlan . which displays your model as if you were looking at it from above. The program’s Rendering solution (available only in 3D Home Architect® 5.

Chapter 11: Viewing Viewing and Opening Views Viewing Open Views If a view is open but not visible. and click Open View. Go to the Views panel and double-click the view. OR Select the view. Closed Views To display a closed view: 1. right-click. 117 . Open Views Opening and Viewing Closed Views Views that are closed are represented by closed folders. you can display the view by clicking it in the Views panel or selecting the view from the Window menu.

Note: Because views are saved automatically with the drawing. However. and scale. Edit the view name or scale. Click OK. But make sure you save the edited drawing file before you exit. Viewing and Editing the Properties of a View The properties of a view include name. Edit the view as desired. you do not need to save them separately. 4. when you reopen the view your changes will still be there. Open the view (if not open) or make it current (if already open). To edit a view: 1. type. display changes (like hiding elements) in any 3D view have no effect on the appearance of the model in any 2D Plan view. Note: If you edit a view. then close it. 2. even if you change them. 2. To view or edit the properties of a view: 1. You can edit the name of all views (2D or 3D). Editing Views Since all views are directly linked. but you can edit the scale of only 2D views: • • Plan Elevation 3D views do not have a scale. You do not have to save the individual view. physical changes (like adding/removing elements) that you make to one view—no matter if it is 2D or 3D—are automatically shown in all other views. 3. Your changes are saved automatically. In the Views pane. 118 . Select Properties from the menu. right-click the view.

and select Close View from the menu. Or. click Close at the top of the view that you want to close. and they both have names. 119 . You can close a view window two ways: • • Go to the Views panel. The program offers three view modes: • • • 2D Plan Parallel (3D) Perspective (3D) Also. Selecting View Modes Selecting a view mode controls your viewpoint of the model. To select a 3D view mode: 1. 2. Choose one of the default Model views. If you have two or more views open. if you tile the two views (Window > Tile). Once you have selected or created a 3D view. you can switch between a 2D view and a 3D view with a single mouse click. right-click the view in the list. and click Camera Properties in the Shortcut menu. you do not have to save them separately. it remains open until you close it or exit the program. even if you have edited them.Chapter 11: Viewing Closing a View When you create a view. OR create a 3D view of your own. Since views are saved automatically with the drawing. you can see both at the same time. right-click in the drawing area.

Shaded Outline. as if you were looking at it from above. Benefits/Uses Most common view for drawing and creating floor layouts Use to set the 3D view at a common angle.) Parallel 120 .) (See: Viewing in Parallel 3D Mode on page 121. Then click OK. Can use Shaded. More Info (See: Viewing in 2D Plan View on page 116. you can further control the appearance of your model by selecting from the 3D-only display types Shaded. click the alternate selection. Tip: In a 3D view. Camera with Parallel Mode Selected To change the view mode. Shaded Outline. Below is a brief description of the three different view modes you can choose. or Textured. The Camera Properties dialog box appears with either Parallel or Perspective selected under View Mode (depending on your Model view). All drawing lines are parallel. View Modes View Mode 2D Plan Description Displays your model in 2D.3. Eliminates the effect of distance from a view. or Textured display views.

Parallel view provides an easily perceived alternative. Camera with Parallel Mode Selected 121 . In Perspective mode. Can use Shaded. To select Parallel 3D view: 1. Right-click in the drawing area of your 3D model. all drawing lines are parallel. Parallel viewing contrasts with Perspective viewing in which the scale of an element decreases according to its distance from the viewer. Select Parallel. 2. 3. Lines converge to a vanishing point. Click Camera Properties in the Shortcut menu. cont.Chapter 11: Viewing View Modes. angle and height. Creates a realistic 3D view of your model. Then click OK. Realistic 3D viewing at a specific viewpoint. or Textured display views (See: Viewing in Perspective 3D Mode on page 122. A Parallel 3D view eliminates the effect of distance from a view. Shaded Outline. In Parallel mode. 4. lines converge to a vanishing point.) Viewing in Parallel 3D Mode Parallel is the default 3D viewing mode. Perspective Scale of an element decreases according to its distance from the viewer. The Camera Properties dialog box appears with Perspective selected in View Mode. Perspective distortion can make some views (particularly Wireframe) hard to understand.

lines converge to a vanishing point. Then click OK. Elements that are closer appear larger. right-click in the drawing area. you have the choice of displaying your model in Shaded.Note: In a 3D view. The effect simulates a real-life viewing experience. you have the choice of displaying your model in Shaded. 2. Viewing in Perspective 3D Mode In a Perspective view. Once you have opened or created a 3D view. all drawing lines are parallel. Camera with Perspective Mode Selected Tip: Once you have created a 3D view. and click Camera Properties in the Shortcut menu. To view a drawing in Perspective 3D mode: 1. The Camera Properties dialog box appears with Parallel selected as the default in View Mode. Shaded Outline or Textured view. Shaded Outline or Textured view. open or create a 3D view. 3. First. Select Perspective. In a Parallel view. elements that are far away from the viewpoint (which can be controlled by camera placement) appear smaller. 4. Naming Views Views are named according to the following convention: • Drawing Name: # View – Name 122 . In a Perspective view.

3. 2. Click OK.bld: 2 Front Elevation (South). A scale of 1:1 (12" = 1'. 5. your drawing is initially shown in and contains one 2D Plan view. 4. Right-click in Views and select New View from the menu. if your drawing is named Bungalow. The view is also added to the 2D Plan group in Views. select 2D Plan. Press Enter. To create an additional 2D Plan view: 1. the current view of the model in the main drawing window is copied to a new window at the scale you specify. From the View Type list. When you create an additional 2D Plan view. In the Scale area. type a name for the view in the Name box. Select Rename from the menu. right-click the view. Note: The scale is the ratio of drawing units to actual units.bld. Note: You can also slowly double-click the name to enter Rename mode. However. you can create an additional 2D Plan view (or views) at a different drawing scale. 3. In the Views panel.0") creates a smaller-scale view. 123 . 4. The scale ratio is automatically shown in the box on the left. the view would be named Bungalow. Actual scaling can only be seen in view printouts. In the View Properties dialog box. Creating an Additional 2D Plan View By default.Chapter 11: Viewing For example.0") creates a view that is the same scale as the view in the main drawing window. The new view is created and becomes the current window. 2. A scale of 1:12 (1" = 1'. Renaming a View To rename a view: 1. select a scale for the view from the drop-down list on the right. and you create an Elevation view named Front. Type the new name.

use the Window menu. To create an additional 3D Model view: 1.Tip: To switch between open view windows and the main drawing window. you can change the mode to Perspective or the view to any of the other display views. Right-click in Views and select New View from the menu. it appears in Wireframe display and in Parallel mode (in the default Camera view for Parallel mode). However. type a name for the view in the Name box. the model in the main drawing window updates to reflect the changes (and vice versa). 3. You can also manipulate the Camera functions to view your model from a variety of angles. you can switch the view between Parallel and Perspective mode and use the 3D-only Shaded. 2. or Textured display views. The view is also added to the Model group in Views. Click OK. you can create additional 3D Model views if you like. Creating an Additional Elevation View The front. back. The new view is created and becomes the current window. Once you have created a new 3D Model view. Creating an Additional 3D Model View The program ships with two default 3D Model views. Shaded Outline. and side views of a building are known as its Elevation views. In the View Properties dialog box. The program ships with four default Elevation views: • • • • Front Elevation (South) Right Elevation (East) Rear Elevation (North) Left Elevation (West) 124 . one in Parallel mode and the other in Perspective mode. use the Window menu. If you want. Note: If you make changes to the model in a view window. From the View Type list. select Model. Tip: To switch between open view windows and the main drawing window. When you create an additional 3D Model view. 4.

From the Preset list. The view is also added to the Elevation group in Views. 2. 5. select a scale for the view from the drop-down list on the right. From the View Type list. The new view is created and becomes the current window. type a name for the view in the Name edit box. To create an additional Elevation view: 1. The scale ratio is automatically shown in the box on the left. create additional Elevation views at different scales and with different directional orientations. 125 . select a direction. In the Scale area.Chapter 11: Viewing You can. select Elevation. In the View Properties dialog box. however. 3. 4. Click OK. Right-click in Views and select New View from the menu. 6.

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Display 12 retpahC 127 .

see the online Help/More Info topics listed. non-textured 3D viewing.0 Professional. Rendered View and Render Mesh are only possible when the model is in 3D view. Note: Rendering is only available in 3D Home Architect ® 5. Display Types Display Type Wireframe View Description In 3D view. Textured. Shaded Outline. The following table describes the eight different view types you can choose. Quick plotting/ printing. Uses/Benefits Simple 2D or 3D viewing. For details on creating display types. Paints the surfaces of elements with colors assigned to them in the catalog. a representation of elements that lets you see through them to view their entire composition. non-color. full-color 3D viewing. Topics without page references are online Help topics. Note that Shaded. Hides lines which you would not normally be able to see. Help/More Info Creating a Wireframe View Hidden Line View Creating a Hidden Line View Shaded View Solid.Selecting Display Types Display types refer to the appearance of elements in your drawing area. Solid. Creating a Shaded View 128 . A more realistic view than Wireframe.

) 129 . Creating a Patterned Outline View Rendered View (See: 3DTrueView Render Controls on page 155. Creating a Textured View Patterned Outline View Simple 2D or 3D viewing. Applies a pattern of lines (hatch pattern) to the surfaces of elements. The material applied depends on an element’s material definition in the catalog. full-color 3D viewing with increased surface definition. An interesting and traditional alternative to solid full-color display. full-textured 3D viewing. Allows photorealistic display of your model. Creating a Shaded Outline View Textured View Solid. Varied line patterns are used to represent different materials. Applies materials (textures) to the surfaces of elements. dark line. cont. Shaded Outline View Paints the surfaces of elements with colors assigned to them in the catalog AND outlines surface edges in a single. Puts you into Render mode which activates the Render toolbar buttons. Solid. Lines can be black or colored.Chapter 12: Display Display Types. The pattern applied depends on an element’s material definition in the catalog.

click in the Texture window. 4. Click a material. Also: The Rendered View button controls a state— Render mode—which is either on or off. Useful when determining the level of detail vs. a preview of your background is visible in the Texture window. Click the Site Visuals tab. In the % Below horizon box. and then click OK. 130 . 3. Displaying a Background Behind a Model Displaying a background behind a model improves 3D viewing. 8. Options on the Tools toolbar. The background will now be displayed behind your model in Textured mode/ Perspective view.e. OR click 2. To display a background: 1. 9. not in Parallel). 6. click the plus sign beside one of the folders in the Materials pane to open it. 7. Note: When in Render mode. Select Tools > Options. you can still change between all Display views except for Patterned Outline.Display Types. or trees) to display when in Textured mode. cont. In the Materials dialog box. grass. 5. Render Mesh Displays the subdivided surfaces used in the photo-realistic display of your model. Note: This feature works only in Perspective view (i. When you are returned to the Site Visuals page. enter the percentage you want the background to appear below ground level (absolute zero). Click OK. speed of rendering relationship. You can choose a texture (such as sky. In the Background area of the Site Visuals page.

4. Once you have made your changes or selection. Click OK to accept your selection. You can control the following ground plane attributes: • • • • • length width level texture color To display a ground plane: 1. Click the Material button . Click a material. Shaded Outline. you can display a ground plane behind your model. Close it by clicking OK one final time. Select the Include level ground plane check box. or load another. type a level for the ground plane (the default is 0). type a width for the ground plane. In the Level box. In the Materials dialog box. c. d. Note: You can also edit the material's texture and color by clicking the Edit button or clicking inside the Texture and Color panes. Select Tools > Options. 5. b. select the Site Visuals tab.Chapter 12: Display Displaying a Ground Plane To improve visualization. 8. Previews of the material's texture and color are shown in the preview panes. type a length for the ground plane. 6. In the Width box. you are returned to the Options dialog box. 3. 2. Your ground plane will now be visible in all 3D views. but only fully revealed in Shaded. OR click Options on the Tools toolbar. 7. 131 . In the Length box. In the Options dialog box. and Textured. To apply a texture and color to the ground plane: a. click the plus sign beside one of the folders in the Materials pane to open it.

e. you can display/hide elements for clarity. Therefore. the Doors layer.Display Filtering All similar catalog elements in your drawing are on their own layer (i. This is called filtering. OR Click Display Filter on the View toolbar. Select View > Display Filter. You can display/hide: • • • • • a location by itself multiple locations simultaneously selected elements on a specific location selected elements on multiple locations Text and Dimension Annotation Elements To access the Display Filter: 1. the Walls layer. 132 . and so on).

It offers two types of filtering: Element and Location. Two Views of the Display Filter 133 .Chapter 12: Display The Display Filter offers complete display control for all locations and elements in your drawing.

the Display Filter displays a list of all element groups: Display Filter Showing Element Groups 134 .Display Filtering by Element If you choose to filter by Element.

click the element’s light bulb icon to show or hide the element. In the Display Filter dialog box. click All Off. c. To instantly turn all elements off. Each has a light bulb icon beside it. d. Select View > Display Filter.g. The filtering takes place automatically. A list of elements is displayed. click All On. This displays a list of locations under the element group. Click OK to return to your drawing. doors on all locations) a particular element group at the Current location only a particular element group at a selected location or locations Text and Dimension Annotation Elements To filter by element: 1. 3. (If the light bulb is yellow. Use the light bulb icons to show/hide the element type at the desired location. To display/hide selected elements at a specific location.Chapter 12: Display You can display/hide: • • • • every instance of a particular element group in your drawing (e. meaning it is visible. select Element. a. 2. To instantly turn all elements on.) b. To display/hide all instances of an element in your drawing. the element is on. OR click Display Filter on the View toolbar. 135 . expand the element group by clicking its plus sign (+).

Under each location is a sub-list of the elements on that location. the Display Filter dialog box displays a list of the locations in your drawing.Display Filtering by Location If you choose to filter by Location. Display Filter Showing Locations 136 .

d. click the location’s light bulb icon to show or hide the location. (If the light bulb is yellow. the location is on. Select View > Display Filter. To instantly turn all locations off. To display/hide an entire location. To display/hide selected elements at a specific location. Click the light bulb icons next to the elements you want to display/ hide. In the Display Filter dialog box. To instantly turn all locations on. 3. 2. see the online Help topics listed. Click a button on the View toolbar. OR click Display Filter on the View toolbar. The filtering takes place automatically. Right-click in the drawing area. Each has a light bulb icon beside it. Click OK to return to your drawing. For details on individual zoom functions. select Location. a. 137 . click All On. and choose a command from the Shortcut menu. Zooming and Panning The program includes a standard set of zoom functions. The locations in your drawing are listed. This displays a list of elements for that location. expand the location by clicking its plus sign (+). c.) b. You can select them three ways: • • • Choose a Zoom command from the View menu.Chapter 12: Display You can display/hide: • • • an entire location selected elements on that location Text and Dimension Annotation Elements To filter by location: 1. click All Off.

Enlarges a specific area (that you select by drawing a window around it). Brings the entire drawing into view (zooms to the extents of the drawing). Shrinks the entire view in increments.The following table describes available zoom functions: Zoom Functions Function Zoom In Zoom Out Zoom Window Description Enlarges the entire view in increments. Shifts the current view the distance you drag it with your mouse. Help Topics Zooming In Zooming Out Zooming a Selected Area Zoom Previous Zoom Extents Returning to the Previous View Zooming to the Extents of the Drawing Zooming Dynamically Panning Zoom Dynamic Pan 138 . Returns to the previous view. Continuously enlarges or shrinks the entire view.

Camera Work 13 retpahC 139 .

However. you should see something similar to the following illustration. In this case. since what you are seeing is what the Camera sees. Select View > Show Camera toolbar. 2D Plan View with Camera Function Activated 140 . with the Camera function activated. OR click Show Camera on the View Note: In 3D Model viewing. . you must switch to 2D Plan view to see the Camera. To activate or view the Camera in any view: 1. In a 2D Plan view. the Camera will not be displayed if there is only one Model view created. And the Camera cannot see itself. when two or more Model views exist. the Camera or Cameras are displayed in the Model views.Camera and Target The Camera allows you to view your model (in the Model views) from virtually any position or angle.

And the Camera cannot see itself. Select View > Show Camera OR 2. Moving the Camera and Target There are three ways of moving the Camera and the Target: • • • Using the dynamic Camera functions Using the Camera Properties dialog box Selecting and dragging the Camera and Target Viewing in Tile View If you find it inconvenient to switch between full-screen 2D Plan and 3D Model views of your model (to alternately move the Camera and Target and then see the result). the Camera or Cameras are displayed in the Model views. In this case. Click Show Camera on the View toolbar. Like all other elements in the program. Select either element. Working with the Camera and Target The Camera function allows you to view your model from virtually any position or angle. all of your views are visible 141 . since what you are seeing is what the Camera sees. right-click and click Properties to display the Camera and Target Properties dialog box. you must switch to 2D Plan view to see the Camera. the Camera and the Target have properties which can be customized. the Camera will not be displayed if there is only one Model view created. when two or more Model views exist. Note: In 3D Model viewing. Activating the Camera Function To activate the Camera function: 1. . In Tile view. another working method is to view in Tile view.Chapter 13: Camera Work Note that the Camera function involves two elements: the Camera and the Target. However.

Click anywhere in the drawing area. When the Move cursor is displayed. the Camera or Target moves with it. However. The Camera is then moved to a variety of viewing positions. Dragging the Camera and Target Both the Camera and the Target can be selected in either 2D Plan or a 3D Model view and dragged to a new location.at the same time. Hover over the selection handle. drag the Camera or Target to a new position. though in reduced size. Also. Release the mouse button to complete the move. OR 4. right-click and choose Move. Typically. The point you choose becomes an invisible extension point attached to the Camera or Target. To move the Camera or Target: 1. 3. you will have to Zoom Out to find the Camera again (or use the Camera Properties dialog box to move it back into view). After the selection handle appears. Select either the Camera or Target by clicking it. that you want to see. 3D Model views update instantly when either the Camera or Target is moved in 2D Plan view. 2. As you drag the extension point. if you place the camera outside the viewing area. A selection handle appears. the target is placed in an area. click once. To complete a move. Tip: Using the extension point method of moving the Camera is particularly useful when you want to move the Camera outside the visible drawing area for "long-shot" viewing. The Move cursor is displayed. or on a detail. 142 .

Chapter 13: Camera Work . Camera Selected for Move in 2D Plan View Camera Selected for Move in a 3D Model View 143 .

3D views update instantly when either the Camera or Target is moved in 2D Plan view. To view in Tile view: • Select Window > Tile. then move it to where you want. use the Zoom Window select it. zoom back out. though in reduced size. extreme zoomed out view. all of your views are visible at the same time. an alternate working method is to view in Tile view. Also. Camera in Zoom Window Using the Camera and Target in Tile View If you find it inconvenient to switch between full-screen 2D Plan and 3D Model views of your model (to alternately move the Camera and Target and then see the result). In Tile view. 144 .Tip: If you are having difficulty selecting either the Camera or the Target in an to enlarge it for selection.

Chapter 13: Camera Work Two Views Displayed in Tile View Note: The Camera (and Target) is not displayed in the (only) Model view shown above because you are looking through it. 145 .

Tip: You might also like to experiment with Cascade view (Windows > Cascade) to see if you find it a convenient working mode. Cameras (and Targets) become visible in all Model views. 146 .More than Two Views Displayed in Tile View Note: When there are two or more Model views.

Camera Properties Dialog Box 147 . Like all other elements in the program.Chapter 13: Camera Work Accessing Camera and Target Properties The Camera function involves two elements: the Camera and the Target. To display the Camera and Target Properties dialog box in a 2D view: • Select either element. the Camera and the Target have properties which can be customized. To display the Camera and Target Properties dialog box in a 3D view: • Right-click anywhere in the drawing area and click Properties. right-click and click Properties.

This is because for the wide-angle views. View Mode View Mode controls whether you see your drawing in Perspective or Parallel view. There are four main sections in the Camera and Target Properties dialog box: • • • • View Mode Angle of View Position Preset Cameras Note: After changing Camera and Target values or selections. In some instances.Examining Camera and Target Properties The Camera and Target properties control the placement of the Camera and Target on three different planes. try switching the view. Higher values reproduce a wide-angle view. or the view can be altered by dragging the slider. Some program functions may be active in only one or the other view. the effect may appear similar to zooming. The Camera properties also control the type and angle of your view. Y and Z axes. so if something does not seem to be working. Precise values can be entered in the edit box. the program must shrink the image to provide enough screen space 148 . Lower values resemble a telephoto view. you must click for your changes to take effect. View Mode Set to Parallel Angle of View Angle of View is only active in Perspective view. These planes are represented by the X. Changing the angle of view changes the field of vision. The function works like a camera lens.

the program enlarges the image to fill the screen at the smaller telephoto ranges. The effect of the Angle of View function is shown in the following illustrations. 0. Interior at 45 Degree Angle of View Interior at 120 Degree Angle of View Position In an initial camera view. 0. 149 . The initial camera values are in relation to the target. Y and Z values are 0. Note: The default unit of measurement in the edit boxes is inches unless you indicate otherwise. The camera's default position is above (Z value) and to one side (X and Y values) of the model. Its X. Both the camera and the target can be repositioned by entering positive or negative values into the Position edit boxes. Conversely. the target is placed at the center of the model and at ground level.Chapter 13: Camera Work to contain the view.

Right-click in the drawing area and choose a command from the Shortcut menu. Click a button on the View toolbar. Nine Preset Camera Views The nine preset camera views show your drawing: • • • looking down at an angle from above the four corners looking straight on from the four sides looking straight down from directly above (90°) Dynamic Camera Viewing The program includes five dynamic Camera functions: • • • • • Orbit Slide Zoom Dynamic Dolly Spin Use these functions to view your model in an animated state or to set view size or Camera and Target positions. You can select them three ways: • • • Choose a command from the View menu.Preset Cameras A convenient and quite effective way to quickly view your drawing from a number of different angles is to use the Preset Cameras. 150 .

Available in Perspective view only. right. see the online Help topics listed. Smoothly and continuously enlarges or shrinks the entire model view. Revolves the Target around the Camera. Moves both the Camera and the Target in or out in relation to the model. Help Topics Orbiting the Camera Around the Target Sliding the Camera and Target Zooming Dynamically Zoom Dynamic Dolly Dollying the Camera Spin Spin Function 151 . up or down.Chapter 13: Camera Work The following table briefly describes available dynamic Camera functions. Dynamic Camera Functions Function Orbit Slide Description Revolves the Camera around the Target. For more detailed information and instructions. Slides both the Camera and the Target left.

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This is possible because the light intensity on surfaces is computed before any view calculations are made. some people standing around. To determine exactly how the hallway is illuminated. 3DTrueView rendering is based on a radiosity solution. In other words. so we find those surface elements in the hallway that are visible to them and calculate how much light is transferred to each element. we consider the element to be a secondary light source and calculate how much of its reflected light is transferred to those other elements in the hallway that are visible to it. and people) is divided into a mesh of elements. By adding up all the light that has been reflected from each surface element. 3DTrueView rendering adds light and shadow to your models to achieve extremely photo-realistic images of both the interior and the exterior of buildings. Radiosity allows you to render a scene so that it can be navigated through without re-calculating the image every time a viewpoint is changed. the "brightness") of each one. We then say that our radiosity calculations have converged to a solution. but we'll ignore the mathematical details here. and a number of light fixtures mounted on the ceiling. we can calculate the luminance (or. and different surfaces will reflect different amounts of light. The calculation of lighting using radiosity is different from traditional computer graphics lighting computation. so the total amount of light reflected back into the hallway will be less than that emitted by the light fixtures. (This is easier said than done.) Some elements will receive more light than others. benches. ceiling. in everyday language. straight 154 . until the amount of light remaining in the hallway is negligible in comparison to the light originally emitted by the light fixture. Still. But what is radiosity? Imagine a hallway that has a few benches sitting on the floor. one step at a time. In addition. we begin with the light fixtures. it is clear that each element will absorb some of the light. They are emitting light. We know the geometry of each element in the hallway—in computer graphics terminology. A radiosity solution is known as view independent. floor. We now find the element that is reflecting the most light and repeat the process. it is a three-dimensional polygon (a closed shape made up of.0 Professional. We repeat this process. imagine that each surface (including walls. This difference can be described as the difference between viewpoint demand-driven and model data-driven lighting computation. or bounded by. This is the first step of our radiosity calculations.3DTrueView Rendering with Radiosity Note: 3DTrueView rendering is available only in 3D Home Architect® 5.

Chapter 14: 3DTrueView Rendering lines). That's all there is to 3DTrueView rendering! Specifying the 3DTrueView Rendering Environment You can define a realistic environment for your model to be used when rendering. To access the Options dialog box: 1. The Global Settings tab and the Site Visuals tab in the Options dialog box contain variables to specify the rendering environment. 155 . we can use 3DTrueView to directly render a photorealistic image of the hallway from any viewpoint. Variables available on the Global Settings page include: • • • Country and City Angle of True North Date and Time Variables available on the Site Visuals page include: • • Background (texture) Ground Plane 3DTrueView Render Controls The three functions on the Render toolbar control the program's 3DTrueView radiosity solution. If we know its luminance. Select Tools > Options OR Click Options on the Tools toolbar. The images that result from a radiosity solution are characterized by soft. Render Toolbar Radiosity is a rendering method that simulates light reflecting off one surface and onto another.

The calculation of lighting using radiosity is different from traditional computer graphics lighting computation. Accesses the Options dialog box from within Model views only. A radiosity solution is known as view independent.0 Professional The following 3DTrueView Rendering Options affect the degree of accuracy of lighting calculations and the speed of rendering: • • • Convergence Adaptive Subdivision Display and Daylight 156 . Radiosity allows you to render a scene so that it can be navigated through without re-calculating the image every time a viewpoint is changed. Resets the 3DTrueView radiosity solution. This is possible because the light intensity on surfaces is computed before any view calculations are made.) 3DTrueView Rendering Options Note: 3DTrueView rendering is available only in 3D Home Architect® 5.) Further Info No topic available No topic available (See: 3DTrueView Rendering Options on page 156.gradual shadows. (Only the Rendering tab is shown. This difference can be described as the difference between viewpoint demand-driven and model data-driven lighting computation. It can achieve extremely photo-realistic results for scenes that contain a number of separate reflecting surfaces. Radiosity is used to render images of both the interior and the exterior of buildings. Render Controls Control Calculate Reset Options Description Starts the 3DTrueView radiosity solution.

Chapter 14: 3DTrueView Rendering If you have not already done so. Dialog Box Showing 3DTrueView Rendering Options 157 . it is recommended that you read 3DTrueView Rendering with Radiosity (see page 154) before proceeding with these topics.

after a certain number of steps (or bounces). the convergence value should generally be less than 0. Higher step values increase lighting accuracy but also lengthen rendering time. Initially. some light is absorbed and the convergence is reduced.Convergence Rendering Options Note: 3DTrueView rendering is available only in 3D Home Architect® 5. None has been absorbed yet. the convergence should be less than 0.01 (1%). it will take another 500 steps to reach 0.25. for images that are truly accurate. Note: The rate of decrease in the convergence value is exponential.25. so the convergence is 1. However. this means that there is 25% of the light still bouncing around in the environment. Below this value.10 and 2000 steps to reach 0. At the end of these initial steps. If it takes 500 steps to reach 0. all light emitted by your inserted light fixtures has been transferred to the visible surface elements.00 (or 100%). If.20. 3DTrueView performs one step for each individual light source. it is unlikely there will be any perceptible differences between images.0 Professional.05. the convergence value is 0. 158 . Convergence Options Maximum Steps You can set the number of steps to be used in your radiosity solution. For good quality images. After each bounce of light from a surface element (one step in the radiosity calculations).05 (5%) and sometimes 0.

A value of 20 means that your view is updated every 20 steps. Max. etc. The purpose of patches is to group elements and simultaneously reflect their light.000 square millimeters. The larger the element area.) are divided into a mesh of elements known as a render mesh. It is not advisable to make patches too large.Chapter 14: 3DTrueView Rendering Stopping Criterion This is the convergence value at which you want to stop the radiosity calculations. Element Area For radiosity lighting calculations. an 8' x 24' wall might be grouped into mesh of 4 x 12 patches. After you have performed a rendering.05) and re-perform your radiosity calculations. Where it would take 192 steps (8 x 24) to calculate the light reflected from each element of the wall. is usually acceptable. Max. you may see odd "scalloping" artifacts across surfaces that are adjacent to the "shooting" patches. 100. you can view your render mesh by selecting View > Display > Render Mesh or clicking Render Mesh on the Display toolbar. they will not capture shadow detail properly. Display Interval The Display Interval determines how often your rendering view is updated while radiosity calculations are ongoing. A maximum element size of 144 square inches (12" square) or its approximate metric equivalent. Patch Area Surface elements are grouped into patches. 159 . you can always change the stopping criterion (say from 0. If patches are too large. the fewer elements there are in the environment to consider. The reflected light is "shot" from the center of each patch. furniture. floors. if element areas are too large. However. Therefore. the faster the radiosity calculations will run. all surfaces in your model (walls. If you decide that you have set the value too high (because your lighting does not look accurate enough). A ratio of 4 elements per patch is usually suitable. For example.10 to 0. it would take only 48 steps (4 x 12) to calculate the light reflected from each patch. with each patch consisting of 2 x 2 elements measuring 12" square. Surface elements receive and reflect light.

After your initial rendering. You can then alter values like Maximum Steps and Stopping Criterion and try again. you need to enable and set the Adaptive Subdivision rendering options. balanced against this is the need to keep the total number of elements in your environment reasonably low to ensure rapid radiosity calculations. Adaptive Subdivision Rendering Options It is sometimes a good idea vary element size depending on the distribution of shadows in your environment. and subdivided where necessary. The smaller the elements are at shadow boundaries. 160 . Then it determines the difference in illumination ("brightness") between each pair of surface elements. 3DTrueView resets it radiosity calculations and again calculates the distribution of light for the subdivided surface mesh. When Adaptive Subdivision is enabled. both elements are subdivided (as long as the subdivision produces new elements whose area is greater than a user-specified Minimum Element Area. If you would like to make shadow areas more sharply defined.Tip: If the values you have entered are making your 3DTrueView rendering take too long. the more accurately defined those boundaries will be. 3DTrueView calculates the distribution of light for the initial surface mesh. you can "bail out" of the radiosity calculations by clicking in the drawing area and the pressing the Escape key on your keyboard.) When all element pairs have been considered. Adaptive Subdivision Rendering Options Note: 3DTrueView rendering is available only in 3D Home Architect® 5. However. If this difference exceeds a userspecified Threshold.0 Professional. you may find that your environment contains poorly defined areas of light and shadow.

Typically a value of 3 is sufficient. Threshold The user-specified Threshold is the difference in direct illumination received by adjacent elements. Typically a value of 2. 161 . Maximum Level The Maximum Level is the number of times the adaptive subdivision process is repeated.) OR 3. Note: Direct illumination is lighting provided from a source without reflection from other surfaces. is adequate.0 produces satisfactory results. or its approximate metric equivalent. The Adaptive Subdivision process will stop when there are no further elements that can be subdivided without breaking this rule. Minimum Element Area The user-specified Minimum Element Area is as described above. The user-specified Minimum Element Area is reached. Typically a value of 4 square inches (2" square).Chapter 14: 3DTrueView Rendering This process continues until: 1. The Maximum Level (number) of adaptive subdivisions has been reached. 2600 square millimeters. The user-specified Threshold is not exceeded by any element pairs. OR 2. (3DTrueView will not subdivide an element it the resulting sub-elements will be smaller than the userspecified Minimum Element Area.

When the convergence value is initially 1. Enable Ambient should be selected only if you want to see the environment before all of the direct light from the light fixtures has been calculated.Display and Daylight Rendering Options Note: 3DTrueView rendering is available only in 3D Home Architect® 5. As the radiosity calculations progress. the result is equivalent to a "shaded view" without any radiosity calculations. the amount of ambient light steadily decreases.05 (5 %) or so. When the convergence value reaches 0. there is little perceptible difference between an environment rendered with and without ambient illumination. 3DTrueView calculates how much light is still “bouncing around” in the environment and distributes it equally to all surfaces in the environment. Display and Daylight Options Enable Ambient When Enable Ambient is selected. 162 .0 Professional.0 (100 %). so its contribution to the rendered image lessens.

the artificial lighting will not be calculated. 163 . You cannot render a scene using both daylight and artificial lighting. Warning: Enable Antialiasing may completely lock up your computer display for 10 to 30 seconds or more. If you try to perform an interior rendering with daylight enabled. in exceptional circumstances. This is determined by your OpenGL display hardware (see online Help file OpenGL). Clear the option when rendering an indoor scene.Chapter 14: 3DTrueView Rendering Enable Antialiasing Select Enable Antialiasing if you want to reduce or eliminate jagged edges in your rendering. Negative values decrease it. However if. Enable Daylight When Rendering Select this option when rendering an outdoor view. F-Stop The program's "virtual camera" works in a manner similar to actual "point-and-shoot" cameras. use the F-Stop settings to manually override the automatic exposure. Positive values increase brightness. It automatically calculates the correct "exposure" for the lighting situation and produces a view with infinite "depth of field" (everything is in focus). The only solution to this problem is to purchase a modern (and unfortunately expensive) video card with antialiasing hardware support. you want to brighten or darken a rendering.

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Materials and Textures 15 retpahC 165 .

This keeps them organized and easy to find. Materials are organized into groups in a tree structure. and click Properties. Tip: You can also access the Materials list through the Appearance tab on an element's properties page. double-click a drawing element. this comes in handy. OR 2. You can also save the current list of available materials to a Materials library (*. you can edit existing materials or add new ones. To bring up the properties page. right-click. You can also delete unneeded groups and materials from the list. The Materials pane of the Materials dialog box (Tools > Appearance > Materials) shows the Materials list. 166 . If you often use the same materials. However. You can then load the saved library into your Materials list window when you work on future projects. This helps minimize content when there seems to be too much. Select Tools > Appearance > Materials.mlb file). Or select its element in the Catalog panel. Click Materials on the Tools toolbar. To access the Materials list: 1.Customizing the Materials List A large selection of materials ships with the program. You can add new groups as needed. New materials are always added to groups.

Allows you to access the Texture. Also accessible by rightclicking in the Materials pane. Also accessible by rightclicking in the Materials pane.) Add Item (See: Adding a Material to the Materials List on page 169. A group cannot be deleted until it is empty of materials. Pattern and Color panes No topic available Edit No topic available 167 . Deletes a selected item or group from the available Materials list. Once a material is selected. Also accessible by rightclicking in the Materials pane. Lets you add a new group to the available Materials list. Show previews of a material's attributes. Materials are organized by group in a tree structure. clicking in a pane will open the list for that attribute. An alternative to clicking inside the preview panes. Lets you add a new material to a selected group in the Materials list. or right-click and click Delete. Texture.) Delete Select the item or group in the Materials pane. More Info No topic available Add Group (See: Adding a Group to the Materials List on page 168. Click . Pattern and Color lists.Chapter 15: Materials and Textures Here is a quick look at the components and functions of the Materials list: Materials List Functions and Components Function/Component Materials pane Description Lists the currently available materials.

Click Materials on the Tools toolbar. Loads a saved materials library (or parts of it) into the current model.) Import (Item or All) Adding a Group to the Materials List To add a group to the Materials list: 1.Materials List Functions and Components. Saves the current list of available materials (or parts of it) to a library file.) Accessible in Transfer Box In Current Model pane Shows current model materials groups and items. After the library has been named or opened. No topic available In External Template pane Export (Item or All) No topic available (See: Exporting Materials to a Library on page 174.) (See: Importing a Materials Library on page 175. b. Select Tools > Appearance > Materials. cont. Transfer Used to export or import Materials libraries. Access the Materials dialog box in one of the three available ways: a. 168 .) (See: Importing a Materials Library on page 175. (See: Exporting Materials to a Library on page 174. the Transfer dialog box is displayed. or select the one you want to import. Initially calls up the Open dialog box where you name the library you want to export. Shows external template materials groups and items.

) 3. right-click. Shaded Outline. Then click OK. Access the Materials dialog box in one of the three available ways: a. and choose Properties). right-click. Double-click a drawing element to bring up its properties page (or select the element. on the Tools toolbar. Textured and Patterned views display elements with material properties. select the group you want to add the material to. In the Materials pane. and choose Properties). Note: You can now go on to define the properties of the material which include Texture. Right-click and click New Item. Select Tools > Appearance > Materials. OR Click Add Group on the toolbar below the Materials pane. type the name you want. Double-click a drawing element to bring up its properties page (or select the element. right-click and click New Group. 4. Surface Color. When the new group is added. Click the Appearance tab. b. color and [line] pattern attributes) used to display the element (or one or more of its components). 2. Click Materials c. When the new item is added. Adding a Material to the Materials List To add a material to the Materials list: 1. An element's Appearance property page lets you select the material (which contains texture. Note: You can now go on to add a material to your new group. Click the Appearance tab.Chapter 15: Materials and Textures c. and then click the Material option button. and Pattern attributes. 3. In the Materials pane. (Before adding a material. type the name you want. OR Click Add Item on the toolbar below the Materials pane. 169 . Then click OK. and then click the Material option button. Attaching Materials to Elements for Displaying The Shaded. you may want to add a new group to the list. 2.

To attach a material to an element: 1. you can export materials to a library or import a library of materials. 3. select the element. assigning a color to the Exterior Side of a 4" General Wall will assign that color to the Exterior Side of all 4" General Walls. In Shaded or Shaded Outline view. Previews of the material's texture. an element is displayed using the pattern assigned to its material. right-click. 4. give one specific wall a different Exterior Side color). The items listed in the Components pane will vary according to the type of element. 5. In the Catalog panel. Select a component. In Patterned view. In the Drawing window. an element is displayed using the color assigned to its material. 170 . 2. select the element. From it. select a material. Click the Appearance tab. You can accept these or alter them. In the Drawing window. pattern and color are displayed. an element is displayed using the bitmap texture assigned to its material. you can customize the available Materials list to suit your needs.• • • In Textured view. b. When you have decided on the material you want.) If you want to set a property for an individual use of an element (for example. you can select the particular element in the Drawing window and define its unique property from there. (For example. c. Note: Setting an element property from the Catalog panel will define the property for all uses of the element. double-click the element. You can add a custom color or a custom lineweight to a pattern. and then click the Material option button. and click Properties. Access the element's properties page in one of the three following ways: a. In the Material pane. right-click and click Properties. click OK. A pattern may be colored. A large Materials library is included with the program. Applying a Pattern to a Material • • You can apply a pattern to an existing material or add a material of your own to the Materials list. In addition.

Click inside the Pattern preview pane. 3. In the Properties pane. right-click. When the Edit Materials dialog box appears. click the Pattern option button. (To create a custom color or set color transparency. select a pattern (or define a new pattern). you can now go on to set a custom color and lineweight for your pattern. Access the Materials dialog box in one of three available ways: a. OR click the Edit button select the Pattern tab. and 171 . Double-click a drawing element to bring up its properties page (or select the element. Your pattern is now visible in the Pattern preview pane. 5. OR click the Edit button select the Color tab. Click inside the Pattern preview pane. Click OK. However. in the Available pane. OR click the Edit button select the Pattern tab. Click the Appearance tab. and 4. Click c. 3. Choose a color in the Pattern pane. 3. your pattern will be applied to your material with the default color and the default lineweight. if you want. Make sure your pattern name is selected in the Available pane.) To add a lineweight to your pattern: 1. Materials on the Tools toolbar. When the Edit Materials dialog box opens. and 2. Select Tools > Appearance > Materials.) 4. click OK. click the Lineweight row. b. When you have decided on the color you want. and choose Properties). (Previews are visible in the Current Selection pane. select the material you want to add the pattern to. see Adding a Color. 2. 2. To add a color to your pattern: 1. In the Materials pane. then click the Material option button. Click inside the Color preview pane.Chapter 15: Materials and Textures To add a pattern to a material: 1. If you click OK to close the Materials dialog box.

Double-click a drawing element to bring up its properties page (or select the element. and choose Properties). Materials on the Tools toolbar. When you have decided on the lineweight you want. 172 . (Previews are visible in the Current Selection pane. 8. Your selection is previewed in the Current Selection pane. You are returned to either the Materials dialog box or the element's Appearance page. select the material you want to add the color to. (To create a custom lineweight. click it and select a lineweight. right-click. Click inside the Color preview pane. When you have decided on your color. then click the Material option button. you can add a material to the materials list. 7. see Adding a Lineweight. b. Click c. Select the Color tab (unless it is already selected). 4. Then you must view your model in Patterned Outline view. 2. Click the Appearance tab. click OK. In the Surface pane. (Or.4. you must attach your material to an element. Applying a Surface Color to a Material To apply a surface color to a material: 1. click OK. In the Materials pane. When the drop-down arrow appears.) 6. Select the Surface option (unless it is already selected). Click OK once more to close the remaining dialog box and apply your color to your material. Click OK to close the Materials dialog box and apply your lineweight to your pattern. select a color (or you can add a color). Select Tools > Appearance > Materials. Access the Materials dialog box in one of the three available ways: a. 6. OR Click the Edit button . 5. Note: Before you can view your pattern.) 5.) 3.

2. Click the Appearance tab. Double-click a drawing element to bring up its properties page (or select the element. Materials on the Tools toolbar. 173 . click OK. Access the Materials dialog box in one of three available ways: a. sample textures are available for each material. Note: Before you can view your texture. then click the Material option button. Select Tools > Appearance > Materials. In the Available pane. (Or. Applying a Texture to a Material Textures are bitmap (*. You are returned to either the Materials dialog box or the element's Appearance page. right-click.bmp) files. Click c. select a texture. Select the Texture tab (unless it is already selected). In the Materials pane. select the material you want to add the texture to. you can add a material to the materials list. Click inside the Texture preview pane. However. To apply a texture to a material: 1. 4.) 3. you must attach your material to an element. When you have decided on your texture. By default. 7. 5. b. Your selection is previewed in the Current Selection pane. and choose Properties). Then you must view your model in Textured View . A Textures library (approximately 200 textures) ships with the program. you can add textures from the library—or from any location—provided the texture file is properly proportioned and not too large. Then you must view your model in Shaded View Outline View or Shaded . 6.Chapter 15: Materials and Textures Note: Before you can view your color. Click OK once more to close the remaining dialog box and apply your texture to your material. you must attach your material to an element. OR Click the Edit button .

Exporting Materials to a Library
You can use the Transfer/Export function in the Materials dialog box to save the current Materials list (or part of it) to a Materials library file (*.mlb). Later, you can load the library using the Transfer/Import function.

To export materials to a library:
1. Access the Materials dialog box in one of three available ways: a. Select Tools > Appearance > Materials. b. Click c. Materials on the Tools toolbar.

Double-click a drawing element to bring up its properties page (or select the element, right-click, and choose Properties). Click the Appearance tab, then click the Material option button. .

2. Click the Transfer button 3. The Open dialog box appears.

4. In the Look in box, navigate to the folder where you want to store the group or item. 5. In the File name box, type the name of the group or item you want to export. 6. Click Open. 7. The Transfer dialog box appears. 8. In the pane labeled In current model, select the group or item you want to export. 9. Depending on your choice, click either Export All . 10. The group or item appears in the pane labeled In external template. 11. Click OK to close the Transfer dialog box. 12. In the Materials dialog box, click the Transfer button . When the Open dialog box appears, you will see that your group or item has been saved externally. 13. Click Cancel to return to the Materials dialog box. 14. Click OK to close the Materials dialog box. or Export Item

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Note: Steps 12 and 13 may be eliminated when you are comfortable with this procedure.

Importing a Materials Library
If you have used the Transfer/Export function in the Materials dialog box to save a list of materials, you can load that library (or part of it) into the Materials window using the Transfer/Import function.

To import a library:
1. Access the Materials dialog box in one of three available ways: a. Select Tools > Appearance > Materials. b. Click c. Materials on the Tools toolbar.

Double-click a drawing element to bring up its properties page (or select the element, right-click, and choose Properties). Click the Appearance tab, then click the Material option button. .

2. Click the Transfer button 3. The Open dialog box appears.

4. In the Look in box, navigate to the folder where you have saved the group or item. 5. Select the group or item you want to import. Its name is displayed in the File name box 6. Click Open. 7. The Transfer dialog box appears. 8. In the pane labeled In external template, select the group or item you want to import. 9. Depending on your choice, click either Import All . 10. The group or item appears in the pane labeled In current model. 11. Click OK to close the Transfer dialog box. 12. Your group or item is now displayed in the Materials pane. 13. Click OK to close the Materials dialog box. or Import Item

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Adding a Group to the Textures List
To add a group to the Textures list:
1. Select Tools > Appearance > Textures to open the Edit Textures dialog box. 2. Right-click in the Available pane, then click New Group. OR Click Add Group on the toolbar below the Available pane. 3. In the selected name area, type the group name you want. 4. Click OK. Note: You can now go on to add a new item or items to your group.

Adding a Texture to the Textures List
To add a new texture to the Textures list:
1. Select Tools > Appearance > Textures to open the Edit Textures dialog box. 2. In the Available pane, select the group you want to add the texture to. Note: Before adding a texture, you may want to add a new group (see above) to the Textures list. 3. Right-click, and click New Item. OR Click Add Item on the toolbar below the Available pane. 4. Type the texture name you want and click OK.

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5. Click at the top right of the dialog box and navigate to the program's Textures folder (if it is not already set as the default destination).

Textures Folder Selected
6. Select one of the .bmp texture files and click .

7. The texture is previewed in the Current Selection pane of the Edit Textures dialog box. 8. Click the texture. to load another texture for preview, OR to add

Tip: You can import an external bitmap file to use as a texture file. However, its dimensions must be in pixels in powers of two. Most implementations of OpenGL (see online Help topic OpenGL) specify a minimum size of 64 x 64. Values of 128, 256 and 512 are also permissible. Larger sizes may cause some video display cards to crash. 128 X 128 is a standard size. As well, files must be 24-bit RGB color. Note: To use your texture, you must now apply the texture to a material (see Applying a Texture to a Material on page 173). Then, you need to attach the material to an element (see Attaching Materials to Elements for Displaying on page 169).

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Line Styles 16 retpahC 179 .

Click c. and click Properties). Line styles are stored and organized in a Line Styles list similar to the Materials list. Double-click a drawing element (or select it. You can access the Line Styles list in any one of three ways: 1. Click Line Styles. lineweight (thickness) and color. Using the Transfer dialog box. Click the Appearance tab. Access the Line Styles list in any one of the three available ways: a. edit. right-click. a drawing can often be understood more easily. OR 2. A default library of line styles ships with the program. a. b. you can save a list of line styles to a library.) A line style consists of linetype (pattern).Line Styles Line styles are used to display the outlines of elements in your drawing. Line Styles on the Tools toolbar. then click Appearance > Line Styles. in the Line Styles pane: a. 180 . as well as load a saved library of line styles. Line Styles on the Tools toolbar. b. Select the group. doors and windows). Adding a Line Style To add a Line Style to the Line Styles list. (Lineweight cannot be displayed in Perspective view. If you want to add a line style to an existing group. walls. Note: Line styles are only fully displayed in Parallel view. follow these steps: 1. but you can add. and delete line styles as needed. c. 2. right-click. and click Properties). Double-click an element (or select it. Select Tools > Appearance > Line Styles. Click OR 3. When different line styles are applied to different elements (for example. Select Tools > Appearance > Line Styles.

(See: Applying a Line Style to an Element on page 187. Note: You can also access the Linetypes list through the Appearance tab on an element's Properties page. Now that you have named your style. in the Line Definition area. Follow the instructions in Step 2 to create a new item. In the Properties pane. If you want to make your line style part of a new group. follow these steps: 1. 4. Access the Edit Linetypes dialog box by selecting Tools > Appearance > Linetypes. 3. Lastly. click New Group. and in the menu. 4. click OK and your line style is defined and ready to be applied to a drawing element. OR Click . OR click c. and in the menu. The values you have set will be shown in the preview panes. In the Available pane.) Adding a Linetype Solid. Give your group a name and click OK. c. Give your style a name and click OK. 3. OR click b. type numerical values to define your linetype. Give your new linetype a name and click OK. lineweight and linetype color. 181 . To add a linetype to the Linetypes list. 2. and in the menu click New Item. Once you have set these three values. you will be returned to the Line Styles dialog box. Right-click. and dashed are three general linetypes. click New Item. you can define it by specifying the linetype. right-click.Chapter 16: Line Styles b. dotted. . . Right-click. in the Line Styles pane: a.

2. you can define it: 4. click OK. When you have the definition you want. in the Lineweight area. Values of 5. You can now go on to specify the lineweight. To return the lineweight to the default value. 5. Adding a Lineweight To add a lineweight to the Lineweights list. (See: Specifying a Linetype on page 184. Hit Enter to preview your definition in the Current Selection pane. Access the Edit Lineweights dialog box by selecting Tools > Appearance > Lineweights. For example.) . 3. type a unit value to define your lineweight. click . Now that you have added and named your lineweight. 7. Note: You can also access the Lineweights list through the Appearance tab on an element's Properties page.Note: Numerical values indicate pen down and pen up units. (Type of unit depends on units of measure selected for the drawing.) 5. follow these steps: 1. Hit Enter to preview your lineweight in the Current Selection pane. -5 would give a dashed line pattern of five units of line followed by five units of space. In the Properties pane. click 7. 6. click OK. Give your lineweight a name and click OK. Note: You now need to apply your lineweight to a line style. When you have the lineweight you want. Type of unit depends on units of measure selected for the drawing. 182 . see Pattern Properties on page 194. In the Available pane. For examples of linetypes. a value of 1 would give a solid line. 6. OR right-click and click New Item.

c. 2.) Note: Once you have added a color to the Colors list. 7. in the Available pane: a. Note: You can also access the Colors list through the Appearance tab on an element's Properties page. (See: Specifying a Linetype Color on page 186. 3. you can define it: 4. In the Transparency area. If you want to add a color to an existing group. Select or define a base color. OR right-click and click New Item. You now need to apply your color to a line style. “100” fully transparent). Give your color a name and click OK. follow these steps: 1. If you want to make your color part of a new group. in the Diffuse area. Click OR right-click and click New Group. b. click the More button 5. Access the Edit Colors dialog box by selecting Tools > Appearance > Colors. 183 . Now that you have named your color. In the Translucency area.Chapter 16: Line Styles Adding a Color To add a Color to the Colors list. Click OK and your color is defined. and click OK. Click c. it can also be applied to a material. In the Properties pane. set the percentage of transparency of your base color (“0” is opaque. in the Available pane: a. This color will "shine through" the base color when your model is rendered. Follow the instructions in Step 2 to create a new item. b. choose a color for translucency. 8. Give your group a name and click OK. 6.) . Select the group. (See: Applying a Surface Color to a Material on page 172.

Before you can specify a linetype. Your changes are now applied to the line style. follow these steps: 1. you apply it to a particular line style. 184 . see the following sections: • • • Specifying a Linetype on page 184 Specifying a Lineweight on page 185 Specifying a Linetype Color on page 186 6. then click Appearance > Line Styles. you need to have added a line style to the Line Styles list (or selected one to customize). Click c. Change the attribute or attributes you want to alter. dotted. 7. Access the Line Styles list in any one of the three available ways: a. Select Tools > Appearance > Line Styles. Line Styles on the Tools toolbar. click OK. 5. When you specify a linetype. In the preview panes. open the folder that contains the line style you want to edit. a linetype named Dashed might be part of a line style named Thick Red Dashed. 3. follow these steps: 1. 4. Select the line style. and dashed are three general linetypes. In the Line Styles pane. Select Tools > Appearance > Line Styles. Access the Line Styles list in any one of the three available ways: a. For more information. Double-click an element (or select it.Customizing a Line Style To customize a Line Style in the Line Styles list. b. Click Line Styles on the Tools toolbar. you will see the line style's attributes (type. For example. weight and color). 2. When you have made your changes and are returned to the Line Styles dialog box. and click Properties). Specifying a Linetype Solid. To specify a linetype. b. right-click.

right-click.) 7. 2. it needs to be applied to an element. follow these steps: 1. Access the Line Styles list in any one of the three available ways: a. Specifying a Lineweight When you specify a lineweight. Click in the Linetype pane. 8. 3. When you have the linetype you want. Click c. b. You can also add a linetype to the Linetypes list. click OK. Double-click an element (or select it. you apply it to a particular line style. then click Appearance > Line Styles. before you can specify a lineweight. 5. OR click 4. then click Appearance > Line Styles. To specify a lineweight. Line Styles on the Tools toolbar. Make sure you have selected a line style in the Line Styles pane. (See: Adding a Linetype. 185 . and click Properties). and click Properties). In the Available pane. Make sure your line style is selected in the Line Styles pane. Note: Once a line style has been defined. You can now click OK to close the Line Styles dialog box and apply the linetype to the line style (and accept its defined or default lineweight). select a linetype. Make sure the Linetype tab is selected. You are returned to the Line Styles dialog box. Double-click an element (or select it. 6. 2. 9.Chapter 16: Line Styles c. OR You can go on to specify the lineweight. you need to have added a line style to the Line Styles list (or selected one to customize). A preview appears in the Current Selection pane. Select Tools > Appearance > Line Styles. Therefore. (See: Applying a Line Style to an Element on page 187. The Edit Line Styles dialog box opens.) . right-click.

then click Appearance > Line Styles. OR You can go on to specify a linetype color. Adding a Color on page 183 6. . 3. right-click. You can now click OK to close the Line Styles dialog box and apply the lineweight to the line style. click OK. 5. In the Available pane. (See: Applying a Line Style to an Element on page 187. A preview appears in the Current Selection pane. A preview appears in the Current Selection pane. When you have the color you want. OR click 4. Click c. You are returned to the Line Styles dialog box. You can also add a lineweight to the list. 186 . Select Tools > Appearance > Line Styles. Double-click an element (or select it. Note: Once a line style has been defined. and click Properties). or added a line style to the Line Styles list. Make sure you have selected a line style in the Line Styles pane. To define your linetype color. .3. You can also add a color to the list.) Specifying a Linetype Color Before you can specify a linetype color you need to have chosen a line style to customize. Click in the Lineweight pane. it needs to be applied to an element. b. When you have the lineweight you want. follow these steps: 1. 2. OR click 4. 5. 8. select a lineweight. (See: Adding a Lineweight. Access the Line Styles list in any one of the three available ways: a. Make sure the Color tab is selected.) 6. 7. select a color. Click in the Linetype color pane. Line Styles on the Tools toolbar. In the Available pane. Make sure the Lineweight tab is selected. click OK.

Exporting Line Styles You can use the Transfer/Export function in the Line Styles dialog box to save the current Line Styles list (or part of it) to a Line Styles library file (*. and the line style is applied to the element. (See: Applying a Line Style to an Element on page 187. 5. it needs to be applied to an element. follow these steps: 1.) Applying a Line Style to an Element To apply a line style to a drawing element. Click Line Styles on the Tools toolbar. 3. When you have the line style you want. Select Tools > Appearance > Line Styles. OR Double-click the element. In the Components pane. Click OK to close the Line Styles dialog box and apply the color to the line style. The properties dialog box closes. You are returned to the Line Styles dialog box. Check or clear the Apply to All Views option. 4. 8. follow these steps: 1. weight and color. the Exterior Side of a wall). The three preview panes show type. Note: Once a line style has been defined. 187 . b.Chapter 16: Line Styles 7. 2. you can load the library using the Transfer/Import function. The element's properties dialog box is displayed. Click the Appearance tab. locate and select the style you want. Access the Line Styles list in any one of the three available ways: a. click OK. In the Line Styles pane.klb). Then. Later. right-click and choose Properties from the menu. or group of line styles. To export a line style. 8. Make sure the Line Styles button is selected above the adjoining pane to the right. 7. select the component you want to apply the line style to (for example. 6. Click the element to select it.

When the Open dialog box appears. and click Properties). 10. Double-click an element (or select it. 11. 12. 4. 9. type the name of your group or individual line style. 6. In the File name box. In the pane labeled In current model. 5. select the group or individual line style you want to export. Click OK to close the Line Styles dialog box. 7. Click Cancel to return to the Line Styles dialog box. 13. Click . Importing Line Styles If you have used the Transfer/Export function in the Line Styles dialog box to save a line style or list of line styles. then click Appearance > Line Styles. The Transfer dialog box opens. The group or individual line style appears in the pane labeled In external template. you can load that library (or part of it) into the Line Styles list using the Transfer/Import function. right-click. 188 . Click . 8. 15. navigate to the folder where you want to store the group or individual line style. you will see that your group or individual line style has been saved as an external library. Click OK to close the Transfer dialog box.c. 14. click either or . 3. click . 2. Depending on your choice. In the Line Styles dialog box. In the Line Styles pane of the Line Styles dialog box. The Open dialog box appears. In the Look in box. select the group or individual line style you want to export. Note: Steps 13 and 14 can be eliminated when you are comfortable with this procedure.

Click c. Line Styles on the Tools toolbar. 11. 2. The Transfer dialog box appears. click either or . 189 . right-click. Double-click an element (or select it. The Open dialog box appears. In the Line Styles dialog box. Depending on your choice. In the Look in box. 4. 5. 10. 7. navigate to the folder where the line style or group of line styles you want is located. 9. . Access the Line Styles list in any one of the three available ways: a. Click 3. The group or individual line style appears in the pane labeled In current model. you will see that the group or individual line style has been imported. In the pane labeled In external template. select the group or individual line style you want.Chapter 16: Line Styles To import a line style. or group of line styles. and click Properties). Select Tools > Appearance > Line Styles. b. Click OK to close the Transfer dialog box. Select the group or individual line style and click 6. from an external library. Click OK to close the Line Styles dialog box. follow these steps: 1. . then click Appearance > Line Styles. 12. 8.

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Patterns are most often used to suggest an element's material. such as concrete. However. The Available pane of the Edit Patterns dialog box (Tools > Appearance > Patterns) shows the Patterns list. which are organized in a tree structure. You can then load the saved library into your Patterns list window when you work on future projects.Customizing the Patterns List A Pattern is a collection of lines that fills an area of your drawing. The Edit Patterns dialog box appears. Select Tools > Appearance> Patterns. 2. Edit Patterns Dialog Box Function/Component Available pane Description Shows a list of currently available Pattern groups and items. Displays a preview of the currently selected pattern. To access the Patterns list: 1. this comes in handy. brick. A large selection of patterns ships with the program. you can edit existing patterns or add new ones. or insulation. More Info No topic available Current Selection pane No topic available 192 . The following is a quick look at the accessible functions and components of the Edit Patterns dialog box. You can also save patterns to a Patterns library. If you often use the same patterns. Patterns are sometimes called hatching or cross-hatching.

) Loads a Pattern file. Lets you add a new group to the Available patterns list. Resets the pattern's Properties to their original values and updates the Current Selection pane to show the changes. or Load Reset To confirm your changes click OK. Also accessible by rightclicking in the Available pane. No topic available 193 . Note: When you create a pattern.Chapter 17: Patterns Edit Patterns Dialog Box. a numerical value must be entered in the No. Lets you add a new item (pattern) to a selected group in the available Patterns list. Deletes a selected item or group from the available Patterns list. (See: Pattern Properties on page 194. (A group must be empty before it can be deleted. Properties pane Shows the specific properties that control the appearance of the pattern. New Group Also accessible by rightclicking in the Available pane.) Delete Select the item or group in the Available patterns window and click right-click and click Delete. cont.) New Item (See: Adding a Pattern to the Patterns List on page 197.) (See: Adding a Group to the Patterns List on page 197. of Lines box for all the pattern's Properties boxes to be displayed. Also accessible by rightclicking in the Available pane.

) (See: Importing Patterns on page 199. You can also control the properties of each line individually. select Tools > Appearance > Patterns.Edit Patterns Dialog Box. Line properties include the X and Y origin. cont. If they are dashed. Lines can be solid or dashed. in the Edit Patterns dialog box. Patterns are used to provide a fill for enclosed areas and usually indicate surface finishes or materials. No topic available No topic available (See: Exporting Patterns on page 198. you can control the length of individual segments (dashes) in the line. Transfer Used to export or import Patterns libraries.) Import (Item or All) Pattern Properties A pattern consists of one more lines. select a pattern in the Available pane. Initially calls up the Open dialog box where you name the library you want to export. Then. Loads a saved Pattern library (or parts of it) into the current model. Saves the current list of available patterns (or parts of it) to a library file. To view a pattern's properties. After the library has been named or opened. you can specify as many lines as you like. A preview of the pattern is 194 . or select the one you want to import. Accessible in Transfer Box In Current Model pane In External Template pane Export (Item or All) Shows current model Pattern groups and items. Shows external template Pattern groups and items. Patterns are sometimes called hatching or crosshatching. the Transfer dialog box is displayed. angle and offset. When editing or defining a pattern.

The point on the Y axis the line passes through. the segment lengths and spaces in the line's pattern.) For dashed patterns. This creates a staggered effect. (See Example 2 below. The distance each offset line is shifted (left or right) from the origin of the previous line.Chapter 17: Patterns displayed in the Current Selection pane. Description Edit Line Lineweight Line Line Definition Generally. Table Properties Property Pattern Definition No. (See Example 3 below. Usually. The spacing between lines as the line is repeated (offset) parallel to the original throughout the pattern. For example. (See Example 1 below. The line you are currently editing. this will be 1 or 2. The angle of the line in degrees. and the following properties are listed in the Properties pane.-5. 5 mm space. but it could be more depending on the complexity of the pattern.10. A single value (other than 0) creates a solid line. 10 mm dash.) 195 .-5 (in Metric) creates the following pattern: 20 mm dash. of Lines The number of lines that will repeat in the pattern. 5 mm space. but spaces must be preceded by a negative sign to indicate they are spaces. The width of the line.) X Origin Y Origin Angle Offset Shift The point on the X axis the line passes through. a definition of 20. segments and spaces can be different lengths.

-5. of Lines: 2 Line Definition: 1. of Lines: 1 Line Definition: 10.00 (both lines) Angle: 45° (line 1) and 135° (line 2) Offset: 20 (both lines) Example 3 (pattern with a shift) No. of Lines: 1 Line Definition: 20.Consider the following Metric examples (Line Definition units are in millimeters): Example 1 (single line pattern) No.-5 Angle: 0° Offset: 5 Shift: 5 196 .-5 Angle: 45° Offset: 5 Example 2 (multi-line pattern) No.10.

of Lines area in the Properties pane. Right-click in the Available pane. Click OK.) 3. Define the pattern properties in the Properties pane. click OK one last time. and click New Item. you may want to add a new group to the list. Then. 5. type the group name you want. In the Available pane. Add Group on the toolbar below the Available pane. Note: To use your pattern. When you are finished defining the pattern properties. you must now apply the pattern to a material (see Applying a Pattern to a Material on page 170). 2. 7. 3. enter the number of lines that will repeat in the pattern (usually 1 or 2) and click OK. (Note: Before adding a pattern. Select Tools > Appearance > Patterns to open the Edit Patterns dialog box. In the No. 2. Type the pattern name you want and click OK. Adding a Pattern to the Patterns List To add a new pattern to the Patterns list: 1.Chapter 17: Patterns Adding a Group to the Patterns List To add a group to the Patterns list: 1. then click New Group. 4. Right-click. Select Tools > Appearance > Patterns to open the Edit Patterns dialog box. OR Click 4. select the group you want to add the pattern to. Note: You can now go on to add a new item or items to your group. OR Click Add Item on the toolbar below the Available pane. 6. In the selected area. 197 . you need to attach the material to an element (see Attaching Materials to Elements for Displaying on page 169).

When the Open dialog box appears. 10. The Transfer dialog box appears. follow these steps: 1. To export a pattern or group to an external library. 6. The Open dialog box appears. In the pane labeled In current model. select the group or pattern you want to export. In the Look in box. 4. 5. Later. 8. 14. Select Tools > Appearance > Patterns to open the Edit Patterns dialog box. 11. Click OK to close the Transfer dialog box.hlb). Depending on your choice. type the name of the group or pattern you want to export. 2. click either or . you will see that your group or pattern has been saved as an external library. Note: Steps 12 and 13 can be eliminated when you are comfortable with this procedure.Exporting Patterns You can use the Transfer/Export function in the Edit Patterns dialog box to save the current Patterns list (or part of it) to a Patterns library file (*. In the File name box. 12. click . 9. In the Edit Patterns dialog box. The group or pattern appears in the pane labeled In external template. 13. 3. you can load the library using the Transfer/Import function. 7. Click OK to close the Edit Patterns dialog box. Click Cancel to return to the Edit Patterns dialog box. Click . navigate to the folder where you want to store the group or pattern. Click . 198 .

You are returned to the Edit Patterns dialog box. The Open dialog box appears. Note: To use your pattern. 8. Your group or item appears in the Available pane. click either or . 11. The group or pattern appears in the pane labeled In current model. you need to attach the material to an element (see Applying a Pattern to a Material on page 170 and Attaching Materials to Elements for Displaying on page 169).Chapter 17: Patterns Importing Patterns If you have used the Transfer/Export function in the Edit Patterns dialog box to save a pattern or list of patterns. or group of patterns. 2. Then. The Transfer dialog box appears. you must now apply the pattern to a material. you can load that library (or part of it) into the Patterns list using the Transfer/Import function. 3. Click . Click OK to close the Edit Patterns dialog box. To import a pattern. 5. 199 . 10. Click OK to close the Transfer dialog box. Select the group or pattern and click 6. follow these steps: 1. . 9. select the group or pattern you want. In the pane labeled In external template. 7. Select Tools > Appearance > Patterns to open the Edit Patterns dialog box. navigate to the folder where the group or pattern you want is located. In the Look in box. 12. Depending on your choice. 4.

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Annotation 18 retpahC 201 .

202 . Selecting Dimension Styles The program ships with three standard dimension styles: • • • Standard Tick Standard Dot Standard Arrow However. 4. Move your mouse (you do not have to hold the mouse button down) to a second point and click. 3.Adding Dimensions to Your Drawing You can add dimensions to your drawing with a few mouse clicks. OR Click Dimensions on the Annotate toolbar. Select Tools > Appearance > Dimension Styles. Note: Selecting your dimension line and right-clicking will give you access to the Delete and Stretch commands. arrows. Click a point in your drawing to begin the dimension line. you can customize and create styles as well. A dimension line including offsets. and a numerical value is added to your drawing. Numerical values are supplied automatically. To access the Dimension Styles list: 1. Select Annotate > Dimensions. You can also choose from a variety of Dimension Styles as well as create your own. 2. To add dimensions to your drawing: 1.

Click OK. Select the style. 203 .Chapter 18: Annotation 2. To customize or edit a dimension style: 1. Customizing and Creating Dimension Styles The program ships with three default dimension styles. Click Set Current. Dimension Styles Dialog Box To choose a different dimension style: 1. 3. they are fully customizable. Select Tools > Appearance > Dimension Styles. However. Select the style you want to alter and click . 2. 3. Also you can create your own dimension styles. The Dimension Styles dialog box is displayed. The Dimension Styles dialog box is displayed. 2.

Give your dimension style a name. For information on these procedures. 204 . 4. each with a variety of settings. click (not shown). Click Add Item. you can export them to a library or import them. Three tabbed pages. To create a dimension style: 1. Note: After you have created or customized dimension styles. Make your selections. see Exporting Line Styles on page 187 and Importing Line Styles on page 188. 2. just as you do with line styles. Edit Dimension Styles Dialog Box (detail) 5. When done. The Edit Dimension Styles dialog box is displayed.4. Follow steps 3–6 above to define and save your style. 5. are available. Select Tools > Appearance > Dimension Styles. The Dimension Styles dialog box is displayed. 3.

Display Filtering and Selection Filtering can also be applied to text. 205 . rotate. You can then move the selection to the location you want by dragging and place it by clicking once. Click the Text button on the Annotate toolbar. color. You can also manipulate the text (move. if you type text into the window and click OK.Chapter 18: Annotation Adding Text to Your Drawing You can add text of varying size. To access the Add/Edit Text dialog box: 1. Add/Edit Text Box (Labels style & left alignment selected) At this point. OR 2.) once it has been selected just like any other element in the program. and font (typeface) to your drawings. Select Annotate > Text. As well. it will be added to your drawing as a floating selection. etc.

Selecting text style Properties works in a manner similar to most word processing software. The Text Styles dialog box appears. you can select or edit any of the text styles in the Available pane. Text Styles Dialog Box Showing Labels Properties At this point. or font: 1. For more information on these procedures. 2. color.To examine or change text size. Click Text Style. see Exporting Line Styles on page 187 and Importing Line Styles on page 188. Note: You can also export text styles to a library and import text style libraries in the same way as you do line styles. You can also create your own text style by clicking Add Item. 206 .

Quantity Report 19 retpahC 207 .

In North America. General Element Properties Property Name Use Automatic Name Generation Hyperlinks Manuf. and price. An alternate code assigned to an element. CSI divisions are used. The unit price of the element in dollars and cents. The name of the company making the element. manufacturer. It is used mostly for linking elements in the catalog to elements in other packages like Timberline. This page contains text information about the element. Manufacturer. General information you may want to note about the element. it is important that you specify the name and price of the element since these are key elements of quantity reports. More info Links to external files or web pages with information about the element. such as its name. Most of the information on the General property page is linked to the contents of quantity reports.General Element Properties Every element has a standard General property page on its Properties page. The name of the company or store supplying the element. A construction division identification. Division Description The name of the element as you want it to appear in quantity reports. Therefore. Price Alt Code Notes 208 . Adjusts the name automatically according to a predefined template when you adjust certain properties. The part number given to the element by the manufacturer. Supplier Part No.

209 . Generate Report on the 2.g. it is displayed in the editor associated with the template you selected (for example. In the Available Templates list. Microsoft Excel). Reports are based on templates. walls) or entire locations.) 5. such as material names and prices. click the Browse button next to the Report File Name box. select the template you want to use. or for walls only. The quantities in your report come from your model. By default. 3. and the program ships with a default set of templates that allows you to generate reports in different formats. you can generate a report for one location only. unit price. and total cost of each material. or type the name you want. 4. navigate to the directory you want. If you want to change the path. The Quantity Report function also lets you filter elements or locations. the report takes the name of the drawing and is saved in the Templates directory. As soon as a Quantity Report is generated. or name of a report. Reports are generated instantly. To generate a quantity report: 1. The report is generated and displayed in the associated editor. Select Quantity > Generate Report. click the Model Filter button and select your filter options. comes from the Properties pages of the inserted elements. Then. The remaining information. You can filter out specific elements (e. For example. If there are elements or locations in the current drawing that you do not want quantified. (See: Filtering a Quantity Report on page 209. Filtering a Quantity Report The Model Filter for a Quantity Report filters out things that exist in the current drawing. Click OK.Chapter 19: Quantity Report Generating a Quantity Report A Quantity Report (Bill of Materials) lists the materials in your drawing and the quantity. OR click Quantity toolbar.

You are returned to the Generate Report dialog box. Previewing a Quantity Report You can preview a Quantity Report before you generate it. Generate Report on the 2. In the Generate Report dialog box. Select Quantity > Generate Report. 4. either Element (see Display Filtering by Element on page 134) or Location (see Display Filtering by Location on page 136). 210 . 3. click . Notice that the Current Model Filter dialog box lists only the elements and locations that currently exist in the drawing. To preview a quantity report: 1. OR click Quantity toolbar. Also.To filter elements/locations in your drawing: 1. Click Report Preview. select the desired filter method. Select the template you want to use for your report in the Available Templates pane. 5. 6. OR click Quantity toolbar. Click the light bulb icon to turn off either an element or a location. Click OK. Select Quantity > Generate Report. 3. Generate Report on the 2. You can now preview your filtered report by clicking . In the Sort By area. you can view it either as a Spread Sheet (information in grid format) or in WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) view.

OR click toolbar. If you select Spread Sheet. click Close . 4. 3. click Preview.Chapter 19: Quantity Report 4. Viewing and Editing a Quantity Report Use View Report to view or edit any generated report at any time. To return to the Generate Report dialog box. View Report Options 5. you can turn the grid lines on or off using the Show Grid check box. click Open. 2. 211 . To view or edit a report: 1. 6. To view the file without editing it. In the View Report window you can select Spread Sheet or WYSIWYG view in the View menu. Click the Browse button View Report on the Quantity beside the Report file edit box. then click Open. Select the file you want to view. Select Quantity > View Report. OR To view and edit the file.

212 .

Appendix A: Glossary 213 .

Assembly – An attachment of nongraphical information to an element's property definition. Aspect Ratio – The ratio of width to height. Used along stairs. etc. decks.g. B Backsplash – The rear portion of a countertop that sits against the wall. a background light of uniform brightness. Base Point – When shifting a point. An assembly consists of an element (e. Alt Code – Alternate Code. T A he following are definitions of names. abbreviations. Array Rectangular – A method of copying an element into a pattern of rows and/or columns. Also called a banister.g. technical and other terms used in this guide that you may not be familiar with. The extension given to the program's drawing files. It opens outward. The drawing file produced by the program.Glossary: bottom corners of the frame. An extra identification code that is used to link an element in the program's catalog to the databases of other applications. Ambient – The base level of brightness. Angle Snap – Makes elements move/ rotate at specific increments (angles). Bullnose – A heavily rounded edge usually found on stair treads. for example. Usually includes a roof structure. part) and a formula to quantify that element (e. Bi-Fold Doors – Narrow doors that are hinged to fold against each other and flat against the jamb. door hinges). Entries are listed in alphabetical order. porches. Bay Window – A window made up of three sash units that project out from the wall. or a splash guard that is fastened to the wall and sits above the countertop. landings. Bow Window – A type of bay window made up of several window units set at slight angles to form a curve. Awning Window – A window having a sash hinged on pins at the two top or 214 . Automatic Save – Saves your drawing for you at specified intervals without prompting. Balustrade – A railing consisting of balusters (spindles) attached to a top rail. the Base Point is the point you are shifting FROM. BLD File – BUILD file. Bird's Mouth – The notch cut in the lower end of a rafter to fit it to the top plate of a wall.

Division – A construction division identification. Catalog Search Path – The location of the directory containing your external catalogs. In North America. Crosshairs – A cursor that looks like a plus sign. It is the one you see when inserting elements. It provides precise control over such things as distance and direction. Contains Dimension Styles. Commander – An editing window that appears when certain functions are chosen. Display Filter – A dialog box used for displaying and hiding elements and/or locations. D Daylight Saving Time – Time usually one hour ahead of standard time. CSI divisions are used. Detail – An intricate close-up of a particular part of your drawing. Delimiter – A character that marks the beginning or end of a unit of data. 215 . Cut Line – The symbol displayed on stairs in Plan view that illustrates the horizontal section cut at eye level. Collision Control – An intelligent drawing aid that prevents elements from being inserted where they won't fit. Complexity – The level of detail shown when elements are displayed. Current Model Catalog – The modelspecific catalog that is created as you insert elements in your drawing. Diffuse – The amount of color that is reflected when an element is illuminated by a light. DLB File – Dimension Library File. Cursor Snap – Makes your cursor snap to points on an imaginary grid. Catalog Panel – The window (often tabbed) that provides catalog access to groups and elements. Ceiling Height – The height of the underside of a ceiling surface relative to the floor level.Appendix A: Glossary C Casement Window – A window having a sash hinged on pins at the top and bottom corners of one side. Column Grid – A fixed set of tagged. CLB File – Color Library File. It opens outward by means of a crank. Crossing – A selection method where you click and drag a rectangle from right to left through elements you want to select. vertical and horizontal lines that facilitate the correct positioning and alignment of columns.

etc. Filter – A means of including elements you want to quantify and excluding those you don't. Double Roof – A type of hip roof in which the slope to all four sides is broken into two slopes. Also called bypass doors. Floor Level – The height of a floor (location) above the ground (0). You can move and rotate elements with your mouse when you are in Drag Mode. thus flipping the swing. Hinges a door on the opposite jamb. Fixed Window – A window whose sash is permanently fixed in the frame. On either end. Flip Swing – Selection command in the right-click menu. such as a door. Dutch Gable – A combination of a hip and gable roof. Sometimes called Scissor Stairs. Drawing Aids – Tools that control the way your cursor works and the way elements are inserted. Also known as a Dutch Hip Roof or a Full Return Gable.). the lower segment is a hip roof and the upper segment is a gable end. 2. Fold-Back Stairs – Stairs that have two flights separated by a landing and that make a complete 180-degree turn. Both slopes have a pitch. Fascia – A flat wood or plywood strip nailed to the overhanging ends of rafters. appearance. door. Element – A specific type of element. Duplicate – Copies a selected element on the same location. back and side views of a building. The height of a location above sea level. Elevation – 1.Document Save Path – The location of the default directory in which projects are stored. E Editor – A software application capable of editing text. The front. or window in a wall. 216 . External Catalog – A container (or listing) of elements available for insertion. Flips an opening. Environment – The geographic location of your model as well as the scene behind it. The program ships with a default Master Catalog. Flip Opening – Selection command in the right-click menu. having its own distinct properties (size. Drag Mode – The default mode you are in when you select an element for editing. F Face Slider – Two or more doors that open by sliding to the side in front or behind each other.

and which opens inward. Hip Roof – A roof with four sloping sides (as opposed to a Gable Roof. Ground Plane – A surface representing the ground. Hopper Window – A window in which the sash is hinged on pins at the two bottom corners. 2. Hinged Door – Any type of door that swings open. Head Height –The height at which the tops of openings. A flat masonry section. Hung Window – A window having two sashes. Contains hatching patterns. Footer – 1. H Hatching – A pattern of lines used to fill a particular area of your drawing and to represent the material used for that area (e. HLB File – Pattern Library File. A structural member placed horizontally over a window. or pier it supports and is used to spread the vertical load. doors are organized in groups such as Bi-fold and Single Hinged. Group – A container for a list of specific element types. with two sloping sides). Glazing Bars – Horizontal and vertical members that divide the individual panes of glass in a window.g.Appendix A: Glossary Fold-Up Door – A door made up of a number of narrow panels that opens overhead by folding up like an accordion. 2. Also called Muntin Bars. and whose lower sash slides up G Gable Roof – A roof with two sloping sides (as opposed to a Hip Roof. Often called a patio door. Highlite – A pane of glass located at the top of a window or door. and windows are located relative to the floor level. Girt Wall – A wall built up of horizontal structural members that are suspended between vertical columns. Text appearing at the bottom of a report. 217 . The text that appears at the top of a quantity report. leaving only surfaces displayed. concrete). doors. column. that is wider than the wall. Header – 1. Hidden Line – A view mode where hidden lines are removed from the view. usually concrete. Usually found in industrial buildings. with four sloping sides). Glass Slider – A door having a wood or aluminum frame fitted with one fixed glass panel and one sliding glass panel. door or other framed opening to carry the load over that opening. For example.

or bearing walls. are supported by beams. in turn. Interface – Program components that you see on the screen and use to perform tasks. The upper slope is nearly or completely flat. Mansard Roof – A type of hip roof in which the slope to all four sides is broken into two slopes. MLB File – Materials Library File. while the lower slope has a sharp pitch. head height and ceiling level. Louvre Window – A small. 3D Perspective or 3D Parallel. K KLB File – Linework Library File. Used mostly for ventilation. I LLB File – Lights Library File. It is the focus of the planet's magnetic field and is the point magnetic compasses point toward. 218 . Mode – The way in which you view a model: 2D Plan. slatted window placed high in a gable end. Match Grid – Matches your cursor snap grid to the drawing grid so it seems like you are snapping to the drawing grid. Contains Line Styles. L L-Winder Stairs – Stairs that ascend in an L-shape and that use wedge-shaped treads called winders to change direction. J Jamb – The wood or metal pieces that form the sides and top of a door or window enclosure. upper sash on the inside.and over the fixed. Joist – One of a parallel set of structural members used to support floor and ceiling loads. Hyperlinks – Jumps (links) to external document files or Web addresses. Linework – A group of settings that determines how lines appear on element components when elements are viewed in 2D. They. Locations – Drawing layers containing definitions for wall height. M Magnetic North – Magnetic North is the magnetic north pole. floor level. girders. Index of Refraction – The amount that light bends as it passes from one material to another. Lite – A pane of glass in a window or door.

left. or right. Parts – Elements (like hinges and weather stripping) that are not visible in the drawing but can be associated with existing elements. Orthogonal View – An alternate name for Parallel View in which all drawing lines are parallel and the effect of distance is eliminated. Nosing – The portion of a stair tread that projects over the riser. NLB File – Linetype Library File. Opening – A cutout in a wall. In Parallel View. O Open GL – A 3D graphics Application Programming Interface (API) that includes routines for shading. Muntin Bars – The vertical and horizontal members that divide the individual panes of glass in a window. Percent (%) Below Horizon – The percentage that you want the background to appear below ground level (absolute zero). Size varies by resolution. 219 . left. down. N Newel – The main post to which the end of a railing is attached. Overhang – The part of the roof that extends over the side wall. texture mapping. Also. all drawing lines are parallel. geometry transformations. etc. The smallest unit of color on a computer display. Perspective View – A 3D view in which the scale of an element decreases according to its distance from the viewer. Or to move the view. Parallel View – A 3D view that eliminates the effect of distance from a view. texture filtering. or right. Parametric – Having a set of physical properties that determines the characteristics of an element. P Pan – A control that allows you to move the on-screen view by dragging up. Contrasts with Perspective View. down. lighting. Perspective View represents the way an element would appear to the human eye. Drawing lines converge to a vanishing point. anti-aliasing. Pixel – A word invented by combining the two words “picture” and “element”. Parallel View is sometimes called Orthogonal View. Ortho – A Drawing Aid that restricts drawing to straight up. the distance from the side wall to the fascia. non-structural bar between window and door units.Appendix A: Glossary Mullion – A thin. Contrasts with Perspective View.

Pixel Search Distance – The Pixel Search Distance determines how close your cursor (which is attached to an element you are inserting) needs to be to an existing element before Object Snap occurs. Snap Angle – The increment angle your cursor will snap at (if Angle Snap is enabled). 2D view from above. textures. Prompt for Assistance – A dialog that appears when you try to insert an element when there are no catalogs open for that element type. Plan View – A flat. doors. Riser – 1. 2. S Sash – A frame that holds one or more panes of glass and that is set into the window frame. Specular – A shininess factor that determines the amount of highlighting you see on an element from light sources. Pocket Door – A door that rolls on an overhead track into a frame or pocket hidden in the wall. Site Visuals – The background behind your model in 3D view. Roller Door – A door made of hinged. etc. R Render – To display a 3D model with surfaces. Shininess – The ability of a texture to reflect light.) and specifications on how they are to be used in a project. Schedule – A detailed list of finish materials (windows. horizontal steel or wood panels that move on rollers in overhead and side tracks. A vertical run of pipe. Q Quantity Report – A list of the type and quantity of materials in your model. lighting and shading. Rough Opening – The opening created in a wall to receive a door or window frame. 3D view where hidden lines are obscured and surfaces are colored intensifying the 3D effect. Shaded View – An on-screen. Section – A profile of the model as it would appear if cut through by an intersecting plane. Also known as a Materials List or Bill of Materials. 220 . Seat Cut – The horizontal cut that is made when cutting a bird's mouth in a rafter. The vertical board placed between the treads of a staircase.

Tile Height – The height of one tile in a texture pattern. a point in the distance where lines extending from the edges of elements appear to meet. Also called a toe kick. 221 . creating a realistic 3D effect. Spreadsheet – A table of values arranged in rows and columns. Split L-Shaped Stairs – Stairs that ascend in an L-shaped direction and whose landing is split on a diagonal to make the change in direction. Toe Space – A recessed area between the bottom of a cabinet and the floor that allows you to stand close to the cabinet. True North – True North is the geographic North Pole. GRIDSNAP.g. etc. Stringer – The inclined side of a stair that supports the treads and risers. TSL File – Text Style Library File T Template – A set of pre-defined properties that determines the setup and outcome of something (like a report). Temporary Directory – The default directory in which temporary files generated by the program are saved. Transom – A small window sash above a door that is hinged at bottom so it can be opened inward. Vent Window – A window made up of two or more segments with one segment acting as a vent. Tilt Door – A door consisting of a single leaf that opens overhead by tilting up (e. 3D view where solid textures are applied to surfaces. Tread – The horizontal part of a stair that is stepped on. Status Bar – The bar below the drawing area that contains the Help message and the Drawing Aids toolbar (AUTOINSERT. Tilt Garage Door). TLB File – Texture Library File.Appendix A: Glossary Splash Screen – The main startup dialog box that appears when you launch the program.). Textured View – An on-screen. U U-Winder Stairs – Stairs that ascend in a U-shaped direction. It is located at 90 degrees North latitude and all lines of longitude converge at the pole. V Vanishing Point – In perspective drawing. Transparency – The degree to which a texture can be penetrated by light.

Zoom Out – De-magnifies the view in 10 percent increments. Model. A Y coordinate specifies a vertical distance. Zoom In – Magnifies the view in 10 percent increments. and Elevation views. Provides the tightest view of geometry in the drawing. Y Y Axis – One of the three drawing axes. 222 . It allows you to see through elements. The open standard for virtual reality on the Internet. Z W Winder – One of the wedge-shaped treads that make up a winding or spiral staircase. around elements you want to select. Wireframe View – The default 3D view where all lines making up elements are displayed. VRML – Virtual Reality Modeling Language. The Z coordinate indicates either elevation or depth. Zoom Previous – Returns to the previous view. Higher depth values improve detail of 3D display but may slow the system.Views Panel – The panel of the screen containing 2D Plan. Z Axis – One of the three drawing axes. X X Axis – One of the three drawing axes. WLB File – Lineweight Library File. An X coordinate specifies a horizontal distance. Windowing – A selection method where you click and drag a rectangle. WYSIWYG – Acronym for “What You See Is What You Get”. Z Buffer – A block of memory used to store the Z-axis value of a pixel on the screen. from left to right. Zoom Extents – Zooms to just the area of the drawing that has elements. Zoom Window – Magnifies an area of your drawing that you select by windowing. Capable of being viewed in VRML viewers. WRL File – WORLD file.

Index 223 .

132 Display Interval.Index 1-2-3 2D Plan view creating. 33 opening. 148 overview. 6 Display Filtering by element. 50 shifting element function. 53 Coordinates (Cartesian & Polar). 75 inserting. 134 by location. 39 deleting elements from. 43 editing elements in external. 151 Doors 224 . 150 Catalogs adding a group to. 37 Ceilings inserting openings. 44 B Background displaying behind model. 202 Direction axes. 124 A Array Rectangular. 73 Commander buttons. 136 overview. 33 overview. 147 dragging. 183 Columns inserting. 6 Dolly. 141 Camera viewing five dynamic functions. 34 deleting a group from. 130 C Cabinets behavior properties. 202 Dimensions adding. 159 Display Types selecting. 6 D Dimension Styles customizing & creating. 203 selecting. 51 overview. 45 using. 74 Camera and Target accessing properties. 35 viewing properties. 38 saving. 140 using in Tile view. 38 adding elements to. 111 Automatic Name Generation modifying formula. 40 closing. 144 working with. 123 3D Model view creating. 85 inserting. 32 renaming a group in. 142 examining properties. 36 creating new. 6 Direction Angle. 81 Colors adding. 39 adding furnishings to. 42 making selections. 128 Distance axes. 43 editing elements in Current Model.

113 selecting. 26 opening while running. 106 rotating manually. 114 editing inserted. 163 F Floor Locations adding. 128 Horizontal distance. 20 defining. 111 copying (overview). 85 inserting. 60 Interface examining. 2 L Line Styles adding. 181 specifying color. 104 General property page. 163 Enable Daylight When Rendering. 3 overview. 29 E Elements arraying. 97 shifting from a point. 180 Linetypes adding. 109 copying to other locations. 131 Guarantee. 162 Enable Antialiasing. 108 copying on same location. 184 Lineweights 225 . 30 opening at startup. 80 F-Stop. 105 editing properties. 184 exporting. 48 moving. 53 Elevation view creating. 21 Floors inserting openings. 18 deleting. 15 Drawings closing. 186 specifying. 65 Dormer adding on walls. 77 inserting. 90 Drawing Aids setting up. 180 applying to elements. 124 Enable Ambient. 208 generating names automatically. 6 I Included Angle. 76 G Ground Plane displaying. 163 Furnishings behavior properties. 28 exporting. 110 deleting. 188 overview. x H Hidden Line view. 66 inserting.Index flipping. 44 inserting. 187 customizing. 187 importing. 28 printing. 112 rotating with Commander. 30 saving. 91 creating simple.

3 Q Quantity Report filtering.adding. 169 customizing. 155 Render Mesh. 169 exporting. 85 inserting standard. 194 Patterns list adding a group to. 172 applying a texture to. 210 using element properties info. 12 Orbit. 198 importing. 208 viewing & editing. 160 Convergence. 197 adding a pattern to. 53 Render Controls. 155 with radiosity. 158 226 . 49 Minimum Element Area. 71 Ramps inserting. 60 Railings inserting. 14 setting program. 12 graphics. 161 Model building. 159 Max. 211 R Radius. 137 Patterned Outline view. 161 Maximum Steps. 197 customizing. 30 Project guidelines. 5 starting. 159 Maximum Level. 173 attaching to elements. 151 P Panning. 4 O Openings inserting custom. 174 importing. 182 specifying. 130 Rendered view. 175 Materials list adding a group to. 166 Max. 49 Printing drawings. 129 Patterns exporting. 199 properties. 154 Rendering Options Adaptive Subdivision. 10 system. 209 generating. Element Area. 13 general. Patch Area. 158 Measure command. 168 adding a material to. 64 removing. 170 applying a surface color to. 70 Redo command. 96 Reference Point. 87 Options file paths. 209 previewing. 129 Rendering specifying the environment. 192 Pointer. 185 M Materials applying a pattern to.

161 U Undo command. 159 T Technical Support contacting. 58 drawing (overview). 122 open & closed views. Y and Z axes. 96 V Vertical distance. 129 Textures list adding a group to. 116 in 2D Plan view. 205 Text Styles customizing & creating. 97 Selection Filtering by element. 83 Rotate command. 99 Shaded Outline view. 21 Templates (drawing) opening. 118 naming. 162 overview. 26 Text adding to drawing. 103 overview.Index Display & Daylight. 26 Selecting. 151 Stairs inserting. 128 Shifting from a point. 61 curved wall radius and angle. 116 in Parallel 3D mode. 176 Threshold. 6 View Modes selecting. 66 Wireframe view. 122 renaming. 67 inserting. 6 227 . 101 by location. 156 Roof support segments editing. 119 editing. 70 Stopping Criterion. 119 Viewing basics of 2D & 3D. 206 Textured view. 113 S Sample projects opening. 129 Shaded view. 56 drawing with Commander. 85 inserting. 151 Spin. 118 W Walls breaking. 121 in Perspective 3D mode. 112. 176 adding a texture to. 56 Windows flipping. ix Templates creating & using. 117 Views closing. 57 drawing with mouse. 87 Roofs inserting openings. 53 Slide. 123 viewing & editing properties. 60 curving. 128 X X.

137 228 .Z Zoom Dynamic. 151 Zooming overview.

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