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Behavioural Styles

Behavioural Styles

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Published by: Mahrous on Oct 10, 2008
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12/30/2012

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Understanding Behavior Styles

DISC Personal Profile
Understanding Behavior Styles utilizes the “DISC Personal Profile”

Objectives
At the end of this session, you will be able to:
 Identify your work behavioral style.  Increase your appreciation of different work styles.  Identify and minimize potential conflicts with others.  Create the motivational environment most conducive to success.

JoHari Window
Open
I Know You Know

JoHari Window
Open
I Know You Know

Hidden
I Know You Don’t Know

JoHari Window
Open
I Know You Know

Hidden
I Know You Don’t Know

Blind
I Don’t Know You Know

JoHari Window
Open
I Know You Know

Hidden
I Know You Don’t Know

Blind
I Don’t Know You Know

Unknown
I Don’t Know You Don’t Know

JoHari Window
Open
I Know You Know

Hidden
I Know You Don’t Know

Blind
I Don’t Know You Know

Unknown
I Don’t Know You Don’t Know

Description of the Personal Profile Survey
• The Personal Profile System is not a test. • There are no “bad” survey results. • It measures your self-perception. • It describes only normal behavior. • It is an educational tool, not a clinical tool. • Interpretations describe tendencies of behavior

Description of Survey, continued

The survey contains 3 levels of interpretations:

• General Highlights • Dimensional Intensity Index • Classical Profile Pattern

Four Basic Profiles D I S C
Dominance Influence Steadiness Compliance

Behavioral Characteristics of

“D” - Dominance

Decisive actions and decisions Likes control Dislikes inaction Prefers maximum freedom to manage Cool, independent, competitive

Low tolerance for feelings and attitudes Works quickly and impressively alone Seeks esteem, selfactualization Administrative skills

D D
High Behavioral Tendencies High Behavioral Tendencies
 High ego strength  Impatient  Change agent  Fears being taken advantage of  Motivated by directness, confrontation

Some Descriptors Some Descriptors
~ Restless ~ Competitive ~ Independent ~ Self-reliant ~ Wants immediate results ~ Adventurous ~ Assertive ~ Likes power and authority ~ Likes prestige and challenge ~ Vigorous ~ Causes action ~ Tends to dominate ~ Pioneering ~ Wants direct answers ~ Outspoken ~ Strong-willed ~ Wants freedom from control & supervision ~ Decisive ~ Persistent ~ Argumentative

D D

D D
Negative Conditions Negative Conditions
Require following policies and procedures Tell them exactly how you want the job done. Give them lots of examples to make your points understood. Require documentation for everything.

D D
What to Remember What to Remember
A high “D” may want authority, challenges, prestige, freedom, varied activities, difficult assignments, logical approaches and an opportunity.

Behavioral Characteristics of

“I” Influence
Spontaneous actions and decisions Likes involvement Dislikes being alone Exaggerates and generalizes Dreams and gets others to dream with them Jumps from one activity to another Works quickly and excitingly with others Seeks esteem and belonging Persuasive skills

I I
High Behavioral Tendencies High Behavioral Tendencies
 Very emotional  People oriented  Disorganized  Fears loss of social approval  Motivated by flattery

I I
Some Descriptors Some Descriptors
~ Inspiring ~ Convincing ~ Likes change ~ Playful ~ Wants freedom from detail ~ Charming ~ Exciting & stimulating ~ Wants freedom of expression ~ Talkative ~ Likes participating in groups ~ Often dramatic ~ Likes working with people ~ Likes recognition for accomplishments ~ Generates enthusiasm ~ Likes stimulating others ~ Desires to help others ~ Persuasive ~ Confident

I I
Negative Conditions Negative Conditions
Assign tasks that require long periods of intense concentration. Place them in a work environment that requires them to always be serious. Assign very detailed tasks to them. Place in a non-participating environment

I I
What to Remember What to Remember
A high “I” may want social recognition, popularity, people to talk to, freedom from control and detail, favorable working conditions, recognition of abilities, an opportunity to help others and a chance to motivate others.

Behavioral Characteristics of

“S” - Steadiness
Makes decisions carefully Likes close personal relationships Dislikes interpersonal conflict Supports and actively listens to others Doesn’t pay much attention to goal setting Has ability to gain support from others Works slowly and cohesively with others Seeks security and belonging Counseling skills

S S
High Behavioral Tendencies High Behavioral Tendencies
 Loyal  Family oriented  Possessive  Fears loss of security  Motivated by use of traditional procedure

Some Descriptors Some Descriptors
~ Dislikes conflict ~ Takes time to listen ~ Likes security and stability ~ Obedient & thorough ~ Takes time to make decisions ~ Wants others to agree ~ Accommodating ~ Patient with others ~ Demonstrates loyalty ~ Satisfied and generous

S S

~ Neighborly ~ Expects credit for accomplishments ~ Considerate of other’s needs ~ Wants to be appreciated ~ Minimal work infringements on home life ~ Wants guarantees before change ~ Likes status quo unless given reason for change

S S
Negative Conditions Negative Conditions
Give assignments that require them to place pressure on others. Give assignments that require a different approach each time they are done - give them guidelines. Place them in conflict situations.

S S
What to Remember What to Remember
A high “S” may want status quo, security of situation, time to adjust, appreciation, identification with group, limited territory, and areas of specialization.

Behavioral Characteristics of

“C” - Compliance
Cautious actions and decisions Likes organization, structure Dislikes involvement Ask questions with specific detail Prefers objectives, task oriented work environment Wants to be right, relies on data collection Works slowly & precisely alone Seeks security, selfactualization Problem solving skills

C C
High Behavioral Tendencies High Behavioral Tendencies
 Perfectionist  Sensitive  Accurate  Fears criticism, especially of their work  Motivated by being permitted to proceed the “right way”

Some Descriptors Some Descriptors
~ Orderly ~ Diplomatic ~ Agreeable ~ Obliging ~ Accuracy ~ Humble ~ Devout ~ Utilizes critical thinking ~ Likes controlled circumstances ~ Likes assurance of security

C C

~ Checks for accuracy ~ Soft spoken ~ Likes status quo, unless assured of quality control ~ Prefers no sudden or abrupt changes ~ Performs precise work ~ Respectful ~ Follows prescribed directive & standards ~ Well-disciplined ~ Cautious

C C
Negative Conditions Negative Conditions
Require quick decisions on important matters. Require them to enforce unpopular rules. Place them in unstructured situations where no performance guidelines exist. Don’t allow enough time to check for accuracy.

C C
What to Remember What to Remember
A high “C” may want security, no sudden changes, personal attention, little responsibility, exact job description, controlled work environment, status quo, reassurance, and to be a part of a group.

When Working with a “D”
• Be clear, specific, brief and to the point. • Stick to business • Come prepared with all requirements, objectives,
support material in well organized “package”.

• Present the facts logically, plan your presentation
efficiently.

• Ask “what”, not “how”. • Provide alternatives & choices for making their
own decisions.

Working, continued . . .
• Provide facts & figures about probability of success,
effectiveness, options.

• If you disagree, take issue with facts, not the person. • If you agree, support results, not the person. • Motivate and persuade by referring to objectives and
results.

• Outline possibilities for person to get results, solve
problems, be in charge.

• After talking business, depart graciously.

When Working with an “I”
• Provide favorable, friendly environment. • Leave time for relating, socializing. • Provide chance for them to verbalize about ideas, people
and their intuitions.

• Provide details in writing, but don’t dwell on them. • Ask for their opinions, ideas regarding people.

Working, continued . . .
• Provide ideas for implementing action • Provide time for stimulating and fun activities. • Provide testimonials of experts on ideas. • Offer special, immediate and extra incentives for
their willingness to take risks.

When Working with an “S”
• Start, however briefly, with a personal comment.
Break the ice.

• Show sincere interest in them as people. Find areas of
common involvement; be candid and open.

• Patiently draw out personal goals, and work with them to
achieve these goals; listen, be responsive.

• Present your case softly, non-threateningly. • Ask “how” questions to draw their opinions.

Working, continued . . .
• If you agree easily, look for possible areas of early
disagreement of dissatisfaction.

• If you disagree, look for hurt feelings, personal reasons. • Move casually, informally. • Define clearly (preferably in writing) individual
contributions.

• Emphasize how their actions will minimize their risk.

When Working with a “C”
• Prepare your “case” in advance. • Provide straight pros and cons of ideas. • Stick to business. Support ideas with accurate data. • Make an organized contribution to their efforts; present
specifics and do what you say you can do.

• Take your time, but be persistent. • Draw up a scheduled approach to implementing actions
with step-by-step timetable; assure them that there won’t be surprises.

Working, continued . . .
• If you agree, follow through. • If you disagree, disagree with the facts, not the person. • Give them time to verify reliability of your action; be
prepared to provide many explanations in a patient, persistent manner.

• Provide solid, tangible, practice evidence. • Indicate guarantees over long period, but provide
options.

When Working with a “D”, don’t . . .
• Don’t ramble on or waste their time. • Don’t try to build personal relations. • Don’t forget or lose things; don’t be disorganized or
messy; don’t confuse or distract their mind from business. to be zapped.

• Don’t leave loopholes or cloudy issues - if you don’t want • Don’t ask rhetorical questions, or useless ones. • Don’t come with a ready-made decisions,
nor make it for them.

Don’t, continued
• Don’t speculate widely or offer guarantees or
assurances.

• If you disagree, don’t let it reflect on them
personally.

• If you agree, don’t reinforce with “I’m with you”. • Don’t direct or order. d • Don’t do an “epilogue” bit after finishing business.

When Working with an “I”, don’t . . .
• Don’t legislate, muffle or stop gaps. • Don’t be curt, cold or tight-lipped. • Don’t drive on to facts and figures, alternatives,
abstracts.

• Don’t leave things hanging in the air, or they’ll hang
there.

• Don’t waste time trying to be impersonal, judgmental,
task-oriented.

Don’t, continued
• Don’t dream” with them, though, or you’ll lose
time.

• Don’t kid around too much, or “stick” to the
agenda too much.

• Don’t talk down to them. • Don’t be dogmatic.

When Working with an “S”, don’t . . .
• Don’t rush headlong into business or the agenda. • Don’t stick coldly or harshly to business. On the
other hand, don’t lose sight of goals by being too personal.

• Don’t force them to respond too quickly to your
objectives; don’t say “Here’s how I see it”.

• Don’t be domineering about facts and figures, they
will not participate in debate.

Don’t, continued
• Don’t manipulate or bully about facts and figures.
They will not participate in debate.

• Don’t patronize or demean by using subtlety or
invective.

• Don’t be abrupt or rapid. • Don’t be vague. Don’t offer opinions and probabilities. • Don’t offer assurances and guarantees you can’t fulfill.

When Working with a “C”, don’t . . .
• Don’t be disorganized or messy. • Don’t be circuitous, giddy, casual, informal. b • Don’t rush the decision-making process. r • Don’t be vague about what’s expected of either b
of you; don’t fail to follow through.

• Don’t dilly-dally. d • Leave things to change or luck.

Don’t, continued
• Don’t provide special personal incentives. • Don’t threaten, cajole, wheedle, coax,
whimper.

• Don’t use testimonies of others or unreliable
sources; don’t be haphazard.

• Don’t use someone’s opinion as evidence. • Don’t use gimmicks or clever, quick
manipulations.

Style Modification
INCREASE your “D” DECREASE your “D”
• Express emotions (emote)
more often,

• Make faster decisions. • “Tell” more often. • “Ask” less often.

• Ask for opinions of others. • Negotiate decision-making. • Listen without
interrupting.

• “Control” less. • Allow others to assume
leadership.

Style Modification
INCREASE your “I”
• Be more outgoing and
friendly.

DECREASE your “I”
• Talk less. • Restrain your enthusiasm. • Made decisions based on
facts.

• Be more enthusiastic. • Express emotion (emote)
more often.

• Spend time on
relationships.

• Get to the point.

Style Modification
INCREASE your “S”
• Initiate conversation. • Be more loyal. • Act on your convictions. • Work on your listening
skills.

DECREASE your “S”
• Make quicker decisions. • Be willing to take risks. • Listen to others. • Become more selfsufficient.

• Become more apathetic.

Style Modification
INCREASE your “C” DECREASE your “C”
• Make non-emotional
decisions.

• Be less concerned about
control and security.

• Gather information,
define, clarify, test your assumptions.

• Relax your standards. • Open yourself more to
emotional appeals.

• Develop standards.

Thank You…..

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