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River Cities' Reader Issue #787 - September 15, 2011

River Cities' Reader Issue #787 - September 15, 2011

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011 

GUEST COMMENTARY

Constitution Day: Is the Bill of Rights Dead?
protect the freedom to speak your mind and protest in peace without being bridled by the government. It also protects the freedom of the media, as well as the right to worship and pray without interference. In other words, Americans cannot be silenced by the government. Yet despite the clear protections found in the First Amendment, the freedoms described therein are under constant assault. Students are often stripped of their rights for such things as wearing a T-shirt that school officials find offensive. Incredibly, one California school official actually forbade students from wearing T-shirts with the American flag on them. Likewise, local governments and police often oppose citizens who express unpopular views in public. Peace activists who speak out against the government are being arrested and subjected to investigation by the FBI, while members of the press are threatened with jail time for reporting on possible government wrongdoing and refusing to reveal their sources. The Second Amendment was intended to guarantee “the right of the people to keep and bear arms.” Yet while gun ownership has been recognized by the U.S. Supreme Court as an individual citizen right, Americans remain powerless to defend themselves against the government. In fact, in 2011, the Indiana Supreme Court broadly ruled that citizens don’t have the right to resist police officers who enter their homes illegally, which is the law in most states. And consider how many individuals have been killed simply for instinctively reaching for any kind of weapon, loaded or not, during the initial trauma of a SWAT-team raid. Thus, as local police departments become more and more like paramilitary units, dressed in black riot gear and armed with assault weapons, the ability of the citizenry to protect itself from the government will become more and more difficult. The Third Amendment reinforces the principle that civilian-elected officials are superior to the military by prohibiting the military from entering any citizen’s home without “the consent of the owner.” Today’s military may not as of yet technically threaten private property. However, with the police increasingly posing as military forces – complete with weapons, uniforms, assault vehicles, etc. – a good case could be made for the fact that SWAT-team raids, which break down the barrier between public and private

by John W. Whitehead

F

or all intents and purposes, the Constitution is on life support and has been for some time now. Those responsible for its demise are none other than the schools, which have failed to educate students about its principles; the courts, which have failed to uphold the rights enshrined within it; the politicians, who long ago sold out to corporations and special interests; and “we the people,” who, in our ignorance and greed, have valued materialism over freedom. We can pretend that the Constitution, which was written to hold the government accountable and was adopted on September 17, 1787, is still our governing document. However, the reality we must come to terms with is that in the America we live in today, the government does whatever it wants. And the few of us who actively fight to preserve the rights enshrined in the Constitution (a group whose numbers continue to shrink) do so knowing that in the long run we may be fighting a losing battle. A review of the first 10 amendments to the Constitution shows that the Bill of Rights may well be dead. The First Amendment is supposed to

property, have done away with this critical safeguard. Indeed, the increasing militarization of the police, the use of sophisticated weaponry against Americans, and the government’s increasing tendency to employ military personnel domestically have eviscerated the Third Amendment. At all levels (federal, local, and state), through the use of fusion centers, information sharing with the national intelligence agencies, and monetary grants for weapons and training from the Pentagon, the local police and the military have for all intents and purposes joined forces. In the process, the police have become a “standing” or permanent army, one composed of full-time professional soldiers who do not disband, which is exactly what the Founders feared. The Fourth Amendment prohibits the government from searching your home without a warrant approved by a judge. Unfortunately, the Fourth Amendment has been all but eviscerated by the passage of the USA PATRIOT Act, which opened the door to unwarranted electronic intrusions by government agents into your most personal

Continued On Page 12 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

ILLINOIS POLITICS

by Rich Miller

I

Quinn Returns to His Craft-a-Crisis Playbook
this is really starting to get old, and it’s more than a little disturbing. Can the governor comprehend what even the threat of a facility closure does to a small Downstate town? Fear spreads like wildfire. People immediately stop spending money. The local economy instantly shuts down. Yet just about everything Quinn has done since the end of the spring session has been aimed directly at Downstate. His reduction veto of the Medicaid budget spared inner-city hospitals. His vetoes of $100 million in school-transportation funding and regional-superintendent operations left Cook County virtually untouched. Last week’s layoff and closure announcement included just one Chicago-area facility. Every other state facility on his list was in a Downstate Senate Republican district. “Let me know when ‘Good Pat’ rides in on his white horse, wouldya?” cracked an otherwise worried state Senator Tim Bivins (R-Dixon) last week. The Mabley Developmental Center is in Bivins’ district, and it’s on Quinn’s closure list. Bivins’ wisecrack referred to a recent Sun-Times column I wrote about how “Bad Pat” will deliberately create a crisis so that “Good Pat” can swoop in and solve it. Yes, there is a budget problem. I get it. I’ve written about it many times. Anyone who doesn’t get it is a fool. But if the governor had done the hard work of governing, rather than just hold a splashy Chicago press conference announcing the end of the world, all of this could have been prevented. Quinn’s budget staff met with legislative staff a few times over the past several days to lay out the situation. Trouble is, the Quinnsters had a different explanation for how much money they needed to free up at every meeting. A memo handed out to staff late last month, for instance, had the budget hole at $180 million, which is a far cry from last week’s claim of a $313-million hole. It’s no wonder that the House Democrats have said they aren’t willing to adjust their revenue estimates to help Quinn out. People’s lives are not fun little Chicagopress-conference games, governor. And you’ve been messing with those lives almost from the moment you were elevated to your position. Grow the heck up, man. Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily political newsletter) and CapitolFax.com.

began to reminisce during Governor Pat Quinn’s Chicago press conference last week. Quinn had called the media together to announce he was closing seven state facilities and laying off almost 2,000 state employees because the General Assembly had passed an inadequate budget. “Wait,” I thought. “Haven’t I already seen this movie?” Back in May 2009, Quinn warned that if the General Assembly didn’t pass his proposed income-tax increase within two weeks he’d have to implement a “doomsday budget” and lay off more than 14,000 teachers, cancel preschool for 100,000 children, cut 400,000 students off of college aid, kick 650,000 people off of health-care rolls, eliminate all funding for public transit, slash a billion dollars to local governments, lay off 1,000 state troopers, and release 6,000 inmates from prison early. Two months later, Quinn threatened to lay off 2,600 state workers because the legislature’s budget was inadequate. Two weeks after that, Quinn had pared down the total threatened cuts to a billion dollars, including $225 million for college student aid, and said there was no way the government could operate through the end of the fiscal year without a tax hike. Almost none of that happened, even though Quinn didn’t get his tax hike until almost two years later. But come the following spring, Quinn was back with the same playbook. Quinn said he’d have to cut education by $1.3 billion if a tax hike wasn’t approved. That didn’t happen, either. This year, Quinn repeatedly threatened huge cuts to human-service providers, then somehow found the money to prevent the tragedy. He also warned in late spring that the bipartisan budget being prepared in the Illinois House was full of “radical” cuts and repeatedly vowed to stop it, then signed the bill into law. And then last week he once again blamed the General Assembly for forcing him to close those facilities and lay off those state employees – all to save a paltry $55 million. Quinn’s game plan is, by now, pretty darned clear: Blame the General Assembly for causing Armageddon, announce horrifically draconian countermeasures, then eventually find a way to somehow prevent the pending disaster. He’s like an arsonist firefighter. And, frankly,

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Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011 

IOWA POLITICS

Decrease in Stimulus Money Blamed for Iowa Closures, Layoffs

by Lynn Campbell IowaPolitics.com

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hile Iowa Democrats point to the irony of the state’s job-finding agency issuing pink slips to its own workers, Iowa Workforce Development Director Teresa Wahlert says the move isn’t surprising. “Ironically, when these one-time [federal] funds to stimulate the economy were injected into Iowa’s economy, Workforce Development hired about 100 people, knowing that those funds were [only for] 12 to 18 months,” Wahlert said September 6 in an interview with IowaPolitics.com. Iowa Workforce Development (IWD) in late August closed 31 part-time field offices intended to help unemployed Iowans find jobs, and on September 1 laid off 47 people who worked in those offices. Another five offices – including in Clinton and Muscatine – will close October 31, leaving another 30 people without jobs. “I think even in the minds of whatever the plan was a couple of years ago, there was an acknowledgment that the funds were short,” Wahlert said, referring to the previous administration of Democratic Governor Chet Culver. “It was, ‘We’ll deal with that problem when we get there.’ So I don’t think it’s ironic at all, that this is the situation we have.” The department received more than $33.8 million in one-time federal funding in Fiscal Year 2011, which ended June 30, IWD spokeswoman Kerry Koonce said September 6. That money dwindled to zero in the current fiscal year, she said. But state Representative Dave Jacoby (DCoralville), a member of the State Workforce Development Board (which oversees the state agency), said it isn’t accurate for Wahlert to blame the federal stimulus for closing Iowa’s field offices. “That’s absolute baloney,” Jacoby said. “The stimulus dollars were meant as a bridge when many states were suffering from their unemployment trust fund. ... There was a decrease in programming dollars from the federal government, but the decrease does not match the magnitude of cuts that Teresa and the governor’s office are making.” Jacoby, one of five lawmakers and a union official who sued the governor’s office recently over the closure of the field offices, said there could have been some downsizing at workforce development. But he said the state did not need to close the field offices. He described the closure of the offices as “extremely frustrating.” “There’s no cliff to fall off of, but they are creating a cliff to jump off,” he said.

have said the IWD is inaccurate in its assertion that it was short of money for the field offices. Iowa Senate File 517, approved by both chambers, required the state to maintain the 55 field offices. However, Governor Terry Branstad line-item-vetoed that language in late July. Five Iowa Democratic state lawmakers and Danny Homan, president of the American Federation of State, County, & Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Iowa Council 61, on August 24 sued the governor. Homan and Jacoby joined Democratic state Senators Bill Dotzler of Waterloo and Daryl Beall of Fort Dodge and Democratic state Representatives Bruce Hunter of Des Moines and Kirsten Running-Marquardt of Cedar Rapids in alleging that the item vetoes are “unconstitutional, illegal, null, void, and have no force and effect.” “Senate File 517 indeed was an appropriations bill,” said Jacoby, who said the lawsuit aims to review the legislature’s intent and questions the governor’s span of authority. “But the question is: If you veto an appropriation, it doesn’t mean you get to take the money.” Jacoby said the lawsuit is being led and financed by AFSCME and other supporters, and will cost taxpayers nothing. A similar lawsuit filed by Republican lawmakers against Democratic Governor Tom Vilsack in 2004 went to the Iowa Supreme Court and cost taxpayers roughly $250,000. Branstad recently defended his actions, saying the Iowa Constitution gives the governor authority to veto items in an appropriations bill. “I just see this as more politics,” Branstad told IowaPolitics.com in late August. “The fact is, we feel very confident on this. I’ve been involved in item-veto cases before. ... In this case, I vetoed a portion of an appropriations bill, including the appropriation. So I think we’re in a very strong position in terms of winning on the governor’s right.”

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Lawsuit Pending on Veto That Closed Field Offices

Iowa had 100,900 people who were unemployed in July and an unemployment rate of 6 percent, according to the latest numbers from IWD. Another 11.6 percent of Iowans are “underemployed,” or not working at their full capacity, according to a report released last week. With the field offices closing, those who are unemployed can help themselves find a job with computer software installed in 526 computer work stations or “access points” at 159 locations statewide including libraries, colleges, armories,

Both Republican and Democratic lawmakers

Continued On Page 25 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011 

Personal Art Therapy

COVER STORY

by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

Works by Breast-Cancer Survivors Are Showcased in Living Proof, September 30 through October 29 at Bucktown Center for the Arts

“I

t was awful,” says area artist and performer Pamela Crouch. “The year and a half I went through the whole cancer thing was just awful. The worst thing ever. But I have an amazing husband, I have an amazing family, and I have the love and support of all these people who are available. “And when they’re not available? I have a paintbrush.” That, in a nutshell, is the concept behind Living Proof, the group exhibit – on display throughout the Bucktown Center for the Arts from September 30 through October 29 – that will showcase artistic works, in numerous media, by more than a dozen breast-cancer survivors residing between Chicago and Camanche, Iowa. Originally conceived by Crouch and Chicago-area artist Mary Ellen Cunningham, Living Proof will be enjoying its second Bucktown exhibition in as many years, and will feature roughly five-dozen never-before-displayed works created by both professional and amateur artists. “A lot of times,” says Moline resident Crouch of living with cancer, “you’re so tired. You’re so exhausted. You’re overwhelmed and you feel very isolated. And that’s what Living Proof is about: getting those feelings out in some kind of creative way.”

V

iewing Boni Hugunin’s photograph of a pink flower set against a lavender sky, you might wonder whether some sort of color-enhancing process was employed to make the background that exact shade. “No, I know nothing about doing that,” says the Camanche resident. “Everything I do is what comes out of my camera. I have a camera with me at all times, and I just take a lot of pictures, and hope some of them turn out.” A survivor for two and a half years, Hugunin says that, during her battle with breast cancer, she relied less on art than family and friends to help her through. Yet even during her treatments, “photography always gave me something to do, and I saw so many beautiful things around Iowa” – among them this nature image captured in McCausland. “I like that one so much I have it hanging in my bathroom,” she said. The artist plans to attend Living Proof’s opening reception, and should be easy to spot when she drives up to Bucktown. She said: “If the weather cooperates, so will my motorcycle,” which boasts Hugunin’s custom-designed image of a hot-pink breast-cancer-awareness ribbon. “I’m really happy with it.”

Birdhouses with Pink Roofs

A familiar face with the improv group ComedySportz and in local theatrical productions – with credits including the Harrison Hilltop Theatre’s Sunday in the Park with George and the Playcrafters Barn Theatre’s The O’Conner Girls – Crouch was appearing in Playcrafters’ Anybody for Murder? when she was first diagnosed with breast cancer in the spring of 2008. After two separate surgeries, Crouch began the processes of chemotherapy and radiation, which

lasted through the end of October. (“My hair stayed in long enough for my daughter’s eighth-grade graduation,” she says, “and then I think it fell out the next day.”) But in addition to the discomfort and exhaustion, Crouch experienced a rather unexpected, and unusual, side effect resulting from her treatments. “At some point during chemotherapy,” she says, “I lost my nouns. That sounds strange, but I would, like, look at a cup, and I’d know it was a cup, but I couldn’t say the word ‘cup.’ I mean, I’m a writer, I’m an actor, and I couldn’t remember my nouns? The treatments sort of eliminated those parts from my life. And so you start to feel sorry for yourself.” Possessing an artistic bent beyond writing and performing, though, Crouch sought out a different distraction from her treatments. “I went to Hobby Lobby and I found birdhouses,” she says. “And I started painting the birdhouses with pink roofs, and then with flowers all around them. It was my idea to give them to other cancer patients – people recently diagnosed. And somewhere along the way while doing this, I found out that you can’t feel sorry for yourself. For one thing, you were doing something for somebody else. “And for another,” says Crouch with a laugh, “when you’re painting birdhouses with pink roofs, it’s just a happy thing. And so that kind of started my own personal art therapy.” It was through participation in the

Quad City Breast Cancer & Lymphedema Support Group that Crouch, in early 2010, made the acquaintance of a woman on a similar journey. “I met Mary Ellen Cunningham,” says Crouch, “who was living in the Quad Cities at the time. She’s about six months ahead of me as far as her survivorship, but I found out that she was involved with Venus Envy,” Bucktown’s annual showcase of the works of female artists. “I literally bounced up to her and was like, ‘Ooo! You’re an artist?’ And she said, ‘Ye-e-es ... ,’ because she didn’t know me yet. And I said, ‘I’m an artist, too! Don’t you think there are other people out there – other breast-cancer survivors – who are artists? We could put on a show!’” Laughing, Crouch says, “And, in shock, Mary Ellen said, ‘Um ... okay.’ That’s how it [Living Proof] started. It was just that easy.” Making the road to Living Proof even easier was Cunningham’s friendship with local artist Jacki Olson, who had a Bucktown studio of her own. “So through Mary Ellen, through Jacki, we got into Bucktown,” says Crouch. “And that was great, because here I was like, ‘Let’s put on a show!’, and I could do all of the organizing things, but Mary Ellen found us a place to have it. Otherwise, you know, we’d be doing it in my backyard.”

hough created just last year, the beginnings of Camanche resident Berdea Hugunin’s patchwork quilt actually originated during the Great Depression. “They couldn’t afford much,” she says of her relatives during that period, “but they were able to afford handkerchiefs, and so they always exchanged handkerchiefs for birthdays.” After the passing of her Aunt Anna, says the 89-year-old Hugunin, “I found all these handkerchiefs that were just lying in a drawer. I just couldn’t part with them and had to do something with them. And last year, I had a little extra time, so I decided to make a quilt from them.” A breast-cancer survivor for 10 years, Hugunin says that the quilt “has a lot of memories for me about family get-togethers when I was a kid,” but that she’s also pleased to have the work displayed in Living Proof, because “those are the things that need to be shared with other people.” Pleased, and a little surprised, as the quilt was included at the urging of her daughter Boni, who also has several works featured in the exhibit. Laughing, Hugunin says, “I thought, ‘What is she dragging that down there for?’” Crouch says that the intention behind Living Proof was always to feature works by anyone for whom art proved relief from the pressures of living with breast cancer – be they professional artists or, as Crouch says, “people like me. I’m not a professional. I don’t make my living this way. I’m not looking for validation of my

T

Community of Art

Though designed as a juried art show,

Continued On Page 22 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Vol. 1 · No. 

W

Meth & Goats, Leisure Time; at RIBCO on September 16

No Pretense to Pretty

MUSIC

by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

September 1 - , 011
River Cities’ Reader
532 W. 3rd St. Davenport IA 52801 RiverCitiesReader.com (563)324-0049 (phone) (563)323-3101 (fax) info@rcreader.com

ithout casting aspersions, it must be said that Meth & Goats’ new album Leisure Time starts at full throttle and never lets up, with few variations in volume, pace, or approach. The Moline-based quartet has crafted a pummeling record that over 32 minutes offers scant relief. The album’s first stylistic breather is the space noise of seventh track “Gem Vision,” which is even more assaultive than the other nine songs. In that context, though, the album is quite an achievement – razor-sharp, discordant hard rock finding a midpoint between the breathless anger of Rage Against the Machine and the sonically ravenous exploration of Cedric BixlerZavala’s and Omar Rodriguez-Lopez’s the Mars Volta and At the Drive-in, without the ego-driven ambition of any of those bands. If Leisure Time also lacks those groups’ moments of transcendent grace, that seems like a choice: Angular and throwing sharp elbows all over the place, Meth & Goats – which will perform a recordrelease show at RIBCO on Friday – makes no pretense to pretty. The album is loaded with hooks and urgency and dares you to keep up. There are plenty of moments within this core style that are lovely in their way. The 23 punk seconds of “Smash Your Head” are (obviously) devoid of fat but amazingly feel fully formed. First track “Filled Up on Candies” segues seamlessly into “Holy Shirt,” conjoined twins with distinct personalities. The opening trio – closing with “Dart Money” – is an incredibly focused eight minutes that plays better as a whole than as separate parts. And standout “Death on Boats” devolves in its second half into a shrill, martial guitar/drum/bass workout of disciplined fury, like Sonic Youth at its most aggressive.

Despite Meth & Goats being something of an occasional band, guitarist Dan Hockaday, vocalist Jon Burns, drummer Ray Malone, and bassist Talbot Borders are a tight and agile ensemble. Hockaday and Malone dominate, and the guitars and drums by themselves could probably stand alone in the noisy-math-rock manner of the duo Hella. Burns’ vocals display a narrow range, but he’s forceful enough that he doesn’t seem superfluous to the instrumental acrobatics. Borders’ bass, though, does seem largely incidental here – mixed relatively low and unable to compete with Hockaday’s busy-ness and purposefully blunt tones. This clear and rigid hierarchy – Hockaday over Malone and Burns, and all three over Borders – hints at the limitations of Leisure Time’s production and mixing. Admirable as it is in many respects, it is a less-dynamic and overall lesser work than the band’s previous Attack from Meth & Goats Mountain. Though lo-fi, Attack ... vibrated with raw energy and a palpable looseness – freedom that was evident in the subtler, quieter passages of songs such as “Come DY K,” on which the bass takes a lead role

and the guitar is used in the opening section as effective color. Leisure Time, on the other hand, is stuck in an expressive strait, and while that results in a marginally more cohesive album, it’s also one that’s harder to penetrate as a listener, especially in the record’s effective but relatively homogeneous first half. The back end, though, does a lot of correction. The concentrated ferocity of “Smash Your Head,” the spastic, jazzy metal of “Gem Vision,” and the fiery finale in “Death on Boats” provide both the variety and signature moments lacking on the front end. And closer “Meth & Goats” is the biggest change-up. It’s slower and drones and breathes, showcasing melody and bass, and featuring a spokenword style from Burns and what sounds like a backwards guitar. Leisure Time would play better as a whole if “Gem Vision” and “Meth & Goats” were put to better use as contrasts, for instance using them as dividers to split Leisure Time into rough thirds. Or maybe the album simply needed another stark departure to break up the opening five songs. As presented, though, the record remains impressive if misshapen. There’s a great EP in Leisure Time, but merely a good album. Meth & Goats will celebrate the release of Leisure Time with a performance at RIBCO (1815 Second Avenue) on Friday, September 16. The show starts at 9 p.m. and also features Tambourine and Jamey Cummins. Cover is $4. The album can be downloaded from MethAndGoats.BandCamp.com and iTunes. For more information on Meth & Goats, visit Facebook.com/methandgoats.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011 

IOWA POLITICS

Iowans Struggle with Open Records, from City Hall to Governor’s Office
(Editor’s note: Links to articles elaborating on the anecdotes in the first three paragraphs can be found at RCReader.com/y/records.)

by Lynn Campbell IowaPolitics.com

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esidents of Riverdale successfully sued their city three times after being denied access to public records and meetings, and now have a case before the Iowa Supreme Court. The Ottumwa school board recently went into closed session to interview three finalists for school superintendent, leading to distrust among some residents who questioned whether the selection process was fair. And Erich Riesenberg, 41, of Des Moines said he can’t get information about stray pets taken into the city’s animal-control unit, now that the shelter is operated under contract by the Animal Rescue League of Iowa, the state’s largest not-for-profit animal shelter. In battles statewide, Iowans are fighting for access to government meetings and records. While state and federal right-to-information laws are on the books to help, Iowans say they’re still running into roadblocks. “We need laws where people who have a direct dog in the fight can find out what’s going on,” said Randall Wilson, legal director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Iowa. “It affects people’s lives. It affects our tax burden. It affects our health and safety.” Kathleen Richardson, executive secretary of the Iowa Freedom of Information Council (a not-for-profit organization at Drake University that promotes open government), said laws on open meetings and public records are not consistently enforced statewide. “The result is that, in many instances, if a citizen has a complaint about violations of public meetings or records law in her community, she has nowhere to turn for help in resolving the situation,” Richardson said. “The only recourse is for the citizen to sue to force compliance, which is time-consuming, expensive, and divisive for a community.”

aren’t normally published, documents [that] in some cases reveal fraud, abuse, neglect, indifference by government, problems that need to be remedied,” Wilson said. “And yet the average citizen probably doesn’t know how to go about it. So our first goal is to put power in the hands of the people to actually use these laws.” While the ACLU of Iowa can’t guarantee an attorney for everyone needing help with open records or meetings, it does aim to provide some legal direction, in part to make up for the legislature’s failure to enact comprehensive open-records-law reform in the past three years. Wilson said response to the project could provide the ammunition needed to advocate next year for the Iowa Public Information Board, despite Republicans’ hesitation to increase the size of government. “We hope that those who are fiscally conservative might actually see some merit in having an army of watchdogs out there, able to get documents about government waste, fraud, and abuse,” he said. Richardson said she believes that government officials and public employees in Iowa generally want to do the right thing and follow the law. “There are always some bad apples who treat government like their own personal fiefdoms, but they are relatively rare,” she said. “A lot of failure to comply with the law is the result of ignorance of what the law requires, fear of releasing information that shouldn’t be released, or the desire for expediency. “Truly open government that allows public input can be time-consuming and messy, but it is what we are all about as a people,” she said.

Governor’s Office

The ACLU’s Open Government Project

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The American Civil Liberties Union of Iowa in mid-August launched an Open Government Project, which largely consists of a Web site (RCReader.com/y/aclu) and aims to improve access to public records and meetings through litigation, public education, and advocacy. “We do have laws that allow citizens to access public records, get documents that

Several recent publicly waged battles over open records have involved the governor’s office. Governor Terry Branstad, who first served as governor from 1983 to 1999, campaigned last year on government transparency and returned to office in January. “We’ve had a request pending with the governor for a month now, and haven’t heard anything,” Wilson said in late August. The ACLU of Iowa requested the governor’s policy on charging fees for open records. But Bill Monroe, Branstad’s special adviser for government transparency, said the governor’s office has complied with all

EE! FR

Continued On Page 25

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Paul Feig’s buoyant, brainy comedy nds Kristen Wiig playing a maid of honor with such inventiveness and style that she seems to be creating a new comic archetype right before your eyes, and Melissa McCarthy o ers a genius-level turn as her tough-talking, level-headed pal.

BRIDESMAIDS

THOR

Director Kenneth Branagh’s grandly produced yet subtly frisky entertainment is an action-packed thrill ride that, incredibly, also manages to be emotionally satisfying and funny, and Chris Hemsworth, in the title role, proves to be a magni cently gifted and con dent light comedian.

X-MEN: FIRST CLASS

BOBBY VINTON

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30

There are sensational e ects, visual ourishes, and throwaway jokes throughout, and just about everything Michael Fassbender does is marvelous; the actor's Magneto is as essential here, and feels as revelatory, as Hugh Jackman's Wolverine was in 2000's original X-Men.

INDIANA UNIVERSITY’S STRAIGHT NO CHASER*
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8

ROOTS & BOOTS

FEATURING SAMMY KERSHAW, JOE DIFFIE AND AARON TIPPIN

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14

THE BUCKINGHAMS

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

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The Cough Heard ’round the World
CONTAGION
I’m presuming, and hoping, that a bunch of you spent your weekend’s cineplex allowances on Contagion, director Steven Soderbergh’s bleak, elegant, deeply disturbing thriller about the planet’s decimation by a new strain of flu-like virus. I’m also praying that none of you saw it while on a date, because I can barely imagine how awkward the drive home must’ve been. One cough or casual touch from your movie-going companion and you’d be frantically ransacking the car for hand sanitizer and a surgeon’s mask. In the film’s devastating opening sequence, and in a later, surveillancecamera flashback, we watch as the disease’s first victim – an American (Gwyneth Paltrow) on business in Hong Kong – unwittingly transmits the virus to residents of Japan, London, Chicago, and her native Minneapolis. Propelled by Cliff Martinez’s subtly insistent score, these blandly horrific montages are masterworks of editing and composition, revealing how simply and unassumingly everyday objects such as cash machines and subway poles, when touched by carrier after carrier, can turn lethal. Yet the more penetrating nightmare of the movie, with its briskly efficient script by Scott Z. Burns, lies in how quickly everything goes to hell. (By the end of the first month in Contagion, 25 million people are dead.) With inspiring dramatic economy and absolute realism, Soderbergh visualizes the means by which fear, paranoia, misinformation, and public panic lead to worldwide chaos; the director’s control is so assured that while you barely have time to catch your breath, you a big-city highway or metropolitan-airport terminal with no travelers at all.

Movie Reviews

by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com

Elliott Gould in Contagion
never feel the narrative rushing past you. And for a movie without a single “Boo!” shock effect, Contagion is sensationally scary. (It was intensely shrewd of Soderbergh and Burns to kill off Paltrow in the film’s first 10 minutes, and another major star in the first 40; if they’re not safe, no one is.) A few detours here feel somewhat underdeveloped, such as the one involving the kidnapping of a World Health Organization doctor (Marion Cotillard, blessedly), and the film’s barely veiled attacks on the blogosphere – personified by a snaggle-toothed, charmless Jude Law – come thisclose to ruinously heavy-handed. But Contagion is still a strong, serious, exceptionally well-crafted freak-out, with wonderfully effective turns by Matt Damon, Kate Winslet, Laurence Fishburne, John Hawkes, and (nabbing best-in-show honors) Jennifer Ehle, and enough chilling, haunting imagery for a year’s worth of fright films. You think a big-city highway or metropolitan-airport terminal packed with grumpy travelers is off-putting? Try

Listen to Mike every Friday at am on ROCK 10- FM with Dave & Darren

Is there a Guinness record for the world’s longest cliché? Because at 140 minutes, I think director/co-writer Gavin O’Connor’s Warrior has the title in the bag. An inspirational sports drama that finds two estranged brothers – Joel Edgerton’s former UFC contender (and current physics teacher) Brendan and Tom Hardy’s Iraq-war vet Tommy – going headto-head at the world’s mixed-martial-arts championship, this is a movie that never met a hackneyed character or plot device it didn’t like. You’ve got your financially strapped siblings and the secrets from their pasts, and the brothers’ overbearing, Irish-American pop (Nick Nolte), now seeking reconciliation after years of drunken abuse. You’ve got your training montages and preliminary bouts, and your behemoth-sized – and Russian! – bad-ass gearing up to clean the boys’ clocks. You’ve got your eccentric-yet-sensible trainers and enthusiastic support groups cheering from the sidelines, and your putupon wife (Jennifer Morrison) who gives the speech telling hubby that if he fights again, she won’t be there to watch. (In the history of movies, has any spouse actually carried Follow Mike on Twitter at Twitter.com/ out this threat?) And, of course, you’ve got MikeSchulzNow. your climactic battle royale. The confluence

WARRIOR

of events leading to Brendan and Tommy squaring off in the ring – without the public being aware of their familial relationship – is almost believable, yet are we really expected to buy that, while pummeling the crap out of each other, they’re also engaging in conversation? I’m here to tell you that absolutely none of this matters; Warrior is a gloriously shameless audience-pleaser, and as spectacularly powerful and affecting as any of the countless Rocky wannabes over the years – including O’Connor’s 2004 Miracle – has ever been. Their material may be shopworn, but the soulful and intimidatingly brawny Edgerton and Hardy deliver beautifully specific, layered portrayals, and Nolte – with that raspy growl that makes you shudder and giggle in equal measure – is fearless and heartbreaking; small though the role is, it features some of the finest, most emotionally naked work of the actor’s career. The three men feel like (long-separated) family, and O’Connor delicately ensures that every figure and exchange in Warrior matches their levels of sincerity and truthfulness. Warrior is designed to get you cheering and weeping, and you likely will. (In one of its few breaks from genre tradition, the film leaves you rooting for both competitors to emerge victorious.) But beyond its viscerally exhilarating fight sequences, O’Connor’s latest, in a joyous surprise, is just as exhilarating dramatically. It’s a knockout. It packs a huge punch. It’s a total kick. And look who’s being a cliché now.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011 Continued From Page 3

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com by John W. Whitehead

GUEST COMMENTARY

Constitution Day: Is the Bill of Rights Dead?
and private transactions, including phone, mail, computer, and medical records. Added to the PATRIOT Act’s lengthy list of abuses, one recent court decision sounded the death knell for our Fourth Amendment rights. Indeed, in its 2011 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court gave police carte blanche authority to break into homes or apartments without a warrant. Specifically, the court ruled that if a SWAT team arrives at the wrong address but for whatever reason suspects the citizen inside the home may possess drugs, these armed warriors can break down the door and invade your home – all without possessing a warrant. The Fifth Amendment is supposed to ensure that you are innocent until proven guilty, and government authorities cannot deprive you of your life, your liberty, or your property without following strict legal codes of conduct. Unfortunately, those protections – especially as they apply to Muslim Americans – have been largely extinguished in the wake of 9/11. For example, beginning in 2002, the government has detained nearly 13,000 Arab, Muslim, and south-Asian men under cover of a special registration program spearheaded by Immigration Services. Detainees were held without bail for an average of three months and waited up to three weeks before they could contact an attorney. The Sixth Amendment was intended to not only ensure a “speedy and public trial” but was supposed to prevent the government from keeping someone in jail for unspecified offenses. That, too, has been a casualty of the “war on terror.” For example, the Presidential Military Order of November 13, 2001, gave the president the power to detain non-citizens suspected of connections to terrorists or terrorism as “enemy combatants.” They can be held indefinitely without charge, without a court hearing, and without access to a lawyer. Not only have non-citizens been held in such a manner but so, too, were American citizens who were captured on American soil rather than on a foreign battlefield. For example, Jose Padilla, an American citizen arrested on American soil, was labeled an “enemy combatant,” denied access to an attorney, and held without charge in a military brig for more than three years. The Seventh Amendment guarantees citizens the right to a jury trial. However, when the populace has no idea of what’s in the Constitution, that inevitably translates to an ignorant jury incapable of distinguishing justice and the law from their own preconceived notions and fears. As Mark Twain famously observed: “The jury system puts a ban upon intelligence and honesty, and a premium upon ignorance, stupidity, and perjury. It is a shame that we must continue to use a worthless system because it was good a thousand years ago. ... I desire to tamper with the jury law. I wish to so alter it as to put a premium on intelligence and character, and close the jury box against idiots, blacklegs, and people who do not read newspapers.” The Eighth Amendment is similar to the Sixth in that it is supposed to protect the rights of the accused and forbid the use of cruel and unusual punishment. However, by turning a blind eye to the abuses at Guantanamo Bay and Abu Ghraib and sanctioning torture deliberately and unapologetically, including the use of waterboarding as a benign form of legalized torture, the Bush administration not only violated U.S. laws and virtually every international treaty against torture but raised the bar on what constitutes cruel and unusual punishment. Many of these same practices are still in place under the Obama administration. And the Supreme Court’s determination that what constitutes “cruel and unusual” should be dependent on the “evolving standards of decency that mark the progress of a maturing society” leaves us with little protection in the face of a society lacking in morals altogether. The continued reliance on the death penalty, which has been shown to be flawed in its application and execution, is a perfect example of this. The Ninth Amendment provides that other rights not enumerated in the Constitution are nonetheless retained by the people. Popular sovereignty – the belief that the power to govern flows upward from the people rather than downward from the rulers – is clearly evident in this amendment. However, it has since been turned on its head by a centralized federal government that sees itself as supreme and that continues to pass more and more laws that restrict our freedoms under the pretext that it has an “important government interest” in doing so. Thus, once the government began violating the non-enumerated rights granted in the Ninth Amendment, it was only a matter of time before it began to trample the enumerated rights of the people, as explicitly spelled out in the rest of the Bill of Rights. As for the Tenth Amendment’s reminder that the people and the states retain every authority that is not otherwise mentioned in the Constitution, that assurance of a system of government in which power is divided among local, state, and national entities has long since been rendered moot by the centralized Washington, DC, power elite – the president, Congress, and the courts. Indeed, the federal governmental bureaucracy has grown so large that it has made local and state legislatures relatively irrelevant. Through its many agencies, the federal government has stripped states of the right to regulate countless issues that were originally governed at the local level. Finally, there is the writ of habeas corpus, found in Article I, Section IX of the U.S. Constitution, which was intended to guard against arbitrary imprisonment, requiring that the government either charge a person or let him go free. This, too, has been seriously undermined in recent years, starting with the passage of the Antiterrorism & Effective Death Penalty Act in 1996, which imposed a one-year statute of limitations on bringing the writ (meaning that those imprisoned were unable to apply for release after being imprisoned for over a year) and removed actual innocence – surely the whole point of habeas corpus – as a grounds for challenging one’s incarceration. It’s a depressing state of affairs. We have certainly come a long way from President John F. Kennedy’s vision of a “nation of Minutemen, citizens who are not only prepared to take arms, but citizens who regard the preservation of freedom as the basic purpose of their daily life and who are willing to consciously work and sacrifice for that freedom.” In fact, when all the glibly patriotic gestures and jargon are stripped away, I’m not even sure Americans really want freedom. What they really want is to be left in peace with their shopping malls, flat-screen TVs, cell phones, and mindless entertainment. After all, how many Americans during the course of a day – even when they see fellow citizens under attack – ever think about their rights? If they did, surely there would be more resistance. Thus, what little hope remains rests with what Pulitzer Prize-winning war correspondent Chris Hedges refers to as the modern rebel, “someone who is perpetually alienated from power, someone who is different from a revolutionary in the sense that you are always alienated from centers of power. This is the Julien Benda vision of the world, where you have two sets of principles – justice and truth, and privilege and power – and the closer you get to privilege and power, the more you compromise justice and truth. I think that in order to maintain a democratic system you need large movements in society committed to issues of justice and truth. To put pressure on the power elite, to make sure that those issues are honored by institutions and by people who hold positions of power.” Constitutional attorney and author John W. Whitehead is founder and president of The Rutherford Institute (Rutherford.org). His book The Freedom Wars is available at Amazon. com, and he can be reached at johnw@ rutherford.org.

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
The German American Heritage Center Presents

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

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"IN PRAISE OF THE PENCIL"
An Exhibit Honoring 250 Years of the First Pencil Factory in Germany Now through October 30

Public Lecture
Saturday, October 1 11 a.m. | Figge Art Museum Auditorium "The History of the Pencil Must Not be Erased; Its Lessons are Too Valuable" by Dr. Henry Petroski GAHC presents Dr. Henry Petroski of Duke University, one of America's most distinguished engineers and design historians, who will speak on the history and evolution of the pencil as a tool for artists, engineers, architects, writers and everyone who uses this common item with a fascinating history. Learn the story of a small object whose design and development truly spans the globe!
Funding for this exhibit provided by Riverboat Development Authority and Wenger Truck Line.

712 W. 2ND STREET | DAVENPORT, IOWA 52802 (563) 322-8844 | WWW.GAHC.ORG

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

1

Pardnership

THEATRE

By Thom White

Make Me a Cowboy, at the Playcrafters Barn Theatre through September 18

T

he Playcrafters Barn Theatre’s Make Me characters’ dirtiest digs at each other seem a Cowboy will appeal to anyone who to be made in good fun. (Their threats of likes pure, wholesome, clean-humored shooting one another had me expecting comedy that’s light on plot and heavy someone to pull out a squirt gun rather on friendly cowboys and public-domain than firing bullets.) All of the eight actors cowboy-themed songs. While that “anyone” are noteworthy for some aspect of their does not include me, I at least recognize the performances, though a few do stand out. earnestness in playwright and director Don Tom Naab’s Alistair, the highfalutin brother of Bailey Bryant’s effort to present a decent the ranch’s owner, couldn’t be more amiable, show, and Make Me a Cowboy certainly made and is most amusing in his stumbling, for a good time for Friday’s audience, many of drunken state. Janell Just adds just enough whom sang along to a good number of ditties hints of tomboyish-ness to make it clear that and seemed pleased with the production. her Annie, who’s just returned to her father’s The show, which is set in the 1890s, is ranch from finishing school, isn’t quite overtly simple, centered on finished. Jon Schweppe a group of cowpokes and offers the most nuance herders singing and telling of the bunch, with his stories in an effort to save Tommy’s overprotective the Jumpin’ J Dude Ranch. frustration at Annie’s Their performances are engagement. And Bryan sold as being part of Woods wipes away all a weekend retreat for of the condescending, Easterners – meaning the grandly postured, clear audience members – to Jon Schweppe, Roger Akers, Bryan and crisp diction that learn how to be cowboys. Woods, and Nicholas Waldbusser made his turn as Pozzo Woven into that plot is an in 2010’s Waiting engagement between a herdsman and the for Godot at the Harrison Hilltop Theatre ranch owner’s daughter, one threatened by the unmissable, portraying his cowpoke Knuckles cowboy not asking his potential bride-to-be’s as a likable oaf with a delightful drawl. father for permission to marry his daughter. The cowboys are also dressed in some There is a lot of exposition in Bryant’s impressive duds created by costume designer script; he takes quite a bit of time explaining Stephanie Naab, with a good mix of maroons, characters, the situation on the ranch, and the blues, blacks, and different colors of leather. fact that we’re at a retreat. The engagement While well-made by Naab, the clothing is plot, meanwhile, isn’t introduced until about also clean and obviously new, which doesn’t two-thirds of the way into the first act, and match the repeated promise to the audience while the father-of-the-bride subplot is members that we’ll soon have “dust up to introduced shortly thereafter, there’s still [our] armpits” like real cowboys. (And exposition regarding his character a few though a minor point, I doubt sparkly-lined scenes into the second act. cowboy hats existed in the 1890s.) Overall, Bryant’s song choices make sense With such a minor plot and only for the show, and I like the idea of weaving minor variance in the characterizations, I public-domain works into an original script, couldn’t help but let my mind wander a bit, creating a new musical out of existing imagining how the script would play with material. However, with the exception of actors portraying grittier, more realistic a few numbers by Kevin Kurth and new cowboys. My conclusion: I’m not sure lyrics (by Shannon Sturgis) added to some Bryant’s words would work in any other way of the familiar songs, the concept of using than with clean, amicable, cheery cowhands many of the tunes to further the storyline is speaking them. Plus, on top of the amiability a tad strained. Instead of flowing with the of the piece, there’s also a sense of familiarity plot, the songs oftentimes seem meant to to the show that’s pleasing. While I couldn’t explain something, but their actual delivery sing along with my fellow audience comes across as through the story is stopping members on most of the numbers, I did at for moments of performance. (This does, least know a few of the tunes, and the feel however, work in the context of the cowboys of the musical inspired pleasant memories performing a show to save the ranch, and the of theme-park performances and church flow is at least consistent, rather than being pageants from my youth. stunted by the song breaks.) The cast, far more often than not, matches For tickets and information, call (309)762the happy tone of the script, and even the 0330 or visit Playcrafters.com.

1

Dance
I

What’s Happenin’
company will, in its St. Ambrose performance, celebrate the elegance and spectacle of China in its newest work, Dynasty Suite, which finds the dancers enacting members of ancient Chinese dynasties and rural minorities through 3,000 years of history. And with it, the Lily Cai Chinese Dance Company is sure to electrify audiences with the same combination of awe and excitement that has greeted the group’s performances at arts venues and festivals worldwide – including, in 1994, the company’s famed dance opener for the Grateful Dead at the Oakland Coliseum. Yet reading about dance, of course, is never as enthralling as actually witnessing it. So for those of you who’d like a sense of the sensual, magical talents of the Lily Cai Chinese Dance Company prior to the group’s Quad Cities arrival, I have two suggestions: (1) Visit the company’s Web site at LilyCaiDance. org and watch the esteemed performers for yourselves, or (2) Stare at the accompanying image of the company’s dancers in action, and shake the paper back and forth and up and down until it looks like the figures are actually moving. I assure you that one of those two ways won’t make you look like an idiot. For more information on, and tickets to, the Lily Cai Chinese Dance Company’s September 17 performance, call (563)333-6251 or visit SAU.edu/ galvin.

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

Lily Cai Chinese Dance Company

Event
S

Unlikely Heroes

Galvin Fine Arts Center Saturday, September 17, 7:30 p.m.
n an interview in the online magazine World & I, the lauded, San Franciscobased Chinese choreographer Lily Cai said, “When I arrived in this country, I didn’t know what to do next. Like most immigrants, I had no money, no job. I didn’t know English. I only knew I had to dance, and even when people advised me just to forget about dance and to concentrate on making a living, I had to find a way to go on.” And go on Cai did, to the Kennedy Center, and the Virgin Islands, and the United Nations’ 50th Anniversary Celebration, and – on Saturday, September 17 – to Davenport’s St. Ambrose University, where the internationally renowned Lily Cai Chinese Dance Company will perform as the first guests in the Galvin Fine Arts Center’s Performing Arts Series. Now in its 23rd year of professional performances, Cai’s gifted ensemble of female dancers prides itself on melding ancient Chinese forms with modern-dance moves, culminating in an inventive marriage of styles scored to original music by composer Gang Situ. Employing multimedia effects, ravishing costumes, and such visual accoutrements as ribbons, fans, and baskets, Cai’s

Rock Island Main Public Library Thursday, September 22, 6:30 p.m.
ee the adorable-looking lady in the accompanying photo? She could be your favorite grandmother, couldn’t she? That is, if your favorite grandmother was also a Jewish spy who traveled to Nazi-occupied Germany to collect

1) Was a survivor of the Holocaust 2) Oversaw spy-ring operations for British agents in 3) Began work as a Mossad agent in Beirut in 1947 4) Was a former prostitute and madam 5) Was a member of the spy organization “the Nili” 6) Was awarded France’s Medaille de la Reconnaiss 7) Was sentenced to death – a sentence later comm 8) Hoped that her actions would lead to a national 9) Co-authored a book of her experiences titled Beh intelligence information for the French Army. The woman in the picture, you see, is 91-yearold Marthe Cohn, who performed staggering

ac is El

Music
P

Little Big Town

Adler Theatre Saturday, September 17, 7:30 p.m.
laying Davenport’s Adler Theatre on September 17, the lauded country stars of Little Big Town – Karen Fairchild, Kimberly Schlapman, Phillip Sweet, and Jimi Westbrook – have been with the group since its 2002 CD debut, have publicly admitted to being dear friends, and are all currently married with children, with Fairchild and Westbrook married (with a child) to each other. No musician turnover over the years? No incessant squabbling? Stable relationships? What the hell kind of abnormal band is this?! As the group’s legions of fans will no

doubt tell you, an absolutely sensational one, thank you very much. In the years since the release of the group’s self-titled debut album, which cracked the Billboard top-40 chart and inspired hit singles in “Don’t Waste My Time” and “Everything Changes,” Little Big Town has been revered for its tight instrumentals and soaring four-part harmonies, the latter frequently likened to the vocals of Fleetwood Mac and the Eagles. To date, the band has charted a dozen singles on Billboard’s Hot Country Songs charts – including top-10 smashes “Boondocks,” “Bring It on Home,” and 2010’s “Little White Church” – and their talents certainly haven’t gone unnoticed by the music industry. Among Little Big Town’s accolades are four Grammy Award nominations (including one this year in the Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals category), eight Country Music Association Award nods, six citations by the CMT Music Awards, and nine nominations at the Academy of Country Music Awards, one of which led to a 2007 win.

NOW PLAYING

WWW.PUTNAM.ORG/PIRATES

o “The Whiffenpoof Song.”

Plus, beyond the Town receives from frequent tour stops, effusive in their pra Press’ Michael McC constantly shifting d turning way they la Big Town is rewritin harmony.” In Entert Wellman raved: “Fo a group whose four musical chops are li vintage SoCal rock Big Town are a gods the band’s 2007 CD Press’ Josh Stewart s waste too much tim should already be in Place to Land.” Thanks a lot, Jos enough trouble gett articles. For tickets to Litt engagement, call (8 AdlerTheatre.com.

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

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by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

Heroes: The True Stories of Three Jewish Women Spies. Presented by the Jewish Federation of the Quad Cities, A) Sarah Aaronsohn and being performed at 6:30 p.m. B) Marthe Cohn ” on September 22 at the Rock Island C) Shulamit Cohen Kishik sance de la Nation downtown library, the presentation will find Rembrandt enacting Cohn, muted – in 1962 Sarah Aaronsohn, and Shulamit home for the Jews in Eretz, Israel Cohen Kishik, exploring the enormous hind Enemy Lines contributions they made as Jewish cts of bravery during World War II, and who spies, and offering insight into a trio of one of three women celebrated in actress female figures largely unknown to even the most laine Rembrandt’s one-woman show Unlikely avid of European-history buffs.

n World War I 7

With her theatrical credits including such productions as Fiddler on the Roof, Crossing Delancy, and, in the role of Golda Meir, William Gibson’s Golda, Rembrandt is sure to provide an evening of marvelously informative entertainment in Unlikely Heroes. And for a primer on September 22’s event, try matching the descriptions to the left with the spy with whom they’re associated. Admission to Unlikely Heroes is free, and more information is available by contacting the Jewish Federation of the Quad Cities at (309)793-1300 or JFQC.org.

What Else Is Happenin’
MUSIC
Thursday, September 15 – Texas Hippie Coalition. Southern rockers in concert, with an opening set by Drama Major. The Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport). 9 p.m. $10. For tickets and information, call (563)3261333 or visit RedstoneRoom.com. Thursday, September 15 – Bomba Estéreo. A dance fusion of electronic dub and hip hop in a Hancher Auditorium presentation. Iowa Memorial Union Main Lounge (125 North Madison Street, Iowa City). 9 p.m. $10-25. For tickets and information, call (319)335-1160 or visit http://www. Hancher.UIowa.edu. Friday, September 16 – Hijinks & Home: Songs of the Civil War. Narrative songs sung by balladeer Judy Cook, featuring choruses interwoven with historical details, anecdotes, and family letters from the Civil War era. Butterworth Center (1105 Eighth Street, Moline). 7 p.m. Free admission. For information, call (309)743-2701 or visit ButterworthCenter.com. Friday, September 16 – Meth & Goats CD Release Show. Alternative rockers in concert, with openers Tambourine and Jamey Cummins. Rock Island Brewing Company (1815 Second Avenue, Rock Island). 9 p.m. $5. For information, call (309)793-4060 or visit RIBCO.com.

e adoration Little Big m audiences on its , music critics have been aise. The Associated Call wrote: “With their dynamics and the headayer their vocals, Little ng the future of country tainment Weekly, Chris or anyone waiting for r-part harmonies and ifted right out of the scene, Nashville’s Little dsend.” And reviewing D release, the Long Island simply implored: “Don’t me reading this when you n your car to pick up A

ou’re familiar with the pop-culture game “Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon,” right? Well, I’d argue that you could also play a version of it called “Six Degrees of Steve Earle” – in honor of the iconic country musician and roots rocker playing Iowa City’s Englert Theatre on September 19 – except the game wouldn’t be any kind of challenge. Given the spectrum of the man’s accomplishments, we’re probably all connected to Earle by six (or fewer) degrees. Known primarily for his staggering assemblage of credits as a singer/songwriter, the 56-year-old Earle’s first album, 1986’s Guitar Town, hit number one on the U.S. country charts, and his most recent, this past April’s I’ll Never Get Out of This World Alive, sh. Like I don’t have ting readers to finish these peaked at number four. Meanwhile, the quarter-century between those releases yielded, you know, just a few professional highlights: tle Big Town’s Davenport a trio of Best Contemporary Folk Album Grammy Awards, 11 additional Grammy nominations, a Lifetime Achievement 800)745-3000 or visit Award from the U.K.’s BBC Radio 2, a Rolling Stone citation as Country Artist of the Year, and covers of his songs performed by

Answers: 1 – B, 2 – A, 3 – C, 4 – C, 5 – A, 6 – B, 7 – C, 8 -A, 9 – B. Wow. And I thought my grandma was impressive for knowing all the lyrics

Music
Steve Earle
Englert Theatre Monday, September 19, 8 p.m.

Y

such artists as Johnny Cash, Joan Baez, Waylon Jennings, The Pretenders, Emmylou Harris, Percy Sledge, and the Highwaymen. So anyone with a foot in the music industry’s door could likely claim a connection to Earle. But so could anyone in the movie business: His soulful crooning can be heard in such films as Talladega Nights, Brokeback Mountain, and Planes, Trains, & Automobiles. And so could anyone in TV: Earle’s on-screen credits include The Wire, 30 Rock, and HBO’s Treme, for which he received an Emmy nomination for his song “This City.” While we’re at it, several people in the publishing world can claim a six-degrees-or-less relationship with Earle, as he wrote the short-story collection Doghouse Roses, and – in conjunction with his CD of the same name – the novel I’ll Never Get Out of This World Alive. How about those involved in professional theatre? He wrote the death-penalty play Karla. Radio? He’s hosted shows for Air America and Sirius Satellite Radio. And bringing the game closer to home, he’s also the father of noted musician Justin Townes Earle, who, in 2008, was interviewed by my boss, Jeff Ignatius, with whom I share an office – making me separated from Steve Earle by a mere three degrees! Of course, that means Jeff is only separated by two degrees ... . Bastard’s always one step ahead ... . Earle performs in Iowa City alongside musician Allison Moorer, and more on the evening is available by calling (319)6882653 or visiting Englert.org.

Continued On Page 24

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

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Figge Art MuseuM Presents
0250_DAV_RiverCitiesReader_4.55x5.4.indd 265 8/16/11 3:27 PM

Turn of the Century Posters
from the Krannert Art Museum Collection
through January 8, 2012
This exhibition features iconic lithographs by prominent 19th-century artists, including Pierre Bonnard, Alphonse Mucha and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. The posters on view include promotional materials for cabaret performances at the Moulin Rouge and large-scale ads for consumer products. Find a schedule of exhibition programs and events at www.figgeartmuseum.org
Sponsored in part by the River Cities’ Reader This exhibition and its programs are supported in part by Humanities Iowa and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The views and opinions expressed by this program do not necessarily reflect those of Humanities Iowa or the National Endowment for the Humanities Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Divan Japonais, 1893,Crayon, brush, spatter, and transferred screen lithograph, Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Davenport, Iowa • 563.326.7804 www.figgeartmuseum.org

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

1

MUSIC
Shenandoah Davis, September 16 at Rozz-Tox

Growing Comfortable with Vulnerability
n April 2008, Seattle alternative-weekly paper came in slower, unguarded songs. The Stranger dubbed Shenandoah Davis She called The Company We Keep a collection its artist of the week, writing that “fans of of a dozen “snapshots”: “It’s the idea that when Joanna Newsom have a local act to love.” The a relationship ends, regardless of the way that comparison to the idiosynit ends, you take away cratic harpist/singer/songfrom it the memories and writer was flattering, but shared experiences that are there was one problem: Davis impossible to re-create.” had never played in public as Reviewing the album, Ball of Wax Audio Quarterly said a solo artist. that Davis is “one of Seattle’s She began to get inquiries most talented singers, and about shows, but she was she’s also one of our best unseasoned as both a songwriters.” But it started songwriter and performer. with the same comparison “I remember very distinctly as The Stranger, saying Davis that there was one show “sounds like Joanna Newsom that I was so nervous about without the cringe.” I canceled it maybe half an For those who like hour before – the second show I was ever supposed to Newsom, I’d say that Davis play,” the 26-year-old Davis Photo by Jennifer Lynne Sweeney shares her thin, agile warble said in a phone interview but generally chooses to promoting her September 16 show at Rozz-Tox. restrain her vocals. And, crucially, Davis’ musical So started a steep learning curve for Davis, settings – often anchored by cello, keyboards, or who began playing piano as a toddler and has piano, a contrast to Newsom’s harp – tend to be a degree in opera performance but has been earthier and more grounded, and reference the writing her own songs for less than four years. classical and early-20th-Century-popular-music She released her debut, We; Camera, in traditions. That makes them more accessible summer 2008, and Seattle Weekly called it but still unlike just about anything in the “artful, harmonic music” blending “classical contemporary music landscape. sounds and modern pop.” She toured over the Despite her degree, Davis’ voice doesn’t past three years and last month unveiled The sound particularly operatic, which she explained Company We Keep. “With piano, horns, and her simply: “I don’t feel like I’m naturally an opera slightly quirky – and gorgeous – voice, Davis singer.” She had no formal vocal training prior flirts with whimsy and vaudeville, but her songs to college and hadn’t taken piano lessons since still remain more thoughtful than theatrical,” she was 11 or 12. “I knew that I wanted to study The Stranger wrote of her new album. music in college but ... I just felt like I wouldn’t “I think the songs on The Company We Keep be able to get into a music school with a piano are much more specific, and when I was writing audition,” she said. “But there are so many them I felt much more comfortable with my components to singing other than what your own experiences and the idea of sharing my voice sounds like ... that I thought there was a experiences with other people ... ,” Davis said. better chance that they might let me skate by on “When I was writing the lyrics for We; Camera the singing ... .” She was correct. three years ago, ... that kind of vulnerability Still, she said, opera informs her songs. “One was really frightening to me – that anyone of the things that I like the most about opera who wanted to could go download a song off music is how big it is and how melodramatic it of iTunes and hear a story from my life.” She is,” she said. “And that’s something I do try to called her first record “a lot more vague, and the adopt a little bit when I’m writing songs. But I experiences that those songs were written about feel like that does not need to be carried over were kind of blown out to the more universal into the vocal side.” kind of idea, because I was afraid of directly communicating what I wanted the songs to Shenandoah Davis will perform on Friday, communicate.” September 16, at Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue The fear, she said, dissipated as she in Rock Island). Doors open at 8 p.m., and Sub performed more. “That moment came just Atlantic opens. Admission is $5. from being on tour a lot and playing a lot of shows in front of strangers and hearing To listen to Shenandoah Davis’ The Company feedback from a lot of audience members ... ,” We Keep, visit ShenandoahDavis.BandCamp. she said. Courage, she added, was drawn from com. Her Daytrotter.com session can be found at people telling her that their favorite moments RCReader.com/y/davis.

by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011 

1

ART

Article and Photos by Bruce Walters

Art in Plain Sight: Two Davenport Cathedral Spires

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hen Sacred Heart Cathedral (at the corner of Iowa and 10th streets in Davenport) was completed in 1891, its bell tower and spire was the tallest structure in the Quad Cities. Soaring majestically above the surrounding trees and neighborhood, its approximate height of 160 feet seemed even greater because of its placement at the top of a steep hill near the crest of the bluff overlooking the Mississippi. Several blocks to the west, Trinity Episcopal Cathedral (at 121 West 12th Street) had been constructed 18 years before. Although a spire was part of architect’s original plans, it was not built because of a lack of funds. But in 1998, Elizabeth Haines (a member of the Trinity congregation) personally financed the building of a bell tower and spire. In memory of her grandparents – who were charter members of the cathedral – the 131-foot tower was built to its original specifications. There are basic similarities in the towers of each cathedral. A cross is at the top of each spire and a pointed arched doorway at the base. (The door at Trinity is painted in a bright red, a tradition from the medieval age that signified a place of safety and refuge.) Each was primarily built with limestone. Bells are heard from each tower throughout the day and on special occasions. However, each has a different visual point of emphasis. The open belfry, framed with its beautiful stone tracery, is the focus of the Sacred Heart tower. The dark-copper spire, half of the tower’s

LEFT and ABOVE: Sacred Heart Cathedral; RIGHT: Trinity Episcopal Cathedral.
architects but also of writers, artists, and composers. The novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame, the carol “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day,” the painting of Salisbury Cathedral by John Constable, and “The Bells” – a poem by Edgar Allan Poe that inspired Rachmaninoff ’s choral symphony of the same name – are just a few works that come to mind. Of course, commercial structures have superseded religious buildings in our urban landscapes. The very year that Sacred Heart was completed, the first true steel-frame skyscraper (the Wainwright Building in St. Louis) was finished. In the Quad Cities, the WHBF-TV tower in the Rock Island District stands 482 feet tall. But the next time you look at that steelframe structure, visualize in its place a stone tower with a spire some 40 feet higher. This was the height of the spire of England’s Lincoln Cathedral built seven centuries ago during the medieval age.

height, stands out on Trinity’s cathedral. And whereas Sacred Heart has a single large bell that dates back to the cathedral’s construction, Trinity’s tower has a carillon, a musical instrument of many bells. Both are rung electronically at present, although Sacred Heart’s bell was originally rung physically with a long rope. Despite these differences, both towers are drawn from the same medieval customs. Church bells became common in the early medieval age. Centuries later, the Gothic architectural style was developed in northern Europe. These traditions captured the imagination of

Though less breathtaking in height and longevity, the spires of Trinity and Sacred Heart cathedrals embody physical might and construction achievement, yet also spiritual longing. They, too, inspire a sense of awe. Bruce Walters is a professor of art at Western Illinois University. This is part of an occasional series on the history of public art in the Quad Cities. If there’s a piece of public art that you’d like to learn more about, e-mail the location and a brief description to BD-Walters@wiu.edu. 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011 Continued From Page 7

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Personal Art Therapy
work from anybody. But I really like doing this. So it’s really for anyone with the courage just to give art a shot. It’s a juried show, but right now, we’ll make room for you.” After Living Proof became incorporated as a not-for-profit, Crouch and Cunningham began soliciting entries from fellow breast-cancer survivors through the local media (including Crouch’s appearance on Paula Sands Live), local hospitals, and word-of-mouth, and they eventually found 17 artists breast-cancer survivor for almost 13 years, Chicago resident Meg Guttman spent some 30 interested in showcasing their years working as an actor, singer, and dancer. “But a big thing about going through the cancer works in last year’s exhibit. treatment,” she says, “is it makes you think, ‘Okay, what really makes me happy?’ And I realized “That’s what Mary Ellen and what would really make me happy was to sit in a room by myself with my fabric and my pictures and I were always hoping,” says all of this stuff and make something with it.” Now a 10-year member of the Illinois Artisans Program, Crouch. “That we’d be able Guttman works primarily in the fiber arts, selling hand-crafted pillows that also boast, as she says, “sort to reach out and have that of a toy-like function or a secret or a gimmick.” Some of her works displayed in Living Proof even come community of art.” with their own functional accessories, such as the pillow that boasts its own accordion folder. (“I like that And with each artist allowed you can have a piece of art that you could put your cell phone in.”) Guttman does admit, though, that to submit up to five works her work can be “kind of a risk, artistically. Because a lot of people look at it and say, ‘Whoa! Fifty dollars each, the pieces featured in for a pillow?! I can go to Walmart and get a pillow!’” Living Proof – both last year and this year – have covered practically the entire spectrum sually, when of artistic media, from painting I shoot to photography to jewelry to things, I try journal entries. to find a bit of a different “If people submit five, then perspective,” says Camanche we accept five, because we think photographer Karen Austin. that support is very important. And her evocative, black-andAnd we include a very wide white image of her daughter range of what we consider art, – created with the assistance and a very wide range of artists. of “some Photoshop-type This year, our oldest participant things to give it a little more is 89 years old, a 10-year impact” – certainly offers survivor, and she made this quilt. a different perspective, an At 89. And that,” says Crouch, expression of what its artist “is Living Proof.” terms a “spiritual type of As might be expected, awakening. Sometimes you numerous pieces on display, just shoot, but with that one, I definitely had something specific in mind, and knew what image I according to Crouch, “are very wanted.” Austin reveals that she’s currently experiencing something of a spiritual awakening herself; meditative. And some of the during our conversation on September 6, she says, “I just got done with my chemo, and I start pieces are very introspective. radiation next week, so I’m kind of a newbie.” (After a laugh, she adds, “But I guess they say that as I know that in my case, I was soon as you get diagnosed, you’re a survivor the following day.”) But already, Austin understands that always interested in photography art can be incredibly therapeutic. “You need to have some kind of outlet,” she says, “and you need to and art. But once you’ve been have something creative to do. It offers some kind of perspective on dealing with what you’re going through cancer, the smaller through.” details become so important. It’s almost like a hyper-focus. I really look at art and nature and the and there are so many different journeys. says Crouch, “because they come from world differently, and I see that in other It’s amazing to see what these ladies go the heart.” people’s art, too. through, and how the arts have helped Currently in the third year of her own “But there’s also this wild, joyful them, and how their art has changed with breast-cancer survivorship, Crouch’s abandon” she says of the spirit behind their diagnoses, and why it’s important to personal contributions to this year’s many works. “Kind of like, ‘Look at this them now. Living Proof exhibit include photographs color! Look at this color!’ There’s such joy, “All the works, I think, are gorgeous,” taken from family vacations, the images

COVER STORY

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ettendorf resident LaNae Ramos’ floral drawing would be striking enough on its own. Yet the work is even more impressive knowing that Ramos created it using the blind-contour method, in which the artist’s eyes never leave the image being drawn, and the artist’s utensil – in this case, a marker – never leaves the paper. “Continuous-line drawing is something I did when I took art classes a long time ago,” says Ramos, a two-year breast-cancer survivor. “And it’s so much fun, because sometimes it looks like what you’re trying to portray, and other times it comes out totally different.” After the initial drawing was completed, Ramos says she went back to do additional shading on a half-dozen areas “to make the drawing more pronounced,” but she adds that she was pleased with the work even without the enhancements. “Because you never know what the piece is going to look like when it’s done. I have a small one that I did that was a paintbrush in a bottle of water, and came out looking like a face in a bottle with a long stick. So you never know.” having been dyed with sepia tones, matted, and placed in antique frames. “So they’re elevated,” she says. “My vacation snapshots are elevated to something else. Because I wanted people to say, ‘Oh ... you mean that I can take my snapshots and do something with them that’s really cool?’ I want people to see how accessible art is. It isn’t scary, you know?” As Crouch knows from personal experience, it’s also something that can also get people through intensely trying

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011 

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oal Valley resident Sue Lemmon’s acrylic Weeping is composed of three sections: one featuring the image of falling tears, one featuring the image of a blooming sunflower, and one that ties the other images together. “When I had cancer, I was really sick,” says the five-year breast-cancer survivor, “and when I was lying in bed, one of the Bible verses that were my mantras was Psalms 30:5. ‘Weeping may come in the night, but joy cometh in the morning.’” Subsequently, for her acrylic, Lemmon connected her doleful and joyous images with a reproduction of this verse, as a reminder that “while things can seem really bad, the sun is going to rise in the morning, and it’s going to be all right.” Adding that “if you feel bad, you can just get out your paints and spend four or five hours without having a thought about anything but your painting,” Lemmon calls art “a wonderful, wonderful outlet,” and urges all novices – as she herself was 10 years ago – to give it a shot. “You may not be a Picasso,” she says, “you may not be a van Gogh, but if you paint a flower, and it looks like a flower, and you’re happy with the flower? Hey. It’s good.” circumstances, and one of her goals with Living Proof is to share this notion with as many people as possible. Beyond presenting the annual exhibit, the notfor-profit recruits instructors to teach the value of therapeutic art to local cancer survivors – a recent class was held with the breast-cancer support group at Gilda’s Club Quad Cities – and Crouch expects that the organization will soon extend its exhibit-entry range farther into Iowa. (“We think that if we work with the hospitals a bit more,” she says, “we can reach into Iowa City. It seems a logical place.”) In the meantime, though, Crouch says that she’s more than proud of what Living Proof has accomplished locally in just under a year. “During chemotherapy,” says Crouch, “you’re up late a lot. At three in the morning, you’re wide awake, and you can only clean your refrigerator so many times. So the whole idea behind this [Living Proof] is that during those times, people are able to reach for that paintbrush, or reach for a pencil for sketching, or reach for the clay. You can always reach for something at three in the morning and you can express yourself. “At our support-group meetings, there’s a strength and an energy that’s just bubbling throughout. There’s spirit. There’s hope. There’s a future. And that’s ... all encompassed in Living Proof. And then we let it spill out onto the canvas.” Bucktown Center for the Arts’ opening reception for Living Proof begins at 6 p.m. on Friday, September 30, and the exhibit is on display through Saturday, October 29. For more information, visit LivingProofExhibit.com. Performing artists are also being sought, through September 23, to share their talents at the Living Proof opening reception on September 30. For information, contact Pamela Crouch at (309)236-1360 or cszfam@yahoo.com.

THE 2012 MODELS ARE ON THE WAY... EVERY REMAINING 2011 IS IN THE WAY! WE HAVE TO MAKE ROOM....FAST!

CLOSEOUT

CLEAR THE LOT

L U J A C K

M I T S U B I S H I ’ S

MITSUBISHI 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

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Continued From Page 17

What Else Is Happenin’
Friday, September 16 – Larry Gatlin & the Gatlin Brothers. Grammy Award-winning country-music legends in concert. Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center. (1777 Isle Parkway, Bettendorf). 7:30 p.m. $20-30. For information and tickets, call (800)724-5825 or visit Bettendorf.IsleOfCapriCasinos.com. Sunday, September 18 – Ernest Dawkins. Musicians Dawkins, Miguel De La Cerna, Junius Paul, and Isaiah Spencer perform and educate as part of Polyrhythms’ Third Sunday Jazz Matinée & Workshop Series. The Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport). 3 p.m. all-ages jazz workshop – $5/adult, children free; 6 p.m. concert – $10-15. For tickets and information, call (309)373-0790 or visit Polyrhythms.org or RedstoneRoom.com. Sunday, September 18 – Caliendo Barcelona Flute/Guitar Duo. Original world music in the styles of tango, gypsy, farandula, flamenco, jazz, classical, samba, bossa nova, and milonga. Augustana College’s Wallenberg Hall (3520 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island). 7 p.m. Free admission. For information, call (309)7947833 or visit Augustana.edu. Tuesday, September 20 – Weedeater. Sludge-metal musicians in concert, with openers Saviours, Bison, and Fight Amp. Rock Island Brewing Company (1815 Second Avenue, Rock Island). 7 p.m. $1316. For information, call (309)793-4060 or visit RIBCO.com. Wednesday, September 21 - .357 String Band. Americana, bluegrass, and country musicians in concert, with openers Hellwater. Rock Island Brewing Company (1815 Second Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. $5. For information, call (309)793-4060 or visit RIBCO.com. Saturday, September 24 – Dave Eggar. Cello music and martial-arts demonstrations with the Juilliard and Harvard graduate and Quad City Arts Visiting Artist. St. Ambrose University’s Galvin Fine Arts Center (2101 Gaines Street, Davenport). 7 p.m. Free admission, with donations encouraged. For information, call (309)793-1213 or visit QuadCityArts.com. Saturday, September 24 – Augustana Symphonic Band Tsunami Relief Concert. Concert in preparation for director James Lambrecht’s departure for a guest residency in Japan. Augustana College’s Centennial Hall (3703 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. Free-will offering taken for tsunami relief. For information, call (309)794-7833 or visit Augustana.edu. Wednesday, September 28 – An Evening with Savoy Brown. Famed acoustic, blues, and rock musician in concert. The Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport). 8 p.m. $17. For tickets and information, call (563)326-1333 or visit RedstoneRoom.com. Lindsay Park (River Drive and Mound Street, Davenport). Saturday 10 a.m.5 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $4. For information, call (309)737-8910 or visit MidCoast.org/riverssance.htm. Saturday, September 17, through Sunday, January 29 – Restoring the Spirit: Celebrating Haitian Art. Exhibition celebrating Haiti’s complex visual traditions and the devotion of artists to creative endeavors in the face of national adversity. Figge Art Museum (225 West Second Street, Davenport). TuesdaySaturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thursday 10 a.m.9 p.m., Sunday noon-5 p.m. Free with $4-7 museum admission. For information, call (563)326-7804 or visit FiggeArt.org. information booths, and more. Centennial Park (Beiderbecke Drive and Marquette Street, Davenport). 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Free admission. For information, e-mail infocelt@celtichighlandgames.org or visit CelticHighlandGames.org. Tuesday, September 20 – Vintage Voices’ Couples. Performances of radio scripts from My Favorite Husband, George Burns & Gracie Allen, Fibber McGee & Molly, and The Bickersons. Broadway Presbyterian Church (710 23rd Street, Rock Island). 5 p.m. light supper, 6:15 p.m. program. $10. For information and to reserve, call (309)764-3968 or visit BroadwayQC.org. Wednesday, September 21, through Friday, September 23 – 2011 Upper Mississippi River Conference: Balancing Nature & Commerce. Fourth-annual conference featuring guest speakers, lectures, workshops, exhibitors, field trips, and more. Isle of Capri Convention Center (1777 Isle Parkway, Bettendorf). Tuesday 4:30 p.m., Wednesday 7:30 a.m., Thursday 6:30 a.m. $99-200. For information and to reserve, call (563)322-0916 or visit RiverAction.org. Thursday, September 22 – Booked for the Night: A Signature Event. Fundraising event for the Moline library featuring a silent auction, cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, music by the Edgar Crockett Jazz Quartet, and more. Moline Public Library (3210 41st Street, Moline). 6 p.m. $25 per person and $45 per couple in advance; $30 per person at the door. For information and to reserve, call (309)5242473 or visit MolineLibrary.com. Sunday, September 25 – Project Chocolate with a Glass of Wine Fundraising event hosted by The Project of the Quad Cities, featuring chocolate samples, catered hors d’oeuvres, a wine tasting, live entertainment, a raffle, and more. Hotel Blackhawk (200 East Third Street, Davenport). 2 p.m. $35 per person, $60 per couple. For information and tickets, call (309)721-7804 or visit APQC4Life.org. Sunday, September 25 – Quad Cities Marathon. Annual event beginning at the i wireless Center (1201 River Drive, Moline) and ending at the John Deere Pavilion (1400 River Drive, Moline), featuring a marathon, a half-marathon, a marathon relay, a 5K walk/run, a one-mile walk, a kids’ run, vendors, live music, and more. 7:30 a.m. $20-175 registration for adults, depending on the race; $10-15 registration for the kids’ run. For information and to register, visit QCMarathon.org.

THEATRE

Thursday, September 15, through Sunday, September 25 – Time Stands Still. The Curtainbox Theatre Company’s presentation of Donald Margulies’ war-correspondent drama, directed by Tyson Danner. Village Theatre (2113 East 11th Street, Village of East Davenport). Thursday-Saturday and Tueday 7:30 p.m.; Sunday 3 p.m. $12-20. For tickets and information, call (563)322-8504 or visit TheCurtainbox.com. Thursday, September 22, and Friday, September 23 – Hubbard Street Dance Chicago 2. A Hancher Auditorium presentation featuring world-premiere choreography and pieces from the company’s repertoire. The University of Iowa’s Space/Place Theatre (North Hall, on the corner of Madison and Jefferson streets, Iowa City). 7:30 p.m. $15-30. For tickets and information, call (319)3351160 or visit http://www.Hancher.UIowa. edu. Saturday, September 24 – Carmen. Ballet Quad Cities’ production of the ballet inspired by Georges Bizet’s legendary opera. Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street, Davenport). 2 and 8 p.m. $14-22. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit BalletQuadCities.com.

DANCE

COMEDY

Friday, September 23 – Joe Raiola: American Heretic. One-man show on religion, politics, and American culture, with the touring artist and senior editor of Mad magazine. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $15-20. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org.

MOVIES

LITERATURE

Wednesday, September 28 – Gerald Stern. New Jersey’s former poet laureate reads from his works in a presentation in the “River Readings at Augustana” series. Augustana College’s Denkmann Memorial Hall (3520 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island). 7 p.m. Free admission. For information, call (309)794-7833 or visit Augustana.edu.

Thursday, September 15, through Saturday, September 17 – Black Earth Film Festival. Eighth-annual screening of independent features and shorts, featuring Thursday’s 7 p.m. premiere of Paul Bonesteel’s documentary The Day Carl Sandburg Died. Carl Sandburg College Fine Arts Theatre (Building F, Tom L. Wilson Boulevard, Galesburg). Thursday 7 p.m. screenings, Friday 7 and 10:30 p.m. screenings, Saturday noon and 7 p.m. screenings. $5 per session, $20 for a threeday all-session pass. For information and a film schedule, call (309)342-7415 or visit BlackEarthFilmFestival.org.

EVENTS

ART

Saturday, September 17, and Sunday, September 18 – 2011 Riverssance Festival of Fine Art. MidCoast Fine Arts presents the 24thannual juried art fair featuring more than 100 artist booths, live music, a children’s activity tent, wine garden, and more.

Saturday, September 17 – 2011 Brew Ha Ha. WQPT’s 12th-annual celebration of locally and nationally brewed beers, featuring cheeses provided by Cabot Creamery Cooperative of Vermont and performances by Wicked Liz & the Bellyswirls and the improv comedians of the Blacklist. LeClaire Park (River Drive and Ripley Street, Davenport). 1-5 p.m. $20-25. For tickets and information, call (309)7642400 or visit WQPT.org/brew. Saturday, September 17 – 2011 Celtic Festival & Highland Games. Annual event featuring vendors, food, athletic competitions, a parade, live music,

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011 

IOWA POLITICS

Continued From Page 5

Decrease in Stimulus Money Blamed for Iowa Closures, Layoffs
faith-based organizations, and probation offices. Another 78 locations are waiting, and more than 800 other locations are possible. “The long-term vision would be similar to ... online banking,” Wahlert said. “Hopefully, one day you can be in your pajamas at home and have access to all these services. We’re not quite there yet with the technology and with the required space needs, but that’s really where we intend to be in a short few years.” The hours for people to have a live online chat with someone from IWD are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Wahlert said the state had the technology but never deployed it. She said she’s seen people using the new “access points” in the evenings after 4:30 p.m., and on Saturdays. She said the state should know by the end of the year whether it needs to adjust hours of operation. Act, signed into law February 17, 2009, by President Barack Obama. The federal government has so far spent nearly $708.6 billion nationwide under the act. “To the extent the federal government reduces funding to the states, which we all know is inevitable, we need to be planning today to say how we’re going to carry out the same level of services,” Vaudt said, “or how we’re going to change the delivery of those services when we run into less federal assistance, which is going to put more actual pressure on the state dollars that we collect here each year.” Vaudt said the state’s “huge reliance” on the

by Lynn Campbell IowaPolitics.com
federal government has grown from $4.9 billion in Fiscal Year 2006 to more than $8 billion in Fiscal Year 2010. The federal money came from the stimulus package and disaster-relief fund to help the state deal with flooding. He said the numbers for Fiscal Year 2011 are not finalized. In Medicaid alone, Vaudt said, Iowa’s share of federal money increased from $1.7 billion in Fiscal Year 2006 to $2.3 billion in Fiscal Year 2010. This article was produced by IowaPolitics. com. For more stories on Iowa politics, visit RCReader.com/y/iapolitics.

Additional Cuts Expected

State Auditor David Vaudt recently warned that Iowa, like other states, should brace for additional budget cuts and closures as the federal government pares back its assistance. Additional federal money to states came from the American Recovery & Reinvestment

Iowans Struggle with Open Records, from City Hall to Governor’s Office
open-records requests in the amount of time allowed by law. Branstad spokesperson Tim Albrecht said the office receives roughly 10 open-records requests each month. “Branstad was the first governor in Iowa history to appoint a transparency adviser,” said Monroe, who between 1981 and 2009 served as executive director of the Iowa Newspaper Association, which represents more than 300 daily and weekly publications in the state. Monroe said in his work with the governor and his staff, he has not seen anything that would lead him to believe the administration is not intent on improving transparency. He said the governor’s office responded to the ACLU request August 9, which was within 20 days. But Wilson said he never received the response, which the governor’s office said must have been discarded as e-mail spam. The governor’s office again responded August 31, this time by letter. Under state law, government agencies can charge for copying costs and the hourly rate of the employee compiling the information. The charges vary widely statewide and depend on the salary of the person processing the request. The governor’s office provides the first 10 pages of copying for free, said Larry Johnson Jr., Branstad’s deputy legal counsel. Any additional copies are 10 cents per page. However, all e-mails requested are provided on a disc at no charge. The governor’s office also provides the first three hours of Johnson’s service to review requested records. Any additional time is $33 per hour, he said. In another case, the Iowa Democratic Party on July 6 submitted an open-records request to find out how much Branstad’s tours across Iowa are costing taxpayers. Monroe said the governor’s office within 10 days told Democrats that it did not have any documents relevant to the request. “Instead of sending the Democratic Party on a wild-goose chase through state government, ... [a party representative] was told that the governor’s staff would be happy to locate the records; however, it would take longer than 20 days,” Monroe said. “The response was fulfilled on Friday, August 26.” Iowa law states that a response should come within 10 business days, and delays shall not exceed 20 calendar days. “I think open-records laws in the state are adequate, but those laws need to be followed,” said Sam Roecker, a spokesperson for the Iowa Democratic Party. “While Governor Branstad frequently talks about his transparency attempts, the results just aren’t there.” Even when open-records requests are fulfilled, the information officials provide might not satisfy those requesting the information. In June, the American Federation of State, County, & Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Iowa Council 61 submitted an open-records request to the governor’s office for Branstad’s plans for a possible stategovernment shutdown. The information the union purchased amounted to hundreds of newspaper articles and no new information. Monroe said AFSCME requested all e-mails with the word “shutdown.” He said the office complied with the request’s search terms. But improvements to streamline the process can be made, he said. “The governor supported legislation in the last session of the General Assembly which would, for the first time ever, provide an enforcement mechanism for Iowa’s sunshine laws,” Monroe said. “Expect to see that legislation debated again in 2012.”

IOWA POLITICS

Continued From Page 9

by Lynn Campbell IowaPolitics.com

Small Steps Forward

Iowa has made some progress toward government openness and transparency this year. In January, the State Judicial Nominating Commission made public the interviews with 60 applicants to fill three slots on the Iowa Supreme Court. Video of the interviews was streamed live online. This unprecedented move came after increased public scrutiny of the high court, a well-funded campaign against the justices, and a vote by Iowans in November to oust three justices who were part of the unanimous 2009 Varnum V. Brien decision legalizing same-sex marriage. Then in May, Branstad signed into law a bill making some improvements in the state’s open-records law. But creation of an Iowa Public Information Board that would add teeth to the state’s open-records law failed to receive final passage this year, for the third consecutive year. That board or agency would have provided a place for people to go if they’ve been denied access. “The governor supported increased transparency with a new board, new enforceability tools, and more training for local government officials in order to make them better aware of the rules and regulations related to Iowa’s open-records and -meetings law,” Albrecht said. State Representative Kevin Koester (RAnkeny), a school administrator who was the bill’s floor manager in the Iowa House, told IowaPolitics.com earlier this year that cost was the main sticking point. He said the Iowa Senate version of the bill would have cost $120,000 to form the new board and staff it with an executive director, administrative law judges, and attorneys – all at a time when lawmakers are working to

reduce the size and cost of government. What was signed into law was Senate File 289, which repealed criminal penalties under the open-records law but increased civil fines. Each member of a governmental body who knowingly violates the state’s openmeetings and public-records law now can be fined between $1,000 and $2,500, up from the previous $100 to $500. A reconvened meeting is now subject to meeting-notice requirements. And certain information about government employees is open to the public, including compensation, terms of employment, the value of benefits, positions the person has held, educational background, previous employers, dates of employment, and discharge information. Wilson said that final provision about government employees stems from a case in which two Atlantic school-district officials conducted a strip search of five high-school girls in August 2009 in an unsuccessful attempt to locate $100 another student reported missing. The ACLU of Iowa last year sued the school district to reveal the discipline imposed on the two school officials. The case is expected to be argued this month before the Iowa Court of Appeals. “School districts won’t tell us whether they took that seriously or not because they refuse to give us the information on what discipline they imposed,” Wilson said. “They say it violates confidentiality of school employees. We think their concerns about privacy are misplaced, that they should have been concerned about the privacy of the students who were strip-searched.” This article was produced by IowaPolitics. com. For more stories on Iowa politics, visit RCReader.com/y/iapolitics. 

Ask
Fraud Prince

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

the

Advice Goddess

BY AMY ALKON

When my boyfriend moved across the country to Manhattan for two years, we pledged we’d be faithful. We talk and text daily, and he tells me he loves me and that I’m the only person for him. Well, my best girlfriend visited her brother, my boyfriend’s roommate, and returned with some real fun facts: Last year, my boyfriend became obsessed with some girl and got into an “open relationship” with her – all year. He claims only she slept with others; he didn’t. Yeah, right. He also insists he only slept with her once and didn’t tell me because he didn’t think I could handle the truth. That’s ridiculous because he knows honesty is everything to me. I now feel I have reason to leave him. Still, I’m 24, he’s my first boyfriend, and we’ve been together for four years, so I’m reluctant to end it. Please give me a silver lining to this dark cloud over my head! – Last Straw Sorry, but this cloud’s lining isn’t silver; it’s cheap polyester with one of those “remove under penalty of law” tags: WARNING! Boyfriend with scruples of spandex has relocated to the North American capital of hot women – “The City That Never Sleeps” (except when people roll over after sex instead of smoking a cigarette or having a cuddle). For some, a wake-up call is a gentle nudge or the delicate tinkle of a fine watch; others need to be bludgeoned over the head with an alarm clock. In case you’re wondering, you’re in the sound sleepers group. In our e-mail exchange, you revealed that in addition to a number of friends warning you about your boyfriend, a complete stranger who spotted you with him in a bar took you aside to hint that he had zipper issues. In red flag terms, this is a call to start shopping for an Eiffel Tower-sized flagpole. Although women typically stick with dirtbag boyfriends out of a lack of selfrespect, your problem seems to be an excess of respect for The Relationship. Okay, he’s your first boyfriend and you’ve been together for four years. This is merely interpersonal census data, not reason to stick around to be lied to and cheated on for another four years. To this day, your boyfriend shows you that his words are suspect anytime he says anything weightier than “pass the Cheerios.” In fact, he may be in Manhattan, but the old joke about the Hollywood agent applies:

“Hello,” he lied. What you need isn’t a silver lining, but a diving pool of louse shampoo. You also need to understand that boyfriends who are liars and cheaters go for girlfriends who put up with lying and cheating. If you want honesty, don’t swallow lies like they’ve been buttered, and don’t let wanting a man to be ethical get in the way of looking to see whether he actually is. You might also take a more realistic approach to human nature. The 20s are our prime rutting time. Send any twentysomething man off for two years, and unless he’s on a solo mission to Mars, you’d better ask him to supplement his daily “ur the only 1!” texts with a web-cam so you can see the girl he isn’t sleeping with in the background, motioning him to get back into bed.

My boyfriend dumped me, and I’m besieged with inquiries about how I’m handling it, both from friends and people who don’t care about me and just want to pry. How do I field questions from the latter without getting into a lot of discussion? – Exhausted Without gossip, people would have to sit around talking about particle physics, the economic downturn, and what’s going on in Libya. Gnawing on your life is much more fun: “Yeah, they broke up, and she’s alone, and I counted 62 empty pork rind bags and 73 beer bottles in her trash.” Recognize that you have no obligation to feed the info vultures, and plan in advance exactly how you won’t be answering their questions. However you decide to shut them down – with humor, vagueness, wild invention, or deflection (“Finehowareyou?!”) – keep responding that way until they get the message that it’s all the message they’re gonna get. Preserving your emotional energy means you can channel it where you need it most – into working your way through the “Seven Stages of Grief ”: (1) Drunk dialing; (2) Watching Law & Order reruns; (3) Looking up elementary school boyfriends on Facebook...; (4) ... and then not writing them; (5) Tearing pages from Chicken Soup for the Soul and lighting them on fire; (6) Putting on shadow puppet shows of brutal murders; (7) Making hangup calls at 3 a.m. to nosy buggers who ask you prying questions about your breakup.

Vulture Shock

171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (AdviceGoddess.com)
©2011, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.

Got A Problem? Ask Amy Alkon.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011 

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY
ARIES (March 21-April 19): “An awakened Aries would rather err on the side of making a daring, improvisational mistake than cuddle up with passionless peace,” writes astrologer Hunter Reynolds. “He or she knows that creative conflict can be a greater unifying force than superficial harmony.” This is an excellent keynote for you to keep in mind during the coming days. But make sure your motivations are pure and humble, please. If the daring improvisation you launch is fueled by arrogance or the urge to dominate, your efforts to shake things up for the greater good will fail. Fight against what Reynolds calls “terrified niceness” – but do it with fierce compassion, not sneering rage. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Back in 2009, John Allwood, an Australian melon-picker, used his head to smash 47 watermelons in 60 seconds. That broke the previous world record of 40 in a minute, also set by him a couple of years earlier. I’ve chosen him to be your role model for the coming week, Taurus – for two reasons. First, you’re primed to outstrip a personal best you achieved some time back. So do it! Second, it’s a perfect time to use your head in fun and creative ways. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): According to April Winchell’s book Regretsy: Where DIY Meets WTF, here are some of the treasures you can find for sale at Etsy. com: a toy pig made from a root beer can; a “juicy enchanted pouch” for holding runes; a handmade hornet’s nest; a stuffed feral goat fashioned to resemble a unicorn; fake tapeworms that are actually spray-painted fettucine; and a “haunted Ouija board Las Vegas casino-style blackjack roulette poker chip.” I would absolutely love it if you designed something like this and hawked it on Etsy, Gemini. Your skill as an idiosyncratic creator will soon be peaking, as will your capacity for marketing the most unique aspects of your shtick and style. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Specialization is for insects,” said science fiction writer Robert Heinlein. “A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, pitch manure, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently.” I bring this thought to your attention, Cancerian, because it’s an excellent time for you to broaden your understanding and expand your repertoire. How many of the things that Heinlein names can you do? Make a list of your talents, and try to add some new ones to that list in the coming weeks. LEO (July 23-August 22): A veterinarian in Nashville was asked to do something he had never done: diagnose and treat a wounded whooping crane. Experts devoted to safeguarding the endangered species advised him to wear a billowy white suit. That way the wild bird would be more likely to accept his attention. “You learn very quickly how to communicate dressed as a marshmallow,” the vet said after completing his work. Be prepared for a metaphorically similar encounter, Leo. You, too, may face a prospect that resembles interspecies conversation. I hope you’ll be as adaptable as the vet. VIRGO (August 23-September 22): “Everything is unique,” said the 19th-century authors known as the Goncourt brothers, who wrote all their books together. “Nothing happens more than once in a lifetime. The physical pleasure that a certain woman gave you at a certain moment, the exquisite dish that you ate on a certain day – you will never meet either again. Nothing is repeated, and everything is unparalleled.” Of course this is always true. But I suspect you will be more intensely aware of it in the coming days than you have in a long time. In part that’s because the sensations and experiences headed your way will be so piquantly unique, so exquisitely fresh. And in part it’s because you’ll be wide-awake to the novel pleasures that are possible when you appreciate the fact that everything changes all the time. LIBRA (September 23-October 22): “Sentiment without action is the ruin of the soul,” said environmentalist Edward Abbey. The “ruin” doesn’t happen all of a sudden, because of a single small failure to translate sincere intentions into good works. Rather, it’s the result of long-running laziness or passivity – a consistent inability to do what one’s passions demand. If there is even a shred of this tendency in your make-up, Libra, now is an urgent time to shed it. According to my astrological analysis, you simply must carry out your soul’s mandates. SCORPIO (October 23-November 21): I would of course never advocate burning all copies of the book Faking It: How to Seem Like a Better Person Without Actually Improving Yourself. I’m a staunch defender of freedom of speech, even if the speech offends my moral sense. On the other hand, my freedom of speech allows me to advise you to strenuously avoid that book and any influence that resembles it. In my astrological opinion, you need to actually become a better person in the coming weeks, not just pretend you are. Here’s a good place to start: Don’t just pay lip service to the idea of supporting others’ freedom of speech. Help them claim and express that freedom, even if it makes you uncomfortable. SAGITTARIUS (November 22December 21): Every one of us is born with up to 150 new mutations that make us different from both of our parents. Most of those genetic alterations are neutral in their effects. Some are negative and a few may be beneficial. I bring this to your attention,

by Rob Brezsny
Sagittarius, because you’re entering a phase when it’s possible to take more advantage of your positive mutations than you ever have before. Can you guess what they are? Try to, because you’re primed to tap in to their fuller potential. CAPRICORN (December 22January 19): Dictionary. com says there are 19 words in the English language with no perfect rhymes. Among them are six words that are useful in constructing this week’s horoscope for you: cusp, glimpsed, depth, rhythm, gulf, and opus. I like the fact that none of them rhyme because it’s symbolic of the task you have ahead of you. You’re on the cusp of a shift in your rhythm that will take you out of your depth, compelling you to close the gulf between you and a resource that will be crucial for you to have access to in the future. You’ve glimpsed what needs to be done – the creation of a new opus – but in order to accomplish it, you will need to be motivated by a frustration that feels like having to rhyme un-rhymeable words. AQUARIUS (January 20-February 18): The Jerusalem Syndrome is a temporary psychological phenomenon that on rare occasions overtakes travelers who visit Jerusalem. Under the influence of ancient holy sites, these people may become obsessed with religious themes or experience delusions that they are characters from stories in the Bible or Koran. I don’t expect you to fall under the sway of such an outbreak, Aquarius, but I do suspect that you will soon have some intense spiritual stirrings. To ensure that they will enlighten you, not dishevel you, stay well-grounded. Have regular meals, please. Sleep well and exercise now and then. PISCES (February 19-March 20): My Pisces friend Rana Satori Stewart coined some new words that happen to be perfect for you to begin using and embodying. “Blissipline,” she says, is “the commitment to experiencing a little or a lot of bliss every day; the practice of expanding one’s capacity for bliss and being open to receive it in any moment.” A “blissiplinarian” is “someone who enforces pleasure and invites opportunities for more pleasure,” while a “blissciple” is a person who aspires to master the art of blissipline. I encourage you to be a blissciple, Pisces, because it will put you in sync with the effervescent invitations the cosmos has scheduled for you. Homework: What are the main dreams you want to accomplish in each of the next three decades? Have fun brainstorming. Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES & DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's

1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

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OSTEOLOGY· September 1, 011

September 1 Answers: Right

September 1 Crossword Answers

ACROSS 1. Smithereens 5. Black tea variety 10. Concrete strengthener 15. A cheese 19. Seed cover 20. Mold 21. Place in the Pine Tree State 22. Explosive device 23. Rickety bike 25. Sternum 27. Predate 28. Church area 30. Ark’s destination 31. Clear square 32. Barroom orders 33. “QB VII” author 34. Paint finish 37. Soppressata 39. Careless 43. Parts of old TVs 44. Fine porcelain: 2 wds. 46. Four seasons 47. “Prince _” 48. Bottle 50. Spirit 51. Flight path: abbr. 52. Hebrew letter 53. Jalousie part 54. Opposite 56. Things for sale 58. Intrude, in a way 60. Miles or Jefferson 61. Birdbaths 62. Virgule 63. Detergent ingredient 64. Bacon or Spacey 65. Uncouple 67. Mallet 68. Water bird: 2 wds. 71. Dormer window 72. Provide refreshments 73. Join 74. No longer fresh 75. _ dolorosa 76. Like some champagne 77. Serviceable 79. Part of Mongolia

80. Lodge members 82. Do-nothing 85. Like it _ _ 86. Determined 88. An out 90. Nobles 91. Ship’s course 92. “Moulin Rouge” setting 93. Portent 95. Surrounded by 98. Broadcast 99. Treat hurriedly: 2 wds. 103. Stupid 105. Desiccated: 4 wds. 107. Bouquet 108. Epics anagram 109. Old weapon 110. Tops 111. Hankerings 112. Schlepped 113. Thrusting weapons 114. Formerly, formerly DOWN 1. _ au rhum 2. Item for a duffer 3. Dye 4. Drowsier 5. Lacking healthy color 6. Specters 7. Behalf 8. An anthropoid 9. Shakespeare’s Antonio, e.g. 10. Mechanical 11. “To _ _ human...” 12. Dutch South African 13. Santa _ 14. Grower of American Beauties 15. Mission’s cousin 16. Fashion name 17. “_ Karenina” 18. Assemble 24. Diagnostic aids 26. Junket 29. Kind of movie 32. Fruit of the blackthorn 33. Of a bone 34. Be sparing 35. Portend

36. Beef servings: 2 wds. 38. Touches on 39. Eliot’s Marner 40. Fabric pattern 41. Of a grain 42. Array 45. Spiral 48. Conflict 49. Infant’s problem 53. Sci-fi setting 54. Kitchen tool 55. Jelly bean shape 56. Fluttered 57. Home to billions 59. Do in 60. Went in headfirst 61. Famed Memphis street 63. Wacko 64. Ship part 65. White cliffs town 66. Foreigner of a kind 67. Bandage material 68. Helvetian 69. Organized group 70. Redacts 72. Item to be shipped 76. Most direct 77. Solve 78. River in England 79. The “Capital of the Alps” 81. Fuses 83. Like Santa Claus 84. Monster 85. Cultural event 87. Beat 89. Comfort 92. Portion 94. Nine Greek goddesses 95. “About _ _” 96. Manner 97. Get _ _ the act 98. Underground passage 99. Dec. 31st word 100. _ dire 101. Tips 102. What’s still available 104. Abbr. in an address 106. Strike

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Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011 

2011/09/15 (Thu)

THURSDAY

15

ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Bomba Estéreo -Iowa Memorial Union Main Lounge - University of Iowa, 125 N. Madison St. Iowa City, IA Danny Schmidt & Carrie Elkin -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA

Dave Schroeder -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL

New Belgium Battle IV: Muddy Rails - Cedars of Lebanon - Nebula Was - Phantom Vibrations -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night w/ Kung Fu Tofu -Stickman’s, 1510 N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night w/ The Dukes of Haggard -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th St Moline, IL

Uniphonics - PB & the Jam - Tallgrass -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA 2011/09/17 (Sat)

SATURDAY

17

DJ Jeff & Karaoke -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Emily “EmJay” Jawoisz - Kevin Carton -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Gong Show Karaoke w/ Rock ‘N the House Karaoke -Uptown Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA Jam Sessions with John O’Meara & Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Jimmy Valentine Quintet -Bass Street Landing Plaza, Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill - Davenport, 3005 W. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night -The Gallery Lounge, 3727 Esplanade Ave. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -The Lucky Frog Bar and Grill, 313 N Salina St McCausland, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Live Lunch w/ Keith Soko (noon) -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Lynne Hart Jazz Quartet -Cabana’s, 2120 4th Ave. Rock Island, IL Mixology - Born Gold - Alex Brody - Cuticle -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA

Rude Punch -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Texas Hippie Coalition - Drama Major -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) -Red Crow Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA Viva Voce - The Parson Red Heads - Alexis Stevens -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA 2011/09/16 (Fri)

Head for the Hills @ Iowa City Yacht Club - September 21
Hotel California -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Item 9 & the Mad Hatters - Five in a Hand - Caterwaulla -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Jazz After Five (5:30pm) - Deleted Scenes - Wax Cannon (9pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Karaoke Night (members only) -Moose Lodge - Davenport, 2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Paddlewheel Sports Bar & Grill, 221 15th St Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night -Stickman’s, 1510 N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA Larry Gatlin & The Gatlin Brothers -QuadCities Waterfront Convention Center, 1777 Isle Parkway Bettendorf, IA Lee Blackmon (6:30pm) -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA

FRIDAY

16

Big Al -The Odeon, 8025 Avenue N. Clinton, IA Bucktown Revue -N ighswander Theatre, 2822 Eastern Ave Davenport, IA Crazy Bad -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Daphne Willis - Megan McCormick -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL

Meth & Goats - Tambourine - Jamey Cummins -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Mike Blumme Trio (6pm) -Toucan’s Cantina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Night People -Cabana’s, 2120 4th Ave. Rock Island, IL Quad City Dub Brew: Tankman - Ghost Science - Mondope Trinkets - Teleport -Bent River Brewing Company, 1413 5th Ave. Moline, IL

Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

Diego Val -Thomas Tredway Library, Augustana College Rock Island, IL

Friday Live at 5: Douglas & Tucker -RME (River Music Experience) Courtyard, Davenport, IA High Cotton Blues Band -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA

Shenandoah Davis - Sub Atlantic -RozzTox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Smooth Groove -Fargo Dance & Sports, 4204 Avenue of the Cities Moline, IL Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Stuart Matthews -Bleyart’s Tap, 2210 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA The Knockoffs (6pm) -Rhythm City Casino, 101 W. River Dr. Davenport, IA Troy Harris, pianist (6pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA

As You Were - TBOPRRIOF - Sidetracked - Sleeper Wakes Society -River Music Experience, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Clayton Jones -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Conspiracy Theory -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Dave Eggar (2:30pm) -Moline Public Library, 3210 41st St Moline, IL David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL Funktastic Five -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL Heatbox - Holding Space - Eddie Elliot -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Hotel California -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Identity Crisis -River House, 1510 River Dr. Moline, IL Justin Morrissey & Friends -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Moe’s Pizza, 1312 Camanche Ave Clinton, IA Karaoke Night -Paddlewheel Sports Bar & Grill, 221 15th St Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night w/ Stevie J. -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Koplant No -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Little Big Town -Adler Theatre, 136 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Mike Compton - Joe Newberry -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA

Mommy’s Little Monster -Mulligan’s Valley Pub, 310 W 1st Ave Coal Valley, IL Open Mic Morning (9am) -Whistle Stop Java Shop, 400 W. 4th St. Milan, IL Riverssance: Alan Sweet (11am) - Barley House Band (1pm) - Hot Club of Davenport (3pm) -Lindsay Park, River Drive and Mound Street Davenport, IA Rude Punch -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (7pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Simon Says Uncle -One More Round, 209211 E. 2nd St Muscatine, IA Smooth Groove -Fargo Dance & Sports, 4204 Avenue of the Cities Moline, IL Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Superfly Samurai -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Surf Zombies (6pm) - Chicago Afrobeat Project (9pm) -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Tangent -Generations Bar & Grill, 4100 4th Ave. Moline, IL Tapped Out -Desperado’s, 112 S. Main St. Wheatland, IA The Fry Daddies (6pm) -Toucan’s Cantina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL

The Knockoffs (6pm) -Rhythm City Casino, 101 W. River Dr. Davenport, IA The Premium $ellouts -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Zither Ensemble (10am) -German American Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA 2011/09/18 (Sun)

ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

SUNDAY

18

Continued On Page 30

Enjoy

IMPROVISED MUSICAL THEATER with

The audience shouts out titles of musicals that have never been performed. Accompanied by a full band, Baby Wants Candy turns one of the titles into the theme of an improvised 60-minute, one-act musical.
OPENING ACT: Saxophonist Matt Corey

8 p.m. Saturday, October 1 | Centennial Hall | Augustana College | Rock Island Tickets $8 general public; $6 seniors and children age 12 and under To order tickets, go to www.augustana.edu/tickets or call (309) 794-7306.

COMING SOON
Quad Cities Ballet Folklorico Saturday, October 8 

0

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
2011/09/20 (Tue)

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Continued From Page 29
Caliendo Barcelona Flute Guitar Duo -Wallenberg Hall, Augustana College, 3520 7th Ave. Rock Island, IL Dave Ellis hosts Funday Sunday Live Music on the Patio (6pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Glenn Hickson (11am & 5:30pm) O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Jazz Brunch w/ the Josh Duffee Band (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Hotel Blackhawk, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Night People (5pm) -The Captain’s Table, 4801 River Dr. Moline, IL Riverssance: Lojo Russo (10:30am) - Ragaman (12:30pm) - Bermuda Report (2:30pm) -Lindsay Park, River Drive and Mound Street Davenport, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am) -The Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA Steve Earle & the Dukes (& Duchesses) featuring Allison Moorer -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Terry Hanson Ensemble (10:30am) -Brady Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA Third Sunday Jazz Series featuring Ernest Dawkins (6pm) -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA 2011/09/19 (Mon)

TUESDAY

20

ABC Karaoke Contest Night -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

Karaoke Night -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th St Moline, IL Metal Mondays -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA One Night Stand Open Mic -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA

MONDAY

19

Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Sharky’s Bar & Grill, 2902 E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night w/ Stevie J. (6:30pm) -Davenport Eagles Lodge, 4401 W. Locust St. Davenport, IA Live Lunch w/ Dave Smith (noon) -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA Open Mic Night w/ Alan Sweet -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Open Mic w/ Jordan Danielsen -Bier Stube Davenport, 2228 E 11th St Davenport, IA Open Mic w/ Steve McFate -Salute, 1814 7th St Moline, IL Quad-Cities KIX Orchestra -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL The Whoozdads -Bass Street Landing Plaza, Moline, IL

Head for the Hills - Tallgrass -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Jeff Miller (6pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL

Rwake @ RIBCO - September 23

Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA

John & Kay Retzl (5:30pm) -The Rusty 2011/09/22 (Thu) Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill - Davenport, 3005 W. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Sharky’s Bar & Grill, 2902 E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA Landfall 2011 -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Live Lunch w/ Brent Feuerbach (noon) -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Open Mic Night w/ Alan Sweet and Siri Mason -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Open Mic Night w/ Karl, Mike, & Doug -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night w/ Luis Ochoa -Uptown Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA

THURSDAY

22

A Night of Sunshine -Circa ‘21 Dinner Playhouse, 1828 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL

ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Cassius Trio -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Danika Holmes -Ember Lounge, 111 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA DJ Jeff & Karaoke -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Emily “EmJay” Jawoisz CD Release Party (6pm) -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL Gong Show Karaoke w/ Rock ‘N the House Karaoke -Uptown Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA Jam Sessions with John O’Meara & Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA

Jill Andrews - Sarah Cram -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Karaoke Night -Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill - Davenport, 3005 W. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night -The Gallery Lounge, 3727 Esplanade Ave. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -The Lucky Frog Bar and Grill, 313 N Salina St McCausland, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Landfall 2011 w/ Staff Benda Bilili & Joaquin Diaz -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Live Lunch w/ Dave Maxwell (noon) -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Lynne Hart Jazz Quartet -Cabana’s, 2120 4th Ave. Rock Island, IL Mixology -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA New Belgium Battle IV: Caterwaulla - River Glen - Gone South - The Enz -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night w/ Kung Fu Tofu Stickman’s, 1510 N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night w/ The Dukes of Haggard -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th St Moline, IL

Weedeater - Saviours - Bison - Fight Amp -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
2011/09/21 (Wed)

Roster McCabe -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

WEDNESDAY

21

Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) -Red Crow Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA 2011/09/23 (Fri)

.357 String Band - Hellwater -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Buddy Olson (6pm) -Ducky’s Lagoon, 13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL DJ Jeff & Karaoke -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL

An Horse - Joe Fassler -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Big Al -The Odeon, 8025 Avenue N. Clinton, IA

FRIDAY

23

“Blues Plate Special” Lunch w/ Tony Hoeppner (noon) -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Buddy Olson (6pm) -Toucan’s Cantina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Dave Eggar (3pm) -Deere-Wiman Carriage House, 817 11th Ave. Moline, IL David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL David Zollo & the Body Electric - The Burrows 4 -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Dear Rabbit - The Davenport Hot Club -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Diane McIntosh -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Dubstep for Dummies: Volume II -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Friday Live at 5: The Whoozdads (5pm) -RME (River Music Experience) Courtyard, Davenport, IA Justin Morrissey & Friends -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Karaoke Night (members only) -Moose Lodge - Davenport, 2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Paddlewheel Sports Bar & Grill, 221 15th St Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night -Stickman’s, 1510 N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA Kent Burnside and New Generation -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Landfall 2011 w/Dikanda & David Greely & Friends -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Even Steven -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL First Impression -Missippi Brew, River Dr Muscatine, IA Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Generations Bar & Grill, 4100 4th Ave. Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Moe’s Pizza, 1312 Camanche Ave Clinton, IA Karaoke Night -Paddlewheel Sports Bar & Grill, 221 15th St Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night w/ Stevie J. -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Landfall 2011 -Greene Square Park, Cedar Rapids, IA Night People -Len Brown’s North Shore Inn, 7th Street and the Rock River Moline, IL Nitrix -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Oktoberfest 2011: John & Kay Retzl (2pm) - Barefoot Becky & the Ivanhoe Dutchmen (5pm) -Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds, 2815 W. Locust St Davenport, IA Open Mic Morning (9am) -Whistle Stop Java Shop, 400 W. 4th St. Milan, IL OSG - Fair-Trade Sound -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Rod Pierson Big Band w/Craig Boche -Orange Street Theatre, 701 Orange St., Muscatine, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (7pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Secret Squirrel -Hawkeye Tap, 4646 Cheyenne Ave. Davenport, IA Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Live Lunch w/ Randy Arcenas (noon) -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Metal Mondays -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA One Night Stand Open Mic -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA P.S. I Love You - Balkans -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA 2011/09/27 (Tue) 2011/09/28 (Wed)

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011 

1

Lost Allies - As Big As A Mouse - Satellite Heart -River Music Experience, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Night People -Cabana’s, 2120 4th Ave. Rock Island, IL

WEDNESDAY

28

Retro Ron -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Rwake - The Horde - Helmsplitter RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Strange Arrangement - The Twin Cats -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA The Tailfins -Col Ballroom, 1012 W. 4th St. Davenport, IA Troy Harris, pianist (6pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Who Cares Band -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL 2011/09/24 (Sat)

TUESDAY

27

ABC Karaoke Contest Night -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

Tear Down the Tower -Hawkeye Tap, 4646 Cheyenne Ave. Davenport, IA

Nitrix @ Martini’s on the Rock – September 24

SATURDAY

24

The Candymakers -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA

Barlowe & James (6pm) -Toucan’s Cantina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Break Up Art - Konrad - Emmit Wilson -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Caroline Smith & the Goodnight Sleeps The Wandering Bears - Datagun -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Community Drum Circle (10:30am) -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Cosmic -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA

The Dave Eggar Ensemble -Galvin Fine Arts Center, 2101 Gaines St. Davenport, IA The Karry Outz Band -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Unity Fest: High Cotton Blues Band - Ray Blue -Putnam Museum & IMAX Theatre, 1717 W 12th St Davenport, IA Zither Ensemble (10am) -German American Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA 2011/09/25 (Sun)

SUNDAY

25

D’Allen Rice -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA

ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

Emily “EmJay” Jawoisz -Outside the i wireless Center, 1201 River Drive, Moline, IL Glenn Hickson (11am & 5:30pm) O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Jazz Brunch w/ the Josh Duffee Band (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Hotel Blackhawk, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA John & Kay Retzl (11am) -St. Mary’s Catholic Church - Rock Island, 2208 4th Ave Rock Island, IL Karaoke Night -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am) -The Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA Sunday Afternoon Social Dance w/ the Ken Paulsen Quartet (3pm) -Moline Viking Club, 1450 41st St. Moline, IL 2011/09/26 (Mon)

David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL Diane McIntosh -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA

Sublime Tribute w/ Second Hand Smoke -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Tangent -Cabana’s, 2120 4th Ave. Rock Island, IL

Anthony Catalfano Quartet (10:30am) -Brady Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA Dave Ellis hosts Funday Sunday Live Music on the Patio (6pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA

MONDAY

26

Karaoke Night -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th St Moline, IL

Brass Bed - Netherfriends - The Olympics -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Karaoke Night -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Sharky’s Bar & Grill, 2902 E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night w/ Stevie J. (6:30pm) -Davenport Eagles Lodge, 4401 W. Locust St. Davenport, IA Mandolin Junction: Bluegrass & Old Time Music Jam -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA Open Mic Night w/ Alan Sweet -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Open Mic w/ Jordan Danielsen -Bier Stube Davenport, 2228 E 11th St Davenport, IA Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL

An Evening with Savoy Brown -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Buddy Olson (6pm) -Ducky’s Lagoon, 13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL Burlington Street Bluegrass Band -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA DJ Jeff & Karaoke -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Jeff Miller (6pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL Karaoke Night -Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill - Davenport, 3005 W. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA

Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -Sharky’s Bar & Grill, 2902 E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA Live Lunch w/ Jessica Smucker (noon) -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Metales M5 -Cedar Rapids Prairie High School, 401 76th Ave. Cedar Rapids, IA

O’Meara Quartet (5:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

Open Mic Night w/ Alan Sweet and Siri Mason -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Open Mic Night w/ Karl, Mike, & Doug -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night w/ Luis Ochoa -Uptown Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 787 • September 15 - 28, 2011

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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