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PublicRelations(PR)MakesThingsHappenManual

PublicRelations(PR)MakesThingsHappenManual

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/W' •••••••

aBLA.TIO MAKES THINGS HAPPEN

IC

IN THIS ISSUE, HOW TO:

Write a news release Deal with editors Write radio &. TV copy Use events effectively

Public Relations
Many Jaycee chapters are so busy conducting numerous community projects that they forget something very important: PUBLICITY! Only through a concerted effort of contacting the media can you inform the entire community of your chapter's activities. Here are a few guidelines for your contacts with the media: • Appoint a public relations chairman to be your chapter's sole contact with the media. This prevents the crossed signals that occur when several chapter members are calling to plug an upcoming event. • Put together an area media list, including (if applicable): TV stations, radio stations, newspapers, periodicals and wire services. You should list addresses, phone numbers and key personnel. The PR chairman should update this list regularly (at least every three months) and try to meet as many media people as possible to talk to them in person. A reporter, editor or news director is usually more likely to be of help if he or she has met someone from the chapter. • Find out, through conversations with reporters, what their copy deadlines and hours of newsroom operation are. This will be a helpful addition to your media list. • With scheduled events, let the media know in advance what's going to happen. If you issue a news release on something that's already happened, be sure to get the information to the media as quickly as possible because old news isn't news at all. • Type all news releases, using double spacing. Be sure to include all important facts, especially WHO, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE AND WHY. Most news releases are submitted in narrative form, and read like a news story (See Example A), with the most pertinent facts in the first paragraph. If you're inexperienced in such writing, a simple fact sheet (Example B) is acceptable. Whichever format you use, the sheet should have the name and phone number(s) of the chapter PR contact at the top. • You can also get some valuable free publicity through radio and TV public service announcements (Example C). Check with public service directors in your area as to what length public service announcements (PSAs) they prefer. They may wish to write them themselves, based upon information you provide them . • Check with area newspapers about ~community calendar" mentions of your activities . • Should you provide photos to newspapers, be sure they are clearly-focused, black-and-white gJossies with good contrast. Any caption information should be taped to the back of the prints (never write on the back of a photo).

Public Relations
an effective PR plan builds credibility
As a new Jaycee president, you have an oppommity to build the credibility of Jaycees in your community. You'll need an effective public relations plan to produce positive results. Use this checklist to develop your public relations plan: Appoint a chapter public relations director to c0ordinate all PR activities. Pass along a copy of this page of LINK to that c0ordinator and work with hirn/her when developing your PR plan. Promote chapter activities, such as local recognition programs, individual development programs and community development projects. Prepare media kits including chapter fact sheet, biography of chapter president and calendar of events. Contact area newspapers, magazines and radio and television stations for the names of editors or news directors. Other information to be obtained includes deadlines, style, fonnat and use of photographs. Hold a reception for the media. The PR director and other chapter officers should be present. Media kits can be distributed at this time. Prepare and distribute public service announcements four weeks prior to all events. Prepare and distribute news releases two weeks prior to all events. Arrange media interviews one week prior to all events. Following the publication or broadcast of stories, send the media a thank you note. Incorporate public relations in the chapter growth plan. Set up a speaker's bureau to visit groups of potential Jaycees (nursing associations, local PT A, etc.). Involve members of the media in chapter programs and projects. They can serve as judges or provide non-Jaycee • support. Don't forget to ask all media personnel between 18 and 36 years of age to become Jaycees. Public relations is the part of a total chapter plan most often overlooked. An effective PR plan builds a strong chapter image and provides the framework for a bener chapter.

.~~,

9

HOW PUBLIC RELATIONS MAKES THINGS HAPPEN

Research

Planning

Communicating

Evaluating

Goals ganization oject

Press Conferences Displays Action Plan Brochures Effects Goals on News Releases of News Research Clippings Community ~\ \\ I Opinion Short-range Reaching Publics Long-range

Evaluating Analyze P. R. Continuing

Speeches

Personal Appearances

Special Events and Projects

Newsletters or House Organs

Annual Reports

9

WHAT

ARE THE JAYCEES?
By J. Terryl Bechtol National Vice President United States Jaycees 1978-1979

I AM THE UNITED STATES JAYCEES. My birth certificate is dated May 1915,51. Louis, Missouri. 1was conceived to provide leadership and I am dedicated to the goal of communities of America joining together to ensure the advancement of freedom throughout the world. 'am Henry Geissenbier with an idea,an idea of people helping people. I am opportunity for all men. The blood of the world runs in my veins. I am hundreds of thousands of active young men striving to become more than they think they can, and the voice of millions of men who have gone on before me to provide the ideals by which 'live today, and which I still make possible for those who follow me. I am a fabulous organization of many things and many people. I am the Indians of Oklahoma, the bright orange coats of Florida, the volunteers of Tennessee, a cowboy from Texas. the sunflowers of Kansas, and the Eskimos of Alaska. I am the 49'ers of California, a Viking from Minnesota, the liberty bells of Pennsylvania, a light house from New Jersey, and a Georgia peach. I am Jaycettes, Special Olympics, Shooters Safety, Haunted Houses, Big Brothers, Boy Scouts, Telethons, and Santa Claus to thousands of needy children at Christmastime. I am Speak-Up, Spoke, Springboard, and Spark-Plug. I am truly Leadership in Action in 10,000 communities in America and in 86 countries throughout the free world. I am men joining together to help those who cannot help themselves, by first building a better me! I can be found in sleepy, rustic villages and large, roaring cities, from the swamplands of Louisiana to the mountaintops of Colorado. I am a strong group of men wherever I am! I search for America in every project I undertake and' am busy at this very moment building a better tomorrow, today!! I am meeting tonight in a small country church, in a skyscraper In new York, in a tavern in North Carolina, and in my own building, built with love and sweat. I am a farmer, a preacher, a salesman, a mechanic, a Christian, a Jew, a Hindu, a Buddist, and, yes, even a convict. I can be found everywhere you look: a college campus, a ghetto, a nature trail, hospitals, orphanages, and a prison cell; I am there. I am a letter to a Senator, a ballot in an election, the excitement of a National Convention, the tears of joy when I win, the silence of defeat when I don't. I am growing through all that I undertake. I
am never a loser! !

I have always been with the Spirit of America. 'was the spirit that would not let Columbus turn back, I was there when George Washington knelt in frozen prayer at Valley Forge, when Paul Revere raised his hand at a committee meeting and said, "I'LL RIDE AND TELL THEM." It was the Jaycee spirit that gave young Nate Hale the guts to look'um in the eye and say, "I regret that I have but one life to lose for my country." I was the group that collected scrap metal and helped FOR spread his message that "THE ONLY ,THING WE HAVE TO FEAR IS FEAR ITSELF," and I was already doing what John Kennedy asked when he said, "Ask not what your country can do for you, but rather what you can do for your country!" I was on the boat when Admiral Farragut said "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!" I built this country with faith, courage, and a spirit that can only be called Jaycees!! ! I led the fight for the draft when wartime America needed it and also led the cause for its abolishment when it didn't. I am Change! I am for what is right and against wrong and injustice. I am white, black, yellow, red ... and I never judge man by the color of his skin, but rather by the content of his character!! I have established and introduced many young men to the Red Cross, M.D.A., the USO, volunteer fire departments, Boy's Clubs, City Hall, state governments, and even the Congress of the United States. I move, , travel to spread Jayceeism. I have presented Billy Graham in Madison Square Gardens, the great Phoenix Rodeo, Niagara Falls, the Grand Canyon, Independence Hall, the Statue of Liberty, Disney World, the Alamo, and the Golden Gate Bridge. I marched with Martin Luther King to Washington, have walked for Mankind, traveled the badlands of the Dakotas, the bluegrass of Kentucky, and the snow-filled valleys of Ohio to pass on this feeling of brotherhood and love. I have made my mark on time with men like Seldon Waldo, Clayton Frost, Keith Upson, Dennis Hamilton, Clint Dunnagon, and Don Cavalli, men who made a difference by giving all that they had. I am Bill Brownfield writing the Creed, Durwood Howe designing the SHIELD, and John Armbuster editing the "Log"; I am millions of young men who have graduated from my ranks, who are the leaders of this very world today! ! I am the JAYCEE CREED. I believe in God, brotherhood, free enterprise, law and order, human personality, and service to humanity. I am what is good about America. Within my spirit lies the very basis of the future of my country. I am freedom and will fight to my last breath if necessary to see that it is preserved. May I always possess the integrity, courage, and strength to keep myself unshackled and to remain a beacon of hope to all men everywhere.

~m pins, patches, vests, coats, bumper stickers, newsletters, a gavel at a podium, backrooms, long drives home, late hours, yearend books, awards, certificates, trophies, plaques, TOYM,
and winners teaching winners to be winners!!

I

I am an American, building my country in the UNITED ST ATES JAYCEES. Be proud, be great, be still, and know that I AM YOU, a JAYCEE.

NEWS t>1EDIAmNTACT

LIST

A.

--------------------Name of editor: -------------------------Address: ----------------------------Daily lOOming newspaJ>er: Telephone : If paper is not published bureau _ in same city as chapter: _

Name of nearby Address:

chief:

-------------------------------

Telephone: B.

-----------newspaper:

Da ilY evening

---------------------------Address: ------------------------------Name of editor: Telephone : If paper is not published bureau _ in same city as chapter: _

Name of nearby Address:

chief:

------------------------------------------_

Tel epnone :

c.

Weekly newspaper: Nail1e of editor: Address:

-----------------------------Telephone: ----------Television: ~ews Director:

D.

• Sta:ion: Address:

-----------------------------_

Telephone :

Television: • Station: Address:

(Continued) News Director:

-----------

-------------------------------

Telephone: • Station: Address:

----------_

News Director:

------------

-------------------------------

Telephone : E. Radio:

• Station: Address:

------------_

News Director:

------------

--------------------------------

Telephone : • Station:

------------- News Director:-----------Address:------------------------------Telephone : _ News Director: -

• Station:

-----------Address:------------------------------Telephone : _ ~ews Director:

• Station:

..ddress : \
Telephone : _

_

MEDIA LIST WORKSHEET RADIO

Call letters: __ Address: Frequency: Phone: Personnel: General Manager: Program _ Director:

Format: __

Frequency:

Call letters: __ Address: Phone: Personnel: General Manager: Program Director: News Director:

Fonnat: __

_

News Director:

Call letters: __ Call letters: __ Address: phone: Personnel: General Manager: Program Director: News Director: Call letters: __ Address: Call letters: __ Address: Phone: Personnel: General Manager: Program Director: News Director:
TELEVISION

Format: __

Frequency:

Format: __

Frequency:

Address: Phone: Personnel: General Manager: _ Program Director: _

News Director:

Format: __

Frequency:

Format: __

Frequency: Phone: Personnel: General Manager: _ Program Director: _

News Director:

Call letters: Call letters: __ Address: Phone: Phone: Personnel: General Manager: General Manager: Program Director: News Director: Call letters: Address: Phone: Personnel: _ News: PSAs: Personnel: Format: __ Frequency: Address:

Channel:

_

Channel:

General Manager:
29

_

News: PSAs:

Name: Address: Phone:

Call letters: Address: Phone: Personnel: General Manager: News: PSAs:

Channel:

Personnel: Edi tor: Publisher: Local Contact: _ Additional:

Name: Call letters: Address: Phone: Personnel: General Manager: News: PSAs: NEWSPAPERS Name: Address: Phone: Personnel: Editor: Publisher: Local Contact: Additional: AND MAGAZINES Name: Address: Phone: Personnel: Edi tor: Publisher: Local Contact: Additional: _ Channel: Address: Phone: Personnel: Editor: Publisher: Local Contact: Additional:

Name: Address: Phone: Personnel: Editor: Publisher: Local Contact: Additional: 30

'I,
j, ._--------_ ..~---_._--.-. --

, Ii •'I,
I , I I i

PREPARING

YOUR STORY

WHO WHAT WHEN WHERE WHY

"

Writing a News Release
'I' !
I '
J

Five points are important to a good news release: WHO, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE and WHY. If possible a sixth, HOW, should be included. Jt is important to get all these points in the first sentence or two, whether you're writing for newspapers or broadcasting. These first sentences are called the "lead." A good lead captures the attention of a reader or listener and makes him want to know more about your chIt-'s activi~y or project. No',v go into the citiai1:, or YUUl ~iury, Ea<.:h succeeding paragraph should be of declining importance. Professionals call this writing technique the "inverted pyramid." It permits an editor to pick up the important facts of your story in the first few lines, Then, if he docs not have space or time to use the whole release he can cut it from the bottom, where least important details are given. This is true of both print and broadcast media. Use short words. Write short sentences, short para8raphs. Two sentences make a good paragraph in a news release. Be brief. Alrnost evcry news release can be written on one or two double-spaced typewritten pages. Two pages double-spaced will fill about 12 inches one newspaper column wide. Thi:> is a lot more space than most editors can give one item. Always give exact date in a news release: "June JO" rather thail "next Thursday" or "tomorrow." Specify "October," not "next month." Double check date and day of week on a ca]endar. List the address as well as the name of a meeting place. Remember, you are writing for peopJe who do not know. Never use a word in a news release that you would not use in everyday conversation. Never use a ten cent WOld if you can think of a good five cent one. Forget aJl about adjectives when you write a news release. Remember, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Don't say a tea table was lovely, or a speaker dynamic. If either is worthy of special mention, describe the table setting, or

"1

i

I

8
!'i

I

relate the gist of what the speaker had to say that was memorable. Figures in your story? Always spell out numbers from one to ten, then use numerals from lion up. Never begin a sentence with numerals.

NEVER, NEVER LAND
When you have finished the draft of your story, go over it and cross out all the adjectives and the unnecessary words like "the," "a," and uan." Check every point of your story for accuracy. Never guess on dates, time, places or names. Never include a telephone number. News copy goes through many hands and the chance of error is great. Also, when you list a phone number for ticket sales and the like, editors realize you are using their columns for free advertising. They sell space and time for such a purpose! Never mention door prizes, raffies or lotteries in a news release. Newspapers are sent through the U. S. mails, and the law forbids their use of such news. Never print the name of a play an ('[tist may be reading, unless you have his word that a release has been granted by the publisher.

I
!
"

I
I
J

NAMES IN YOUR NEWS
Proper presentation of names and accuracy of spelling are important. Always say "Mrs. Timothy M. Jones." rather than "Mrs. Mary Jones" or "Mrs. Midge Jones'" A widow remains "Mrs. Timothy M. Jones" until she remarries. Divorcees drop their ex-husband's Christian name, replace it with the maiden family name: "Mrs. Butterfield Jones." Womcn in public life may use their professional or maidcn name. Then it is proper to say "Dinah Shore" for example. Use neithcr "Miss" nor "Mrs." in such instances in first mention. These are hard and fast rules. Anything else is incorrcct. Where "Jones," Smith" or any other last name is common in your community, bc sure to give the husband's first name and middlc initial to avoid mix-ups. Second mention of a woman's name in a news story is simply "Mrs. Jones" or "Miss Shore." First mention of a man's name is "Gordon C. Best." Second mention, "Mr. Bcst."

THE FINAL QUESTION
Ask yourself: If I wcre not a member of my club would this news interest me? If thc answer is No, tear it up. If the answer is Yes, you are rcady to type your news release.

9

PREPARING

YOUR STORY

TYPtJlg

a News Release

News releases should always be typewritten. Use 81/2 x 11" plain white paper. This is standard business size. Odd sizes make an editor's job difficult. Use a good quality paper that can be handled without tearing. Never use onion skin or tissue weight. Never send carbon copies. Carbons smear easily, causing possible errors in spelling of names or in dates and hours. They also make an editor's hands dirty! If you need numerous copies, mimeograph them. That lets the editor know others are getting the same release. and he'll rewrite it a little for individuality. When identical individually typed releases are sent out. be sure to list at the top of the release just which newspapers and broadcast outlets are getting identical stories. This is a must. Be sure to keep a copy of every release you send out. Leave ample margins (I V2 inches) on each side of the paper. Give full reference data in the upper left hand corner of the first page. This can be single spaced. List the name of your club, your name, street and city address. Be sure to list your phone number. Next, type the release date in the upper right hand corner. Stipulate "FOR IMMEDIA TE RELEASE" if at all possible. This means the editor or broadcaster can use it at once. If you must ask for a specific publication date it should read "RELEASE AFTER 4:00 P.;\1 .. Thursday, June 10, 19 .... " "Hold" releases complicate an editor's task. so avoid whenever possible. Always start typing your copy one-third of the way down the first page. The editor needs this space left open so he can write a head for your story and give other instructions.

'1

THE BODY OF THE RELEASE
Type double-space or triple-space on one side of the paper only. Indent each paragraph at least five typewriter spaces. If your story must run more than one page, write "More" at the bottom of each page except the last. Always end each page with a complete sentence and paragraph. When your release runs more than one page, type your club name at the top of each succeeding page. Drop down one inch below this and continue your story. Type a few # # # under the final paragraph of the news release. Many newspapers supply a style sheet on request, telling how they capitalize, abbreviate, spell and punctuate their copy. Follow the editorial style of edch paper carefully, Check your news release for absolute accuracy in typing. Make sure all names, dates, hours and places are correct. {~', f there are unusual names, put a small check over each one to let I the editor know you have checked them for accuracy. Never staple the pages of a news release. They must be separated in the news room, and may be torn in the process.

~ i

j

'1

,

10

LOCAL CtlAPTER

.•
FOR MORE INFORMATION

&&••_&&~&A.&
CAll

I
I

Name: Address :

Phone: (Res.)

---------(Bus.) ---------I

Wit A
(Name Here) ( Name Of Event)

WBAt

I
I I

I

WBfaH
(Date/Dates Here)

I
I I I I
.1

W8&&&
(location Of Event)

I

I

WltY
( Reo!.on For Event)

SAW
( Give Details Here)

[ [ [ [ [ [ [ [ [ [ [ [ [ [ [

] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ]

PRESIDENTS REPORT STATE DIRECTOR INDIVIDUAL REPORT COW>fUNln' REPORT WAYS-~~~~S REPORT MEMBERSHIP REPORT SECRETARY REPORT TREASURERS REPORT COW>1ITTEE REPORT PROJECT REPORT AUXILIARY REPORT TO THE EDITOR DISTRICT NEWS REGIONAL NEWS STATE NEWS

Make copies of this page. Use it as the official form used to submit articles to your newsletter. This Porm Will Save Time and Work.

,

RELEASE Public R~18tions Chairman

COCONUT GROVE JAYCEES. P. O. BOX 518 COCO~UT GROVE, FLORIDA

INC. 33133

FOR IMMEDIATE Coconut Grove,

RELEASE Florida

ADVERTISING/PROMOTION/PUBLICITY
\

RECORD

'-.J

:,
(attach Name(s): copy)

ADVERTISEMENT: Newspaper

--------------_

Date (s) :
Size: Section:

MEDIA

PROMOTION: Station: Aired: of Spots

(attach

on-air

copy)

Radio Dates Number PUBLJCITY:

per

day:

_

Newspapers Date

(attach Appeared

articles) : _

Story

TELEVISIOJ\' Date Date News Story: Short Interview: Who time description: time _ length

-----_

------

show

time

was

interviewed:

RA.DIO Date Date News of Story:

------Programs: Show Who time time: was interviewed:

Interview

-------------------------_ Affiliation:

_ length

_

AT-EVENT Name of

COVERAGE Press Attending:

(Please

use

additional

pages

to list

all

media

coverage.)

COMMUNITY MEDIA RESOURCES

AND VEHICLES

s. 5. d. 21. 37. 19.

Commercial Public Lobbies & CableandInserts ElderlyVFW,offices BulletinService Commentaries Talk CareCanteens Ad Fact Inserts Stores Food MEDIA PostersShowsDentist StationeryTheaters MilitaryCardsLegion,Drive-InSchools Restaurantsand&andSystem&Boards,Vehicles Kiwanis,C. 23. 36. AND OTHER Utility Clubs 31. 24. 13. 4. Bumper Department MontWyRadio, Bulletinand Service Union CommunityforT.V.Offices Vehicles PRINTProgramsand & Daily Shows Halls Independenand ClosedMessagesHighGovernment JuniorCartonsBulletinNewspaper SupermarketEducationLocal (education Bus andOfficesMEDIA ELECTRONIC Napkins County Vehicle tsRadio CivicCards&andRecreationDinning Bar T.V.) Paid StationsYWCAStationsCenters Lions, Milk Commercials Youth Fairs Print StoresShelters TO Other Town TerminalsBars Agencies HealthCenter Vehicles Boards Trade StopGroupT.V. Billboards(ABC)Centers Civic Capitol Cleaning Hotel BroadcastAND Gas Banks Signs Union Vehicle Welfare offices Post HardwareGovernment Churches Vocational Movie Chamber Youth YMCA Health Taverns Libraries Motor Board Food 49. 45. Offices 44. other club 43. 6. 40. 38. 52. 50. 48. 47. 42. 39. 34. 51. 46. 30. 29. 28. 26. 25. 35. 17. 18. 16. 15. 12. 11. 14. 9. 8. 7. 3. 1. Logo HallCountyStores WalletSchoolStoresOfficesBuilding and High Display Meetings, EditorialsTaxies,Universities EnvelopeofShows 10. FLYERS 41. 33. 32. Women'sInsertsRacksRadioPLACElobbies Conventions and 2. 22. 20. r. buildings MATERIALS Bus KEY A. T.V.PrinHighofShowsMedicalLobbiesPOSTERS, CollegeandT.V.UniversitiesVEHICLES Association PublicMediaJr.HealthCardsCourtRooms Underground tSpecialsor Administration Flyers Programs & EducationStickers TypesSheets Centers Waiting Day Jaycee State AFL-CIO, Buses, WeeklyTimeTopicsor Schools and Bargain Jaycee Technical NewspapersPartyWindowsBoards Buildings Halls CollegesorBoardsAnnouncements Rooms Offices MinorityCircuit Commerce Stores Bureaus PayrollOfficesTeamsters,MATERIALS PrimeShowsBusiness facilitiesDAR, News LOCATIONS Bags T.V.Messages Store ofHouses on Youth Advertising Airports and Drug High and Community Employment Laundry/Dry Political City/Town Colleges Company Factory T.V., Police Housing State, County American Bus Doctor Social Liquor a.

46

State Date

_

COMMUNICATIONS

CHECKLIST

-----------

The following is a group of questions that will, hopefully, get you thinking about communication principles that will be a necessity to your year as a State Program Manager. Several of the following questions should be plugged into your implementation checklist. A. Articles: Magazine/Newsletters 1. 2. Purposes for publishing articles: Procedures for getting articles published: Deadline dates: 3. 4. 5. Different uses of newsletter in my state: People and organizations to receive newsletter: Persons responsible for publication of newsletter: _ _ _ _ _ _

6.

Other mailings/printed

promotions:

_

B.

Seminars/Workshops/Presentations 1. 2. 3. 4. Location of Seminars/Workshops: Needs for special seminars: Persons to attend seminars: Speakers for seminars: _ _ _ _

5. 6. 7. 8.

Procedures for promoting seminars: Places and times for seminars: Financing for seminars:

_ _ _

Roster of special speakers for other meetings, regardless of whether meeting is Jaycee-related: Speaker Specialty

S3

~
~,tI

C.

Phone Calls/Correspondence 1. Regional Directors:

2.

State Officers:

3.

Other State Program Managers:

4.

State Editor:

5.

State President/State

Committee Member:

6.

Others:

D. Other Communications 1. Elected Officials:

2.

Agencies and Organizations:

3.

Other:

54

COMMUNICATIONS I. Meetings

2.

Newsletters

3.

Public Relations

WHICH ONE???

Sex
Stock Car Race Lecture By Paul Harvey

Family Picnic Your Chapter Movie (free) Bowling Poker Game Work Pool At Your Favorite
PIl~

Meeting

THE .'
UNITED
STATffS JAYCE~S
BOX 7 TULSA, OKLAHOMA 74102

U.S. JAYCEES
-J « z o i= « z a::

FACTS

Name:

~
Z
w w
(I)

w

u > « ..,
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J:

The United States Jaycees, formerly The United States Junior Chamber of Commerce. The name was changed in 1965 because of the misconception that the Jaycee organization was affiliated with the national Chamber of Commerce. Leadership young men, Training and personal development aged 18 through 35, inclusive. for

Scope:

a w
t..J LL LL

« «

Membership:

More than 9,100 local chapters with more than 380,000 members in 50 states and the District of Columbia . To offer young men the opportunity for further personal development and leadership training. Major efforts are directed at finding solutions to environmental and economic problems within their communities. The Jaycee movement was begun in St. Louis, Missouri, by Henry Giessenbier on October 13, 1915. His idea quickly spread and the national organization was formally created by 29 chapters at the first convention in St. Louis on January 21, 1920. The War Memorial Headquarters is located in Tulsa. A network of seven regional offices in Alabama, Arizona, Idaho, Indiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota and Pennsylvania serves the state organizations also. The ,U.S. Jaycees has a total staff of 80. The U.S. Jaycees offer: Individual, Family and Spiritual Development; Governmental Affairs; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation; Assistance to the Disadvantaged; Youth Programs; International Relations; Energy Conservation.

Purpose:

History:

Headquarters:

Programs:

National

Events:

Annual Meeting (June), Congress of America's Ten Outstanding Young Men (January), America's Four Outstanding Young Farmers (February), International B.B. Gun Championship Matches (July) and Junior Athletic Championships (July). Home of the U.S. Jaycees President during his term of office, which begins July 1. The fully-furnished home is situated in suburban Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Jaycee

White

House:

THE
UNITED
_

=

STATES JAYCEES

A LEADERSHIP TRAINING ORGANIZATION

UNITED STATES JAYCEES FACTS
Name: Scope: Membership:
The United States Jaycees, formerly The United States Junior Chamber of Commerce. The name was changed in 1965. Leadership training and personal development for men and women ages 21 through 39. Approximately 5,500 chapters with some 250,000 members nationwide. ment and leadership training. Major efforts are directed toward finding solutions to problems specific to their communities.

Purpose: To offer young people the opportunity for personal develop-

History:

The Jaycee movement was begun in St. Louis, Missouri, by Henry Giessenbier on October 13, 1915. His ideas quickly spread, and the national organization was formally created by 29 chapters at the first convention in St. Louis on January 21, 1920. The U.S.Jaycees War Memorial Headquarters is located in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and provides services to chapters and state organizations through some 80 employees. The U.S.Jaycees offers: Individual Development, Management Development and Community Development; Governmental Affairs; fundraising for Muscular Dystrophy Association and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital; youth programs and family life programs. Annual Meeting (June), International BB Gun Championships (July), Governmental Affairs Leadership Seminar (Sept.); Healthy American Fitness Leaders Awards (Sept.), the Ten Outstanding Young Americans Awards Congress (Jan.) and the National Outstanding Young Farmer Awards Congress (Feb.). Gary Wilkinson, Meridian, Mississippi one-year term of office, which began July 1.

Headquarters: Programs:

National Events:

President:

Jaycee Founders' Home: The Tulsa home of The U.S. Jaycees president during his

P.O. BOX 7.

TULSA. OKLAHOMA

74121-0007

THE
_STATES = JAYCEES
UNITED
A LEADERSHIP TRAINING ORGANIZATION

u.s.

JAYCEESANNUAL EETING M FACTS

PURPOSE:

The PI: imary purpo se of the Annual Meeting is to conduct the yearly United States business meeting and to elect a na tional president and 11 vice presidents for the coming year. The Jaycee convention has been held annually since the first one in June, 1920 when founder Henry Geissenbeir coordina ted a na tional meeting in St. Louis with delegates from 29 cities across the nation. Of those present, 12 became charter members of the new national organization, which elected Giessenbier its first national president. The June, 1943 Annual Meeting scheaul ed for Milwaukee was cancelled due to severe travel restr ictions imposed dur ing Worl d War II. Instead, a "War Conference", attended by some 400 Jaycees, was held the following year in Omaha, Nebraska. After the war, the Jaycees made good on their Milwaukee plans--holding the 1946 Annual Meeting there. This year's convention in Indianapolis, Indiana, is the 65th Annual Meeting. Other convention si tes over the years have incl uded Dallas, Kansas City, Denver, Los Angeles, Atlantic City, .Buffalo and Nashv ille.

HISTORY:

ACTIVITIES:

BUSINESSMEETINGS Major speakers keynote the bus1ness sessions which convene to consider constitutional and business matters. ELECTIONS Campaigning for national president and vice president is often dramatic and always col orf ul. Ther e is a great simil ari ty to na tional political party nominating conventions, with a fl ur ry of demonstra tions 1eading up to a state-by-state roll call vote. The election of national vice presidents is scheduled for Wednesday morning, June 19, and the election of the national president will begin at 3:45 that af ternoon.
TULSA, OKLAHOMA
74121-0007

P.O. BOX 7,

Annual Meeting Fact Sheet page -2-

AcrIVITIES, (cont'd.):

PARADE STATES Visually exciting and always OF colorful, the p;lrade features delegates fran all the state Jaycee delegations, marching in the costtnne of the state. States march in the order in which they finished in a year-long evaluation of membership, training and programming. PIN TRADIN:; Perhaps the most novel of the activities is the trading of sp:!cially-made pins by delegates fran all states. Each state brings a state outline pin and at least one sp:!cial pin. The pins are indicative of a state motto, product, event or geographic area. SameJaycees attempt to obtain an outline of each state and piece them all together in map fashion. STATE PARTIES A culinary tour of America, with food and beverages native to various states, is another longstanding feature of Jaycee conventions. Such items as Wisconsin cheese, Nebraska beef, California wine and Texas rattlesnake are likely to grace the unusual menu. EXHIBITS Various commercial booths and exhibits will be set up at the convention center.

THEJAYCEE CREED: ehind every Jaycee project or goal, and behind B every member, is the Jaycee Creed:
WE BELIE.VE:

That faith in God gives meaning and purpose to human life; That the brotherhood of man transcends the sovereignty of nations; That econanic justice can best be won by free men through free enterprise; That government should be of laws rather than of men; That earth's great treasure lies in human personality; And that service to humanity is the best work of life. (Written by C. William Brownfield in 1946.)

---------------------------------------------------'----.-----,----For ~;. ':.her information, cont ... t: c Bob Shelton Public Relations Department The u.S. Jaycees P.O. Box 7
Tulsa, OK 74121-0007

(918) 584-2481

THE
UNITED
_ STATES ~ JAYCEES
A LEADERSHIP TRAINING ORGANIZATION

JAYCEES TIONAL m LEADERSHIP H\CTS POLICY QJAN;&S: '!he United States Jaycees Executive Board of Directors is the b:>dy resI:X>nsible for making all major {:Olicy decisions for the organization. Bylaws can re changed l:¥ a two-thirds majority vote of the delegates in attendance at a U.S. Jaycees Annual Meeting, provided written mtice of the intended changes has reen sent to all local chapters at least 3" days pr ior to the vote. PRESIDENI' : Elected annually to serve as the leader of the organization from July 1 through June 3" of the following year, this person is a ke.y IOOtivator in stimulating Irembership involvement in the national '!be programs oonducted by '!be United States Jaycees. president usually travels retween 1"" ,""" and 3"" ,""" miles during the term of office. The executive vice president is responsible for managing the national heaa;ruarters in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The EVPdirects the activities of some 8" employees who administer the organization's programs.

E.VP :

EXECUTIVE CDMMITI'EE: The Executive Corranittee is made up of the president, the executive vice president, 11 national vice presidents, the chairman of the l:oard, the past chairman of the l:oard, the legal oounsel, the treasurer and the chaplain. '!be Executive Corranittee selects the sites for U.S. Jaycees events and meetings, and provides leadership for the Executive Board of Directors. EXECUTIVE BOARD OFDIRECroRS: The Executive Bqard of Directors oonsists of the members of the Executive Corrmittee and the presidents of all the state Jaycee organizations. It is the res{:Onsibility of this group to provide leadership to the entire organization through their activities on corrmittees - which do the long-range planning - and through setting the {:Olicies of the organization, based on '!be U.S. Jaycees Bylaws.

P.o. BOX 7,

TULSA, OKLAHOMA

74121-0007

~~

u.s. JUNIOR CHAMBER PRESIDENCY FACTS
OVERVIEW To qualify for the presidency, a candidate must have served as an elected state officer for at least one year, and must have served a full term as a member of the Executive Board of Directors of The U.S. Junior Chamber of Commerce. The president is elected for one year and must not have reached the age of 40 on or before the commencement of the term of office. During the term of office, the Jaycee president travels extensively. As chief spokesman for the organization, it is not uncommon for the president to travel 100,000 to 300,000 miles. The president serves on a number of honorary boards and commissions on national and international levels, and is the U.S. Junior Chamber's most visible link to the public. The year following the term of office, the president serves as chairman of the board providing valuable service on the Executive Board of Directors. ELECTION The Junior Chamber president is elected in a manner similar to the nomination process used by major U.S. political parties. Candidates campaign for several weeks prior to the Annual Meeting, and begin the process in earnest when delegates meet at the convention site. Receptions, caucuses, buttons, placards, the balloting approaches. Votes are cast and lasting into the early-morning hours. winner is declared and the oath of office OATH OF OFFICE The Junior Chamber president-elect oath: officially accepts the office upon reciting the following slogans and songs engulf the convention hall as state by state, frequently requiring multiple ballots When one person receives a majority of votes, a is administered.

"I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of president of The United States Junior Chamber of Commerce and will, to the best of my ability, serve as a living example of this organization's philosophy and beliefs, and I will uphold the Bylaws and Policies of this organization, so help me God."

P.O. Box

i, Tulsa,

OK 74121-0007- 4 West 21st St., Tulsa, OK 74114-1116 (918) 584-2481 FAX: (918) 584-4422

THE
UNITED

STATES
JAYCEES
BOX 7 TULSA. OKLAHOMA 74102

U.S.
..J -<

JAYCEES

PRESIDENCY

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Overview:

To qualify for the Presidency, a candidate must have served as an elected State Officer in a State Jaycee organization for at least one year, and must have served a full term as a member of the Executive Board of Directors of The U.S. Jaycees. He is elected for one year and must not have reached the age of 36 on or before the commencement of his term. During his year in office, the Jaycee President travels extensively. As chief spokesman for the organization, it is not uncommon for him to travel 100,000 miles in a year. He serves on a number of honorary boards and commissions on national and international levels and is the Jaycees' most visible link to the public.

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The year following his term of office, the President serves as Chairman of the Board, and a year later serves as Past Chairman of the Board. In both capacities, the former input to the Executive Election: President provides valuable Board of Directors.

The Jaycee President is elected in a manner similar to the nomination process used by major political parties. Candidates campaign for several weeks prior to the Annual Meeting but begin the process in earnest when delegates meet at the convention site. Receptions, caucuses, buttons, placards, slogans and songs engulf the convention hall as the balloting approaches. Votes are cast state by state, frequently requiring multiple ballots and lasting into the morning hours. When one man receives a majority of votes, a winner is declared and the oath of office administered.

Oath of Office:

The Jaycees President-elect officially assumes office upon reciting the following oath: "I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of President of The United States Jaycees and will, to the best of my ability, serve as a living example of this organization's philosophy and beliefs, and I will uphold the By-Laws and Policies of this organization. (At this point the Jaycee Creed is recited) So help me God."

THE
UNITED
STATES JAYCEES
BOX 7 TULSA, OKLAHOMA 74102

u.s. JAYCEES

PRESIDENCY

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Overview:

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To qualify for the Presidency, a candidate must have served as an elected State Officer in a State Jaycee organization for at least one year, and must have served a full term as a member of the Executive Board of Directors of The U.S. Jaycees. He is elected for one year and must not have reached the age of 36 on or before the commencement of his term. During his year in office, the Jaycee President travels extensively. As chief spokesman for the organization, it is not uncommon for him to travel 100,000 miles in a year. He serves on a number of honorary boards and commissions on national and international levels and is the Jaycees' most visible link to the public.

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The year following his term of office, the President serves as Chairman of the Board, and a year later serves as Past Chairman of the Board. In both capacities, the former input to the Executive Election: President provides valuable Board of Directors.

The Jaycee President is elected in a manner similar to the nomination process used by major political parties. Candidates campaign for several weeks prior to the Annual Meeting but begin the process in earnest when delegates meet at the convention site. Receptions, caucuses, buttons, placards, slogans and songs engulf the convention hall as the balloting approaches. Votes are cast state by state, frequently requiring multiple ballots and lasting into the morning hours. When one man receives a majority of votes, a winner is declared and the oath of office administered.

Oath of Office:

The Jaycees President-elect officially assumes office upon reciting the following oath: "I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of President of The United States Jaycees and will, to the best of my ability, serve as a living example of this organization's philosophy and beliefs, and I will uphold the By-Laws and Policies of this organization. (At this point the Jaycee Creed is recited)

So help me God."

FACT SHEET

1991-92 NATIONAL EVENT FACT SHEET July 1, 1991 - June 30, 1992

International BB Gun Match -July5-7, 1991, Bowling Green, KY. The match is the grand finale of Shooting Education programs that begin with chapters around the country. After an educational program that teaches proper gun handling to young people 8 to 15, teams compete on the state level for the honor of competing in the international championship. This is one of the world's largest organized shooting competitions. Sponsored by Daisy Manufacturing Company, Inc.

Jaycees Officer Training School-July

18-21, 1991, Tulsa, OK. Each year about 1,000 Junior Chamber leaders on the chapter, state and national levels travel to national headquarters for intensive training.

Governmental Affairs Leadership Seminar - September 14-17,
1991, Washington, D.C. State Junior Chamber presidents and national officers gather for seminars about the current American governmental system. The time is spent meeting with congressional leaders, and usually includes a meeting with the president or vice president of the United States.

Healthy American Fitness Leaders Awards Congress - September
13-15, 1991, Washington, D.C. For 10 years The U.S. Junior Chamber of Commerce has recognized 10 individuals who demonstrate outstanding leadership in physical fitness or health. The award is not restricted to athletes. Past honorees include Ronald Reagan, former Apollo astronaut James Lovell Jr., four-time Iditarod dogsled race winner Susan Butcher, Sen. Richard Lugar and TV celebrity Denise Austin. HAFL is sponsored by Allstate Life Insurance Co. in cooperation with the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.

P.O. Box

7,

Tulsa, OK 74121-0007-

4

West 21st St., Tulsa, OK 74114-1116

(918) 584-2481 FAX: (918) 584-4422

Congress of Ten Outstanding Young Americans - January 16-19,
1992, Tulsa, OK. For the 54th year, 10 influential Americans will be honored in a program whose tenet is "the hope of Mankind lies in the hands of youth and action." More than 500 young people, ages 21-39, have been honored since 1938, many in their early years before going on to public greatness. Past honorees include Gerald Ford (1949), Henry Ford II (1945), Howard Hughes (1938), Jesse Jackson (1969), Henry Kissinger (1958), John F. Kennedy (1946), and Dan Quayle (1982). Honorees can be chosen from several categories including education, literature, business, science, sports, community services and journalism. The awards ceremony is conducted annually in Tulsa, OK.

National Jaycee Week - January 19-25, 1992. A celebration of the
organization's anniversary. Chapters sponsor numerous community events during the week-long retrospective spanning the Jaycees' 72 years.

National Outstanding Young Farmer Awards Congress - February 20-23, 1992, Moline, IL. The U.S. Junior Chamber will honor outstanding young farmers fortheir accomplishments. State winners receive an expensepaid trip to the national congress, sponsored by Deer & Company The four National Outstanding Young Farmers are selected from the field of state winners.

72nd Annual Meeting of The United States Junior Chamber of Commerce - June 22-25, 1992, Portland, OR. Thousands of Jaycee
delegates will gather to conduct the yearly business of the organization and elect national officers. Major events include elections, the Parade of Flags, speeches by nationally known individuals, awards to top Jaycees, States Party, a parade and forums.

A LEADERSHIP TRAINING ORGANIZATION

THE UNITED STATES JAYCEES'"'
POST OFFICE BOX 7 TULSA, OKLAHOMA 74121-0007 PHONE: 918-584-2481 FAX: 918-584-4422 TELEX: 293292 USJC UR

Purpose Jaycee and Junior Chamber of Commerce chapters around the country offer leadership training and personal development for men and women aged 21 through 39 inclusive. Even though the organization's programs have changed through the decades to meet the needs of America and local communities, the basic philosophy from which the organization evolved remains. Major efforts are directed toward finding solutions to problems specific to local communities. In addition to raising millions of dollars for charity each year on the local, state and national levels, members donate countless thousands of volunteer hours to important projects that may not be done in communities without Jaycees. One major drawing card for members is the diversity of programs and services offered by local Jaycee organizations. The organization can be many things to many people. In 1947, shortly after a national Jaycee convention, Jaycee Bill Brownfield wrote the basic phrases of The Jaycee Creed to tell who the Jaycees are and for what they stand. Brownfield, a minister, wanted to emphasize being a Jaycee is more than just taking part in "activities." It is a way of life. The basic phrases of the creed were adopted officially by the u.s. Junior Chamber of Commerce in 1947. In 1951, the line which affirms the Jaycees' belief in God was added.

THE JAYCEE WE BELIEVE:

CREED

That faith in God gives meaning and purpose to human life; That the brotherhood of man transcends the sovereignty of nations; That economic justice can best be won by free men through free enterprise; That government should be of laws rather than of men; That earth's great treasure lies in human personality; And that service to humanity is the best work of life.

u.s. JUNIOR CHAMBER HISTORY FACT SHEET
1910
Herculaneum Dance Club forms in St. Louis by Henry Giessenbier. The group seeks to be of service to its community and country. It refuses to sponsor events at which liquor would be served, tackling the first of what would be many social problems the Jaycees' would address through the years.

1914
Federation of Dancing Clubs forms with Giessenbier as president.

1915
At the prompting of St. Louis politician Col. H.P. Morgan, the Herculaneum joins with other young men's groups to form the Young Men's Progressive Civic Association (YMPCA). The historic meeting is October 12 at the Mission Inn. The group quickly becomes involved in St. Louis civic affairs. Thirty-two men attend the first meeting, with Giessenbier elected president. Within six months the membership grows to 750.

1916
The president of the St. Louis Chamber of Commerce, Clarence Howard, becomes a major backer of YMPCA, envisioning a group of action, building a better community. The YMPCA changes its name to Junior Citizens and for the first time uses the abbreviation J.C.

1918
Giessenbier and the Junior Citizens affiliate with the St. Louis chamber of Commerce. and assume the title Junior Chamber

1920
January 22. After contacting local organizations similar to the St. Louis Junior Chamber of Commerce, Giessenbier spearheads a caucus of 29 clubs from around the country. The United States Junior Chamber of Commerce (USJCC) forms with 3,000 members. at the first United States Junior Chamber of Commerce convention in St. Louis. Twelve chapters become paid charter members. Giessenbier is elected the first president and outlines a platform of community service and educational programs.

June 17-19. Forty cities are represented

1929-30
First National Junior Chamber Week celebrated. 1930-31 USJCC President Durward Howes designs the first nationally recognized Jaycee Seal.

1932-33
Jaycees push "50-Million Voters Campaign."

1934-35
"Americanism" becomes a major program in response to the threat of communism.

1935-36
The first "permanent" national headquarters is established in St. Louis. The USJCC Conservation influences the foundation of the National Wildlife Federation. program

P.O. Bo.

i, luisa,

(lK i4121-0007 _:1 Jhsc 2hr)
(918) 584-2481
FAX .• f91RI r;;R4-442J

v.lsa, VI\. /-.11 -

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1938-39

Ten Outstanding Young Men award is adopted by the USJCC as a national program.
1940

The USJCC becomes the first young men's organization to support the draft.
1944

Junior Chamber International is founded in Mexico City.
1946

First World Congress of Junior Chamber International in Panama City.
1947

U.S. Junior Chamber of Commerce officially adopts the Jaycee Creed written by Bill Brownfield after he attends the 1946 Milwaukee convention.
1947-48

National headquarters moves to permanent home in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Akdar Shrine Temple is used while the War Memorial Headquarters is built.
1951

War Memorial Headquarters is dedicated August 4, 1951.
1953

Dwight D. Eisenhower becomes the first of many U.S. presidents to deliver a speech at a USJCC convention.
1964-65

The USJCC officially changes name to The U.S. Jaycees.
1969

Jaycees International (JCI) World Headquarters moves to current location in Coral Gables, Florida.
1979-80

U.S. Jaycees Exhibition Hall opens in Tulsa.
1984

July 3. U.S. Supreme Court rules Jaycees a "place of public accommodation" in Minnesota, which prompts an August 16, 1984, Special Meeting in Tulsa. An overwhelming majority of delegates vote to allow women to join as regular members.
1985

Jaycee Women auxiliary group disbands.
1987

Jaycees vote to change age requirements from 18 through 36 to allow people 21 through 39 membership in the organization.
1989

The organization's leaders declare four major emphasis areas for the 1990s, the environment, drug and alcohol abuse prevention, governmental affairs and the homeless.
1990

During the 70th Annual Meeting, delegates vote to change the official name of the organization back to The United States Junior Chamber of Commerce.

THE
UNITED _.STATES ~~J AYCEES
_
A LEADERSlllP TRAINING ORGANIZATION
45TH CONGRESS OF AMERICA'S TEN OUTSTANDING YOUNG MEN ~
"FACT SHEET"

NAME: PURPOSE: mSTORY:

Commonly known as "The Ten Outstanding Young Men of America" or "TOYM", the official name is "Congress of America's Ten Outstanding Young Men". To honor ten Americans who exemplify the best attributes of the nation's young men between I8 and 36 years of age. The concept was developed by Durward Howes, 19~31 President of the national Jaycee organization. The program was officially adopted in 1938 and has been conducted annually since 1940. Each nominee must be a young man between the ages of 18 and 36, an American citizen, and agree to attend the TOYM Congress, unless extreme circumstances prohibit that appearance. Winners are selected on the basis of their achievement or contribution in any three of the following areas: I. Personal improvement 2. Financial success and economic innovation 3. Social improvement to major contemporary problems 4. Philanthropic contribution or voluntary service 5. Politics or government service 6. Scientific or technological contributions 7. Legal reform 8. Cultural achievement (to include literature, history, education or the arts) 9. Academic leadership 10. Moral and religious leadership I I. Athletic accomplishment 12. Success in the influence of public opinion (news media and other means) 13. Any other important contributions to community, state or nation Copies of all entries are sent to each of five screening judges, who independently select and rank the top 20. The 20 entries with the highest point totals (according to ranking) become finalists. Those entries are sent to finalist judges, who independently narrow the selection to ten. The ballots are reviewed by CP As to insure correct tabulation of results. Howard Hughes, William Saroyan, John F. Kennedy, Gerald R. Ford, Carl T. Rowan, Gale Sayers, Elvis Presley and Ralph Nader are just a few of the many notables recognized. The 1983 Congress will be held in Tulsa, OlcIahoma, January 1~15, 1983. The Williams Plaza will be the Headquarters hotel and the Awards Ceremony will be at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center on January 15. BY: The United States Jaycees (since 1938) and the Metropolitan Commerce. For ticket information, call The United States Jaycees Tulsa Chamber of

QUAUFICA nONS:

JUDGING

GUIDEUNES:

JUDGING

PROCESS:

PAST WINNERS:

1983 TOYM:

SPONSORED TICKETS:

(918) 5~248I.

P.O. BOX 7,

TULSA,

OKLAHOMA

74121

NATIONAL EVENTS ENHANCE JAYCEE MOVEMENT
National events, such as the Congress of America's Ten Outstanding Young Men (TOYM), the Governmental Affairs Leadership Seminar (GALS), the Annual Meeting and the Outstanding Young Farmer program (OYF), broaden the realm of Jaycee programming and visibility. The Congress of America's Ten Outstanding Young Men, probably the Jaycees most prestigious event, honors those of outstanding and exceptional ability at an early age in all fields of endeavor. Past honorees include President Gerald R. Ford, President John F. Kennedy, Joe Louis, Leonard Bernstein, Ralph Nader, Henry Kissinger, Dr. George Gallup and, in 1976, includes White House Chief of Staff Richard Cheney and basketball great Bill Bradley. One of the most well-attended events on the Jaycee calendar is the Annual Meeting which brings 12,000 members together to participate in such activities as the election of their new president in a fashion similar to a political party nominating convention with all the noise and trimmings.

THE

-J
__

UNITED
STATES .-----------------AYCEES
A LEADERSHIP TRAINING ORGANIZATION
JAYCEESNTERNATIONAL I FACI'S Jaycees International (JCI)

Name: Scope:

Leadership training and personal development for ymmg people between the ages of 18 and 40, inclusive. The organization welcomes all nationalities, races and religions. More than 500,000 young people in 12,500 communities througho'~t 81 membernations. The goals oi JCI are outlined in the JCI Constitution: "To develop the individual abilities and stirm.11ate the j oint efforts of your people for the purpose of improving economic, social and spiritual well-being of mankind by: 1. 2. Development of an awareness and acceptance of the responsibilities of citizenship; Individual participation in internal training programs to develop leadership potential;

Membership: Purpose:

3. Active participation in planning and executing programs for the development of the individual and the community; 4. History: Furtherance of understanding, goodwill and cooperation al1xmgall peoples."

The U.S. Jaycees organization was founded in St. Louis, Y.[ssouri by Henry Giessenbier on October 13, 1915. His idea spread to the extent that on December 11, 1944, representatives from eight nations met in Mexico City and founded the world organization, Jaycees International. Genichi (Gary) Nagao, Japan. The Jaycees International Secretariat is located in Coral Gables, Florida. A staff of 30 provides membership and development services in four languages to its local and national organization members. Its chief administrative officer is the Secretary General, Dan Rankow.

1980-81 President: Headquarters:

P.O. BOX 7,

TULSA, OKLAHOMA

74121

THE
UNITED
_ STATES == JAYCEES
A LEADERSIDP TRAINING ORGANIZATION

l\ATION.1\L VICE

ERESIDENT

FACl'S

WID:

u.s. Jaycees national vice presidents,
WPs.

ala> knownas

Eleven NVPsare elected each year at '!be u.s. Jaycees' ArumalMeeting in June (for a term of one year) •
FUK:TION :

'!be NVPs serve on the Executive Cbnunittee and the Executive Board of Directors of 'nle U.S. Jaycees. 'nley are assigned to five state Jaycee organizations each, one of which is the WP's hone state. Each WP must visit each state under their jurisdiction at least twice during the year, at which tine they survey the rondition of the organization - making oral and written reronmendations for the improvertEnt of its programs, structure, operations and finances. WPs also make reIX>rts to the national president at each Executive Committee neeting on the status of their assigned states or areas of resp:msibility; each WP serves on various planning rommittees as assigned l:.¥ the national president. The 11th NVPis in charge of the Metro Conference, and has the resfX)nsibility for recruitment and rnanagertEnt roordination in large urban areas and chapters with more than lee members.

~ION:

Ten national vice fCesidents are voted into office in the same manner as the national Jaycee president. Votes are cast statel:.¥ state, with voting strength determined by the states' Jaycee IX>pulation and attendance at the Annual Meeting. Each state is allowed to vote for ten candidates; those receiving a simple majority of available votes are elected. 'nle Metro WP is elected l:¥ delegates of Metro chapters at the ronvention. Each pera>n serves a one-year term, and must be under 36 whenelected.

P.O. BOX 7,

TULSA, OKLAHOMA

74121-0007

Official Publication of the United States Jaycees

Future Readers Are Young And Successful
AGE Average 29.5 Years Old 18-24 18% 25-29 35% 30-35 36% II % 36 or Older INCOME Average $27,971 Under $10,000 5% $10,000 to $19,999 32% $20,000 to $29,999 31% $30,000 to $49,999 20% $50,000 or Over 9% HIGHEST LEVEL OF EDUCATION Postgraduate Study 20% College 57% High School 19%

Reader Profile

OCCUPATIONAL TITLE Manager or Administrator Professional or Technical Clerical or Sales Foreman or Supervisor Other SELF-EMPLOYMENT QUOTIENT Own a Business of Their Own Plan to Become Self-Employed

31% 25% 13% 8% 23% 22% 37%

TRAVEL (in the past year) Used Commercial Airlines Drove on Business Trips of 200 Miles or More Rented a Car

59% 57% 28%

Future Readers Are Family Types
MARITAL STATUS Married Widowed, Separated or Divorced WIFE EMPLOYED Part Time Full Time SIZE OF HOUSEHOLD Average 3.4 INVESTMENTS (average value) Real Estate Other Than Home Savings Accounts Stocks/Bonds Collectibles IRNKEOGH/Pension Accounts PRIMARY SOURCE OF INVESTMENT ADVICE Bank Stock Broker Accountant Insurance Agent Lawyer 69% 7% 17% 48% people $4,535 $3,054 $1,885 $1,495 $1,269

LEISURE ACTIVITIES (in the past year) Fishing 57% Camping 51 % Hunting 40% (Average Reader Owns 2.2 Guns) CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES (7-day period) Beer 6.3 Glasses Wine 1.9 Glasses Liquor 2.8 Glasses USE OF CREDIT Oil Company 52% Visa 51% Master Charge 50% American Express 17% Car Rental Card 10%

Readers Rely On FUTURE To Keep Up With Their World
FUTURE Total Readers Per Copy OTHER PERIODICALS READ more than half of issues published: SPECIAL INTEREST PUBLICATIONS Field & Stream Mechanix Illustrated Guns & Ammo Success Unlimited BUSINESS PUBLICATIONS Money Nation's Business GENERAL INTEREST PUBLICATIONS Playboy Newsweek Sports Illustrated Time U.S. News & World Report 3.59

32% 30% II % 10% 5%

12% 12% 7% 5% 11% 9% 36% 33% 29% 29% 17%

Future Readers Are IIU p-And-Comersll
HOME OWNERSHIP Own Home 69% Rent Home II % Rent Apartment 13% VALUE OF HOME OR APARTMENT OWNED Average Value $62,755 Less than $20,000 8% 10% $20,000 to $34,999 $35,000 to $49,999 24% $50,000 to $74,999 31 % $75,000 to $99,999 16% $100,000 or More 10% PERSONAL INSURANCE Term Life 58% (Average Face Value $33,725) Life other than Term 79% (Average Face Value $44,052)

Future Readers Are Involved
COMMUNITY SIZE PREFERENCE (county population) 1.5 Million or More 150,000-1.5 Million 35,000-150,000 Less than 35,000 CIVIC INVOLVEMENT In the Last Year ... Gave a Speech or Public Address Took Action to Make View Known on a Public Issue Wrote to Magazine, Newspaper, Radio or TV Station Wrote an Elected Official Wrote Something for Publication Political Volunteer Work Serve in Elected or Appointed Office READER INVOLVEMENT IN JAYCEES A verage Length of Membership 4 Average Number of Meetings or Activities Attended Yearly Have Held Position of Responsibility Chapter President Chapter Board Member Committee Chairman 7% 26% 36% 29%

64% 49% 48% 40% 37% 30% 22% Years 18 72%
2/ %

55% 54%

SURVEY METHODOLOGY*
The objectives of the Basic Subscriber Study have been met through utilization of mail survey techniques. Questionnaires were mailed to 2,000 randomly-selected members of The United States Jaycees, using a random-interval, systematic sampling technique. Beginning with the 251st name of the circulation list (a number selected at random), we then proceeded to select every 186th name thereafter in order to provide a total of 2,000 randomly-selected names. Questionnaires were pretested with a mailing to 200 randomlyselected readers on Monday, January 28,1980. The purpose of the pretest was to detect any difficulties in comprehension or format engendered by the survey instrument and to allow us to test the efficiency of two different incentive enclosure devices. After evaluation of the pretest results, the first full mailing to 2,000 readers was made on Friday, February 8. Each mailing consisted of a questionnaire, a covering letter on FUTURE letterhead signed by the editor/associate publisher describing the nature of the research project and requesting the reader's cooperation, an incentive enclosure to maximize the rate of return, and a business reply envelope preaddressed to Harvey Research Organization. All mailings were sent via first class mail from Rochester, New York. A second, follow-up mailing was sent to the entire sample on Monday, February 18. Returns of questionnaires were terminated with the delivery of mail on Monday, March 10, 1980. The study is based upon a sampling of 1,073 FUTURE readers, representing a 57% return of questionnaires initially mailed on February 8, 1980. Harvey Research Organization maintained sole control over all procedures involved in sample selected, mailing of questionnaire, editing, coding, statistical tabulations and analysis. All questionnaires were returned directly to Harvey Research Organization in postage-paid preaddressed envelopes, and only Harvey staff analysts were authorized to assist in the sorting and tabulation of the results. *Taken from Basic Subscriber Study, conducted by Harvey Research Organization, Inc., Rochester, New York, 1980.

A LEADERSHIP TRAINING ORGANIZA nON

THE UNITED

STATES JAYCEES®

POST OFFICE BOX 7 TULSA, OKLAHOMA 74121-0007 PHONE: 918-584-2481 FAX: 918-584-4422 TELEX: 293292 USJC UR

Purpose Jaycee and Junior Chamber of Commerce chapters around the country offer leadership training and personal development for men and women aged 21 through 39 inclusive. Even though the organization's programs have changed through the decades to meet the needs of America and local communities, the basic philosophy from which the organization evolved remains. Major efforts are directed toward finding solutions to problems specific to local communities. In addition to raising millions of dollars for charity each year on the local, state and national levels, members donate countless thousands of volunteer hours to important projects that may not be done in communities without Jaycees. One major drawing card for members is the diversity of programs and services offered by local Jaycee organizations. The organization can be many things to many people. In 1947, shortly after a national Jaycee convention, Jaycee Bill Brownfield wrote the basic phrases of The Jaycee Creed to tell who the Jaycees are and for what they stand. Brownfield, a minister, wanted to emphasize being a Jaycee is more than just taking part in "activities." It is a way of life. The basic phrases of the creed were adopted officially by the u.s. Junior Chamber of Commerce in 1947. In 1951, the line which affirms the Jaycees' belief in God was added.

THE JAYCEE WE BELIEVE:

CREED

That faith in God gives meaning and purpose to human life; That the brotherhood of man transcends the sovereignty of nations; That economic justice can best be won by free men through free enterprise; That government should be of laws rather than of men; That earth's great treasure lies in human personality; And that service to humanity is the best work of life.

HEADQUARTERS
The United States Junior Chamber of Commerce War Memorial Headquarters-Tulsa, Oklahoma. Twenty-seven years after the official founding of The United States Junior Chamber of Commerce in the fall of 1946, delegates to a post-war conference voted to establish a national headquarters in Tulsa, Oklahoma. In the beginning, the national president ran the organization from his hometown. Then, headquarters existed in St. Louis and later in Chicago. In the LaSalle Hotel in Chicago, a fire destroyed many of the young organization's records. A $100,000 grant from Tulsa's city fathers was raised after their bid was selected among several others. The move to Tulsa was completed by July 7, 1947. The first offices in Tulsa were set up in the Akdar Shrine building. Ground for The U.S. Junior Chamber headquarters was purchased in the fall of 1947 for about $19,000, and dedication ceremonies were December 7, 1947, the sixth anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. A fund drive raised money for the headquarters. As it reached a goal of one dollar per member each state sent a plaque as a memorial to state Jaycees who died during World War II. These plaques still hang in the building. Besides a headquarters, the building was built as a war memorial. In 1948-49, an architectural contest to select a design for the new headquarters attracted 287 proposed designs. Three Illinois men won and were commissioned to detail the design. The ground-breaking ceremony was July 10, 1950. The cornerstone ceremonies for the headquarters were December 7, 1950, exactly nine years following the U.S. entry into World War II. The first- and second-floor construction was completed with dedication ceremonies August 4, 1951. Additions to the building include the 1955-56 first-floor addition. In October 1959, construction began on an addition to the third floor, adding 9,300 square feet of space. The third-floor addition was dedicated in July 1959. A final 1972-73 addition increased the size of the headquarters by 35%. A section of the War Memorial Headquarters ceremony. was dedicated in honor of Vietnam veterans during a July 1990

Exhibition Hall The Exhibition Hall is located on the second floor. The room was designed with the assistance of architects from the Smithsonian Institution. It cost more than $200,000 to construct and was paid for by donations and funding raised by The U.S. Junior Chamber Foundation through Jaycee alumni. The hall was opened to the public in 1980. The Exhibition Hall is a memorial to the founders of the movement and "the young people who keep the vision alive." Exhibits of interest include letters from the father U.S. Junior Chamber president from Giessenbier allowed women to become Jaycees; and much ier and a stained-glass window from the Mission of the movement, Henry Giessenbier; a display of every to the present; the historic Special Meeting in 1984 which more. Two other highlights include a bust of "Hy" GiessenbInn in St. Louis, where the Junior Chamber was founded.

Founders' Home During the June 1954 convention, enthusiastic backing was given to the idea of building a Jaycee "White House" for the organization's president. The ideas came from two Arkansas Jaycees who visited Tulsa and discovered the national president had to pay outlandish rent during his year in office. The furniture and other items were donated by Jaycees around the nation to build a residence for the national president. The first national president to occupy the home was Hugh McKenna in 1955. The "White House" moved several times as the Jaycees' needs for space changed and demands for the presidency grew. In 1983, The U.S. Junior Chamber president moved to the present location near headquarters, where the house was re-named the Founders' Home.

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NATIONAL LEADERSHIP
POLICY CHANGES

FACTS

The United States Junior Chamber of Commerce Executive Board of Directors is the body responsible for making all major policy decisions for the organization. BYLAW CHANGES Bylaws can be changed by a two-thirds majority vote of the delegates in attendance at a U.S. Junior Chamber Annual Meeting, provided written notice of the intended changes has been sent to all local chapters at least 30 days prior to the vote. PRESIDENT Elected annually to serve as the leader of the organization from July 1 through June 30 of the following year, this person is a key motivator in stimulating membership involvement in the national programs conducted by The U.S. Junior Chamber. The president usually travels between 100,000 and 300,000 miles during the term of office. EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT The executive vice president (EVP) is responsible for managing the national headquarters in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The EVP directs the activities of the 70 employees who administer the organization's programs. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE The Executive Committee is made up of the president, the executive vice president, 10 national vice presidents, chairman of the board, legal counsel, and treasurer. EXECUTIVE BOARD OF DIRECTORS The Executive Board of Directors consists of the members of the Executive Committee and the presidents of all the state Junior Chamber organizations. It is the responsibility of this group to provide leadership to the entire organization through committees - which do the long-range planning - and through setting the policies of the organization, based on The U.S. Junior Chamber Bylaws.

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FACT SHEET
NAME:
The United States Junior Chamber of Commerce, formerly known as The United States Jaycees.

SCOPE:
Leadership training and personal development for men and women ages 21 through 39.

MEMBERSHIP:
Approximately 4,500 chapters with some 225,000 members nationwide.

PURPOSE:
This organization shall be a non-profit corporation, organized for such educational and charitable purposes as will promote and foster the growth and development of young persons' civic organizations in the United States, designed to inculcate in the individual membership of such organization a spirit of genuine Americanism and civic interest, and as a supplementary education institute to provide them with opportunity for personal development and achievement and an avenue for intelligent participation by young persons in the affairs of their community, state and nation, and to develop true friendship and understanding among young persons of all nations. A Jaycee organization is a constructive action organization of young persons who devote a portion of their time to community service in the public interest, developing young persons as leaders of their community. All local organization members shall be known as Jaycee and/or Junior Chamber of Commerce chapters, and individual members shall be known as Jaycees.

HISTORY:
Henry Giessenbier began the Junior Chamber movement October 13, 1915, in St. Louis, Missouri. His ideas quickly spread, and the national organization was formally created by 12 cities at the first convention in St. Louis on January 21, 1920.

HEADQUARTERS:
The War Memorial Headquarters is located in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and provides services to chapters and state organizations through some 70 employees. Operations: Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Central time.

PROGRAMS:
Individual Development, Management Development and Community Development programs for members. Four priority areas for the 1990s are the environment, drug and alcohol abuse prevention, the homeless, and governmental affairs. Besides youth and family life programs, scholarships for students are provided by the War Memorial Fund.

NATIONAL EVENTS:
Annual Meeting (June), International BB Gun Match (July), Governmental Affairs Leadership Seminar (Sept.), Healthy American Fitness Leaders Awards Congress (Sept.), the Congress of Ten Outstanding Young Americans (Jan.) and the National Outstanding Young Farmer Awards Congress (Feb.)

PRESIDENT:
Greg Thomes, Maple Lake, Minnesota. 1991, through June 30, 1992. Elected June 12, 1991. Thomes will serve full-time July 1,

FOUNDERS' HOME:
The Tulsa home of The U.S. Junior Chamber president and family during his one-year term of office.
P.O. Bo .•. 7, Tulsa, OA 74121-0007- 4 WeSt 21st St., Tulsa, OA 74114-1116
(918) 584-2481

FAX: (918) 584-4422

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