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Ivan Frimmel presents

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Wei Wu Wei (Terrence Gray)
– The Effortless Nondual Way
(1895 – 1986)

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His Biography (1)
 Wei Wu Wei, born Terence Gray in 1895 into a well-
established Irish family, was raised on an estate outside
Cambridge, England, and received a thorough education,
including studies at Oxford University.

 Early in life he pursued an interest in Egyptology which


culminated in the publication of two books on ancient
Egyptian history and culture in 1923.

 This was followed by a period of involvement in the arts in


Britain in the 20's and 30's as a theorist, theatrical producer,
creator of radical 'dance-dramas', publisher of several
related magazines and author of two related books.

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His Biography (2)
 The identity of Wei Wu Wei was not revealed at the time of the publication of
his first book in 1958, at the age of 63, nor was he "known" outside of a
certain circle of a select few, as either Wei Wu Wei OR as Terence Gray. He
postioned himself to remain anonymous and it was only after his death that his
true identity became known to a more general spiritual audience.

 The 16 years following the publication of his first book saw the appearance of
seven subsequent books, including his final work under the further pseudonym
'O.O.O.' in 1974.

 It is apparent from his writings that Wei Wu Wei had studied in some depth
both Eastern and Western philosophy and metaphysics, as well as the more
esoteric teachings of all the great religions. It can also be understood from the
writings that he regarded himself as merely one of many seeking so-called
'liberation', the works themselves being seen in part, as a record of his quest.

 During that quest he is known to have met many spiritual luminaries including
the Bhagwan Sri Ramana Maharshi, Lama Anagarika Govinda, Dr. Hubert
Benoit, Douglas Harding, Robert Linssen, Arthur Osborne, Robert Powell,
Albert Sorensen (also known as Shunyata), and Dr D.T. Suzuki.

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His Biography (3)
 Somewhere along the way Gray exhausted his
interest in the avant garde theater and to a large
extent turned his thoughts towards philosophy and
metaphysics. This led to a period of travel
throughout Asia, including time spent at the
Ramana Ashram, located along the base of the
holy mountain, Arunachala, Tiruvannamalai, in
Southern India.

 He died in 1986, at 91.

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His Quotes (1)
 It is less what one is that should matter, than what one is
not.

 The qualities we possess should never be a matter for


satisfaction, but the qualities we have discarded.

 It is not for us to search but to remain still, to achieve


Immobility not Action.

 There is no becoming. ALL IS.

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His Quotes (2)
 The Saint is a man who disciplines his ego. The Sage is a
man who rids himself of his ego.

 It is only the artificial ego that suffers. The man who has
transcended his false 'me' no longer identifies with his
suffering.

 We ourselves are not an illusory part of Reality; rather are


we Reality itself illusorily conceived.

 Are we not wasps who spend all day in a fruitless attempt


to traverse a window-pane - while the other half of the
window is wide open?

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His Quotes (3)
 Detachment is a state, it is not a totalisation of achieved
indifferences.

 The notion that human life has greater value than any
other form of life is both unjustifiable and arrogant.

 Wise men don't judge: they seek to understand.

 How many of the ways (disciplines, exercises, practices)


recommended as helpful, or even necessary, for the
attainment of Satori are not in fact consequences of that
state erroneously suggested as means?

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His Quotes (4)

 There seem to two kinds of searchers: those who seek to


make their ego something other than it is, i.e. holy, happy,
unselfish (as though you could make a fish unfish), and
those who understand that all such attempts are just
gesticulation and play-acting, that there is only one thing
that can be done, which is to disidentify themselves with
the ego, by realising its unreality, and by becoming aware
of their eternal identity with pure being.

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His Quotes (5)

 Doctrines, scriptures, sutras, essays, are not to be


regarded as systems to be followed. They merely
contribute to understanding. They should be for us a
source of stimulation, and nothing more... Adopted, rather
than used as a stimulus, they are a hindrance.

 Play your part in the comedy, but don't identify yourself


with your role!

 Living should be perpetual and universal benediction.

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His Quotes (6)
 What is your trouble? Mistaken identity.

 Truth is that which lies in a dimension beyond the reach of


thought.

 Whole-mind has no 'thoughts', thoughts are split-mind.

 Realization is a matter of becoming conscious of that


which is already realized.

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His Quotes (7)
 THIS which is seeking is THAT which is sought, and
THAT which is sought is THIS which is seeking.

 As long as we are identified with an object: that is


bondage.

 As long as we think, act, live via an object, or as an object:


that is bondage.

 As long as we feel ourselves to be an object, or think we


are such (and a 'self' is an object): that is bondage.

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Books by Wei Wu Wei (1)
1958
Like a master instructing every reader who has the dedication to read this book, the author
maintains direct and unrelenting perspective, giving Fingers Pointing to the Moon its status as
one of Zen Buddhism's essential classics...

1960
Drawing from the ancient traditions of Buddhism, Taoism, and Advaita Vedanta, the writer
renders their insights in his own radical, uncompromising language, with humor and profundity...

1963
This classic gem of Eastern spirituality is especially timely in the current climate of interest in
Buddhism. Wei Wu Wei's unique and fresh interpretation of the ancient teachings opens the
reader's eyes...

1964
These thirty-four powerful essays, poems, and dialogs based on Taoist and Buddhist thought
constitute a guide to what the author calls “non-volitional living”—the ancient understanding
that our efforts to grasp our true nature are futile. While this may sound disheartening, fully
comprehending this truth is the key to our liberation...
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Books by Wei Wu Wei (2)
1965
Open Secret is an essential work by the mysterious Wei Wu Wei, author of a series of Buddhist
and Taoist spiritual classics. In poetry, dialogs, epigrams, and essays, he addresses our illusions
concerning the mind, the self, logic, time, space, and causation...

1965
Wei Wu Wei described his books as “reflections of the moon in a puddle” because he does not
set himself apart from any other, does not profess to be a teacher, and does not claim to have the
last word on spiritual truth...

1968
These thirty-four powerful essays, poems, and dialogs based on Taoist and Buddhist thought
constitute a guide to what the author calls “non-volitional living”—the ancient understanding
that our efforts to grasp our true nature are futile. While this may sound disheartening, fully
comprehending this truth is the key to our liberation...

1974
Using the pseudonym O. O. O., the author was obviously having some fun with this final book,
which he wrote entirely as a dialog between a wise owl and a naïve rabbit...
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Wei Wu Wei – Ask the Awakened

 Perhaps the most important and best known of Wei Wu Wei’s books, Ask
The Awakened, draws on a variety of sources, including Taoism—
specifically the texts attributed to Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu; Buddhism—
especially the Heart, Diamond and Lankavatara sutras; and Chan Buddhism
as taught by Hui Neng, Huang Po, Hui Hai, etc.; as well as the Vedantic
teachings of Padmasambhava and Sri Ramana Maharshi, among others.

 Wei Wu Wei's unique and fresh interpretation of the ancient teachings opens
the reader's eyes. This powerful book rewards by exposing illusions, and
takes the reader beyond logic to the inexpressible truth of existence.

 Wei Wu Wei joins D.T. Suzuki, Paul Reps, Alan Watts and Philip Kapleau
as one of the earliest and most profound interpreters of Advaita Vedanta,
Zen Buddhism and Taoist philosophies.

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Why are you so unhappy?
Why are you so unhappy?
Because 99,9 per cent
of everything you think
and everything you do
is for yourself—
and there isn’t one.

From Ask the Awakened by Wei WuWei


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Thank You

Ivan Frimmel
Cell: 082-454-0311

E-mail: ivan.frimmel@nanhua.co.za

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