Danseco, Joselito Jr. E.

Palomares, Cedric Mathew
Environmental Science 1 – WFV-2 University of the Philippines - Diliman July 18, 2008

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THE PROBLEM
Rapid increase in world human population poses environmental degradation and abuse, deterioration of human living standards, and escalation of poverty.

DEFINITION OF RELATED TERMS
Population
o Came from the Latin word “populus” meaning people. o Group of organisms of one particular species. o Have interbreed and live in the same place at the same time.

Overpopulation
o o A condition in which the number of people per square unit of land area or density enlarges to a limit. Population that is too large and too poor to be adequately supplied by scarce resources .

DEFINITION OF RELATED TERMS
Sustainable Development
o The condition at which the needs of many are being met without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Using, conserving and enhancing the community’s resources so that ecological processes are maintained and the total quality of life can be increased.

o

Optimum Population
o o The level of population beyond which the average product in an economy fails. The maximum number of people that can be supported with the existing resources.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: FACTS AND FIGURES

Source: Lambert Dolphin. “World Population Since Creation”. Idolphin.org. July 31, 2007. July 10, 2008. <http://www.ldolphin.org/popul.html >

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: FACTS AND FIGURES The Size of Countries Based on Their Population

Source: “Size of Countries Based on Population”. GeoHIve. 2000-2008. July 10, 2008. <http://www.xist.org/earth/gen_popsize.aspx >

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: FACTS AND FIGURES
rank country area sq.km. population 2007-07-01 est. 1,321,851,888 1,129,866,154 301,139,947 234,693,997 190,010,647 164,741,924 150,448,339 141,377,752 135,031,164 127,433,494 108,700,891 91,077,287 85,262,356 82,400,996 80,335,036 76,511,887 71,158,647 65,751,512 65,397,521 65,068,149 2008-07-01 est. 1,330,044,605 1,147,995,898 303,824,646 237,512,355 191,908,598 167,762,040 153,546,901 140,702,094 138,283,240 127,288,419 109,955,400 92,681,453 86,116,559 82,369,548 81,713,517 78,254,090 71,892,807 66,514,506 65,875,223 65,493,298 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. China India United States of America Indonesia Brazil Pakistan Bangladesh Russia Nigeria Japan Mexico Philippines Vietnam Germany Egypt Ethiopia Turkey Congo, Dem. Rep. of the Iran Thailand 9,596,960 3,287,590 9,826,630 1,919,440 8,511,965 803,940 144,000 17,075,200 923,768 377,835 1,972,550 300,000 329,560 357,021 1,001,450 1,127,127 780,580 2,345,410 1,648,000 514,000

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: FACTS AND FIGURES
510,072,00 0 6,681,237, 894 ~13 World Land Area
In square kilometers.

World As of July 10, 2008 at Population
11:50:00 PM.

World Population Number of people per Density square kilometer

This seemed to be very small but we didn’t take into consideration the “habitable” land area of the world.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: FACTS AND FIGURES
150,000,00 0 6,681,237, 894 ~45 World “Habitable” Land Area
In square kilometers.

World As of July 10, 2008 at Population
11:50:00 PM.

World Population Number of people per Density square kilometer

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: FACTS AND FIGURES Factors Affecting Population Density
A. Physical Factors 1. Relief (the shape and height of the land)
• HIGH DENSITY: Low land (e.g. Ganges Valley in India) • LOW DENSITY: High land and/or mountainous (e.g. The Himalayas)

2. Resources
• HIGH DENSITY: Areas rich in resources (e.g. coal, oil, and wood on Western Europe) • LOW DENSITY: Areas with few resources (e.g. The Sahel)

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: FACTS AND FIGURES Factors Affecting Population Density
1. Climate
• HIGH DENSITY: Temperate Areas since there is enough rain and heat to grow crops, etc. (e.g. Philippines) • LOW DENSITY: Areas with extreme climates (e.g. The Sahara Desert)

B. Human Factors 1. Political
• HIGH DENSITY: Stable governments (e.g. Singapore) • LOW DENSITY: Unstable gorvernments (e.g. Afghanistan)

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: FACTS AND FIGURES Factors Affecting Population Density
1. Social
• HIGH DENSITY: Groups of people want to live close to each other for security purposes (e.g. USA) • LOW DENSITY: Groups of people tend to be isolated from the many (e.g. Scandinavians)

2. Economic
• HIGH DENSITY: Good job opportunities particularly in large cities of developing countries around the world. • LOW DENSITY: Limited job opportunities (e.g. The Amazon Rainforest)

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: FACTS AND FIGURES

Birth rate and death rate are the two major reasons for population changes.
No. of childbirths for year X Current Population No. of deaths for year X Crude Death Rate = 1000 people

Crude Birth Rate =

X 1000

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: FACTS AND FIGURES

When birth rates are higher than death rates, there will be an increase in the population. Over the past 150 years developments in health care and sanitation around the world have led to a drop in the death rate. While birth rates have dropped in More Economically Developed Countries (MEDCs), birth rates are still elevated in Less Economically Developed Countries (LEDCs). Thus, the human population has grown very fast.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: THE CONSEQUENCES
Prolific Poverty
Poverty is a condition of chronic deprivation and need at the family level. 28 Poverty, is a major concern of humankind, because poverty everywhere reduces human beings to a low level of existence. Poor people lack access to enough land and income to meet basic needs. A lack of basic needs results in physical weakness and poor health. Poor health decreases the ability of the poor to work and put them deeper into poverty.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: THE CONSEQUENCES
Prolific Poverty
At the present growth rates, the population of economically developed countries would double in 120 years. The Third World, with over three quarters of the world's people, would double its numbers in about 33 years. This rapid doubling time reflects the fact that 37 percent of the developing world's population is under the age of 15 and entering their most productive childbearing years.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: THE CONSEQUENCES
Increased Energy Demands
Increasing population numbers and growing affluence—at least for some—have already resulted in rapid growth of energy consumption. Over the next 20 years, the demand for energy will grow more quickly in Asia than in any other region. The fastest growth will be in Asia’s developing countries.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: THE CONSEQUENCES
Increased Energy Demands
This increase in energy consumption will be fueled primarily by economic development and changing consumption pattern caused primarily of increasae in population.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: THE CONSEQUENCES
Unplanned Urbanization
According to United Nations estimates, the urban population in Asia will nearly double in the next 30 years. By 2030, more than half of Asia’s population will live in cities—some 2.6 billion people. By 2015, the urban population of Asia will be larger than the urban population of all the other regions of the world combined.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: THE CONSEQUENCES
Unplanned Urbanization
This rapid—largely unplanned—expansion of urban areas has robbed many Asian countries of some of their most productive agricultural land and has resulted in serious problems of air, soil, and water pollution.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: THE CONSEQUENCES
Global Warming

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: THE CONSEQUENCES
Global Warming
In the 1950s, Asian countries produced about onefifth of the CO2 emissions produced by Europe, but by the mid-1980s carbon emissions from Asia surpassed those from Europe. If current trends continue, carbon emissions from Asia will double between 2000 and 2020. By 2010, Asia in will be the leading producer of CO2 the world.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: THE CONSEQUENCES

Freshwater Scarcity and Water Pollution
Today, Asia has the least fresh water available per person of any region. Water pollution is also a serious problem, mainly caused by the disposal of untreated sewage and industrial waste, nitrates from animal waste and chemical fertilizers, and the intrusion of seawater. Largely because of widespread pollution, one out of three Asians does not have access to safe drinking water, defined as a reliable source within 200 meters of the home. Polluted, unsafe water causes millions of deaths every year, particularly among infants and young children.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: THE CONSEQUENCES

Ruined Biodiversity and Habitat Destruction
Due in part to population pressure, forests and wetlands have been cleared and drained, resulting in the loss of an estimated 70 to 90 percent of the region’s original wildlife habitat. Habitat destruction and pollution also threaten fresh-water and marine fish and coral reefs in the region.

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: THE CONSEQUENCES
Pressure on Land

CRITICAL ANALYSIS: THE CONSEQUENCES
Pressure on Land
Asia faces the most acute pressure on agricultural land of any region. Over the past 30 years, while Asia’s total population increased by about 68 percent, the total area of land under cultivation increased by only 21 percent—from 355 to 430 million hectares. Throughout Asia, it is estimated that about one-third of all cropland has already been damaged by agricultural practices that are not sustainable. And every year, good agricultural land is lost to industrial and infrastructure development and urban sprawl. As a result, the area of productive farmland may actually decrease in coming decades.

SUMMARY
Overpopulation poses ominous effects on one’s living standards and the ecological balance of nature. Increasing number of people living in the planet causes more demand on the basic needs such as food and shelter, thus pressuring their immediate environment.

Thank FIN you.