American West

University of oklahoma Press

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American West
COnTenTs American Indian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Art & Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Biography & Memoir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Literature & Fiction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Military History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 The Arthur H. Clark Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Chickasaw Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Cherokee national Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Best sellers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Forthcoming Books. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 For more than eighty years, the University of Oklahoma Press has published award-winning books about the West and we are proud to bring to you our new American West catalog. The catalog features the newest titles from both the University of Oklahoma Press and The Arthur H. Clark Company, an imprint of OU Press. For a complete list of titles available from OU Press, please visit our website at oupress.com. For a complete list of The Arthur H. Clark Company titles, please visit ahclark.com. We hope you enjoy this catalog and appreciate your continued support of the University of Oklahoma Press.
Price and availability subject to change without notice.

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American Indian
the northern cheyenne exodUs in history and memory By James n. Leiker and Ramon Powers $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4221-0 · 272 pages The exodus of the Northern cheyennes in 1878 and 1879, an attempt to flee from Indian Territory to their montana homeland, is an important event in American Indian history. more than a century later, the story remains familiar because it has been told by historians and novelists, and on film. In The Northern Cheyenne Exodus in History and Memory, James N. leiker and ramon powers explore how the event has been remembered, told, and retold. They examine the recollections of Indians and settlers and their descendants, and they consider local history, mass-media treatments, and literature to draw thought-provoking conclusions about how this story has changed over time. the Jar of severed hands the spanish deportation of apache Prisoners of War, 1770–1810 By Mark santiago $29.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4177-0 · 264 pages more than two centuries after the coronado expedition first set foot in the region, the northern frontier of New spain in the late 1770s was still under attack by Apache raiders. mark santiago’s gripping account of spanish efforts to subdue the Apaches illuminates larger cultural and political issues in the colonial period of the southwest and northern mexico. red PoWer rising the national indian youth council and the origins of native activism By Bradley F. shreve $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4178-7 · 288 pages During the 1960s, American Indian youth were swept up in a movement called red power. While some define the movement as militant, others see it as peaceful, but there is one common assumption about its history: red power began with the Indian takeover of Alcatraz in 1969. In this groundbreaking book shreve sets the record straight by tracing red power’s origins back to the student activism of the National Indian Youth council, founded in gallup, New mexico, in 1961. by uncovering the origins of red power, shreve writes an important new chapter in the history of American Indian activism. tribal Wars of the soUthern Plains By stan Hoig $24.95s paper · 978-0-8061-4201-2 · 352 pages Tribal Wars of the Southern Plains is a comprehensive account of Indian conflicts in the area between the platte river and the rio grande, from the first written reports of the spaniards in the sixteenth century through the united statescheyenne battle of the sand Hills in 1875. The reader follows the exploits and defeats of such chiefs as lone Wolf, satanta, black Kettle, and Dull Knife as they signed treaties, led attacks, battled for land, and defended their villages in the huge region that was home to the Wichitas, comanches, cheyennes, Arapahos, Kiowas, osages, pawnees, and other Indian nations. a gUide to the indian tribes of the Pacific northWest third edition By Robert H. Ruby, John A. Brown, and Cary C. Collins $26.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4024-7 · 448 pages The Native peoples of the pacific Northwest inhabit a vast region extending from the rocky mountains to the pacific ocean and from california to british columbia. For more than two decades, this book has served as a standard reference on these diverse peoples. Now, in the wake of renewed tribal self-determination, this revised edition reflects the many recent political, economic, and cultural developments shaping these Native communities.

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dreaming With the ancestors black seminole Women in texas and mexico By shirley Boteler Mock $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4053-7 · 400 pages Indian freedmen and their descendants have garnered much public and scholarly attention, but women’s roles have largely been absent from that discussion. In Dreaming with the Ancestors, shirley boteler mock explores the role that black seminole women have played in shaping and perpetuating a culture born of African roots and shaped by southeastern Native American and mexican influences. War Party in blUe Pawnee indian scouts in the U.s. army By Mark van de Logt $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4139-8 · 368 pages between 1864 and 1877, during the height of the plains Indian wars, pawnee Indian scouts rendered invaluable service to the united states Army. They led missions deep into contested territory, tracked resisting bands, spearheaded attacks against enemy camps, and on more than one occasion saved American troops from disaster on the field of battle. In War Party in Blue, mark van de logt tells the story of the pawnee scouts from their perspective, detailing the battles in which they served and recounting hitherto neglected episodes. from cochise to geronimo the chiricahua apaches, 1874–1886 By edwin R. sweeney $39.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4150-3 · 640 pages In the decade after the death of their revered chief cochise in 1874, the chiricahua Apaches struggled to survive as a people and their relations with the u.s. government further deteriorated. In From Cochise to Geronimo, edwin r. sweeney builds on his previous biographies of chiricahua leaders cochise and mangas coloradas to offer a definitive history of the turbulent period between cochise’s death and geronimo’s surrender in 1886. the Peyote road religious freedom and the native american church By Thomas C. Maroukis $29.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4109-1 · 272 pages Despite challenges by the federal government to restrict the use of peyote, the Native American church, which uses the hallucinogenic cactus as a religious sacrament, has become the largest indigenous denomination among American Indians today. The Peyote Road examines the history of the NAc, including its legal struggles to defend the controversial use of peyote. fUll-coUrt QUest the girls from fort shaw indian school basketball champions of the World By Linda Peavy and Ursula smith $29.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-3973-9 · 496 pages most fans of women’s basketball would be startled to learn that girls’ teams were making their mark more than a century ago—and that none was more prominent than a team from an isolated Indian boarding school in montana. playing like “lambent flames” across the polished floors of dance halls, armories, and gymnasiums, the girls from Fort shaw stormed the state to emerge as montana’s first basketball champions. Taking their game to the 1904 st. louis World’s Fair, these young women introduced an international audience to the fledgling game and returned home with a trophy declaring them champions. Full-Court Quest offers a rare glimpse into American Indian life and into the world of women’s basketball before “girls’ rules” temporarily shackled the sport.

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kioWa military societies ethnohistory and ritual By William C. Meadows $75.00s cloth · 978-0-8061-4072-8 · 472 pages For Kiowa Indians, military societies have special significance. They serve not only to honor veterans and celebrate and publicize martial achievements but also to foster strong role models for younger tribal members. To this day, these societies serve to maintain traditional Kiowa values, culture, and ethnic identity. William c. meadows now provides a detailed account of the ritual structures, ceremonial composition, and historical development of each society. the seminole nation of oklahoma a legal history By L. susan Work $45.00s cloth · 978-0-8061-4089-6 · 376 pages When it adopted a new constitution in 1969, the seminole Nation was the first of the Five Tribes in oklahoma to formally reorganize its government. In the face of an American legal system that sought either to destroy its nationhood or to impede its self-government, the seminole Nation tenaciously retained its internal autonomy, cultural vitality, and economic subsistence. Here, l. susan Work draws on her experience as a tribal attorney to present the first legal history of the twentieth-century seminole Nation. indian tribes of oklahoma a guide By Blue Clark $29.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-4060-5 · 416 pages oklahoma is home to nearly forty American Indian tribes, and it includes the largest Native population of any state. As a result, many Americans think of the state as “Indian country.” blue clark, an enrolled member of the muscogee (creek) Nation, has rendered a completely new guide for information on the state’s Native peoples that reflects the drastic transformation of Indian country in recent years. As a synthesis of current knowledge, this book places the state’s Indians in their contemporary context as no other book has done. choctaW crime and PUnishment, 1884–1907 By Devon Abbott Mihesuah $32.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4052-0 · 352 pages During the decades between the civil War and the establishment of oklahoma statehood, choctaws suffered almost daily from murders, thefts, and assaults—usually at the hands of white intruders, but increasingly by choctaws themselves. This book focuses on two previously unexplored murder cases to illustrate the intense factionalism that emerged among tribal members during those lawless years as conservative Nationalists and proassimilation progressives fought for control of the choctaw Nation. indian alliances and the sPanish in the soUthWest, 750–1750 By William B. Carter $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4009-4 · 312 pages When considering the history of the southwest, scholars have typically viewed Apaches, Navajos, and other Athabaskans as marauders who preyed on pueblo towns and spanish settlements. William carter now offers a multilayered reassessment of historical events and environmental and social change to show how mutually supportive networks among Native peoples created alliances in the centuries before and after spanish settlement.

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Art & Photography
the eUgene b. adkins collection selected Works With contributions by Jane Ford Aebersold, Christina e. Burke, James Pick, B. Byron Price, W. Jackson Rushing III, Mary Jo Watson, and Mark A. White $60.00 cloth · 978-0-8061-4100-8 · 304 pages $29.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4101-5 · 304 pages A native of Tulsa, oklahoma, eugene b. Adkins (1920–2006) spent nearly four decades acquiring his extraordinary collection of Native American and American southwestern art. His vast assemblage includes paintings, photographs, jewelry, baskets, textiles, and ceramics by many of the southwest’s most renowned artists and artisans. This stunning volume features full-color reproductions of significant works from the Adkins collection, some of which are reproduced here for the first time. Plains indian art the Pioneering Work of John c. ewers edited by Jane ewers Robinson $39.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-3061-3 · 224 pages For almost three-quarters of a century, the study of plains Indian art has been shaped by the expertise, wisdom, and inspired leadership of John canfield ewers (1909–97). based on years of field research with Native Americans, careful scholarship, and exhaustive firsthand studies of museum collections around the world, ewers’s publications have long been required reading for anyone interested in the cultures of the plains peoples, especially their visual art traditions. This vividly illustrated collection of ewers’s writings presents studies first published in American Indian Art Magazine and other periodicals between 1968 and 1992. araPaho JoUrneys Photographs and stories from the Wind river reservation By sara Wiles Foreword by Frances Merle Haas $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4158-9 · 256 pages In what is now colorado and Wyoming, the Northern Arapahos thrived for centuries, connected by strong spirituality and kinship and community structures that allowed them to survive in the rugged environment. by the mid-nineteenth century, however, they were forced to relocate to a reservation. Today, tribal members preserve the integrity of a society that still fosters living ni’iihi’, as they call it, “in a good way.” Award-winning photographer sara Wiles captures that life on film and in words in Arapaho Journeys, an inside look at thirty years of Northern Arapaho life on the Wind river Indian reservation in central Wyoming. scenery, cUriosities, and stUPendoUs rocks William Quesenbury’s overland sketches, 1850–1851 By David Royce Murphy With contributions by michael l. Tate and michael Farrell $45.00s cloth · 978-0-8061-4219-7 · 304 pages long before Hollywood brought the landscapes of the American West to movie screens, clever impresarios invented ways of simulating the experience of western travel and selling it to mass audiences. In 1851, entrepreneur John Wesley Jones hired artist William Quesenbury to join such a venture. Quesenbury and other artists traveled the overland trails through Nebraska Territory to sketch the “scenery, curiosities, and stupendous rocks” they encountered. Scenery, Curiosities, and Stupendous Rocks gathers 71 of Quesenbury’s sketches from the Jones expedition illuminated by eyewitness accounts from the period, modern maps, contemporary photographs, and descriptive notes.

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shooting from the hiP Photographs and essays By J. Don Cook Foreword by James Garner $29.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-4180-0 · 128 pages In this heartfelt tribute to the spirit and people of oklahoma, one of the state’s most distinguished photojournalists shows that he is equally talented as a photographer and writer. showcasing black-and-white photographs and fifty short essays, Shooting from the Hip portrays oklahoma’s people, animals, lifestyles, landscapes, and weather in all their diversity. cowboys, kids, tornados, trucks, rattlesnakes, fiddlers—J. Don cook has seen them all, and through his poignant essays, he allows us not only to see them but to understand them as he does. search for the native american PUrebloods third edition By Charles Banks Wilson $24.95s paper · 978-0-8061-3285-3 · 64 pages over several decades, renowned oklahoma artist charles banks Wilson sought out “purebloods” (that is, Indians of a single tribal heritage) of each of oklahoma’s tribes to create a gallery of American Indian portraits. Search for the Native American Purebloods captures the state’s visual heritage in a series of seventy-seven remarkable pencil drawings, each accompanied by a narrative describing Wilson’s visits with the subject. out of print since 2005, the book is once again available with the generous assistance of the college of Arts and sciences at the university of oklahoma. bUilding one fire art and World view in cherokee life By Chadwick smith, Rennard strickland, and Benny smith $24.95 cloth · 978-1-61658-960-8 · 224 pages In Building One Fire, principal chief of the cherokee Nation chad smith and renowned cherokee-osage scholar and author rennard strickland present a unique look at cherokee art through the lens of cherokee philosophy. since the time when Water spider brought the gift of fire to the cherokee people, the one Fire, “the Ancient lady,” has been at the center of cherokee spiritual life. grand Procession contemporary artistic visions of american indians the diker collection at the denver art museum By Lois sherr Dubin $19.95 cloth · 978-0-914738-67-1 · 64 pages Grand Procession celebrates a remarkable new tradition-based, contemporary American Indian art form. From a heritage rooted in dolls and ledger-book drawings, a fresh and exciting sculptural art featuring human and animal figures has evolved since the mid-1980s. Typically around two feet tall and meticulously clothed in elaborate beaded and quilled ceremonial dress, the figures carefully emulate plains and plateau traditions of the mid-nineteenth to early twentieth centuries. shaPing the West american sculptors of the 19th century Contributions by Thayer Tolles, Peter H. Hassrick, Andrew Walker, and sarah Boehme $10.95 paper · 978-0-914738-66-4 · 96 pages Shaping the West, the sixth edition of Western Passages, focuses on sculpture—an often overlooked, neglected, and misunderstood form of artistic expression. sculpture has too often taken a backseat to painting, and this is equally true for western American art.  so why are these accomplished and celebrated artists and artworks not widely known to us today? This generously illustrated book aims to help rectify and explore that conundrum.

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generations the helen cox kersting collection of southwestern cultural arts By James H. nottage edited by James H. nottage $75.00 cloth · 978-0-9798495-1-0 · 460 pages lavishly illustrated, Generations celebrates the nearly 800 works of Native American art in The Helen cox Kersting collection, including pottery, jewelry, baskets, weavings, katsinas, and paintings. representing the work of Native artists from the late 1800s to the present, the collection demonstrates the survival and flowering of work by Navajo, pueblo, and other American Indian artists across the generations. Perfectly american the art-Union and its artists Contributions by Patricia Hills, Peter J. Brownlee, Randy Ramer, and Amanda Lett $39.95s cloth · 978-0-9819799-2-2 · 200 pages $24.95s paper · 978-0-9819799-3-9 · 200 pages The American Art-union, based in New York city, was founded in 1844 with the goal of fostering the arts in America through education and publication. modeled after european organizations, the American Art-union sought to establish a national aesthetic in the united states and unite all regions of the country through art. life at the kioWa, comanche, and Wichita agency the Photographs of annette ross hume By Kristina L. southwell and John R. Lovett $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4138-1 · 256 pages Anadarko, oklahoma, bills itself today as the “Indian capital of the Nation,” but it was a drowsy frontier village when budding photographer Annette ross Hume arrived in 1890. Home to a federal agency charged with serving the many American Indian tribes in the area, the town burgeoned when the u.s. government auctioned off building lots at the turn of the twentieth century. Hume faithfully documented its explosive growth and the American Indians she encountered. Her extraordinary photographs are collected here for the first time. charlie rUssell and friends Contribution by Peter Hassrick, Thomas B. smith, Brian W. Dippie, and Mark A. White $10.95 paper · 978-0-914738-64-0 · 72 pages Although he was painfully reserved among strangers, the artist charles m. russell had a knack for making lifelong friends. This issue of Western Passages is devoted to one group among russell’s diverse tribe of comrades: his fellow artists. Five distinguished scholars consider the painters and illustrators with whom russell associated, gauging the contributions of some to his artistic progress and assessing the debt owed by others to his work, with particular attention to russell’s friendships with his protégé Joe De Yong, sporting artist philip goodwin, and “kindred spirit” maynard Dixon, famed interpreter of the southwest. visions of the big sky Painting and Photographing the northern rocky mountain West By Dan Flores $45.00 cloth · 978-0-8061-3897-8 · 248 pages From the Wind river range to the canadian border, the northern rocky mountain West is an outsized land of stunning dimensions and emotive power. In Visions of the Big Sky, Dan Flores revisits the Northern rockies artistic tradition to explore its diversity and richness. In his essays about the artists, photographers, and thematic historical imagery of the region, he blends art and cultural history with personal reflection to assess the formation of the region’s character.

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lUis ortega’s raWhide artistry braiding in the california tradition By Chuck stormes and Don Reeves $29.95s paper · 978-0-8061-4091-9 · 160 pages An acclaimed rawhide braider of horse gear, luis ortega elevated his craft to collectible art and influenced a generation of gear makers. This book is the most comprehensive overview of his life, art, and career and the first booklength work on rawhide braiding in North America, charting changes in horse gear over five decades. a Place of refUge maynard dixon’s arizona By Thomas B. smith $49.95s cloth · 978-0-911611-36-6 · 160 pages Western painter maynard Dixon once pronounced “Arizona” “the magic name of a land bright and mysterious, of sun and sand, of tragedy and stark endeavor.” “so long had I dreamed of it,” he professed, “that when I came there it was not strange to me. Its sun was my sun; its ground was my ground.” The california-born Dixon (1875–1946) first traveled to Arizona in 1900 to absorb what he believed was a vanishing West. Dixon found Arizona a visually inspiring and spiritual place that shaped the course of his paintings and ultimately defined him. forging a nation the american history collection at gilcrease museum Contributions by Kimberly Roblin, Amanda Lett, eric singleton, and Randy Ramer Foreword by Duane H. King $39.95s cloth · 978-0-9725657-9-0 · 250 pages $24.95s paper · 978-0-9725657-8-3 · 250 pages When the second continental congress adopted the Declaration of Independence and created a new nation – the united states of America - few colonists-turned-citizens could foresee the great struggles that lay before it in the centuries to come. Forging a Nation explores those struggles—the history of the us—as told through art, artifacts, and archival materials that illuminate some three hundred years of a shared cultural experience. the masterWorks of charles m. rUssell a retrospective of Paintings and sculpture By Joan C. Troccoli $65.00 cloth · 978-0-8061-4081-0 · 304 pages $39.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4097-1 · 304 pages In the decades bracketing the turn of the twentieth century, charles m. russell depicted the American West in a fresh, personal, and deeply moving way. This handsome book—a companion volume to the acclaimed Charles M. Russell: A Catalogue Raisonné, edited by b. byron price—showcases many of the artist’s best-known works and chronicles the sources and evolution of his style. charles m. rUssell a catalogue raisonné edited by B. Byron Price Contributions by Raphael J. Cristy, Brian W. Dippee, Peter H. Hassrick, and B. Byron Price $125.00 cloth · 978-0-8061-3836-7 · 352 pages charles m. russell is the most beloved artist of the American West. This work, the result of a decade of research and scholarship, features 170 color reproductions of his greatest works and six essays by russell experts and scholars. each book contains a unique key code granting access to the more than 4,000 works created and signed by russell. Visit the website at www.russellraisonne.com.

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the West of the imagination second edition By William H. Goetzmann and William n. Goetzmann $65.00 cloth · 978-0-8061-3533-5 · 640 pages A landmark overview of western American art, the original edition of The West of the Imagination brought the region to wide public attention as a companion to a popular pbs series of the same name. This book, significantly expanded and updated, shows that the West is a vibrant mirror of American cultural diversity. Through 450 illustrations—more than 300 in color—the authors trace the visual evolution of the myth of the American West, from unknown frontier to repository of American values, covering popular and high arts alike. Wildlife in american art masterworks from the national museum of Wildlife art By Adam D. Harris $55.00s cloth · 978-0-8061-4015-5 · 320 pages $35.00 paper · 978-0-8061-4099-5 · 320 pages For more than two decades, the National museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson, Wyoming, has honored and sustained the tradition of wildlife in American art by assembling the most comprehensive collection of paintings and sculptures portraying North American wildlife in the world. Wildlife in American Art presents for the first time a generous sampling of the museum’s holdings, charts the history of this enduring theme in American art, and explores the evolving relationship between Americans and the natural resources of this continent. in contemPorary rhythm the art of ernest l. blumenschein By Peter H. Hassrick, elizabeth J. Cunningham, Lewis I. sharp, and Cathy L. Wright $34.95s paper · 978-0-8061-3948-7 · 416 pages The definitive retrospective on ernest l. blumenschein (1874–1960), one of the founders of the Taos society of Artists and perhaps the most accomplished of all the painters associated with that organization. reproducing masterworks from a new exhibit along with additional works and historical photographs, this volume forms the most comprehensive assemblage of his paintings ever published. faces of the frontier Photographic Portraits from the american West, 1845–1924 By Frank H. Goodyear III $45.00s cloth · 978-0-8061-4082-7 · 320 pages Faces of the Frontier showcases more than 120 photographic portraits of leaders, statesmen, soldiers, laborers, activists, criminals, and others, all posed before the cameras that made their way to nearly every mining shantytown and frontier outpost on the prairie. Drawing primarily on the collection of the National portrait gallery, this book depicts many of the people who helped transform the West between the end of the mexican War and passage of the Indian citizenship Act. charles deas and 1840s america By Carol Clark contributions by Joan c. Troccoli, Frederick e. Hoxie, and guy Jordan $39.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4030-8 · 248 pages This handsome volume—featuring more than 150 illustrations, 70 in color— is the first book exclusively devoted to charles Deas. In two major essays, carol clark presents Deas’s haunting biography and complex art—works that embodied Americans’ uncertainty about the future of their rapidly expanding nation, especially in the contested spaces of the West. ranging from Indian genre scenes to more violent and bizarre themes drawn from literature and his own imagination, Deas’s images reverberate with the racial tensions and cutthroat economic competition of the period.

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JUliUs seyler and the blackfeet an impressionist at glacier national Park By William e. Farr $45.00s cloth · 978-0-8061-4014-8 · 256 pages german Impressionist artist Julius seyler had already made a name for himself in europe when America beckoned. While in st. paul, minnesota, he encountered louis Hill, head of the great Northern railroad, who wanted to encourage travel to montana’s newly created glacier National park. To that end, Hill enticed the adventuresome seyler to visit this majestic landscape and to see the blackfeet Indians who lived there. This book marks both an appreciation of seyler’s unique art and a fascinating glimpse into the promotion of a national park in its early years. scUlPtor in bUckskin the autobiography of alexander Phimister Proctor, second edition edited by Katharine C. ebner $45.00s cloth · 978-0-8061-4007-0 · 244 pages Two disparate worlds met in the life of Alexander phimister proctor: the art world centered in the eastern united states and the world of the western frontier. proctor was a remarkable amalgam: a big-game hunter and intrepid explorer who felt at home in paris or New York, and an academically trained artist who painted and sculpted the characters and wild creatures of the West. This new edition of proctor’s autobiography provides a thorough introduction to a distinctively American artist whose monumental sculptures and statues adorn parks, public buildings, and museums, as well as private homes and businesses across the country. lanterns on the Prairie the blackfeet Photographs of Walter mcclintock By steven L. Grafe $60.00s cloth · 978-0-8061-4022-3 · 336 pages $34.95s paper · 978-0-8061-4029-2 · 336 pages Lanterns on the Prairie explores the motivations of the players in Walter mcclintock’s story and the historic context of his engagement with the blackfeet. The photographs themselves provide an irreplaceable visual record of the blackfeet during a pivotal period in their history.

Biography & Memoir
kit carson the life of an american border man By David Remley $24.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-4172-5 · 320 pages History has portrayed christopher “Kit” carson in black and white. best known as a nineteenth-century frontier hero, he has been represented more recently as an Indian killer responsible for the deaths of hundreds of Navajos. biographer David remley counters these polarized views, finding carson to be less than a mythical hero, but more than a simpleminded rascal with a rifle. shooting from the liP the life of senator al simpson By Donald Loren Hardy $26.95 cloth · 978-8-8061-4211-1 · 488 pages shortly before Wyoming’s Alan K. simpson was elected majority whip of the united states senate, he decided to keep a journal. Now the senator’s longtime chief of staff, Donald loren Hardy, has drawn extensively on simpson’s personal papers and nineteen-volume diary to write this unvarnished account of a storied life and political career. Full of entertaining tales and moments of historical significance, Shooting from the Lip offers a privileged and revealing backstage view of late-twentieth-century American politics.

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Wd farr cowboy in the boardroom By Daniel Tyler Foreword by senator Hank Brown $29.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4193-0 · 312 pages “Always a better way” was WD Farr’s motto. As a colorado rancher, banker, cattle feeder, and expert in irrigation, Farr (1910–2007) had a unique talent for building consensus and instigating change in an industry known for its conservatism. With his persistent optimism and gregarious personality, Farr’s influence extended from next-door neighbors and business colleagues to u.s. presidents and foreign dignitaries. In this biography, Daniel Tyler chronicles Farr’s singular life and career. At the same time, he tells a broader story of sweeping changes in agricultural production and irrigated agriculture in colorado and across the West during the twentieth century. ned WynkooP and the lonely road from sand creek By Louis Kraft $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4226-5 · 336 pages When edward W. Wynkoop arrived in colorado Territory during the 1858 gold rush, he was one of many ambitious newcomers seeking wealth in a promising land mostly inhabited by American Indians. After he worked as a miner, sheriff, bartender, and land speculator, Wynkoop’s life drastically changed after he joined the First colorado Volunteers to fight for the union during the civil War. This sympathetic but critical biography centers on his subsequent efforts to prevent war with Indians during the volatile 1860s. george crook from the redwoods to appomattox By Paul Magid $39.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4207-4 · 408 pages renowned for his prominent role in the Apache and sioux wars, general george crook (1828–90) was considered by William Tecumseh sherman to be his greatest Indian-fighting general. Although crook was feared by Indian opponents on the battlefield, in defeat the tribes found him a true friend and advocate who earned their trust and friendship when he spoke out in their defense against political corruption and greed. George Crook offers insight into the influences that later would make this general both a nemesis of the Indian tribes and their ardent advocate, and it illuminates the personality of this most enigmatic and eccentric of army officers. deeP trails in the old West a frontier memoir By Frank Clifford edited by Frederick nolan $29.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4186-2 · 336 pages During the 1870s and 1880s cowboy and drifter Frank clifford’s restless spirit led him all over the southwest, crossing the paths of many of the era’s most notorious characters, most notably clay Allison and billy the Kid. more than just an entertaining and informative narrative of his Wild West adventures, clifford’s memoir also paints a picture of how ranchers and ordinary folk lived, worked, and stayed alive during those tumultuous years. Written in 1940 and edited and annotated by Frederick Nolan, Deep Trails in the Old West is likely one of the last eyewitness histories of the old West ever to be discovered.

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mangas coloradas chief of the chiricahua apaches By edwin R. sweeney $32.95s paper · 978-0-8061-4239-5 · 608 pages mangas coloradas led his chiricahua Apache people for almost forty years. During the last years of mangas’s life, he and his son-in-law cochise led an assault against white settlement in Apacheria that made the two of them the most feared warriors in the southwest. In this first full-length biography of the legendary chief, edwin r. sweeney vividly portrays the Apache culture in which mangas rose to power and the conflict with Americans that led to his brutal death. the irish general thomas francis meagher By Paul R. Wylie $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4185-5 · 416 pages Irish patriot, civil War general, frontier governor—Thomas Francis meagher played key roles in three major historical arenas. Today he is hailed as a hero by some, condemned as a drunkard by others. paul r. Wylie now offers a definitive biography of this nineteenth-century figure who has long remained an enigma. “An engaging biography.”—James m. mcPherson, pulitzer prize–winning author of Battle Cry of Freedom charles goodnight father of the texas Panhandle By William T. Hagan $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4195-4 · 168 pages charles goodnight was a pioneer of the early range cattle industry—an opinionated and profane but energetic and well-liked rancher. goodnight’s story is now re-examined by William T. Hagan in this brief, authoritative account that considers the role of ranching in general—and goodnight in particular—in the development of the Texas panhandle. The first major reassessment of his life in seventy years, Charles Goodnight traces its subject’s life from hardscrabble farmer to cattle baron, giving close attention to lesserknown aspects of his last thirty years. Jedediah smith no ordinary mountain man By Barton H. Barbour $26.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-4011-7 · 304 pages $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4196-1 · 304 pages mountain man and fur trader Jedediah smith casts a heroic shadow. He was the first Anglo-American to travel overland to california via the southwest, and he roamed through more of the West than anyone else of his era. His adventures quickly became the stuff of legend. using new information and sifting fact from folklore, barton H. barbour now offers a fresh look at this dynamic figure. mr. Jefferson’s hammer William henry harrison and the origins of american indian Policy By Robert M. Owens $19.95s paper · 978-0-8061-4198-5 · 344 pages often remembered as the president who died shortly after taking office, William Henry Harrison remains misunderstood by most Americans. before becoming the ninth president of the united states in 1841, Harrison was instrumental in shaping the early years of westward expansion. robert m. owens now explores that era through the lens of Harrison’s career, providing a new synthesis of his role in the political development of Indiana Territory and in shaping Indian policy in the old Northwest.

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don’t shoot the gentile By James C. Work $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4194-7 · 152 pages When James c. Work took a teaching job at the college of southern utah in the mid-1960s, he knew little about teaching and even less about the customs of his mormon neighbors. With deadpan humor, Work pokes fun at his own naïveté in Don’t Shoot the Gentile, a memoir of his rookie years teaching at a small college in a small, mostly mormon town. Pío Pico the last governor of mexican california By Carlos Manuel salomon $24.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4090-2 · 256 pages $19.95s paper · 978-0-8061-4237-1 · 248 pages Two-time governor of Alta, california and prominent businessman after the u.s. annexation, pío de Jesus pico was a politically savvy californio who thrived in both the mexican and the American periods. This is the first biography of pico, whose life vibrantly illustrates the opportunities and risks faced by mexican Americans in those transitional years. a free and hardy life theodore roosevelt’s sojourn in the american West By Clay s. Jenkinson Foreword by Douglas Brinkley $45.00 cloth · 978-0-9825597-8-9 · 176 pages Theodore roosevelt ventured into the American West to seek authentic frontier experience and the strenuous life. This book contains 70 stories, many set in Dakota Territory, about roosevelt’s life as an adventurer, politician, and man of letters, lavishly illustrated with more than 100 photographs, some never previously published. clay s. Jenkinson’s introduction assesses what roosevelt learned from his sojourn in the West, including his commitment to conservation of America’s natural resources. With a foreword by best-selling biographer Douglas brinkley, this book tells the story of Theodore roosevelt’s life in his own words, carefully excerpted from his 1913 autobiography. tUrning Points a memoir By George A. “Bud” sinner and Bob Jansen $29.95 cloth · 978-0-9825597-4-1 · 350 pages $18.95 paper · 978-0-9825597-5-8 · 350 pages george “bud” sinner was the governor of North Dakota from 1984 to1992, one of the most difficult periods in North Dakota history. This is the story of a catholic farm boy who studied for the priesthood but discovered that his true vocation was public service. Turning Points exhibits bud sinner’s characteristic outspokenness about life and power, friendship and faith, agriculture and community, public affairs and personal ethics. boUnd like grass a memoir from the Western high Plains By Ruth McLaughlin $24.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-4137-4 · 200 pages Bound Like Grass is author ruth mclaughlin’s account of her own — and her family’s — struggle to survive on their isolated wheat and cattle farm. With acute observation, she explores her roots as a descendant of swedish American grandparents who settled in montana at the turn of the twentieth century with high ambitions, and of parents who barely managed to eke out a living on their own neighboring farm.

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bandido the life and times of tiburcio vasquez By John Boessenecker $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4127-5 · 496 pages Tiburcio Vasquez is, next to Joaquin murrieta, America’s most infamous Hispanic bandit. After he was hanged as a murderer in 1875, the Chicago Tribune called him “the most noted desperado of modern times.” Yet questions about him still linger. Why did he become a bandido? Why did so many Hispanics protect him and his band? Was he a common thief and heartless killer who got what he deserved, or was he a mexican American robin Hood who suffered at the hands of a racist government? In this engrossing biography, John boessenecker provides definitive answers. “. . . Bandido is a comprehensive biography of the legendary outlaw that strips away the myths surrounding Vasquez. With this book, boessenecker has reaffirmed his place as one of the best of the West.”—True West Magazine, best of the West 2011 oPen range the life of agnes morley cleaveland By Darlis A. Miller $24.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4117-6 · 192 pages Agnes morley cleaveland found lasting fame after publishing her memoir, No Life for a Lady, in 1941. Her account of growing up on a cattle ranch in westcentral New mexico captivated readers from coast to coast, and it remains in print to this day. In her book, cleaveland memorably portrayed herself and other ranchwomen as capable workers and independent thinkers. Her life, however, was not limited to the ranch. In Open Range, Darlis A. miller expands our understanding of cleaveland’s significance, showing how a young girl who was a fearless risk-taker grew up to be a prolific author and well-known social activist. a Pair of shootists the Wild West story of s. f. cody and maud lee By Jerry Kuntz $29.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4149-7 · 224 pages In 1888, samuel F. cody, a twenty-one-year-old horse wrangler, met maud lee, a sixteen-year-old aspiring circus performer, while touring with the Wild West show cast of Adam Forepaugh’s circus. A quick rapport developed between the girl from Norristown, pennsylvania, and the cowboy who dazzled audiences with his good looks and fancy pistol shooting. A Pair of Shootists is the exuberant and sometimes heartbreaking story of the elusive cody and his first wife, lee. recounting their many dramatic exploits, this biography also overturns the frequently romanticized view of Wild West shows. race and the University a memoir By George Henderson Foreword by David W. Levy $24.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4129-9 · 272 pages In 1967, george Henderson, the son of uneducated Alabama sharecroppers, accepted a full-time professorship at the university of oklahoma, despite his mentor’s warning to avoid the “redneck school in a backward state.” Henderson became the university’s third African American professor, a hire that seemed to suggest the dissolving of racial divides. capturing what was perhaps the most tumultuous era in the history of American higher education, Race and the University includes valuable recollections of former student activists who helped transform the university of oklahoma into one of the nation’s most diverse college campuses.

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chief loco apache Peacemaker By Bud shapard $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4047-6 · 376 pages Jlin-tay-i-tith, better known as loco, was the only Apache leader to make a lasting peace with both Americans and mexicans. Yet most historians have ignored his efforts, and some chiricahua descendants have branded him as fainthearted despite his well-known valor in combat. In this engaging biography, bud shapard tells the story of this important but overlooked chief against the backdrop of the harrowing Apache wars and eventual removal of the tribe from its homeland to prison camps in Florida, Alabama, and oklahoma. PiPestone my life in an indian boarding school By Adam Fortunate eagle $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4114-5 · 248 pages best known as a leader of the Indian takeover of Alcatraz Island in 1969, Adam Fortunate eagle now offers an unforgettable memoir of his years as a young student at pipestone Indian boarding school in minnesota. In this rare firsthand account, Fortunate eagle lives up to his reputation as a “contrary warrior” by disproving the popular view of Indian boarding schools as bleak and prisonlike. n. scott momaday remembering ancestors, earth, and traditions an annotated bio-bibliography By Phyllis s. Morgan $60.00s cloth · 978-0-8061-4054-4 · 400 pages N. scott momaday, pulitzer prize–winning author of House Made of Dawn (1969) and National medal of Arts awardee, is the elder statesman of Native American literature and a major twentieth-century American author. This volume marks the most comprehensive resource available on momaday. Along with an insightful new biography, it offers extensive, up-to-date bibliographies of his own work and the work of others about him. best of covered Wagon Women, volUme 1 By Kenneth L. Holmes $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-3914-2 · 304 pages The diaries and letters of women who braved the overland trails during the great nineteenth-century westward migration are treasured documents in the study of the American West. These eight firsthand accounts are among the best ever written. They were selected for the power with which they portray the hardship, adventure, and boundless love for friends and family that characterized the overland experience. some were written with the skilled pens of educated women. best of covered Wagon Women, volUme 2 emigrant girls on the overland trails By Kenneth Holmes $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4104-6 · 256 pages The diaries and letters of women on the overland trails in the mid- to late nineteenth century are treasured documents. These eleven selections drawn from the multivolume Covered Wagon Women series present the best first-person trail accounts penned by women in their teens who traveled west between 1846 and 1898. ranging in age from eleven to nineteen, unmarried and without children of their own, these diarists had experiences different from those of older women who carried heavier responsibilities with them on the trail. These letters and diaries reflect both the unique perspective of youthful optimism and the experiences common among all female emigrants.

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a roUgh ride to redemPtion the ben daniels story By Robert K. DeArment and Jack DeMattos $29.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4112-1 · 264 pages He may be little known today, but ben Daniels was a feared gunman who typified the journeyman gunfighter every bit as much as those whose names have become legend. Yet his story has eluded researchers and yarn-spinners alike— until now. Two prominent western historians have teamed up to tell the story of Daniels’s rise from outlaw and convict to presidential protégé and high-ranking officer of the law. Tracing his life from jailhouse to White House, from Dodge city to san Juan Hill, robert K. DeArment and Jack Demattos present a fulllength biography of Daniels, the most controversial of Teddy roosevelt’s “White House gunfighters.” deadly dozen, volUme 3 forgotten gunfighters of the old West By Robert K. DeArment $29.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4076-6 · 408 pages For every Wild bill Hickok or billy the Kid, there was another western gunfighter just as deadly but not as well known. robert K. DeArment has earned a reputation as the premier researcher of unknown gunfighters, and here he offers twelve more portraits of men who weren’t glorified in legend but were just as notorious in their day. The product of iron-clad research, this newest Deadly Dozen delivers the goods for gunfighter buffs in search of something different. Together the Deadly Dozen volumes constitute a Who’s Who of western outlaws and prove that there’s more to the Wild West than Jesse James. When i came West By Laurie Wagner Buyer $14.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4059-9 · 200 pages As a young college student in the early 1970s, laurie Wagner had never camped out, never gone hiking, and never lived without electricity or indoor plumbing. Yet she walked away from these comforts and headed for the wildest reaches of montana to live with a man she had not met in person.When I Came West is laurie Wagner buyer’s account of her terrifying and exhilarating years in montana as she changes from a girl too squeamish to touch a dead mouse to a toughened frontierswoman unafraid to butcher a domestic animal. lyndon b. Johnson and modern america By Kevin J. Fernlund $24.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-4077-3 · 192 pages born in a farmhouse in the Texas Hill country, lyndon baines Johnson brought a western sensibility to the White House. building on recent studies that have delved into Johnson’s Texas roots, Kevin J. Fernlund has written a brief, lively biography of the thirty-sixth president that better shows how his home state molded his early years—and how the one-time Houston schoolteacher eventually became a Texas tornado twisting across the state’s and soon the nation’s political landscape. J. robert oPPenheimer, the cold War, and the atomic West By Jon Hunner $24.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-4046-9 · 272 pages In 1922, the teenage son of a Jewish immigrant ventured from manhattan to New mexico for his health. It was the first of many trips to the sangre de cristo mountains, a western retreat where J. robert oppenheimer would eventually hold pathbreaking discussions with world-renowned scientists about atomic physics. oppenheimer came to feel at home in the American West, and while extensive studies have been made of the man, this is the first book to explicitly link him with the region. J. Robert Oppenheimer, the Cold War, and the Atomic West explores how the West influenced oppenheimer as a scientist and as a person— and the role he played in influencing it.

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call me lUcky a texan in hollywood By Robert Hinkle $24.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-4093-3 · 272 pages From his birth in brownfield, Texas, to a family so poor “they could only afford a tumbleweed as a pet,” robert Hinkle went on to gain acclaim in Hollywood. Through it all, he remained the salty, down-to-earth former rodeo cowboy from West Texas who could talk his way into—or out of—most any situation. more than forty photographs, including rare behind-the-scenes glimpses of the stars Hinkle met and befriended along the way, complement this rousing, never-dull memoir. the sUndance kid the life of harry alonzo longabaugh By Donna B. ernst Foreword by Dan Buck, and Anne Meadows Introduction by Paul D. ernst $29.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-3982-1 · 264 pages $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4115-2 · 264 pages He gained renown as the sidekick of butch cassidy, but the sundance Kid— whose real name was Harry Alonzo longabaugh—led a fuller life than history or Hollywood has allowed. A relative of longabaugh through marriage, Donna b. ernst now brings to print the most thorough account ever of one of the West’s most infamous outlaws. The Sundance Kid is enlivened by more than three dozen photographs, including family photos never before seen. the good times are all gone noW life, death, and rebirth in an idaho mining town By Julie W. Weston $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4075-9 · 248 pages Julie Whitesel Weston left her hometown of Kellogg, Idaho, but eventually it pulled her back. only when she returned to this mining community did she begin to see the paradoxes of the place where she grew up. The Good Times Are All Gone Now begins the day the smokestacks came down, and it reaches far back into collective and personal memory to understand a way of life now gone. The company town Weston knew is a different place, where “uncle bunker” is a superfund site, and where the townspeople have endured to reinvent Kellogg—not once, but twice. “Julie Weston’s book could have been subtitled growing up in America— against a background of poison from one of the most notorious mining operations in the world. Weston’s insights are unforgettable; her writing is wonderful.” - mary clearman blew, author of All but the Waltz and Jackalope Dreams “An important portrait of the interior West—the true stuff, raw and gritty, honest to the bone.”--craig lesley, author of Burning Fence and Sky Fisherman horses that bUck the story of champion bronc rider bill smith By Margot Kahn $24.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-3912-8 · 208 pages When asked in an interview what he most liked about rodeo, three-time world champion saddle-bronc rider “cody” bill smith said simply, “Horses that buck.” smith redefined the image of America’s iconic cowboy. Determined as a boy to escape a miner’s life in montana, he fantasized a life in rodeo and went on to earn thirteen trips to the national finals, becoming one of the greatest of all riders. His story is a genuine slice of rodeo life—a life of magic for those good enough to win. This book will delight rodeo and cowboy enthusiasts alike.

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agnes lake hickok Queen of the circus, Wife of a legend By Linda A. Fisher and Carrie Bowers $29.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-3983-8 · 416 pages The first woman in America to own and operate a circus, Agnes lake spent thirty years under the big Top before becoming the wife of Wild bill Hickok—a mere five months before he was killed. Although books abound on the famous lawman, Agnes’s life has remained obscured by circus myth and legend. This account of a remarkable life cuts through fictions about Agnes’s life, including her own embellishments, to uncover her true story. Numerous illustrations, including rare photographs and circus memorabilia, bring Agnes’s world to life. gall lakota War chief By Robert W. Larson $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4036-0 · 320 pages called the “Fighting cock of the sioux” by u.s. soldiers, Hunkpapa warrior gall was a great lakota chief who, along with sitting bull and crazy Horse, resisted efforts by the u.s. government to annex the black Hills. It was gall, enraged by the slaughter of his family, who led the charge across medicine Tail Ford to attack custer’s main forces on the other side of the little bighorn. Filling many gaps in our understanding of this warrior and his relationship with sitting bull, this engaging biography also offers new interpretations of the little bighorn that lay to rest the contention that gall was “custer’s conqueror.” folloWing isabella travels in colorado then and now By Robert Root $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4018-6 · 288 pages A world traveler, Isabella bird recorded her 1873 visit to colorado Territory in her classic travel narrative, A Lady’s Life in the Rocky Mountains. This work inspired robert root’s own discovery of colorado’s Front range following his move from the flatlands of michigan. In this elegantly written book, root retraces bird’s three-month journey, seeking to understand what colorado meant to her—and what it would come to mean for him. baby doe tabor the madwoman in the cabin By Judy n. Temple $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4035-3 · 280 pages The story of baby Doe Tabor has seduced America for more than a century. long before her body was found frozen in a leadville shack near the matchless mine, elizabeth mccourt “baby Doe” Tabor was the stuff of legend. The stunning divorcée married colorado’s wealthiest mining magnate and became the “silver Queen of the West.” blessed with two daughters, Horace and baby Doe mesmerized the world with their wealth and extravagance. baby Doe Tabor left a record of her madness in a set of writings she called her “Dreams and Visions.” These were discovered after her death but never studied in detail—until now. oklahoma roUgh rider billy mcginty’s own story edited by Jim Fulbright and Albert stehno $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-3935-7 · 232 pages When Americans answered the call-to-arms after the sinking of the uss Maine in 1898, a wiry little oklahoman was in the front ranks. Veteran cowboy billy mcginty put his horseman’s skills to work as one of Teddy roosevelt’s rough riders and participated in the battle of las guasimas, the attack on san Juan Heights, and the siege of santiago. Oklahoma Rough Rider recounts mcginty’s exploits on the battlefield and later on the stage.

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Environment
Windfall Wind energy in america today By Robert W. Righter $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4192-3 · 232 pages Not long ago, energy experts dismissed wind power as unreliable and capricious. Not anymore. The industry has arrived, and the spinning blades of this new kid on the electric power block offer hope for a partial solution to our energy problems by converting nature’s energy into electricity without exposing our planet and its inhabitants to the dangers of heat, pollution, toxicity, or depletion of irreplaceable natural resources. Windfall tells the story of this extraordinary transformation and examines the arguments both for and against wind generation. going green true tales from gleaners, scavengers, and dumpster divers By Laura Pritchett $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4013-1 · 240 pages Never mind the ph.D. and middle-class trappings—laura pritchett is a dumpster diver and proud of it. ever since she was old enough to navigate the contents of a metal bin, she has reveled in the treasures found in other people’s cast-offs. brimming with practical and creative new ways to think about recycling, this collection invites you to dive in and find your own way of going green. oUr better natUre environment and the making of san francisco By Philip J. Dreyfus $24.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-3958-6 · 240 pages In Our Better Nature, philip J. Dreyfus recounts the history of san Francisco from Indian village to world-class metropolis, focusing on the interactions between the city and the land and on the generations of people who have transformed them both. Dreyfus examines the ways that san Franciscans remade the landscape to fit their needs, and how their actions reflected and affected their ideas about nature, from the destruction of wetlands and forests to the creation of golden gate and Yosemite parks, the sierra club, and later, the birth of the modern environmental movement. disaPPearing desert the growth of Phoenix and the culture of sprawl By Janine schipper $19.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-3955-5 · 144 pages phoenix, Arizona, is one of the fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the united states. The city’s expansion—at the rate of one acre per hour—comes at the expense of its sonoran Desert environment. For some residents, the American Dream has become a nightmare. In this provocative book, Janine schipper examines the cultural forces that contribute to suburban sprawl in the united states. Focusing on the phoenix area, she examines sustainable development in cave creek, various master-planned suburbs, and the salt river pima-maricopa Indian reservation to explore suburbanization and ecological destruction.

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History
stories of old-time oklahoma By David Dary $24.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-4181-7 · 288 pages Do you know how oklahoma came to have a panhandle? Did you know that Washington Irving once visited what is now oklahoma? can you name the official state rock, or list the courses in the official state meal? The answers to these questions, and others you may not have thought to ask, can be found in this engaging collection of tales by renowned journalist-historian David Dary. an archaeology of desPeration exploring the donner Party’s alder creek camp edited by Kelly J. Dixon, Julie M. schablitsky, and shannon A. novak With Contributions by Will Bagley, Kelsey Gray, Donald L. Hardesty, Kristin Johnson, sean McMurry, Jo Ann nevers, Gwen Robbins, Penny Rucks, and G. Richard scott $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4210-4 · 384 pages The Donner party is almost inextricably linked with cannibalism. In truth, we know remarkably little about what actually happened to the starving travelers stranded in the sierra Nevada in the winter of 1846–47. combining the approaches of history, ethnohistory, archaeology, bioarchaeology, and social anthropology, this innovative look at the Donner party’s experience at the Alder creek camp offers insights into many long-unsolved mysteries. fort clark and its indian neighbors a trading Post on the Upper missouri By W. Raymond Wood, William J. Hunt, Jr., and Randy H. Williams $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4213-5 · 328 pages A thriving fur trade post between 1830 and 1860, Fort clark, in what is today western North Dakota, also served as a way station for artists, scientists, missionaries, soldiers, and other western chroniclers traveling along the upper missouri river. The written and visual legacies of these visitors have long been the primary sources of information on the cultures of the mandan and Hidatsa Indians. This book, by a team of anthropologists, is the first thorough account of the fur trade at Fort clark to integrate new archaeological evidence with the historical record. after cUster loss and transformation in sioux country By Paul L. Hedren $24.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4216-6 · 272 pages between 1876 and 1877, the u.s. Army battled lakota sioux and Northern cheyenne Indians in a series of vicious conflicts known today as the great sioux War. After the defeat of custer at the little big Horn in June 1876, the army responded to its stunning loss by pouring fresh troops and resources into the war effort. In the end, the u.s. Army prevailed, but at a significant cost. In this unique contribution to American western history, paul l. Hedren examines the war’s effects on the culture, environment, and geography of the northern great plains, their Native inhabitants, and the Anglo-American invaders. alaska a history By Claus-M. naske and Herman e. slotnick $39.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-4040-7 · 420 pages The largest by far of the fifty states, Alaska is also the state of greatest mystery and diversity. And, as claus-m. Naske and Herman e. slotnick show in this comprehensive survey, the history of Alaska’s peoples and the development of its economy have matched the diversity of its land- and seascapes.

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rainboW bridge to monUment valley making the modern old West By Thomas J. Harvey $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4190-9 · 304 pages The colorado river plateau is home to two of the best-known landscapes in the world: rainbow bridge in southern utah and monument Valley on the utah-Arizona border. Twentieth-century popular culture made these places icons of the American West, and advertising continues to exploit their significance today. In Rainbow Bridge to Monument Valley, Harvey artfully tells how Navajos and Anglo-Americans created fabrics of meaning out of this stunning desert landscape, space that western novelist Zane grey called “the storehouse of unlived years,” where a rugged, more authentic life beckoned. assaUlt on the deadWood stage road agents and shotgun messengers By Robert K. DeArment Foreword by Joseph G. Rosa $24.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4182-4 · 272 pages In the 1870s, Deadwood was a thriving—and largely lawless—boomtown. And as any fan of western history and films knows, stagecoach robberies were a regular feature of life in this fabled region of Dakota Territory. Now, for the first time, robert K. DeArment tells the story of the “good guys and bad guys” behind these violent crimes: the road agents who wreaked havoc on Deadwood’s roadways and the shotgun messengers who battled to protect stagecoach passengers and their valuable cargo. the bronco bill gang By Karen Holliday Tanner and John D. Tanner, Jr. $29.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4165-7 · 280 pages The short, bloody career of “bronco bill” Walters and his gang captures the devil-may-care violence of the Wild West. In this detailed narrative of the gang’s crime spree in territorial New mexico and Arizona, two experts in outlaw history offer a gunshot-by-gunshot account of how some especially dangerous outlaws plied their trade in 1898. violent encoUnters interviews on Western massacres By Deborah Lawrence and Jon Lawrence $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4126-8 · 336 pages merciless killing in the nineteenth-century American West, as this unusual book shows, was not as simple as depicted in dime novels and movie Westerns. The scholars interviewed here, experts on violence in the West, embrace a wide range of approaches and perspectives and challenge both traditional views of western expansion and politically correct ideologies. The battle of the little bighorn, the sand creek massacre, the battle of the Washita, and the mountain meadows massacre are iconic events. scholars and students of history and historiography will be fascinated by the nuts-andbolts information about the practice of history revealed in these interviews. Western heritage a selection of Wrangler award–Winning articles edited by Paul A. Hutton Foreword by Charles P. schroeder $19.95s paper · 978-0-8061-4206-7 · 292 pages The enduring fascination of the American West marks this collection of essays by distinguished historians, investigative reporters, a novelist, and a celebrated screenwriter. All of these articles have won Wrangler Awards—the western equivalent of the oscars—presented annually by the National cowboy & Western Heritage museum in oklahoma city.

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shot in oklahoma a century of sooner state cinema By John Wooley $16.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4174-9 · 320 pages When Thomas edison wanted to capture western magic on film in 1904, where did he send his crew? To oklahoma’s 101 ranch near ponca city. And when Francis Ford coppola readied young actors Tom cruise and matt Dillon to portray teen class strife in the 1983 movie The Outsiders, he took cast and crew to Tulsa, the setting of s. e. Hinton’s acclaimed novel. From edison to coppola and beyond, oklahoma has served as both backdrop and home base for cinematic productions. Shot in Oklahoma explores the variety, spunk, and ingenuity of moviemaking in the sooner state over more than a century. oklahoma a history By W. David Baird and Danney Goble $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4197-8 · 360 page From the tectonic formation of oklahoma’s varied landscape to the recovery and renewal following the oklahoma city bombing, this readable book includes both the well-known and the not-so-familiar of the state’s people, events, and places. W. David baird and Danney goble offer fresh perspectives on such widely recognized history makers as sequoyah, the 1889 land run, and the glenn pool oil strike. but they also give due attention to black seminole John Horse, Tulsa’s greenwood District, coach bertha Frank Teague’s 40-year winning streak with the byng lady pirates, and other lesser-known but equally important milestones. The result is a rousing, often surprising, and ever-fascinating story. enhanced by more than 40 illustrations, including 11 maps, this definitive history of the state ensures that experiences shared by oklahomans of the past will be passed on to future generations. Women Who Pioneered oklahoma stories from the WPa narratives edited by Terri M. Baker and Connie Oliver Henshaw $19.95s paper · 978-0-8061-3846-6 · 248 pages They came in land runs and on the Trail of Tears, sometimes with families, sometimes alone. but the women who first came to oklahoma all had trials to face—and stories to tell. In this stirring collection, the women who settled what would become oklahoma tell their own stories in their own words. elegantly written, skillfully edited, Women Who Pioneered Oklahoma reflects the everyday will and courage to survive of oklahoma’s founding mothers. coWboy life on the llano estacado By Vivian H. Whitlock (Ol’ Waddy) $26.95s paper · 978-0-8061-4188-6 · 320 pages In 1887, Vivian H. Whitlock went with his brother and widowed mother to live with his uncle, george causey, a buffalo hunter turned rancher, at his ranch on the llano estacado (staked plains) in New mexico. Here Whitlock describes— vividly, realistically, and with humor—what life was like on those vast, desolate plains at the turn of the century. Pioneer cattleman in montana the story of the circle c ranch By Walt Coburn $26.95s paper · 978-0-8061-4208-1 · 352 pages In 1886, robert coburn bought 30,000 acres of land from granville stuart. The tract lay in the long shadows of the little rockies of montana, and coburn called it a “cattleman’s paradise.” Then the still-remembered blizzard of the following winter erased half of his stock. This is the story of how coburn overcame long odds, proved that the circle c was, indeed, the “paradise” he envisioned, and emerged as one of the progressive men of montana. Pioneer Cattleman in Montana will appeal to everyone interested in the “most colorful, romantic, lawless era in the history of western America.”

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so rUgged and moUntainoUs blazing the trails to oregon and california, 1812–1848 By Will Bagley $45.00s cloth · 978-0-8061-4103-9 · 480 pages The story of America’s westward migration is a powerful blend of fact and fable. over the course of three decades, almost a million eager fortunehunters, pioneers, and visionaries transformed the face of a continent—and displaced its previous inhabitants. The people who made the long and perilous journey over the oregon and california trails drove this swift and astonishing change. In this magisterial volume, Will bagley tells why and how this massive emigration began. “No one tells the history of the early western trails better than utah historian Will bagley. This is an epic story drawing on official records, letters, journals, personal accounts, newspaper articles and legend, all woven together into an absorbing narrative. Not since John D. unruh, Jr., wrote The plains Across more than 30 years ago, has anyone tackled such a massive project on westward migration. or done it this well. So Rugged and Mountainous is as good as history gets.”—Denver Post texas a historical atlas, second edition By A. Ray stephens $39.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-3873-2 · 448 pages For twenty years the Historical Atlas of Texas stood as a trusted resource for students and aficionados of the state. Now this key reference has been thoroughly updated and expanded—and even rechristened. Texas: A Historical Atlas more accurately reflects the lone star state at the dawn of the twentyfirst century. Its 86 entries feature 175 newly designed maps—more than twice the number in the original volume—illustrating the most significant aspects of the state’s history, geography, and current affairs. The most comprehensive, state-of-the-art work of its kind, Texas: A Historical Atlas is more than just a reference. It is a striking visual introduction to the lone star state. the north american JoUrnals of Prince maximilian of Wied edited by stephen s. Witte and Marsha V. Gallagher Volume oNe: may 1832-April 1833 $295.00n • Leather Bound • 978-87062-365-3 • 512 pages $85.00s Cloth • 978-0-8061-3888-6 • 544 pages Volume TWo: April-september 1833 $295.00n • Leather Bound • 978-0-87062-366-0 • 612 pages $85.00s Cloth • 978-0-8061-3923-4 • 612 pages Few historical chronicles are as informative and eloquent as the journal written by prince maximilian of Wied as a record of his journey into the North American interior in 1833, following the route lewis and clark had taken almost thirty years earlier. maximilian’s memorable descriptions of topography, Native peoples, and natural history were further brought to life through the now-familiar watercolors and sketches of Karl bodmer, the young swiss artist who accompanied him. Volume one of the North American Journals recounts the prince’s journey from europe to st. louis—then the edge of the frontier. Volume Two vividly narrates his experiences on the upper missouri and offers an unparalleled view of the region and the peoples native to it. Volume Three covers september 1833–August 1834 and will be forthcoming in spring 2012. This book is published with the assistance of the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

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Wyoming range War the infamous invasion of Johnson county By John W. Davis $29.95 Cloth • 978-0-8061-4106-0 384 • pages John W. Davis retells the story of the West’s most notorious range war. Having delved more deeply than previous writers into land and census records, newspapers, and trial transcripts, Davis has produced an all-new interpretation. He looks at the conflict from the perspective of Johnson county residents and finds that, contrary to the received explanation, these people were not thieves and rustlers but legitimate citizens. Wyoming Range War tells a compelling story that redraws the lines between heroes and villains. arena legacy the heritage of american rodeo By Richard C. Rattenbury $65.00 cloth · 978-0-8061-4084-1 · 400 pages From its roots in cowboy and vaquero culture to the big-business excitement of today’s National Finals competitions, rodeo has embodied the rugged individualism and competitive spirit of the American West. Now the long trajectory of rodeo culture comes fully alive in Arena Legacy. showcasing the unrivaled collections of the National cowboy & Western Heritage museum, this lavishly illustrated volume is the first to depict rodeo’s material and graphic heritage. certain to delight a diverse audience of rodeo aficionados, participants, collectors, and historians, this stunning volume is a fitting tribute to America’s truly western sport. Pendleton roUnd-UP at 100 By Michael Bales and Ann T. Hall $60.00 cloth · 978-0-88240-773-9 · 302 pages every september since 1910, the pendleton round-up has drawn thousands of rodeo fans to a small town in eastern oregon. For seven days, the crowds in pendleton thrill to contests that range from bull riding and bronc busting to barrel racing and bareback Indian relays. This extravagantly illustrated book commemorates the centennial of the round-up and captures its enduring appeal in oregon, the pacific Northwest, and the world of rodeo. beautifully designed, this book features a breadth of color and black-andwhite photographs—more than 900—showcasing the riders, the drama, and the special atmosphere that is pendleton. river of Promise lewis and clark on the columbia By David nicandri $29.95 cloth · 978-0-9825597-0-3 · 325 pages $18.95 paper · 978-0-9825597-1-0 · 325 pages In the many published accounts of the lewis and clark expedition, historians have tended to undervalue the explorers’ encounter with columbia river country. most narratives emphasize lewis and clark’s adventures through their journey to the bitterroot mountains but have said little about the rest of their travels west of there. River of Promise fills a significant gap in our understanding of lewis and clark’s legendary expedition. the billy the kid reader By Frederick nolan $29.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-3849-7 · 400 pages Despite the countless books and films devoted to him, billy the Kid remains one of the most elusive figures of the old West. Now, award-winning western historian Frederick Nolan has scoured the published literature to offer this well-rounded compendium on the life and times of William H. bonney.

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the character of meriWether leWis explorer in the Wilderness By Clay s. Jenkinson $29.95 cloth · 978-0-9825597-2-7 · 250 pages $19.95 paper · 978-0-9825597-3-4 · 250 pages meriwether lewis commanded the most important exploration mission in the early history of the united states. clay s. Jenkinson takes a fresh look at lewis, not to offer a paper cutout hero but to describe and explain a hyperserious young man of great complexity who found the wilderness of upper louisiana as exacting as it was exhilarating. america’s folklorist b. a. botkin and american culture edited by Lawrence R. Rodgers and Jerrod Hirsch $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4111-4 · 296 pages Folklorist, writer, editor, regionalist, cultural activist—benjamin Albert botkin (1901–1975) was an American intellectual who made a mark on the twentieth century, even though most people may be unaware of it. This book, the first to reevaluate the legacy of botkin in the history of American culture, celebrates his centenary through a collection of writings that assess his influence on scholarship and the American scene. beyond bear’s PaW the nez Perce indians in canada By Jerome A. Greene $24.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4068-1 · 264 pages In the fall of 1877, Nez perce (Nimiipuu) Indians were desperately fleeing u.s. Army troops. The army caught up with them at the bear’s paw mountains in northern montana, and following a devastating battle, chief Joseph and most of his people surrendered. The wrenching tale of chief Joseph and his followers is now legendary, but bear’s paw is not the entire story. In fact, nearly three hundred Nez perces escaped the u.s. Army and fled into canada. Beyond Bear’s Paw is the first book to explore the fate of these “nontreaty” Indians. Prairie rePUblic the Political culture of dakota territory, 1879–1889 By Jon K. Lauck $32.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4110-7 · 256 pages Territorial politics in the late-nineteenth-century West is typically viewed as a closed-door game of unprincipled opportunism or is caricatured, as in the classic film The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, as a drunken exercise in bombast and rascality. Now Jon K. lauck examines anew the values we like to think were at work during the founding of our western states. Taking Dakota Territory as a laboratory for examining a formative stage of western politics, lauck finds that settlers from New england and the midwest brought democratic practices and republican values to the northern plains and invoked them as guiding principles in the drive for south Dakota statehood. droPPers america’s first hippie commune, drop city By Mark Matthews $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4058-2 · 248 pages sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll. In popular imagination, these words seem to capture the atmosphere of 1960s hippie communes. Yet when the first hippie commune was founded in 1965 outside Trinidad, colorado, the goal wasn’t one long party but rather a new society that integrated life and art. In Droppers, mark matthews chronicles the rise and fall of this utopian community, exploring the goals behind its creation and the factors that eventually led to its dissolution.

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flying across america By Daniel L. Rust $45.00 cloth · 978-0-8061-3870-1 · 272 pages Americans who now endure the inconveniences of crowded airports, packed airplanes, and missed connections might not realize that flying was once an elegant, exhilarating adventure. In this colorful history, Daniel l. rust traces the evolution of commercial air travel from the first transcontinental expeditions of the 1920s, through the luxurious airline environments of the 1960s, to the more hectic, fatiguing experiences of flying in the post-9/11 era. “An impressive collection of illustrations, photographs and vintage airline advertisements, as well as first-hand accounts of passengers, to give readers a taste of airline travel through its evolution from being a novelty for a select few to a necessary nuisance for millions.” – Wall Street Journal a decent, orderly lynching the montana vigilantes By Frederick Allen $34.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-3637-0 · 496 pages $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4038-4 · 496 pages The deadliest campaign of vigilante justice in American history erupted in the rocky mountains during the civil War when a private army hanged twenty-one troublemakers. Hailed as great heroes at the time, the montana vigilantes are still revered as founding fathers. Frederick Allen’s sharply drawn characters, illustrated by dozens of photographs, are woven into a masterfully written narrative that will change textbook accounts of montana’s early days—and challenge our thinking on the essence of justice. amber Waves and UndertoW Peril, hope, sweat, and downright nonchalance in dry Wheat country By steve Turner $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4005-6 · 224 pages Adams county, Washington, is home to farmlands on the columbia plateau that produce more crops than might be expected of its semiarid soils. but while unique in its geography and history, it also faces many of the problems confronting farmers throughout rural America. seasoned journalist steve Turner, having spent time in Adams county as a young harvest hand, returned to the region to portray farm life and history in a land where change is a subtle but powerful constant. PUeblos, sPaniards, and the kingdom of neW mexico By John L. Kessell $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4122-0 · 240 pages For more than four hundred years in New mexico, pueblo Indians and spaniards have lived “together yet apart.” Now the preeminent historian of that region’s colonial past offers a fresh, balanced look at the origins of a precarious relationship. brimming with new insights embedded in an engaging narrative, Kessell’s work presents a clearer picture than ever before of events leading to the pueblo revolt. Pueblos, Spaniards, and the Kingdom of New Mexico is the definitive account of a volatile era. We’ll find the Place the mormon exodus, 1846–1848 By Richard e. Bennett $21.95 paper · 978-0-8061-3838-1 · 448 pages We’ll Find the Place tells the fascinating story of the mormons’ exodus from Nauvoo, Illinois, to their New Zion in the West—a story of a people’s deliverance that has never before been completely told. A work many years in the making, this book looks behind the scenes to reveal mormonism on the move, its believers sacrificing home, comfort, and sometimes life itself as they sought a safe refuge beyond the rocky mountains. It is faithful both to the convictions of the early pioneers and to the records they kept.

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texas devils rangers and regulars on the lower rio grande, 1846–1861 By Michael L. Collins $26.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-3939-5 · 328 pages $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4132-9 · 328 pages The Texas rangers have been the source of tall tales and the stuff of legend as well as a growing darker reputation. but the story of the rangers along the mexican border between Texas statehood and the onset of the civil War has been largely overlooked—until now. This engaging history pulls readers back to a chaotic time along the lower rio grande in the mid-nineteenth century. Texas Devils challenges the time-honored image of “good guys in white hats” to reveal the more complicated and sobering reality behind the ranger myth. “they are all red oUt here” socialist Politics in the Pacific northwest, 1895–1925 By Jeffrey A. Johnson $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-3967-8 · 240 pages In this first book to fully examine the development of the American socialist party in the Northwest, Jeffrey A. Johnson draws a sharp picture of one of the most vigorous left-wing organizations of the early twentieth century. relying on party newspapers, pamphlets, and correspondence, he allows socialists to reveal their own strategies as they pursued their agendas in Washington, oregon, Idaho, and montana. And he explores how the party gained sizable support in butte, spokane, and other cities seldom associated today with leftwing radicalism. radical l.a. from coxey’s army to the Watts riots, 1894–1965 By errol W. stevens $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4002-5 · 352 pages When the depression of the 1890s prompted unemployed workers from los Angeles to join a nationwide march on Washington, “coxey’s Army” marked the birth of radicalism in that city. In this first book to trace the subsequent struggle between the radical left and l.A.’s power structure, errol Wayne stevens tells how both sides shaped the city’s character from the turn of the twentieth century through the civil rights era. a great day to fight fire mann gulch, 1949 By Mark Matthews $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4034-6 · 280 pages mann gulch, montana, 1949. sixteen men ventured into hell to fight a raging wildfire; only three came out alive. searing the fire into the nation’s consciousness, Norman maclean chronicled the mann gulch tragedy in his award-winning book Young Men and Fire. still, the silence of the victims’ families robbed maclean’s account of an essential personal dimension. shifting the focus from the fire to the men who fought it, mark matthews now provides that perspective. race & the War on Poverty from Watts to east l.a. By Robert Bauman $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-3965-4 · 192 pages president lyndon b. Johnson’s War on poverty did more than offer aid to needy Americans; in some cities, it also sparked both racial conflict and cooperation. Race and the War on Poverty examines the African American and mexican American community organizations in los Angeles that emerged to implement War on poverty programs. It explores how organizers applied democratic vision and political savvy to community action, and how the ongoing African American, chicano, and feminist movements in turn shaped the contours of the War on poverty’s goals, programs, and cultural identity.

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conflict on the rio grande Water and the law, 1879–1939 By Douglas R. Littlefield $39.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-3998-2 · 344 pages The history of the rio grande since the late nineteenth century reflects the evolution of water-resource management in the West. It was here that the earliest interstate and international water-allocation problems pitted irrigators in southern New mexico against farmers downstream in el paso and Juarez, with the voluntary resolution of that conflict setting important precedents for national and international water law. Conflict on the Rio Grande reveals the transformation of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century law, traces changing attitudes about the role of government, and examines the ways these changes affected the use and eventual protection of natural resources.

Literature & Fiction
randy loPez goes home a novel By Rudolfo Anaya $19.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-4189-3 · 168 pages When he was a young man, randy lopez left his village in northern New mexico to seek his fortune. since then, he has learned some of the secrets of success in the Anglo world—and has even written a book called Life Among the Gringos. but something has been missing. Now he returns to Agua bendita to reconnect with his past and to find the wisdom the Anglo world has not provided. In this allegorical account of randy’s final journey, master storyteller rudolfo Anaya tackles life’s big questions with a light touch. blUe heaven a novel By Willard Wyman $21.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-4218-0 · 200 pages The year is 1902. A young stock-handler named Fenton pardee has just survived the train wreck that almost destroyed William F. cody’s Wild West show. surveying the train’s smoldering ruins—and what is left of cody’s company of stunt-riders, trick-shooters, and stage actors—Fenton realizes that turning the West into a circus to thrill the world is no longer thrilling for him. Blue Heaven marks the return of Fenton pardee, veteran guide and packer, who figured so memorably in High Country, Willard Wyman’s highly acclaimed first novel. high coUntry a novel By Willard Wyman $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-3899-2 · 368 pages During the great Depression, young Ty Hardin is sent from his family’s failing montana ranch to learn from the last of the great packers, Fenton pardee, legendary in the montana rockies for his packing adventures across the swan range all the way to the big Divide. Writing in the tradition of Norman maclean’s A River Runs through It, Willard Wyman shares techniques of breaking and packing and leading animals into forbidding country, hunting and tracking, and making camp. Wyman brings you so close to the packer’s life you smell the leather, sweat, and oil.

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billy the kid and other Plays By Rudolfo Anaya Afterword by Cecilia J. Aragón and Robert Con Davis-Undiano $24.95s paper · 978-0-8061-4225-8 · 384 pages While award-winning author rudolfo Anaya is known primarily as a novelist, his genius is also evident in dramatic works performed regularly in his native New mexico and throughout the world. Billy the Kid and Other Plays collects seven of these works and offers them together for the first time. hUnter’s log Poems by Timothy Murphy $19.95 cloth · 978-0-9825597-9-6 · 100 pages $14.95 paper · 978-0-9834059-0-0 · 100 pages Timothy murphy is a major American poet who lives on the great plains. Hunter’s Log is his long-awaited book of hunting poetry. Heavily influenced by spanish philosopher José ortega y gasset’s Meditation on Hunting, murphy sees hunting as a spiritual activity. There is nothing cloistered in his poetry. He tramps through the tall grass prairie of eastern Dakota and along the ridges and buttes that overlook the mighty missouri, then cooks up what he kills in exquisite stews and ragouts. murphy’s genius is to write poetry that is accessible to all, simultaneously simple and profound, and deeply imbued with the spirit of place. mortal stakes · faint thUnder new Poetry by Timothy Murphy $19.95 cloth · 978-0-9825597-6-5 · 160 pages $14.95 paper · 978-0-9825597-7-2 · 160 pages A fascinating and complicated man and a child of the northern prairie, Timothy murphy writes deceptively simple poetry. He studied with robert penn Warren at Yale, who passed him on to richard Wilbur with a note saying, “because he’s the best man we’ve got.” murphy likens his poetry to the work of robert Frost, and, like Frost, he prefers to work in rhyme. This double book, Mortal Stakes and Faint Thunder, is the first of several volumes of murphy’s poetry to be published by the Dakota Institute press. the green corn rebellion A novel by William Cunningham $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4057-5 · 256 pages These days, rural oklahoma is the last place anybody would look for leftist revolutionaries, but in 1917 the area exploded into full-blown insurrection. The state’s tenant farmers, many of whom were socialist party members, viewed the great War in europe as a conflict that benefited only the rich. When the federal government enacted a draft, an uprising in eastern oklahoma saw local townspeople skirmishing with rebellious farmers, including whites, blacks, and American Indians. Although the insurrection itself succeeded only in undermining the socialist movement and fueling the red scare of the 1920s, cunningham’s incendiary writing has been compared to that of erskine caldwell. PUshing the bear after the trail of tears By Diane Glancy $14.95 paper · 978-0-8061-4069-8 · 176 pages Pushing the Bear: After the Trail of Tears tells the story of the cherokees’ resettlement in the hard years following removal, a story never before explored in fiction. In this sequel to her popular 1996 novel Pushing the Bear: A Novel of the Trail of Tears, author Diane glancy continues the tale of cherokee brothers o-ga-na-ya and Knobowtee and their families, as well the reverend Jesse bushyhead, a cherokee christian minister. The book follows their travails in Indian Territory as they attempt to build cabins, raise crops, and adjust to new realities.

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the essays By Rudolfo Anaya $24.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4023-0 · 320 pages “The storyteller’s gift is my inheritance,” writes rudolfo Anaya in his essay “shaman of Words.” Although he is best known for Bless Me, Ultima and other novels, his writing also takes the form of nonfiction, and in these 52 essays he draws on both his heritage as a mexican American and his gift for storytelling. besides tackling issues such as censorship, racism, education, and sexual politics, Anaya explores the tragedies and triumphs of his own life. cherokee thoUghts honest and Uncensored By Robert J. Conley $19.95 paper · 978-0-8061-3943-2 · 196 pages gaming and chiefing. Imposters and freedmen. Distinguished novelist robert J. conley examines some of the most interesting facets of the cherokee world. In 26 essays laced with humor, understatement, and even open sarcasm, this popular writer takes on politics, culture, his people’s history, and what it means to be cherokee. As provocative as it is entertaining, Cherokee Thoughts will intrigue tribal members and anyone with an interest in the cherokee people. harPsong By Rilla Askew $24.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-3823-7 · 256 pages $14.95 paper · 978-0-8061-3928-9 · 256 pages Harlan singer, a harmonica-playing troubadour, shows up in the Thompson family’s yard one morning. He steals their hearts with his music, and their daughter with his charm. soon he and his fourteen-year-old bride, sharon, are on the road, two more hobos of the great Depression, hitchhiking and hopping freights across the great plains in search of an old man and the settlement of Harlan’s long-standing debt. In this moving, redemptive tale inspired by oklahoma folk heroes, rilla Askew continues her exploration of the American story. Harpsong is a novel of love and loss, of adventure and renewal, and of a wayfaring orphan’s search for home—all set to the sounds of Harlan’s harmonica. mack to the rescUe By Jim Lehrer $24.95 cloth · 978-0-8061-3915-9 · 216 pages When he’s not anchoring the NewsHour on pbs, Jim lehrer may be found casting a satirical eye at America’s heartland in such books as crown oklahoma and The sooner spy. Mack to the Rescue is the latest of his successful one-eyed mack novels. set in oklahoma and tracing the exploits of a fictional lieutenant governor, the series allows lehrer to address contemporary national issues with a unique blend of humor and insight. rife with oklahoma-isms and brimming with memorable characters, this is political satire at its best, employing ironic twists and sharp dialogue to poke fun at government foibles. Inventive and hilarious, it demonstrates once again that lehrer knows middle America and its ways all too well. on native groUnd memoirs and impressions By Jim Barnes $16.95s paper · 978-0-8061-4092-6 · 296 pages On Native Ground takes us from Jim barnes’s boyhood in rural southeastern oklahoma during the great Depression and World War II through his mature years as an internationally recognized poet. of choctaw and Welsh ancestry, barnes is often identified as a Native American poet. He emphasizes his desire to be recognized for his art, not his blood. Yet he speaks eloquently here of his attachment to his “native ground,” the choctaw region in oklahoma—for him “the land where memory dwells.” This edition features a new postscript by the author.

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Military History
oUr centennial indian War and the life of general cUster By Frances Fuller Victor Introduction by Jerome A. Greene $29.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4173-2 · 208 pages lieutenant colonel george A. custer was widely known as a civil War figure, author, and successful cavalry leader before his spectacular defeat at the battle of the little bighorn in 1876 by lakota and Northern cheyenne Indians. A ready audience of readers was hungry for information about the engagement and about their fallen hero when Frances Fuller Victor’s book appeared in spring 1877. Featuring an introduction by historian Jerome A. greene, this edition of Our Centennial Indian War provides a remarkable window into contemporary thinking about an iconic event. the mormon rebellion america’s first civil War 1857–1858 By David L. Bigler and Will Bagley $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4135-0 · 408 pages In 1857 president James buchanan ordered u.s. troops to utah to replace brigham Young as governor and restore order in what the federal government viewed as a territory in rebellion. In this compelling narrative, award-winning authors David l. bigler and Will bagley use long-suppressed sources to show that—contrary to common perception—the mormon rebellion was not the result of buchanan’s “blunder,” nor was it a David-and-goliath tale. They argue that mormon leaders had their own far-reaching ambitions and fully intended to establish an independent nation—the Kingdom of god—in the West. child of the fighting tenth on the frontier with the buffalo soldiers By Forrestine Cooper Hooker edited by steve Wilson $19.95s paper · 978-0-8061-4080-3 · 288 pages Forrestine “birdie” cooper’s father, charles cooper, was an officer in the Tenth u.s. cavalry, known as the buffalo soldiers, one of four regiments of black troops with white officers. The buffalo soldiers made headlines with their battles against geronimo, sitting bull, lone Wolf, billy the Kid, and pancho Villa. The compelling yet humorous stories told in Child of the Fighting Tenth capture the drama of the settlement of the American West, the Indian wars on the plains, and the geronimo campaign in the southwest and mexico as seen through the eyes of a young girl. In this memoir, birdie cooper draws us into her world, offering a vibrant portrait of behind-the-scenes life on the western frontier. steve Wilson edited the manuscript into publishable form. a Perfect gibraltar the battle for monterrey, mexico, 1846 By Christopher D. Dishman $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4140-4 · 344 pages For three days in the fall of 1846, u.s. and mexican soldiers fought fiercely in the picturesque city of monterrey, turning the northern mexican town, known for its towering mountains and luxurious gardens, into one of the nineteenth century’s most gruesome battlefields. led by brigadier general Zachary Taylor, graduates of the u.s. military Academy encountered a city almost perfectly protected by mountains, a river, and a vast plain. monterrey’s ideal defensive position inspired more than one u.s. soldier to call it “a perfect gibraltar.” christopher D. Dishman conveys in a vivid narrative the intensity and drama of the battle of monterrey. Accompanied by maps and period illustrations, this skillfully written history will interest scholars, history enthusiasts, and everyone who enjoys a true war story well told.

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military history

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civil War arkansas, 1863 the battle for a state By Mark K. Christ $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-4087-2 · 336 pages The Arkansas river Valley is one of the most fertile regions in the south. During the civil War, the river also served as a vital artery for moving troops and supplies. In 1863 the battle to wrest control of the valley was, in effect, a battle for the state itself. In spite of its importance, however, this campaign is often overshadowed by the siege of Vicksburg. Now mark K. christ offers the first detailed military assessment of parallel events in Arkansas, describing their consequences for both union and confederate powers. soldiers West biographies from the military frontier edited by Paul A. Hutton and Durwood Ball $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-3997-5 · 416 pages From the War of 1812 to the end of the nineteenth century, u.s. Army officers were instrumental in shaping the American West. They helped explore uncharted places and survey and engineer its far-flung transportation arteries. many also served in the ferocious campaigns that drove American Indians onto reservations. Soldiers West views the turbulent history of the West from the perspective of fifteen senior army officers—including philip H. sheridan, george Armstrong custer, and Nelson A. miles—who were assigned to bring order to the region. class and race in frontier army military life in the West, 1870–1890 By Kevin Adams $34.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-3981-4 · 296 pages Historians have long assumed that ethnic and racial divisions in post– civil War America were reflected in the u.s. Army, of whose enlistees 40 percent were foreign-born. Now Kevin Adams shows that the frontier army was characterized by a “Victorian class divide” that overshadowed ethnic prejudices. Class and Race in the Frontier Army offers fresh insight into the interplay of class, race, and ethnicity in late-nineteenth-century America. JayhaWkers the civil War brigade of James henry lane By Bryce Benedict $32.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-3999-9 · 352 pages No person excited greater emotion in Kansas than James Henry lane, the u.s. senator who led a volunteer brigade in 1861–1862. In fighting numerous skirmishes, liberating hundreds of slaves, burning portions of four towns, and murdering half a dozen men, lane and his brigade garnered national attention as the saviors of Kansas and the terror of missouri. An entertaining story rich in detail, Jayhawkers will captivate scholars and history enthusiasts as it sheds new light on the unfettered violence on this western fringe of the civil War. the fall of a black army officer racism and the myth of henry o. flipper By Charles M. Robinson III $29.95s cloth · 978-0-8061-3521-2 · 216 pages lieutenant Henry o. Flipper was a former slave who became the first African American graduate of West point. While serving as commissary officer at Fort Davis, Texas, in 1881, he was charged with embezzlement and conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman and dismissed from the service of the united states. charles m. robinson III challenges the assumption that Flipper was railroaded because he was black and in this complete revision of his earlier work, The Court-Martial of Lieutenant Henry Flipper, robinson finds that Flipper was the author of his own problems.

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The Arthur H. Clark Company
JUstinian caire and santa crUz island the rise and fall of a california dynasty By Frederic Caire Chiles Foreword by Marla Daily $34.95s cloth · 978-0-87062-400-1 · 240 pages santa cruz was once the largest privately owned island off the coast of the continental united states. This account traces the island’s history from its aboriginal chumash population to its acquisition by The Nature conservancy at the end of the twentieth century. The heart of the book, however, is a family saga: the story of French émigré Justinian caire and his descendants, who owned and occupied the island for more than fifty years. The author, descended from caire, uses family archives unavailable to earlier historians to recount the previously untold story. Playing With shadoWs voices of dissent in the mormon West edited by Polly Aird, Jeff nichols, and Will Bagley $45.00s cloth · 978-0-87062-380-6 · 496 pages This collection of narratives by four individuals who abandoned mormonism— “apostates,” as brigham Young and other latter-day saint leaders labeled them—provides an overview of dissent from the beginning of the religion to the early twentieth century and presents a wide range of disaffection with the faith or its leaders. Parley P. Pratt and the making of mormonism edited and with contributions by Gregory K. Armstrong, Matthew J. Grow, and Dennis J. siler $45.00s cloth · 978-0-87062-401-8 · 352 pages parley p. pratt joined the church of Jesus christ of latter-day saints in 1830 and was murdered in 1857 by the estranged husband of his twelfth plural wife. An original member of the church’s Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, pratt’s writings helped define mormon theology and identity, and his hymns remain popular today. This collection of essays uses pratt’s life and writings as a means for gaining insight on early latter-day saint history, including the church’s initial internationalization, vibrant print culture, development of a unique theology, family dynamics, and the mountain meadows massacre.

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forging a fUr emPire expeditions in the snake river country, 1809–1824 By John Phillip Reid $29.95s cloth · 978-0-87062-402-5 · 240 pages Alexander ross, the pioneer recorder of the early fur trade in the far northern West, led a beaver trapping expedition in 1824 into the vast, unfamiliar territory east of trading posts in the pacific Northwest. He and his men ventured deep into snake river country in present-day Idaho and montana. In this narrative, based on the accounts left by ross and others, historian and legal scholar John phillip reid describes the experiences of the earliest Hudson’s bay company fur-trapping expeditions—ventures usually overlooked by historians—and explores the interaction between the diverse cultures of the pacific Northwest. valentine t. mcgillycUddy army surgeon, agent to the sioux By Candy Moulton $34.95s cloth · 978-0-87062-389-9 · 288 pages on a september day in 1877, hundreds of sioux and soldiers at camp robinson crowded around a fatally injured lakota leader. A young doctor forced his way through the crowd, only to see the victim fading before him. It was the famed crazy Horse. From intense moments like this to encounters with such legendary western figures as calamity Jane and red cloud, Valentine T. mcgillycuddy’s life encapsulated key events in American history that changed the lives of Native people forever. In Valentine T. McGillycuddy award-winning author candy moulton explores mcgillycuddy’s fascinating experiences on the northern plains. With anza to california, 1775-1776 the Journal of Pedro font, o.f.m. By Pedro Font Translated and edited by Alan K. Brown $55.00s cloth · 978-0-87062-375-2 · 472 pages Juan bautista de Anza led the spanish colonizing expedition in 1775–76 that opened a trail from Arizona to california and established a presidio at san Francisco bay. Franciscan missionary Fray pedro Font accompanied Anza. As chaplain and geographer, Font kept a detailed daily record of the expedition’s progress that today is considered one of the fundamental documents of exploration in the American southwest. This edition is the most complete account of the Anza expedition and a foundational primary source in california and southwest history.

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The Arthur H. Clark Company
neW england to gold rUsh california the Journal of alfred and chastina W. rix, 1849–1854 edited Lynn A. Bonfield $45.00s cloth · 978-0-87062-392-9 · 384 pages on July 29, 1849, two young schoolteachers were married in a small town in northern Vermont. Their story could easily have been lost to history, except that Alfred and chastina rix had the foresight to begin recording their observations in a joint journal. Their unique husband-and-wife account, which captures the turbulence of life and events during the gold rush era, is also a personal—and compelling—chronicle of a singular family’s separation and reunion. great sioUx War orders of battle how the United states army Waged War on the northern Plains, 1876–1877 By Paul L. Hedren $150.00s leather bound · 978-0-87062-398-1 · 240 pages $39.95s cloth · 978-0-87062-397-4 · 240 pages The great sioux War pitted almost one-third of the u.s. Army against lakota sioux and Northern cheyennes. by the time it ended, this war had played out on twenty-seven different battlefields, resulted in hundreds of casualties, cost millions of dollars, and transformed the landscape and the lives of survivors on both sides. In this compelling sourcebook, paul Hedren uses extensive documentation to demonstrate that the American army adapted quickly to the challenges of fighting this unconventional war and was more effectively led and better equipped than is customarily believed. in the WhirlPool the Pre-manifesto letters of President Wilford Woodruff to the William atkin family, 1885–1890 edited by Reid L. neilson Contributions by Thomas G. Alexander and Jan shipps $29.95s cloth · 978-0-87062-390-5 · 224 pages political and religious turmoil in the late 1800s plagued the church of Jesus christ of latter-day saints and its leaders. As utah statehood loomed, congress aggressively moved against mormons who engaged in polygamy. one of those who went into hiding in 1879 was Wilford Woodruff, who became church president in 1887. This never-before-published collection of Woodruff’s letters to the Atkins, edited by reid l. Neilson, reveals the church leader’s political and spiritual conflicts in the five years leading up to his 1890 manifesto, which officially disallowed polygamy. red cloUd’s War the bozeman trail, 1866–1868 (2 vols.) By John D. McDermott $225.00s leather bound · 978-0-87062-377-6 · 704 pages $75.00s cloth · 978-0-87062-376-9 · 704 pages on a cold December day in 1866, captain William J. Fetterman disobeyed orders and spurred his men across lodge Trail ridge in pursuit of a group of retreating lakota sioux, Arapahos, and cheyennes. He saw a perfect opportunity to punish the tribes for harassing travelers on the bozeman Trail and attacking wood trains sent out from nearby Fort phil Kearny. In a sudden turn of events, his command was, within moments, annihilated. John D. mcDermott’s spellbinding narrative offers a cautionary tale of hubris and miscalculation.

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35

vineyards and vaQUeros indian labor and the economic expansion of southern california, 1771–1877 By George Harwood Phillips $45.00s cloth · 978-0-87062-391-2 · 384 pages Indian labor was vital to the early economic development of the los Angeles region. This first volume in the new series Before Gold: California under Spain and Mexico explores for the first time Native contributions to early southern california. based on exhaustive research, george Harwood phillips’s account focuses on california Indians more as workers than as victims. He describes the work they performed and how their relations evolved with the missionaries, settlers, and rancheros who employed them. phillips emphasizes the importance of Indian labor in shaping the economic history of what is now los Angeles, orange, and riverside counties. dUde ranching in yelloWstone coUntry larry larom and valley ranch, 1915–1969 By W. Hudson Kensel $29.95s cloth · 978-0-87062-384-4 · 256 pages A welcome study of early dude ranch development, Dude Ranching in Yellowstone Country preserves the history of an important Wyoming ranch and the man who built it. W. Hudson Kensel recounts the life of Irving H. “larry” larom, whose east coast connections to financial resources and wealthy guests enabled him to transform mclaughlin’s small homestead into a major tourist destination and prep school on the edge of Yellowstone National park. steamboats West the 1859 american fur company missouri river expedition By Lawrence H. Larsen and Barbara J. Cottrell $34.95s cloth · 978-0-87062-385-1 · 256 pages In 1859, the American Fur company set out on what would then be the longest steamboat trip in North American history—a headline-making, 6,200-mile trek along the missouri river from st. louis to Fort benton in present-day montana, and back again. Steamboats West is an adventure story that navigates the rocky rapids of the upper missouri to offer a fascinating account of travel to the raw frontier past the pale of settlement. It was a venture that extended trade deep into the Northwest and made an enormous stride in transportation. the naUvoo legion in illinois a history of the mormon militia, 1841–1846 By Richard Bennett, susan easton Black, and Donald Q. Cannon $39.95s cloth · 978-0-87062-382-0 · 440 pages When the mormons established their theocratic city of Nauvoo on the banks of the mississippi in 1839, they made self-defense a priority. organized under Illinois law, the Nauvoo legion was a city militia made up primarily of latter-day saints. This comprehensive work on the history, structure, and purpose of the Nauvoo legion traces its unique story from its founding to the mormon exodus in 1846. Impeccably researched and honestly told, this groundbreaking study fills a major gap in latter-day saint church history and adds a significant chapter to the annals of American militias.

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The Arthur H. Clark Company
mUrder of a landscaPe the california farmer-smelter War, 1897–1916 By Khaled J. Bloom $34.95s cloth · 978-0-87062-396-7 · 240 pages between 1896 and 1919, air pollution from large-scale copper smelting in northern california’s shasta county severely damaged crops and timber in a 1,000-square-mile region, completely devastating a core area of 200 square miles. The poisons from these smelters created the nation’s largest man-made desert—a shocking contrast to the beauty of the surrounding cascades and Trinity Alps. offering the drama and pathos of a David-and-goliath tale in which goliath wins and strides on, Murder of a Landscape makes compelling reading for anyone interested in the industrial, political, and environmental history of the American West. hancock’s War conflict on the southern Plains By William Y. Chalfant $59.95s cloth · 978-0-87062-371-4 · 296 pages When general Winfield scott Hancock led a military expedition across Kansas, colorado, and Nebraska in 1867, his purpose was a show of force that would curtail Indian raiding sparked by the sand creek massacre of 1864. but the havoc he and his troops wrought on the plains served only to further incite the tribes and inflame passions on both sides, disrupting u.s.Indian relations for more than a decade. one of the most significant Indian campaigns in American history, Hancock’s War is in many ways a microcosm of all the wars between Indians and whites on the high plains. chalfant’s sweeping narrative forms the definitive history of a questionable enterprise. gettysbUrg to great salt lake george r. maxwell, civil War hero and federal marshal among the mormons By John G. Maxwell $39.95s cloth · 978-0-87062-388-2 · 384 pages Following distinguished civil War service that took one of his legs and rendered an arm useless, general george r. maxwell was sent to utah Territory and charged—first as register of land, then as u.s. marshal—with bringing the mormons into compliance with federal law. John g. maxwell’s biography of general maxwell (no relation) both celebrates an unsung war hero and presents the history of the longest episode of civil disobedience in u.s. history from the point of view of this young, non-mormon who lived through it. mormon convert, mormon defector a scottish immigrant in the american West, 1848–1861 By Polly Aird $39.95s cloth · 978-0-87062-369-1 · 320 pages peter mcAuslan heeded mormon missionaries spreading the faith in his native scotland in the mid-1840s. The uncertainty his family faced in a rapidly industrializing economy, the political turmoil erupting across europe, the welter of competing religions—all were signs of the imminent end of time, the missionaries warned. Drawing on mcAuslan’s writings and other archival sources, polly Aird offers a rare interior portrait of a man in whom religious fervor warred with indignation at absolutist religious authorities and fear for the consequences of dissension. In so doing, she brings to life a dramatic but little-known period of American history.

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california odyssey an overland Journey on the southern trails, 1849 By William R. Goulding edited by Patricia A. etter Foreword by Howard R. Lamar $45.00s cloth · 978-0-87062-373-8 · 360 pages In 1849, William r. goulding and the Knickerbocker exploring company struck out for california on the southern route—a road less traveled. This rare first-person diary of the southern gold rush trails, introduced and annotated by patricia A. etter, highlights an important alternative route to the pacific coast. fort laramie military bastion of the high Plains By Douglas C. McChristian $45.00s cloth · 978-0-87062-360-8 · 448 pages of all the u.s. Army posts in the West, none witnessed more history than Fort laramie, positioned where the northern great plains join the rocky mountains. From its beginnings as a trading post in 1834 to its abandonment by the army in 1890, it was involved in the buffalo hide trade, overland migrations, Indian wars and treaties, the utah War, confederate maneuvering, and the coming of the telegraph and first transcontinental railroad. meticulously researched and gracefully told, this is a long-overdue military history of one of the American West’s most venerable historic places. on the Western trails the overland diaries of Washington Peck edited by susan M. erb $45.00s cloth · 978-0-87062-379-0 · 296 pages A cooper and farmer from ontario, canada, Washington peck (1801–89) spent decades traveling across the western frontier before finally settling in Washington Territory. peck’s chronicle of his itinerant life offers fresh insight into some of the less traveled emigrant routes across the nineteenthcentury West. peck left two wagon-train diaries—published here for the first time—that log western routes not often recorded: an 1850–51 trip to the california gold fields via the platte river road–mormon Trail, the salt lake– los Angeles southern route, and the california coastline; and a journey over the santa Fe Trail in 1858, continuing on the beale Wagon road along the 35th parallel. dodge city the early years, 1872–1886 By Wm. B. shillingberg $49.95s cloth · 978-0-87062-378-3 · 476 pages The most famous cattle town of the trail-driving era, Dodge city, Kansas, holds a special allure for western historians and enthusiasts alike. Wm. b. shillingberg now goes beyond the violence for which the town became notorious, more fully documenting its early history by uncovering the economic, political, and social forces that shaped Dodge. The author takes readers back to the southwestern Kansas frontier and traces Dodge city’s evolution from a military site for protecting santa Fe commerce, to a wild and lawless buffalo hunters’ rendezvous, to a regional freighting center and the primary shipping point for Texas cattle on the central plains. Along the way, the book offers new perspectives on the exploits of such legendary figures as bat masterson and Wyatt earp.

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Chickasaw Press
ilimPa’chi’ (let’s eat) a chickasaw cookbook By JoAnn ellis and Vicki M. Penner $25.00s cloth · 978-1-935684-03-9 · 160 pages recipes, reminiscences, and lessons in chickasaw lifeways are the main ingredients in Ilimpa’chi’ (Let’s Eat!): A Chickasaw Cookbook. Well-known chickasaw cooks JoAnn ellis and Vicki m. penner share more than forty recipes, accompanied by scenes from their lives spent cooking, eating, and growing up around foods prepared in chickasaw kitchens and over outdoor cooking fires. chikasha stories volume one: shared spirit By Glenda Galvan Illustrated by Jeannie Barbour $25.00s cloth · 978-1-935684-04-6 · 96 pages In Chikasha Stories, Volume One: Shared Spirit, premier chickasaw storyteller and tribal elder glenda galvan tells traditional stories drawn from the tribe’s oral traditions. Illustrating the tales are original artworks by award-winning chickasaw artist Jeannie barbour. This long-awaited and much-needed volume, a groundbreaking work for the chickasaw press, is the first of an important series of books intended to revive and maintain the storytelling tradition so vital to the roots of chickasaw and Native culture. dynamic chickasaW Women By Phillip C. Morgan and Judy G. Parker $20.00s cloth · 978-1-935684-05-3 · 192 pages It has become tradition for chickasaw governor bill Anoatubby to open his public addresses with a tribute to the unconquered and unconquerable warriors and to the dynamic women of the chickasaw Nation. researched and written by phillip carroll morgan and Judy goforth parker, Dynamic Chickasaw Women presents biographies of carefully chosen dynamic women from the histories of Indian removal, Indian Territory, and early oklahoma statehood. This book demonstrates that the diversity and distinction represented by today’s recipients of that honor are also found in historical counterparts among the dynamic chickasaw women of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth centuries. ProUd to be chickasaW By Mike Larsen and Martha Larsen $25.00s cloth · 978-1-935684-01-5 · 130 pages Among oklahoma painters, mike larsen is a living legend. His work—from a twenty-six-foot mural in the oklahoma state capitol to a painting appearing on the u.s. postage stamp honoring the oklahoma centennial—is visible and prominent. In 2005, leaders of the chickasaw Nation commissioned larsen to create twenty-four oil portraits of living chickasaw elders. After those paintings were completed, the chickasaws commissioned a second series of twenty-four portraits—showcased in this handsome, full-color volume.

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chickasaW lives volume three: sketches of Past and Present By Richard Green $20.00s cloth · 978-0-9797858-9-4 · 250 pages Sketches of Past and Present is the third volume in the chickasaw lives series. In contrast to a conventional, chronological history, green’s book is a fascinating amalgam of chickasaw epochs and characters, grouped under headings of common themes. The reader is treated to stories of great chickasaw athletes in the twentieth century, as well as an essay on the significance to chickasaw history of the 1729 Natchez uprising. chickasaW removal By Amanda L. Paige, Fuller L. Bumpers, and Daniel F. Littlefield, Jr. $20.00s cloth · 978-1-935684-00-8 · 220 pages In the early nineteenth century, the chickasaw Indians were a beleaguered people. Anglo-American settlers were streaming illegally into their homelands east of the mississippi river. Then, in 1830, the Indian removal Act forced the chickasaw Nation, along with other eastern tribes, to remove to Indian Territory, in present-day oklahoma. This book provides the most detailed account to date of the chickasaw removal, from their harrowing journey west to their first difficult years in an unfamiliar land. chickasaW renaissance By Phillip Carroll Morgan and David G. Fitzgerald $34.95s cloth · 978-0-9797858-8-7 · 240 pages In Chickasaw Renaissance, phillip carroll morgan profiles the experiences of the chickasaw people during this tumultuous period in their history, from the dissolution of their government to the resurgence of their nation. A sequel to the award-winning book Chickasaw: Unconquered and Unconquerable, this equally beautiful volume features more than 100 new images by celebrated oklahoma photographer David g. Fitzgerald. His stunning portraits of tribal elders and numerous other subjects are supplemented by historical photographs from the chickasaw Nation archives. a nation in transition douglas henry Johnston and the chickasaws, 1898–1939 By Michael Lovegrove $24.95s cloth · 978-0-9797858-7-0 · 256 pages Douglas Henry Johnston was governor of the chickasaw Nation from 1898 to 1902 and from 1904 to 1939. michael lovegrove chronicles Johnston’s remarkable political life, telling the story of how he led his people—with diplomacy and efficiency—through the devasting dissolution of tribal lands at the beginning of the twentieth century and through the contentious struggles in the three decades that followed. This richly textured historical narrative reveals the tribulations and accomplishments of a great statesman.

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Cherokee National Press
the develoPment of laW and legal institUtions among the cherokees By Thomas L. Ballenger $35.00s cloth · 978-0-9826907-2-7 · 230 pages before the arrival of europeans to North America, cherokee Indians practiced a form of justice called blood law, or clan law. In this system, responsibility for the punishment of a homicide fell to the clan of the victim. In the nineteenth century, following the forced removal of tribal members to Indian Territory, the cherokee Nation developed a court system that is still in use today. In this thorough account, Thomas lee ballenger traces the history of cherokee justice from its traditional beginnings to the development of its modern-day institutions. records of the moravians among the cherokees volume one: early contact and the establishment of the first mission, 1752–1802 edited by C. Daniel Crews and Richard W. starbuck $50.00s Cloth 978-0-9826907-0-3 • 426 pages In the mid-eighteenth century, members of the moravian church, which had its origins in central europe, began conducting mission work among the cherokee people. Their archives, now housed in North carolina, include valuable records of their contact with the cherokees. Volume one describes initial contact between the moravians and cherokees during the French and Indian War and the revolution, exploratory visits by moravian missionaries into the cherokee Nation, and the founding of a mission — called springplace — in northern georgia. volume two: beginnings of the mission and establishment of the school, 1802–1805 edited by C. Daniel Crews and Richard W. starbuck $50.00s Cloth • 978-0-9826907-1-0 • 426 pages Volume Two ends with the year 1805. As the moravians occupy springplace, they begin to spread the gospel. The cherokees, in turn, are interested in schooling for their children, who need new tools to deal with the encroachment of white settlers upon their land and life. volume three: the anna rosina years, Part 1, success in school and mission, 1805–1810 edited by C. Daniel Crews and Richard W. starbuck $50.00s Cloth 978-0-9826907-4-1 • 624 pages Volume Three, spanning the years 1805 to 1810, chronicles the arrival of John and Anna rosina gambold to the mission. Anna rosina proved dedicated to the education of cherokee children, and the mission took on a new life and character. The gambolds soon won the people’s affection and respect, and chief chuleoa, who at first opposed the mission, became their friend. These years also witnessed the tragic death of James Vann, the moravians’ benefactor among the cherokees, and the mission’s first successful baptism of a cherokee into the moravian church. volume four: the anna rosina years, Part 2 Warfare on the horizon, 1810–1816 edited by C. Daniel Crews and Richard W. starbuck $50.00s cloth · 978-0-9826907-5-8 · 618 pages Volume Four continues the story through 1816, when earthquakes ushered in a period of upheaval—from the cherokees’ involvement in the creek War, to métis battles in canada, to Napoleon’s conquests in europe.

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the chUck Wagon cookbook Recipes from the Ranch and Range for Today’s Kitchen by b. byron price
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Pioneer Women The Lives of Women on the Frontier by linda peavy and ursula smith
978-0-8061-3054-5 $26.95 pAper

native north america by larry J. Zimmerman
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age of the gUnfighter Men and Weapons on the Frontier, 1840–1900 by Joseph g. rosa
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the sacred PiPe Black elk’s Account of the seven Rites of the Oglala sioux by Joseph epes brown
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doc holliday A Family Portrait by Karen Holliday Tanner
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crazy horse A Lakota Life by Kingsley m. bray
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sam hoUston by James l. Haley
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blood of the ProPhets Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows by Will bagley
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the moUntain meadoWs massacre by Juanita brooks
978-0-8061-2318-9 $19.95 pAper

the american frontier Pioneers, settlers, and Cowboys 1800–1899 by William c. Davis
978-0-8061-3129-0 $29.95 pAper

charles goodnight Cowman and Plainsman by J. evetts Haley
978-0-8061-1453-8 $24.95 pAper

a lady ’s life in the rocky moUntains by Isabella l. bird
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cochise Chiricahua Apache Chief by edwin r. sweeney
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calamity Jane The Woman and the Legend by James D. mclaird
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the oatman massacre A Tale of Desert Captivity and survival by brian mcginty
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geronimo The Man, His Time, His Place by Angie Debo
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the World rUshed in The California Gold Rush experience by J. s. Holliday
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the bUffalo soldiers A narrative of the Black Cavalry in the West Revised edition by William H. leckie with shirley A. leckie
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american indians Answers to Today’s Questions second edition by Jack utter
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cUster died for yoUr sins An Indian Manifesto by Vine Deloria, Jr.
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Where cUster fell Photographs of the Little Bighorn Battlefield Then and now by James s. brust, brian c. pohanka, and sandy barnard
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stricken field The Little Bighorn since 1876 by Jerome A. greene
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dUke The Life and Image of John Wayne by ronald l. Davis
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Washita The U.s. Army and the southern Cheyennes, 1867–1869 by Jerome A. greene
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historical atlas of oklahoma, foUrth edition by charles robert goins and Danney goble
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forthcoming books spring

2012

1 800 627 7377

Forthcoming Books Spring 2012
zebUlon Pike, thomas Jefferson, and the oPening of the West
edited by Matthew L. Harris and Jay H. Buckley $29.95s CLOTH • 978-0-8061-4243-2 In life and in death, fame and glory eluded Zebulon montgomery pike (1779–1813). The ambitious young military officer and explorer, best known for a mountain peak that he neither scaled nor named, lived in the shadows of more famous contemporaries—explorers meriwether lewis and William clark. This collection of thought-provoking essays rescues pike from his undeserved obscurity.

iroQUois art, PoWer, and history
By neal B. Keating $55.00s cloTH · 978-0-8061-3890-9 In this richly illustrated book, Neal b. Keating explores Iroquois visual expression through more than five thousand years, from its emergence in ancient North America into the early twentyfirst century. Drawing on extensive archival research and fieldwork with Iroquois artists and communities, Keating foregrounds the voices and visions of Iroquois peoples, revealing how they have continuously used visual expression to adapt creatively to shifting political and economic environments.

the north american JoUrnals of Prince maximilian of Wied, volUme 3 september 1833-august 1834
edited by stephen s. Witte and Marsha V. Gallagher $295.00n leATHer bouND · 978-087062-367-2 $85.00s cloTH · 978-0-8061-3924-1 Few historical chronicles are as informative and eloquent as the journals written by prince maximilian of Wied as a record of his journey into the North American interior in 1833–34. This handsome, oversize volume not only reproduces the prince’s historic document but also features every one of his illustrations.

from the hands of a Weaver olympic Peninsula basketry through time
By Jacilee Wray $45.00s cloTH · 978-0-8061-4245-6 For millennia, Native artists on olympic peninsula, in what is now northwestern Washington, have created coiled and woven baskets using tree roots, bark, plant stems—and meticulous skill. From the Hands of a Weaver presents the traditional art of basket making among the peninsula’s Native peoples—particularly women—and describes the ancient, historic, and modern practices of the craft.

gUnfight at the eco-corral Western cinema and the environment
By Robin L. Murray and Joseph K. Heumann $24.95s PAPER • 978-0-8061-4246-3 most film critics point to classic conflicts—good versus evil, right versus wrong—as defining themes of the American Western. In this provocative examination of Westerns from Tumbleweeds (1925) to Rango (2011), robin l. murray and Joseph K. Heumann argue for a more expansive view that moves beyond traditional conflicts to encompass environmental themes and struggles.

tWenty thoUsand mornings an autobiography
By John Joseph Mathews $29.95s cloTH · 978-0-8061-4253-1 When John Joseph mathews (1894–1979) began his career as a writer in the 1930s, he was one of only a small number of Native American authors writing for a national audience. Today he is widely recognized as a founder and shaper of twentiethcentury Native American literature. Written in 196667 but only recently discovered, Twenty Thousand Mornings captures osage life in pre-statehood oklahoma and recounts many remarkable events in early-twentieth-century history.

a toast to ecliPse arpad haraszthy and the sparkling Wine of old san francisco
By Brian McGinty $29.95s cloTH · 978-0-8061-4248-7 The sparkling wines of california rival the best French champagnes today, but their place at our tables came about through careful craftsmanship. In A Toast to Eclipse, brian mcginty offers a definitive history of the wine, exploring california’s winemaking past and two of the people who put the state’s varietal wines on the map Arpad Haraszthy and his father Agoston.

bUying america from the indians Johnson v. McIntosh and the history of native land rights
By Blake A. Watson $45.00s cloTH · 978-0-8061-4244-9 The u.s. supreme court ruling in Johnson v. McIntosh established the basic principles that govern American Indian property rights to this day. blake A. Watson’s examination of Johnson v. McIntosh and its impact offers a comprehensive historical and legal overview of Native land rights since the european discovery of the New World.

University of oklahoma Press

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forthcoming books spring

2012

45

telling stories in the face of danger language renewal in native american communities
By Paul V. Kroskrity $24.95s pAper · 978-0-8061-4227-2 stories are important in all human societies, and especially in those whose languages are threatened with extinction. The contributors to this volume, all linguists and linguistic anthropologists concerned with the revitalization of indigenous languages, draw on that understanding as they explore Native American storytelling both as a response to and a symptom of language endangerment.

voyage to the northWest coast of america, 1792 Juan francisco de la bodega y Quadra and the nootka sound controversy
By Juan Francisco de la Bodega y Quadra edited by Robin Inglis and Iris H. W. engstrand $34.95s cloTH · 978-0-87062-408-7 The first english translation of a key document in the early history of california, the pacific Northwest, and british columbia.

bonanzas & borrascas
By Richard e. Lingenfelter

american indians and the mass media
edited by Meta G. Carstarphen and John P. sanchez $24.95s pAper · 978-0-8061-4234-0 mention “American Indian,” and the first image that comes to most people’s minds is likely to be a figment of the American mass media: A war-bonneted chief. The land o’ lakes maiden. American Indians and the Mass Media explores Native experience and the mainstream media’s impact on American Indian histories, cultures, and communities.

volume one: gold lust and silver sharks, 1803–1884
$40.00s CLOTH 978-0-87062-405-6

volume two: copper kings and stock frenzies, 1885–1918
$40.00s cloTH 978-0-87062-406-3 This two-volume account of hard-rock mining in its heyday in the American West is unique in both scope and approach. Volume one, Gold Lust and Silver Sharks, 1803–1884 moves from the early years when western investors and speculators dominated both the mines and the markets, to the early 1880s, when california lawmakers cracked down on stock speculation by banning margin trading, driving san Francisco’s mining sharks to New York. The companion volume, Copper Kings and Stock Frenzies, 1885–1918, begins with that watershed and reveals how easterners bought control of most of the large mines to further exploit eastern markets for even bigger profits and losses. Developing technology in the early twentieth century opened greater deposits of copper, which rapidly became the leading metal as the electrification of the nation drove up demand and prices.

contest for california from spanish colonization to the american conquest
By stephen G. Hyslop $39.95s cloTH · 978-0-87062-411-7 california’s early history was both colorful and turbulent. After europeans first explored the region in the sixteenth century, it was conquered and colonized by successive waves of adventurers and settlers. In Contest for California, award-winning author stephen g. Hyslop draws on a wide array of primary sources to weave an elegant narrative of this epic struggle for control of the territory that many saw as a beautiful, sprawling land of promise.

West from salt lake diaries from the central overland trail
By Jesse G. Petersen $34.95s cloTH · 978-0-87062-407-0 prior to 1859, overland travelers leaving salt lake city for california had but two alternatives. They could go north into Idaho, then southwest into northern california, or they could go south, and enter southern california. both routes were long and tortuous. In the summer of 1859, captain James simpson blazed a more direct trail – the central overland Trail.

gold-mining boomtoWn People of White oaks, lincoln county, new mexico territory
By Roberta Key Haldane $45.00s cloTH · 978-0-87062-410-0 The town of White oaks, New mexico Territory, was born in 1879 when prospectors discovered gold at nearby baxter mountain. In Gold-Mining Boomtown, roberta Key Haldane offers an intimate portrait of the southeastern New mexico community by profiling more than forty families and individuals who made their homes there during its heyday.

Payment must accompany orders from individuals. For domestic orders, please add $5.00 UsPs shipping for the first book and $1.50 for each additional book. For UPs/Priority shipping, add $8.00 for the first book, and $2.00 for each additional book. For international orders, including Canada, add $15.00 UsPs shipping for the first book, and $10.00 for each additional book. Residents of Oklahoma must include 8.25% sales tax. Canadian orders add 5% GsT. We accept checks, money orders, Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American express.

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American West

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American West

American West

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