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Linear Elastic Waves (Cambridge Texts in Applied Mathematics) (John G. Harris) 0521643686

Linear Elastic Waves (Cambridge Texts in Applied Mathematics) (John G. Harris) 0521643686

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The central feature of a waveguide is that the waves phase match in the propa-
gationdirectionandstandinthetransversedirection.Equivalentlystated,asthe
wavesreflectbackandforthwithintheguide,theymustinterfereconstructively
to reconstruct themselves and form a sustained wavefield. There are two sets of
plane waves in a guide, as indicated in Fig. 6.1 – one propagating downward
and one upward. The members of each set are referred to as partial waves, just
as were the individual plane waves in each cell of the periodic structure exam-
ined in Section 1.4. Those that propagate downward are indicated by the solid
lines and those that propagate upward by the dashed ones. The downward and

Fig. 6.1. The dashed lines indicate the upward propagating set of plane waves, while
the solid lines indicate the downward propagating set. These rays are shown in the
slowness diagram to the right. Note that phase matching must occur in the x1 direction.

124

6 Guided Waves and Dispersion

upward propagating sets are

u3 = Aei(βx1−γx2)

,

(6.9)

u3 = Bei(βx1+γx2)

,

(6.10)

respectively. The term γ is given by (6.6). We have, at this stage, assumed
only that (γ)≥0. From our previous work, given in Section 3.2, we can,
by a slight modification of that calculation, show that the reflection coefficient
at x2=±h is one. Each upward propagating wave must be reflected into a
downward propagating one and vice versa. Therefore, at the upper and lower
boundaries,

Ae−iγh

Beiγh =1,

(6.11)

Be−iγh

Aeiγh =1,

(6.12)

respectively. The terms A and B are constants. For these two equations to hold
simultaneously, the following must be true:

γh=mπ/2,

(6.13)

and

A=B for m=2n, n=0,1,2,...

(6.14)

or

A=−B for m=2n+1, n=0,1,2,....

(6.15)

Therefore

u3m = Am

cos
sin (γmx2)eiβmx1

, m=0,1,2,...,

(6.16)

where βm is given by (6.4), γm =mπ/2h, and Am is 2A or 2iA. This method of
finding the dispersion relation, (6.4), wherein partial waves are made to stand
orresonateinthetransversedirection,isreferredtoasthetransverseresonance
principle.

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