You are on page 1of 145

UNIVERSITY OF BAGAMOYO

PROSPECTUS FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2010/11

October 2010

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. 0 UNIVERSITY OF BAGAMOYO PROFILE ...................................... 9 1.1 THE HISTORICAL REASON OF UB ............................................... 9 1.2 THE FOUNDING PRINCIPLES OF UB.......................................... 11 1.2.1 UB VISION............................................................................ 12 1.2.2 UB MISSION......................................................................... 12 1.2.3 UB GUIDING PHILOSOPHY ................................................ 12 1.3 INFRASTRUCTURAL PREPAREDNESS ..................................... 12 Photo01: Showing the present Head Quarters office at Mikocheni. . 13 1.3.1 ACCOMODATION FACILITIES ............................................ 13 1.4 SOCIAL WELFARE ....................................................................... 14 1.5 ACCREDITATION OF UB.............................................................. 14 1.6 UB STRATEGIC (ROLLING) PLAN .............................................. 14 2.0 UB MANAGEMENT ......................................................................... 15 2.1 LIST OF THE TOP MANAGEMENT TEAM ................................... 15 2.2 GUIDING PRINCIPLES OF UB ..................................................... 15 2.3 UB ORGANS ................................................................................. 15 2.2.1 UB council............................................................................. 15 2.2.2 UB Senate ............................................................................ 15 2.3 OPERATIONALIZATION OF THE UB ........................................... 16 3.0 STRUCTURE OF THE UB ................................................................ 16 3.1 ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES OFFRED ............................................ 16 3.1.1 Certificates ................................................................................. 16 3.1.2 Diplomas .................................................................................... 16 3.1.3 Higher Diplomas ........................................................................ 16 3.1.4 Bachelors Degrees ................................................................... 17 3.1.5 Masters Degrees ........................................................................ 17 3.1.6 PhD Degrees .............................................................................. 17 3.2 UB COLLEGE OF LAW AND GOVERNANCE ............................. 17 2

3.2.1 Faculty of Law & Governance ............................................... 17 3.2.2 Institute of Human Rights & Governance .............................. 17 3.2.3 Graduate School of Law & Governance ............................... 18 3.3 UB COLLEGE OF SCIENCE, INFORMATICS AND BUILT ENVIROMENT ........................................................................... 18 3.3.1 Faculty of Applied Sciences .................................................. 18 3.3.2 The Faculty of Basic ............................................................. 18 3.3.3 Technical Institute of Science and ICT ................................. 18 3.3.4 Post Graduate School of Science and ICT ........................... 19 3.4 UB SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS19 3.4.1 Consultancy Programmes..................................................... 19 3.4.2 Enterpreneurship Programmes ............................................. 19 5.0 ADMISSION INFORMATION ........................................................... 19 5.1 FINACIAL INFORMATION ............................................................ 20 5.1.1 Fees structure ....................................................................... 20 5.1.2 Other costs ........................................................................... 20 5.2 ADMISSION ADDRESS....................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 6.0 EXAMINATION PROCEDURES ....................................................... 21 6.1 GENERAL EXAMINATION REGULATIONS ................................. 21 6.2 DETAILED EXAMINATION REGULATIONS ................................ 22 6.3 THE GRADING SYSTEM............................................................... 23 6.04 FINAL DEGREE CLASSIFICATION ............................................ 23 7.0 DEGREE PROGRAMMES FOR THE COLLEGE OF LAW AND GOVERNANCE ............................................................................. 24 7.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................ 24 7.2 OBJECTIVES OF THE LAW DEGREE PROGRAMMES AT UB FACULTY OF LAW ................................................................... 25 7.3 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS ..................................................... 26 7.3.1 Direct Entry (Form Six) ....................................................... 27 7.3.2 Foreign Applicants ................................................................ 27 7.3.3 Other Qualifications .............................................................. 27 7.3.4 Special Matriculation Requirements ..................................... 27 3

7.3.5 Mature age entry ................................................................... 27 7.4.6 Other admission requirements .............................................. 28 7.4 EXAMINATION REGULATIONS ................................................... 28 8.0 THE LL.B CURRICULUM ................................................................. 29 8.1 SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES OF THE CURRICULUM ........................ 29 8.2 DURATION OF THE LLB .............................................................. 29 8.3 COURSES OFFERED.................................................................... 29 8.3.1 List of Core Courses ............................................................. 30 8.3.2 List of Optional Courses........................................................ 32 8.4 THE ORDER IN WHICH COURSES SHALL BE OFFERED ......... 33 8.4.1 First year (all core courses) .................................................. 33 8.4.2 Second year (core courses) .................................................. 34 8.4.3 Third year (core courses) ...................................................... 36 8.4.4 Fourth year (core courses).................................................... 37 9.0 INSTITUTE OF HUMAN RIGHTS & GOVERNANCE ....................... 39 9.1 CERTIFICATE IN LAW LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE ....... 39 9.1.1 Introduction ........................................................................... 39 9.1.2 Details of the courses ........................................................... 39 9.1.3 Assessment .......................................................................... 44 9.1.4 List of Optional Courses........................................................ 45 9.2 DIPLOMA IN LAW, LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE ............. 46 9.2.1 Introduction ........................................................................... 46 9.2.2 Details of the courses ........................................................... 46 9.2.3 Assessment .......................................................................... 56 9.2.4 List of Core Courses ............................................................. 57 9.2.5 List of options ........................................................................ 58 10.0 GRADUATE PROGRAMMES OF THE UB GRADUATE SCHOOL OF LAW & GOVERNANCE .......................................................... 60 10.1 10.2 INTRODUCTION ....................................................................... 60 POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN LAW & GOVERNANCE (PGDLG) ................................................................................... 60 Core Courses .................................................................. 61 4

10.2.1

10.2.3 Optional Courses ................................................................ 61 10.2.4 Pass Grade ......................................................................... 61 10.2.5 Supplementary Examinations ............................................. 61 10.2.6 Repeat Year........................................................................ 61 10.2.7 Discontinuation ................................................................... 62 10.3 SPECIALIZED POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN LAW (SPGDLG)62 10.3.1 Core Courses...................................................................... 62 10.3.2 Optional Courses ................................................................ 62 10.3.3 Pass Grade ......................................................................... 62 10.3.4 Supplementary Examinations ............................................. 63 10.3.5 Repeat Year........................................................................ 63 10.3.6 Discontinuation ................................................................... 63 10.3.7 Examination Mode for PGDLG and SPGDLG ..................... 63 10.4 MASTERS OF LAWS & GOVERNANCE [LL.MG] ................... 63 10.4.1 Introduction ......................................................................... 63 10.4.2 mode of material delivery .................................................... 63 Classification of LLMG ...................................................................... 64 10.4.3 List of courses offered......................................................... 68 10.4.4 Compulsory courses ........................................................... 71 10.4.5 Specific Programmes Content ........................................... 71 10.5 DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (PhD) ....................... 72 10.5.1 Introduction ......................................................................... 72 10.5.2 The Ph.D Programme ......................................................... 72 11.0 UB COLLEGE OF SCIENCE, INFORMATICS AND BUILT ENVIRONMENT ............................................................................ 74 11.1 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................... 74 11.1.1 Rationale............................................................................. 74 11.1.2 Overall Objectives of the Programme ................................. 75 11.2 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME ........................................... 75 11.2.1 Basic Science Degree Programs ( Faculty of Science) ...... 75 11.2.2 Applied Science Degree Programs (Faculty of Built Environment) ................................................................................. 76 5

11.2.3 The Informatics and Communications Degree Programs ... 76 11.2.4 Diploma and Certificate programs: ..................................... 76 11.2.6 UB B.Sc Computer Science PROGRAM ............................ 81 11.2.7 UB B .Sc IT Program .......................................................... 84 11.2.8 UB B.Sc Geoinformatics Program ..................................... 91 11.3 POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA PROGRAMME (PGDCS) ............. 92 11.3.1 Expected output of the programme ..................................... 93 11.3.2 General entry requirements ................................................ 93 11.3.3 Programme fee structure .................................................... 94 11.3.4 Program structure ............................................................... 94 11.3.5 Mode of Delivery ................................................................. 94 11.3.6 Graduation requirements: ................................................... 95 11.3.7 General Rules and Regulations .......................................... 95 11.3.8 Details of the Programme ................................................... 95 11.3.9 Courses Description and course Content ........................... 97 12.0 UB SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS119 12.1 THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE COURSES ...................................... 119 12.1.1First Year ........................................................................... 120 12.1.2 Second Year ..................................................................... 122 12.3 Third Year ............................................................................ 123 12.2 Communication Skills ............................................................. 125 12.2.1 UBCL 403 & 409: Communication Skills .......................... 125 12.2.2 UBCL 403 Communication Skills I .................................... 126 12.2.3 UBCL 409 Communication Skills II ................................... 128 12.3 UB LEADERSHIP, GOVERNANCE AND DIPLOMACY CENTRE.130 12.3.1 Introduction ....................................................................... 130 12.3.2 Objectives of UB LGDC .................................................... 130 12.3.3 The UB LGDC Administrative organs ............................... 131 12.3.4 UB LGDC Stakeholders................................................... 132 12.3.5 The UB LGDC Programmes ............................................. 132 13.0 ALMANAC FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2010/2011 .................. 135 6

13.1 Almanac 2010/11 General ........................................................ 135 13.2 Almanac 2010/11 Meetings ...................................................... 136 13.3 Almanac 2010/11 Public Holidays ........................................... 137 14.0 STAFF LIST AND PROFILE ....................................................... 139 14.1SENIOR STAFF LIST ................................................................. 139 14.1.1 Office of the Vice Chancellor ............................................ 139 14.1.2 Office of the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic) ............. 139 14.1.3 Office of Deputy Vice Chancellor (FPA) ............................ 140 14.2 ACADEMIC STAFF LIST ........................................................... 140 14.2.1 College of Law and Governance ....................................... 140 14.2.3 College of Science and ICT .............................................. 144

ABBREVIATIONS

CoLG: CV: DVC-ARC DVC-PFA FoLG: FoLSICT: ICT: IHRG: LHRC PG: PGSLG: TANLET TCU UB: UG:

College of Law and Governance Vice Chancellor Deputy Vice Chancellor Academic, Research & Consultancy Deputy Vice Chancellor Planning, Finance & Administration Faculty of Law and Governance Faculty of Science, Information Communication and Technology Information Communication and technology Institute of Human Rights and Governance Legal and Human Rights Centre Postgraduate Postgraduate School of Law and Governance Tanzania Legal Education Trust Tanzania Commission of Universities University of Bagamoyo Undergraduate

1. 0 UNIVERSITY OF BAGAMOYO PROFILE


University of Bagamoyo [UB] is new, independent, privately established and non partisan university owned by two institutions; Tanzania Legal Education Trust (TANLET) and The Legal and Human Rights Centre (LHRC). Steps towards UB establishment were taken in a modest style on 31st January 1987 when a nongovernmental institution called Tanzania Legal Education Trust (TANLET) was established. This was a trust for achieving through education; inter alia, a free, national democratic society based on the principles of social equity and social justice. TANLET created a legal and human rights project in 1994 which eventually resulted to the establishment of the Legal and Human Rights Centre (LHRC). In 2006 TANLET Board made a deliberate decision to establish training institution that would promote legal education in Tanzania. On 17th October 2007 TANLET informed the LHRC of its intention to establish a new University at Bagamoyo with a view to providing integrated formation to young Tanzanians. On the 7th August 2009 the LHRC unanimously endorsed the University of Bagamoyo project and decided to participate in its establishment as coowner. On 28th January 2010 UB registration Application was lodged at the Tanzania Commission for Universities. On 15th February the Council of the Prospective University of Bagamoyo held its inception meeting. Between 22nd and 23rd February 2010 the Tanzania Commission for Universities (TCU) Accreditation Inspection Team conducted 1st accreditation inspection of UB facilities at Dar es Salaam and Bagamoyo. UBs main campus shall be constructed at Kiromo, Bagamoyo. According to UBs Five years Rolling Strategic Plan, teaching will start at Dar es Salaam campus by September 2010. 1.1 THE HISTORICAL REASON OF UB Like other Universities, the founding of UB has been predicated by momentous changes that are taking place in Tanzania. At the current state, Tanzania badly needs high quality, high level education and training. The ratio of one high level graduate to four school entrants has to be reached before the nation can take off in its mission to social and economic development. The creation of the UB was conceived as an opportunity of transforming the LHRC work done over the last 15 years into a new qualitative level which could only be accomplished through an institution in the nature of a university. Tanzania needs a qualitative leap in its social and economic development, from a copy- cat type into a self reliant, confident and self conscious nation. Tanzania needs a new liberation education that can disentangle it from dependency syndrome. Tanzania needs young educated 9

civil society capable of generating and sustainably propelling changes in all sectors of social economic life. Tanzania needs an intelligentsia that thinks outside the existing knowledge box we find ourselves in. Both the LHRC and TANLET acknowledged the apparent lack of good leaders that could lead the change movement in Tanzania and Africa. The LHRC and TANLET realise that blaming the current leaders is not helpful. It only aggravates the hopeless situation that Tanzania and the rest of Africa is in. The fact that the majority of current leaders were never trained to be leaders of any sort makes finger-pointing a less productive exercise. Tanzania and Africa needs well trained leaders to be able to move away from the present bad governance taking place in Tanzania and Africa. Also the two civil societies accepted the fact that hitherto, the mainstream education content imparted to the youth of this nation has been aimed at producing job seekers. They deliberately decided that the new university should intervene into the knowledge creation industry in order to produce self employment and job creators. The focus of UB shall therefore be to produce graduates who will employ themselves and provide employment to others. The tailoring of knowledge in UB shall be done so that the graduates off-load into their production and service-delivery businesses so that in terms of output, the University becomes the nerve centre of a new social and economic basis of the new Tanzania. This means that the burden of providing this new type of higher education cannot be left upon the government. It has to come from somewhere else, and that place is in free and independent higher education institutions like UB. While the government is expanding primary and secondary education, it is necessary that efforts be directed with same vigour to providing a new type of higher education. The patriots who have founded UB are Tanzanian citizens whose patriotism puts them at the helm of the national education policy. For these reasons the responsibility of promoting higher education cant be left upon the government alone. While the government is expanding primary and secondary education, it is necessary that efforts be directed with same vigour to higher education. The patriots who have founded UB are Tanzanian citizens whose patriotism puts them at the helm of the national education Development. Bagamoyo as derived from etymology of bwaga moyo was the act of slaves hurling their tired bodies to the ground celebrating the end of the long torturous caravan route from interior. The route spanned hundreds of kilometres from Congo to Bagamoyo and walking through this long torturous route bonded in chains and carrying several kilogrammes of trade wares such as ivory, gold etc. was the height of human suffering and endurance.

10

The ancient slave trade gives Bagamoyo a historical heritage that is rare and exquisite. UB turns this otherwise dark, exasperating and ignominious part of human history into an exquisite cultural engagement aimed at making Bagamoyo a learning centre of excellence for critical culture, governance and tourism. This role shall make Bagamoyo a gem not only in East Africa but Africa and the world. Enjoying Bagamoyos exquisite cultural heritage is Tanzanias offer of hospitality to the whole mankind. The University of Bagamoyo shall in the meanwhile offer new dimensions and contribution to science, technology, and liberal arts never known to man before. Through the establishment of UB, the founding fathers have bequeathed to the nation and mankind, a priceless pearl in the white soothing sands of Bagamoyo. Therefore Bagamoyo stands to be the most suitable place for the situation of this university named Bagamoyo University where the pangs of ignorance and its endpoints will be extinguished. Therefore, the generations that will pass through the Bagamoyo University can proudly utter Through Bagamoyo we were enslaved and through Bagamoyo we were liberated 1.2 THE FOUNDING PRINCIPLES OF UB TANLET, a nongovernmental (NGO) institution dealing with legal education in Tanzania has championed the idea of establishing this private University at Bagamoyo. TANLET founded the Legal and Human Rights Centre (LHRC) in 1995 in order to give the struggle for legal and human rights in Tanzania a requisite focus and emphasis. By then Human rights were unknown and any one found talking about human rights was seen as an enemy of the state. Currently, LHRC is an independent, non governmental and not for profit sharing national human rights institution. The LHRC is a success story, because, thanks to the hard work done by LHRC activists, in less than two decades human rights have become a national agenda. The idea of founding a university is part and parcel of TANLETs vision to seek the achievement of a free democratic Tanzania. This is based on the principles of social justice, equity and peace. The good work done by LHRC needs to be uplifted to a higher level. The nation needs a University that can teach, research and perform consultancy services in legal and human agenda. Since researches done, and experience gained by both TANLET and LHRC indicate that legal and human rights agendas are being severely harmed by lack of good leaders in both state and private sectors, the two civil society organisations decided to team up and create a university of to meet their perceived solution to the situation. Both TANLET and LHRC draw from same vision and mission which includes, inter alia, the empowerment of the Tanzanian public with education in a socio-economic context with a view to creating strong democratic civil society 11

that respects democratic constitutionalism, the rule of law and good governance. Within this theoretical framework TANLET and LHRC believe in integrated formation that aims at a holistic nurturance of a human being. Development of mental faculties must go hand in hand with spiritual development that can tailor and produce a refined human being and leader of a new type. The UB concept takes leadership and individual personality nurturance as core elements in its programmes. Both the Governing Board of TANLET and LHRC want the UB to begin in a modest style with faculties as resources permit. The strategy is to utilise available resources to the maximum advantage and yield capacity. UB shall therefore focus on those fields of knowledge that founders already have sufficient strength on in terms of human resources. Secondly, owners shall guide the founding faculty to design curricula focusing on fields of knowledge whose initial investment is not too huge to make the concept an illusion. That is to say UB shall aim at establishing its niche in rare areas of knowledge that currently East Africa and Africa do not have. 1.2.1 UB VISION To be and remain a unique centre of excellence in offering university education in the World. 1.2.2 UB MISSION To nurture and develop socially conscious, committed and ethical human being through integrated holistic formation. 1.2.3 UB GUIDING PHILOSOPHY The guiding philosophy of UB shall be: "To lead is to show the way. 1.3 INFRASTRUCTURAL PREPAREDNESS The UB concept revolves around integrated formation that aims at a holistic nurturance of a human being. The initial head quarters are situated at plot 706, Sembeti street off old Bagamoyo road close to Oxford University press in Mikocheni area. The office is in operation and fully prepared for the takeoff of the University.

12

Photo01: Showing the present Head Quarters office at Mikocheni.

1.3.1 ACCOMODATION FACILITIES The UB currently will have teaching lecture halls located at Ursino Estate in Mikocheni and Kimara stop over. These are equipped with computer facilities that will serve as teaching tool and resource for information and academic materials. Initial library facility is located at Ursino Estate incorporating most relevant academic text books and other sources to facilitate reference need for the university students. It will be noted however, that boarding hostels will be under construction at Bagamoyo in proceeding years. Prospective students will be advised to get prepared to source this service outside the university at the initial stages. 13

1.4

SOCIAL WELFARE

Social life at the UB should generate fun among other infotainment activities. Students together with the other members of the UB community will actively engage in sports, music, art and other cultural activities. Social clubs, faith groups, professional, academic and political associations shall be freely established and registered by the Director of Student Affairs. This is to enable the University Community to create an environment of dialogue, debates, discussion and dynamic human welfare. 1.5 ACCREDITATION OF UB

In establishing the University of Bagamoyo, the Founders have complied with the legal procedures for the establishment of universities stipulated by the Universities Act, 2005 and the Universities (Chartering, Registration and Accreditation Procedures) Regulations, 2006. Pursuant to this legal framework, the UB Founders lodged requisite application and forms for the accreditation of UB in January 28th 2010 and the Tanzania Commission for Universities (TCU) sent an Inspection Team on 22 nd February 2010. On 22nd February 2010 the team inspected UB teaching facilities at Kijitonyama, Ursino, Kinondoni and Stop-Over Kimara. On 23rd February 2010 the team visited the 100 acre each UB plots of land at Kiromo and Makurunge in Bagamoyo. The team made several recommendations that have now been implemented. The TCU has satisfied itself that the Founders have completed all the procedures and requirements and after have inspection allowed UB to start its programmes in November 2010. 1.6 UB STRATEGIC (ROLLING) PLAN UB as a new university, has a Rolling Strategic Plan (2010), a Business Plan (2010) and an Implementation Master Plan (2010). The creation of this new university shall be complete by 2020 when the construction of the main campus at Bagamoyo township is expected to be complete. Meanwhile the University headquarters are transitionally located at Mikocheni B, 709 Sembeti Street, off old Bagamoyo road in Dar es Salaam. Various colleges, faculties and schools of the new University constituting the Dar es Salaam Campus are transitionally located at different places in the city of Dar es Salaam, pending the construction of the main campus at Bagamoyo. The transition towards the completion of the new university also envisages the establishment of other UB colleges that shall be established once facilities and their faculties are ready. The upcoming colleges include: College of business, Entrepreneurial studies and Tourism, College of Arts, Social Sciences and Journalism, College of Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences, College of Education, and College of Engineering and Technology. 14

2.0

UB MANAGEMENT

The UB is a private university set to the target of integrated formation that aims at a holistic nurturance of a human being. To facilitate the task ahead the management has be well prepared and self motivated toward the mission and the vision of the UB. It is with this view that the UB University Council held its inception meeting on 15th February 2010 at LHRC Board Room. The following persons were appointed to take up top management positions in the prospective University. 2.1 LIST OF THE TOP MANAGEMENT TEAM Chancellor Chairman of UB Council Vice Chancellor DVC-ARC DVC-PFA Mr. Ezekiel Masanja Rt. Rev. Bishop Elinaza Sendoro Prof. Josaphat Kanywanyi Prof. Costa R. Mahalu Prof. Gamaliel Mgongo Fimbo Dr. Edmund Sengondo Mvungi Bursar

2.2 GUIDING PRINCIPLES OF UB The UB is a university that has been established and founded on all legal grounds and principles. Therefore the overall structure is stipulated in the University Charter signed by the President of the United Republic of Tanzania. These principles will be safeguarded and administered accordingly in the established system. 2.3 UB ORGANS UB is managed by organs that have been established by the University Charter. These Organs ensure good governance and their members represent diverse composition of a vibrant university community. 2.2.1 UB COUNCIL This is the highest policy making organ of the University established under Article 4 of the Charter. 2.2.2 UB SENATE This is the academic decision making body of the University. It is established by Article 5 of the Charter. 15

2.3 OPERATIONALIZATION OF THE UB Day to day activities of the university shall flow on the overall structures of UB Colleges, Faculties, Schools and Boards. These Boards shall run the day to day academic affairs of the UB and shall be accountable to Senate and the Council. They are established pursuant to Article 7 of the Charter as campus colleges, Faculties and schools.

3.0

STRUCTURE OF THE UB

The general structure of the UB will flow as University, College, Faculty, School, Institute and Centre.

3.1

ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES OFFERED

These will include all programmes to be offered in the totality of the


university components. 3.1.1 CERTIFICATES i. Certificate in Law and Governance ii. Certificate in Governance Science with ICT and

iii. Certificate in Languages iv. Certificate in Communication Skills 3.1.2 DIPLOMAS i. Diploma in Law and Governance ii. Diploma in ICT and Governance iii. Diploma in applied sciences 3.1.3 HIGHER DIPLOMAS i. Post Graduate Governance diploma in Law and

ii. Post Graduate Diploma in Science with ICT and Governance

16

3.1.4 BACHELORS DEGREES i. LL.B & Governance ii. BA Law & Governance iii. Bachelor in Science with ICT and Governance iv. BA Basic Science &Governance v. BA Basic Applied Sciences & Governance 3.1.5 MASTERS DEGREES i. LL.M and Governance ii. Masters in Science with ICT and Governance 3.1.6 PHD DEGREES i. Ph.D in Law and Governance ii. Ph.D in Science with ICT and Governance iii. Doctor of laws Degree with Governance 3.2 UB COLLEGE OF LAW AND GOVERNANCE

The College of Law and Governance offers, inter alia, professional LLB, LLM, and PhD. degrees. The College consists of three institutions namely; the Faculty of Law & Governance, the Institute of Human Rights & Governance and the Post Graduate School of Law & Governance. 3.2.1 FACULTY OF LAW & GOVERNANCE The Faculty of Law & Governance of the UB College of Law & Governance offers the law undergraduate programme. Two undergraduate degree programmes are expected to be offered by this faculty which are the LLB & Governance and BA Law & Governance. 3.2.2 INSTITUTE OF HUMAN RIGHTS & GOVERNANCE The Institute of Human Rights & Governance (IHRG) of the UB College of Law & Governance offers inter alia, non degree programmes such as Paralegal training, certificate in law, diploma in law and tailored training programmes in legal, human rights and governance fields in tandem with

17

university standards. Later it will offer undergraduate degree programmes on human rights law and governance. 3.2.3 GRADUATE SCHOOL OF LAW & GOVERNANCE The Graduate School of Law & Governance offers graduate programmes that include Graduate Diploma in Law and Governance, master in Law and Governance and PhD of Law and Governance. 3.3 UB COLLEGE ENVIROMENT OF SCIENCE, INFORMATICS AND BUILT

The UB College of Science, Informatics and built environment consists of three main faculties, namely Faculty of Sciences, Faculty of Science & Built Environment and Faculty of Informatics & Communication technologies. The college also consists of Graduate school of Science, Informatics & Built Environment and Institute of Applied Sciences and Education. 3.3.1 FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCES Degree undergraduate programmes in the Faculty of Applied Sciences will commence on the 1st November 2010 taking a duration of three years bachelor of Applied Sciences in Computer Science, ICT and Geomatics. Students who meet direct entry requirements should apply to take up these programmes through the Tanzania Commission for University (TCU) and must have A Level passes as stipulated in the UB Prospectus 3.3.2 THE FACULTY OF BASIC SCIENCE The Faculty of Basic Sciences will offer Bachelor of Basic Science degrees basically aiming at developing science teachers the group that is highly needed by the nation. The Degree programmes to be offered by this faculty in the 2011/12 academic year will include double majors in physics & mathematics, Physics & Chemistry, Biology & Chemistry and mathematics & Chemistry. The design of these degree programmes will entail widening the student intake catchment area to include form IV leavers whose degree programme will take four years 3.3.3 TECHNICAL INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND ICT The Technical Institute of Science and ICT offer all capacity building, tailored, non degree courses. The Institute will also award certificates and diplomas in tandem with University standards. 18

3.3.4 POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND ICT The Post graduate School of Science offers Post Graduate Diplomas, Masters and PhD in Science and ICT with governance. 3.4 UB SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS

The UB School of Languages and Communication Skills is one of the essential components of the university. This will offer compulsory language and communication skills courses cutting across the whole university. According to the academic programmes of UB, language and communication skills is a compulsory subject stressed and should be passed in all semesters during the tenure of degree programmes. The basic language to be emphasised will be English as the medium of instruction for the whole University. 3.5 UB LEADERSHIP, GOVERNANCE AND DIPLOMACY CENTRE

The UB Leadership, Governance and Diplomacy Centre is a university wide academic institution whose function is to offer to all university students an intensive training in leadership, good governance and diplomatic skills. The Centres offerings are compulsory in all university programmes are stressed to be passed in each academic year. 3.4.1 CONSULTANCY PROGRAMMES The Centre will also offer separate leadership training programmes that are not part of degree programmes. Such courses are customer tailored courses developed and given to particular clients to meet intended needs and goals. 3.4.2 ENTERPRENEURSHIP PROGRAMMES The center is intended to cater entrepreneurship programmes as one of the objective of the University in producing job creators against job seekers. Courses will be delivered to all students under all programmes to implement what they would have grasped from all basic courses. Just as English language, courses on entrepreneurship will also be compulsory.

5.0

ADMISSION INFORMATION

This information covers all offerings in UB Colleges, faculties and Schools.

19

5.1

FINACIAL INFORMATION

5.1.1 FEES STRUCTURE All prospective students are asked to confirm with the admission office on the cost involved in the course one intends to undertake.
Fees: PROGRAMME LLB Degree Program LLM Degree Program LLM Degree Program-Executive Other Degree Programs E-Courses for Paralegals Professional Courses Other Courses Seminars and Workshops Research Grants or Contracts Consultancy Assignments EXPLANATION Tshs US $ 3,200 3,800 4,200 2,500 2,000 2,500 2,000 100,000 75,000 50,000

5.1.2 OTHER COSTS Item


Practical Training Boarding

Computation
Tsh10,000/= x 70 days Tsh. 5000/= per day

Tshs

US $
560 4

20

Meals Books and stationery Medicals

Tsh. 3,000/= per day Tsh. 350,000/= per year Tsh 450,000/= per year

2.5 280 360

Applications must be addressed to: The Admissions Office, University of Bagamoyo, P.O.Box 75254 Dar es Salaam Tz East Africa. Tel: +255-0222-2781419 Email: admissionsub@gmail.com Website: www.ub.ac.tz (not active until 20th Dec. 2010) currently use www.humanrights.or.tz

6.0

EXAMINATION PROCEDURES

The senate shall prescribe the form under which students shall be examined, whether oral, written or practical. 6.1 GENERAL EXAMINATION REGULATIONS Examinations shall be conducted in accordance with prescribed time schedule in terms of when they should be held within semester time and duration which each course module may take depending on the units allotted to each module, provided that in the absence of specific rule made by the Senate, College or Faculty Board, standard examination time shall be 3 hours for each course held at the end of the course or semester. i. A Candidate eligible to sit for any university examination shall be issued with an identity card on payment of examination fee and satisfying the examination officer of having acquired adequate academic competence requisite for sitting for the scheduled examination; and for avoidance of doubt no candidate shall be allowed to sit for a final examination in a course in which the candidate has not passed course work; 21

ii. no candidate shall be allowed to sit for a final examination in a course the candidate has not attended at least 2/3 of the lecture and seminar hours. Failure to appear for a scheduled examination without a written permission of the Head of department, Dean or College Principal shall attract discontinuation from studies by the academic board of the Faculty, School, College or Senate on grounds of abscondment. A student who has been discontinued for absconding from examination or course may apply for re-admission and the admission authorities may readmit such student on payment of admission fees, settlement of any outstanding debts to the University and acceptance of any conditions laid down by the relevant academic board; 6.2 DETAILED EXAMINATION REGULATIONS i. Each course will be examined upon completion of requisite course units. The pass mark for each examinable course is 40%, which is graded as C. ii. Candidates shall be continuously assessed for examinable courses. The coursework will be generated from assignments, presentations, projects, reports, papers, quizzes, tests, etc. and will account for 40% of the final marks in each examinable course. iii. The University Examination at the end of each semester shall account for 60% of the total marks. iv. Candidates are required to pass the examination of each subject before proceeding to the next semester of study. v. A candidate may be allowed to take a supplementary examination in the failed course provided that the weighted average in all courses taken in that semester constitutes a GPA greater than or equal to 1.8. . vi. A candidate who fails to improve the GPA after supplementary examination results from 1.8 to 2.0 in any year of study may be allowed to repeat the year; vii. A candidate who obtains an aggregate GPA of 2.0 but fails in any course may be allowed to carry over the failed courses and such carried over courses must be passed in the subsequent year of study; 22

viii. A pass in supplementary examination of score greater than or 40% shall be recorded as pass i.e. C. ix. No candidate shall be allowed to repeat the same year thrice.

6.3 THE GRADING SYSTEM The University shall use a letter grading system as follows: Grade Score (%) Points A B+ B C D E 6.4 70-100 60-69 50-59 40-49 35-39 0-34 5 4 3 2 1 0 Remarks Excellent Very Good Good Pass Fail Absolute Fail

FINAL DEGREE CLASSIFICATION i. A candidates final standing in degree will be determined by the weighted average for all EXCEPT TWO SEMERSTERS OF THE FIRST YEAR OF STUDY. ii. All degrees shall be classified as: First Class, Upper Second Class, Lower Second Class and Pass (Third Class)

The table below presents a key for categorization of the LL.B degree.

First Class

Upper Second Lower Second

Pass (Third)

23

Overall Average Grade Final GPA

B+

4.4-5.0

3.5-4.3

2.7-3.4

2.0-2.6

The final GPA will be calculated as follows: GPA = CUMULATIVE GRADE POINTS ATTAINED (in 2nd, 3rd and 4th Year) TOTAL CREDIT POINTS TAKEN (in the 2nd, 3rd and 4th Year) 6.5 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS i. In order to receive a Bachelors degree the candidate must: ii. Have successfully completed all prescribed courses in the degree programme; and iii. Have fulfilled all other conditions prescribed by the University Senate including completion of payment of all tuition and other related fees.

7.0

DEGREE PROGRAMMES FOR THE COLLEGE OF LAW AND GOVERNANCE

7.1 INTRODUCTION UB College of Law and Governance consists of three institutions namely; Faculty of Law and Governance, Institute of Human Rights and Governance and the Post Graduate School of Law and Governance. Faculty of Law offers two professional qualifying undergraduate programmes namely LLB & Governance and BA Law & Governance. The Post Graduate School of Law offers Masters of Law & Governance, MA Law & Governance, PhD in Law and Governance and PhD in Arts with Law & Governance. The Institute of Human Rights and Governance [IHRG] gives students an opportunity to study Human Rights law in an all round socio-economic context and also prepares them to play leadership role in their societies. The UB IHRG offers non degree academic courses leading to Certificate in Law, Diploma in Law, paralegal training and has scores of years of experience in legal aid and outreach services, the latter that include research and civic education. The faculty at UB College of Law and Governance consists of a pool of well rounded up and experienced professors supported by a large number of 24

highly competent young junior academic staff. Procedural and practical skills courses are offered by senior professional faculty who have practiced law in diverse fields of specialisation including adjudication at the magistracy, High Court and the Court of Appeal, advocacy at the Court of Appeal, High Court and subordinate courts and prosecution and state attorney-ship at the Attorney Generals Chambers. In a nutshell the UB College of Law and Governance is a centre of excellence, professionalism and good leadership mentoring. UB pedagogical philosophy is to offer holistic knowledge that merges professionalism, excellence, ethics and good leadership. This makes enrolment with UB College of Law and Governance a rare learning and mentoring opportunity for aspiring young students who aim at global leadership. The college offers legal education aimed at providing theoretical knowledge and analytical and practical skills both which are necessary to produce a society-conscious professional lawyer. UB graduate are doubtlessly smart minds tailored to move forward the world around them. Relevance, innovation and change are the attributes you can always expect from a UB graduate. The governance programme at UB College of Law and Governance is part of the University-wide programme tailored to train and produce a new brand of global leaders committed to social cause, professionalism and result oriented practice. This rare programme in an African university prepares students to either join the legal profession or a number of other careers as competent leaders conversant with rules and practice of good governance. The leadership programme is a compulsory component of UBs offerings aimed at providing theoretical knowledge and analytical and practical leadership skills which are necessary to produce a society-conscious lawyer, professional and leader who can relevantly and innovatively contribute to change and the development of his/her country and the international community. Joining the UB College of Law and Governance therefore prepares students to confidently take up a positive role in the legal profession or other diverse job offerings in academic, corporate, governance and even political terrains. The UB programme is tailor- made to take care of individual preferences and knowledge blending for specific practical human resource capacity development, a rare niche rarely found anywhere else but at UB. 7.2 OBJECTIVES OF THE LAW DEGREE PROGRAMMES AT UB FACULTY OF LAW The Faculty of law at UB College of Law and Governance offers a professional LL.B degree programme aimed at achieving the following:

25

i. Providing a thorough and basic training in law and legal techniques required for highest standard professional practice of law and scholarly work in law; ii. Producing ethical, socially conscious, committed and accountable graduates who shall take up professional service and leadership roles in the public and private sectors; iii. Inculcation upon UB graduates professional legal and practical skills including ethical principles; iv. Tooling students with sufficient legal research skills, analytical skills and drafting skills; v. Empowering students with sufficient legal counselling skills, advocacy skills, arbitration skills and negotiation skills; vi. Imparting to students sufficient legal documentation skills, draftsmanship, communication skills, competency in English, Kiswahili and at least a third international language; vii. Imparting to students sufficient legal procedural skills, sufficient knowledge of substantive and adjectival law; viii. Arming the students with requisite moral and ethical foundations of a socially conscious professional lawyer; ix. Imparting to students sufficient theoretical and ideological foundations of a socially conscious, professional and critical thinking lawyer . 7.3 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS The applicants for the degree programmes at UB College of Law and Governance Faculty of law, the Institute of Human Rights & Governance and the Post Graduate School of Law and Governance must fulfill the requirements for admission which include admission by the UB College of Law and Governance Academic Board and approval by the UB Senate. UB Prospectus may prescribe special matriculation requirements to be complied with by all or special group of students before admission. 7.4 ELIGIBILITY FOR ADMISSION All members of the public from within and without Tanzania are eligible for admission for the LL.B degree provided that they satisfy the entry

26

requirements and their applications are approved by the appropriate admission bodies. 7.3.1 DIRECT ENTRY (FORM SIX) Any person who has the following qualifications may apply for admission to the LL.B with Governance programme: A. Certificate of Secondary Education Examination (CSEE) or equivalent with passes in five approved subjects, obtained prior to sitting for the Advanced Certificate of Secondary Education Examination (ACSEE) or equivalent; and B. At least two Principal level passes and a subsidiary in General Paper in approved subjects in the Advanced Certificate of Secondary Education Examination (ACSEE); provided that he/she gets a total of 5 points where A=5, B=4, C=3, D=2, E=1, S=0.5); and C. O level credit pass of at least C grade in English. 7.3.2 FOREIGN APPLICANTS Entry requirements of foreign applicants will be equivalent to the entry requirements of Tanzanians. UB aptitude tests will be used to peg foreign applicants qualifications to Tanzania standards. 7.3.3 OTHER QUALIFICATIONS a) A Diploma in law from an accredited/recognized institution of education of not less than Upper second-class and an O level credit pass of at least C grade in English; or b) A distinction in Certificate in Law from UB or a recognised University whose Certificate in Law programme is accepted by UB and O level credit pass of at least C grade in English. 7.3.4 SPECIAL MATRICULATION REQUIREMENTS Candidates who have fulfilled all the conditions for direct entrants but whose two principal level and the subsidiary is less than 5.0 points on the ACSEE and all candidates with other qualifications specified in 3.2.3 above shall sit and pass Special UB Matriculation Examination before admission. 7.3.5 MATURE AGE ENTRY To qualify for mature age entry candidates must: 27

a) be 23 years of age or older; and b) have completed form IV (or equivalent) at least five years prior to the year in which application is sought; and c) be able to show that they have attended extra-mural classes or residential courses, in which case recommendation from the principal of the college attended will be necessary; and d) pass UB College of Law and Governance Mature Age Entry Examination. 7.4.6 OTHER ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS i. The applicant must have proof of sufficient funds for the completion of the programme ii. The applicant must submit two reference letters regarding his/her character iii. Preference will be given to candidates with highest academic qualification in the admission process.

iv. Female applicants may be admitted at points lower than male applicants to ensure gender mainstreaming if need arises 7.4 EXAMINATION REGULATIONS i. Each course will be examined upon completion of requisite course units. The pass mark for each examinable course is 40%, which is graded as C. ii. Candidates shall be continuously assessed for examinable courses. The coursework will be generated from assignments, presentations, projects, reports, papers, quizzes, tests, etc. and will account for 40% of the final marks in each examinable course. iii. The University Examination at the end of each semester shall account for 60% of the total marks. iv. Candidates are required to pass the examination of each subject before proceeding to the next semester of study. v. A candidate may be allowed to take a supplementary examination in the failed course provided that the weighted average in all courses taken in that semester constitutes a GPA greater than or equal to 1.8. . 28

vi. A candidate who fails to improve the GPA after supplementary examination results from 1.8 to 2.0 in any year of study may be allowed to repeat the year; vii. A candidate who obtains an aggregate GPA of 2.0 but fails in any course may be allowed to carry over the failed courses and such carried over courses must be passed in the subsequent year of study; viii. A pass in supplementary examination of score greater than or 40% shall be recorded as pass i.e. C ix. No candidate shall be allowed to repeat the same year thrice.

8.0

THE LL.B CURRICULUM

8.1 SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES OF THE CURRICULUM This LL.B degree curriculum is designed to meet the following specific objectives: i. To satisfy the requirements of UB College of Law and Governance; ii. To satisfy the requirements of the Law School of Tanzania; iii. To comply with the requirements of the Council of Legal Education; and iv. To meet the highest academic standards compared to other universities in the world. 8.2 DURATION OF THE LLB The UB COLLEGE OF LAW AND GOVERNANCE LL.B degree is a fouryear programme based on semester unit system. Within this period of time the candidate should clear the pending courses and examinations where any. Failure to do that the student shall be discontinued from studies. Therefore, the main UB College of Law and Governance LLB programme is a four years full time programme. However, UB has part time programmes tailored to meet specific needs of working peoples. 8.3 COURSES OFFERED Programmes are divided into two semesters and in each semester there and course to be covered. These are also divided into two categories of CORE

29

and OPTIONAL courses. All core courses are compulsory in each year as prescribed in 8.4 below. 8.3.1 LIST OF CORE COURSES LW 100 Constitutional Law I English Language I & II Law of Contract I Information Technologies I Criminal Law I Legal Method I Leadership and Governance I Constitutional Law II Law of Contract II Information Technologies II Criminal Law II Legal Method II Leadership and Governance II Administrative Law I Land Law I Law of Torts I Business Association Law Family Law English Course III &IV Administrative Law II Land Law II Law of Torts II 30

UBEC 101 LW 102

UBIT 103 LW LW LG LW LW IT LW LW LG LW LW LW LW LW EL LW LW LW 104 105 106 100 102 103 104 105 106 200 201 202 203 204 205 200 201 202

LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW EL LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW EL LW LW LW

203 204 206 300 301 302 303 304 305 397 320 321 322 323 324 325 400 401 402 403 404 405 406

Business Association Law II Family Law II Public International Law Jurisprudence I Public International Law Law of Evidence I Legal Ethics Legal Research Methodology Criminal Procedure English Course V & VI Jurisprudence II Labour law I Law of Evidence II Legal Writing and Drafting Legal Ethics Environmental Law Civil Procedure I LLB Dissertation Local Government Law English Course VII & VIII Civil Procedure II ADR Social Security Law

31

8.3.2 LIST OF OPTIONAL COURSES LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 Banking Law Canon Law Capital Markets and Securities Law Criminology and Penology Insurance Law Intellectual Property Law International Humanitarian Law Private International law International Trade and Finance Law Law of the Child Local Government Law Refugee Law Tax Law The law of Negotiable Instruments Cyber Crimes law Forensic law Islamic law Media law Natural Resources Law Planning Law Entertainment Law Computer Law Conflict Resolution Law 32

LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW FL

523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533

Criminology and penology Cultural Property and Antiquities Law Investment law Labour Law Maritime Law Health Law Hire Purchase Law Competition Law Landlord and tenant law East African Law French

8.4

THE ORDER IN WHICH COURSES SHALL BE OFFERED

8.4.1 FIRST YEAR (ALL CORE COURSES) SEMESTER ONE Course Code 1.LW100 2.LW101 3.LW 102 4.LW103 5.EC104 6.IT105 7.LG106 Course name Constitutional Law I Law of Contract I Criminal Law I Legal Method I English Language I Information Technology I Leadership and Governance I Duration 15 weeks 15 weeks 15 weeks 15 weeks 15 weeks 15 weeks 15 weeks Units 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 33

SEMESTER TWO Course Code 1.LW100 2.LW101 3.LW 102 4.LW103 5.EC104 units 6.IT 105 7.LG106 Course Name Constitutional Law II Law of Contract II Criminal Law II Legal Method II English Language II Information Technology II Duration 15 weeks 15 weeks 15 weeks 15 weeks 15 weeks 15 weeks Units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 3 units 3 units

Leadership and Governance II 15 weeks

Total Minimum 1st Year Credits:

36 units

8.4.2 SECOND YEAR (CORE COURSES) SEMESTER THREE Course LW LW LW LW LW EL 200 201 202 203 204 205 Code Course Name Administrative Law I Land Law I Law of Torts I Business Association Law Family Law English Language III Duration Units 15Weeks 15Weeks 15 Weeks 15 Weeks 15 Weeks 15 Weeks 3 3 3 3 3 3

Options: During semester three, a candidate must take at least one (1) course from the list of options. 34

Option I:

15 weeks;

3 units

French can only be opted continuously up to the fourth year from third semester. SEMESTER FOUR Course Code Units LW Units LW Units LW Units LW Units LW Units EL Units LW Units 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 Course Name Administrative Law II Land Law II Law of Torts II Duration 15 Weeks 15 Weeks 15 Weeks 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Business Association Law II 15 Weeks Family Law II English Language III Public International Law 15 Weeks 15 Weeks 15 Weeks

During semester four a student must take at least two [2] courses from the list of options. Option I: units Option II: 3units Total minimum Second Year Credits: 36 units Maximum Options (Non credit): 1 option 15 weeks 15 weeks 3

35

8.4.3 THIRD YEAR (CORE COURSES) SEMESTER FIVE Course LW LW LW LW LW LW EL Code 300 301 302 303 304 305 397 Course Name Jurisprudence I Duration 15 weeks Units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 units 3 Units 3 Units

Public International Law 15 weeks Law of Evidence I Social Ethics 15 weeks 15 weeks

Research Methodology 15 weeks Criminal Procedure English Course IV 15 Weeks 15 Weeks

Options: In semester five a candidate must take at least one (1) course from the list of options. Option 1: SEMESTER SIX Course LW LW LW LW LW LW EL 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 Code Course Name Jurisprudence II Labour law Law of Evidence II Legal Writing and Drafting Legal Ethics Environmental Law English Course IV Duration 15 Weeks 15 Weeks 15 Weeks 15 Weeks 15 Weeks 15 Weeks 15 Weeks Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 15 weeks; 3 units

Options: In semester six a candidate must take at least one (1) course from the list of options. Option 1: 15 weeks 3 units 36

Total minimum credits for Third Year: 42 units 8.4.4 FOURTH YEAR (CORE COURSES) SEMESTER SEVEN Course LW LW LW CL 400 401 402 403 Code Course Name Civil Procedure I LLB Dissertation Local Government Law Communication Skills I Duration 15 Weeks 30 Weeks 15 Weeks 15 Weeks Units 3 Units 6 Units 3 Units 3 Units

During semester VII a student must take at least three (3) courses from the list of options Option 1 Option 2 Option 3 SEMESTER EIGHT Course LW LW LW LW CL Code 404 405 406 401 407 Course Name Civil Procedure II ADR Social Security Law LLB Dissertation Duration 15 Weeks 15 Weeks 15 Weeks 30 Weeks Units 3 Units 3 Units 3 Units 6 Units 3 Units 15 weeks; 15 weeks; 15 weeks 3 units 3 units 3 units

Communications Skills II 15 Weeks

During semester eight a student must take at least three (3) courses from the list of options Option 1 Option 2 15 weeks 15 weeks 3 units 3 units 37

Option 3

15 weeks

3 units

A fourth year student must do a compulsory research paper whose weight is 6 units. Therefore the Total Minimum Credits for 4th year: 36 units.

38

9.0 INSTITUTE OF HUMAN RIGHTS & GOVERNANCE


The Institute of Human Rights & Governance (IHRG) of the UB College of Law & Governance offers inter alia, non degree programmes such as Paralegal training, certificate in law, diploma in law and tailored training programmes in legal, human rights and governance fields in tandem with university standards. Later it will offer undergraduate degree programmes on human rights law and governance. 9.1 CERTIFICATE IN LAW, LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE 9.1.1 INTRODUCTION The certificate is designed for a maximum duration of one year with two semesters. Students undertaking this certificate programme will need to cover six core courses in total of 18 units. 9.1.2 DETAILS OF THE COURSES Core courses will include; Criminal Law, Administrative Law, Criminal Law, Human rights Law, Leadership and Governance, 9.1.2.1 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: This is a 3 unit compulsory course, designed to impart basic knowledge of constitutional principles basing on Tanzanias constitution. Objectives To lay the foundation for candidates to understand the basic constitutional legal principles and apply them in Tanzanian context especially as enshrined in the Countrys Constitution. Course Content General overview of constitution (meaning, classification, types and sources of Constitution); role and function of constitution in a State; introduction to Constitutional principles and doctrines (separation of powers, rule of law, parliamentary supremacy, ministerial responsibility, independence of Judiciary); introduction to Bill of Rights. Readings

39

i. Court of Appeal of Tanzania, The history of Administration of Justice in Tanzania, Mathew Publishers, Dar es Salaam 2004. ii. Dicey, A. V., An Introduction to the Study of the Law of the Constitution, New Delhi,2000. iii. Jackson, P.O., Hood Phillips Leading Cases in Constitutional and Administrative Law, Sweet and Maxwell, London1998. iv. Kijo-Bisimba, H.,& C.M., Peter(eds) Justice James Mwalusanya and Commentaries, Legal and Human Rights Centre, Dar es Salaam,2005. v. Mtaki, C. K, Constitutions and Legal Systems of East Africa, Mkuki na Nyota Publishers, Dar es Salaam, 1998. vi. Peter, C.M., Human Rights in Tanzania: Selected Cases and Materials, Rudger Kope Verlag,Koln,1997. vii. Pylee, M. Y, Selected constitution of the World, Universal Law Publishing Company, New Delhi, 2002. viii. Rotunda, R.D., Supplement to modern Constitutional Law: Case and Notes, West Publishing Company, St. Paul Minnesota, 1992. ix. Rutinwa, B., Constitutions and Legal Systems of East Africa, Part III (The Court System and Conflict of Laws in Tanzania),The Open University of Tanzania, Dar es Salaam,1996. x. Shivji, I. G., et al, Constitutional and Legal System of Tanzania: A Civics Source Book, Mkuki na Nyoka Publishers, Dar es Salaam, 2004. xi. Wade, E. C. S & Phillips O.H., Constitutional Law, London, 1965. xii. Wheare, K. C., Modern Constitutions, Oxford University Press, London, 1964. 9.1.2.2 ADMINISTRATIVE LAW This is 3 units compulsory course designed to enable candidates to understand the basic concepts and principles regulating the exercise of powers. These are Government, administrative bodies and Systems so as to ensure accountability, fostering participation of interested parties in decisionmaking process. Objective(s) To introduce candidates to the basic principles and theories pertaining to the exercise of powers within the prescribed limits and that the rights of the subjects of such administrative bodies and systems are protected. Course Content

40

Introduction to administrative law (Meaning, development & functions); basic constitutional and administrative principles; principles of natural justice; subsidiary legislations; judicial review. Readings i. Bounemouth , A. C., A Re-examination of the Case for a Locus Standi Rule in Public Law,1996. ii. Foulkes, Introduction to Administrative Law. iii. H.W.R., Wade & C.F. Forsyth, Administrative Law. iv. Jackson, P.O., Hood Phillips Leading Cases in Constitutional and Administrative Law, Sweet and Maxwell, London,1998. v. Katzen, Hayley and Douglas, Roger., Administrative Law, Butterworths Tutorials Series,1999. vi. M.P., Jain & S.N. Jain, Principles of Administrative Law(4th Edition) vii. P.P. Craig, Administrative Law(6th Edition) viii. Schwartz, Administrative Law 26(1976) ix. Stanley De Smith and Rodney Braizier, Constitutional and Administrative Law. 9.1.2.3 CRIMINAL LAW This is 3 units compulsory course designed to enable candidates to understand the basic legal principles and theories underlying crime, basic elements of various offences, criminal responsibility, and defences. Course Objective(s) To enable candidates to understand the basic legal principles and theories applicable in dealing with offences focusing on: a. Provide basic knowledge that will expose candidates to the fundamental principles of criminal law. b. Equip candidates with basic knowledge on legal theories and principles for identifying and dealing with crimes by applying the criminal law. c. Enable candidates to understand the concept of criminal responsibility and the available defences. Course Content An overview of criminal law(definition, purpose, and source of criminal law); general Principle of criminal responsibility; Parties to offenses, General Defences of Criminal Liability; Attempts and Conspiracies, Inchoate Offences; 41

Offences against Molarity; Offences Against Property; Selected Offences(Murder, Manslaughter etc) Readings i. Smith and Hogan, Criminal Law, 7th Ed.,Butterworths,London,1992. ii. Harris, Criminal Law,22nd Ed., Universal Law Publishing Company Ltd, New Delhi,1973 iii. Collingwood, Criminal Law of East and Central Africa,Lusaka,1967. iv. B.D. Chipeta, Criminal Law and Procedure A Digest of Cases v. Card, Cross and Jones Criminal Law, 13th Ed., ButterworthsLondon,1995. vi. D.W. Elliot, Casebook on Criminal Law,6th Edition., Sweet & Maxwell,London,1993. vii. Alan Reed & Bed Fitzpatric, Criminal Law,3rd Ed., Sweet & Maxwell,Canada,2006. viii. Lillian Tibatenwa-Ekiribinza, Criminal Law in Uganda: Sexual Assaults and Offences Against Morality, Fountain Publisher, Kampala,2005. ix. Andrew Shaworth, Criminal Law,14th Ed., Oxford University Press, New York,2003. x. R.V Kelkar, Lectures on Criminal Procedure, 3rd Ed., Eastern Book Company,lucknow,2002. 9.1.2.4 HUMAN RIGHTS LAW The Course is 3 units compulsory and designed to introduce candidates to concepts and development of human rights law and institutions at international level. The approach of human rights law, the implementation of human rights law within international, regional and national courts. Practice and enforcement of human rights law in Tanzania and challenges to the full realization of human rights at domestic, regional and international levels. Objective(s) To provide candidates with the basic understanding of human rights law and its institutions as well as trends and approaches in the global protection and enforcement of human rights. Course Content(s) The course will cover the Concept, nature and development of human rights; introduction to international approach of human rights, the United Nations; regional, African System. Eventually human rights under domestic law-human rights in Tanzania; protection and promotion of human rights in Tanzania; and contemporary issues of human rights in Tanzania. Readings 42

i. Chandra,U., Human Rights,Allahabad,2001. ii. Peter,C.M, Human Rights in Tanzania, Selected Cases and Materials, Rudger Koper Verlag Koln,1997 iii. Shaw, M, International Law, Cambridge, 1998. iv. Shivji,I., The Concept of Human Rights in Africa, Cadestria Book Series,Dakar,1989 v. Shivji. I., et al, Constitutional and Legal System in Tanzania: A Civics Sourcebook, Mkuki and Nyota, Dar es Salaam,2004. vi. Smith, R., International Human Rights, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2003 vii. English, K., and Stapleton, A., The Human Rights Handbook: A Practical Guide to Monitoring Human Rights, Colcheester, Ennifield, 1995. viii. Ankrumah, E. A., The African Commission on Human Rights and Peoples Rights: Practice and Procedure, Matinus Nijhoff Publishers, London, 1996. 9.1.2.5 LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE This course is offered in the first and second semester. It is intended to further equip the student with critical developmental problems in the fields of, economics, culture, science & technology, agriculture, industry and commerce, law and social services. The course is focused on success and failure of leadership globally and in Tanzania.

Course Objectives(s) a. To create and inculcate role models as part of leadership nurturing in students. b. To enable the student to critically analyse issues, To enable the student cope up with changes that are taking places in the world and take up bold and creative leadership engagement role.Course Content Tanzanias developmental experience and alternative development strategies i.Global leadership experiences of good and bad leaders ii.African leadership experiences of good and bad leaders iii.Tanzanian leadership experience of good and bad leaders

43

Development experiences and alternative development strategies as leadership modelling agents i. Global development experience in bold strokes ii. Africas development experience in bold strokes iii. Alternative development strategies in Tanzania, Africa and elsewhere in Third World Global capitalist development crisis and impact on third world development in Society, Culture, Technology and Environment i. ii. iii. iv. Society, population and culture as factors of development Science, technology and environment as factors of development Leadership models, statesmanship, styles and development Local politics as predicates of statesmanship and the role of foreign policy, v. Foreign aid, foreign investments and development vi. Critical evaluation of leadership and underdevelopment Readings i. Todaro, M.P. (1985) Economic Development in the Third World, Oriental Longman Ltd. ii. Rodney, W. (1976) How Europe Underdeveloped Africa, TPH, Dar es Salaam iii. Maurice Cornforth (1975) Historical Materialism, International Publishers, New York iv. Mabogunye A.L. (1990) The Development Process: Spatial Perspective, Hutchison & Co., Chpt. 3&4 v. Justinian Rweyemamu, Underdevelopment and Industrialization in Tanzania, a study of Perverse Capitalist Industrial Development 9.1.2.6 COMMUNICATION SKILLS AND LANGUAGE This is a compulsory course that runs through all the year and is delivered basing on the schedule of the Language and communication skills programmes. 9.1.3 ASSESSMENT Final examination will be marked out of 80% and 20% from Assignments, to make a total of 100% marks at the end of each semester. Optional courses will offer an added knowledge to the students though they have no contribution in the assessment part.

44

9.1.4 LIST OF OPTIONAL COURSES Course Code CL CL CL CL CL CL Course Title Units

Introduction to Public International Law Introduction to the Law of Banking Introduction to the Law of Insurance Introduction to International Trade Law Introduction to Refugee Law

3 3 3 3 3

Introduction to International Humanitarian 3 Law Introduction to Family Law 3

CL CL CL CL CL CL CL CL

Introduction to International Law Enforcement 3 Introduction to Health and the Law Introduction to social security Law Introduction to Tax Law Introduction to Gender and the Law Introduction to social Work Introduction to Procurement Law 3 3 3 3 3 3

45

9.2 DIPLOMA IN LAW, LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE 9.2.1 INTRODUCTION The Diploma course is designed for a maximum duration of two years with four semesters. Students undertaking the Diploma course will need to complete all courses listed below and pass examinations at the end of each semester which will count for the award of the Diploma at the end of the two years. 9.2.2 DETAILS OF THE COURSES Core courses will include; Administrative Law, Criminal Law, Human rights Law, Leadership and Governance, Communication skills and English Language 9.2.2.1 ADMINISTRATIVE LAW Introduction: This is a 3 units course designed to enable candidate to grasp basic concepts and functions of administrative bodies and constitutional principles. Candidates will also be introduced to administrative powers and limits Course Objective(s) To enable candidates understand the basic functions of administrative law, constitutional and legal principles governing the exercise of power by administrative authorities and the remedies available for those suffering from abuse of powers by administrative organs of the State. Course Content Meaning and nature of administrative Law, Basic Constitutional Principles, Administrative Tribunals, Control of Administrative Actions, Remedies and related matters, Suit against the Government. Readings: i. De Smith, S. A.(1989) Constitutional and Administrative Law, Penguin Books, London. ii. Garner & James: (1975) Garners Administrative Law, Butterworths, London. iii. Griffith and Street (1973) Principles of Administrative Law, Pitman, London. 46

iv. Leyland. P. and Woods T. and Harden J. (1994) Textbook on Administrative Law, Blackstone Press Ltd, London. v. Oluyede, P. (1973) Administrative Law in East Africa. E.A.L.B., Nairobi. vi. Wade, E.C. and A.W BRADLEY (198700 Constitutional and Administrative Law, Longman, London/New York. vii. Takwani, C. K., Lectures on Administrative Law, 3 rd Edition, Eastern Book Company,1998. viii. Bailey, et al., Cases and Materials on Administrative Law,3 rd Edition, Sweet and Maxwell 9.2.2.2 CONSTITUTIONAL AND LEGAL SYSTEMS OF TANZANIA Introduction This is a 3 units course intended to introduce candidates to legal systems of Tanzania. Which are; basic constitutional principles, constitutional making and constitutional change. These will be culminated by the court systems and structures in Tanzania mainland and Zanzibar. Course Objective(s) To enable candidates acquire knowledge, skills and tools on various aspects of constitutional law and its application in the legal system of Tanzania. Course Content The course will cover; Introduction to law: General Principles, meaning of role and function of constitutions; principles and doctrines; introduction and court systems Readings i. Allen, S. R The evolution of Governments and Laws, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1919. ii. Court of Appeal of Tanzania, The History of Administration of Justice, Mathew Bookstore & Stationeries, 2004. iii. Densov, A. Theory Moscow,1987 of State and Law, Progress Publishers, legal systems; meaning, Constitutional Constitution; sources of constitutions; types of constitutions; constitutional to constitutional history; Bill of Rights

47

iv. Fimbo, G.M ; Constitutional Making and Courts in Tanzania, DUP, Dar es Saalam,1992 v. Fimbo, G.M; Tuijadili Katiba Yetu: Katiba ya Jamhuri ya Muungano wa Tanzania y mwaka 1977, DUP, Dar es Saalam, 2007. vi. Fredman, C. J. Constitutional Government and Democracy Theory and Practice in Europeand America, New York,1950 vii. Mtaki, C. K. and Okema, M. (eds): Constitutional Reforms and Democratic Government in Tanzania, Friedrick Naumann Foundation, Dar es Salaam, 1996. viii. Mtaki, C.K Constitutions and Legal Systems of East Africa: Part One: General Principles of the constitution, The Open University of Tanzania, Dar es Salaam, 1996. ix. Rutinwa, B, Constitution Legal Systems of East Africa, The Open University of Tanzania, 1996. 9.2.2.3 LEGAL METHOD Introduction This is also 3 units course designed to equip candidates with the theories and techniques of handling authoritative legal materials, especially legislation and decided cases. The course also introduces the candidates to legal research and writing. Course Objective(s) This course is intended to equip candidates with basic knowledge and techniques of where and how to find legal materials, how to handle, interpret and apply them in legal problems and settings. Course Contents The course will cover the nature, classification and source of law. Authoritative legal materials and usage, statutes, case law and other materials. Legal research, writing, citation of authorities, language of law, and language of the court: forms and types dispute settlement; logic and legal reasoning forms, style and systems of reasoning, legalism and the two basic activities in law i.e. law making and law interpretation; case law techniques; precedents and Stare Decisis, introduction to statutory interpretation. Readings 48

i. Allot, A.: New Essays in Africa Law, Butterworths,London,1970 ii. Block, G; Effective Legal writing: A style Book for Law candidates and Lawyers, Minnesota, Minnesota, N.Y, The Foundation Press, 1988. iii. Harris, J. W; Legal Philosophies, Butterworths, London, 1980. iv. Holland, J.A and J.S, Webb, Learning Legal Rules, 3rd edition, Blackstone Press Ltd., London, 1996. v. Karen K.P., Introduction to Legal Writing and Advocacy, Mathew Mender and Company,1989 vi. Levy, E. H: Introduction to Legal Reasoning, University of Chicago, 1984. vii. Williams, G.; Learning the Law, Stevens and Sons, London, 1982. viii. Sawyer, G.G.A and Hiller, J. A: The Doctrine of Precedent in the Court of Appeal for East Africa, Tanzania, Publishing House, Dar es Salaam,1971 ix. Zander, M; The Law Making Process,London,1980 9.2.2.4 LABOUR LAW Introduction This is a 3 unit course aiming at exploring the legal aspects of labour and labour relation applicable in Tanzania especially in the light of globalization, liberalization and private investments. Course Objective(s) To enable candidates understand the basic mechanics of industrial relations grasp legal aspects of employment contracts and be familiar with jurisdictional and procedural aspects relating to labour laws. Course Contents The course will cover Introduction to labour law and relation, legal aspects of an employment contract, termination of contracts, Labour institutions, dispute settlement machinery, social security schemes and the law, workers compensation law and occupational diseases. Readings i. Bowers, J., A Practical Approach to Employment Law, 7 th Edition, Oxford University Press. ii. Goswami, V. G., Labour Industrial Laws,8th Edition, Central Law Agency,India,2004 49

iii. Johri, S. N, Industrial Jurusprudence, 2nd Edition, Suvidha Law House, India, 2000. iv. Shivji, I. G: Law, State and The Working Class in Tanzania, Tanzania publishing House, Dar es Salaam, 1986. v. Selwyn, N: Selwyns Law of Employment (8 th Edition), Butterworths, London, Dublin, Edinburgh, 1993. vi. Smith,I.J and Wood, J.C: Industrial Law(3rd Edition),Butterworths,London,1986. 9.2.2.5 CIVIL PROCEDURE Introduction This course is designed in 3 units to introduce candidates the theory and practice of institution, prosecution and defence of a civil action in courts of law. Course Objective(s) To enable candidates to acquire knowledge, skills and tools on the application of various rules and principles on the resolution of civil disputes Course Contents Introduction to Civil Procedure Law; Source of Civil Procedure Law; scope and applicability of CPC; modes of dispute settlement; civil litigation; the law of pleadings; institution of suits and miscellaneous matters; hearing and examination of witnesses; interlocutory proceedings; judgment, decree and execution; appeal, revision and review; civil procedure in primary courts. Readings i. Sarkar, S. C., The Law of Civil {rocedure, 8th Edition (1992), Nagpur: Wadhwa & Co. Law Publishers. ii. Mullas Code of Civil Procedure. iii. Supplement to Mullas Code of Civil Procedure, 15th Edition in 3 volumes (1999 Supplement), Butterworths. iv. Takwani, C. K, Civil Procedure, 5th Edition (2003), Eastern Book Company. v. Civil Procedure in Tanzania: A Candidates Manual by B.D. Chipeta A Magistrates Manual by B.D. Chipeta 9.2.2.6 LAW OF CONTRACT Introduction 50

The course is intended in 3 units to introduce candidates to nature and scope of contractual relations, and obligations that arise as a result from them. Course Objective(s) The course aims to expose candidates to know the basis of contracts and their inherent legal implications. Course Contents The course will cover; Introduction to contracts, formation of contract, essential elements of a valid contract, performance of a contract, vitiating factors, discharge of a contract, and remedies for breach of a contract Readings i. Bangia ,R. K, Law of Contract II, 2nd Edition, Allahabah LawAgency,Haryana,2001 ii. Beatson, J., Ansons Law of Contract,28th Edition, Oxford University Press, New York,2002 iii. Binamungu, C. S., Business Law: candidates Manual, NBAA, Dar es Salaam,2000 iv. Borrie, Gordon J.: Commercial Law,Butterworths,London1980 v. Elliot, C&F. Quinn Contract Law, Pearson Education Ltd,Edinburgh,2005 vi. Furmston, M. Cheshire, Fifoot and Furmstons Law of Contract, 15th Edition Oxford press, London, 2007. vii. Guest, A.G.: Ansons Law of Contract, 26thed. Clarendon,Press,Oxford,1989. viii. Hodgin, R. W, Law of Contract in East Africa, Kenya Literature Bureau, Nairobi, 2006. ix. Massawe, A. A. F.; Digest of Tanzania Law of Contracts, T.M.P Book Department, Tabora, 1989. x. Nditi, N. N. N, General Principles of Contract Law in East Africa, Dar es Salaam University Press Ltd, Dar es Salaam,2004. xi. Singh.A, Law of CVontract, 8th Edition, Eastern Book Company, Lucknow, 2002. xii. Smith,J.C Law of Contract,4th Edition, Sweet & Maxwell,London,2002. xiii. Soulsby J. and S.B Marsh : Business Law,McGraw-Hill,London,1975 xiv. Mwakajinga,J.BusinessLaw, Banyakajinga Elimu Establishments, 2005.

51

9.2.2.7 CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE Introduction This course covers 3 units designed to enable candidates to understand criminal justice system and the way it is operationalised. The course covers the legal principles and theories underlying crime, criminal responsibility, offences and defences and the procedures applicable in dealing with criminal matters Course Objective(s) To enable Candidates to get acquainted with the nature and function of criminal law, basic ingredients of a crime and the procedures thereof. Course Contents Nature, function and sources of criminal law; criminal liability; general defenses; parties to an offence; selected offences; meaning, functions and sources of criminal procedure; jurisdiction, institution of proceedings and miscellaneous matters; criminal proceedings; law of bail; witnesses; criminal trial; judgment; sentencing; appeal, revision and review; criminal procedure in primary courts. Readings i. Sprack, J., A Practical Approach to Criminal Procedure,10th Edition, Oxford University Press,2004 ii. Sarkar on Criminal Procedule, 8th Edition, Wadhwa Nagpur, India, 2005. iii. Smith, J.C and Hogan, B.: Criminal Law Cases and Materials, 7th Edition, Butterworths. iv. Allen, M. J.: Text Book on Criminal Law, 2nd Edition, Ashford colour Press, Londo, 1993. v. Chipeta, B. D.: A Handbook for Public Prosecutors, T.M.P Book Department, Tabora, 1978. vi. Clarkson, C. M .V & Keating, H. M; Criminal Law, 11th Edition, Oxford, 1984. vii. Jones, C. and Card: Introduction to Criminal Law,11 th Edition,Butterworths,London,1988 viii. Smith, J. C and Hogan, B.: Criminal Law, 11th Edition, Oxford University Press, London, 2005.

52

ix. Chipeta, B. D.: A Magistrates Manual, T. M. P, Book Department, Mkuki and Nyoka Publishers Ltd, Dar es Salaam,2004. 9.2.2.8 LAW OF EVIDENCE Introduction Law of evidence is intended in 3 units to introduce candidates to knowledge and skills about rules of evidence applicable in the courts of law. Course Objective(s) To enable candidates acquire knowledge, skills and tools on various legal aspects of evidence in various legal proceedings, and understand the nature and characteristics of evidence and witnesses. Course Contents In this course, candidates will cover Introduction to the law of evidence, relevance and admissibility of evidence, types, admissions and confessions, witnesses and burden and standard of proof of evidence. Readings i. Chipeta, B. D, A Handbook for Public Prosecutors ii. Chipeta, B. D, A Magistrate manual, Tabora, T. M. P Book Deprtment,1987-1996 iii. Malek, H. M and Specialist editors, Phipson on Evidence,16th Edition, Sweet & Maxwell,London,2005 iv. Massawe, A. A.F, The Burden and Standard of Proof in Criminal Cases, IDM v. Minor, M, Textbook on the Law of Evidence, 7th edition, Universal Law Publishing Co, Delhi, 2006. vi. Morris, H. F, Evidence in East Africa, Sweet and Maxwell Ltd, London, 1967. vii. Murphy, P., Murphy on Evidence, 5th Edition, Universal Law Publishing Co. Pvt. Delhi. viii. Sarath, V. P, Law of Evidence, 5th Edition, Eastern Book Co, Delhi, 2002. 53

ix. Sarkar, S., Sarkars Law of Evidence, Rekha Printers, New Delhi, 1993. x. Tapper, C., Cross on Evidence, Butterworths, London, 1990. 9.2.2.9 LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE Introduction This course is intended in 3 units to further equip the student with critical developmental problems in the fields of, among others, politics, economics, culture, science and technology, agriculture, industry and commerce, law and social services. The course is focused success and failure of leadership globally and in Tanzania. Course Objective(s) To create and inculcate role models as part of leadership nurturing in students To enable the student to critically analyse issues, To enable the student cope up with changes that are taking places in the world and take up bold and creative leadership engagement role. Course Contents Topic One: Tanzanias development experience and alternative development strategies Global leadership experiences of good and bad leaders African leadership experiences of good and bad leaders Tanzanian leadership experience of good and bad leaders Topic Two: Development experiences and alternative development strategies as leadership modeling agents Global development experience in bold strokes Africas development experience in bold strokes Alternative development strategies in Africa, Tanzania Elsewhere in Third World Global capitalist development crisis and impact on third world development 54

Topic Three: Society, Culture, Technology and Environment Society, population and culture as factors of development Science, technology and environment as factors of development Leadership models, statesmanship, styles and development Local politics as predicates of statesmanship and the role of foreign policy, Foreign aid, foreign investments and development Critical evaluation of leadership and underdevelopment Readings i. ii. iii. iv. v. Todaro, M.P. (1985) Economic Development in the Third World, Oriental Longman Ltd. Rodney, W. (1976) How Europe Underdeveloped Africa, TPH, Dar es Salaam Maurice Cornforth (1975) Publishers, New York Historical Materialism, International Spatial

Mabogunye A.L. (1990) The Development Process: Perspective, Hutchison & Co., Chpt. 3&4

Justinian Rweyemamu, Underdevelopment and Industrialization in Tanzania, a study of Perverse Capitalist Industrial Development

9.2.2.10 HUMAN RIGHTS LAW Introduction The Course is designed to introduce candidates to concepts and development of human rights law and institutions at international level, the approach of human rights law, the implementation of human rights law within international, regional and national courts and practice and enforcement of human rights law in Tanzania and challenges to the full realization of human rights at domestic, regional and international Course Objective(s) To provide candidates with the basic understanding of human rights law and its institutions as well as trends and approaches in the global protection and enforcement of human rights 55

Course Contents Concept, nature and development of human rights, introduction to international approach of human rights, the United Nations System; regional approach to human rights, the African System; human rights under domestic law-human rights in Tanzania; protection and promotion of human rights in Tanzania; and contemporary issues of human rights in Tanzania. Readings i. Chandra,U., Human Rights,Allahabad,2001. ii. Peter,C.M, Human Rights in Tanzania, Selected Cases and Materials, Rudger Koper Verlag Koln,1997 iii. Shaw, M, International Law, Cambridge, 1998. iv. Shivji,I., The Concept of Human Rights in Africa, Cadestria Book Series,Dakar,1989 v. Shivji. I., et al, Constitutional and Legal System in Tanzania: A Civics Sourcebook, Mkuki and Nyota, Dar es Salaam, 2004. vi. Smith, R., International Human Rights, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2003 vii. English, K., and Stapleton, A., The Human Rights Handbook: A Practical Guide to Monitoring Human Rights, Colcheester, Ennifield, 1995. viii. Ankrumah, E. A., The African Commission on Human Rights and Peoples Rights: Practice and Procedure, Matinus Nijhoff Publishers, London, 1996. 9.2.2.11 COMMUNICATION SKILLS AND LANGUAGE Introduction This is a compulsory course that runs through all the year and is delivered basing on the schedule of the Language and communication skills programmes. 9.2.3 ASSESSMENT Final examination will be marked out of 80% and 20% from Assignments, to make a total of 100% marks at the end of each semester. Optional courses

56

will offer an added knowledge to the students though they have no contribution in the assessment part 9.2.4 LIST OF CORE COURSES YEAR 1 SEMESTER 1 Course code DL 101 DL 102 DL 103 Course Title Units

Legal Method Constitution and Legal Systems of Tanzania Leadership and Governance Communication skills and Language

3 3 3 3 3

Option 2 SEMESTER II DL 104 DL 105 DL 106 DL Option 2 YEAR 2 SEMESTER I Course Code

Select from DL Approved Option Course

Administrative Law Civil Procedure Law of Evidence Leadership and Governance Select from DL Approved Option Course

3 3 3 3 3

Course Title

Units

Semester

57

DL 201 DL 202 DL DL

Labour Law Criminal Law and Procedure Leadership and Governance Communication Language skills

3 3 3 and 3

I I II II

Option 1

Select from DL Option Series 3 Course

II

SEMESTER II Course Code DL 203 DL 204 DL Course Title Units Semester

Contract Law Introduction to Human Rights Communication Language skills

3 3 and 3

II II II

Option 1

Select from DL Option Series 3 Course Select from Course Approved Option 3

II

Option 3

II

9.2.5 LIST OF OPTIONS Course Code DL 300 DL 301 Course Title Units

Introduction to Public International Law Legal Research, Drafting and Writing

3 3

58

DL 302

Basic Principles Customary Law and Islamic 3 Law Law of Business Association Introduction to the Law of Banking Introduction to the Law of Insurance Negotiable Instruments 3 3 3 3

DL 303 DL 304 DL 305 DL 306 DL 307

Commercial and Consumer Transactions 3 Law Introduction to International Trade Law Immigration Law Introduction to Refugee Law 3 3 3

DL 308 DL 309 DL 310 DL 311

Introduction to International Humanitarian 3 Law Introduction to Family Law Court Records and case Management Alternative Dispute Resolution Judicial Practice and ethics Emerging Trends in Child and Women Law 3 3 3 3 3

DL 312 DL 313 DL 314 DL 315 DL 316 DL 317 DL 318 DL 319

Introduction to International Law Enforcement 3 Probate and Administration of Estates Islamic Law and Customary Law 3 3 59

DL 320 DL 321 DL 322 DL 323 DL 324 DL 325 DL 326 DL 327 DL 328 DL 329 DL 330 DL 331 DL 332

Juvenile Justice in Tanzania Emerging Trends in Cyber Crimes and Fraud Media Law Local Government Law Introduction to Health and the Law Introduction to social security Law Introduction to Tax Law Introduction to Gender and the Law Introduction to social Work Legal aspect of Construction management Introduction to Procurement Law Basic Principles of Private Law(Land, Tort) Law and development Perspectives

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2

10.0 GRADUATE PROGRAMMES OF THE UB GRADUATE SCHOOL OF LAW & GOVERNANCE


10.1 INTRODUCTION

The University of Bagamoyo Graduate School of Law & Governance (GSLG) offers postgraduate diplomas in law & Governance (PGDLG), specialized postgraduate diplomas in law & Governance (SPGDL), Masters of Law degree & Governance (LL.MG) and PhD in Law & Governance. 10.2 POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN LAW & GOVERNANCE (PGDLG) Two semesters i.e. 12 months of full time attendance. 60

Duration:

Eligibility for admission In order for a candidate to be considered for admission to this programme, the candidate must be a holder of a Bachelor of Laws degree (LL.B) or has satisfied the requirement of an award of such a degree from an accredited university. 10.2.1 CORE COURSES A candidate admitted to pursue the PGDLG programme shall do the following compulsory courses: i. LW 300 Jurisprudence (if not taken at undergraduate level); ii. LG 407 Leadership and Governance; iii. EL 205 English Language; 10.2.3 OPTIONAL COURSES The Candidate shall be required to select two courses from the list of courses for the LL.M degree programme or one course from that list and such number of courses from the undergraduate courses whose total units is not less than six (6); The Candidate shall be required to write two postgraduate papers for each LL.M course selected. 10.2.4 PASS GRADE The pass grade for the PGDL shall be B; and where a candidate takes an undergraduate course, regulations relating to undergraduate courses shall apply provided that the pass grade is B. 10.2.5 SUPPLEMENTARY EXAMINATIONS A Candidate who fails in one to three courses, may, on the recommendation of the GSLG Board be permitted to re-sit the examination in that course or courses at a supplementary examination. 10.2.6 REPEAT YEAR A Candidate who fails in more than three courses in a first sitting or fails any course after supplementary examination shall repeat the year.

61

10.2.7 DISCONTINUATION A Candidate who fails in any supplementary examination having repeated a year shall be discontinued. 10.3 SPECIALIZED POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN LAW (SPGDLG) Specialized postgraduate Diploma in Law (SPGDLG) is a programme which is designed to provide specialized training in specific fields of law to holders of degrees other than LL.B. The aim of this programme is to provide to a candidate an opportunity to study and thus enhance his legal knowledge and competence in his field of work. Duration: Two (2) Semesters i.e. twelve months (12) of full time attendance. Eligibility for admission In order for a candidate to be considered for admission to this programme, the candidate must be a holder of a first degree from an accredited university; or has satisfied the requirements for the award of the degree. 10.3.1 CORE COURSES

A candidate enrolled to pursue the special programme shall do the following core courses: i. ii. iii. iv. 10.3.2 LW LW LG EL 700 701 407 205 Legal Method Constitutional Law Leadership and Governance English Course

OPTIONAL COURSES

A Candidate shall select a maximum of three (3) optional courses from the list of the courses approved by the GSLG Board for that academic year, provided that SPGDLG shall bear the LW 700 series code. 10.3.3 PASS GRADE

The pass grade shall be B but candidates shall be required to complete a minimum of 21 units accumulated from compulsory and optional courses in order to qualify for an award of SPGDLG. 62

10.3.4 SUPPLEMENTARY EXAMINATIONS A Candidate who fails in one to three courses, may, on the recommendation of the GSLG Board be permitted to re-sit the examination in that course or courses at a supplementary examination. 10.3.5 REPEAT YEAR A Candidate who fails in more than three courses in a first sitting or fails any course after supplementary examination shall repeat the year. 10.3.6 DISCONTINUATION A Candidate who fails in any supplementary examination having repeated a year shall be discontinued. 10.3.7 EXAMINATION MODE FOR PGDLG AND SPGDLG

Examination for PGDLG and SPGDLG shall consist of written examination and course work, provided that both the PGDLG and SPGDLG shall be graded on a PASS or FAIL basis. 10.4 MASTERS OF LAWS & GOVERNANCE [LL.MG]

10.4.1 INTRODUCTION The University of Bagamoyo offers a Masters of Law and Governance degree program which is a specialized advanced degree in a chosen legal field and governance. It is designed to impart advanced legal knowledge in a chosen area of law through strong theoretical grounding, intensive research and engagement simulation exercises where necessary. 10.4.2 MODE OF MATERIAL DELIVERY The Masters of Laws Degree is offered in the following three modes: Taught Masters of Laws Degree program; Masters of Laws Degree through course dissertations; and iii. Masters of Laws Degree by thesis. i. ii.

work

and

The General Regulations and Guidelines for Postgraduate study Postgraduate Programs issued from time to time by the Senate shall regulate the Master of Laws Degree programs. Duration 63

The Masters of Laws and Governance Degrees shall be completed in two (2) semesters i.e. 12 months, except in special circumstances where the Faculty, Institute or School Board on application of a Candidate, extends time for the completion of the programme on reasonable grounds. Eligibility for admission: A candidate must be a holder of a Bachelor of Laws Degree (LL.B) of an accredited University or has satisfied the requirements for the award of such degree, provided that the said Bachelor of Laws Degree (LL.B) shall be of GPA 2.7 or above. Every applicant shall, when applying for admission, indicate the category of the LL.M degree he/she intends to pursue and courses to be taken. Such a candidate once admitted may also register for coursed offered at undergraduate level as long as he/she meets the minimum conditions prescribed for the programme. Classification of LLMG The award of the Degree of Masters of Laws & Governance shall not be classified but may be awarded with a distinction. 10.4.2.1 TAUGHT MASTERS OF LAWS & GOVERNANCE DEGREE PROGRAMME Duration The taught Masters of Laws & Governance Degree programme shall cover two semesters involving full-time attendance. Eligibility for admission A candidate applying for admission in masters of laws & Governance degree programme shall be a holder of an LLB Degree of not less than 2.7 GPA. 10.4.2.1.1 COMPULSORY COURSES i. LW 300, Jurisprudence (if not taken in undergraduate programme), ii. LG 407 Leadership and Governance iii. EL 205 English Course iv. LW 305 Legal Research (if not taken in undergraduate programme). 64

10.4.2.1.2 OPTIONAL COURSES A candidate shall select four (4) courses from the list of courses offered for the Master of Laws degree and such number of under graduate courses whose total units is not below 12. 10.4.2.1.3 PASS GRADE The pass grade shall be B but candidates shall be required to complete a minimum of 30 units accumulated from compulsory and optional courses in order to qualify for an award of Masters of Law & Governance. 10.4.2.1.3 EXAMINATION MODE Examination mode for Masters of Law & Governance shall consist of written examination and course work; In respect of each course, examination shall consist of written examination (60%) and a graduate essay (40%). The award of the Degree of Masters of Laws & Governance shall not be classified but may be awarded with a distinction. 10.4.2.1.4 SUPPLEMENTARY EXAMINATIONS A Candidate who fails in one to three courses, at D grade may, on the recommendation of the GSLG Board be permitted to re-sit the examination in that course or courses at a supplementary examination. 10.4.2.1.5 REPEAT YEAR A Candidate who fails in more than three courses at D grade in a first sitting or fails any course at D grade after supplementary examination shall repeat the year. 10.4.2.1.6 DISCONTINUATION A Candidate who fails in any supplementary examination having repeated a year shall be discontinued. 10.4.2.2 MASTERS Structure This Masters of Laws and Governance degree programme is made up of two components namely: - Coursework and Dissertation. 65
OF LAWS AND DISSERTATION

&

GOVERNANCE DEGREE BY COURSEWORK

Duration This Masters of Laws & Governance Degree programme shall cover two semesters involving full-time attendance. Eligibility for admission i. A candidate applying for admission in masters of laws & Governance degree programme shall be a holder of an LLB Degree of not less than 2.7 GPA. ii. A candidate intending to undertake a Masters of Laws degree by coursework and dissertation shall, when lodging an application submit a research proposal for dissertation which will serve to determine availability of supervisors. 10.4.2.2.1 COMPULSORY COURSES i. LW 300, Jurisprudence (if not taken in undergraduate programme), ii. LG 407 Leadership and Governance iii. EL 205 English Course iv. LW 305 Legal Research (if not taken in undergraduate programme); 10.4.2.2.2 OPTIONAL COURSES A candidate shall select two courses from the list of courses offered for the Masters of Laws degree for his/her work and also write a dissertation on a topic he/she has chosen and approved by the GSLG Board. The writing of the dissertation shall commence within two (2) weeks of his/her registration and subject to the general regulations for postgraduate studies the Masters of Laws dissertation shall be completed and submitted for examination to the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies, at the commencement of the examination period of the second semester. The dissertation shall be marked as PASS or FAIL. 10.4.2.2.3 PASS GRADE The pass grade shall be B but candidates shall be required to complete a minimum of 24 units accumulated from compulsory and optional courses in order to qualify for an award of Masters of Law & Governance. 66

10.4.2.2.4 EXAMINATION MODE Examination mode for Masters of Law & Governance shall consist of written examination and course work; In respect of each course, examination shall consist of written examination (60%) and a graduate essay (40%). Classification of LLMG The award of the Degree of Masters of Laws & Governance shall not be classified but may be awarded with a distinction. 10.4.2.2.5 SUPPLEMENTARY EXAMINATIONS A Candidate who fails in one to three courses, at D grade may, on the recommendation of the GSLG Board be permitted to re-sit the examination in that course or courses at a supplementary examination. 10.4.2.2.6 REPEAT YEAR A Candidate who fails in more than three courses at D grade in a first sitting or fails any course at D grade after supplementary examination shall repeat the year. 10.4.2.2.7 DISCONTINUATION A Candidate who fails in any supplementary examination having repeated a year shall be discontinued. 10.4.2.2.7 UNDERGRADUATE COURSES No candidate shall do an undergraduate course which was pursued at an undergraduate level. 10.4.2.3 MASTERS OF LAWS DEGREE BY THESIS Introduction This degree course shall be governed by the General Regulations and Guidelines for Postgraduate studies issues by the Graduate School of Law & Governance Board. Eligibility for admission

67

An applicant shall only be allowed to pursue the Masters of Laws degree course by thesis if he/she had obtained an Upper Second class and above LL.B degree from an accredited University. Condition A candidate intending to pursue this course shall, when applying for admissions submit a research proposal for the thesis. 10.4.3 LIST OF COURSES OFFERED The following courses are offered for the Masters of Laws Degree at the University of Bagamoyo: LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW 604 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 619 620 Agency and Bailment Law Air and Space Law Arbitration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Law. Banking Law Business Association Law II Canon Law Capital Markets and Securities Law Law of Carriage of Goods and Passengers Law of the Child Commercial and Consumer Transaction Law Comparative Law Competition Law Computer Law Conflict Resolution Law Construction Law Conveyancing Law Criminology and Penology 68

LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW

621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644

Cultural Property and antiquities Law Customary Law Entertainment Law Environmental Law Gender and the Law Health Law Hire Purchase Law Human Rights Law Insolvency Law Insurance Law Law of Economic Integration Intellectual Property Law International Humanitarian Law Law of International Organisations International Trade and Finance Law Law of the Internet Investment Law Islamic Law Labour Law Landlord and Tenant Law Local Government Law Maritime Law Media Law Law of Mortgages 69

LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW LW

646 647 648 649 650 651 652 653 654 655 656 657 658 659 660 661 662 663 664 665 666 667 668 669

Natural Resources Law Planning Law Private International Law (Conflict of Laws) Refugee Law Regulatory Law Law of the Sea Social Security Law Law of Succession Tax Law Telecommunication Law Constitutional Law Law of Contract Criminal Law Legal Method Administrative Law Public International Law Land Law Law of Torts Business Associations Law 1 Jurisprudence Family Law Civil Procedure Criminal Procedure Law and Evidence 70

LW LW LW LW LW

670 671 672 673 674

Professional Ethics, Advocacy skills Law of Trusts. East African Community Law African Union Law

10.4.4 COMPULSORY COURSES A Candidate for any postgraduate programme apart from a Doctor of philosophy of Laws, offered at the University of Bagamoyo shall pursue the following compulsory courses as a condition for sitting for the University final examinations and submission of dissertation or thesis: LW EL EL LG LG 304 306 306 307 307 Research Methodology English Course III English Course IV Leadership and Governance V Leadership and Governance VI

10.4.5 SPECIFIC PROGRAMMES CONTENT 10.4.5.1 MASTER OF LAWS & GOVERNANCE OFFERINGS 2010/11 The following Master of law & Governance programmes shall be offered in the 2010/11 academic year at the College of Law & Governance: (A) TAUGHT PROGRAMMES [one- year programme] i. LLMG [ Employment and Labour relations) Law ii. LLMG [ International Trade] Law iii. LLMG [Corporate & Commercial] Law iv. LLMG [Law Enforcement] v. LLMG [Judicial Practice and Administration] (B) COURSEWORK AND DISSERTATION [two year-programme] 71

i. LLMG Procedural Law & Court Practice ii. LLMG Public Law iii. LLMG [Procedural Law & Court Practice] iv. LLMG 10.5 DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (PHD) 10.5.1 INTRODUCTION The University of Bagamoyo will run degree programme at level of Doctor of Philosophy. This will give wide and specific knowledge in the specified field of Law. Eligibility and Admission In order for a candidate to be considered for admission to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) at the University of Bagamoyo, he/she must be a holder of a Masters of Laws degree (LL.M) from an accredited University; or a holder of a first class Bachelor of laws degree (LL.B) of an accredited university and who has initially registered for the Master of Laws degree and apply for permission to transfer his registration to the PhD degree. If the application is approved by the Graduate School of Law & Governance Board his /her registration for the PhD programme shall be retroactive. Duration No candidate may be permitted to submit a thesis for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in less than two academic years from the date of registration save with a special permission of the University senate. The thesis must be submitted within five (5) years from the date of registration for his degree though the senate may, on recommendation of the Graduate School of Law & Governance Board extend this time. 10.5.2 THE PH.D PROGRAMME A prospective candidate for this programme is required to submit a proposal of the course of study and/or research which he/she proposes to pursue and on approval by the Board of the School of Graduate Studies the candidate shall be registered for the programme. A Supervisor will be appointed by the Board of the School of Graduate Studies to advise the candidate in his/her field of study or research. A candidate for the degree shall be required to submit a thesis embodying the results of his study or research at the end of the programme. 72

A Candidate may choose his field of study or research from any of the subjects offered at the Master of laws level. The PhD thesis shall be marked on a PASS or FAIL basis. General University Rules and Regulations relating to submission of thesis shall apply to PhD candidates. 10.5.2.1 DOCTOR OF LAWS (LL.D) The Doctor of Laws (LL.D) is retained as a higher doctorate to be awarded in accordance with rules and regulations relating to higher doctorates at the University of Bagamoyo.

73

11.0 UB COLLEGE OF SCIENCE, INFORMATICS AND BUILT ENVIRONMENT


11.1 INTRODUCTION The Bagamoyo University is a private University aimed at offering students equal opportunity for academic excellence and individual growth. It also aims at the global integration of its endeavours and it stand to promote qualitative academic programs and research. The ever changing nature of Information and Communication Technologies necessitates the need to design academic programs that will be flexible enough to go with the dynamism of these changes. Bagamoyo University as a new Institution is spear heading in this endeavour. The global challenge is huge basing on the foreseen gapes in the current structures of educations standards. The gravity is high on the science fields and therefore the University of Bagamoyo unanimously empower the college of science to spear head the changing trends in science from early stages of academic levels possible. 11.1.1 RATIONALE With the current increase in the use of Computer Science or in general Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and a global trend towards a Knowledge-based Economy, Bagamoyo University is obliged to start a program in computer science at a postgraduate diploma level. This is necessitated by the fact that, there are already many higher learning Institutions which are offering undergraduate degrees and diplomas in this field. This trend will put the University at a level of modern world where almost all higher learning institutions must have these programs. The postgraduate diploma will act as a bridge for those who want a change of career by doing M.Sc. in computer science. This concerns Computer Science graduates who didnt meet M.Sc. entry requirements (low GPA) and non Computer Science graduates. The postgraduate diploma program will be under the college of science and ICT. Comprehensive industry survey has been conducted to establish the needs for Computer Science and Information Technology graduates in Tanzania at Postgraduate diploma level. It is clear that a major emphasis of the tertiary education will need to be the acquisition of appropriate practical skills, which will enable the graduate to be productive from the first day of their employment. These practical skills need to be underpinned by theoretical concepts, thus enabling the graduate to advance that knowledge as the market place changes in the future. 74

The Bagamoyo University intends through well trained and natured professionals to produce many energetic individuals who will be job creators than job seekers. Science will be one of the strongest means to achieve this goal, hence the college makes the following objectives. 11.1.2 OVERALL OBJECTIVES OF THE PROGRAMME The college of science, informatics and built environment offers a professional science and ICT degree programmes aimed at achieving the following: i. Providing a thorough and basic training in science and ICT required for highest standard professional practice; ii. Producing ethical, socially conscious, committed and accountable graduates who shall take up professional service and leadership roles in the public and private sectors; iii. Inculcation upon UB graduates professional scientific and practical skills including ethical principles; iv. Tooling students with sufficient scientific research skills, analytical skills and implementing skills; v. Imparting to students sufficient scientific demonstration skills, draftsman-ship, communication skills, competency in English, Kiswahili and at least a third international language; vi. Arming the students with requisite moral and ethical foundations of a socially conscious professional scientist; vii. Imparting to students sufficient theoretical and practical foundations of a socially and scientifically conscious professional; who will be a change agent for the whole society. 11.2 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME UB will offer three programs that fall into three distinct categories. These categories will also correspond to the proposed faculties within the College: 1. Faculty of Science. 2. Faculty of Built Environment (Applied Science) and 3. Faculty of Informatics and Communication Technologies. 11.2.1 BASIC SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMS ( FACULTY OF SCIENCE) The following degree programs will be offered under the basic science theme program: i. B.Sc. Physics/mathematics 75

ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii.

B.Sc. Chemistry/physics B.Sc. Biology/chemistry B.Sc. Mathematics(Applied, Pure) B.Sc. Geo-Science(geology/geophysic, hydrology) B.Sc. Education Bsc. Mathemantics /Geography

11.2.2 APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMS (FACULTY OF BUILT ENVIRONMENT) The School of the Built Environment will offer the following degree programs under the applied science theme: i. B.Sc. Geomatics (Geo)/Geoinformatics ii. B.Sc. Infrastructure Management (IM) iii. B.Sc. Environmental Science (ES) iv. B.Sc. Urban and Regional Planning (URP) 11.2.3 THE INFORMATICS AND COMMUNICATIONS DEGREE PROGRAMS (FACULTY OF INFORMATICS AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES) The faculty of Informatics and Communication Technology will offer the following degree programs under the informatics theme: i. B.Sc. Computer Science (CS) ii. Bsc. Information Technology (IT) iii. B.Sc. Information Management (IM) iv. B.Sc. Geo-Information Science (GiSc) Also the Faculty of Informatics and Communication Technologies will offer the following non-degree technical programs 11.2.4 DIPLOMA AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS: The College of Science and Technology will also offer the following certificate and diploma courses under the Applied Science and Informatics theme: 11.2.4.1 APPLIED SCIENCE DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATES i. Diploma in Geo-informatics (Jointly with External Partners) ii. Certicicate in ICT 11.2.4.2 INFORMATICS DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATES i. Diploma in ICT for the general public. ii. ICT and GIT Refresher Course in Surveying for Practicing Professionals iii. ICT and GIT Refresher Course in Urban and Regional Planning for Practicing Professionals iv. ICT and GIT Refresher Course in Environmental Management for Practicing Professionals 76

v. Diploma in Science with Education

77

11.2.5 UB SCIENCE, INFORMATICS AND BUILT BACKGROUND PROGRAM ROAD MAP ENTRY/SOURCE LEVELS UB PROCESSES SCREENING O-level with Teacher's Educ cert. TRAINING High O-level grades TTC grades O-Level Grades B.Sc. High Foundation 2 years Basic Applied Sciences Sciences (3 Yrs) B.Sc. 3.0 [Maths/Physic Comp. Sc s (3 yrs) Physics /Chem B.Sc. etc ] IT (3 Yrs ) SCREENIN G OUTPUT (Market Product) TRAINING Basic Sciences Bsc with Educ (3yrs)

O-level

High GPA A-level A-level with Grades Diploma in Educ TTC Grades High < 3.0

FOUNDATIO N 1year

78 A-level A-level Grades

Moderate B.Sc Geoinformatics Diploma in Sc Moderate with Educ Applied Sc O-level + High Diploma (2yrs) Technical Diploma (3 Yrs )

High

O-level + Professional Certificates +

grades Moderate +

2yrs ( 1yr) 2 Yrs Fig: experience UB Science, Informatics, and Built Environment Programs' Road map.

79

80

11.2.6 UB B.SC COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM 11.2.6.1 FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. Discrete Structures(3 units) Linear Algebra (3 Units) Calculus I ( 2 units) Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3 Units) Operations Research I (3units) Operations Research II ( 3 Units) Introduction to Numerical Analysis(3 Units)

11.2.6.2 FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE 1. Introduction to Informatics and Microcomputers 2. Introduction to Digital Logic 3. Programming Fundamentals 4. Data Structures and Algorithms 5 Computer Architecture and Organization I. 6. Operating Systems Principles & Design 7. Operating Systems Configuration & Use 8. Net Centric Principles and Design 9. Net Centric Use and configuration 10. Theory of Programming Languages 11. Legal / Professional / Ethics / Society 12. Interpersonal communication 13. Introduction to Computer Systems Maintenance 81

11.2.6.3 COMPUTER SCIENCE INTERMEDIATE 1. Computer Architecture and Organization II 2. Human-Computer Interaction 3. Information Management (DB) Theory 4. Information Management (DB) Practice 5. Scientific computing (Numerical methods) 6. Information Systems Development 7. Analysis of Business Requirements 8. E-business Elective for Computer Science 9. Analysis of Technical Requirements I 10. Engineering Foundations for SW 11. Engineering Economics for SW 12. Software Modelling and Analysis 13. Software Design 14.Software Process 15. Software Quality 16. Comp Systems Engineering 17. Digital logic 18. Embedded Systems 19. Distributed Systems 20. Security: issues and principles 21. Digital media development 22. Decision Theory 23. General Systems Theory 82

24. Circuits and Systems 25. Digital Signal Processing 26. VLSI design 27. Fault tolerance Introduction to Intelligent Systems (AI) 29. 2nd Year Dissertation 11.2.6.4 COMPUTER SCIENCE - ADVANCED 1. Computer Architecture and Organization III 2. Integrative Programming 3. Platform technologies 4. Graphics and Visualization 5. Intelligent Systems (AI) 6. Analysis of Technical Requirements II 7. Software Verification and Validation 8. Software Evolution (maintenance) 9. Security: implementation and mgt 10. Systems administration 11. Management of Information Systems Organisation. 12. Systems integration 13. Digital media development 14. Technical support 15. Organizational Theory 16. Organizational Behaviour 17. Organizational Change Management 83

18. Risk Management (Project, safety risk) 19. Project Management 20 Business Models 21. Functional Business Areas 22. Evaluation of Business Performance 23. Mathematical foundations 24 Final Year Dissertation 11.2.6.5 LEADERSHIP AND HUMAN LEGAL RIGHTS COURSES ENGLISH LANGUAGE COMMUNICATION SKILLS COURSES 11.2.7 UB B .SC IT PROGRAM 11.2.7.1 FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. Discrete Structures Linear Algebra Calculus I Introduction to Probability and Statistics Operations Research I Operations Research II Introduction to Numerical Analysis

11.2.7.2 FUNDAMENTALS OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (Core areas in the IT body of knowledge) 11.2.7.1.1 PF. Programming Fundamentals PF1. Fundamental Data Structures PF2. Fundamental Programming Constructs PF3. Object-Oriented Programming 84

PF4. Algorithms and Problem-Solving PF5. Event-Driven Programming PF6. Recursion

11.2.7.2.2ITF. Information Technology Fundamentals


ITF1. Pervasive Themes in IT ITF2. Organizational Issues ITF3. History of IT ITF4. IT and Its Related and Informing Disciplines ITF5. Application Domains ITF6. Applications of Math and Statistics to IT

11.2.7.2.3 HCI. Human Computer Interaction


HCI 1. Human Factors HCI 2. HCI Aspects of Application Domains HCI 3. Human-Centered Evaluation HCI 4. Developing Effective Interfaces HCI 5. Accessibility HCI 6. Emerging Technologies HCI 7. Human-Centered Software

11.2.7.2.4 IAS. Information Assurance and Security


IAS1. Fundamental Aspects IAS2. Security Mechanisms (Countermeasures) 85

IAS3. Operational Issues IAS4. Policy IAS5. Attacks IAS6. Security Domains IAS7. Forensics IAS8. Information States IAS9. Security Services IAS10. Threat Analysis Model IAS11. Vulnerabilities

11.2.7.2.5 IM. Information Management


IM1. Information Management Concepts and Fundamentals IM2. Database Query Languages IM3. Data Organization Architecture IM4. Data Modeling IM5. Managing the Database Environment IM6. Special Purpose Databases

11.2.7.2.6 IPT. Integrative Programming & Technologies


IPT1. Intersystems Communications IPT2. Data Mapping and Exchange IPT3. Integrative Coding IPT4. Scripting Techniques IPT5. Software Security Practices IPT6. Miscellaneous Issues IPT7. Overview of Programming Languages 86

11.2.7.2.7 NET. Networking and Net Management


NET1. Foundations of Networking NET2. Routing and Switching NET3. Physical Layer NET4. Security NET5. Application Areas NET6. Network Management

11.2.7.2.8 PT. Platform Technologies


PT1. Operating Systems PT2. Architecture and Organization PT3. Computing infrastructures PT4. Enterprise Deployment Software PT5. Firmware PT6. Hardware

11.2.7.2.9 SA. System Administration and Maintenance


SA1. Operating Systems SA2. Applications SA3. Administrative Activities SA4. Administrative Domains

11.2.7.2.10 SIA. System Integration and Architecture


SIA1. Requirements SIA2. Acquisition/Sourcing SIA3. Integration SIA4. Project Management 87

SIA5. Testing and QA SIA6. Organizational Context SIA7. Architecture

11.2.7.2.11SP. Social and Professional Issues


SP1. Professional Communications SP2. History of Computing SP3. Social Context of Computing SP4. Teamwork Concepts and Issues SP5. Intellectual Properties SP6. Legal Issues in Computing SP7. Organizational Context SP8. Professional and Ethical Issues and Responsibilities SP9. Privacy and Civil Liberties

11.2.7.2.12 WS. Web Systems and Technologies


WS1. Web Technologies WS2. Information Architecture WS3. Digital Media WS4. Web Development WS5. Vulnerabilities WS6. Social Software 11.2.7.2 ADVANCED COURSES IN IT BY AREA
1 Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) IT301. Human-Centered Design and Evaluation IT302. Graphical User Interface

88

IT303. Multimedia Systems Development IT304. Interactive Systems Development IT305. Computer-Supported Cooperative Work IT306. Human Cognitive Skills 2 Information Assurance and Security (IAS) IT311. Cryptography IT312. Forensics and Incident Response IT313. Biometrics IT314. Security Policies and Procedures 3 Information Management (IM) IT320. Advanced Databases IT321. Database Design IT322. Transaction Processing IT323. Distributed and Object Database IT324. Data Mining IT325. Data Warehousing IT326. Multimedia Information Systems IT327. Digital Libraries 4 Integrative Programming & Technologies (IPT) IT330. Fundamentals of n-Tier Architectures IT331. Implementing n-Tier Architectures IT332. Advanced Scripting Concepts IT333. Security and the Seams 5 Networking (NET) IT340. Advanced Computer Networks

89

IT341. Distributed Systems IT342. Wireless and Mobile Computing IT343. Cluster Computing IT344. Data Compression IT345. Network Security IT346. Enterprise Networking IT347. Digital Communications 6 Programming Fundamentals (PF) IT350. Object-Oriented Programming IT351. Event-Driven Programming IT352. Functional Programming IT353. Logic Programming 7 Platform Technologies (PT) IT360. Advanced Computer Architecture IT361. Parallel Architectures IT362. Hardware Implementation Technologies IT363. Advanced Computing Techniques 8 System Administration and Maintenance (SA) IT370. Network Management IT371. Technical Support IT372. Database Administration 9 System Integration and Architecture (SIA) IT410. Software Acquisition and Implementation IT411. System Needs Assessment IT412. Software Economics

90

IT413. Enterprise Systems IT414. Knowledge Management IT415. Computing Economics IT416. Software Testing 10 Social and Professional Issues (SP)

IT420. Professional Practice IT421. Social Context of Computing IT422. Computers and Ethics IT423. IT and Economic Development IT424. Computer Law IT425. Intellectual Property IT426. Privacy and Civil Liberties IT427. Globalization IT428. Change Catalyzed by IT 11 Web Systems and Technologies (WS) IT390. Programming for the WWW IT391. E-commerce IT392. Data-Driven Websites IT393. Web Software Tools 11.2.7.3 LEADERSHP, GOVERNANCE & DIPLOMACY COURSES 11.2.7.4 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS COURSES 11.2.8 UB B.SC GEOINFORMATICS PROGRAM 11.2.8.1 FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS i. Discrete Structures

91

ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii.

Linear Algebra Calculus I Introduction to Probability and Statistics Operations Research I Operations Research II Introduction to Numerical Analysis

11.2.8.2 FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOINFORMATICS (Core areas in the Geoinformatics Body of Knowledge ) 11.3 POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA PROGRAMME (PGDCS) Within the context of the general Learning & Teaching Aims of the Bagamoyo University, the Postgraduate Diploma programme a conversion of one-year, aims at providing: i. A solid foundation for a career or further study in Computer Science/IT ii. Coverage of the core areas of computer science iii. A solid grounding in the theoretical underpinnings contemporary developments in computer science iv. A solid grounding in practical software development skills v. A choice of options to reflect the students interests The Postgraduate Diploma in Computer Science (PGDCS) is specifically designed to provide an excellent opportunity for non-CS graduates to learn how to apply concepts of CS in their own disciplines and train for career in the computing services industry. Hence the programme will provide an effective and systematic upgrade to professionals to strengthen their technical capabilities to tackle increasing demands in information systems and services development. Students will obtain an in-depth understanding of computer systems, covering theoretical foundation, technologies and applications in the fields of computer networks, software engineering, programming and Internet technologies. of

92

The programme will also develop students capabilities in the development of computer systems and applications. This is interpreted to include specification design, implementation and evaluation aspects. A said foundation for the achievement of technical competence in these areas will be given. In addition, technical competence will also be achieved through participation in the actual development of various case studies. Individual students will also be able to specialize in various areas: computer networks, Information system, artificial intelligence and web technology, etc. Such specialization is achieved through selection from a wide range of elective courses. Upon completion of the programme, students should be able to apply the acquired theories and techniques to various technical aspects of system development. Moreover, the programme will also provide flexibility through choice to enable prompt response to changing industry as well as student interests. 11.3.1 EXPECTED OUTPUT OF THE PROGRAMME Principally these courses will provide students with the specialized knowledge and skills in Computer Science techniques that are needed in the computer industry. They will also enable students to evaluate alternative solutions to computing system problems and to make choices among solutions. Students will be access the work of others based on mastery of the fundamental principles of the subject. PROGRAM DURATION The postgraduate diploma is a one year two semesters program. 11.3.2 GENERAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS To be eligible for admission, a prospective student must have one of the following qualifications: (a) A first degree in a computing discipline such as computer studies, Information Technology, Computer Engineering or Information System; or equivalent; Or (b) A first degree in any discipline from a recognized institution Or 93

(c) A Higher National Diploma (HND) or an Advanced diploma from any recognized institution of higher learning in the disciplines in (a) and (b) above The course is intensive in nature and basic familiarity with computers and basic programming is an added advantage. 11.3.3 PROGRAMME FEE STRUCTURE The programme fee structure will be determined on a cost basis and will be based on the Bagamoyo University fee structure. To be obtained from admission office. 11.3.4 PROGRAM STRUCTURE The programme consists of a set compulsory courses and a set of elective courses. Students are expected to take a minimum of one elective course per semester. It is anticipated that many students on this PGD will undertake projects linked to their own interest, and that some may go on to undertake research associated with their respective working area. At the end of the second semester, an extra month will be given to round up the project. Taught courses will run during the two semesters with the following arrangements: 11.3.5 MODE OF DELIVERY It has been agreed that there will be two form of delivering the content. 11.3.5.1 LECTURES AND PRACTICALS. Lectures will run as a full time as well as part time program with lecturing going on exclusively in class or computer laboratory. This can be done during the day for full time and evening time and Saturdays for part time students. It is anticipated that in the future the program will also be delivered online. 11.3.5.2 MODE OF ASSESSMENT: All courses shall be assessed during the semester they are taught. The assessment shall consist of continuous assessment of written assignment, practical demonstrations, timed tests and a written final examination Timed test: There shall be at least 2 timed tests for each course 94

Assignments: The number and mode for conducting assignments shall depend on the course requirements as indicated in each course. Practical demonstrations: The practical demonstrations shall be conducted during courses which involve lab work Final examinations: Final examination for each semester will be conducted at the end of the semester. PGDCS project: The project shall start at the beginning of the second semester. The final project reports, presentations and demonstrations shall be done one month after the end of the second semester. 11.3.6 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS: To qualify for the award of the Postgraduate diploma in Computer Science a candidate is required to pass all the compulsory courses including the selected electives with a minimum of 50% and successfully completing the postgraduate Diploma Project within a period stipulated by the BU regulations. 11.3.7 GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS General University regulations which govern degree course shall also apply to the postgraduate diploma courses. A student must complete normally in one year a minimum of 32 units including all courses for the award of the postgraduate diploma. The PGDCS will have a total of 25 units, core courses and a total of 14 units, elective course as shown in table 1.1. The units are defined as follows: 15 lecture hours are equivalent to 1 unit, and 30 45 hours of practical are equivalent to 1 unit. 11.3.8 DETAILS OF THE PROGRAMME 10.3.8.1 SEMESTER I: CORE COURSES Course Code Course Title Mode of Delivery Equivalent Lecture hours Equivalent Practical hours Units

95

BCS 502 Computer Architecture BCS 503 Programmin g languages BCS 505 Operating Systems BCS 506 Discrete Mathematics BCS 509

30

30

45

30

30

Principles of 45 Software Engineering

Total Units 11.3.8.2 SEMESTER I: OPTIONAL COURSES BCS 512 Introduction Intelligence to Artificial 15 30

12

BCS 514 BCS 515

Linux System Administration Computers and Society

15 30

30 0 Total Units

2 2 6

11.3. 8.3 SEMESTER II: CORE COURSES Courses Course Title Code Mode of Delivery Equivalent Lecture hours of 30 Equivalent practical hours 30 Number of Units

BCS 504 Fundamentals

3 96

Database Systems BCS 508 Data Structures 15 and their Implementation BCIS 510 Introduction Computer Networks to 30 45 3

30

BCS 599 Problem Learning Project

Based 30 (PBL)

60

Total Units 11.3.8.4 SEMESTER II: OPTIONAL COURSES BCS 501 Windows Administration BCS 511 Computer Installation and Troubleshooting BCS 513 Internet Technology BCS 507 Operation Research 15 30 30 0 Total Units 11.3.9 COURSES DESCRIPTION AND COURSE CONTENT System 15 30

13

System 15

30

2 2 8

11.3.9.1 BCS 501 WINDOWS SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION (IL + 2P) Course Description This course describes day-to-day administration and maintenance issues commonly faced by windows system administrators. Objectives 97

On completion of this course, students will be able to Install administer, and manage a windows system in a networked environment as productively as possible, making the task as pleasant and satisfying as it can be. Contents i. How windows system boot and how to shut down ii. User account administration iii. Creating file system, including striped and fault-tolerant file system and securing their contents from unauthorized access iv. Active directory integrated. v. Server Management vi. User Management vii. Sharing file system vie the network using windows native share facility and other facilities such as samba and NFS viii. General and advanced network configuration, including DHCP, DNS, WINS, routing, and RAS ix. Managing printers, including local printers network printers and printer pools x. Managing processes including the windows schedule service as well as performance optimization and capacity planning xi. Disk and file Administration xii. Reporting and Exporting xiii. Securing windows systems, including implementing security policies and system auditing Delivery: 15 Lecture hours, 30 hours practicals Assessment: 50% Coursework While 50% Final Examination 11.3.9.2 BCS 505 COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE (2L) Course Description 98

The course describes computer architecture and organization. It will cover topics in both the physical design of a computer (organization) and the logical design of a computer (architecture). Students will be introduced to computer hardware components (processors, memory, disk drives and peripherals) and appreciation of how software and Hardware work together. 0bjectives: On the completion of the course, students will be able to: i. ii. iii. iv. Contents: Basic Structure of computers: Computer generations: Basic functional Units of Functional Specifications. Processing Unit: Fundamental Concepts Instruction execution internal register organization, Instruction formats processor architecture RISCs, CISCs. Input output Organization: Various 1/O devices, Devices such as keyboards, Mouse Screen, Printers Addressing of 1/0 devices Data transfers, Interrupt Handling 1/O Interfaces Main memory: Basic Concept, RAM/ROM memories, cache memories. Virtual memory systems, Pentium memory module & MM Hardware Describe the physical construction and logical operation of the computer Explain the evolution of the computers Identify the most appropriate computer for their needs Carry out simple troubleshooting

Secondary Memory: Basic concepts in memory hierarchy, Magnetic disks, Magnetic tapes, Optical Memory. Their Physical Organization and working. Hard disks Other Peripherals: Scanners, Sound Cards and Microphone Interface. Speaker Interfaces, Modems, their Characteristics & Working, CD-ROM drives and how they work Delivery: 30 lecture hour.

99

Assessment: 50% Coursework (30% comes from assigned semester paper) Written examination 50% 11.3.9.3 BCS 503 PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES (2L + IP) Course Description The students are introduced to high level Programming languages and to Object Oriented Programming languages such as C. C. ++ or Java Objectives For any OOP language selected, on completion of this subject students should be able to identify and write programs using: Declaration and Executable Statements, Data Structures, Software Structures, Modules Scope, Parameters, Class and Object, Encapsulation. Contents: using C++ i. C+ + Fundamentals: Keywords, Variables, Built in Data types, Constants, Statements, Functions, Program Control statements, Looping constructs, parameter passing to functions. ii. Pointer Basics: Pointer concept, Pointer Variable, Declaring & Using Pointers pointer arithmetic, Arrays concepts, Pointer to arrays, Array of Pointers, and function. iii. Objects & Classes: Defining Class Using a Data Members, Member function, Access Modifiers Static Member function, Volatile In line Member Function, and Constructor. iv. Polymorphism: Dynamic memory allocation & deal location. Concept of destructors Basic concepts of polymorphism, Function overloading, Operator overloading. v. Inheritance: Deriving the c lasses, Levels of inheritance, Visibility & Scope of member. Role of constructors in inheritance, Friend function: concept &inheritance. Virtual Function &inheritance. vi. Streams & Exception Handling: C+ + Streams, Standard stream 1/O with basic data types. Manipulation. File 1/O with 100

streams, Concepts of exception handling, Exception as class objects. Handling common errors. Delivery: 30 Lecture hours, 30 hours practical. Assessment: 50% course work 50% Final Examination 11.3.9.4 BCS 504 Course Description Most of the developed in a business environment are using a fourth generation language (4GL). Databases are an instance of 4GLs. This module gives an appreciation of the complexity of real world databases. It considers some of the problems that can occur in multi- user, multi transaction situations. It discusses relational databases and covers their design and implementation. The aim is to develop students Practical expertise in the use and development of databases programs and to understand the theoretical basic of a relational database. Objectives i. To study Database Management System and role of modern application development techniques and tools within a database environment. ii. To enable the student to develop an appreciation of the complexity and approaches to database design. iii. To provide the student with practical experience in the design and development of relational databases iv. To develop the student with practical experience in the design and development of relational databases Contents i. Understand the relational model and the theory that supports its definition and manipulation: mainly a. What is a database? Motivation for using a database b. Entities, attributes and relations between them c. Converting user requirements to an Entity-Attribute Relation (EAR) model 101 FUNDAMENTALS OF DATABASE SYSTEM (2L + 2P)

d. Manipulate data stored in a relational DBMS using a query language interface and such as SQL instructions e. Create reports

ii. iii.

Packages to create and manipulate relations within a database can be MySQL. FoxPro, Oracle, SQI. Server Apply the techniques relating to advanced database design to produce a logical data model, and to map this to a relational DBMS demonstrating how and why techniques, such as transaction analysis, influence alterations to the physical implementation; Demonstrate a basic understanding of the concepts of Database administration, data dictionary, transaction management, recovery and concurrency control for DBMS Apply appropriate security and integrity mechanisms to safeguard data Object-Oriented Databases Distributed Databases

iv.

v. vi. vii.

Delivery: 30 Lecture hours. 30 hours, Practicals Assessment: 50% Course Work. 50%: Final Examination 11.3.9.5 BCS 505 OPERATING SYSTEMS (2L)

Course Description The course intends to give students an in depth description of the techniques used in modern Operating Systems. Objectives On completion of this subject students should able to: i. Demonstrate an understanding of operating system kernel structure, ii. Understand memory management iii. Appreciate job and process scheduling, 102

iv. Understand file management, v. Operating system security issues vi. Distinguish between single user operating system services and their specific requirements. Contents i. Fundamental Concepts, Instruction execution, Internal register organization, Instruction formats ii. Various 1/O Devices like key Boards, Mouse, Screen, Printers, Addressing of 1/O devices, Data transfers, Interrupt Handling, 1/O Interfaces iii. Overview of Operating System Functions, process & its management, various sets of processes, Process Scheduling & Algorithms. iv. Memory Management Schemes, Segmentation, Paging, Virtual memory concepts & Demand paging, Thrashing. v. File System Concept, Directory Structures & Types, Disk scheduling and disk scheduling algorithms, Performance considerations vi. Security (cryptography, worm, virus) vii. Case Study: a. Windows NT & Windows 2000 Operating System Memory Management, Process Scheduling, File Systems, User Interface b. LAN: Novel operating System Security consideration, directory Conventions, resource sharing. c. WAN: UNIX file structure, directories, processes and scheduling, shells e- mail, writing shell scripts. Delivery: 30 Lecture Hours Assessment: 50% Coursework 50% Final Examination 103

11.3.9.6 BCS 506 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS (2L) Course Description This course introduces and studies (with an emphasis on problem solving) many of the fundamental ideas and methods of discrete mathematics that are the tools of the computer scientist. Objectives On completion of this subject students should: i. ii. Master the ideas of propositional and predicate logic Be able to apply these ideas to the solutions of difference equation (recurrence relations), to the analysis of algorithms and to the construction of expert systems Be familiar with the properties of graphs, and those special graphs known as trees Be able to interpret and construct graphs, trees, paths, Huffman codes and parse trees Be able to change mathematical expressions between infix, prefix and postfix forms Be familiar with the definition and properties of groups and semi groups Be able to construct languages from alphabets of symbols. Be able to construct and use error - Detecting and error correcting codes.

iii. iv. v. vi. vii. viii. Contents

i. Logic, graphs, trees and algebraic structures Mathematical Logic Tautologies, contradictions and contingencies ii. Logical equivalence, logical implication, Argument evaluation and rules of inference iii. Predicate logic Combining quantifiers Proving mathematical theorems

104

iv. Proof by induction, Recursive definitions and recurrence relations v. Recurrence relation, Program correctness and Graphs vi. Connectedness, Paths in graphs, Hamilton paths and Hamilton circuit of least possible total weight. vii. Matrix representations of graphs, isomorphism and planarity, and Isomorphism and trees viii. Rooted and binary trees and Huffman codes ix. Algebraic structures, Semi groups and Groups x. Subgroups Semi groups obtained from finite alphabets and Coding and decoding xi. Error detecting / correcting capabilities of cades, Generator matrices and codes and Characteristics of error detecting / correcting codes xii. Parity Check matrices, Syndromes, syndromes, error correction and Hamming codes Delivery: 30 Lecture hours Assessment: 50% Coursework 50% Final Examination 11.3.9.7 BCS 507 OPERATIONS RESEARCH (2L)

Course Description The aim of this course is to introduce students to computation mathematical methods of solution and techniques that can solve a wide range of problems occurring in business environments. These techniques provide the basis for informed and economically rational decision making in deterministic situations. Objectives On completion of this course, students should be able to: i. Solve single non linear equations

105

ii. Linear and non linear system of equations iii. Formulate and solve linear and integer programming problems iv. Determine the minimizer of non- listed multivariate functions both with and without constraints, v. Recognize problems before deriving a solution: Formulate such a problem as a model: solve it using an appropriate technique from those listed in the Contents. Modelling and hands on computer solutions of practical problem is an important objective of the subject. Contents i. Linear and integer programming: simplex method, duality, phasephase 2 methods, sensitivity analysis and economic interpretation of results. ii. Optimization: minimizing a function of several variables, search methods. iii. Minimization with one or more constraints either inequality or equality constraints iv. Problem formulation and solution and Case Studies. v. Deterministic decisions as optimization problems. The theory will be illustrated by resource allocation problems, location and assignment problems, stock control. There will be an emphasis on problem formulation and solution vi. The techniques developed include: Classical non linear optimization; convexity and duality; linear programming; game theory; dynamic programming. Delivery: 30 Lecture hours Assessment: 50% Coursework (30% from Practicals, 20% from tests) 11.3.9.8 BCS 508 Course Description DATA STRUCTURES IMPLEMENTATION (2L + I P) AND THEIR

106

The course is to introduce the students to algorithms and structures along with basic programming techniques using languages such as C and C+ +. Objectives On completion of this course, students will be able to: i. Get an elementary background in programming and are able to participant effectively in software developments ii. Understand some of the basic data structures in algorithms and programming iii. Awareness of computational complexity issues of running teme and memory as they arise in programming. Contents i. Primitive data types: variable, character, Boolean, numeric, date ii. Data Structures: Arrays, Records, Stacks and Queues a. Operations on these data Structures and implementation b. Algorithms for searching and sorting iii. Data Structures: Linked Lists, Trees and Graphs a. Operations on these data Structures and implementation b. Algorithms for searching and sorting iv. Conditional control flow, repetition. Loops v. Functions Delivery: 30 Lecture hours, 30 hours Practicals Assessment: 50% Coursework 50% Final Examination 11.3.9.9 BCS 509 PRINCIPLES OF SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (3L) Course Description This course introduces the necessary conceptual and analytical for systematic and rigorous development of software systems. It covers for main 107

areas of software development, namely software requirement analysis, design implementation and testing. This subject concentrates on developing skills in the use of software engineering techniques and software tools Objectives On completion of this subject students should be able to: i. Describe the concept of software engineering, the phases of the software life cycle and the different tasks that are carried out during a software project ii. Use software engineering techniques to develop requirements documents write specifications, analyze and design medium- scale pieces of software iii. Demonstrate skills in the use of software tools to support the different stages of the software life cycle. iv. Describe different ways of achieving, verifying an d testing the quality of a piece of software. Contents i. Fundamental principles of software Development a. Life- cycle model evolutionary); (waterfall, spiral, staged delivery,

b. The stages of software life cycle c. Different techniques, used at each stage ii. Requirement analysis: purpose, levels and Approaches to analysis, prototyping, a. Software Requirements: b. Algorithms and system decomposition c. Abstraction and Information Hiding d. Software Testing (Product and Process, Reviews, Metrics, Standards);

108

i. Documentation; (Teams Allocation, Estimation)

Communications,

Work

iii. Fact finding and interviews, working with the people, detailed analysis, Review &Assignment, Working with people &Technology. iv. Prototyping & 4GLs. v. Overviews of implementation. Scheduling & Assigning table, Testing Training System maintenance. vi. Implementation, testing and maintenance: Modularity, cohesion data abstraction procedural abstraction. coupling

vii. Testing techniques and strategies. Practical exercises to test large system. Delivery: 45 Lecture hours Assessment: 50% 50% Final Examination 11.3.9.10 BCS 510 INTRODUCTIONS TO COMPUTER NETWORKS (3L) Course Description This course seeks to expose the students to the fundamentals of computer networks and the principles of their use. It will examine how users can effectively exploit networks for communication, information gathering and dissemination. Objectives On completion of this subject students should able to: i. Specify the advantages of networking ii. Understand the ISO Open Systems Interconnection 7 layer model, iii. Choose set up evaluate, and manage a local are network iv. Use Internet network services v. Address the main networking problems and solutions Contents 109

i. Data communication concepts , uses and applications a. The Telephone Network principles and topologies, Exchanges, PBX b. Synchronous and asynchronous communication modes. c. Packet switching Packets assemble and disassemble ii. Hardware: network architecture, Hosts, Clients, Circuits, Special purpose Communication Devices FEP, Multiplexers Protocol Converters Line adapters iii. Data transmission: Coding Transmission Modulation, Modem: Types and modes, Band width.

Standards, PAM & PCM techniques, Connector cables iv. International Standard Organization Open System Interconnection 7 Layer Model Physical, MAC protocol controlled & contention- based Error control in networks. Data link Protocols: Asynchronous & synchronous Transmission efficiency. v. Transport, Network Layer: TOPOLOGIES. Network routing. Network Standard and network protocols: CP/IP, IPX/SPX, X.25& GOSIP protocols. Routing algorithms, IPv6. vi. Network Topologies Local Area Network wide. Area Networks vii. LANs: uses and type, LAN components. Ethernet: topology, MAC, type Token Rings: topology, MAC, types, other types of LANs, MAP (IEEE 802.4) Arc Net and Apple Talk. LAN performance improvement, selecting a LAN. Also VLANs: uses and type viii. Network Security principles, Delivery: 45 Lecture hours Assessment: 50% Coursework 50% Final Examination 11.3.9.11 BCS 511 COMPUTER SYSTEM TROUBLE SHOOTING (IL + IP) Course Description: 110 INSTALLATION AND

This course aims to provide a practical introduction to essentials of installing configuring and troubleshooting some types of PC hardware and software. Contents Hardware basics: PC Functions and Components introduction to the PC the system case: the Motherboard: CPU/ MCP; Clock Memory; 1/O Expansion Bus Speaker 1/O Ports and Cables. PS2 Ports, Parallel Ports, Serial Ports, USB Ports, SCSI, Network Ports, Audio Ports, lrDA Ports Joystick/MIDI Ports, Interface Cards, Storage Devices Hard Drives, Floppy Drives Optical Dick Storage, Power, Supply Unit (PSU), The Display Subsystem, Modem Types. Motherboards and components: Processors: Processor Terminology Processor Modes, Intel Processors, Summary of Processor Specification Processor Sockets, Non- Intel Processors, Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) Memory: Memory Types, Memory Packaging Memory Characteristics. Motherboard Architecture: Motherboard Components, Motherboard Factors, Bus Architecture, Bus Standards. System configuration: BIOS: The Function of BIOS, BOIS, Service, BIOS Components, BIOS Upgrades, BOIS CMOSS Memory and Battery. BIOS/CMOS Settings. BIOS/CMOS Setup Programs. System Resources: System Resources, Interrupt Request Line (IRQ), Direct Memory Access (DMA), 1/O Addresses (Ports), Memory Addresses Determining Resources in Use, Resource Conflicts, Setting System Resources, Plug-and-play, Installing Software Printers: Printer Types: Dont Matrix Printers, Inkjet Printers, Laser Printer Connections, Configurations and Troubleshooting: Printer Technologies, Printer Connections, Configuring Printer Drivers, General Troubleshooting Installing upgrading and troubleshooting: Field Replaceable Units Disassembling a PC).Input Devices Storage Device Reassembling the PC (How to building your own PC). IDE Devices Installing an IDE, Preparing a Hard Disk (Fdick and Format Tools) File System. SCSI Devices The SCSI Interface IEEE 1394 Setting Up a SCSI Bus. Peripheral Devices: Installing a Video Card and Monitor Installing a Modem UART Chips Installation of Operating System Software Linux Win2000, XP, Unix etc. 111

Safety and preventive maintenance: Leaning and Preventive Maintenance Computer Case Maintenance Cleaning a Mouse Cleaning a Monitor Cleaning Keyboard. Problems Dealing with Power Supplies and Fans Environmental issues: Power Problems Dealing with Power Problems Uninterruptible Power Supplies Storage of Components for future Use High Voltage Equipment CRT Servicing and Handling Lasers and High- Power Light Sources High Voltage Equipment. Maintenance Toolkit. Delivery: 15 Lecture hours; 30 hours Practicals. Assessment: 50% Coursework, 50% Final examination 11.3.9.12 BCS 512 INTRODUCTION INTELLIGENCE (2L+IP) TO ARTIFICIAL

The course provides a general introduction to artificial intelligence, its techniques, and main subfields. The principal focus of the course will be on the common underlying ideas, such as knowledge representation, rule-based systems, search, and learning. It will provide a foundation for further study of specific areas of artificial intelligence. Objectives This subject aims to give students an application oriented introduction to knowledge-based systems (KBS). On completion of this subject students should be able to: i. Decide on the suitability of a KBS solution for a given problem ii. Design knowledge representations and an inference engine for a given task iii. Implement a knowledge-based solution in a shell iv. Discuss AI techniques and their implementation using any shell programming v. Describe typical of AI in the future Contents 112

Overview: What is knowledge? What is AI? Scope and limitations of Knowledge-based techniques, Life cycle of KBS Knowledge Acquisition: Observation, interviews, use of protocols, selection of problems, expert programmer solutions, verification Problems in knowledge acquisition Knowledge Representation: Decision trees, rules, semantic nets, frames, uncertainty fuzzy logic, constraints, meta rules Search and Inference Techniques: Forward and backward, chaining, tree and graph searching (simple searches, hill climbing, means end), constraints, case-based reasoning, machine learning Implementation: Use of a rule-based shell Applications: Examples will be taken from games, education, design support, customer support, medicine, geology, equipment configuration will be used to demonstrate search, classification, intelligent checklists, decision making/advice and problem solving The future of KBS Delivery: 30 Lecture hours, 30 hours Practicals Assessment: 50% Course Work 50% Final Examination 11.3.9.13 BCS 513 INTERNET TECHNOLOGY (IL+IP) Course Description This subject will introduce the techniques and technologies used to develop content for the World Wide Web on the Internet and Intranets. It will be oriented towards implementation, and will describe and examine the issues involved in using web pages to pass information between web servers and web browsers. 113

Objectives On completion of this course, the student will be able to: i. Understand the underlying protocols used by web browsers ii. Appreciate the need for standards for interoperability on the Web iii. Develop static and dynamic web pages using HTML, and style sheets iv. Develop client-side scripts using a popular scripting language v. Develop server-side interaction scripts capable of handling forms-based

vi. Understand the capabilities of web servers vii. Understand the difference between languages commonly used for web programming Contents i. Intranets, and Internet ii. Internet services iii. The World Wide Web iv. HTML; HTTP; PHP; MySQI v. Client and Server-Site Scripting Technologies, JavaScript, Jscript, VBScript and Java; web server technology and other scripting environments vi. Internet Database Interaction Delivery; 15 Lecture hours, 30 hours Practicals Assessment: 50% Coursework 50% Final Examination 11.3.9.14 BCS 514 LINUX SYSTEM ADMINISTRATIONS (IL+ IP) Course Description This course describes day- to- day administration and maintenance issues commonly faced by Linux system administrators. 114

Objectives To install administer and manage a Linux system in a network environment Contents i. The What Why and How of System Administration ii. Information Sources iii. Using UNIX/LINUX iv. The File Hierarchy Processes and File v. The Shell, Text Manipulation Shell Programming vi. Users vii. Managing File Systems viii. Backups ix. Start-up and Shutdown x. The Kernel xi. Observation: The Connection Applications Security Delivery: 30 Lecture hours, 30 hours Practicals Assessment: 50% Course Work 50% Final Examination 11.3.9.15 BCS 515 COMPUTERS AND SOCIETY (2L) Course Description This course is an introduction the major issues surrounding the use of computer in our society with a special focus on fields related to computer science and information technology management the course will cover an analysis of major trends in emerging computer technology and their potential effect on work leisure government and human relations. Objectives On completion of the course students will be able to: 115

i. Describe the aspects of the society that are affected by the use of computers and the microprocessor technology and examine the changes that are taking place ii. Discuss key concepts in a digital society including copy rights, privacy personal freedom. Computer crime and new legal issues. iii. Critically evaluate such ability by way of debate or role- play Contents i. Critical examination of the capabilities and uses of modern computer and they are changing the business. law politics and society legal effects of electronic evidence ii. Digital signatures, Privacy and personal information Can we trust the computer? iii. Intellectual Property, iv. Computer Crime WWW, Legal aspects of the use and abuse of the Internet and WWW v. Computer and Work vi. Professional Ethics and Responsibilities. Delivery: 30 Lecture hours, 30 hours Practicals Assessment: 50% Course Work 50% Final Examination 11.3.9.16 BCS 599 PROBLEM BASED LEARNING PROJECT (2L+ 2P) Course Description: Students are prepared to undertake a medium size project on one the of the following topics a. Programming b. Networking c. Databases

116

The choice of topic will depend on students competence preferences and/ or supervisors guidance Students are recommended to work in groups of two In cases where a student remains without a partner then this student can join another group of two students making an only group of 3 students However if some student prefer to work alone they are also allowed. Objectives i. To expose students to the real word of project management and implementation ii. To let students work independently with minimum supervision iii. To improve presentation and project implementation skills iv. To work effectively as part of team interact with users, and develop specifications design documents and build prototypes as well as full specification for the required system v. To develop a set of practical skills that will serve them well throughout their professional life. Contents The project shall be carried out through the following steps: i. Introduction to project/ research methodology (to be conducted as special session before starting the project.) ii. Project formulation including initial reading/ stud discussion with Supervisor to decide about the project Students to produce a project proposal. iii. Literature review and initial data collection which ands up with an Interim report which should include the following Project definition Scope of the project, project objectives, Project goals and its relevance to Computer Science, with literature review. The project should have a project schedule (project diary) iv. Literature review and initial data collection, which ends up with an Interview report which should include the following. Project definition, Scope of the project. Project objectives, Project goals and its relevance to Computer Science with literature review. The proposal should have a project schedule (project diary) 117

v. Data collection and Analysis, designing and Prototyping-Producing progress report vi. Continuation of Prototype design and implementation vii. Producing final year project report viii. Presentation and Demonstration

Delivery: There shall be a 2 hours weekly seminar where students will present up-todate progress reports in front of their fellow students and supervisor. Presenters will us feedback as inputs to improvement and continuation of the project Assessment: Intermediate progress reports 25% Final Project presentation 25% Final implementation and report 50%

118

12.0 UB SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS


The UB School of Languages and Communication Skills is one of the essential components of the university. This will offer compulsory language and communication skills courses cutting across the whole university; according to the academic programmes of UB. Language and communication skills are compulsory programmes taken and should be passed in all semesters during the tenure of degree programmes. The basic language to be emphasised will be English the medium of instruction is for the whole University is. Initially the school will offer its courses to all programmes under no specific award. However in consequent number of year the school will also offer specific awards on particular programmes on Languages and Communication skills.

12.1THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE COURSES

OBJECTIVE

This course is designed for undergraduate students learning English as a foreign or second language. The course assumes an advanced elementary and near intermediate standard of knowledge and practical handling of the language and seeks to fulfil the following aims: i. ii. to further students knowledge of English through exploration and analysis; to help students acquire a global vision of English rather than concentrate on unrelated ideas;

iii.

to see a grammar as providing a means of understanding the relation of form to meaning, and meaning to function, in context;

119

iv.

to provide basic terminology which, within this framework, will enable students to make these relationships explicit in their academic and professional endeavours.

12.1.1FIRST YEAR

UBEL 101 English Language I (Structure, Usage, and Spoken) A general Course in English language comprising:

Semester 1 Module One: [What does a module mean? A module per semester? One might be inclined to think that 1. Basic concepts and 2.The skeleton of the message: Introduction to clause structure are modules under which one would expect to see learning units] 1. Basic Concepts

Language & Meaning Linguistic forms and syntactic functions Negation and expansion

2. The skeleton of the message: Introduction to clause structure

Syntactic functions and sentence structures. Basic sentence patterns Direct , Indirect, & Prepositional Objects Subject and Object Complements

120

Adjuncts

Semester 2 Module Two: 3. The Development of the message: Complementation of the verb. Intransitive & copular patterns Transitive patterns Complementation by finite clauses Complementation by non-finite clauses.

4. Conceptualizing patterns of experience: processes, participants, circumstances; Conceptualising experiences expressed as situation types. Material process of doing and happening Causative processes Process of transfer Conceptualising what we think, perceive, and feel. Relational processes of being and becoming. Processes of saying, behaving, and existing Expressing attendant circumstances Conceptualising experiences from a different angle Nominalization & grammatical metaphor

121

12.1.2 SECOND YEAR Semester 1 UBEL 201 English Language II (English Structure) A continuation in greater detail of the structure and usage components of English I Topics include a detailed study group structures in English.

Module Three: 5. Interaction between speaker and hearer: Linking speech acts and grammar.

Speech acts and clause types. The declarative and interrogative types. The explanative and imperative clause types. Indirect speech acts, clause types and discourse functions Questions: clause types and discourse functions. Directives: getting people to carry out actions.

6. Organising the message: Thematic and information structures of the clause.

Theme: the point of departure of the message The distribution and focus of information.

122

Semester 2

Module Four 7. Expanding the message: Clause combinations: Clause combining Types of relationship between clauses, Elaborating the message Extending the message Enhancing the message Reporting speech and thought.

8. Taking about events: The Verbal group: Expressing our experience of events, Basic structure of the Verbal Group Organizing our experience of events The semantic of phrasal verbs

12.3 THIRD YEAR

UBEL 301 English Language III (English Structure)

Semester 1 Module 5 9. Viewpoints on events: Tense, aspects and modality 123

Expressing location in time through the verb tense

Past events and present time connected: Present Perfect and Past perfect. Situation types and Progressive aspect. Expressing attitude towards the event: Modality.

10. Talking about people and things: The Nominal Group: Expressing our experiences of people and things Referring to people and things as definite and indefinite generic. Selecting and particularizing the referent: the determiner. Describing and classifying the deferent: the pre-modifier Identifying and elaborating the referent; the post-modifier Noun Complement clauses

Semester 2 Module 6 11. Describing persons, things, and circumstances: Adjectival and Adverbial groups Adjectives and the adjectival groups Degrees of comparison and intensification Complementation of adjectives Adverbs & Adverbial group Syntactic functions of adverbs and adverbial group Modification and complementation in the adverbial group. 124

12. Spartial, temporal and other relationships: The Prepositional Phrase. Prepositions and Prepositional Phrases Syntactic functions of the prepositional phrase Semantic features of the preposition Stranded prepositions; discontinuous prepositional phrases

Basic Readings i. Downing, A. & Locke, P. (2006). English grammar: A university course (2nd Edition). Oxon: Routledge. ii. Greenbaum, S. & Nelson, G. (2002). An Introduction to English grammar (2nd Edition). London: Longman. iii. Leech , G. & Svartvik, J. (2002). A Communicative grammar of English (3rd Edition). London: Longman. iv. Murphy, R. (2004). English grammar in use: A self-study reference and practice book for Intermediate students of English (3rd Edition). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 12.2 COMMUNICATION SKILLS 12.2.1 UBCL 403 & 409: COMMUNICATION SKILLS

COURSE OBJECTIVES: This course is aimed at developing study skills and the ability to use the English language effectively in specialised academic endeavours at University level and after. It considers the ways in which information is presented in academic discourse. Written and spoken general and legal texts are analysed. Course Description 125

This Course is designed on the assumption that, after six semester of following the English language course, students will have a high command of the grammar of English. The course therefore concentrates on the way in which sentences are combined in large units to form academic discourse. Considerable attention is given to the differences in the structure of written and spoken texts. The Course presents strategies for improved efficiency in Listening Skills, Reading academic texts, Taking notes from speech and written texts, and writing essays, reports, and letters

Delivery:

30 Lecture hrs and 15 Seminar hours

Assessment: Coursework 40 percent. Final Examination 60 percent.

12.2.2 UBCL 403 COMMUNICATION SKILLS I MODULE 1 Topic 1: Theory and Nature of Communication 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Communication theory Types and channels of communication Communication systems. Communication barriers The nature of Legal English

Topic 2:

Listening 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Listening Styles Problems in listening Learning to Listen The listening Process Active Listening 126

2.6 2.7 2.8

Critical Listening Emphatic Listening Listening for Enjoyment

Topic 2:

Note taking and Note making Techniques 3.1 3.2 Identifying main from subsidiary points Identifying signals/makers of relationships of ideas in a lecture and a text. 3.3 3.4 TOPIC 4: 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 Brevity techniques Signalling relationship in notes READING TECHNIQUES Identifying the purpose for reading Skimming and scanning Prediction and Comprehension Coping with unfamiliar words Understanding the relationship of information Reading and note taking

Topic 5:

Academic Writing Process 5.1 5.2 5.3 Understanding conditions. key instruction words and special

Preparing an outline of an essay/report Essay Writing ( Parts of an essay/ Thesis / topic sentences)

127

5.4 5.5 5.6

Paragraph development Unity, logical ordering of information, and Coherence Summarising and paraphrasing Presenting references/bibliography.

5.7 Letter writing

12.2.3 UBCL 409 COMMUNICATION SKILLS II

Delivery:

30 Lecture hrs and 15 Seminar hours

Assessment: Coursework 40 percent. Final Examination 60 percent

MODULE 2 TOPIC 6: PRESENTING AN ARGUMENT 6.1 6.2 6.3 Distinguishing fact from opinion Presenting arguments Expressing fact and opinion

Topic 7 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6

Verbal Communication How Words Work People and Meaning The Language Environment Working on Your Communication (What, How, to Whom, & Meta-messages. Participating in seminar discussions Giving a seminar/ conference presentation 128

7.7 Delivery)

The Art of Public Speaking (Speech Preparation and

Topic 8

Nonverbal Communication (NVC) 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 The Importance of NVC Verbal and Nonverbal Differences Characteristics of NVC Types of NVC Space and Distance in NVC Improving NVC

Topic 9:

Interviews 7.1 7.2 7.3 Interviews as Interpersonal Communication Preparing for the interview. (As interviewee/interviewer) In the interview process.

BASIC READINGS i. Apps, J.W. (1990). Study Skills for Todays College Student. McGraw Hill: New York. ii. Bailey, R.E. & Denstaedt, L. (2005). Destinations: An Integrated Approach to Writing Paragraphs and Essays. McGraw Hill; Boston. iii. Barass, R.(1982). Students Must Write: A Guide to Better Writing in Coursework and Examinations, Methuen & Co. Ltd: New York. iv. Brannan, B. (2003). A Writers Workshop: Crafting Paragraphs, Building Essays. McGraw Hill: Toronto. v. Camp, S.C. & Satterwhite, M.L. (1998). College Communication. McGraw Hill: New York. 129

vi. Crusius, T.W. & Channell,C.E. (2006). The Aims of Argument (5th Edition). Boston: MacGraw Hill vii. Galvin, K.M. & Terrell, J. (2001). Communication Works! Communication Applications in the Workplace. National Textbook Company: Lincolnwood, Illinois. viii. Gregory, H. (2005) Public Speaking for College & Career.7th edition. McGraw Hill: Boston. ix. Hybels, S. & Weaver,R.L.(2001). Communicating Effectively (6th Edition). Boston: McGraw Hill. x. Hairston, M.C. (1998). Successful Writing 4th edition... W.W. Norton & Co.: N.Y. xi. Langan, J. (2003). College Writing Skills, Media Edition, 5th edition, McGraw Hill: Toronto.

12.3 UB LEADERSHIP, GOVERNANCE AND DIPLOMACY CENTRE. 12.3.1 INTRODUCTION The University of Bagamoyo leadership, Governance and Diplomacy Centre (UB LGDC) is located in Dar es Salaam at Plot 709, Mikocheni B, Sembeti street. It is hosted in the headquarters of the University of Bagamoyo as an inter- university institution for teaching leadership, governance and diplomacy to all students taking diverse programmes offered by the University. The Leadership, Governance and Diplomacy Centre aims at resolving the leadership challenge in Africa. The Centre is a deliberate step to turn around Africas underdevelopment by deliberately training socially conscious, ethical and committed leaders for Africas good governance. 12.3.2 OBJECTIVES OF UB LGDC i. ii. iii. Educating, training and nurturing socially conscious, committed and ethical leaders through an integrated holistic formation. Creating a corruption free public and private service for good governance in Africa. Training committed leaders who put the interests of the people they serve first and see themselves as their servants instead of pursuing

130

their personal interests and seeing themselves as masters of the people they serve. These objectives make the UB a university with a difference. Its vision of being and remaining a unique centre of excellence in offering university education in the World, is well placed within the imperatives of Africas development agenda. The University of Bagamoyo is not just

another institution of higher learning. Its mission is nurturing and developing socially conscious, committed and ethical human
being through integrated holistic formation. This mission challenges UB to deliver a compact of knowledge in its programme offerings with a view to producing graduates who have been tailored to be world citizens and world class professionals. Hand in hand with this global mission, UB has a challenging mission of offering leadership and good governance programmes that will produce for Africa graduate leaders. UB has what it takes to mould socially conscious and ethical graduates who are academically and professionally and ready to take up leadership roles in the civil society both in private and public sectors. UB believes that to lead is to show the way. This means that establishing itself as a leader in training and nurturing leaders already makes UB a leader among other universities. 12.3.3 THE UB LGDC ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANS The UB LGDC is headed by an Executive Director who has overall administrative authority over day to day running of the centre. Subject to the Charter, Rules and regulations of the University, the UB LGDC Executive Director is accountable to the UB LGDC Governing Board, the latter which is accountable to the senate and the University Council. The tenure of office, salary and emoluments of the UB LGDC Executive Director and other staff of the LGDC shall be in accordance with the University scheme of service with the exemption of any allowances and or benefits that are special and specific to the centre. The UB LGDC Deputy Director is the assistant to the Executive Director. He reports and receives assignments from the Executive Director and acts as the Executive Director during the absence from office of the Executive Director. The UB LGDC Executive Secretary is the head of the UB LGDC Secretariat. The Executive Secretary has the responsibility of managing the centre and is the secretary to the UB LGDC Governing Boa

131

12.3.4 UB LGDC STAKEHOLDERS UB LGDC is a university wide institution with a special duty of training leaders for Tanzania, Africa and the world. This mandate gives it a national and international significance. It is a support structure for institutionalisation of democracy and good governance at both national and international levels. In this regard therefore, the UB LGDC shall strive to establish links and contacts will all the stakeholders in the area of democracy and good governance. The UB LGDC funding arrangements, working relationships, institutional culture shall therefore assume and adopt global ethical standards and codes of good practices. 12.3.5 THE UB LGDC PROGRAMMES 12.3.5.1 INTRODUCTION The UB LGDC programmes are university level academic and professional training programmes aimed at educating, training and nurturing good leadership for Africa and the world in general. The UB LGDC draws international students from Africa and the world generally. The backdrop to the establishment of the UB LGDC is the disturbing reality of Africas continuing underdevelopment. The truth is that although Africa is endowed with natural resources, including minerals, fauna, flora, sea and inland water resources and agricultural products, it has remained a poor and underdeveloped continent. Contemporary Africa lacks the capacity to provide sufficient energy, food, industrial goods and services required by its people. In the past African leaders found it convenient and normal to blame slavery, slave trade and colonialism for Africas underdevelopment. Today, more than 50 years since the first African state, Ghana achieved independence in 1947, Africa is increasingly moving towards underdevelopment amidst acts of political barbarism, genocide, failure of states and disintegration. The majority of African states still suffer from illiteracy, famine, diseases, and abject poverty and corruption. African scholarship is increasingly associating corruption, indolence and unethical leadership with Africas underdevelopment. Therefore most informed people associate Africas underdevelopment with the lack of well educated, ethical and committed leadership. The Founders of UB believe that Africas lack of good leaders can in a greater part, be explained as a consequence of absence of leadership training programmes in institutions of higher learning. The UB LGDC has been 132

established to remedy this apparent gap in efforts and processes that are being directed against the challenge of Africas underdevelopment. Therefore the UB LGDC is a deliberate effort to offer university level education, professional training and nurturance in leadership science, skills and practices as a sustainable approach to resolving the challenge of bad governance in Africa. The UB LGDC programmes have four components parts, namely the public leadership empowerment programme, the undergraduate programme, the postgraduate programme and the judicial administration programme. 12.3.5.2 THE PUBLIC LEADERSHIP EMPOWERMENT PROGRAMME This is a capacity building qualifying programme aimed at developing leadership skills for leaders, potential leaders with special emphasis on young leaders and females. The programme is designed to train leaders for short qualifying empowerment courses with a view to improving leadership quality. 12.3.5.3 THE UNDERGRADUATE LEADERSHIP TRAINING PROGRAMME This is the main leadership training programme that will be taken as a compulsory part of all academic programmes offered by the University of Bagamoyo. The purpose is to improve leadership quality and quantity in Africa and the world. Leadership is the hallmark of UB graduates professional qualifications. 12.3.5.4 THE POST GRADUATE LEADERSHIP TRAINING PROGRAMME This is an elite leadership training programme aimed at training graduate students as leaders irrespective of their Alma matter. The objective of this programme is to improve leadership quality in Africa and the world generally. The post graduate products of UB shall be professional leaders capable of good leadership and innovation within competitive global social economic development imperatives. 12.3.5.5 JUDICIAL ADMINISTRATION FELLOWSHIP The judiciary plays a pivotal role in the good governance and democracy matrix. The separation of powers and the rule of law principles would be empty shells if nothing is done to create a competent, professional, ethical and socially conscious judiciary. The theory of justice has a social context without which law becomes a means of stealing from the people their basic human rights.

133

The University of Bagamoyo Judicial Administration Fellowship aims at enabling judicial personnel i.e magistrates and judges to re-tool, upgrade and or advance their legal knowledge and skills through professional competence building training programmes and academic qualifying degree programmes. The output of the programme is to have in place highly trained and professional judicial officers with leadership skills and who are ethically and socially accountable. This is purely an executive training programme aimed at improving the professional competence of the judiciary.

134

13.0 ALMANAC FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2010/2011

13.1 ALMANAC 2010/11 GENERAL GENERAL 2010 / 2011 COMMENTS

Orientation Week 01 November2010 Registration and setting for to acc. year is done at this week. (1 Week) 07 November 2010 Semester one (16 Weeks) 27 February 2011 Semester Exams (2 Week) Inter-Semester break (3 Weeks) Registration for 04 April 2011 to Semester Two (1 10. April 2011 Week) Semester Two (16 Weeks) Semester Exams 11 April 2011 to 31 July 2011 Two 01 August 2011 to Verification of Id Numbers 14 March 2011 to 03 April 2011 Processing of Examination and setting goals for second semester External examiners leave Release of provisional Results Processing of appeals & registrations for 2nd semester courses All units have to be covered for the year one. one 28 February 2011 to Verification of Id Numbers 13 March 2011 All students in all UB Colleges 08 November 2010 This is the beginning of to semesters in all UB Colleges

135

GENERAL (2Week3) Long vacations (11 Weeks)

2010 / 2011 14 August 2011 15 August 2011 to 30 October 2011

COMMENTS All students in all UB Colleges Field work and practice placements Examination processing Appeals processing

The end of Year One 13.2 ALMANAC 2010/11 MEETINGS Meetings SENATE COUNCIL 2010 / 2011 06 October 2010 13 October 2010 COMMENTS Adoption of all Instruments and Regulations 1.Approval of all instruments and Regulations 2.Plan way forward Admissions Regular meeting

SENATE APPOINTMENT COMMITTEE COUNCIL Examinations Board Faculty Board

26 October 2010 16 February 2011

23 February 2011 01 April 2011

Regular meeting Internal examiners and external

06 April 2011

To discuss on the report from examination board. To discuss on appeals Approval of the Examination (Results and Appeals)

SENATE

13 April 2011

136

MEETING APPOINTMENT COMMITTEE COUNCIL Examinations Board Faculty Board

2010 / 2011 29 June 2011

COMMENTS Regular meeting

06 July 2011

Regular council meeting and external

09 September 2011 Internal examiners

14 September 2011 To discuss on the report from examination board. To discuss on appeals 28 September 2011 Approval of the Examination (Results and Appeals)

SENATE

13.3 ALMANAC 2010/11 PUBLIC HOLIDAYS Public Holidays Independence Christmas day Boxing day New Year Zanzibar Revolution 2011 TO 2012 09 Dec 2010 25 Dec 2010 26 Dec. 2010 01 Jan 2011 12 Jan 2011 COMMENTS Thursday (No lectures) Saturday (No lectures) Sunday (No lectures) Saturday (No Lectures) Wednesday (No Lectures)

WORKERS DAY

01 May 2011

Sunday (No Lectures) 137

Public Holidays

2011 TO 2012 7 July 8 August

COMMENTS Thursday (No Lectures) Monday (No Exams) Monday (No Lectures) Tuesday (No Lectures)

IDD EL HAJJ IDD EL HAJJ

28 November 29 November

138

14.0 STAFF LIST AND PROFILE


14.1SENIOR STAFF LIST 14.1.1 OFFICE OF THE VICE CHANCELLOR Vice chancellor Prof. Costa Ricky Mahalu LLB, LLM (Dar), Dr. iuris (Hamburg) Public Relation Officer Rose Mwalongo, Diploma in Journalism 14.1.2 OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY VICE CHANCELLOR (ACADEMIC) Prof. G.M Fimbo LLB (EA), LLM (London) PhD (Dar) Students Services, Admissions and Examinations Officer Mr. Joseph Innocent Mahedi (B.Phil) Salvatorian Institute affiliated to Urbanian University, Italy Timetable, Almanac and Prospectus Officer Raphael Bahati Tweve Mgaya (LLB Hons) (Dar) LLM (Warwick) Scholarships and link office Flaviana Charles Mayutta LLB (Dar), LLM (Coventry) Quality Assurance Bureau Director Acting: Flaviana Charles Mayutta LLB (Dar), LLM (Coventry) RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT BUREAU Director Acting: Raphael Bahati Tweve Mgaya (LLB Hons) (Dar) LLM (Warwick)

139

14.1.3 OFFICE OF DEPUTY VICE CHANCELLOR (FPA) Deputy Vice Chancellor Dr. Edmund Sengondo Mvungi, LLB, LLM (Dar) Magister Legum (Hamburg) Dr. iuris (Hamburg) Planning office & burser Ezekiel J. Massanja, MBA (Eastern and Southern African Management Institute & Maastricht school of management) National Diploma in Development Studies (Arusha),Certificate in NGO Financial Management (Arusha), Certificate in International Human Rights (Copenhagen),National Accountancy Diploma(Dar), National Book Keeping Certificate(Dar ) Director of student services Mr. Joseph Innocent Mahedi (B.Phil) Salvatorian Institute affiliated to Urbanian University, Italy Director of library services *Acting: Perpetua Nderakindo Kessy (Bsc. NY), (Msc. Maryland), (Ph.D Candidate Maryland) Director of built environment Adv. Alex Mgongolwa LLB, LLM (Dar) 14.2 ACADEMIC STAFF LIST 14.2.1 COLLEGE OF LAW AND GOVERNANCE 1. Principal Shaidi FACULTY OF LAW Dean Helen Kijo-Bisimba, Diploma in Education, LLB, LLM (Dar) Currently undergoing PhD studies in the University of Warwick, England. Professors Prof. Costa Ricky Mahalu LLB, LLM (Dar), Doctor iuris (Hamburg) Prof. G. M Fimbo LL.B (EA), LLM (London) PhD (Dar) 140

Associate Professors - Josaphat Kanywani LLB (E.A), LLM (Barkely) PhD Senior Lecturers Dr. Angelo M. Mapunda, LLB (Dar), LLM, PhD (Warwick) Dr. Edmund Sengondo Mvungi Dr. iuris (Hamburg) LLB, LLM (Dar) Magister Legum (Hamburg)

Dr. Harrison Mwakyembe LLB, LLM (Dar) Magister Legum Dr. iuris (Hamburg) Dr. Wilbert Kapinga LLB, LLM (Dar), PhD (North Eastern, Boston) Hon. Judge, Dr. Fauz Twaib LLB, LLM (Dar), Dr. iuris (Bayereuth) Dr. Fred Ringo LLB, LLM (Dar), Dr, iuris(Konstanz) Dr. Eve Sinare LLB,LLM (Dar), Dr iuris (Konstanz) Dr. Alex Thomas Nguluma LLB, LLM(Dar), PhD( Warwick) Lecturers 1. Mrs. Helen Kijo- Bisimba Diploma in Education, LLB, LLM (Dar) 2.Dr. Natujwa S. Mvungi LLB, Magister Legum (Chemnitz); Dr. iur (cum laude) Chemnitz 3. Advocate Alex Mgongolwa, LLB, LLM (Dar) Assistant Lecturers Mr. Alex Mgongolwa LLB, LLM (Dar) Mr. Bahati Raphael Tweve Mgaya LLB (Dar), LLM (Warwick) Ms. Flaviana Mayutta LLB (Dar), LLM (Coventry) Visiting Professors Prof. Dr. G .C Ingo Von Muench (Emeritus) - Hamburg FRG Prof. Dr. Philip Kunig, Free University of Berlin Berlin FRG Prof. Dr. Ulrich Karpen, Free University of Berlin Berlin FRG 141

Prof. Dr. Rainer Lagoni, University of Hamburg Hamburg FRG Prof. Toni Marsh, The George Washington University Prof. Dr. Nico Schriever, University of Utrecht Utrecht, The Netherland Prof. Dr. Gramlich Hamburg School of Law- Hamburg FRG Prof Dr. Mainhard Hilf University of Chemnitz, Chemnitz FRG 14.2.1.1 INSTITUTE OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND GOVERNANCE Executive Director 1Acting Mr. Harold Sungusia Professors Prof. Dr. Costa R. Mahalu LLB, LLM (Dar), Doctor iuris (Hamburg) Prof. Toni Marsh, The George Washington University, USA Senior Lecturers Dr. Edmund Sengondo Mvungi, LLB, LLM (Dar) Magister Legum, Dr. iuris (Hamburg) Lecturers Mr. Hellen Kijo Bisimba Advocate Francis Kiwanga, Visiting Lectures Advocate Mabere Marando Advocate Erick S. Ngimaryo Advocate Francis Stolla Advocate Athanasia Soka Assistant Lecturer Ms. Flaviana Charles Mayutta LLB (Dar), LLM (Coventry) LLB (Dar) LLB (Dar) LLB (Dar) LLB (Dar) Diploma in Education, LLB, LLM (Dar) LLB (Dar), MBA (ESAMI)

142

14.2.1.2 GRADUATE SCHOOL OF LAW AND GOVERNANCE Dean 1. Dr. Rita Mwaipopo (Acting Dean) LLB (Dar), LLM, PhD (Dar) Professors Prof. Costa Ricky Mahalu LLB, LLM (Dar), Doctor iuris (Hamburg) Prof G. M Fimbo Associate Professors 1. Josephat Kanywanyi LLB (E.A), LLM (Barkely), PhD (Dar) Senior Lecturers Dr. Angelo M. Mapunda, Dr. Edmund Sengondo Mvungi (Hamburg) LLB (Dar), LLM, PhD (Warwick) LLB, LLM (Dar) Magister Legum, Dr. Iuris LLB (E.A), LLM (London) PhD (Dar)

Dr. Harrison Mwakyembe LLB, LLM (Dar) Magister Legum, Dr. Iuris (Hamburg) Dr. Wilbert Kapinga LLB, LLM (Dar), PhD (North Eastern, Boston) LLB, LLM (Dar), Dr. Iuris (Bayreuth) LLB, LLM (Dar), Dr, iuris (Konstanz) LLB, LLM (Dar), Dr iuris (Konstanz) LLB, LLM(Dar), PhD( Warwick)

Hon. Judge Dr. Fauz Twaib Dr. Fred Ringo Dr. Eve Sinare Dr. Alex Thomas Nguluma Lucturers

Dr. Natujwa S. Mvungi LLB, Magister Legum (Chemnitz); Dr. iur (cum laude) Chemnitz Visiting Professors Prof. Dr. G. C Ingo Von Muench (Emeritus) Hamburg FRG Prof. Dr. Philip Kunig, Free University of Berlin Berlin FRG Prof. Dr. Ulrich Karpen, Free University of Berlin Berlin FRG 143

Prof. Dr. Rainer Lagoni, University of Hamburg Hamburg FRG Prof. Toni Marsh, The George Washington University, U.S.A Prof. Dr. Nico Schriever, University of Utrecht Utrecht The Netherlands Prof. Dr. Gramlich, Hamburg School of Law Hamburg FRG Prof. Dr. Mainhard Hilf, University of Chemnitz Chemnitz FRG 14.2.3 COLLEGE OF SCIENCE, INFORMATICS AND BUILT ENVIRONMENT Principal 1. Dr. G.R Koda, Bsc,Msc.(Dar), Msc (Carleton), PhD(Dar) FACULTY OF BUILT ENVIRONMENT Dean 1. Dr. E. Mtallo Msc. Engineering (TU Budapest), Msc. Engineering in Geomatics, PhD in Geomatics (Newbranswick Canada) 14.2.3.1 GRADUATE SCHOOL OF SCIENCE, INFORMATICS AND BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Dean (Acting) 1. Dr. G.R Koda Bsc, Msc. (Dar), Msc (Carleton), PhD (Dar) FACULTY OF INFORMATICS AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES Dr. Hashim Twakyondo INSTITUTE OF APPLIED SCIENCE AND EDUCATION Director: (Acting) 1. Dr. E. Mtallo Msc. Engineering (TU Budapest), Msc. Engineering in Geomatics, PhD. In Geomatics (Newbranswick, Canada) 14.2.3.1 SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS

Dean 144

1. Elli D. A Mrindoko (Lancaster), PhD (Dar) ACADEMIC STAFF Senior Lecturers Dr. Elli. D. A Mrindoko PhD (Dar)

Dip. Ed, BA (Dar), CALTE (Essex), MA

Dip. Ed, BA (Dar), CALTE (Essex), MA (Lancaster),

Mr. Y. R. Mweteni, BA Ed, M.Ed (Exeter) *Completing their doctorial studies abroad i.e. U.S.A, UK and FRG respectively =========================================

145