Title on Each Page AMBIENCE: 1950'S SCIENCE LAB BACKGROUND, WITH ELECTRICAL BUZZES AND BUBBLING CHEMICALS.

ESTABLISH PLACE WITH THESE. DON'T TELL HOW TO MAKE SOUNDS, JUST WHAT YOU HEAR. LET THE DIRECTOR FIGURE IT OUT.

Page No.

1. Little Frieda: 2. Dr. Ambrose:

So this is what a radio script looks like, eh, Dr. Ambrose? Yes. Some directors number each speech, though some used to number each line. The line or speech numbers are for the director and the actors. They can write notes in the margins on both sides. But for in-house stuff we don't really need the numbers, right Doc? Mostly for long scripts? That's right. Also notice that the body of the speech is indented from the character name, so the reader can quickly find her part. The speech is written in a narrow column and a sans serif font to make it easier to read. EFFECTS AND OTHER STAGE DIRECTIONS ARE WRITTEN IN ALL CAPS, (SOMETIMES BOLD OR UNDERLINED) TO EASILY DISTINGUISH THEM FROM SPOKEN LINES. MUSIC TRANSITIONS WORK THE SAME WAY. PHONE RINGS, IS PICKED UP. Hello?

3. Blue Knight: 4. Dr. Ambrose:

5. SOUND EFFECT:

6. Little Frieda:

7. Galactic Poohbah:(ON PHONE) Hello, Little Frieda. I'm calling just to show you how to indicate special effects done to voices. 8. Little Frieda: But if effects are written in all caps, what do you do if you want to emphasize dialogue? You underline them, you busibody! Notice I didn't include a stage direction, telling the actor how to say this line. That sort of thing should be implicit in the dialogue, and only written in when it would not be obvious. I see. Reading of the lines is left up to the direct and the actors' interpretation of what's written. 11. Dr. Ambrose: And only copy on one side of the page, too. Also, keep lines together. Don't let a speech run over onto the next page. It opens the door to pauses when Version No. or P rinting Date

9. Dr. Ambrose:

10. Blue Knight: or

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