MARCH / 1

UWS
THE
ISSUE
PATRICIA
FIELDS
SENDS
HER BEST
SPARKLE
DAPHNE
GUINNESS
GOES
GOTHIC
WARBY
PARKER
LOOKS UP
ALL IS FAIR
IN BEER
AND WAR

first
lady
OFNEWYORKCITY
Diana Taylor on what’s wrong with Congress, the
economy and the mayor’s Spanish-speaking skills
THE
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24 Oct. - 9 Nov. 2011
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of military and historical interest
Antiquities, Antique Arms & Armour,
Fine Antique & Modern Firearms,
Orders and Military Collectibles
All catalogues and further informations:
www.hermann-historica.com
French Militaria from the Revo lution to the Indochina War
A Horch 108
Type 40 KFZ,
a NSU HK 101
Ketten kraftrad
and a
BMW/Stoewer
”leichter
Einheits-PKW“
Model steam
engines,
composition
figures,
military radios
and binoculars
A pre sen tation
sabre, USA,
19th cent.
Antique Arms & Armour
A gold-mounted ceremonial
Burmese dha, 19th cent., and an
Ottoman kilij set with corals and
turquoises, 19th century
Order of Alexander Nevsky, embroidered breast
star, Russian field marshal shoulder boards and a
helmet for enlisted
men of the mounted
artillery, Russia 1910
King Maximilian II /
King Ludwig II
– a quarter striking
repeater watch of the
Bavarian Royal
Family
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MARCH / 1

UWS
THE
ISSUE
PATRICIA
FIELDS
SENDS
HER BEST
SPARKLE
DAPHNE
GUINNESS
GOES
GOTHIC
WARBY
PARKER
LOOKS UP
ALL IS FAIR
IN BEER
AND WAR

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OFNEWYORKCITY
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THE
ON THE COVER:
DIANA TAYLOR STYLED BY
NIKOLA TAMINDZIC AND
HIS TEAM AT HER OFFICE
SEPTEMBER 19.
8 | OCTOBER
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HW_MidnightWomens_NYobserverMagazine.indd 1 9/19/11 2:20 PM
Harry WInston.indd 1 9/22/11 3:57:09 PM
10 | OCTOBER
contents
14 EDITOR’S LETTER
16 FOOD + DRINK
You thought apple cider was the only thing
to look forward to in fall? Tell your tummy to
grumble again. Emerald Pellot picks the best
spots for brunch
20 Have no fear, the beer is here. We show you
creative cans and Tom Acitelli takes a sip
24 CULTURE
Spectacles, anyone? It’s reading time. A
collection of great books gushes in for fall.
Turn a page with Christian Lorentzen
28 MAKE A DATE
Ah, New York. So many parties, so little time.
Guest of a Guest fills our little black book
32 CHINA HAPPENINGS
Chiu-Ti Jansen gets us excited about Hong
Kong fashion week
38 OBJECTS OF DESIRE
Patricia Fields talks jewelry with Elise
Knutsen
42 TRAVEL
Get out. (No, really.) Sachsa Levine and
Hannah Ghorashi discover that Fall is
the best time to escape New York
32
24
20
18
28
32
JOE: on our
brunch list
(and our best
dressed list!)
Cool winds call for cuddling up
with our favorite books, including
a new novel by Jeffrey Eugenides
99 cans of beer on our
wall—well, not quite
GUEST OF A GUEST
invites us to an animal
preservation dinner
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ASIAN INVASION
Guo Pei shows 2011
collection in Hong Kong
Fashion Week
NYO_MAG5_UWS TOC.indd 10 9/23/11 7:51:22 PM
Untitled-18 2 9/22/11 4:41:34 PM
46 FASHION
Of a Kind teaches us how to make an
entrance with fashion this fall
58 Daphne Guinness is never boring.
Chui-Ti Jansen is transfixed
52 PARTIES
Nate Freeman on the season’s best
parties.
62 MONEY
There’s no business like gold business.
Foster Kamer gets the Midas touch
66 FEATURE
The First Lady of New York City. Diana
Taylor on what’s wrong with Congress,
why her former boss George Pataki
won’t be president and the perils
and pleasures of being Hizzoner’s
girlfriend. Elizabeth Spiers reports
74 Warby Parker glasses gain some serious
praise. Chris Clemmons tells the
founding duo’s heartfelt story
80 TRAVERSED
We don’t want to fool you—there’s a lot
of history in New York. But the Upper
West Side has some particular gems.
Emilia Ferrara takes us back in time
82 STAY
A tour of the best Upper West Side
condos by Hannah Ghorashi
XXXXXXX
2 | OCTOBER
NYO
By Foster Kamer
°The symboI for goId - is an eye in a circIe
- from fhe Egyµfian for fhe Sun God - Ra,¨
Ben Davies exµIained fo me. Ben`s a direcfor
af Hinde CaµifaI, a Brifish Hedge fund fhaf
manages fhe Hinde GoId Fund, a high-voIume
fund fhaf deaIs excIusiveIy in goId. He is nofh-
ing shorf of reIigious when he wrifes abouf
if. °If means aII seeing. The sfeady rise in fhe
µrice of goId is fhaf of knowIedge. GoId,¨ he
exµIains, °is aII knowing.¨
If Ben sounds crazy, fhen fhere`s a signif-
canf µorfion of fhose making earfh-shaking
deaIs in gIobaI fnanciaI markefs who are
cafegoricaIIy insane.
Their quesfionabIe menfaI heaIfh, if if is
indeed so, has aIso made fhem cafegoricaIIy,
asfoundingIy rich.
Meef fhe GoId Bugs, or fhose who are
absoIufeIy crazy for fhe shiny sfun.
LafeIy, if`s been hard fo fnd whaf any
sensibIeµersoncouIdseeas a°sfabIe¨ invesf-
menf. TheworId`s fnances havedemonsfrafed
fhedicfionary-defnifionof voIafiIify: sfock
exchanges droµdownafewhundredµoinfs
inasingIeday, wifhµicfures of face-grabbing,
anguishedfraders gracingnewsµaµer covers
aroundfhecounfry. AweekIafer, fhose
hundredµoinfs andfhensomearerecovered.
Everyone`s afargef, as weaII haveskininfhe
game: invesfmenf µorffoIios, mufuaI funds,
refiremenf funds, µensions, anyfhingfhaf`s any
kindof invesfmenf is subjecf fofhebareIy-con-
froIIedchaos of whaf areoffenvagueIyreferred
THL NLW
GOLD H¡SH
qeIIInq Io knou
AT A COCKTAIL PARTY THIS SUMMER FOR SEX AND THE CITY AUTHOR (AND NYO MAGAZINE
COVER STAR) CANDACE DUSHNELL'S NEW DOOK, THE PARTY'S HOST, DRIGHT LIGHTS, DIG
CITY AUTHOR AND MANHATTAN GADADOUT JAY MCINERNEYSWAYING ADOUT IN A WHITE
TUXEDO JACKETJOKED TO THIS REPORTER THAT HE HAD STARTED HIS OWN HEDGE FUND.
"I THINK I'M JUST GOING TO DE A GOLDDUG!" HE SAID. MCINERNEY UNWITTINGLY ECHOED
A PHENOMENON SPREADING AROUND THE GLODE FOR THE LAST FEW MONTHS: A NEW,
MODERN FASCINATION WITH AND ADDICTION TO THAT YELLOW, SHINY STUFF.
M¡ DAS WLLL

46
12 | OCTOBER
82
62
66
42
The Observer investigates
why the gold rush is back
The only fall
fashion you
need to know
Yes, you could live here (if
you read our condo list!)
The Glass House
Diana Taylor ,
Philanthropist,
Businesswoman
and the Mayor’s
girlfriend
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Untitled-14 1 9/22/11 3:52:37 PM
14 | OCTOBER
editor’s note

it’s that time of year in New York when the last waning moments of sum-
mer give way to chillier mornings, wool outwear and the inevitable appearance
of far too-early holiday decorations. (We’re eyeballing the windows at Barneys
already for any suspicious traces of tinsel.)
But if we’re being honest, it’s really our favorite time of year. It’s not yet so cold
that we’re inclined to hibernate under a down comforter with Seasons 1 through
28 or so of The Wire on Netflix or justify a hop-skip-jump commuter plane to St.
Barths in the middle of the workweek, but we’re past the summer season of heat
and humidity and the ongoing experience of agonizing over the Mets. The air’s a
little brisk, the pace is faster and it’s a great time to do all the things we’ll miss when
we hole up for the holidays.
In this issue, we’ll bring you some great fall escapes to nearby locales – we’re looking
forward to seeing Philip Johnson’s Glass House this time of year – and book recommen-
dations for the train. (Murakami’s 1Q84 looks great, but we’ll take the Kindle edition; 944
pages is a bit much to haul on the Metro North.) We’ll also introduce you to some of the
more interesting people in New York right now, including the young charismatic duo be-
hind eyewear startup Warby Parker, the owner of one of the hottest microbreweries in
the five boroughs and the incomparable style icon Daphne Guinness. Stylist and designer
Patricia Fields of Sex and the City fame tells us the stories behind her favorite pieces of
jewelry and we get a glimpse of fashion in the Far East with an overview of
emerging Chinese designers. And while we’re on the subject of trends,
we’ll fill you in on why everyone’s investing in gold these days and
you can decide for yourself whether the market’s been seduced by
the shiny stuf, or the hedgies in Greenwich are onto something.
But for the most part, we’ll be spending our time on the lovely
Upper West Side. Central Park foliage is wonderful this time of
year, and we’ll take you on a walking
tour of classic UWS locales. We’ll also
take you to our favorite brunch spots
and show you the best condos in the
upper left corner of Manhattan. And if
that’s not enough, we’ll even tell you how
to dress for the occasion, courtesy of our
guest curators, the founding team behind OfA-
Kind, which commissions capsule collections from
up-and-coming designers.
Then we’ll sit down with prolific businesswoman and philan-
thropist Diana Taylor – or as we like to think of her, the first
lady of New York City. We’ll talk about politics, what’s wrong
with the economy, and the Mayor’s technically-proficient-but-
not-very-easy-on-the-ears Spanish speaking skills. You’ll get
her take on President Obama, the challenges of being a woman in a male-dominated in-
dustry and why she won’t run for Senate against Kirsten Gillibrand.
And finally, we’ll leave you with a hypothetical (and hilarious) trip to Brooklyn with
new sometime New York resident, Kim Kardashian. We’re not sure she’s ever been on
anything resembling a New York City subway, but we can’t resist imagining it. Ms. Kar-
dashian may not be everyone’s idea of the perfect NYC transplant, but as any lifelong
New Yorker knows, it takes all kinds. o C
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NYO_MAG5_EditNote.indd 14 9/23/11 8:58:55 PM
nycbuIIet.com or z±z-(ç6-o6oo
David H. Kocl Tlealer al Lincoln Cenler, 6_rd Blreel & Colunbus Avenue
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16 | OCTOBER
NYO
FOODDRINK
Our list begins with Pop-
over Cafe. The quaint
atmosphere feels like
home but has much better
food. Open for30 years
now, in the founder’s mes-
sage, Carol Baer states
she wanted to create a
“place to return to over and
over, a place the regulars
would consider their own.”
Popover does just that with
an impeccable menu from
vegetarian avocado melts to
prime filet mignon entrées.
Chef and owner Carrie Levin
was born in New York and
raised in Belgium, but she
spent summers with her visit-
ing grandparents as a kid,
cultivating a worldly palette
she brought back to the city.
Founding Good Enough
to Eat in 1981 to offer qual-
ity old-fashioned American
cuisine, Ms. Levin does not
fall short, bringing a menu of
pancakes, massive sand-
wiches and meatloaf dinners,
making for a gourmet take on
the best comfort food.
Fred is a restaurant named
after a female black Labra-
dor retriever bred by Guiding
Eyes, a nonprofit dedicated
to providing seeing-eye >
A Bite
of Brunch
We pick the best of brunch
on the Upper West Side
By Emerald Pellot
J\gk\dY\iifcc\[`eXe[XlkldekX^^\[Xcfe^, letting
none of us forget what “jacket weather” is like. While the onset of
changing leaves may recall how daunting a New York City winter is
(think Ugg boots and salted silver sidewalks), there’s always Sunday
brunch. Fancy eggs and cocktails are the only worthy consolation
prize as workloads begin to pile up and temperatures begin to drop
down . Wondering where to find the coziest brunch spots with
the best menus? Of course you are! That’s why The Observer has
compiled a list of the best brunches on the Upper West Side. E
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NYO_MAG5_UWS Brunch Spots.indd 16 9/23/11 6:05:49 PM
DEVEL OPED BY ARCHI TECTURE/I NTERI OR DESI GN BY CETRARUDDY EQUAL HOUSI NG OPPORTUNI TY
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GRAND SPACES f or
SMALL MOMENTS
A grand corner building in the heart of the Upper West Side. Generous well-proportioned layouts.
Elegantly restored classic details. New modern conveniences rarely found in pre-war buildings.
2 – 4 be droom pr e - wa r c ondomi ni ums s ta rt at $1.995 mi l l i on.
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212.784.9845 845wea.com EXCL USI VE MARKETI NG AND SAL ES AGENT THE CORCORAN GROUP
845 Cocoran.indd 1 9/22/11 3:45:22 PM
18 | OCTOBER
NYO
FOODDRINK
guides and companions for
the blind. Now that we’re
done with the mushy part,
“Fred’s Gourmet Sit
and Stay” isn’t just a pun.
With a traditional brunch
menu loaded with Bloody
Marys, French toast and
huevos rancheros, you’ll
know you’re being served by
some compassionate folks
with great taste.
Dying to try something new?
But don’t want to be disap-
pointed? Gazala Palace is
the number-one place in New
York City for authentic Druze
food. The Druze are a mixed
race and religious commu-
nity found in Lebanon, Syria,
Israel and Jordon, which is no
surprise with Gazala’s menu
of Mediterranean and Middle
Eastern cuisine. Pita distin-
guishes this place from your
regular old Lower East Side
falafel joint.
’Cesca is some of the fin-
est Italian cuisine in the city.
Both rustic and sophisticat-
ed, chef and owner Anthony
Mazzola reinterprets tradi-
tional Southern Italian dishes
and pairs them with fine
Italian wines all using mostly
local ingredients. We know
you like grandma’s cooking,
but she’s not in Manhattan.
Sante Fe is a Southwestern,
contemporary Mexican style
restaurant that has been a
staple of the Upper West
Side for 25 years. Sante Fe’s
brunch menus provides a
Southwestern spin on the
classic meal with choices like
steak and egg burritos and
“torta de huevo con chorizo,”
a drool-worthy translation
of chorizo with eggs, refried
beans and chile-dusted fries.
Joe the Art of Coffee
will have caffeine-addicts
squealing (if they haven’t
heard about it yet). Joe
serves up rich and nutty
coffee, with sleek style. This
Seattle-style fair-trade cup
of coffee will surely quell the
yearning of fiends at Sunday
brunch—and it sure beats
Starbucks.
You don’t have to leave
New York City to experi-
ence fine Belgian dining.
Just head over to B. Cafe.
This sophisticated menu
offers traditional Belgian
cuisine paired with imported
Belgian beers and gourmet
desserts like the irresist-
ible Gauffre de Bruxelles
Chantilly (a Belgian waffle
with Callebaut chocolate
sauce and whipped cream).
Enough—gulp—said.
In 2009, for the 12th year in
a row, Barney Greengrass
was Zagat-rated as the No.
1 deli in New York. It’s a
tough slot to compete for.
While it’s not your typical
picturesque brunch spot,
quality does not go amiss
at Greengrass, a New York
staple for 100 years.
If you’ve ever been to Paris,
you know the allure of a
patisserie is irresistible, so
it’s a good thing New York
City has everything and that
includes Cafe Lalo. This
uniquely European-style
patisserie serves brunch
every day, not just weekends.
Enjoy fresh baked bread and
gourmet coffee and choose
from an assortment of 100
French desserts. o
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FOODDRINK
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NYO
f
or Shane Welch, it all started with a sip
at age 2. There is a photo of him stealing
a pull on his dad’s glass of what he thinks
was probably Miller. Roughly 30 years later,
and Mr. Welch makes no mistake about his
beer: the Sixpoint Craft Ales he founded seven
years ago is having a moment in Brooklyn.
Its beers are among the more adventurous,
boundary-shoving brews being produced in the
borough, due in no small part to their packag-
ing. Sixpoint was one of the first craft breweries
in the U.S. to can its beer.
Once heretical to craft brewers—if glass
bottles were good enough for Belgian and
German brewers, it should be good enough
for American ones—cans have crept steadily
into vogue among the higher-end suds set.
The pioneer was Oskar Blues, a brewery in
Colorado that canned its Dale’s Pale Ale in
2002 to much acclaim.
When Sixpoint followed suit around
Memorial Day of this year, some New York
City tipplers were skeptical, despite the
trailblazing by Oskar Blues. Cans seemed too
much like, well, what dads such as Mr. Welch
drank.
“The two biggest enemies of beer are light
and oxygen—those are the two things that will
degrade beer or transform beer more than any
other element,” Mr. Welch, 32, explained
earlier this month. “The can simply protects
the beer from those two things way better than
a bottle ever could.”
Since their debuts, the Sixpoint cans, usually
retailing in four-packs, have become a
signature of the brewery—16-ounce, steel-gray
stamps of innovation favored by hipsters
tossing Frisbees in Prospect Park and young
professionals at rooftop parties in the West
Village. Once cracked, Sixpoint’s ales tend to be
on the tangy, sweeter side (the aptly named
Sweet Action line, in fact, according to Mr.
Welch, is the brewery’s biggest seller in New
York City), lighter than most other ales. And
the freshness aspect touted by the founder is no
Mad Men marketing line: the ales do tend to
taste sharper and richer than comparable
styles in bottles.
Mr. Welch apprenticed at a Madison, Wis.,
brewery for three years in his early 20s
before starting Sixpoint. Actually, the
Milwaukee native took a slight detour right
before that, essentially traversing the globe,
first through Europe and then through
central and eastern Asia.
“The genesis of Sixpoint is really based on
Brooklyn’s It brewery, Sixpoint,
pivoted from bottles in a big way
this year. Latest canned creation
all wet for New York’s hipsters
By Tom Acitelli
Not for nothing,
the “Sweet
Action” florescent
cans claim high
popularity. Our
pick goes to
Bengali Tiger.

NYO_MAG5_Beer2.indd 20 9/23/11 6:14:33 PM

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NYO
FOODDRINK
22 | OCTOBER
NYO
those two experiences,” he said, “which
were getting my technical foundation in
making beer and then the cultural experi-
ences I had traveling.”
It brought him full circle to an old, 7,000-
square-foot warehouse on Van Dyke Street in
Red Hook, the somewhat isolated belly of
Brooklyn (no subway stops, for one thing), a
remoteness that suited the young brewer’s
plans just fine. “In my opinion, Red Hook was
an ideal neighborhood for a brewery,” Mr.
Welch said. “It has the industrial elements that
you need; but it’s not stifled by encroaching
residential development. The classic manufac-
turing neighborhoods of Brooklyn have
sometimes been completely consumed by
residential encroachment. It gets so you can’t
operate because you can’t have forklifts and
you can’t have trucks moving on the street.”
Mr. Welch started readying the operation—
cleanliness is next to godliness in brewing,
where a dollop of bacteria can destroy
gallons—in October 2004. The first beer, a
brown ale with the double-entendre name of
Brownstone, rolled out in February 2005.
Since then, Sixpoint has grown to 14 employees
and has brewed 15 lines of beer, including an
India Pale Ale, a Scotch ale, a Belgian rye and a
Belgian IPA (and the mysterious Sweet Action,
which, as the brewery points out on its website,
remains but “an idea, a concept”—and, in this
writer’s opinion, an extra-bitter pale ale).
All of these, though, have been eclipsed for
a bit by a typically adventurous, “very
limited,” in Mr. Welch’s words, line that
debuted in September during New York
City’s Craft Beer Week, which started Sept.
16: a wet-hopped ale called Autumnation.
Wet-hopped? Let the brewer explain.
“There’s one point in the entire year when
you harvest hops [the flower that makes beer
bitter],” he said. “You obviously have to make
beer year-round; you can’t make beer once
and then quit making beer. There’s one part
of the year where the hops are fresh and wet
and on the vine; and instead of processing
them the way you normally would, you pick
them and immediately put them into the
brewing process.”
Sixpoint has harvested Autumnation’s
hops from a farm in Yakima, Wash., smack-
dab in the nation’s “hop belt” (and, it should
be noted, the brewery proudly uses tasty New
York City tap water).
“It’s just an outstanding sort of opportu-
nity,” Mr. Welch said of the new line, “to
deliver people something like that that
they’ve never had before.” o
TOM ACITELLIISWRITINGANARRATIVE
HISTORYOFAMERICANCRAFTBEERFOR
THEUNIVERSITYOFCHICAGOPRESS
‘In my
opinion,
Red Hook
was an ideal
neighbor-
hood for
a brewery’
SHANEWELCH
Shane Welch takes
a unique position on
brewing.
Brewery mimicks historic
touch on facade and
interior architecture.
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Untitled-13 1 9/22/11 3:49:56 PM
24 | OCTOBER
NYO
CULTURE
In Ms. Didion’s 1
Blue Nights, she often
seems to be telling stories to prove to herself
that she’s still alive. This second memoir of
grief, a sequel of grim sorts to The Year of
Magical Thinking, unfolds a series of vignettes
occasioned by the death of her daughter,
Quintana. Those of us who would prefer to be
writing about the Obama administration will
have to make do. Those seeking a memoir less
mournful are directed to James Wolcott’s
2
Lucking Out: My Life Getting Down and
Semi-Dirty in Seventies New York. As Mr.
Wolcott, in his youth a Village Voice lance and
Pauline Kael protégé, shufes between
Carnegie Hall and CBGB, encountering Bob
Dylan, Gore Vidal and Patti Smith along the
way, you won’t want to miss out on the puns.
In Japanese the number nine is pro-
nounced like the letter Q, so one of the things
lost in the translation of Haruki Murakami’s
new novel 3
1Q84 is the pun in its title. Last
year in Japan, the book appeared in three
installments, and lines wrapped around the
stores, with the first printing selling out in a
day. We get the whole thing at once, in a
928-page door-stopper. The novel allegorizes
the history of postwar Japan through the story
of an aspiring writer, entangled in literary
intrigue and on a collision course with his
grade-school sweetheart, now a stealthy
assassin who kills men who beat their wives by
jamming needles into the backs of their necks.
A righteous homicidal girl is just waiting out
there for every sad young bookworm.
A few sad young bookworms will always
turn into giants, even if they are giants of a
somewhat gnomic variety, and so after 40
years we have 4
The Angel Esmeralda: Nine
Stories from Don DeLillo. Obsessives might
point out that many of the early, funny ones
are missing, and that the title story is not
much diferent from a passage in Underworld,
but it’s good to have creepy little gems like the
casual encounter-at-MoMA set piece
“Baader-Meinhof” finally between hard
covers. The generation that grew up reading
Mr. DeLillo is still reckoning with its
relationship to postmodernism. Part-time
subway vigilante Jefrey Eugenides seems to
be throwing it of in 5
The Marriage Plot for
the connubial comforts of Jane Austen. Not so
Book It!
This season’s reading list—
now with zombies. DeLillo, Didion
and a dose of DeWitt headline
the fall lineup, but leave room for
Murakami’s new door-stopper.
By Christian Lorentzen
“ We tell ourselves stories in order to live,” Joan Didion once wrote,
a line that speaks to the existential quality of New Yorkers’ concern
for the ever-dying publishing industry. Bookstores, like the currently
endangered St. Mark’s, will always be closing, but as long as new books
are coming out, the rest of us aren’t dead yet.
4
1
2
>
5
3
NYO_MAG5_BookIt.indd 24 9/23/11 6:56:53 PM
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Untitled-12 1 9/22/11 3:47:38 PM
26 | OCTOBER
NYO
CULTURE
Colson Whitehead, who follows up his
autobiographical fourth novel Sag Harbor—
on Twitter he called the book tour “The Icy
Postmodernist Cools Of”—with the zombie
thriller 6 Zone One. As if back from the dead
herself, Helen DeWitt, last heard from in
print more than a decade ago with The Last
Samurai, returns with 7
Lightning Rods,
about a man who starts a business furnishing
corporations with women who will provide
in-house sexual relief—sort of like walking
sperm toilets—to male employees in order to
eliminate sexual harassment in the
workplace.
Ms. Dewitt lives in Berlin, a place where,
since the Wall fell, you might conclude that
capitalism is capable of anything. That
would include turning a thousand-page
tome about two families’ after the fall of the
Wall into an international best-seller, even
one under the innocuous title Parallel
Stories. Its author, the Hungarian Peter
Nadas, is known for a similarly long and
banally titled novel about life behind the
iron curtain, A Book of Memories. Susan
Sontag called it “the greatest novel written
in our time, and one of the great books of the
century,” and if you can’t trust a New York
intellectual, who can you trust?
We don’t have New York intellectuals any
more. Instead we have reissues, like the new
Dwight Macdonald collection Masscult
and Midcult and books like Adam Kirsch’s
Why Trilling Matters, to remind us of a time
when the release of Dr. Zhivago stirred up the
sort of frenzy we associate with Harry Potter.
But if we lack intellectuals, we will never be
lacking in diverting volumes by contributors
to The New Yorker. And some of them, like
cartoonist Roz Chast’s What I Hate From A
to Z, require little more intellect than a
passing familiarity with the alphabet. Susan
Orlean ups the ante slightly with her opus on
dogs, 8 Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend.
If you’re gripped with the feeling that they
don’t write ’em like they used to, we refer you
to 9
Backward Ran Sentences: The Best of
Wolcott Gibbs From The New Yorker,
probably the above-mentioned Mr. Wolcott’s
only competition this season in the categories
of wit, wordplay and all-around insouciance.
One sort of writer who always writes ’em
like they used to is the historian. For the
historian, the same great men are forever on
the march. The Founding Father of the season
looks to be James Madison, who receives a
biography by former Observer columnist
Richard Brookhiser. If you prefer another
sort of rabble-rouser, there’s Joshua Ruben-
stein’s Leon Trotsky: A Revolutionary’s Life.
But what about the Nazis—surely someone
must have a new angle on them? Sure enough,
there’s Robert Gerwarth’s
10
Hitler’s
Hangman: The Life of Heydrich, about the
Gestapo boss the Czechs and Slovaks
managed to assassinate in 1942. Those
looking for a more feel-good story are referred
to Eamon Dufy’s Ten Popes Who Shook the
World. And to those looking for something
more like current history—i.e., the sort of
history that will no doubt require rewriting
in two years time—Michael Lewis ofers
11
Boomerang: Travels in the New Third
World, a survey of the financial crisis’s
fallout in Iceland, Greece, Germany,
Washington, D.C., and California. Which
should serve to remind us, when life gets
bad in New York, it’s always worse just
about everywhere else. o
8
7
6
9
10
11
NYO_MAG5_BookIt.indd 26 9/23/11 6:57:17 PM
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Glenwood.indd 1 9/22/11 3:51:24 PM
28 | OCTOBER
NYO
MAKEADATE
Saturday, Oct. 1
The New Yorker
Festival
(Sept. 30-Oct. 2)
WHERE: Acura at SIR
Stage37, 408 W. 37th Street
WHEN: 6-10 p.m.
New York City
Wine & Food
Festival
WHERE: All over N.Y.C.
WHEN: 11 a.m.-11 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 2
The New Yorker
Festival
(Sept. 30-Oct. 2)
WHERE: Acura at SIR
Stage37
WHEN: 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
New York City Wine
& Food Festival
WHERE: All over N.Y.C.
WHEN: 10 a.m.-11 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 3
Scarlett Johansson
Hosts an Evening
in Support of
Scott Stringer
WHERE: Jane Hotel
Ballroom, 113 Jane Street
WHEN: 7-9 p.m.
N.Y.U. Cancer
Institute Gala
WHERE: The Plaza Hotel
WHEN: 6-9 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 4
Nite @ the Ballet
WHERE: The School of
American Ballet, 70 Lincoln
Center Plaza
WHEN: 6-9 p.m.
Hamptons Classic
Dinner at the James
Beard House
WHERE: The James Beard
House, 167 West 12th Street
WHEN: 7-11 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 5
Carnegie Hall
Opening Gala
WHERE: Carnegie Hall
WHEN: 5:30-9 p.m.
Whitney
Studio Party
WHERE: Hudson River
Park’s Pier 57
WHEN: 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m.
2011 Silicon Alley 100
WHERE: New York
Stock Exchange
WHEN: 6:30-8:30 p.m.
To the Rescue!
From Cruelty to
Kindness Gala
WHERE: Cipriani 42nd
WHEN: 6-10 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 6
2011 Gala for the
Health and Dignity
of Women
WHERE: Espace, 635 West
42nd Street
WHEN: 7-10 p.m.
Fall Back in Time
WHERE: International Poster
Center, 601 West 26th Street
WHEN: 7-9 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 7
Beyond Words
WHERE: Urban Stages, 259
West 30th Street
WHEN: 8-9:15 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 9
Fifth Annual Stand
Up for Heroes
Event at New York
Comedy Festival
WHERE: Beacon Theatre
WHEN: 8-10 p.m.
Love Heals: The
Alison Gertz
Foundation for
AIDS Education 20th
Anniversary Gala
WHERE: The Four Seasons,
99 East 52nd Street
WHEN: 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 10
Popular Mechanics
Breakthrough Awards
WHERE: Hearst Tower,
300 West 57th Street
WHEN:6-9 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 11
Skin Sense
Award Gala
WHERE: The Plaza Hotel
WHEN: 6:30-9:30 p.m.
The Fourth
Annual Journey
of Hope Gala
WHERE: The Prince George
Ballroom, 15 East 27th Street
WHEN: 6:30-10 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 13
The 2011
Humanitarian
Awards Gala Dinner
WHERE: The Union Club, 101
East 69th Street
WHEN: 6:30-9 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 15
The Catholic
Big Sisters &
Big Brothers
October Ball
WHERE: Museum of
Modern Art
WHEN: 9 p.m.-1 a.m.
The Village
Voice’s Brooklyn
Pour Craft
Beer Festival
WHERE: Skylight One
Hanson, 1 Hanson Place,
Brooklyn
WHEN: 2-6 p.m.
The Cystic
Fibrosis
Foundation’s Second
Annual “A Prom
to Remember”
WHERE: Hiro Ballroom
WHEN: 7-11 p.m.
October

To do it all, you need our guide.
Don’t hesitate to hold back
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NYO_MAG5_FallInNewYork.indd 28 9/23/11 6:29:00 PM
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that moves your
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PARALLEL LIVES: LISZT & BUSONI
Sun, Dec 11
STRAVINSKY OUTSIDE RUSSIA
Fri, Jan 20
ORIENTALISM IN FRANCE
Fri, Feb 10
THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME
Sun, Mar 18
CRUMB
Thu, Apr 19
MAHLER’S SYMPHONY NO. 1, “TITAN”
Sun, Oct 30
STRAVINSKY’S RITE OF SPRING
Sun, Feb 26
BARTÓK’S CONCERTO FOR ORCHESTRA
Sun, Apr 29
Vanguard Series
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ASOINS1796_NYObsMag.indd 1 9/15/11 9:47:01 AM
ASO.indd 1 9/22/11 3:35:32 PM
MAKEADATE
30 | OCTOBER
NYO
Sunday, Oct. 16
Beauty Brunch
for the Cure
WHERE: World Yacht, Pier 81
WHEN: 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 17
Take Home a Nude
Art Auction & Party
WHERE: Sotheby’s
WHEN: 6-10 p.m.
3rd Annual Caron
Renaissance Save
a Life Benefit
WHERE: Capitale, 130
Bowery
WHEN: 7-10 p.m.
The Frick Collection
Autumn Dinner
WHERE: 1 East 70th Street
WHEN: 7-10 p.m.
Gabrielle’s Angel
Foundation for
Cancer Research
Angel Ball
WHERE: Cipriani Wall Street
WHEN: 7-9 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 18
The Partnership at
Drugfree.org 25th
Anniversary Gala
WHERE: Waldorf Astoria
WHEN: 6:30-10 p.m.
City Harvest Bid
Against Hunger
WHERE: Metropolitan
Pavilion
WHEN: 7:30-10 p.m.
American Museum
of Natural History’s
Family Party
WHERE: American Museum
of Natural History
WHEN: 5-7 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 19
The Fifth Annual
Golden Heart Awards
WHERE: Skylight Soho,
275 Hudson Street
WHEN: 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 20
Alfred E. Smith
Memorial
Foundation Dinner
WHERE: The Waldorf Astoria
WHEN: 7-11 p.m.
2011 Hope for Hell’s
Kitchen Benefit
WHERE: HK Lounge,
523 Ninth Avenue
WHEN: 6-9 p.m.
International Fine
Art and Antique Deal-
ers Preview Party
WHERE: Park Avenue
Armory
WHEN: 5:30-9 p.m.
3rd Annual
Cocktails 4 a Cause
WHERE: Marquee,
289 10th Avenue
WHEN: 7-10:30 p.m.
Fall Fling Benefitting
Teach for America-
New York
WHERE: The Bowery
Hotel, 355 Bowery
WHEN: 8 p.m.-12 a.m.
Saturday, Oct. 22
VH1 Save the
Music Foundation’s
2011 Family Day
WHERE: Anderson School,
100 West 77th Street
WHEN: 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Rolling Stone:
The Art of the
Record Review
Exhibit
WHERE: Society of Illustra-
tors Museum, 128 East 63rd
Street
WHEN: 12-7:30 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 24
Ice Theatre of
New York’s 2011
Benefit Gala and
Performance
WHERE: Sky Rink and the
Lighthouse, Chelsea Piers
WHEN: 7-11 p.m.
We Are Family
Foundation’s 10-Year
Celebration Gala
WHERE: Hammerstein
Ballroom
WHEN: 6-11 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 25
Alzheimer’s
Association Rita
Hayworth Gala
WHERE: Waldorf Astoria
WHEN: 6:30-11 p.m.
New York City Center
Opening Night Gala
WHERE: City Center, 131
West 55th Street
WHEN: 7-10 p.m.
French American
Foundation Annual
Gala Dinner
WHERE: Capitale
WHEN: 6-10 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 26
AFA Gala & Cultural
Leadership Awards
WHERE: The Metropolitan
Club, 1 East 60th Street
WHEN: 6:30 p.m.
Women’s Venture
Fund Defining
Moments Gala
& Auction
WHERE: Capitale
WHEN: 6-10 p.m.
Charles B. Benenson
Entrepreneur Awards
WHERE: Alhambra Ballroom,
2116 Seventh Avenue
WHEN: 6-9 p.m.
New York Asian
Women’s Center’s
29th Anniversary
Benefit and
Phoenix Awards
WHERE: Manhattan Pent-
house, 80 Fifth Avenue
WHEN: 6:30-9 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 27
UNICEF Masquerade
Ball
WHERE: Angel Orensanz,
172 Norfolk Street
WHEN: 8 p.m.-1 a.m.
New York Design
Center Sixth Annual
Masquerade Ball
WHERE: New York Design
Center
WHEN: 7 p.m.-12 a.m.
Sunday, Oct. 30
Future Stars Recital:
A Day of Culture at
Carnegie Hall
WHERE: Carnegie Hall
WHEN: 2-4:30 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 31
A Halloween
Thriller: A
Dance Celebration
of Ghosts
WHERE: City Center
WHEN: 7-11 p.m.
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NYO_MAG5_FallInNewYork.indd 30 9/23/11 6:29:56 PM
PAINTINGS OF NEW YORK
15 SEPTEMBER - 29 OCTOBER 2011
TOM BLACKWELL
ANTHONY BRUNELLI
PAUL CARINICAS
RICHARD ESTES
ROBERT GNIEWEK
ROBERT NEFFSON
MATTHEW PIEROG
RAPHAELLA SPENCE
BERNARDO TORRENS
DOUG WEBB
GUS HEINZE
DON JACOT
CHARLES JARBOE
RON KLEEMANN
BERTRAND MENIEL
C I T Y S C A P E S B Y
GUS HEINZE, Light Rain in Manhattan, 2011, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 36 in
141 Prince St NY 10012 37 West 57 St NY 10019
212.677.1340 gallery @ meiselgallery.com meiselgallery.com
.
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bernarducci.indd 1 9/22/11 3:37:39 PM
XXXXXXX
32 | OCTOBER
NYO
C
Style Beast
FROM THE
EAST
China stretches its long legs and steps into fashion
By Chiu-Ti Jansen
HONG KONG
Model showcases
designs by Guo Pei
during HK Fashion
Week
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OCTOBER | 33
NYO
CHINAHAPPENINGS
C
The Designers
Guo Pei is the reigning queen of fashion for
China’s most-watched state events and galas,
having even produced dresses for the hosts of
the annual CCTV Spring Festival Gala. Fast
Company named her one of the 100 Most
Creative People in Business in 2011. She started
her design career following the end of the
Cultural Revolution and has continued
working in the Chinese fashion
industry for more than 26 years.
Known for her
extravagant, made-to-order
couture creations, Ms. Guo
has charted the course for
the indigenous Chinese
“haute-couture” with her unique fashion sense,
steeped in historical references as well as a mod-
ern imagination. Having never been educated
in the West, she draws freely from classical
Chinese embroidery techniques, a comprehen-
sive visual vocabulary and Western inspirations.
Fearless and highly imaginative, her works
evoke the outrageous fantasy of Alexander
McQueen—though with less of his dark energy
and death instinct—while infusing China’s
imperial glory with Elizabethan theatricality.
Her collection from 2009, “One Thousand and
Two Nights,” embodied Ms. Guo’s Sisyphean
desire for “that most beautiful dress.” Just as
story-telling became a way to prolong life in One
Thousand and One Nights, dress-making has
become a way for the designer to prolong her
search for the most beautiful dress. For an
outrageously glorious gown with fur trims in
her Arabian-nights inspired collection, Ms. Guo
felt she needed a regal, over-the-top personality
and reached out to Carmen Dell’Orefice, at the
time in her late 70s and to whom Ms. Guo was a
stranger. Without ever having met Ms. Guo in
person, Ms. Dell’Orefice graciously flew to
China for the opening of the show. When
Chinese singer Song Zuying performed “The
Flame of Love” in a duet with Placido Domingo
Style Beast
FROM THE
EAST
China stretches its long legs and steps into fashion
By Chiu-Ti Jansen
hinese fashion from the last hundred years reveals a myriad of technical extremes. The dull, blue
suits of the Mao era juxtoposed against the slavish subscription to Western brands in contemporary China
leaves many onlookers scratching their heads. For some Westerners, a search for fashion requires transport-
ing to a time of cheongsam, dragon-festooned robes or kung fu jackets. But The Observer recently explored
four designers who make Beijing their deity of style inspiration, redefining the phrase, “made in China.”
at the closing ceremony of the 2008 Beijing
Olympics, she dazzled the crowd in a long
robe studded with 200,000 Swarovski
crystals that she had a dozen craftsmen
manually attach to the garment in
nonstop shifts for two weeks. And when
Ms. Guo’s 40-pound crystal-beaded dress
arrived in Los Angeles, Lady Gaga discov-
ered that she couldn’t move in it onstage.
The romantic garments of 37-year-old
designer with Chinese roots Alex
Wang (not to be confused with New
York-based Alexander Wang) employ
fine beadings and luxurious materials to
illustrate restrained femininity. A graduate
of the Central Academy of Design, now part of
Tsinghua University, Mr. Wang spent years
working for a Chinese clothing company before
he established his ALEX WANG Couture Studio
in 2004. He explained that a bespoke fashion
line is natural for a budding fashion designer
because it requires less of an initial capital
investment. He boasts a large range of clients,
from teenagers to ladies in their 50s and 60s,
coming from a variety of diferent professions
and backgrounds.
Unlike Ms. Guo, who is perfectly at home
with over-the-top designs, Mr. Wang’s signature
style is much more subdued, though he has
taken risks with his menswear line and bridal
collections. A silver satin suit in his most recent
collection features an open-chested, curvy,
buttonless jacket coupled with a pair of low-cut
trousers with a cutout and attached folded
fabric. His white-powdered swooning brides,
wrapped in lace or chifon veils, are often Gothic
and alluring.
Neither Ms. Guo nor Mr. Wang participates in
the Beijing or Shanghai fashion week, choos-
ing instead to stage their own trunk shows in
settings of their own making. They are less
concerned with media-assisted brand-building
than direct connections with their custom-
ers. The two other, younger designers that we
Sleeves and
back like the
pipes of an
organ. Guo
Pei, 2011
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34 | OCTOBER
NYO
CHINAHAPPENINGS
interviewed were much more self-conscious
about building their brand.
At the age of 28, Zhang Chi specializes in
avant-garde menswear, with a womenswear line
yet to come. He famously described his
profession as “Change Your Life,” believing that
his clothes can empower the wearer and further
their lives. After Mr. Zhang studied fashion in
London and Italy, he set up his eponymous
studio in London in 2007 before returning to
Beijing in late 2008. “I was born and raised in
Beijing,” Mr. Zhang said of his reason to return
to his homeland. “My studio is in Beijing, but my
design enterprise is international.”
Known for his exaggerated jackets, Mr. Zhang
focuses on Gothic elements, ornate decoration
and unexpected twists in the cut. Some of his
menswear even incorporates details tradition-
ally associated with women’s clothing, such as
ruched pants and pufy shoulders. His self-pro-
fessed “look-at-me” and “in-your-face” designs
appeal to a disparate group of clientele that
includes heirs and heiresses and entertainers
as well as business executives and government
ofcers. “My customers are those who want to
express themselves through fashion,” he told
The Observer.
Vega Wang is the only designer among the
four who is not a Beijing native. After spending
seven years in London, she launched her own
label in Xiamen, a coastal town in southern
China. A fortuitous encounter with actress Fan
Bingbing, who bought out her entire first
collection, inspired the designer to move her
design studio to Beijing in 2009.
Sporting her own designs of London-style
nonchalance coupled with several eye-catching
tattoos, Vega Wang is a confident 27-year-old
who aspires to design for independent-minded
women. “I want my clothes to inspire Chinese
women to feel confident and free to pursue their
own destinies,” she said. Vega Wang’s models
are typically androgynous-looking and she
favors fabric traditionally associated with
menswear. Her cape-inspired special collection
turns the 19th-century English cape into
dresses, shirts and jackets.
Chinese Elements
How have these four designers incorporated the
“Chinese Elements” into their designs?
For Zhang Chi, the post-’80s generation does
not view “Chinese Elements” as preconceived
stylistic references immediately identifiable as
Chinese by Westerners. Contemporary Chinese
style can be fluid and eclectic, comfortable in
its ranging references to traditional Chinese
cultural elements and modern Western influ-
ences. Similarly, Vega Wang believes that the
women she dresses—of whatever age group—
are not as obsessed with the chinoiserie as many
believe. “Why are there ‘Chinese Elements’?”
Vega Wang asked. “Why aren’t there ‘English
Elements’ or ‘French Elements’?”
Ms. Guo told The Observer that until 2009
she had purposefully avoided any “Chinese
Element” in her early designs. During the pro-
cess of restoring an old Chinese wedding gown
intended to be handed down by a prominent
Hong Kong socialite to her future daughter-in-
law, Ms. Guo was blown away by the exquisite
craftsmanship of the traditional Chinese
designs. She came to a sad realization that
today’s Chinese brides were wearing Western
designs and China has not yet produced a bridal
gown with international following. Two years
in the works and scheduled to take place before
the end of this year, “Chinese Brides” will be the
theme of Ms. Guo’s next trunk show through
which she will engage contemporary China.
Mr. Wang explained that when China
becomes stronger economically, it will also
exert great influences on fashion and style. He
believes that Chinese designers have yet to suc-
cessfully deploy the “Chinese Elements” with
spiritual contents or contemporary sensitivity.
“ Created in
China” Designs
Are Chinese consumers helplessly chained to
Western designers brands, as often perceived
by the Western media? For Vega Wang, the
previous obsession with cost-saving has led
to the loss of quality now associated with
China-made products. Lately, as all of these
designers have found, their elite customers
have harbored a fatigue of the uniform looks of
the designer brands. They believe that in due
time, many more Chinese would desire to dis-
tinguish themselves with unique looks rather
than head-to-toe outfits copied from fashion
magazines. Guo explained to The Observer
that Chinese luxury consumers are in love
with beauty that transcends the purported
dichotomy between traditional Western and
Chinese brands.
While the designers are thrilled with the op-
portunities accorded by a dynamic society that
continues to stimulate them and their custom-
ers, they admit that the Chinese fashion world
still has a way to go before it has the proper
infrastructure. Mr. Zhang wishes that in his
lifetime he will contribute to making “Made in
China” a symbol of quality. The world will be
keeping their eyes peeled for their “Created in
China” designs in the years to come. o
GUOPEI
SLASON 2D||
ALEXWANG
SLASON 2D||
VEGAWANG
CAlL
COllLC1lON
ZHIANGCHI
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DEFAULT_NYO_MAG5_FashionableChina.indd 34 9/23/11 6:33:42 PM
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38 | OCTOBER
NYO
OBJECTSOFDESIRE
d
esigner and fashion icon
Patricia Field may be best
known for her wardrobe and
distinctive style. Less discussed,
however, is her equally trend-
setting taste in jewelry. While Ms. Field has a
substantial jewelry collection, don’t expect to
see troves of diamonds or emeralds among her
prize possessions. “I’m not big on, you know,
precious jewelry,” she told The Observer. “I
have few personal pieces; a ring my mother
gave me when I graduated from college, but
I’m not really into fine jewelry in that sense.”
Although she tends to forgo gems, Ms. Field
nonetheless has a penchant for unique baubles
and original ornaments.
These days Ms. Field can be seen sporting
a nameplate necklace with her appellation in-
scribed in Arabic. “About a year ago a very good
friend of mine who is a Jordanian … had this
made for me in Jordan,” she explained. Ms.
Field is no stranger to the nameplate motif,
however. Remember the ubiquitous “Car-
rie” necklace worn by Sarah Jessica Parker’s
character throughout Sex and the City? It
turns out that was Ms. Field’s idea. “Name-
plate necklaces have really been a classy, basic
item of the girls from the boroughs,” Ms. Field
told The Observer, briefing us on the history
of accessorizing in the city. “The ethnic girls
wear nameplates, and they have always been
a substantial percentage of my clientele at the
New York City shop.” Ever the vanguard, Ms.
Field proposed that Sarah Jessica Parker don
one of the necklaces in the show. “I thought
it was unique piece and a classic piece that
really didn’t have the exposure in the general
population,” she said.
Ever since, the nameplate necklace has
become a ubiquitous item for girls from all
boroughs, sold by fancy jewelry establish-
ments and little local shops alike. So when the
Jordanian friend gave her the gift last year,
Ms. Field felt it was a whole new iteration of
the trend she had started. “I was like, ‘Oh,
great, this is a new twist on the name necklace
… People often ask me about it.”
The nameplate piece isn’t the only necklace
Ms. Field wears every day. She has taken to
wearing a pendant of the evil eye. “I wear the
little necklace, like, every day ... I don’t take
it of,” she said. Is Ms. Field superstitious?
“It keeps away the evil. It keeps away the bad
things. I do believe in it that way,” she said.
Quick to qualify, she noted that she doesn’t
wear the pendant only to fend of ofending
spirits. “I also think that it’s an eye, it’s one
of the most basic things of the human being.
The eye is the lens to, you know, so much of
the information that we receive. And I also
see it that way,” she added. Recently, jewelry
designers like Judith Ripka and Aaron Basha
have picked up on the trend, making evil >
Accessories
in The City
Carrie’s fairy godmother
takes us under her spell
By Elise Knutsen
Evil eyes ward off bad omens
or demons in ancient Greek
mythology. Now the simple
symbol is popular in Turkey
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NYO_MAG5_PatriciaField.indd 38 9/23/11 6:54:58 PM
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the most important rooms in any home-rooms to be
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Elgot has been the choice of New Yorkers for
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more smoothly than you could have imagined, trust
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thing every step of the way. Make your first and only
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Since 1945, Elgot has provided the inspiration and expertise to bring
dream kitchens to life. From start to fnish, our seasoned professionals
will handle the entire project with tender loving care. Offering the fnest
in American and European cabinetry, all major appliances, and design and
remodeling services, Elgot is the frst and only step you`ll need to have
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Manhattan's Premier Kitchen and Bath Designers
937 Lexington Avenue · Between 68th and 69th Streets
New York, NY 10065
212-879-1200 www.elgotkitchens.com
An updated kitchen for culinary life as it should
be. A bath designed for the luxury of enjoyment. For
the most important rooms in any home-rooms to be
proud of-come to Elgot.
Elgot has been the choice of New Yorkers for
kitchen and bath design and remodeling since 1945.
For inspiration in helping you choose the best appli-
ances and fixtures, for unsurpassed know-how to get
the job done quickly and correctly, for the expertise
that brings together the dream and the finished result
more smoothly than you could have imagined, trust
in Elgot.
The only stop you need to make for your kitchen
or bath design is Elgot. Offering the finest in Ameri-
can and European cabinetry and major appliances
Elgot`s seasoned professionals will listen to you,
help you with your choices, and take care of every-
thing every step of the way. Make your first and only
stop a visit to Elgot.
Come and be inspired.
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Since 1945, Elgot has provided the inspiration and expertise to bring
dream kitchens to life. From start to fnish, our seasoned professionals
will handle the entire project with tender loving care. Offering the fnest
in American and European cabinetry, all major appliances, and design and
remodeling services, Elgot is the frst and only step you`ll need to have
your dreams come true. You can trust in Elgot.
ELGOT AD.indd 1 3/18/10 6:52:41 PM
Elgot_K&BSUP_1010_JN2.indd 1 9/2/10 10:50 AM K&B_Supp_2010_REV2.indd 11 9/15/10 12:58 PM
Elgot.indd 1 9/23/11 4:07:39 PM
40 | OCTOBER
NYO
OBJECTSOFDESIRE
eye pieces studded with diamonds and set in
14-carat gold.
An antique pendant completes the trifecta
of neck adornments Ms. Fields wears regularly.
“When I was in Turkey a couple of years ago
I picked up an ancient bronze amulet which I
thought was very beautiful and felt I identified
with,” she said. “I purchased it there and I’ve
been wearing that one as an everyday piece.”
But will she add more articles to her daily
jewelry collection? How many chains and
charms can one rather petite body carry? It
comes in cycles, apparently. “I have many oth-
ers that sort of are sitting now in a drawer,” Ms.
Field explained. “I took them all of because,
I don’t remember, maybe I was wearing a
gown or something, and then I never put them
back on.” The three necklaces she currently
wears date from after the last evening-gown-
mandated purge.
In addition to the staples, Ms. Field does
have a stock collection for special occasions.
“I would say those pieces are more expres-
sive than valuable in dollars,” she said of
her costume jewelry. “For example, I have
earrings that come from Thailand and they’re
backs of locusts and they’re green iridescent
and they sort of hang like a chandelier … So
with my red hair and that iridescent green, if
I’m wearing something simple or black, they
kind of set it of,” Ms. Field eagerly shared. “I
have a few pieces of jewelry that I wear in that
manner that I wouldn’t wear every day,” she
said, although we would hardly blink an eye
if it turned out that Ms. Field did in fact wear
earrings made from the abdomens of locusts
on a daily basis.
Ms. Field’s eclectic jewelry collection
morphs as inspiration strikes her. Although
her staple pieces may work on a rotating cycle,
a constant theme runs throughout: personal-
ity. “Jewelry is personal,” Ms. Field explained.
“And you know, just wearing trendy jewelry
that doesn’t express something inside of you, I
kind of shy away from that.” o
Nameplate necklaces are
popular in America but Fields
makes hers in Arabic
Adam or Eve? These long,
leafy vine earings are classic
eccentricity: classic Fields
Fields believes all fashion
should relate to the self. This
necklace is no exception and
is a perfect example of her
open expression
...just wearing trendy jewelry that
doesn’t express something inside of
you, I kind of shy away from that.”
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NYO_MAG5_PatriciaField.indd 40 9/23/11 6:55:27 PM
For more information, visit orpheusnyc.org.
BOX OFFICE: 57th Street and 7th Avenue
CARNEGIECHARGE: 212.247.7800
ONLINE: carnegiehall.org
Orpheus.indd 1 9/22/11 4:05:48 PM
42 | OCTOBER
NYO
TRAVEL
For the Art Enthusiast
JOHNSON’S GLASS HOUSL IN NLW CANAAN
Instead of leaving a glass slipper at a ball,
it might be a grander thing to leave an
eco-friendly, contemporary art glass house
behind. Actually, you shouldn’t leave it at all.
Tickets are available for the Philip John-
son Glass House campus in New Canaan,
Connecticut, containing the most uniquely
shaped homes—most of these polygons don’t
have names—on a backdrop of the most gor-
geous sprawling scenery outside of autumnal
Central Park. The interiors of these houses
won’t disappoint either, as the minimalist
aesthetic featuring subtly intricate design
can rarely be replicated and certainly never
duplicated.
DANA SCHU1Z A1 NLUßLRGLR MUSLUM:
IF 1HL FACL HAD WHLLLS
A girl’s head makes contact with the surface
of water. The tint of her hair appears to fall
somewhere on the red spectrum. She looks
concerned. The eye that’s closest to the water
appears to be melting. Welcome to Dana
Schutz’s exhibition, “If the Face Had Wheels,”
at the Neuberger Museum of Art. Ms. Schutz’s
figurative paintings, which combine fantasy
and reality as well as great alliterative doses
of humor and horror, hum with expressionist
energy. The first 10-year survey of her work
features approximately 30 paintings and 12
drawings from 2001 to the present, including
work from each of her relentlessly inspired
series.
ZAHA HADID: FORM IN MO1ION
This exhibit could be summarily described by
the Oxford English Dictionary definition of
“innovation,” and maybe of “wow.” Architect
Zaha Hadid, the first female recipient of the
renowned Pritzker Architecture Prize, uses
complex fluid geometries and manufacturing
technologies. This exhibition (the first in the
United States to feature her designs; take notes,
globally competitive schoolchildren of Amer-
ica) has created a sculptural environment for
a selection of furniture, decorative art, jewelry
and footwear. The exhibition demonstrates
the continuous nature of her work, reinventing
the balance between objects and space in an
interior landscape. Streamlined, curving sofas,
tables and lounge chairs—made of materials
spanning wood, steel, aluminum and polyure-
thane—decorate the gallery, while biomorphic
forms display the new and unexpected shapes
Ms. Hadid has introduced into the world of
design. Some highlights: Swarovski crystal-
encrusted necklaces and bracelets; spiraling
strappy heels made for Lacoste and Melissa,
and the three-wheeled Z-car I, a prototype of
high-density foam that echoes several of her
sculptural forms. On Nov. 19, Collab, a group of
design professionals and enthusiasts who sup-
port the museum’s modern and contemporary
design collection, will honor Ms. Hadid with
the 2011 Design Excellence Award. Huzzah.
DIA ßLACON: CIRCA ¡97¡
Why see live performance art when you could,
at your greatest leisure, see performance art for
years and years to come on video? “Circa 1971”
presents a selection of video and film works by
notable figures in early video art from the col-
lection of Electronic Arts Intermix, a nonprofit
organization that supports the creation, exhibi-
tion, distribution and preservation—essentially
both the mad scientists and embalmers—of
moving image art. This year, marking the
E.A.I.’s 40th anniversary, the exhibition takes
the organization’s founding year as a starting
point and presents a diverse series of media
generated in and around 1971, the unifying
theme being alternative artistic practices and
activist impulses that drove the early video sub-
culture using newfound technology as a form of
expression.
MASS MOCA: ”ALL 1HOSL VANISHLD LNGINLS”
Imagine visiting the setting of Upton Sinclair’s
The Jungle for a day, except it’s an arguably
more pleasant environment. The building is a
relic from the industrial history of the site that
was once used to heat the factory buildings that
are part of the museum. Sound artist Stephen
Vitiello created the installation All Those Van-
ished Engines (accompanied by the eponymous
story by novelist Paul Park) especially for the
MASS MoCA boiler house. Using the natural
resonance of the pipes and metal drums in the
space, Mr. Vitiello recreated the “vanished
engines” of the factory’s past—this symphony
of sound, dear readers, is indeed death metal.
The story acts as a thematic structure for Mr.
Vitiello’s sound from the point of view of two
narrators visiting a fictional worker of the boiler
house. It vividly recalls the history of the build-
ing as both a producer of sounds and a construc-
tion haunted by its productive past. As visitors
move through the building, the soundscape
alternates between clattering crescendos and
eerie calm.
1HL CLARK-RLMßRAND1 AND DLGAS
Here the Dutch painter famous for his numer-
ous portrayals of Christ (and, no less, himself ),
is compared with the French impressionist ·
Fall
Escape

Leaving the city (without
straying far!): our guide to
Autumn’s best day trips
By Hannah Ghorashi and Sasha Levine
The Glass House,
Philip Johnson
The Glass House,
Philip Johnson
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NYO_MAG5_Fallescapes.indd 42 9/23/11 6:47:14 PM
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Expanded hours - open unIi| 1ûpm every Thursday
ON V!EW THROUGH
JANUARY 8
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This exhibiIion is organized by
Ihe UniversiIy oI New Mexico
ArI Museum, A|buquerque, in
co||aboraIion wiIh Ihe EsIaIe oI
Eva Hesse.
SupporIed by Ihe E|izabeIh A.
Sack|er FoundaIion.
Wednesday, Friday, SaIurday & Sunday 11am - 6pm; Thursday 11am - 1ûpm · 2ûû EasIern Parkway
Subway: 2 3 Io EasIern Parkway]Brook|yn Museum · On-SiIe Parking
BMM-0028-NYOMag_Sep28_7.875x9.75_v1.indd 1 9/20/11 4:05 PM
Brooklyn museum.indd 1 9/22/11 3:41:52 PM
44 | OCTOBER
NYO
TRAVEL
best known for his variously positioned tutus.
Only recently have scholars publicly explored
a respective influence, and thus is born the
Clark’s upcoming exhibition: “Rembrandt and
Degas: Two Young Artists.” The focus will be,
in an mirror-on-mirror sort of way, the artists’
focus on themselves: Rembrandt’s Self Portrait
as a Young Man and Degas’s Self Portrait. In his
earlier years, Degas studied the portraiture of
previous masters, most notably Rembrandt,
and created around 40 self-portraits in paint-
ings, prints and drawings during the mid- to
late- 1850s. This prompted Degas’s explora-
tion of the technical and expressive potential
of portraiture. And then a little later James
Joyce wrote a book.This exhibition comes to
the Clark from Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam,
after which it will travel to the Metropolitan
Museum of Art in New York.
For the Culinary Expert
ANNUAL MARKL1 DAY
(OC1. ¡, NLW1OWN, PA.)
Travel back in time to celebrate colonial
America’s autumnal traditions at Market Day.
This 35-year-old event gives visitors the chance
to experience the fares and wares of over 60
participating restaurants and original crafters
from the area. Open Hearth Cooking will serve
up colony-inspired meals while craftsmen
demonstrate how to candle dip, bee-keep, quilt
and carve wood. For a more relaxing touch,
kick of the harvest season with a horse-drawn
hayride from the Belgian draft horses of “A Bet-
ter Way Farm.” All proceeds go to the Newtown
Historic Association—specialty vendors and
handcrafts are the new black, after all.
AU1UMN ALIVL
(OC1. 22, QUAKLR1OWN, PA.)
There is no better place to be a pet than
Downtown Quakertown for the 12th annual Pet
Parade. Bring the kids—those on two and four
legs—in the car and enjoy a day of fall festivities,
including pet-themed vendors, varied food
court options, a scarecrow contest and visits
from animal rescue groups. While preparing a
routine ahead of time might help your scores in
the Talent Contest, don’t forget to bring a dog-
gie bag for the local produce, which abounds.
VILLAGL APPLL FLS1IVAL (NOV. 5-ó,
PLDDLLR’S VILLAGL, PA.)
Commemorate fall’s return in the most classic
way we know how—an apple festival. At this an-
nual party, guests celebrate the flavors of Amer-
ica’s favorite fruit done every way: apple butter,
apple cider, apple dumplings and apple fritters.
Or, take them home in bushels fresh, whole and
in their natural skins. In case you haven’t had
enough of this (far from) forbidden fruit, enter
the apple pie eating contest, and ingest to your
heart’s content. The festival also touts a variety
of craftsmen wares (those of which may or may
not be made of apples).
LAURLL LAKL VINLYARDS
Winos no longer need to travel cross-country
looking for an authentic vineyard experience.
Long Island’s Laurel Lake Vineyards uses
traditional, handcrafted methods in their
winemaking, including minimal intervention,
zero filtration and the incorporation of local
yeast and bacteria. The vineyard ofers tastings
of its award-winning wines and tours of their
blissful property every day of the week. It’s like
Napa, but not so far.
For the Outdoor Hero
PRIVA1L ADIRONDACK CAßINS
Adventure of the grid and hide away in one
of seven authentic Adirondack cabins. Each
camp enjoys its privacy in the High Peaks of the
six-million acre Adirondack Park. Undisturbed
9,000-year-old grounds allows for 20 miles of
hiking, mountain viewing and wilderness canoe-
ing. Leave your smartphone; take your canoe.
ROCK CLIMßING IN SHAWANGUNK RIDGL IN
1HL HLAR1 OF 1HL HUDSON VALLLY
For the adventurer in all of us, Mohonk Moun-
tain House ofers some of the best mountain
climbing in New York State. Conquer Sha-
wangunk Ridges’s major clifs, Millbrook, the
Near Trapps and Skytop, and enjoy the clear,
mountain air at 300 feet. “The Gunks”—as they
are afectionately known—are the single most
popular climbing ranges in North America,
touting both elite and more moderate routes.
Rest your hands and feet back at the lodge’s
spa, housed in a Victorian castle, and relax into
an arnica oil Swedish massage or a dip in the
outdoor heated mineral pool.
NLW LNGLAND FOLIAGL ßOA1 1OURS
For someone looking for more than a
weekend getaway, the Foliage Boat tours are
the upper crust’s classic luxury cruise. The
eight-day New England boat trip is a true
body-mind elixir. Traveling up the Hudson
River in a small, intimate ship during the
peak of autumn ofers breathtaking views of
the Taconic and Berkshire Hills to the east
and the Catskill Mountains to the west. Visit
18th-century cities, tour quaint farmhouse
architecture of the Hudson River Valley and
discover the history of Dutch and English set-
tlers. Experience first-hand the inspiration
for Washington Irving’s American classics
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van
Winkle with a visit to Sunnyside, a Registered
National Historic Landmark and Irving’s
country home. And in case five days of spec-
tacular fall foliage alienates Manhattanites,
end your travels with a magnificent nighttime
cruise through New York City.
FLY FISHING
Perfect your ten and two at the Lake Placid
Lodge and get knee deep in one of the cleanest
lakes in the country. Fresh, spring-fed waters
replenish themselves every few days, providing
some of the best fishing in New York State. Cast
your line into the Ausable River and serve up a
rainbow trout for dinner. Better yet, hole up in
the rustic lodge or one of its romantic, lake view
cabins—each one unique. o
Dia art gallery
Beacon New York
New England foliage
boat tours
Climbing the
Shawangunks
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NYO_MAG5_Fallescapes.indd 44 9/23/11 6:47:45 PM
MetLife Home Loans is now in
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* Jumbo loan program offered for mortgage financing is above conventional loan limits.
† A pre-qualification is not an approval of credit and does not signify that underwriting requirements have been met.
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Met Life.indd 1 9/22/11 4:02:01 PM
46 | OCTOBER
FASHION
NYO
CURATED BY OF A KI ND COM
GOODBYE
,HEAT,
hello cool
As the leaves in Central Park fall away, we toss
out our sunscreen, book a table at Café Luxembourg
and get down to business at Joe.
And here’s what we’re wearing:
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NYO_MAG5_OfAKind_MarketPages.indd 46 9/23/11 7:42:42 PM
NYO
FASHION
Suede Wrap Around
Bracelet + Bronze Spikes
BYGABRIELAARTIGAS
Metal jewelry isn’t good for lounging.
Suede is. And, because the Los
Angeles designer behind this
bracelet uses charms and loops
for closure here, it is a lot easier
to put on and take off than those
with miniscule (frustrating!) clasps.
$70, gabrielaartigas.com
Field of Diamonds Tunic
BYTOUJOURSTOIFAMILYAFFAIRS
FOROFAKIND
Designed by a mother-daughter
team, this shirt-slash-dress can
legitimately be worn year-round, but
we like it best with tights and boots
and the sort of chunky cardigan
that makes you feel com-
pelled to walk an extra lap
around the reservoir.
$189, ofakind.com
Survey Bag
BYHERSCHELSUPPLYCO
If you’re looking to get some work
done, this Army-green canvas bag
is ideal for scouting out the perfect
place to settle in with your laptop.
Plus, the retro design gives the
appearance that you could be doing
some actual field work.
$50, herschelsupply.com
Monster – 01
BYBLN
Best (and least creepy) way to make
friends with small children at the park?
Pull this ingenious T-shirt over your
head to expose an only-mildly-scary
mask. Yes, it might just be the most
innovative tee you’ve ever seen.
$100, bl33n.com
WHATTOWEARTO…
Central
Park
Jasper Sunglasses
BYWARBYPARKER
Now that the eyewear rising star is
making shades, there’s no excuse not
to own a pair—even if your vision is
perfect. Something about this style
is very Hitchcockian, which is a
look that’s especially tough to
achieve for under $100.
$95, warbyparker.com
Parker Scarf
BYSYMMETRYGOODS
FOROFAKIND
Made from vintage Swiss
herringbone and Guatemalan
ikat fabrics, this piece aids just
about every step of the picnicking
process. With the help of the oxblood
leather straps, you can use it as a
bag to tote your meal to the Sheep’s
Meadow, spread it out as a blanket for
eating, and toss it around your neck
if you get cold, since it’s getting to be
that time of year.
$225, ofakind.com >
OCTOBER | 47
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NYO_MAG5_OfAKind_MarketPages.indd 47 9/23/11 7:43:35 PM
48 | OCTOBER
NYO
FASHION
Headband of Thorns
BYGIGIBURRISFOROFAKIND
Blair Waldorf may be the most
renowned crosstown headband-
wearer of late, but this style—with its
black feathers and leather accents—
is too cool for her. Bonus: It does a
pretty stellar job of spiffing up
unwashed hair, buying you the extra
time required to grab a latte when
you’re running late.
$125, ofakind.com
Celia Bag
BYRACHELNASVIKFOROFAKIND
This is not the sort of bag that holds
every lip product you own—and thank
god. Instead, fake like you’re European
and fill it with just the essentials:
your keys, your phone and a few bills
(required—this place is cash-only).
$184, ofakind.com
Eaton Contrast Pocket Shirt
BYBARONWELLS
With button-downs, the goal should
always be just interesting enough, and
the duo at Baron Wells totally nails it
with their Japanese fabrics, rounded
collars and attention-grabbing pock-
ets—which happen to be designed to
hold an iPhone.
$168, baronwells.com
Tipra Handmade Earrings
BYAPEACETREATY
While most chandelier earrings feel
too dressy to wear during the day-
light hours, this style has a certain
rough-around-the-edges appeal that
seems suited to lingering over a Tom
Perrotta novel (or your Twitter feed)
and a scone.
$90, apeacetreaty.com
Double Cut Tee – 325
BYEIGHTEENTH
Take this as proof that the slouchy
tee can have an uptown air. This black
number has just enough structure up
top to look sophisticated (and to hide
bra straps). In fact, done right, it could
look pretty spectacular with a wool
pencil skirt and the kind of heels not
intended for subway riding.
$120, eighteenthnyc.bigcartel.com
Denim Smokin’ Slip On
BYOSBORN
Brooklyn-based Osborn makes some
of the zaniest shoes around, and,
while their crazy-patterned lace-ups
are probably their most popular, there
is something undeniably alluring
about a loafer shape that screams
well-heeled constructed in a fabric as
everyman as denim.
$143, osborndesign.com >
WHATTOWEARTO…
Joe
NYO_MAG5_OfAKind_MarketPages.indd 48 9/23/11 7:45:02 PM
WWWċCHAMBERMUS!CSOC!ETYċORGŏđŏĂāĂġĉĈĆġĆĈĉĉ
2011-2012 SEASON
WlNDS + STRlNGS + PlANO
Tuèsoay, Octobèr ¹8, 7:3CPM
LA BONNE CHANSON
Sunoay, Octobèr 23, 5:CCPM
Fall Fèstival:
Dèoications
DEDlCATED TO HAYDN
Frioay, Novèmbèr 4, 7:3CPM
DEDlCATED TO MENDELSSOHN
Sunoay, Novèmbèr 6, 5:CCPM
lN THE GERMAN TRADlTlON
Tuèsoay, Novèmbèr ¹5, 7:3CPM
BRUCHJJALBERTJ
MENDELSSOHN
Sunoay, Novèmbèr 2C, 5:CCPM
Paro¢uè Fèstival
BACH CANTATAS
Tuèsoay, Dècèmbèr 6, 7:3CPM
BAROOUE COLLECTlON
Frioay, Dècèmbèr 9, 7:3CPM
Sunoay, Dècèmbèr ¹¹, 5:CCPM
BRANDENBURG CONCERTOS
Sunoay, Dècèmbèr ¹8, 5:CCPM
Tuèsoay, Dècèmbèr 2C, 7:3CPM
BEETHOVENJBRUCHJBRAHMS
Sunoay, January 29, 5:CCPM
Tuèsoay, January 3¹, 7:3CPM
Vintèr Fèstival:
lmmortal lnvèstmènts
A PRlNCELY COLLECTlON:
HAYDNJBEETHOVEN
Frioay, Fèbruary ¹C, 7:3CPM
lNSPlRED BY JOACHlM
Sunoay, Fèbruary ¹2, 5:CCPM
THE LEGENDARY SALON
Frioay, Fèbruary 24, 7:3CPM
APPALACHlAN SPRlNG
Sunoay, Fèbruary 26, 5:CCPM
Tuèsoay, Fèbruary 28, 7:3CPM
OUARTET VARlATlONS
Tuèsoay, March ¹3, 7:3CPM
PlANOSJPlANlSTS
Sunoay, March ¹8, 5:CCPM
GREAT CLARlNET OUlNTETS
Frioay, March 3C, 7:3CPM
RUSSlAN DEDlCATlONS
Sunoay, /pril ¹, 5:CCPM
DEBUSSY & STRAVlNSKY
Sunoay, /pril ¹5, 5:CCPM
AN EVENlNG WlTH FLElSHER &
KALlSH
Frioay, /pril 2C, 7:3CPM
BEETHOVENJHARBlSONJ
BRAHMS
Tuèsoay, /pril 24, 7:3CPM
lNSPlRED BY THE KALlCHSTElN-
LAREDO- ROBlNSON TRlO
Sunoay, May 6, 5:CCPM
LA GRANDE FlNALE
Frioay, May ¹8, 7:3CPM
Sunoay, May 2C, 5:CCPM
All Concerts Take Place in
Alice Tully Hall
OPEN!NG N!GHT: F!REWORKS!
Monday, September 26, 7:30 PM, Alice Tully Hall
SA!NTġŏSAËNS Fantaisiè in / ma|or íor Violin ano Harp, Op. ¹24 (¹9C7)
FUNG Pizzicato íor String Ouartèt (2CC¹)
DUT!LLEUX Sonatinè íor Flutè ano Piano (¹943)
BOTTES!N! Gran ouo concèrtantè íor Violin, Pass, ano String Ouartèt (¹88C)
BRAHMS Hungarian Dancè íor Piano, Four Hanos (¹868)
MENDELSSOHN Octèt in E- nat ma|or íor Strings, Op. 2C (¹825)
/lèssioŏPaxČŏVuŏHanČŏpianoŏđŏErinŏKèèíèČŏChoġŏ LiangŏLinČŏviolinŏđŏPaulŏNèubauèrČŏviolaŏŏ
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When you’re as close as a whisper,
THE MUSIC
SPEAKS VOLUMES.
—IT’S AN INTIMATE CONCERT—
an èxchangè oí irrèprèssiblè ènèrgy.
ThèŏChambèrŏMusicŏSociètyŏoíŏLincolnŏ
Cèntèrŏinvitèsŏyouŏtoŏbèŏaŏpartŏoíŏitċ
CMSINS1770_NYObMag.indd 1 9/16/11 9:30:05 AM
Chamber muisc.indd 1 9/22/11 3:43:22 PM
XXXXXXX
50 | OCTOBER
NYO
Magma Shoreline Dress
BYSHABD
Dyed by hand in Brooklyn by the very
talented Shabd Simon-Alexander, this
dress is big on versatility. The panels
attached at the shoulders can be left
hanging down the front, draped like a
scarf or tied for a cinched waist. Plus,
the silk’s rich, irregular pattern does
wonders to hide any red-wine spills.
$545, shabdismyname.com
Small Roses Discharge
Print Pocket Square
BYTHEHILLSIDE
Nothing’s more dapper
than a pocket square,
or more ballsy than
one printed with flowers.
This take goes best with a
loosened tie, mussed hair and a
heaping plate of steak frites.
$39, hickorees.com
Studio Denim Tie
BYSOVEREIGNBECK
The magic of this tie is that you have
no idea what it’s made of until you’re
several feet away: Across the room, it
could be fine wool or silk, but really it’s
black denim. Thankfully, that’s the only
rebellious thing about it. The width—
three inches—achieves the happy me-
dium between too-thin indie frontman
and too-hefty sportscaster varieties.
$75, sovereignbeck.com
WHATTOWEARTO…
Cafe
Luxembourg
Crystal Ship Necklace
BYLIZZIEFORTUNATOJEWELS
This necklace is tough to pin down—
and that’s a good thing. It combines
both an Old Hollywood and a tribal
vibe in a way that will make all the
jazzed-up octogenarians very jealous.
And, because of the mixed metals, you
can layer it with, well, most anything.
$270, ofakind.com
Closetoe Wedge in Tan
BYMARAISUSA
Buttery camel suede, a just-high-
enough heel, a girly ankle strap—
pretty sure you could have purchased
shoes like these in this part of town
decades ago. And the pricetag, well—
it wouldn’t have been so far off.
$115, maraisusa.com
Midnight Rider Clutch
BYWENDYNICHOL
Sure, this is a black clutch, but it’s
far from staid. The braided trim really
sells its handmade nature, and the
tassel delivers just the right amount of
fun—especially when flung across the
restaurant’s zinc bar.
$575, wendynicholnyc.com o
EDITOR’SNOTEOBSERVEREDITORIAL
DIRECTORELIZABETHSPIERS
ISANADVISERTOOFAKINDCOM
NYO_MAG5_OfAKind_MarketPages.indd 50 9/23/11 7:45:42 PM
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9 BOND STREET , 680 & 897 MADI SON AVENUE
399 BLEECKER STREET , 45 MAIN STREET IN SAG HARBOR
863 WASHINGTON STREET , 1.877.273.3369
ILoveNY5.25x6.875d.indd 1 9/6/11 2:16 PM
Bond no 9.indd 1 9/22/11 3:40:28 PM
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Alexander
Wang’s
frat-tastic
afterparty
Those in fashion lucky enough to snag a ticket to
Alexander Wang’s legendary after party may have
been shocked to see something that was much more
Animal House than The September Issue. But once
inside Mr. Wang’s decked-out frat house, not even
Anna Wintour could be kept away. The models and
designers grabbed Budweisers without hesitation
and danced in the pavilion with the designer himself,
and when a keg appeared, a kegstand was attempted.
Among the rowdy crowd were Christina Ricci, Jared
Followill of Kings of Leon, and Tyler, the Creator, who
brought out Odd Future for a surprise performance.
Watch out for the flying inflatable sex dolls!
CHRISTINARICCI
TOMIGARYNAND
KARLIEKLOSS
BEEANDCHARLIE
SHAFFER
JAREDLETO
JAREDFOLLOWILL
BRIANGREENBERG
MODELAND
ALEXANDERWANG
ANDMODEL
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NYO_MAG5_PXX_PartyPics.indd 52 9/23/11 6:20:05 PM
MAY PB
V Magazine Ball
gets painted
black, white
and red all over
Despite the waves of balloons that hovered in the
air and the omnipresent gold streams hanging down
from them, it was still easy to spot Lindsay Lohan as
we walked into the Boom Boom Room. It was the V
Magazine Black & White Ball, an attempt to recreate
Truman Capote’s famous bash at the Plaza that came
to define the end of early-’60s excess. And thanks
to Ms. Lohan, the V party will have its own notoriety.
The tabloids had a field day over her antics, which
included tossing a cocktail at a photographer and
causing a scene when a spill down the stairs made
for a very bloody sofa. Rachel Zoe, supermodels Kar-
lie Kloss and Lindsey Wixson, and Dasha Zhukova all
looked on, but once the lights went on and the cut-up
girl went out on a stretcher, the party ended—though
it may never be forgotten.
OLIVIERTHEYSKENS
OLYMPIASCORRYAND
DASHAZHUKOVA
ANDREJPEJICAND
RYANMCGINLEY
JAREDFOLLOWILL
KARLIEKLOSS
LINDSAYLOHAN
LINDSEYWIXSON
VLADIMIR
RESTOIN
ROISTFIELD
SKYEFERREIRA
PARTIES
NYO
NYO_MAG5_PXX_PartyPics.indd 53 9/23/11 6:21:17 PM
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GIANCARLOGIOMMETTI
ANDCARINEROITFELD
ANDVALENTINO
CARINEROITFELDAND
STEFANOTONCHI
BYRDIEBELL
ELETTRAWIEDEMANN
KAROLINAKURKOVA
valentino avoids
being (too)
funny as he belts
standards at
Barneys Bash
Any party at a strip club is hard to pass up, but when ex-
French Vogue editor Carine Roitfeld hooks up the kara-
oke gear at one, you don’t say no. Westway, a topless
bar turned nudity-free hotspot earlier this year, played
host to one of the year’s most memorable moments
when legendary designer – and one of the last fashion
icons left – Valentino got up on the catwalk to sing “My
Way.” Needless to say, he brought the house down,
and it’s a good thing Byrdie Bell, Elettra Wiedmann and
W editor Stefano Tonchi were all there to see it.
54 | OCTOBER
NYO_MAG5_PXX_PartyPics.indd 54 9/23/11 6:22:02 PM
“Friends With
Benefits” Premiere
takes the bedroom to the
boom boom room
In one of the summer’s best romantic comedies, Mila
Kunis and Justin Timberlake decide that, yes, best
friends can be sex friends – but only after a few drinks.
Thus, the Cinema Society threw a party for the cast
after the New York premiere at the Ziegfeld, and at
the after party everyone made sure the booze flowed
freely the whole time. Ms. Kunis and Mr. Timberlake held
court, of course, and they were joined by Emma Stone,
Shawn White and Olivia Palermo, among others. Did
any friends take it to the next level afterward? We don’t
kiss and tell.
MILAKUNIS COURTNEYLOVE
EMMASTONE
SHAUNWHITE
JUSTINTIMBERLAKE PATRICIACLARKSON
OLIVIAPALERMO
PARTIES
NYO
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ASHLEYGREENE
EMMAROBERTS
MINKAKELLY
LAURENREMINGTONPLATT
FREIDAPINTO
BRADGORESKI
RACHELROY
TERESAPALMER
Ferragamo
goes maritime
at the James B.
Duke mansion
With Fashion Week still two months away, Ferrag-
amo treated invited guests to a glam and gorgeous
runway show set up in one of the most famous
– and enormous – Millionaire’s Row abodes.
A crowd outside clamored for stars such
as Emma Roberts, Eva Mendes, Ashley
Green, Minka Kelly and Frida Pinto.
Naturally there were drinks at the Car-
lyle afterward, though Ms. Roberts had
to leave early to watch movies with her
friend in the hotel room. Good for her,
though we kept on partying at the Jane. To
each his – or her – own.
56 | OCTOBER
NYO_MAG5_PXX_PartyPics.indd 56 9/23/11 6:24:05 PM
APRIL | 57
Art and Ponies
through rosé-colored
glasses in Greenwich
The Brant Foundation hosted a Sunday afternoon
of art, polo and Champagne lunch at its impossibly
green estate. And as gorgeous as it all was, one can
only imagine it looked better through the sunglasses
of Dree Hemingway – rounded and silver-sheened,
but angular, too, like something that could be found
on a très sportif spaceship, something Walt Disney
designed for Tomorrowland mixed with something
appropriate for a motorcycle race. O.K., we were sort
of preoccupied with Ms. Hemingway, but there were
others present as well, such as Olivier Zahm, artist
Johan Lindeberg, and Don Perignon’s number-one
chef de cave, Richard Geoffroy. We drank a lot of
bubbly.
NAMEHERE
ALEXISDAHAN
ZANIGUGELMANN
JENNIFERCREEL
ANDCARLOSMOTA
MARIELAFRANCE
DREEHEMINGWAY JOHANLINDEBERG
PARTIES
NYO
NYO_MAG5_PXX_PartyPics.indd 57 9/23/11 6:24:48 PM
58 | OCTOBER
NYO
FASHION
t
he phrase Contra mundum is Latin for
“against the world,” usually attributed
to Athanasius, who was exiled for
defending Christian orthodoxy.
But Daphne Guiness used it to name the gold
and diamond encrusted arm glove that she
designed along with Shaune Leane. Guiness
slowly laid down on a stone efgy in a crystal
body suit at the White Cube Gallery, remain-
ing motionless under a veil. The staged
funeral wake was in honor of her beloved and
late friend, designer Alexander McQueen.
“I always want to be protected against the
world,” Ms. Guinness explained over an
interview referencing her upcoming show
centering on her at the Fashion Institute of
Technology (F.I.T.).
It seems counterintuitive to associate that
concept with a person who seems to have
everything: lineage (heiress to the Irish
brewing fortune and granddaughter of one of
the legendary Mitford sisters), prestige
(growing up in stately homes in Ireland,
England and Spain), adventures (marrying
Greek shipping scion Spyros Niarchos at 19
and living in New York City in the ’80s with
her sister, who was in Andy Warhol’s inner
circle) thus making her the muse of designers
Karl Lagerfeld, Valentino and, of course,
Alexander McQueen. She is also the designer
of a clothing line with Dover Street Market,
creator a fragrance in 2009 with Comme des
Garçons and producer or actress in several
guinessgracious
I always
want to be
protected
against the
world
McQueen muse
transforms
fashion into art
By Chiu-Ti Jansen
NYO_MAG5_Guinness2.indd 58 9/23/11 6:38:41 PM
OCTOBER | 59
guinessgracious
films. Although Contra Mundum and the
associated performance were merely one of
Ms. Guinness’s many art projects, they
capture all of the main themes in her life: love
of armor and veil; multilayered literary
allusions and framing fashion as works of art
rather than as simple stylish objects. “[The
glove] is more a sculpture than a piece of
jewelry. There were so many things involving
so many people during the process of
creation. And I incorporated a piece of my
own jewelry in it. … So it’s really me in that.”
“Mad Genius,” “Style Muse,” “Fashion
Icon” and “Lady Gaga Trailblazer” are merely
some of the many sobriquets accorded to Ms.
Guinness. She was not dressing according to
utilitarian consideration for weather (87
degrees) or occasion (a museum director’s
ofce), but taking on fashion as a form of
self-fashioning: a piece of lace tied over her
hair that was 7/8ths bleached platinum blond
and 1/8th pitch black, a fitted black jacket over
white lace romperlike garment with a creamy
white belt, her barely-there short pants
revealing over-the-knee-high black semi-
opaque stockings and her signature vertigi-
nous shoes without heels. The entire black/
white ensemble was very Lagerfeldesque,
accentuated by layers of studded punk leather
bracelets and oversize punk rings. Her left
hand wore a fingerless black satin glove,
which was not matched on her right hand, à la
Karl Lagerfeld, who would randomly select
from his trays of rings to populate his fingers
right before he headed out of the door. Her
black eyeliners were unevenly applied.
Ms. Guinness admitted that she was a bit
apprehensive when she first accepted the
I am very
influenced by
literature . . .
I love being in
that process
of a very
thought-out,
elaborate plot
invitation of Valerie Steele, director of the
F.I.T. Museum, to do a show based on her
style, her fashion collection and her own
designs. But she decided to “own the project”
because it might be of interest to other people
and make [fashion] accessible. “Yes, I am very
lucky, but I don’t need to be ashamed of it.”
Ms. Steele said that when she first met Ms.
Guinness at a Couture Council Annual
Luncheon, she immediately decided that she
wanted to do a show with her, about her
couture collection and her personal style,
because of the extraordinary way that she
used fashion to turn herself into a work of art.
Ms. Steele noted that while there were many
shows about designers and collections, there
were very few about individual women of
style; however, [the latter] is the way fashion
comes alive when it is worn by extraordinary
persons. To prepare for the show, Ms. Steele
had scouted Ms. Guinness’s couture-filled
apartment in London and her many closets in
New York, as well as going through many
rounds of interviews. “She was a true
trooper,” Ms. Steele said.
The show will include approximately 100
pieces, organized not by designer, but by style:
Dandyism, chic/simple, extravagant, armor,
sparkling things and exotic. All in all, the
looks are distinctively her own. Ms. Steele
believed that Ms. Guinness was not only an
inspiration for many designers; at a time of
conformity she also held the flag high for
individuality and creativity.
Ms. Steele called the show a way to explore
the mystery and poetics of fashion. For Ms.
Guinness, fashion, photography, drawing,
literature and singing all dovetail one
another. Talking about the inspirations for
her take on fashion: “I am very influenced by
literature . . . . I love being in that process of a
very thought-out, elaborate plot.”
Asked how she put together her look on that
day, “I just did … It’s been always my look.”
But does she dress diferently when she is in
London versus when she is in New York? “I’ve
never changed. … I don’t see the world change
. . . . You should dress the way you want. … It
seems peculiar that today I seem to stick out
more than, say, in the ’80s, when there were
many [fashion] movements.”
Ms. Guinness clearly would rather talk
about the philosophy of fashion and style
than about her “look.” Looking back at her
collection, she said that she would have very
few regrets. Although she is often perceived
as the vanguard of fashion, she said that she
hardly looked at fashion magazines, nor
would she follow trends. “I don’t really
change that much. … I am rather consis-
tent. I would carry the same handbag
the shoes

Black studded boots, black leaf
heel and red suede heels all by
Daphne Guiness at the Fashion
Institute of Technology museum
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NYO_MAG5_Guinness2.indd 59 9/23/11 6:39:52 PM
60 | OCTOBER
NYO
FASHION
until it falls apart.”
Ms. Steele described Ms. Guinness’s
collection as methodically organized and
documented. Ms. Guinness said that she
would wear some pieces she collected, while
leaving others for pure aesthetic appreciation
for fear of ruining them. Even though she has
bought a lot of shoes, she would wear only
some of them repeatedly for comfort after she
has already broken the in.
“I do like cross-dressing—[dressing] like
19th-century men.” Ms. Guinness used the
word “jealous” to describe her envy of the
men at that time wearing frock jackets, tails
and top hats. We asked her if she liked Oscar
Wilde, the quintessential dandy. She gushed,
“Oh, I love Oscar Wilde. … He said that nature
follows art, which is true . … Unless an artist
points out it’s a frock, nobody notices it … ”
Ms. Guinness rattled of a long litany of
Wilde’s classics: “The Importance of Being
Earnest, The Nightingale and the Rose, The
Picture of Dorian Gray … he is a cipher of the
art. He has fantastic one-liners. And he was
Irish. He was so unbelievably clever … ”
At that point Ms. Guinness turned to her
obsession with Hamlet, which is the work she
would bring with her to a desert island,
although she could not explain why. But she
thought Hamlet was an extraordinary
character and a universal man who was
questioning. She said it took many encoun-
ters to fully appreciate the depth of the play.
So what are misperceptions about her? She
stuttered a bit: “I am a normal person, just
like other persons. [I am in] a quest about
what it means to be here, what it means to be a
human being. . . . Another misconception: I
am [actually] not very social.” Earlier in the
conversation, Ms. Guinness emphatically said
that she was “not very good at parties.”
Ms. Guinness explained that she married
young and fashion for her is not a matter of
I don’t really
change that
much . . .
I am rather
consistent.
I would carry
the same
handbag until
it falls apart
Angel of The
Night: Daphne
Guiness takes on
a lighter role for a
photograph as part
of the exhibit at the
museum for the
Fashion Institute
for Technology
(FIT)

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NYO_MAG5_Guinness2.indd 60 9/23/11 6:42:43 PM
NYO
TROPHY
JULY | 61
re-creating oneself—it’s a matter of what one
can actually do. Indeed, Ms. Steele believes
that Ms. Guinness’s style is an emblem of
every person’s desire to dress aspirationally,
but she carries it to a higher, more extreme
degree—so you can see the magical compo-
nent to it.
“There is something extremely magical
about armor,” Ms. Guinness had said. Ms.
Guinness’s fascination with armor is visible
in the fashion she collected and created.
After all, armor is not only a garment that
strengthens one’s defense, but one that also
reveals one’s vulnerability. “Yes,” Ms. Steele
said. “It is true, in fact. Armor evokes a
metaphor for fashion because fashion is a
way to present nobila figura, our best and
more beautiful selves. Beneath the ‘mask,’
there is something vulnerable, less
perfect.”
McQueen is known for his many
armor-inspired creations. Ms. Guinness
said that she had been a very close friend
of the designer’s since 1999, but did not
think of herself as instrumental in
nourishing McQueen’s career. She
pointed to Isabella Blow, a renowned
fashion editor who famously launched
McQueen’s career by buying up his
entire graduation collection. “We are
all cut from the same cloth,” Ms.
Guinness would say to describe the
spiritual kinship she had felt with
McQueen and Blow. Ms. Guinness
remembered the days that she would
visit McQueen’s studio and work with
him, but she believed that McQueen
did not need her to be
the genius he was. Ms.
Guinness learned about
McQueen’s suicide when
she got a call from Mr.
Leane, just as she got a
call about Blow’s suicide
four years before that.
She then explained that
she did not want to put
herself in the position of
a fashion designer who
had to produce 14
collections at year. The pressure was
unbearable. After Blow’s suicide, Ms.
Guinness acquired Blow’s entire fashion
collection before it went on auction. She said
that she gravitated toward creative people
and they gravitated toward her.
Bernard-Henry Levy once said that
Guinness was not a person but a concept. But
how would she describe herself? Guinness
paused, “Oh I don’t know . . . . I am just a
human being . . . .” o
CLOCWISE FROM LEFT:
Alexander McQueen,
black eagle; jacket; Gareth
Pugh silver coat; Alexander
McQueen kimono; Gareth
Pugh, black ruffl e dress;
Givenchy black fur dress; all
on display at the museum
of the Fashion Institute for
Technology (FIT)
C
O
U
R
T
E
S
Y

T
H
E

M
U
S
E
U
M

A
T

F
I
T
the clothes
NYO_MAG5_Guinness2.indd 61 9/23/11 6:44:25 PM
62 | OCTOBER
NYO
MONEY
By Foster Kamer
“The symbol for gold is an eye in a circle—from
the Egyptian for the sun god, Ra,” Ben Davies
explained to the Observer. Mr. Davies is a
director at Hinde Capital, a British hedge fund
that manages the Hinde Gold Fund, a high-
volume fund that deals exclusively in gold. He
is nothing short of religious when he writes
about it. “It means all seeing. The steady rise in
the price of gold is that of knowledge. Gold,” he
explains, “is all knowing.”
If Mr. Davies sounds crazy, then there’s a
significant portion of those making earth-
shaking deals in global financial markets who
are categorically insane.
Their questionable mental health, if that’s
what it is, has made them categorically,
astoundingly rich.
Meet the goldbugs – or those who are abso-
lutely crazy for the shiny stuf.
Lately, it’s been hard to find what any sen-
sible person could see as a “stable” investment.
The world’s financial markets have demon-
strated the dictionary-definition of volatility:
stock exchanges drop down a few hundred
points in a single day, with pictures of face-
grabbing, anguished traders gracing the front
pages of newspapers around the country.
A week later, those few hundred points and
then some are recovered. Everyone’s a target,
and we all have skin in the game: invest-
ment portfolios, mutual funds, retirement
funds, pensions, anything that’s any kind of
investment is subject to the barely-controlled
THE NEW
GOLD RUSH
getting to know
AT A COCKTAIL PARTY THIS SUMMER FOR SEX AND THE CITY AUTHOR (AND NYO MAGAZINE
COVER STAR) CANDACE BUSHNELL’S NEW BOOK, THE PARTY’S HOST, BRIGHT LIGHTS, BIG
CITY AUTHOR AND MANHATTAN GADABOUT JAY MCINERNEY—SWAYING ABOUT IN A WHITE
TUXEDO JACKET—JOKED TO THIS REPORTER THAT HE HAD STARTED HIS OWN HEDGE
FUND. “I THINK I’M JUST GOING TO BE A GOLDBUG!” HE SAID. MCINERNEY UNWITTINGLY
ECHOED A PHENOMENON SPREADING AROUND THE GLOBE FOR THE PAST FEW MONTHS: A
NEW, MODERN FASCINATION WITH AND ADDICTION TO THAT YELLOW, SHINY STUFF.
MI DAS WELL
NYO_MAG5_Gold.indd 62 9/23/11 6:49:48 PM
OCTOBER | 63
NYO
GOLDEN BOYS:
WHO’RE THE TRUE
BELIEVERS (AND SKEPTICS)
OF THE SHINY STUFF?
THE APOSTLES
David Einhorn, Greenlight Capital: The
42-year-old poker-playing billionaire origi-
nally avoided gold, because his grandfa-
ther waited 30 years for gold prices to go
up. Since 2009, he’s taken Grandpa Ben’s advice
and made it the largest position in his portfolio.
John Paulson, Paulson & Co: Mr.
Paulson reportedly netted $5B in 2010
thanks to securities representing a share
of gold larger than those held by Austra-
lia’s government or the whole of Bulgaria. Forty-
two percent of his Paulson Gold Fund is made up
of his employees’ money.
Steve Cohen, SAC Capital Advisors:
Before putting down $628M on gold op-
tions in August, Mr. Cohen already had
invested in four gold mining companies
and $9M in gold stocks in late 2010. It’s now the
biggest position in his $14B firm.
THE APOSTATES
Warren Buffet, Berkshire Hathaway:
The 81-year-old face of American wealth
and value-investing thinks gold investing
is silly: “It gets dug out of the ground in
Africa, or someplace. Then we … pay people to
stand around guarding it. Anyone watching from
Mars would be scratching their head.”
Nouriel Roubini, Roubini Global
Economics: The “Dr. Doom” who
famously predicted 2008’s financial
crisis called gold a “hyperbolic bubble”
and openly mocked goldbugs on Twitter when
gold took a dip in early September.
Ben Bernanke, U.S. Federal Reserve:
The Fed chair faced off against Rep. Ron
Paul in a July policy report to Congress,
chastising the libertarian for promoting
gold against the dollar in an attack on Mr. Bernan-
ke: “Is gold money? No. It’s a precious metal.”
MONEY
chaos of what are often vaguely referred to as
“market forces.”
Even the almighty dollar—the world’s
reserve currency, or what the rest of the world
measures its money’s value against—remains
a great source of consternation to the money-
spending universe. After bad American real
estate investments nearly capsized the global
economy, and after QE1 and QE2—two rounds
of “quantitative easing,” or pumping more
American money into circulation to fight
deflation and encourage lending, and with it,
economic stimulus—nobody’s entirely sure
what’s going to happen with the greenback.
And that’s where gold—and the goldbugs,
those preaching the religion of the yellow
stuf—comes in. Goldbugs think it’s the future,
not just of investing, but of economics, period.
Over the past 10 years, gold has sextupled in
value, from a little over $300 an ounce to where
it stands as of this writing, $1,786 an ounce.
In August, J.P. Morgan saw gold going up to
$2,500 by the end of 2011. And just one year
ago, it was under $1,300 an ounce. Some people
would call that a bubble. Others, like goldbugs,
call it a balancing out of global economics.
Beyond that? The future.
Hedge fund manager David Einhorn—who
recently achieved notoriety for attempting to
buy a minority share of the New York Mets—
made billions on gold investments. Paulson
& Co. founder John Paulson—the 36th-
wealthiest person on the planet, according to
Forbes—has moved massive volumes of gold, all
to the benefit of his portfolio. The University of
Texas endowment fund has $1 billion worth of
gold in its endowment fund, hidden somewhere
in a massive vault under Manhattan. China’s
addictlike demand for gold just surpassed
India’s and is seen by some as a bid to undercut
the value of the American dollar. SAC Capital,
run by the famed Steve Cohen, disclosed in
August a $628 million investment in gold op-
tions, making it the single most-valued equity
position in the entire firm’s holdings.
So, why gold? When Moses came down
from the mountain after getting the Ten
Commandments, all those people he’d freed
from Egypt were worshipping at the feet of a
giant, golden calf. Among other things, they
were pissed at Moses for making them wonder
around the desert.
It’s more or less like that.
Investors getting into gold see it as a bet
against the dollar, as what’s commonly called
an “inflation hedge.” An inflation hedge is
a financial bet used to fight the declining
value of a currency and an economy on the
whole; in this case, that’s the dollar and the
American economy. Rather than keep one’s
money in the bank, or in companies that need
the American dollar and economy to retain
their worth, gold investors choose to put
their money into something that’s doesn’t
measure its worth in dollars. And here’s
where it gets especially crazy.
Hardcore goldbugs think that gold as simply
an “inflation hedge” is downright pedestrian.
One hedge fund manager we spoke with
chastised us for even thinking like that: “It’s
not a financial instrument, it’s an element, it
is money. One that has been desired by every
civilization since recorded time.”
And so it goes: people like him think that the
reserve currency—the dollar—will eventually
be tied to what’s called the “gold standard,”
which measures all currencies goods, and ser-
vices against tangible, physical gold. Way back
when, goods and services were actually paid
for in gold. This came to an end in 1933, when
President Franklin Roosevelt outlawed civilian
ownership of monetary gold. In 1971, President
Nixon ended the trading of gold for a fixed price
(at that time, $35 an ounce). But 1971 was a time
of American prosperity. Lately? Not so much. >
NYO_MAG5_Gold.indd 63 9/23/11 6:53:08 PM
64 | OCTOBER
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MONEY
But why not silver, or platinum, or rare earth,
or anything else for that matter? What else can
> you use it for other than ostentatious decor?
When most people think of gold, they think
of jewelry. That’s not wrong. But gold can also
be used as a conductor in electronics—like cell
phones—to carry voltage without corroding, or
in computers, to carry data efciently. There’s
also gold’s medical use: dentists use it for fill-
ings, oncologists use it as a radiation source to
treat certain kinds of cancer, and ophthalmolo-
gists use it in tiny amounts to treat lagophthal-
mos, or the inability to close one’s eyes. It’s also,
among the shopping list of things on the planet
you can find on the Periodic Table of Elements,
and the only reasonable candidate to replace a
piece of paper (like, say, the dollar) that might
come to mean absolutely nothing overnight.
Among all the elements on the planet, gold
has one of the highest melting points and is one
of the most resistant to corrosion.
Most important, though, with gold, the fund
manager explained, “there’s no central banker
dictating supply. Every other form of money
is being debased by central bankers.” Like the
Federal Reserve, for example. He continued:
“Peak gold production occurred in 2001 despite
a massive price move from then to now. Bar-
ring some kind of sea-dredging technology that
actually works to extract gold, the only way to
increase the absolute value of above-ground
gold is by price, as supply is constrained.” In
other words, no mere mortals can directly
influence—or screw up—the price of gold like
they can the dollar. There’s a finite amount of it,
so a value assigned to it won’t go completely flat
overnight. Unlike the dollar, you can’t simply
create more of it. Unlike silver, it’s not every-
where, and unlike platinum, it’s not so rare as
to be nearly impossible to acquire.
Does that mean we’ll be using gold coins
to pay the dinner check anytime soon? Gold
skeptics from a government standpoint
would laugh at that. They don’t think there’s
enough of it to go around. “I agree,” the hedge
fund manager explained, “but would argue
that there can be more than enough gold on
a dollar basis if you increase the price, more
than enough gold above ground if it trades
at $50,000 per ounce.” For that to happen,
the value of an ounce of gold would have to
increase to about 24 times what it is now.
If this sounds totally unreasonable, others
think it’s a very real possibility, and not just in-
vestors. Just last month, Donald Trump made
headlines when he started accepting pure gold
bullion as a down payment on a commercial
real estate lease. He saw it as a response to the
Obama administration’s financial policies.
But for every David Einhorn, Steve Cohen,
Ben Davies and Donald Trump, there are
naysayers who see the goldbugs as crazed hype
men profiting of the equivalent of financial
snake-oil and the hype that comes with it.
As passionate as the goldbugs are about their
investment, they are about writing it—and
goldbugs—of. Call it Goldenfreude.
World-renowned value investor Warren
Bufet thinks gold investment is absurd. “Gold
really doesn’t have utility,” he said at his annual
shareholders meeting in May, continuing: “I’d
bet on a good producing business to outper-
form something that doesn’t do anything.”
Nouriel “Dr. Doom” Roubini of Roubini
Global Economics thinks gold is going to look
like the tech bubble of the early aughts, telling
clients in 2009: “Since gold has no intrinsic
value, there are significant risks of a down-
ward correction.” When gold took a $60 dip
in value early last month, Mr. Roubini wasted
no time laughing at goldbugs in public, using
seven tweets to fulfill his need to be publicly
vindicated.
So, what is it? Is gold the future of global
economics? Or is it the product of an incredibly
sophisticated publicity campaign that, like
all that goes up, must eventually come down?
Anybody who professes to be sure of this is
almost inevitably wrong: the entire concept of
a financial market is based on people who think
they’re correct and making a bet on it getting
something wrong.
That said, it’s pretty hard to ignore the bil-
lions those have gained on gold, as well as the
operative aforementioned term: almost inevi-
tably wrong. Because on every transaction with
two sides, there’s always a winner. Whether or
not who wins is making any sense as they do it
isn’t always a given.
Famed investor Dennis Gartman of the
Gartman Report put it more simply: “What-
ever it is, for whatever reason, it is embedded in
the DNA of human beings to admire and hold
gold. And sometimes it becomes a frenzy and
sometimes it doesn’t. And if you try to ascribe
rationality to gold,” he laughed, “you’re wrong.” o
‘ ... there’s no
central banker
dictating supply.
Every other
form of money
is being debased
by central
bankers.’
NYO_MAG5_Gold.indd 64 9/23/11 6:53:27 PM
OCTOBER | 65
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catalogue and further information
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Untitled-27 65 9/23/11 11:08:58 AM
XXXXXXX
NYO
66 | OCTOBER
Diana Taylor on what’s wrong with Congress,
why her former boss George Pataki won’t be president
and the perils and pleasures of being Hizzoner’s girlfriend.
PHOTOGRAPHY BY NI KOL A TAMI NDZI C
BY ELI ZABETH SPI ERS


the
first
lady of
New York City
NYO_MAG5_DianaTayler_CoverStory.indd 66 9/23/11 8:04:18 PM
FEATURE
NYO
OCTOBER | 67
NYO_MAG5_DianaTayler_CoverStory.indd 67 9/23/11 8:04:38 PM
68 | OCTOBER
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i
FEATURE
t was a sunny September afternoon at
the mayor’s home on East 79th Street
and Diana Taylor was talking to the
two boisterous Labrador retrievers that
she shares with her boyfriend, Michael
Bloomberg. “Yes!” she said, in a
soothing voice that “Bonnie” and “Clyde”
seemed to appreciate, “I’m talking about you!”
She had been describing her early morning
hour-and-a-half walks with the dogs (which
she bought for the mayor four years ago) and
extolling the virtues of Central Park in that
sort of breathless-but-genuine tone that all
New Yorkers adopt when speaking apprecia-
tively about Things That Also Impress the
Tourists. “Central Park is the most amazing
gift,” she said. “It’s incredible. You find new
spots, new people, new friends for the dogs. I
love going to parks.”
But she wasn’t as bubbly as the sentiment
would suggest. She erupted in a rare peal of
laughter—“Oh my god, that was hilarious!”—
only when asked about the mayor’s Spanish
speaking skills and the parody Twitter account
@elBloombito, which exhorted New Yorkers
during Hurricane Irene to “no looto el bodaga!
Esta es Nuevo Yorko!” (She explained his tech-
nical proficiency despite abysmal pronuncia-
tion: he’s an engineer; they are very technical.)
As we sat at small table next to the kitchen,
she spoke softly but directly, carefully
considering everything she was saying. A tall,
animated figure who often appears to tower
over her high-profile partner at public events,
her demeanor was warm but professional.
And it makes sense. Until 2000, when she
was seated next to the mayor at a Citizens
Budget Commission event, Ms. Taylor’s career
was the most recognizable facet of her public
identity. If her tone seems professional—com-
forting in one sense, and perhaps a bit over-
polished in another—it’s because that’s the
mode in which she’s accustomed to operating.
Before she met the mayor, Ms. Taylor had
occupied several high-profile job positions in
both the public and the private sector, and was
divorced, with no children.
She still holds several high-profile positions
and is still divorced with no children, but it’s
probably fair to say that her day-to-day life now
has several added dimensions that weren’t
there before. Her social life is determined in
many ways by the schedule of her partner, and
nights out (downtown for events, Harlem for
dinner at the Red Rooster) are now routinely
documented by photographers.
And of course, this means Ms. Taylor is being
scrutinized in ways she previously wouldn’t
have expected. Her fondness for tailored,
elegant clothing has been noted in various
fashion pages and her favorite designers (Oscar
de la Renta, Carolina Herrera, Ralphs Rucci
and Lauren, natch) have been catalogued for
the public. But the look isn’t entirely confort-
able for the first girlfriend. Our photographer
assumed that her consistent, well-put together
look was the work of a personal stylist and Ms.
Taylor seemed taken aback by the idea.
“My what?” she said, laughing. Stylist?
“You’re talking to her!”
But, she acknowledged, she did have her
own personal style. “I like simple, not too
frilly, tailored.” And then, with a tiny sparkle
of calculation: “And my favorite designers
are New York City-based designers. So that
makes it easy because they’re mostly tailored
and elegant clothes.” We pointed out that the
Greenwich native’s taste in clothing seemed
very, well, Greenwich-ian. “Yeah, I know,” she
said. “[But] let me put it to you this way: I basi-
cally wore overalls all the way through college. I
mean, you just try and present yourself as being
neat, fairly well put together. You try to make
sure your shoes are from the same pair.”
She then informed us that she planned to
wear a business suit for her photo shoot. “I’m
not wearing an evening gown; it’s the wrong
image.” The scads of evening gown photos are
not how she views herself, or at the very least,
not how she wishes to present herself. “There
are enough pictures like that, so I’ll just wear a
simple business suit.”
d
iana Taylor was born in 1955 in
the upscale Connecticut suburb of
Greenwich, Conn., the daughter of a
schoolteacher and a biochemist for
Union Carbide chemical company.
She went to college at Dartmouth and was
in the second class of women to go all the way
through all four years. “There were two hun-
dred of us, or maybe three hundred of us,” she
said, “and three thousand of them at the time.”
Not entirely a bad ratio in certain respects, she
admitted. “It was so much fun. I had a blast;
I loved it. And my best friends to this day are
people I met my first week at Dartmouth.” (Ms.
Taylor is now a member of her alma mater’s
board of trustees.)
Much of what happened after Dartmouth
was a matter of serendipity. “I have basically
fallen into everything I’ve ever done,” she said.
“I’ve never really planned anything. I’ve basi-
cally seen opportunities as they come up and
they’ve turned out to be really good ones.
But there was one thing she planned: “I
knew was that I wanted to move to NewYork
City [after college]” she said. Like many
20-somethings who decamp to Manhattan
after undergrad, Mr. Taylor’s roommate from
Dartmouth was living in a one-bedroom apart-
ment with one other roommate and they were
looking for a third. But Ms. Taylor needed to
find a job. She was interested in health care and
began sending resumes to hospitals but “un-
fortunately none of them wanted me as their
hospital administrator at that point.” She got a
job in government in the department of social
services but realized quickly that it wasn’t
where she wanted to end up, so she applied to
business school in a joint degree program that
also included a public health degree.
But she was still working on top of that. “I
was an evening and weekend administrator at
St. Vincent’s hospital in Brooklyn, which was
an experience,” she said. “It was fascinating.”
She was also working at Smith Barney in their
public finance department and received an
ofer for a full-time job when she graduated.
She moved on to Lehmann Brothers with a
couple of her colleagues from Smith Barney,
and then on to Donaldson Lufin & Jenrette.
“And then some guy I didn’t even know at
the time called me up [four years later],”
she explained, “and said, ‘I’m starting this
new firm do you want to come join?’ And I’d
basically hit the ceiling, if you will, at DLJ and
it sounded like a good idea, so I did that. Stuf
happens at really good times!”
In 1996, she made a transition to public work
as assistant secretary to then-Governor George
Pataki. After brief stints at Keyspan Energy
and the Long Island Power Authority (where
she served as CFO) she returned to Governor
Pataki’s ofce as deputy secretary and became
superintendent of banks in 2003.
In 2007, she returned to the private sector
as a managing director at Wolfensohn Fund
Management, but still hasn’t fully extricated
herself from public life.
And how could she? She’s partner to the
most powerful man in New York City politics.
Which has its particular downsides. “Oh, it’s hi-
larious,” she laughed. “I have the scars to prove
how many times I’ve been knocked over the
head by TV cameras running to get a picture of
the mayor.” But, she notes, it’s also not without
its pleasures. “Actually I love observing life,”
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I have the scars
to prove how
many times I’ve
been knocked over
the head by TV
cameras running
to get a picture
of the mayor
NYO_MAG5_DianaTayler_CoverStory.indd 69 9/23/11 8:06:21 PM
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FEATURE
she explains. “And it’s a great place to observe
from. You see a lot in this kind of position and
it’s incredibly rewarding.”
That said, the reality is that when Ms. Taylor
walks into a room with the mayor, she’s not
recognized as Diana Taylor, managing director
at Wolfensohn, or Diana Taylor, former deputy
secretary to the governor. She’s Diana Taylor,
girlfriend of Michael Bloomberg. For a woman
with her own impressive resume and laundry
list of accomplishments, it must be a little,
well, ego-bruising.
But Ms. Taylor insisted it was just part of the
role she had chosen to play. “One of the things
that you just need to remember is that it’s not
about you,” she said. “He’s the elected ofcial
and you’re there for support. And if people
want you to do something, you do it and if they
don’t, you don’t. He’s the one who was elected
and I wasn’t.”
But, she acknowledged, “That’s one reason
why it’s really good that I’m busy. He’s doing
his thing and I have my life, too, and things that
are important to me.”
And many things are important to Ms. Taylor
these days. She’s on the board of ACCION
International, a microfinancing organization
that provides loans to small businesses that are
underserviced by banks in emerging econo-
mies, and recently visited Brazil and Honduras
on behalf of the organization. In June she was
named to the board of the YMCA of Greater
New York. She’s a director of Sotheby’s, Citi-
group and Brookfield Properties.
She’s also involved in a variety of charities
that benefit women and girls. And she’s a natu-
ral advocate, having been one of the few women
in a variety of traditionally male-dominated
environments.
“I think one of the problem that most
women have is that they’re not really good
at advocating for themselves,” she said.
“They’re great at advocating for other people.
They’re hard workers, they’re really smart
but they’re not very good about marching into
their boss’s ofces and saying, ‘I need a raise!
So-and-so got a raise and I work better and
harder than they do and am more productive
than they are.’ Women are just not particu-
larly good at that.” It was a broad generaliza-
tion, she said, but “women tend to have the
attitude that, ‘if I put my head down, I work
really hard, I’ll get recognized.’ And life is not
fair. That’s a hard thing.”
She attributed much of the gender lopsided-
ness to natural attrition rates as women
dropped out of the work force to have children.
“A lot of times you find it’s a decision they make
to have a family. And they’re bringing up kids
and working and something’s gotta give, and
the work’s not rewarding enough and they’re
not getting enough back from their work situa-
tion, so they say, you know what? I can’t.”
Her own decisions were made years ago—
what she described as organizing a series
of priorities. And for better or worse, being
childless probably helped her career. “I’m sure
it did,” she said. “I never had to run home and
help anybody with their homework. That was
a whole very time-consuming aspect I didn’t
have to worry about. “
But, she adds, “you have to do what you’re
comfortable with and what makes you happy
and that’s not the same for everybody.
a
nd in looking at Ms. Taylor’s choices,
the ones paths she decided not to take
are as significant as the ones she did.
Last year, Senate Republicans approached Ms.
Taylor about the possibility of running against
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FEATURE
incumbent Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, and for
a while she considered it. “The Senate Repub-
licans basically asked me to run and I thought
about it talked to a lot of people,” she said.
“But then when I really thought about it, what
attracted me to the idea was the race because I
knew I could win that race. It was the thought
of actually having to go and do that job, that was
really not all that appealing.”
When asked what she thought of Sena-
tor Gillibrand’s job performance now, she
paused. “I think she works very hard,” she
said, diplomatically. “I don’t agree with her
on anything—” She hesitated. “Some things
that … ” Then choosing the if-you-can’t-say-
something-nice option, she reiterated: “I think
she just works really hard.”
But Ms. Taylor insisted she wasn’t tempted
to run against her now, either. She said she had
no political ambitions. “I never did!”
She also brought up a complicating factor
in any Senate—the convoluted and often
antagonistic relationship between the city
and the state. “Because what’s good for the
state of New York and what’s good for the city
of New York are not always aligned, and I’d be
representing the state.
“Plus, I’d have to go live in Washington?”
she said, rolling her eyes. “And you know, what
would I do with the dogs? Would I take them on
the train? Would I have to drive? These are the
kinds of considerations!”
Then she turned serious. “You’re one of a
body of 100. I would be a very junior member of
the minority party and I didn’t feel like I’d have
a lot of say in what went on and the decisions
that were made. And I don’t have a particularly
high opinion of Congress at this point.”
We pointed out that no one had a particu-
larly high opinion of Congress at this point. (A
recent Gallup poll indicated that Congress’s
approval rate had dropped to a measly 13%.)
“Then I hold the majority opinion on
that, l and I think that we’re in a situation
now where it’s sort of a downward spiral,”
she said. “You know, the opinion of the body
itself is so bad, how do you get qualified intel-
ligent good people to run? I don’t know the
answer to that question.”
Everyone has a theory about why things
are bad when they are, and as a corollary,
how they got that way. Ms. Taylor thinks the
system itself can’t work in its current incar-
nation. And not just some piece of the system;
the entirety of democracy.
“I put this in the context of [the notion
that] democracy is the worst system except for
all the others. I don’t know what you replace it
with and how you fix this. But it does sort of go
to the lowest common denominator.”
And the primary system is one of the
culprits, according to Ms. Taylor. Take the
districts in the House of Representatives,
for example. “Most of them are completely
gerrymandered to be safe districts for what-
ever party’s in control. And when you have
something like that with the primary system,
you have people [winning] the primary in the
majority party of that district.”
“There are not very many people who go
out and vote in primaries,” she added. “So
to get elected in a particular district, you
have to appeal to the five people who vote in
the primary. So you get elected, and you get
into ofce and you have zero incentive to do
anything that does not fit with [the agenda
of ] those five people who elected you who are
the wacko right-wing or the wacko-left wing
depending on what kind of district you’re
coming from—so you have no ability really
to go to the center because you will not get
re-elected if you go the center.”
Re-election incentives have always been a
big part of New York City political discourse.
Especially with regard Ms. Taylor’s, whose
three-term mayorship has been the source of
much controversy over the years.
But she’s changed her mind on that one. “I
used to be completely for term limits,” she said.
“I thought it was a great thing. But basically
what happens with term limits is that the staf
takes on huge power because they’re the ones
who have the institutional power. I’m not sure
that term limits is a particularly good thing.”
The key, she said, was changing how district-
ing worked. “I think that nonpartisan primaries
would be great. I think that would make a lot
more sense. Because then you have the whole
slate and you don’t have people who’ve run on
the total right and total left having to have one
set of ideas during the primary and then move
to the center for the re-election.”
Along those lines, the current field of Re-
publican presidential candidates didn’t seem
too promising. A ripple of irritation passed her
expression. “I don’t really like any of them very
much. A lot of them scare me … a lot.”
“I’ve never met [Michele Bachmann]. I have
read a lot about her and I’m not particularly
impressed by what I’ve read.”
As for the other Republican beauty queen-
cum-politico: “I have met [Sarah Palin] once,
just very briefly. If I were her, the best thing she
could do is keep the buzz going and then not
run. And she’s doing just fine doing that.”
She was even less sanguine about Presi-
dent Obama. “I think that he’s a very intel-
ligent man,” she said carefully. “And he has a
lot to learn.”
Her voice took on a sharper edge. “For some-
body’s who’s going to come in and be the great
unifier—you know, that hopey-changey stuf—it
hasn’t worked very well. The country is more
divided now than it’s ever been. And he doesn’t
appreciate other people and what they do. “
Having given this some thought, she had
a three-pronged list of his biggest mistakes.
“There are probably more,” she said, but here
were three. He wasn’t supporting business,
Ms. Taylor said. “He should be a champion
for this country and he’s not. Because that’s
where the jobs are going to come from.
They’re not going to come from government;
they’re going to come from the private sec-
tor.” The second: Obamacare. He basically
told Congress, ‘You know what? I want a
health care bill, do something.’
“The last time I checked, the president was
supposed to sit down and figure out what he
wanted and then get Congress to go along
When I really
thought about it
what attracted
me to the idea
[of running
for Senator
against Kirsten
Gillibrand], it
was the race
because I knew
I could win that
race. It was
the thought of
actually having
to go and do that
job, that was
really not all
that appealing
NYO_MAG5_DianaTayler_CoverStory.indd 71 9/23/11 8:07:20 PM
72 | OCTOBER
NYO
FEATURE
with it. And we got a mess. And exactly the
same thing with financial regulation and
regulatory reform.” This was number three.
“And we have a mess.”
And Ms. Taylor would know a bit about
the banks, having worked in both the public
and private arenas of banking for decades.
Economic uncertainty was making it difcult
to get anything done, she maintained. “I mean,
Dodd Frank has like 400 things that need to be
done—you know, changes, and the regulators
have to go and promulgate rules and regula-
tions around those things—and they can’t do it.
There’s so much uncertainty. And whoever has
created a situation now where they’re basically
saying to the banks, well, we want you to lend
money, but you can’t lend money to anybody
who actually needs it!”
Here she became more animated. This
was far more interesting to her than Ralph
Lauren dresses. “And this whole business
of the F.H.F.A. suing all the banks around
Fannie and Freddie; it’s crazy!” Inasmuch as
Mr. Taylor would ever be inclined to pound
her fist on a table to make a point, she seemed
on the verge of it. “I’ve never—I mean, it just
makes no sense at all to me!”
And then there was a glimmer of what
Diana Taylor, freshman senator might be
like. “I think it’s a problem throughout the
system,” she said, gearing up her delivery. “I
think it’s a problem with Congress. I think
it’s a problem with the ratings agencies. I
think it’s a problem with the banks. I think
it’s a problem with the population at large.
Everybody’s going like this,” she said while
throwing her hands up in the air. “And at the
end of the day, everybody’s responsible in
some way or another.”
As for what Ms. Taylor is responsible for,
she still wants to tackle public health. She’s on
the board of the Mailman School at Columbia
and said her studies there had informed her
thinking on things like microfinance “and
what people actually need to survive and
make their lives better.”
It’s still easy to imagine her getting in-
volved in some tangential way, though—may-
be even with her former boss, ex-governor
George Pataki, who’s reportedly mulling a
presidential campaign.
“Yeah, I don’t think that he’s going to run,”
she said. “He’s an absolutely great guy, and
if he decides to do it, I wish him the best.
But I think there’s a pretty large field right
now.” And there was the primary problem
again. “You’re never going to get through a
republican primary if you’re pro-gun control,
pro-choice. He is a lot more liberal than run
of the mill.”
Ms. Taylor self-identifies as a Republican,
but is socially liberal herself, though fiscally
conservative—a libertarian lite, perhaps. “I’m
socially very liberal. I don’t understand why
anybody cares who marries who. I think that
guns should not be in the hands of criminals,
and I’m rabidly pro-choice. It’s nobody else’s
business, and I’m fiscally quite conservative.”
She says she may have inherited this from
her family. “My mother has a bumper sticker
on the back of her car that says ‘Pro-family,
pro-child, pro-choice.’”
So we were curious: where might she clash
with the mayor, whose politics occasionally
difered. She shook her head, determinedly:
“Not going there!” o
“I think that
he’s a very
intelligent man,”
Ms. Taylor
said carefully,
of President
Obama’s job
performance.
“And he has
a lot to learn”
NYO_MAG5_DianaTayler_CoverStory.indd 72 9/23/11 8:08:04 PM
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Untitled-16 1 9/22/11 4:36:00 PM
FEATURE
74 | OCTOBER
NYO
Mr. Blumenthal, a native New Yorker, re-
ceivesd his bachelors from Tufts, his interest
shifting from one humanitarian cause to the
next before he finally settled on conflict reso-
lution. “I thought that if we could get people
to stop killing each other, we could focus on
issues like health and education.”
But a short stint at a think tank proved to
be as disillusioning as it was unfulfilling—“I
wanted to get my hands dirty”—so when
Mr. Blumenthal met an eye-doctor who had
just started a nonprofit that was train-
ing low-income women in the developing
world to start their own businesses selling
prescription glasses, he signed right up. The
second salaried employee of VisionSpring,
he quickly rose through the ranks and soon
became the director. Within five years as
the company’s head, he had significantly
increased the organization’s reach, expand-
ing it from a pilot-program in El Salvador to
10 more programs in as many countries.
An impact assessment conducted by the
University of Michigan found that a pair of
glasses given to a person in need increases
that person’s productivity by 35 percent
and his income by 20 percent. “That’s the
equivalent of an extra day’s work per week,
so it literally is one of the most efective
poverty alleviation tools in the world,” said
Mr. Blumenthal.
But as far as charitable causes go, afordable
eyewear is low on most people’s radar. “I think
it’s because it’s not obvious, right? In the U.S.
and Europe, glasses are everywhere. It’s a
technology that’s almost 800 years old, and
nobody thinks that about 15 percent of the
world’s population doesn’t have access to it.”
Looking for a fresh, new challenge, Mr.
Blumenthal left VisionSpring and enrolled at
Wharton Business School, where he would
meet Jefrey Raider, Andrew Hunt and David
Gilboa. The latter, an aspiring doctor-turned-
management consultant, had recently lost his
glasses while traveling in Thailand and, not
being able to justify paying $700 to replace
them, went the first semester spec-less. The
four self-proclaimed “drinking buddies”
bonded over a shared frustration with the
high price of a decent pair of glasses. Mr.
Blumenthal, during his days at VisionSpring,
had been to the factories in Asia and knew
firsthand how little it cost to manufacture
glasses—he’d even designed a line of reading
glasses for people living on as little as $4 a
day. But why, then, if the manufacturing costs
were so small, were glasses priced so high on
retailer’s shelves?
They found that the eyewear industry
is a characteristic oligopoly. A handful of
behemoth, top-down-integrated companies
like Luxottica control the entire process from
the manufacturing facilities in Europe and
OUT OF
SIGHT

NEIL BLUMENTHAL AND DAVID GILBOA THE FOUNDERS OF DESIGNER EYEWEAR BRAND
WARBY PARKER REJECT THE NOTION THAT THEY HAVE TO CHOOSE BETWEEN DOING
GOOD AND MAKING MONEY. IT STARTED EARLY.
Philanthropy and
fashion combine
at Warby Parker to make
a great pair (of glasses)
By Chris Clemans
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Asia to the licensing for brands including
Ray-ban and Chanel, to the retail chains such
as LensCrafters and Sunglass Hut. “We found
that they were marking up frames—just the
frames, not the lenses—between 10 and 25
times from point of manufacture to point of
sale,” said Mr. Blumenthal.
By designing glasses themselves and selling
them directly to customers online they could
ofer high-quality glasses—made from the
same materials and on the same production
lines as those sold retail for $500—for a frac-
tion of the price, the four sat down together at
their favorite watering hole, a bar near Whar-
ton called Roosevelt’s, to discuss the idea and
the prospect of writing a business plan. “It’s
a pretty involved process, and we wanted to
make sure we were doing it well and not just
kind of half-assing it,” recalled Mr. Gilboa.
“We all committed to dedicate a huge portion
of our time to write a full business plan and
really see if this thing would work. That was at
the end of our first semester.”
While the brand’s social mission—for every
pair of glasses sold, a pair would be donated
to person in need—was clear from the start,
other matters proved murkier. One question
loomed particularly large: would people really
buy prescription eyewear online? While suc-
cessful e-commerce sites like Zappos.com had
silenced skeptics who had said that certain
products couldn’t be sold online, they worried
that glasses, more a part of a person’s identity
than, say, shoes, and subtler in style and fit,
might be a diferent story.
The prescribed solution would be an excep-
tional customer experience. Customers would
be able to try on glasses virtually through
software on the website. Then they would
choose five frames to receive in the mail,
trying them on at their leisure, before sending
back the pairs that they didn’t want free of
charge. And, of course, every pair would be
reasonably priced, at $95.
What began as a submission for Wharton’s
Business Plan Competition soon became an
obsession. “Everything we learned about this
industry and this opportunity got us more and
more excited,” said Mr. Gilboa. “So, early in
2009, we all sat down again and had another
meeting at Roosevelt’s and asked ourselves if
we were all committed to investing our life sav-
ings and actually starting this company.”
The answer was an emphatic yes.
Sensitive as the partners were to the
strain that business can put on relation-
ships, they carefully considered the best
ways to safeguard their friendship. “We’ve
all heard horror stories about founders who
were best friends and who became mortal
enemies,” said Mr. Blumenthal, “And we knew
just saying it wasn’t enough. We had to be
really thoughtful about how we could do it
diferently.”
With this end in mind, each of the four stu-
dents put in the same amount of money and
became equal partners. They then created a
schedule by which additional stock would vest
each month to whoever continued to work on
the project until graduation. “We all assumed
all four of us would continue to work on it
until graduation, but just in case life’s circum-
stances changed and someone wanted to leave
the business they could do so without feeling
guilty or the rest of us feeling resentful,” said
Mr. Blumenthal. The friends also conducted
monthly 360-degree review sessions, during
which they would take turns openly critiquing
each other’s recent performance—“Hey, what
are you doing well? What could be improved?
Hey, when you shoot me a 10-page email at 2 in
BECKETT
Striped
Evergreen
A happy recipient of
Warby Parker frames.
OCTOBER | 75
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NYO_MAG5_Warby.indd 75 9/23/11 8:11:07 PM
76 | OCTOBER
NYO
FEATURE
the morning, I want to punch you in the face.”
Warby Parker—the name is a mash-up of
two fictional characters, Warby Pepper and
Zach Parker, from Jack Kerouac’s unpublished
journals—launched early in 2010, receiving at-
tention in features in both Vogue and GQ. Two
days later, Daily Candy picked up the site before
the partners had even had a chance to reach out
to it. Within three weeks, Warby Parker had
reached its first-year’s sales target, and a week
later it had sold out of its top 15 styles.
“It was madness,” recalled Mr. Gilboa. “I
had my phone set up to receive an email every
time an order was placed, and I was siting in
class a few hours later when I got an email that
we had our first order. I got super excited and
emailed Jef and Andy. Then about 10 minutes
later we got another order. And then 10
minutes later, another order. And then orders
just started flowing in. At first it was super
exciting, but then we all just kind of freaked
out and realized, ‘Oh, crap!’ We didn’t have
enough inventory, and we didn’t have any ‘sold
out’ functionality on the website.”
A year and half later, Warby Parker has more
or less arrived, evident as The Observer walked
into Partner and Spade’s storefront gallery in
Noho. “Fuck it, I’m a hillbilly. I can play with
five strings!” bellowed Justin Townes Earle as
he picked away at the first notes of his last song
of the night. It was Fashion’s Night Out, and
publicists, editors, and the ever-enthusiastic
F.N.O. venue-hoppers nudged their way to back
of the sweltering room, where the music could
be better heard and Earle—an emerging star in
the Americana genre—better viewed. Behind
the lone singer-songwriter stood a floor-to-
ceiling photograph of Buddy Holly that read,
“Warby Parker Celebrates Buddy Holly’s
Birthday.” The great rock ’n’ roll pioneer—
whose iconic specs inspired WP’s “Thatcher”
design—would have been turning 75, and the
company, together with the producers of Rave
on Buddy Holly, a recently released tribute
album featuring Mr. Earle as well as other
well-known artists like Paul McCartney, Kid
Rock, and Modest Mouse, wanted to throw the
bespectacled rocker a posthumous shindig.
After Mr. Earle finished up his set, and
before the young, similarly bespectacled
crowd burst into a raucous rendition of
“Happy Birthday to You,” The Observer found
Mr. Blumenthal and Mr. Gilboa near Buddy
Holly’s cake. We arranged to meet a few days
later at their new location.
Walking into Warby Parker, The Observer
felt for a moment as though we were in the
wrong place. Expecting an eyewear show-
room, we found ourselves instead in the
middle of an of ce. On the vast hard-wood
floor were six or seven tables, at each of which
sat about 10 people—perched in front of lap-
tops and monitors—none of whom appeared
to be over 30. The place felt something like an
Apple-store-meets-college-library.
At one end of the room, separated by only a
gray sofa and couple of chairs, is the “show-
room” where the entire collection of Warby
Parker glasses—retro in their chunky style—is
displayed on a minimalistic arrangement
of shelving and tables. Nearby are two Macs
upon which a customer can access the website
and place an order.
An open of ce, the co-founders sit side-
“ Everything we
learned about
this industry and
this opportunity
got us more and
more excited”
GILBOA
THATCHER
Whiskey
Tortoise
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NYO_MAG5_Warby.indd 76 9/23/11 8:11:27 PM
ROGER ERI CKSON
LXCLPT|ONAL FALL
O F F L P | N G S
Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. is owned and operated by NRT LLC. Sotheby’s International Realty
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EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE I sothebyshomes.com/nyc
38 EAST 61ST STREET NEW YORK, NY 10065 T 212.606.7660 F 212.606.7661
ROGER ERICKSON SENIOR MANAGING DIRECTOR I T 212.606.7612 I www.roger-erickson.com
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Untitled-17 1 9/22/11 4:37:07 PM
78 | OCTOBER
NYO
FEATURE
by-side with their employees. “There were a
bunch of walls in here before and we knocked
them all down. We wanted to create a really
open culture,” said Mr. Gilboa.
“And that just gets to the culture of the
organization,” added Mr. Blumenthal.
“People are here to learn. They’re excited to
be at a fast growing start-up, and they want
visibility into all the diferent departments
and all the things that we’re doing.”
“What does this brand mean?” Mr.
Blumenthal repeated The Observer’s inquiry.
“Well, at a high level it’s about transforming
an industry that hasn’t innovated in 50 years.
It’s about creating a new paradigm for how
for-profit companies should behave, and it’s
about not taking yourself too seriously—
because life’s too short—but taking work
seriously and being smart and creative.”
In the world where new start-ups are
introduced every day, it’s common for suc-
cessful business models to be copied. Indeed,
Warby Parker has seen its fair share of these
clones, the most prominent of which is Eyefly.
com. Owned by web-only apparel retailer
Bluefly, the site is a carbon copy of Warby-
Parker.com from its design and layout to the
style of the glasses, even going so far as to
emulate the virtual try-on feature. One dif-
ference, however, is that Eyefly.com’s glasses
are a slightly more expensive at $99 a pair.
One would think that, with the resources of a
large parent company and no commitment to
donating a pair of glasses for every pair sold,
Eyefly.com could ofer its products for less.
“Yeah, but they don’t,” said Mr. Blumenthal.
“That’s what’s amazing to us. First of all,
what type of person wants to dedicate all
their energy to copying somebody else? And
then, rather than take our model and im-
prove upon it, they’ve made it worse. They’ve
cut out the whole social mission, which is
the core of who we are, and they’ve decided
to charge more for an inferior product. It’s
mind-boggling.”
Fortunately for Warby Parker, consum-
ers seem to be able to identify authenticity.
“We’ve had an emotional reaction,” said Mr.
Gilboa. “Anytime you feel like someone is
stealing from you or copying you, it’s incred-
ibly frustrating. But we really haven’t seen
any business impact at all.”
From its humble beginning in the apart-
ment of four friends, Warby Parker has
grown to 50 employees, and, through its “buy
a pair, give a pair” program, the company has
distributed over 75,000 pair of glasses to peo-
ple in need. “We know that we’re not going to
reach the billion people who need glasses,”
admitted Mr. Gilboa. “But if we can just
create as much awareness as possible, and get
other folks on board to help alongside—that’s
definitely one of our biggest goals.” o
EDITOR’SNOTEOBSERVEROWNERJARED
KUSHNERISANINVESTORINWARBYPARKER
NEIL
BLUMENTHAL
DAVE
GILBOA
FILLMORE
Sandalwood Matte
MABEL
Greystone
EVERETT
Gimlet Tortoise
TENLEY
Burgundy Fade
SINCLAIR
Midnight Blue
SOMEOF
WARBY’S
CURRENT
COLLECTION
$
9
5
each
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NYO_MAG5_Warby.indd 78 9/23/11 8:12:34 PM
KEVIN B. BROWN
Senior Vice President
Associate Broker
DOLLY HERTZ
Sales Associate
NIKKI FIELD
Senior Vice President
Associate Broker
GILLIAN FRIEDMAN
Sales Associate
JEANNE BUCKNAM
Associate Broker
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Sales Associate
HELEN MARCOS
Associate Broker
ZOE MILLEN
Sales Associate
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Untitled-17 1 9/22/11 4:37:34 PM
80 | OCTOBER
NYO
TRAVERSED
t would be impossible to traverse the
Upper West Side and not notice its marks and scars.
Any place displays a bit of its history (and hides a
bit, too). We’ve organized a historic walking tour of
an area celebrated by West Side Story and cherished
for eateries like Zabar’s Market. Don’t be shy;
West-siders are known for perhaps being the most
welcoming of New Yorkers, so pull up a chair at
Tom’s and make some friends.
The David H. Koch Theater
20 LINCOLN CLN1LR
A1 ó41H S1RLL1
Inside Lincoln Center is a small but
poingnant tribute to ballet legend
George Balanchine.
“Rhapsody in Blue”
50¡ WLS1 ¡¡01H S1RLL1
A1 AMS1LRDAM AVLNUL
The classic New York melody was
written here by beloved composer
George Gershwin.
Ghostbusters
55 CLN1RAL PARK WLS1
A1 óó1H S1RLL1
It may no longer be a mystery,
but this building can still give
anyone the spooks.
The Seinfeld Diner
2880 ßROADWAY A1 ¡¡21H S1RLL1
Tom’s Restaurant boasts a menu of
home-cooked meals and service as
warm as its pies.
Zabar’s Market
2245 ßROADWAY A1 801H S1RLL1
There’s no place like Zabar’s, no New
Yorker can deny it.
Strawberry Fields
CLN1RAL PARK WLS1
A1 72ND S1RLL1
This place dedicated to John Lennon
and his death is equal parts cool and
peacefulness.
The Beacon Theater
2¡24 ßROADWAY A1 741H S1RLL1
This comedy center of New York is a
historical Upper West Side fixture.
Firemen’s Memorial
RIVLRSIDL DRIVL AND ¡001H
S1RLL1
Visiting this memorial, dedicated
to the F.D.N.Y., is an emotional
experience.
St. Agnes Library
444 AMS1LRDAM AVLNUL
A1 CLN1RAL PARK WLS1
A historic branch of the N.Y.P.L., this
architectural landmark used to be a
church.
Straus Memorial
ßROADWAY AND ¡0ó1H S1RLL1
Ida and Isodor Straus died on the
Titanic and the statue to the beloved
New York couple is here.
St. John the Divine
Cathedral
¡047 AMS1LRDAM AVLNUL
A1 ¡¡21H S1RLL1
Soaring archways and Gothic details
make this structure a historic beauty.
Congregation Shearith
Israel
8 WLS1 701H S1RLL1
A1 CLN1RAL PARK WLS1
Housing the oldest American Jewish
congregation, this is truly an Upper
West Side treasure. o
i
HISTORY
in Hand
George Balanchine, Jerry Seinfeld,
Ida Straus–many legends have left
a mark on Manhattan’s left cheek.
It takes only a sunny afternoon and
our map to make their history yours.
By Emilia Ferrara
Illustration by Kristine Lombardi
NYO_MAG5_HistoryTour.indd 80 9/23/11 6:16:50 PM
Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Sotheby’s International Realty
®
is a registered trademark. Street in Saintes-Maries, used with permission.
Local Experts Worl dwide
MANHATTAN
PROPERTIES
MANHATTAN BROKERAGES I sothebyshomes.com/nyc
EAST SIDE 38 EAST 61ST STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10065 T 212.606.7660 F 212.606.7661
DOWNTOWN 379 WEST BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10012 T 212.431.2440 F 212.431.2441
THE PARK LAUREL/ 15 W 63RD ST: Amazing unob-
structed Central Park views from this spectacular 3
bedroom home. $9,000,000. WEB: NYO0017702.
Mika Sakamoto, 212.606.7676, Tom Cauthorn, 917.696.1558
ESSEX HOUSE, 160 CENTRAL PARK SOUTH: Mint
2 bedroom, 2 bath prewar condo on high floor with lovely
Central Park views. $3,495,000. WEB: NYO0016262.
Eva J. Mohr, 212.606.7736
1 WEST 67TH STREET DUPLEX: Dramatic 5 room
home in the famed Hotel des Artistes with soaring 19’
ceilings, 14’ windows, sunny city views. $2,350,000.
WEB: NYO0017738. Cheryl Daly, 212.606.7758
GORGEOUS 2 BEDROOM AT TRUMP PLACE:
Stunning new 4 room condo with sophisticated amenities.
$1,925,000. WEB: NYO0017212. Mika Sakamoto,
212.606.7676, Cleo Vauban, 212.606.7675
MANSION WITH PARK VIEWS: Majestic Clarence
True designed 26’ wide mansion in move-in condition.
Directly across from Park with views. $14,750,000.
WEB: NYO0017528. Roger Erickson, 212.606.7612
GREAT INVESTMENT PROPERTY: 21’ wide, 6 story
mixed use building near Columbus Circle. $8,000,000.
WEB: NYO0017416. Mon Ling Landegger, 212.606.7665,
Christine Mouterde-Berk, 212.606.7642
HAMPSHIRE HOUSE GLAMOUR: Glamorous, sun-
flooded 3 bedroom, 3½ bath prewar co-op in triple mint
condition. $3,590,000. WEB: NYO0016917. Juliette Janssens,
212.606.7670, Allison Koffman, 212.606.7688
150 CENTRAL PARK SOUTH: Spectacular 1,800± sq ft,
37th floor penthouse apartment offering breathtaking
Central Park views. $7,950,000. WEB: NYO0017515.
Robin Rothman, 212.606.7751
25 COLUMBUS CIRCLE: Located on a PH floor offer-
ing unparalled Central Park and city skyline views. 4 bed-
rooms, 5
1
⁄2 baths. $60,000,000. WEB: NYO0017793 Brenda
Powers, 212.606.7653, Elizabeth Sample, 212.606.7685
THE BERESFORD: One of the world most celebrated
addresses. Elegant spacious 9 room, 4 bedroom, prewar
co-op with Central Park views. Co-excl. $14,700,000.
WEB: NYO0017720. Olivia Hoge, 212.606.7738
126 W 95TH ST: Exceptionally renovated turn of the
century 4-5 bedroom townhouse. Approx. 3,200± sq ft
interior, 1,100± sq ft exterior. Meticulously maintained.
$4,495,000. WEB: NYO0017691. A. Schuster, 212.606.7797
CENTRAL PARK VIEWS: Magnificent 5 bedrooms, 4½
baths condop with panoramic views renovated by Joanna
Poitier of Beverly Hills. Triple mint condition. $24,000,000.
WEB: NYO0017654. Eva J. Mohr, 212.606.7736
Untitled-17 1 9/22/11 4:38:09 PM
82 | OCTOBER
NYO
2109 Broadway
BETWEENWRD&WTH
Prewar
The Ansonia, oh the Ansonia!
Our classic beauty. Famous
residents have included Babe
Ruth and Igor Stravinsky, and
it was added to the National
Register of Historic Places in
1980. The exterior is done in
Beaux-Arts style with a Parisian
style mansard roof, as well as
a huge domed skylight and the
widest interior corridors in
the city. But this building can’t
seem to hide its Midwestern
grassroots. A quirky fact: The
Ansonia houses a cattle elevator
that allowed dairy cows to be
stabled on the roof in the years
when original owner William
Earle Dodge Stokes kept farm
animals on up there.
527 West 110th
BETWEENAMSTERDAM
&BROADWAY
Prewar
The Britannia arguably chan-
nels the Gothic—think festoons
of gargoyles and similar orna-
ments such as peaked roofs and
high wings. A lovely open central
courtyard at the entrance of
the building tempers this, an
especially nice amenity for
January thaws. Known for its
heavenly management, Eugene
Herrera is a superintendent from
on high. The building is also in
close proximity to Columbia
University, Barnard College, the
Teachers Institute, the Jewish
Theological Seminary and St.
John the Divine Cathedral—thus
leaving little worry about walk-
ing 20 miles in the snow for an
education, any kind of education.
STAY
CONDO-
La-Crem
The Upper West
Side may be scenic
along Central Park
West and enchanting
along Riverside
Drive, but navigating
the rental market
can be treacherous.
These are the 10 best
condominiums for
amenities, location,
interiors, bathrooms—
you get the point.
By Hannah Ghorshi
2109 Broadway
NYO_MAG5_Condos2.indd 82 9/23/11 7:59:07 PM
©2O!!. ^n lnueµenuently owneu anu oµerateu memler of tbe Þruuentlal Þeal Lstate ^mllates, ¦nc. ls a servlce marl of Þruuentlal ¦nsurance Comµany of ^merlca. Lgual Houslng Oµµortunlty. ^ll materlal µresenteu bereln ls lntenueu for lnformatlon
µurµoses only. Wblle, tbls lnformatlon ls lelleveu to le correct, lt ls reµresenteu sulject to errors, omlsslons, cbanges or wltburawal wltbout notlce. ^ll µroµerty outllnes anu sguare footage ln µroµerty llstlngs are aµµroxlmate.
LONG ISLAND MANHA11AN ßROOKLYN QULLNS 1HL HAMÞ1ONS 1HL NOR1H IORK RIVLRDALL/ßRONX WLS1CHLS1LR/ÞU1NAM
S1LÞS1OCLN1RALÞARK
West 70s near 0PW ǧ $óº5,000 ǧ E¦eq~:l & sj~cious,
qul :e:ov~leo 1 Leo:oo: wil¦ ¦iq¦ cei¦i:qs, lojo¦
l¦e¦i:e ¦ilc¦e:, :~:L¦e L~l¦ ~:o q:e~l slo:~qe
T¦e e¦ev~lo: low:¦ouse is :elicu¦ous¦y :~i:l~i:eo
\eL= 1´oOo55 Keri 0hambers ó7º.8ó1.2578
Vincent 5antoro 212.31º.58ó2
GLORIOUSCLN1RALÞARKVILWS
210 0entral Park 5outh ǧ $13,000 per month
M~q:i¦ice:l ~j~:l:e:l ¦uqe ¦ivi:q :oo: ~:o ¦o::~¦
oi:i:q :oo:, 2 Leo:oo:, 2 :~:L¦e L~l¦s ~:o jowoe:
:oo:, 28 ¦l le::~ce ¦~ci:q Ce:l:~¦ P~:¦ De~uli¦u¦¦y
oeco:~leo E¦eq~:l Lui¦oi:q, q~:~qe M~io se:vice
\eL= 1/O11¯1 5haron Aspis 212.óº2.ó13º
NLW5ßLDROOMIURNISHLD
Lincoln 0enter Area ǧ $8,º00 per month ǧ ´ Leo:oo:,
25 L~l¦s :e:l~¦ ¦u::is¦eo, lojo¦l¦e¦i:e ~jj¦i~:ces,
wi:e coo¦e: \~s¦e:/o:ye:, 2/¦ou: ~lle:o~:l, ¦ive i:
suje:, ¦il:ess ce:le:, Li¦e :oo:, oulooo: j~lio
\eL= 1´8''O' Beth Friedman 212.535.1350
5cott 5chlachter 212.8º1.72ó7

GORGLOUSÞRLWARCONDO
West º8th 5treet ǧ $1,125,000 ǧ 2 Leo:oo: j:ew~:
co:oo wil¦ lojo¦l¦e ¦i:e e~li: ¦ilc¦e: ~:o \/D
0o:qeous :e:ov~lio: co:j¦e:e:li:q c¦~ssic o:iqi:~¦
~:c¦ileclu:~¦ oel~i¦s ¦oe~¦ ¦oc~lio: \eL= 1´'1558
Lee 5ender 212.712.óó0ó
MIN1ÞRLWARCONDO
21º West 81st 5treet ǧ $3,óº5,000 ǧ 0o:qeous q:~:o
sc~¦e seve: :oo: ¦o:e wil¦ wo:oe:¦u¦ ¦iq¦l
l¦:ouq¦oul Dui¦oi:q o¦¦e:s qy:, j¦~y:oo:, :oo¦ oec¦
~:o co:¦e:e:ce :oo: / :usl see \eL= 1´¯oOoo
Jim Testa, EVP 212.7óº.ó5ó1
0liI Thorn, 5VP 212.7óº.ó538
LS1A1LSALL-GRLA1VALUL
17ó West 87th 5treet ǧ $75º,000 ǧ E¦eq~:l j:ew~: lwo
Leo:oo: ¦o:e ~w~ili:q you: ow: je:so:~¦ louc¦
Fu¦¦ se:vice Lui¦oi:q wil¦ ¦ivei: suje:, ¦~:osc~jeo
:oo¦ oec¦ ~:o c¦i¦o:e:s j¦~y:oo: Pels ~:e we¦co:e
\eL= 1´o5o5/ 5teven Kramer, Associate Broker
óóó.871.óó73
ÞRICLD1OSLLL
Upper West 5ide ǧ $1,225,000 ǧ Sj~cious 2 Leo:oo:,
2 L~l¦ wil¦ sej~:~le oi:i:q :oo: co:Li:es j:ew~:
e¦eq~:ce ~:o :ooe:: co:ve:ie:ce Re:ov~leo
¦ilc¦e:/L~l¦, s¦i:co~leo w~¦¦s, wooo ¦¦oo:s, \/D,
q:e~l :eiq¦Lo:¦ooo \eL= 1´O5ooO Barbara Melson
212.8º1.723ó I Patrick 0avin 212.8º1.72º7
CLASSICÞRLWARLLLGANCL
Upper West 5ide ǧ $1,ººº,000 ǧ ¦iq¦ ¦¦oo:, l¦:ee
exjosu:es wil¦ oje: cily views, :ece:l¦y :e:ov~leo
¦ilc¦e: 25 ¦l ¦ivi:q :oo:, e:le:l~i:i:q si.eo ¦o::~¦
oi:i:q :oo:, :~sle: Leo:oo: wil¦ j:iv~le o¦¦ice
\eL= 1´'1/88 Lisa Maysonet, EVP 212.8º1.71º5
ßLS1ÞARKANDSKYLINLVILWS
0entral Park North ǧ $2,3ºº,000 ǧ Dui¦l i: 2OO¯, l¦is
´ Leo:oo:, ´ L~l¦ co:oo is o: l¦e 15l¦ ¦¦oo: F¦oo:
locei¦i:q wi:oows, q¦~ss L~¦co:y, qou::el ¦ilc¦e:,
:~ssive :~sle: suile, ~ w~s¦e:/o:ye:, ~:o j~:¦i:q
sj~ce \eL= 1´o´5Oo Michael Rosenblum 212.7óº.ó5ó1
5andy 0ansberg º17.733.ó337
Pru dog elliman.indd 1 9/22/11 3:48:40 PM
84 | OCTOBER
NYO
STAY
The Laureate at 2150
Broadway (rendering
and interior shots).
2150 Broadway
ßL1WLLN W. 751H & W. 7ó1H
Prewar
The Laureate is a lovely new
building constructed in 2008
in homage to prewar New York
style. It boasts modern details
such as floor-to-ceiling win-
dows, two layers of plywood and
insulation under wood floors
for soundproofing, and separate
rooms with sinks for washer and
dryer. Its exterior, with Juliet
balconies, Art Deco notes, and
a limestone and granite facade,
has won it praise in the past.
101 West 79th
A1 COLUMßUS AVLNUL
Postwar
The Park Belvedere holds
the unique advantage of
being exactly across from the
Museum of Natural History,
allowing you to finally indulge
your clandestine passion
for pterodactyls. To this
end, you’ll want an intimate
place of residence with small
elevator landings and only a few
neighbors per floor—or perhaps
not, but don’t these qualities
sound nice? The location is
one of the best in terms of both
culture and transportation
and is close to Belvedere
Castle in Central Park, which
overlooks Turtle Pond and the
Shakespeare in the Park Theater.
Also, you must not forget to take
into account nine-foot ceilings
and mammoth picture windows
overlooking Central Park.
500 West End Avenue
ßL1WLLN W. 841H & W. 851H
Prewar
Allow us to introduce the foreign
exchange student from France,
already subtly and marvel-
ously thriving in an American
environment! Another prewar
creation, decorative elements ·
E
V
A
N
J
O
S
E
P
H
NYO_MAG5_Condos2.indd 84 9/23/11 7:59:44 PM
LIVE OUTSIDE THE BOX. INFINITE POSSIBILITIES
FINITE PRICE. APPRECIATE. VALUE YOUR LIVING. REBUILDING.
LIVING ON THE CUSP. CENTURIES COLLIDE, OLD BECOMES NEW.
CONNECTING THE DOWNTOWNS, BY FOOT, BLADES, BIKE, BOAT
AND UNDERGROUND. MINUTES TO CHANGE PERSPECTIVES, BRIDGE VIEWS FROM
ABOVE. SOLACE AT HOME, CHECK IN FROM YOUR AMENITIES. COOL NEVER
GOES OUT OF STYLE. DECIDE YOU’RE COOL DECO YOUR LOFT.

LIVE
The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from the sponsor. File No. CD07-0093. Sponsor: 99 John LLC, 387 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10016. Equal Housing Opportunity
1 (212) 217 9999 | 99johndecolofts.com
C
M
Y
CM
MY
CY
CMY
K
NY Observer-diego4.pdf 1 9/22/11 4:43 PM
Untitled-24 1 9/22/11 6:28:06 PM
86 | OCTOBER
NYO
STAY
include quoins, cornices, facade
ornamentation and elegant
canopied entrance. This condo-
minium graciously celebrates
its proximity to Riverside Park
as well as excellent shopping (as
only it could), not to mention a
full time concierge.
60 Riverside Boulevard
ßL1WLLN W. ó41H & W. óó1H
Postwar
Waterfront living combined with
a Lincoln Center proximity truly
elevates the Aldyn on this list.
For last year’s Fashion Week, the
rooms in each apartment were
designed by such masters as
Diane von Furstenberg, Nicole
Miller, Richard Lambertson and
Tifany&Co along with interior
designers to introduce their new
home collections. La Palestra
Gym, created by designers
Roman and Williams, makes
nonresidents wish that, well,
they were residents.
905 West End Avenue
ßL1WLLN W. ¡041H & W. ¡051H
Prewar
We New Yorkers can be suspi-
cious of Europe’s claim to
superiority of taste, but this
condominium has classically
prewar New York style with only
wonderful hints of European-
inspired elegance, especially in
the kitchen and bath regions. A
large, indeed sun-drenched, roof
deck puts a cumulatively Italian
face to double wall ovens, double
dishwashers, a breakfast area
and wine fridge, a grand foyer,
and again, we repeat, lots and lots
of natural light. ·
The view from 905
West End Avenue, and,
apartments, below.
NYO_MAG5_Condos2.indd 86 9/23/11 8:00:08 PM
OCTOBER | 87
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FOR OVER 30 YEARS,
WE’VE BEEN HELPING
NEW YORKERS
LIVE WELL
IN THE WORLD’S
GREATEST CITY.
212-¯44-1110
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Untitled-27 87 9/23/11 11:03:12 AM
88 | OCTOBER
NYO
REALESTATE
535 West End Avenue
ßL1WLLN W. 851H & W. 8ó1H
Prewar
Some buildings may aspire to
such compliments as “a palace
in the sky,” nursing ambitions
in their little limestone hearts,
but this unique condominium
graciously accepts the title.
Architects such as Emery Roth
have created a suburban-size
living space with rosewood hard
floors, traditional moldings,
carefully proportioned rooms
and a formal library with direct
access to a terrace. As a host, you
may entertain as though you’re
about to carve the turkey in Nor-
man Rockwell’s Freedom From
Want in a formal dining room
before lounging into a subtly
merged den for informal chatting
or relaxing.
250 West 90th
ßL1WLLN WLS1 LND & ßROADWAY
Postwar
This building mirrors the mul-
titude of attractions of its close
street, Broadway. It combines
easy transportation, shopping
and parks with a phenomenally
well-rounded penthouse floor:
which includes a gym, swimming
pool, hot tub, roof deck, sauna, a
large space for events—we could
continue, but that would be
boastful.
205 West 76th
ßL1WLLN ßROADWAY &
AMS1LRDAM
Prewar
First, let’s reveal the most
important fact: this condo-
minium is just a few blocks away
from Shake Shack. There. But
if that somehow fails to create
enthusiasm, we’ll try the more
traditional route of noting this
postwar building’s Romanesque
arches and columns, beautiful
English oak millwork and grand
stone fireplaces. Its details lend
an open and light feel. Also, in
this building, the words marble
and bathroom are essentially
synonymous.
279 Central Park West
ßL1WLLN W. 881H & W. 891H
Prewar
Let’s finally cement the defini-
tion of the word “starchitect”:
Costas Kondylas designed this
condominium to be moodily
dazzling; its mahogany-paneled
lobby sits across from a fireplace
embedded with a deep Empress-
green marble floor recalling
days of eternal yonder. A famil-
ial atmosphere is cultivated by
doormen and attendants alike,
and a grand view of Central
Park and automatically watered
decorative trees and flowers
really don’t hurt. For those of us
with children, or those of us who
want children conveniently the
Dwight School is only a couple of
blocks away. o
Clockwise from top le: 279 Central
Park West, 250 West 90th Street, 205
West 76th Street.
P
R
O
P
E
R
T
Y
S
H
A
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K
NYO_MAG5_Condos2.indd 88 9/23/11 8:00:38 PM
Exclusive by Appointment:
STEPHEN P. WALD • 212-750-WALD(9253)
Luxury Living at The Lombardy Hotel, NY’s
Best Kept Investment Secret!
111 EAST 56TH STREET / Park Ave - Oversized Hotel
Suites from Studios to Four Bedroom apartments
are available in this Pre-war, Full Service Hotel once
owned by William Randolph Hearst. The Lombardy
Hotel unrestricted Rental Program lets you be part of
a Manhattan landmark. Benefit from a savvy invest-
ment property, earn top rental income, and live in
grand style whenever you are in town.The Lombardy
World Class Plaza District location is close to all of
NY’s best shopping, restaurants, theatre, Carnegie
Hall & MOMA. Full hotel services include twice daily
maid service, utilities and more. Prices from $500’s.
On-site Broker
Live in Grandeur at
The Landmark Historic Osborne
205 West 57th Street - A dramatic, newly renovated
duplex featuring a grand living room, and 3 over-
sized bedrooms with 3 full baths, replete with original
Osborne details including an elegant marble and
wrought iron staircase and the most beautiful hard-
wood flooring. Live among the legends of Leonard
Bernstein, Lynn Redgrave, Andre Watts, Fran Leb-
owitz, Robert Osborne and others who have called
The Osborne their home. An incredible opportunity!
Asking price: $2,295,000
Offering New York’s Best Central Park
South Penthouse Deal!
SIMPLY THE BEST: Have it all, the most scenic, longitu-
dinal views of Central Park and Times Square from this
35th story Central Park South penthouse. It’s all about
Star Quality in this superbly renovated gem featuring
six glorious rooms with sweeping Central Park and City
Views. Included is an oversized Living Room & Library
with powder room, an elegant Formal Dining Room,
a true Chef’s kitchen with top appliances including
two dishwashers and a washer/dryer, a grand Master
Suite with beautiful built-ins and a bath with its own
Japanese soaking tub and steam shower and a sec-
ond bedroom and bath. Asking $6,000,000. Separate
1BR guest apartment available.
WaldRealEstate.com
Hiring Experienced Agents
WALDNYOSept2011.indd 1 9/20/11 1:06:47 PM
OCTOBER | 89
Untitled-27 89 9/23/11 11:01:22 AM
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There are eight million
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city and as many solutions
as there are problems.
Our job is to help you
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We measure, design and
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furniture that
hts
3S East 19th Street, New York City f Weekdays 10- 6, Saturday 8 Sunday 12-S f 212.67+.1813
www.techlineStudio.com
Tech1ineStudio Revised 8-11 NY Observer Page Ad 8/10/11 12:.. PM Page 1

MARKETPLACE 90-113.indd 90 9/23/11 10:39:44 AM
NOW ENERGY IS A
MATTER OF TASTE
28BLACK is different – refreshingly different in taste. 28BLACK is natural –
pure and without artificial ingredients. 28BLACK stands for a new generation
of energy drinks.
The only true alternative to 28BLACK? 28WHITE. Five calories per can. Just
like 28BLACK, 28WHITE delivers natural energy and premium taste, again with
no taurine, no artificial flavors, no artificial color, and no preservatives. And on
top of that 28WHITE is sugar-free.
THE DAY NOW
HAS 28 HOURS!
Four hours more for creativity, socializing,
and all the rest an average day doesn’t allow.
Calidras.indd 1 6/15/11 4:03:29 PM Calidras.indd 1 9/22/11 3:42:28 PM
MARKETPLACE 90-113.indd 92 9/23/11 10:40:27 AM
NYO MARKETPLACE OCTOBER | 93
359 Columbus Ave at 77th St, NY 10024
212.72+.2100 - www.lsabellas.com
lsabella's Pestaurant serves casually sophlstlcated,
marlet-íresh Medlterranean culslne on the
Upper West Slde, New Yorl Clty.
isabellas.indd 1 9/21/11 3:27:21 PM
IGOR BABAILOV
SPECIAL DINNER PAIRING
Oct 13th 14th & 15th 2011
365 West 46th St., New York, New York 10036
Phone: 212-586-0244 • Fax: 212-957-2983
www.firebirdrestaurant.com
Meet the world renowned artist,
Maestro Igor Babailov
“Living Master” and Vatican Artist,
and his genius artistic creation of
“Journey of Hope” Ice Wine.
This rare gift was picked in the coldest
moment of the winter season, and like the
“Journey of Hope” it is an expression
of the metamorphosis of divine spirit and energy.
Exclusive world release of the exquisite new
Ice Wine by Igor Babailov
Come Celebrate
Your Child’s
Birthday Here!
GRAMERCY PARK
239 Park Avenue South
212-477-1500
UPPER EAST SIDE
1596 2nd Ave
212-717-2020
UPPER WEST SIDE
2454 Broadway
212-677-2004
www.BigDaddysNYC.com
Balloon Maker • Mini Chef • Science Guy
Magician • Clown • Trivia Guy
1640 Second Avenue, corner of 85th Street
New York, NY 10028
2T2.43º.T580 º www.midnighlblue85.com
ITALIAN AMERICAN CUISINE
Neslled in lhe Upper Eosl Side of New York Cily omidsl lhe
huslle ond buslle, Midnighl 8lue Peslouronl is on oosis of o
fomilior yel new ond reloxed olmosphere, where everyone
feels righl ol home. Cur gool is lo remind our polrons whol o
good reslouronl is oll oboul.
MARKETPLACE 90-113.indd 93 9/23/11 10:41:08 AM
94 OCTOBER NYO MARKETPLACE
HAHP70N5
lN7£kNA7l0NAL
FlLH F£57lVAL
F£57IvAL PA55£5
AvAILAßL£ 0NLIN£ N0W
Indlvldual 7lckets start at $15
£ast Pamµton ßox 0mce 0µens 5eµtember 30
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A6R055 7P£ PAHP70N5
0ctober 13-17, 2011
hamptonsñlmfest.or§
MARKETPLACE 90-113.indd 94 9/23/11 10:41:52 AM
NYO MARKETPLACE OCTOBER | 95
MARKETPLACE 90-113.indd 95 9/23/11 10:42:14 AM
96 OCTOBER NYO MARKETPLACE
We are a holistic, hands-on PT facility that offers intimate,
practitioner to client treatment for direct rehab. Our
clients include high end “type A” professionals who injure
themselves during daily activities, weekend warriors, post
surgery rehab and compensation cases. Get better!
We IreuI Ihe µerson,
noI Ihe JIuqnosIs.
Manual based, Pilates Physical Therapy facility located
in midtown Manhattan. We focus on manual therapies,
Pilates-based exercises and sports-specific functional
training. True, hands-on therapy and one-on-one service.
Heal yourself with the best!
Heneu. Hecover. HesIurI.
www.activecarephysicaltherapy.com
KARENA WU
PT, MS, CSCS, CPI
12 West 37th Street, Ste 1202
New York, NY 10018
212 777 4374
Wood-Fired
Pizza
Authentic
Cooking from
Naples
Contemporary
Italian Art
Gallery
PizzArte
69 West 55th Street
between 5th & 6th Aves
212-247-3936
www.PizzArteNY.com
BLOOMFLOWERS.COM
MARKETPLACE 90-113.indd 96 9/23/11 10:43:15 AM
NYO MARKETPLACE OCTOBER | 97
We are a holistic, hands-on PT facility that offers intimate,
practitioner to client treatment for direct rehab. Our
clients include high end “type A” professionals who injure
themselves during daily activities, weekend warriors, post
surgery rehab and compensation cases. Get better!
We IreuI Ihe µerson,
noI Ihe JIuqnosIs.
Manual based, Pilates Physical Therapy facility located
in midtown Manhattan. We focus on manual therapies,
Pilates-based exercises and sports-specific functional
training. True, hands-on therapy and one-on-one service.
Heal yourself with the best!
Heneu. Hecover. HesIurI.
www.activecarephysicaltherapy.com
KARENA WU
PT, MS, CSCS, CPI
12 West 37th Street, Ste 1202
New York, NY 10018
212 777 4374
*Eat & Play Combo does not include tax and gratuity. Price may vary by location.
sun -thurs – open to close º fri & sat – until 5pm
e
a
t

p
l
a
y
$
1
8
.9
9
*
&
c
o
m
b
o
choice of 9 entrées & a $10 game card
free
game play
wi th purchase of $10 game pl ay
Promotional. EXPIRES: 12/30/2011. Present this coupon at Front Desk to redeem.
Limit one coupon per customer. Barcode valid for one use only. Minor policies vary
by location – please check www.daveandbusters.com/locations for details. Not valid
with any other offers, including Eat & Play Combo and Special Price Game Days.
Not valid with Special Events Packages. Coupon must be surrendered at time of
redemption and may not be photocopied or duplicated. Non negotiable. Power Card
activation fee is $2. ($3 Times Square). NOT FOR RESALE.
f i nd a l ocati on at daveandbusters. com/l ocati ons
T|mes Square 234 W. 42nd Street, 3rd F|oor º 646.495.2015
D
&B
M
E
ET
I
N
G
S
P
A
R
TIE
S
make your next meeting
a 1 of a kind experience
great offers for any size group
103001023 E12302011
MARKETPLACE 90-113.indd 97 9/23/11 10:50:40 AM
98 OCTOBER NYO MARKETPLACE
Crosstown Custom Shade &
Glass

200 W 86th St
New York NY
212-787-8040

115 W 10th St
New York NY
212-647-1519

M: 9:30-5:00, T: 9:30-7:00, W:
9:30-5:00, Th: 9:30-7:00, F: 9:30-5:00
S: 9:30-4:00
Closed Sundays

crosstownshadeandglass.com
crosstown.hdwfg.com
Hunter Douglas offers stylish
options for every décor.
Save $25 - 300 per unit on selected Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas offers an
array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces. With their
enduring craftsmanship and energy-efficient designs, they present exceptional value _ smart style
that’s energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings through December 12, 2011
with mail-in rebates on selected styles. Ask us for details.
©2008 Hunter Douglas Inc. ® and TM are trademark of Hunter Douglas Inc.
We also offer:
Motorization Interior Design Custom Draperies
Fabrics and Upholstery Glass, Mirror & Shower Doors
Celebrate the
Season




Hunter Douglas offers stylish
options for every décor.
Save $25 - 300 per unit on selected Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas offers an
array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces. With their
enduring craftsmanship and energy-efficient designs, they present exceptional value _ smart style
that’s energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings through December 12, 2011
with mail-in rebates on selected styles. Ask us for details.
Select Body Copy
©2008 Hunter Douglas Inc. ®and TM are trademark of Hunter Douglas Inc.
We also offer:
Motorization Interior Design Custom Draperies
Fabrics and Upholstery Glass, Mirror & Shower Doors
Celebrate the
Season




Hunter Douglas offers stylish
options for every décor.
Save $25 - 300 per unit on selected Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas offers an
array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces. With their
enduring craftsmanship and energy-efficient designs, they present exceptional value _ smart style
that’s energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings through December 12, 2011
with mail-in rebates on selected styles. Ask us for details.
Select Body Copy
©2008 Hunter Douglas Inc. ®and TM are trademark of Hunter Douglas Inc.
We also offer:
Motorization Interior Design Custom Draperies
Fabrics and Upholstery Glass, Mirror & Shower Doors
Celebrate The Season
Crosstown Custom Shade &
Glass

200 W 86th St
New York NY
212-787-8040

115 W 10th St
New York NY
212-647-1519

M: 9:30-5:00, T: 9:30-7:00, W:
9:30-5:00, Th: 9:30-7:00, F: 9:30-5:00
S: 9:30-4:00
Closed Sundays

crosstownshadeandglass.com
crosstown.hdwfg.com
Hunter Douglas offers stylish
options for every décor.
Save $25 - 300 per unit on selected Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas offers an
array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces. With their
enduring craftsmanship and energy-efficient designs, they present exceptional value _ smart style
that’s energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings through December 12, 2011
with mail-in rebates on selected styles. Ask us for details.
©2008 Hunter Douglas Inc. ® and TM are trademark of Hunter Douglas Inc.
We also offer:
Motorization Interior Design Custom Draperies
Fabrics and Upholstery Glass, Mirror & Shower Doors
Crosstown Custom Shade &
Glass

200 W 86th St
New York NY
212-787-8040

115 W 10th St
New York NY
212-647-1519

M: 9:30-5:00, T: 9:30-7:00, W:
9:30-5:00, Th: 9:30-7:00, F: 9:30-5:00
S: 9:30-4:00
Closed Sundays

crosstownshadeandglass.com
crosstown.hdwfg.com
Hunter Douglas offers stylish
options for every décor.
Save $25 - 300 per unit on selected Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas offers an
array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces. With their
enduring craftsmanship and energy-efficient designs, they present exceptional value _ smart style
that’s energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings through December 12, 2011
with mail-in rebates on selected styles. Ask us for details.
©2008 Hunter Douglas Inc. ®and TM are trademark of Hunter Douglas Inc.
We also offer:
Motorization Interior Design Custom Draperies
Fabrics and Upholstery Glass, Mirror & Shower Doors
Celebrate the
Season




Hunter Douglas offers stylish
options for every décor.
Save $25 - 300 per unit on selected Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas offers an
array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces. With their
enduring craftsmanship and energy-efficient designs, they present exceptional value _ smart style
that’s energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings through December 12, 2011
with mail-in rebates on selected styles. Ask us for details.
Select Body Copy
©2008 Hunter Douglas Inc. ®and TM are trademark of Hunter Douglas Inc.
We also offer:
Motorization Interior Design Custom Draperies
Fabrics and Upholstery Glass, Mirror & Shower Doors
Crosstown
Custom Shade & Glass
200 W 86th St., New York NY
212-787-8040
115 W 10th St., New York NY
212-647-1519
M: 9:30-5:00, T: 9:30-7:00, W:
9:30-5:00, Th: 9:30-7:00, F: 9:30-5:00 S:
9:30-4:00 Closed Sundays
crosstownshadeandglass.com
crosstown.hdwfg.com
Save $25 - 300 per unit on selected Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas
offers an array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces.
With their enduring craftsmanship and energy-efficient designs, they present excep-
tional value & smart style that’s energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings
through December 12, 2011 with mail-in rebates on selected styles. Ask us for details.
We also offer:
Motorization Interior Design Custom Draperies
Fabrics and Upholstery Glass, Mirror & Shower Doors
High Performance Optics for Earth and Sky
B66.6Z8.7987 º gIanIbInoruIars.rom
Enhance
Your
Beautiful
View
THE MOST IHTERESTIHG STORES IH HEW YORK CITY

ARCHITECTURAL AH0
ALTERE0 AHTIDUES
J212) 9S9 S401 J212) 9S9 SS14 J212) S62 S02S
WWW.OL0EGOO0THIHGS.COM
0b£|5£A
I24 w 24Ib
0k|0k 500Ak£
5 £ I6Ib
0PP£k w£5I 5|0£
450 00|0N805 AV£
NYO MARKETPLACE
MAY | 107
back of mag.indd 107 4/30/11 3:47:42 PM
Commemorates the life u times of Craf von Zeppelin, the father
of commercial aviation. Much like the old Baron himself and the
legendary leviathans of the sky that bore his name, these globe-
trotting timepieces set the bar in their class. And as long as we are
talking about setting the bar, we think you`ll agree that 1ime Quest
isn`t you run of the mill web experience either.
www.TimeQuestWatches.com

Time Quest, timepieces with a tale
(949) 632-1145
1he Zeppelin
I00 Year Anniversary series
MARKETPLACE 90-113.indd 98 9/23/11 10:51:24 AM
NYO MARKETPLACE OCTOBER | 99
High Performance Optics for Earth and Sky
B66.6Z8.7987 º gIanIbInoruIars.rom
Enhance
Your
Beautiful
View
THE MOST IHTERESTIHG STORES IH HEW YORK CITY

ARCHITECTURAL AH0
ALTERE0 AHTIDUES
J212) 9S9 S401 J212) 9S9 SS14 J212) S62 S02S
WWW.OL0EGOO0THIHGS.COM
0b£|5£A
I24 w 24Ib
0k|0k 500Ak£
5 £ I6Ib
0PP£k w£5I 5|0£
450 00|0N805 AV£
NYO MARKETPLACE
MAY | 107
back of mag.indd 107 4/30/11 3:47:42 PM
MARKETPLACE 90-113.indd 99 9/23/11 10:51:57 AM
100 OCTOBER NYO MARKETPLACE
Established 1887
E. Osborne Smith Development Corp.
www.EOsborneSmith.com
FOR SALE
ISRAEL ZIPES, PRINCIPAL
(212) 986-7644
CALL
TURN OF THE CENTURY SIGN
A Full Service Real Estate Brokerage Firm
with 124 Years of History.
A privately owned brokerage firm that has survived & thrived through two major depressions
and all real estate downturns in the economy. It currently is in good standing on its real estate
brokerage license, trade mark protection and local state and federal taxes.
The group that buys this firm will own 100% of the stock of the corp. free and clear of any and
all past obligations. We have 100% successfully stopped all operations in the past 7 years to
accomplish this task.
You will posses, with this purchase, a company with a very clean track record with experience,
history and name recognition in real estate. Assisting buyers and sellers of commercial, industrial
and residential real estate, including management and leasing. To compete in a local, national and
international real estate market in the internet world.
ZipesNYO.indd 1 9/19/11 12:08:46 PM
E. Osborne Smith,Inc.
MARKETPLACE 90-113.indd 100 9/23/11 10:52:26 AM
Established 1887
E. Osborne Smith Development Corp.
www.EOsborneSmith.com
FOR SALE
ISRAEL ZIPES, PRINCIPAL
(212) 986-7644
CALL
TURN OF THE CENTURY SIGN
A Full Service Real Estate Brokerage Firm
with 124 Years of History.
A privately owned brokerage firm that has survived & thrived through two major depressions
and all real estate downturns in the economy. It currently is in good standing on its real estate
brokerage license, trade mark protection and local state and federal taxes.
The group that buys this firm will own 100% of the stock of the corp. free and clear of any and
all past obligations. We have 100% successfully stopped all operations in the past 7 years to
accomplish this task.
You will posses, with this purchase, a company with a very clean track record with experience,
history and name recognition in real estate. Assisting buyers and sellers of commercial, industrial
and residential real estate, including management and leasing. To compete in a local, national and
international real estate market in the internet world.
ZipesNYO.indd 1 9/19/11 12:08:46 PM
E. Osborne Smith,Inc.
MARKETPLACE 90-113.indd 101 9/23/11 10:53:05 AM
102 OCTOBER NYO MARKETPLACE
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aiihiiiis, bacL µain and siicss.
KipJfi\EfDfi\kf[Xp%
Iully guaianiccd oi moncy bacL!
¡Su Easi Ccnici Siicci, Moab, Uiah 84S82
(488) 289-898I - (800) 842-6622
www.SoreNoMore.com
SoreNoMoreSept2011.indd 1 9/20/11 12:50:03 PM
TELBOOK
Directories
Check for Accuracy
Authorized Person
Pri nt Name:
Si gnature:
This is a proof of your ad for the next edition of the TelBook Directory noted. Please review proof for accuracy including name,
address, telephone number, copy, colors and heading. If changes/corrections are necessary, please note them clearly on your
advertising proof and mail a signed copy to Telbook, 365 County Road 39A, Suite 17B, Southampton, NY 11968-5220 or fax
to 631-287-1781 IMMEDIATELY within receipt of this proof. This ad will be considered to be correct and final unless we receive
changes in writing from you within two weeks of the date above. Color seen on your advertising proof may vary in the final
directory due to the environmentally selected papers and inks used to print the directories. It is the responsibility of the advertiser
to notify the TelBook office in writing of any listing or ad copy changes (change of address and/or telephone number).
Please Check for Accuracy
Peconic Year: 2012
Date: Mail Fax
Heading:
Ad proof 2010
These changes are for this ad ONLY or ALL advertising
Date
Customer Proof
1990 - 2011
21
YE ARS OF
E XCE L L E NCE
TelBook
Directories
Name:
Rep:
631-283-7075 EXT. 115
maria@telbooks.com
FAX: 631-287-1781
Artist: Maria A. 05/17/11
X
Maria
Gas-Propane
Petro-Propane
30 Old Dock Rd
Yaphank, NY 11980
Call For Special Promotions
Natural Gas Service
And Installations
2%3)$%.4)!,s#/--%2#)!,
3!,%3s3%26)#%s).34!,,!4)/.
DEPENDABLE AUTOMATIC DELIVERY
EMERGENCY SERVICE
855-4U PROPANE
855-487-7672
NATIONALLY CERTIFIED
SERVICE TECHS AND DRIVERS
FAST, RELIABLE
PROPANE DELIVERIES
Licensed
&
Insured
FAST, RELIABLE
PROPANE DELIVERIES
Propane Offers Homeowners Reliability, Cleanliness,
Improved Performance And, On Average,
Costs Half As Much Per BTU As Electricity
PROPANE
CI TA
Internationally
Acclaimed
Advisor to the Stars
PREE PHOHE COHSULTATIOH. S00-606-S124
Over 40 years of experience.
Solves all problems.
Love expert, reunites lovers.
Hever fails, no false promises.
Immediate results.
CITA.indd 1 9/16/11 5:29:30 PM MARKETPLACE 90-113.indd 102 9/23/11 10:53:31 AM
NYO MARKETPLACE OCTOBER | 103
=fik_XkifdXek`Z\m\e`e^#j`dgcpi\dfm\k_\[X`cp
jki\jjXe[XepYf[pXZ_\jfigX`ejYpÔijkjfXb`e^`eX
nXidYXk_n`k_knfkXYc\jgffejf]Jfi\EfDfi\
¡S ycais of icscaich and icsiing, µaicnis includc
Iibiomyalgia iicaimcni (abovc) and iclicf fiom
aiihiiiis, bacL µain and siicss.
KipJfi\EfDfi\kf[Xp%
Iully guaianiccd oi moncy bacL!
¡Su Easi Ccnici Siicci, Moab, Uiah 84S82
(488) 289-898I - (800) 842-6622
www.SoreNoMore.com
SoreNoMoreSept2011.indd 1 9/20/11 12:50:03 PM
TELBOOK
Directories
Check for Accuracy
Authorized Person
Pri nt Name:
Si gnature:
This is a proof of your ad for the next edition of the TelBook Directory noted. Please review proof for accuracy including name,
address, telephone number, copy, colors and heading. If changes/corrections are necessary, please note them clearly on your
advertising proof and mail a signed copy to Telbook, 365 County Road 39A, Suite 17B, Southampton, NY 11968-5220 or fax
to 631-287-1781 IMMEDIATELY within receipt of this proof. This ad will be considered to be correct and final unless we receive
changes in writing from you within two weeks of the date above. Color seen on your advertising proof may vary in the final
directory due to the environmentally selected papers and inks used to print the directories. It is the responsibility of the advertiser
to notify the TelBook office in writing of any listing or ad copy changes (change of address and/or telephone number).
Please Check for Accuracy
Peconic Year: 2012
Date: Mail Fax
Heading:
Ad proof 2010
These changes are for this ad ONLY or ALL advertising
Date
Customer Proof
1990 - 2011
21
YE ARS OF
E XCE L L E NCE
TelBook
Directories
Name:
Rep:
631-283-7075 EXT. 115
maria@telbooks.com
FAX: 631-287-1781
Artist: Maria A. 05/17/11
X
Maria
Gas-Propane
Petro-Propane
30 Old Dock Rd
Yaphank, NY 11980
Call For Special Promotions
Natural Gas Service
And Installations
2%3)$%.4)!,s#/--%2#)!,
3!,%3s3%26)#%s).34!,,!4)/.
DEPENDABLE AUTOMATIC DELIVERY
EMERGENCY SERVICE
855-4U PROPANE
855-487-7672
NATIONALLY CERTIFIED
SERVICE TECHS AND DRIVERS
FAST, RELIABLE
PROPANE DELIVERIES
Licensed
&
Insured
FAST, RELIABLE
PROPANE DELIVERIES
Propane Offers Homeowners Reliability, Cleanliness,
Improved Performance And, On Average,
Costs Half As Much Per BTU As Electricity
PROPANE
CI TA
Internationally
Acclaimed
Advisor to the Stars
PREE PHOHE COHSULTATIOH. S00-606-S124
Over 40 years of experience.
Solves all problems.
Love expert, reunites lovers.
Hever fails, no false promises.
Immediate results.
CITA.indd 1 9/16/11 5:29:30 PM MARKETPLACE 90-113.indd 103 9/23/11 10:54:09 AM
NYO GALLERY
104 OCTOBER NYO GALLERY
NYO GALLERY
NYO DIRECTORY
845 West End
Avenue is a
grand corner
building in the
heart of the
Upper West
Side. Gener-
ous well-
proportioned
homes and elegantly restored classic details
are found in each of the six diferent layouts of
two to four bedrooms. Features include new
modern conveniences like air-conditioning and
washer dryers in each home. Condominium
pricing begins at $1.995 million, financing is
available. We are pleased to announce that
the ofering plan has been accepted and im-
mediate occupancy is available.
www.845wea.com . For sales information,
contact Elizabeth Unger or Mark Samsky of
The Corcoran Group, sales@845wea.com or
212-784-9845.
Bettina Equities: Living
Well, In the Worldís
Greatest City. Bettina
is known for aford-
able prices that make
Manhattan living in the
finest buildings within
reach, with NO FEE!
Attractive studios, spa-
cious three-bedroom
duplexes and triplexes
in the most desired
neighborhoods: East/
West Side, Clinton,
Murray Hill, Gramercy Park, Union Square and
East Village. Experience the diference in the
way our buildings are run with a quality com-
mitment and ongoing attention to amenities
such as exceptional maintenance/upgrades,
a responsive management staf and roomy,
comfortable layouts.
www.bettinaequities.com. (212) 744-3330.
Bonobos
Better fitting, better looking men’s pants,
shorts, blazers and polos. Quickly expanding
our selection of complementary bags, belts,
shoes, watches and more.
Sold only online. Delivered to you with impec-
cable customer service. Free shipping on all
returns & exchanges.
Check us out at bonobos.com
CITA
Internationally Acclaimed Advisor to the Stars
Over 40 years of experience. Solves all prob-
lems. Love expert, reunites lovers. Never fails,
no false promises.
Immediate results.
Free phone consultation.
800-606-3124
Dave and Buster’s
There is always
something new and
exciting waiting
for you at Dave &
Buster’s. Eat & Play
Combo, drink spe-
cials, and more. You
never know how
much fun you will
get into on any given day. Events should be
fun. Big or small, corporate or social, birthday
parties or holiday gatherings, we can help
you host the perfect event so everyone can
let loose. Ask about private rooms, business
meetings, team-building activities and chef-
crafted menus. We’ll have an answer you’re
going to love.
Times Square Location: 234 West 42nd
Street. New York, NY 10036. Tel no. 646-
495-2015 or go to www.daveandbusters.com

Columbus Square,
a collection of
five unique rental
buildings and over
500,000 square
feet of prime retail
and community
space rising from
97th to 100th
Streets between Columbus Avenue and
Amsterdam Avenue, has become one of NYC’s
most sought-after residences. Each apartment
is smartly designed with nine-foot ceilings,
piece-laid white oak strip flooring, floor-to-
ceiling windows, and solar shades. Residents
are surprised by the elegant touches that are
generally reserved for condos, such as valet
parking, acres of landscaped roof decks, and a
70-foot salt water swimming pool.
For more information log onto or call
1-866-644-8813.
Crosstown Shades
and Glass
Showcasing the
prestigious Hunter
Douglas Gallery, a
variety of hard and
soft window cover-
ings, glass, mirrors and shower doors, Cross-
town Custom Shade & Glass has delivered the
highest level of customer service and product
knowledge for over twenty-five years.
For every step design you can visit any of
their two convenient locations: Upper West
Side, 200 West 86th Street, between Amster-
dam and Broadway.
Greenwich Village Location, 115 West 10th
Street between Greenwich Avenue and Sixth
Avenue call now for store hours and direc-
tions: (212) 787-8040. Or on the web: www.
crosstownshadeandglass.com.
ABC Carpet and
Home ofers a
diverse selec-
tion of globally
sourced product
at the cutting
edge of design, beauty and sustainability. ABC
encourages you to create your home as an ex-
pression of your vision and values. Its dynamic
and inspiring assortment includes vintage
& antiques, ABC Goodwood furniture from
responsibly managed forests; chemical free
organic beds; indigenous artistry from global
cooperatives; jewelry and apothecary; tabletop
and lighting, and the largest collection of rugs
and carpets in the world.
888 Broadway, New York, NY 10003,
www.abchome.com,
212-473-3000
Karena Wu is the
owner of ActiveCare
Physical Therapy
located in midtown
Manhattan. The facil-
ity ofers one-on-one
hands on treatment
and takes most major
insurances.
Please call for an
appointment.
212-777-4374. www.ActiveCarephysicalthera-
py.com; Karena Wu, PT, MS, CSCS, CPI, ACTIVE-
CARE PHYSICAL THERAPY, PC.. 12 West 37th
Street, Suite 1202, New York, NY 10018
www.activecarephysicaltherapy.com
INDEX UWS.indd 104 9/23/11 10:55:34 AM
NYO GALLERY OCTOBER | 105
NYO GALLERY
from Movie Stars to Politicians. Also, rent your own
The Grand Tier: Overlooking Lincoln Center and
Central Park, The Grand Tier, located at 1930
Broadway, presents residents with an incom-
parable lifestyle in one of New York City’s most
sought-after neighborhoods. One-, two- and
three-bedroom homes boast spacious layouts
and exceptionally elegant design. Unparalleled
services and amenities — including 24-hour
doorman and concierge, 50-foot lap pool,
landscaped outdoor terrace and designer lobby
and public spaces — further elevate the living
experience.
Call (212)769-1930 or visit
www.glenwoodnyc.com.
Established in
1938, Jaguar of
Great Neck was
the first Jaguar
dealership in
the Country.
Our experience
has led to a
reputation of value, personal service and after-
sale support that is unrivaled. For 70+ years
we have been selling to and servicing the New
York area with the pride and attention it de-
serves. Model for model, option for option, no
one is more competitive than us. We will beat
any advertised price in New York...Guaranteed!
Fulfill your passion for perfection with one of
our awesome 2012 Jaguar XK Convertibles.
One is waiting for you at Jaguar of Great Neck.
www.GreatNeckJaguar.com,
888-263-4158
LE FANION ís vividly colored
garlic pots (pots pour líail)
are great for properly storing
garlic. Handmade in France in
the Provençale tradition, they
keep the garlic perfectly dry
and dark. Get one in time to
coddle the fresh garlic heads youíll find at the
farmer’s market this fall! Le Fanion brings you
pottery, chandeliers, fine art, antique furniture
and more. The whimsical pottery is extraordi-
nary. Fine art, including rare prints and draw-
ings, is also ofered. Everything in the store,
including the lovely antique French Country
furniture, has the essence and origin of South-
ern France. Get any one of these gems and it
will transform your house. The store is open 7
days a week (except Sundays during the Fall)
and is located at the charming corner of West
4th and Bank Streets in Greenwich Village,
NYC. Tel. (212) 463-8760 or go to www.
lefanion.com for even more treasures from
the South of France.
Nest Seekers International specializes in the
sale of condominiums, co-ops and townhouses
to an international audience in North America,
Europe, the Middle East, Asia and South
America. One of the 10 largest residential real
estate firms in New York City, the company
has a total of seven of ces in Manhattan,
Brooklyn, Long Island City, the Hamptons
and Miami. Additionally, the Nest Seekers
network includes hundreds of satellite af liates
worldwide.
For more information, visit
www.nestseekers.com
Oberwerk does your home or of ce have
a great view? Explore and enjoy it to the
utmost with Oberwerk Long-Range Binoculars
and Binocular Telescopes. Highest quality
optics provide Stunning clarity and sharpness
at surprisingly afordable prices.
See us online at www.giantbinoculars.com
For free catalog, call 866-623-7937 or email
to info@oberwerk.com OBERWERK CORPO-
RATION 866-623-7937. www.giantbinoculars.
com.
Olde Good Things is your source for cool and
eclectic altered and architectural uniques and
artifacts! You name it we may even have it! De-
signers and dealers welcome! Vintage and in-
dustrial chic our specialty! Marble mantles and
chandeliers galore.
Any further information needed please e-mail
mail@oldegoodthings.com. Chelsea Flagship-
Store Union-Sq Upper West Side, 124 W. 24th
St. 5 East 16th St., 450 Columbus Av., 212-989-
8401. 212-989-8814. 212-341-7668.
For over 60
years Elgot has
been Manhat-
tan’s premier
source for
kitchen and
bath design,
remodeling and
major appliance sales and installation. That’s
why discerning New Yorkers rely on Elgot for
quality, service and experience. Our staf is
always happy to help you choose energy ef-
ficient and eco-friendly products to allow you
to support green living in Manhattan. From
too-tight spaces to arcane building codes to
co-op regulations, we’ve seen and done it all!
937 Lexington Avenue (68th/69th Sts.)
New York, NY 10065
212-879-1200
www.elgotkitchens.com
Uniquely your own for Your Wedding Day to be
like no other..... Selected as Long Island’s “Best
of Weddings Pick” - the knot 2010 & 2011
2011 Bride’s Choice Award - Martha Stewart’s
WeddingWire
Voted in the Top 5 Places on Long Island to get
Married! - Newsday
“Best of” Award - LIWeddings.com
Ofering One Wedding at a time in it’s own
private setting on 26 lush acres enriched with
beautiful gardens, gazebos, and flourishing
floral arbors for outdoor ceremonies.
www.EastWindWeddings.com
631.929.3500
FOR SALE: E. Osborne
Smith, Inc., a full service,
privately owned Real Estate
Brokerage Firm with 124
years of history. Company
survived & thrived through
depression and all real
estate downturns. In good
standing on its real estate
brokerage license, trade mark protection and
all taxes. Buyer will own 100% of the corpora-
tion’s stock free and clear of obligations; hav-
ing successfully stopped all operations in the
past 7 years. Buyer will own a company with
a very clean track record, experience, history
and positive name recognition. Assisting buy-
ers and sellers of commercial, industrial and
residential real estate, including management
and leasing.
Israel Zipes, Principal (212) 986-7644
www.EOsborneSmith.com
INDEX UWS.indd 105 9/23/11 10:56:29 AM
NYO GALLERY
106 OCTOBER NYO GALLERY
NYO GALLERY
Roger Erickson
has been a top
producing broker
in Manhattan for
over 20 years with
sales in excess of a
billion dollars. For
the 3rd consecutive
year, he has been
recognized by The
Wall Street Journal,
REAL Trends and
lore Magazine as
one of the Top 100
Agents in America by Sales Volume, currently
ranked as the #4 agent in the nation. The
prior year he was ranked as the #1 agent in
Manhattan.
www.Roger-Erickson.com
Nikki Field,
Senior Vice
President, As-
sociate Broker,
has been a dy-
namic presence
with Sothebyís
International
Realty since
1998, consis-
tently ranking
among the
global agencyís top five producers and ac-
complishing sales of over one billion dollars.
Americaís Top 400 Real Estate Professionals,
an annual ranking sponsored by The Wall
Street Journal, ranked Nikki in the top 100
agents in America and in the top 10 in New
York City for Sales Volume.
For more information,
visit www.nikkifield.com.
Sotheby’s The East Side Manhattan ofce is
just steps away from Central Park in one of the
most desirable neighborhoods in the city. It
is known for its prime Manhattan real estate,
which includes some of the cityís most elegant
historic and prewar homes. Our brokerage
staf ofers unsurpassed service to our clients.
Our agents are thoroughly familiar with
the neighborhoods in this area, and with all
aspects of sales, including the demands of the
luxury market.
For more information, please visit
www.sothebyshomes.com/nyc
SLATE, one of New York’s
only venues with private
and semiprivate reception
spaces; featuring 16,000
square feet of sleek décor
over 2 floors, accommodating parties of 10 to
1200 guests. Slate provides on-site cater-
ing of sumptuous modern American cuisine,
activities such as billiards, ping pong and
foosball, state-of-the-art surround sound and
audiovisual capabilities as well as a spacious
dance floor. Slate is ideal for all of your special
and private events including corporate parties,
Bar/Bat Mitzvahis, fashion shows, birthday
parties, photo shoots, meetings/seminars,
rehearsal dinners and receptions. The possibili-
ties are endless!

54 West 21st Street,
Between 5th and 6th Ave.
www.slate-ny.com - 212.989.0096
event@slate-ny.com
SLATE
For nearly a century, Prudential Douglas El-
liman has been recognized as a leader in the
residential real estate industry. With more than
3,500 agents and over 60 ofces from Manhat-
tan to Montauk, the companyís reach is unsur-
passed. Prudential Douglas Elliman ofers its
customers a comprehensive array of services
including residential sales and rental brokerage,
retail and commercial sales & leasing, relocation,
new development marketing, property man-
agement, mortgage brokerage and title insur-
ance. So whether youíre in Manhattan, Brooklyn,
Queens, Westchester or Long Island, including
the Hamptons and North Fork, there is a Pru-
dential Douglas Elliman ofce and agent ready
to assist you in any of your real estate needs.
Please contact 1.800.ELLIMAN or visit
elliman.com
Sore No More, Sore? From backache, arthritis,
bruise, sprain, workout? Soothing & penetrat-
ing topical analgesic gel provides efective relief.
Visit our Website for a Free Sample Ofer for our
special blend of six natural plant extracts. Stay
fit. Enjoy life and romance to the fullest!
435-259-5931;
1-800-842-6622
www.sorenomore.com

At Time Quest we
don’t do the ex-
pected, if you want
that, you can find it
almost anywhere.
We pride ourselves
on ofering some of
the most beautiful,
most interesting and
yet afordable time-
pieces you will find,
and from places you
might not expect. Cool stuf, great prices, and
a little surprise & amazement just for coming by
www.TimeQuestWatches.com
(949) 632-1145
Over 100 years of industry leadership. Petro Pro-
pane is the countryís leading provider of home
heating oil. Our years of experience and stability
enable us to support all your heating and cool-
ing needs better than any oil company. We also
provide propane and plumbing services. We are
also local, we live and work where you do, so we
are always available, 24/7 all year.
Come home to Petro and get $ 50.00 in Free
heating oil . 855-4U PROPANE 855-487-7672
PROPANE
PizzArte’s mission
is to ofer authentic
Neapolitan pizza
prepared with ex-
treme attention
and professionalism
using simple, high
quality ingredients
in accordance with
the finest culinary traditions of its birthplace of
Naples. The choice of imported Italian ingredi-
ents combined with the tremendous abilities
of our master pizza makers results in a culinary
level that can be defined as artistic expression.
69 West 55th Street, between 5th & 6th
Aves. Call 212-247-3936 or visit
www.pizzarteny.com
INDEX UWS.indd 106 9/23/11 10:56:58 AM
NYO GALLERY OCTOBER | 107
NYO GALLERY
Since 1985, Stephen P. Wald
Real Estate Associates, Inc.
has been synonymous with
exceptional service and
consummate knowledge of
New York City real estate.
Founded by industry leader, and principal broker Stephen P. Wald,
our full-service brokerage firm has a well-earned reputation for
outstanding service. We not only facilitate the buying and selling
of residential and nvestment properties, but we also see beyond to
what makes each property special and unique. Our understanding
of the specific location, the floor plan, market valuation and the
buildingís architectural characteristics is most important to our
clientele. It is customer satisfaction that continues to set us apart
from the brokerage community. Our business was built on it.
WaldRealEstate.com
New York
Zipline Adventures
“Experience the longest, fastest and
highest Zipline Tour in North America
with New York Zipline Adventures
at Hunter Mountain. With over 4.6
miles of ziplines, the SkyRider Tour soars up to 600’ above the
valley, reaching speeds of over 50 mph! Or, try the family friendly
Mid-Mountain tour that sweeps guests into the forest canopy on a
series of 6 ziplines, 4 rope bridges, 9 tree platforms and an exciting
rappel. All just 2 hours from NYC!”
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INDEX UWS.indd 107 9/23/11 10:57:23 AM
108 | OCTOBER
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INJEST
B`d BXi[Xj_`Xe jd`c\[
and waved her hand. She pout-
ed her lips. She looked over
her shoulder, so people could
see her face while still admir-
ing her back. She tried smiling
again. Kim Kardashian did this
whenever she was confused or
upset or hungry, and right now
she was all five.
Usually Kim Kardashian
loved Manhattan, because
Fashion Week lived there
sometimes, and she and a
sister could walk around the
city and talk about their rela-
tionships. That New York was
always a lot of fun, especially
the part where it was filmed for
television. Then Ryan Seacrest
would call her and they would
discuss “The Big Apple” and
he would tell her how she was a
role model for young women.
This “Brookland” that her
husband Kris Humphries had
moved her to was very difer-
ent. Kim doubted Brookland
was even in New York, because
she had been riding in the met-
al limo that smelled like pee for
a long time now, and the driver
still hadn’t pulled over to find a
gifting suite. Sometimes the doors of the big
limo would open and extras would come and
try to sit on her side of the car or hold onto the
limo’s dancing poles.
Kim was wary. These people didn’t look
like paparazzi, but you could never be too
careful: a hard lesson she learned in Septem-
ber when she put her sister Kourtney’s baby
in her Goyard purse because it looked super-
cute in there, and the next day the pictures
were all over the Internet, and not in a good
way, like that time she made a sex tape. Kim
didn’t think that was fair, because people
put puppies in Gucci bags all the time and it
was adorable, but if you did it to a baby it was
“child abuse”?
Kim smiled at one of the extras in her limo.
“Can you tell me where I’m supposed to be?
I’m kind of busy.” Kim tapped her bracelet for
efect, like she had seen people do when they
were late for something.
Instead of asking for her autograph, the
extra looked at Kim like she was a baby-bag
lady. That was the worst part of New York
and Brookland: people always pretending
not to know who she was. The doors of the
limo opened at a place called Bedford. That
sounded like as good a place as any to get of
and find a professional athlete or rap star to
help her get home.
Kim got out of her limo, which was under-
ground. On the street the people had messy
hair and you couldn’t tell if they were boys or
girls or bicycles. It was like the Grammys all
over again.
“Cut!” yelled Kim Kar-
dashian. But nobody stopped
moving. Kim walked into the
first store she saw to ask the
man behind the counter to
please get her a VitaminWa-
ter and two Ritz crackers with
some peanut butter on them.
The man just stared at her.
It took a moment, but then
Kim got the hint. She sighed,
reaching into her pocket and
pulling out a seal-skin note-
book to scrawl something.
She ripped out the page and
handed it to the man.
“Here you go, this should
cover it,” said Kim Kar-
dashian benevolently. “Don’t
bother with the change.
Could you also call me a limo
though? And find out where
I live? And tell the limo to
take me there? Or it can be
an S.U.V. Thank you so, so,
much.”
Kim air-kissed the guy,
which was his cue to leave
and go get her the water and
crackers and a limo or sports
utility vehicle. But in Brook-
land everyone had to act like
they were as stupid as a baby in an oversize
purse. Instead of saying, “Right away, Mrs.
Kardashian, and also may I just say, your
body is an inspiration to women every-
where,” he just stared at it like he didn’t even
know how much her autograph was worth. It
was definitely worth more than money, which
was lucky since Kim Kardashian didn’t have
a wallet on account of losing a very valuable
purse with a baby in it recently. Now she was
in Brookland alone and it was terrible.
But Kim Kardashian could be patient while
she waited for her new assistant to get her some
crackers and a car. Kim nodded her head. She
smiled. She blew air-kisses. Even if she didn’t
know what that word meant, Kim Kardashian
was nothing if not professional. o
Kimpossible!
A Kardashian Goes to Brooklyn
(as we imagine it)
By Drew Grant o Illustration by Paul Kisselev
NYO_MAG5_LastPage_Kardashian.indd 108 9/23/11 6:26:04 PM
Untitled-27 1 9/23/11 10:58:31 AM
Embodying watchmaking tradition and timeless elegance,
the 0apeland chronograph oIIers a Iascinating blend oI
authenticity and style that keeps in perIect step with liIe`s
most precious moments. www.baume-et-mercier.cem
NYObserver_BAM8183_CL10007.indd 1 9/23/11 12:04 PM
Untitled-28 1 9/23/11 3:15:57 PM

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