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1574828754 Meaningful Results1

1574828754 Meaningful Results1

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11/02/2012

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Think of Developmental Assets as salt in the ocean
or oxygen in blood. Asset-building opportunities
should permeate the life of a young person, and
likewise, the Developmental Assets need to be

infused throughout a mentoring program. Use
this checklist to see how you’re currently building
Developmental Assets and to identify areas you
could strengthen.

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SUPPORT

Does our program aim to be part of a larger

web of support that includes mentees’ families,

schools, and neighborhoods?

Do we communicate with mentors, mentees,

and mentees’ families to recognize the

important roles they each play in supporting

the mentoring relationship?

EMPOWERMENT

Does our training and recruitment process

reflect that we appreciate young people

as valuable participants with something to

contribute, not just as “needing our help”?

Do we conduct background checks or take

other measures to make our program as safe

as possible?

BOUNDARIES AND EXPECTATIONS

Do we set clear, consistent boundaries

for behavior in our program?

Do we have high expectations and reward

the positive behavior we see?

WE ALREADY

DO THIS WELL

WE COULD DO

THIS BETTER

NOT SURE WE

CAN DO THIS

CONTINUES

21

AN ASSET-BUILDING CHECKLIST FOR MENTORING ORGANIZATIONS

Developmental Assets™ are positive factors within young people, families, communities, schools, and other settings that research has found to be important in promoting

young people’s development. This handout may be reproduced for educational, noncommercial uses only (with this copyright line). From Mentoring for Meaningful

Results: Asset-Building Tips, Tools, and Activities for Youth and Adults. Copyright © 2006 by Search InstituteSM

; 800-888-7828; www.search-institute.org.

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After you have completed this worksheet, use it as
a discussion starter. What are your current asset-
building strengths? How can you build on the things
that are already working well? What are your areas

of opportunity? Which things are you unable to do,
given the structure, nature, or mission of your orga-
nization? How can this checklist help you in mak-
ing plans and developing ways to act?

CONSTRUCTIVE USE OF TIME

Do we encourage our program’s participants to balance

their involvement with other important activities?

Do we offer mentors and mentees opportunities to take

part in a variety of creative activities?

COMMITMENT TO LEARNING

Does our program motivate mentees to do well in school?

Do our mentors and mentees spend time learning new

things, completing homework assignments, or reading

for pleasure?

POSITIVE VALUES

Have we identified all the ways our programs may

affect or engage all young people, regardless of gender,

ability, race, ethnicity, culture, sexual orientation, or

socioeconomic status?

Does our program staff articulate the values that are

important to our organization?

SOCIAL COMPETENCIES

Do we provide mentors and mentees with tools for

building strong, positive relationships?

Do we have policies and resources to help mentors and

mentees practice peaceful conflict resolution?

POSITIVE IDENTITY

Do the adults in our program share power and work

with young people instead of doing things for them?

Does our program help young people plan for

the future?

WE ALREADY

DO THIS WELL

WE COULD DO

THIS BETTER

NOT SURE WE

CAN DO THIS

22

FOR MENTORING PROGRAM PROVIDERS

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