Veritas NetBackup™ Administrator’s Guide, Volume II

for Windows

Release 6.5

12308282

Veritas NetBackup Administrator’s Guide, Volume II
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30 ACS_mediatype ................................................................................................29 vm.............................33 AVRD_SCAN_DELAY ............30 API_BARCODE_RULES ................28 NBRB_RETRY_DELAY_AFTER_EMM_ERR ..........................................Contents Chapter 1 Additional configuration Multiplexing ......................................................................................18 Demultiplexing ..............................27 NetBackup administration options ....28 NBRB_FORCE_FULL_EVAL .......................................................................................................................................22 NetBackup catalogs ........32 AUTO_UPDATE_ROBOT ..................................................................................................14 Maximum streams per drive for a storage unit ................................................34 CLUSTER_NAME ...............34 .....................................21 Software on each server ................................................................................................................................................................31 AUTHORIZATION_REQUIRED ...............conf options for media servers ............29 REQUIRED_NETWORK .....................................33 CLEAN_REQUEST_TIMEOUT .........................................................................................15 Media multiplexing for a schedule .................23 Adding a media server ...................................33 AVRD_PEND_DELAY .................................................................................................................................................28 NBRB_ENABLE_OPTIMIZATIONS ...............25 NetBackup configuration options ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................15 Other configuration settings to consider using multiplexing .....................34 CLIENT_PORT_WINDOW ............29 NBRB_MPX_GROUP_UNLOAD_DELAY .............................23 Registering a media server .............................................20 Using multiple media servers with one master server ....32 AUTO_PATH_CORRECTION ............30 ADJ_LSM ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................27 NBRB_CLEANUP_OBSOLETE_DBINFO ..........................................................14 How to configure multiplexing ................................................19 Using multiple NetBackup master servers ..................28 NBRB_REEVAL_PENDING ...................................................28 NBRB_REEVAL_PERIOD ........................................................................................................................................................13 When to use multiplexing .....................................................................................

.... 39 PREFERRED_GROUP ................................................ 45 Dynamic host name and IP addressing .......................................................................................... 46 Configuring the NetBackup master server ........................................................... 43 Direct I/O for backups ............................................................................... 42 SSO_DA_RETRY_TIMEOUT ....................................................................................................................................................... 54 How NetBackup uses host names ...... 37 MAP_CONTINUE_TIMEOUT ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 40 PREVENT_MEDIA_REMOVAL .................... 40 RANDOM_PORTS ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 38 MEDIA_ID_PREFIX ... 51 Chapter 2 Reference topics Rules for using host names in NetBackup ...................... 55 Catalog backup information .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 50 Specifying the locale of the NetBackup installation ................... 35 DAYS_TO_KEEP_LOGS .. 36 EMM_REQUEST_TIMOUT ........................................................................................................................ 43 VERBOSE .......................................... 44 Disabling direct I/O ................................... 54 Policy configuration ......................................................................... 54 Qualifying host names .....conf file ................................................ 38 MEDIA_ID_BARCODE_CHARS ................................................................................................................................ 43 Example vm..................................................6 CONNECT_OPTIONS ........................................................................................................... 49 Configuring email notifications .......................................................... 55 ........ 39 MM_SERVER_NAME .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 49 Configuring a dynamic UNIX NetBackup client ................................................. 36 EMM_RETRY_COUNT ................ 41 SERVER ................................................... 35 DAS_CLIENT ......... 55 Image catalog ........................................................................................................... 37 MAP_ID ......................................................................... 37 INVENTORY_FILTER .... 40 REQUIRED_INTERFACE ............................................... 36 EMM_CONNECT_TIMOUT .......................................................................................................................................................... 41 SSO_DA_REREGISTER_INTERVAL ............................ 47 Configuring a dynamic Microsoft Windows client .. 36 ENABLE_ROBOT_AUTH ................................................................... 42 SSO_HOST_NAME .............. 43 TLH_mediatype ... 45 Setting up dynamic IP addresses and host names ................................................ 43 TLM_mediatype ........................... 55 Error catalog ..............................

..........................................7 How to update NetBackup after a host name changes ...................................80 nbmail.......................................................................87 TapeAlert log codes .........58 Factors that affect backup time ....85 Performance and troubleshooting ......69 bpstart_notify (UNIX clients only) ........................................................67 NetBackup notify scripts ............81 parent_end_notify................................................................................................................................................76 dbbackup_notify.............................................................................................................................................cmd ..........83 Media and device management best practices ..................61 Examples ........................................70 bpstart_notify.........61 Total transfer rate .......cmd .....................................................................................59 Device delays .............................................cmd ...............................62 How NetBackup builds a worklist ...........................................................................................86 Using TapeAlert ......................60 Network transfer rate ...............................................................................................................................................66 Determining backup media requirements ...............................87 Requirements for using TapeAlert ........................................................................................................................................................................................bat (Microsoft Windows clients only) ..................79 mail_dr_info..............................................................................87 ....................74 bpend_notify.................83 session_start_notify.............................................................................................59 Total data .cmd ....................82 restore_notify...61 Using the system monitor ............cmd .....................65 To prioritize queued jobs ............................................................................................bat (Microsoft Windows clients only) ..........................................................................................................................................cmd .....................................................................................................................................................................................72 bpend_notify (UNIX clients only) ......................................60 Determining NetBackup transfer rate ..........................58 Effects of a non-NetBackup tar ...84 Media management ................................................................60 Network transfer plus end-of-backup-processing rate ..........83 userreq_notify................................85 Device management ...................................................................59 Transfer rate .............................................................................................................................56 Special considerations for Domain Name Service (DNS) ...cmd .........................................82 session_notify................................................................................................................................................................cmd ...........................................................68 backup_notify.....cmd ....................................cmd ....................cmd ...........................................cmd ...........................69 backup_exit_notify.................65 Building the worklist (Queue) .......................................................................................................81 parent_start_notify.....................................84 General practices ..........................................78 diskfull_notify......................................56 Reading backup images with tar .................................................................................................

........................................................................................................... 114 Server operating system limitations ............................................................................................................... 94 Volume pool and volume group example ................................. 94 Volume groups ................................ 91 TapeAlert cleaning .................................................................................... 112 SCSI reservation logging ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 111 Breaking a reservation ........................................................................104 How NetBackup selects drives ....................................................... 109 SPC-2 SCSI reserve commands ......................... 93 Volume pools ............................................................................ 99 Checking barcodes ... 91 Frequency-based cleaning ....................................................... 90 Reactive cleaning (TapeAlert) ............................... 114 Checking for data loss ............................................................................ 99 NetBackup actions for barcodes ................... 95 Scratch volume pools ....... 111 Forcing a release ..................................................... 98 Barcode advantages ............................................... 94 Rules for assigning volume groups .............................. 98 Barcode rules ................................ 93 Volume pool and volume group overview ............................................................................................ 110 SCSI reservation conflicts ....................................................................... 96 Scratch pool example ............................................................ 107 SCSI persistent reserve process .. 93 Using a cleaning tape ........................................ 100 Media ID generation rules ................................................................................................................. 92 Operator-initiated cleaning ......................................................................................................................................................... 97 Barcode overview ......... 106 How NetBackup reserves drives ............................................................................................... 112 SCSI reserve requirements and limitations ... 91 TapeAlert and frequency-based cleaning ................................................ 109 SPC-2 SCSI reserve process ............................100 Example barcode rules ........................ 91 Library-based cleaning .................... 98 Barcode best practices .....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................114 ............................................................................102 Replacing devices ........................................................................................... 109 SCSI persistent reserve conflicts ..................................... 108 SCSI persistent reserve commands ..................................... 102 Decommissioning a media server .............. 102 Changing your hardware configuration ...................................................................8 Drive cleaning overview .................................................................................................................................................... 102 Controlling hardware compression ................................................................................................................................ 92 Frequency-based cleaning limitations .............. 96 Scratch pool usage .........................................................................................................................................................................................................

121 Fragmented backups .....................................................................................................................................115 How NetBackup selects media ............125 Device discovery in NetBackup .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................120 Standard tape format .......120 QIC/WORM tape format ...................141 ...116 Spanning media ..............................................116 Selecting media in robots .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................120 Optical media format ..............128 Correlating devices and names on Windows hosts ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................115 Common configuration problems .........128 Correlating tape drives to device files or addresses .......121 Multiplexing format ...................................128 Correlating devices and device files on UNIX hosts ............124 Device serialization .................115 Configuring SCSI reserve ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................117 Media selection using stand-alone drive extensions ....136 Creating an exclude list on a UNIX client ............................134 Exclude and include lists on UNIX clients ...................................................................................................127 Device mapping file ..............................................................................................................................................127 Adding devices without discovery .................118 Media formats ...................................141 System requirements ............................125 Device discovery in the Device Configuration Wizard ...141 Server and client installation ................................................139 Schedules for user backups or archives .............................................................122 Device discovery overview ...............126 Device discovery and shared tape drives ....................117 Selecting media in stand-alone drives ...121 Spanning tapes .............................................................................126 Viewing and verifying the device configuration ...........................................................................................................................114 Checking for tape and driver configuration errors .............136 Creating an include list on a UNIX client ..140 Chapter 4 Using NetBackup with AFS Installation .............130 Chapter 3 UNIX reference topics Cross mount points .....................................................122 Media Manager commands .....................................................................................................124 Devices that can be discovered ......9 Possible data loss causes .....................................141 Configuration ....................

............................. 154 To modify diskette sets for use with multiple Windows 2000 computers 155 Creating a bootable CD image ............. 142 Client list ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................161 Step 1: Boot your computer .....................160 Recovering your computer ........................................................................................................ 142 Regular expressions ..................... 144 Backups and restores ....................................................................................................................................... 144 Restore from the NetBackup for AFS client ........................................................................... 167 .......0 and later .................. 149 Overview of IDR use ...........................................................................................157 Updating IDR media ......................... 152 Creating IDR media ..............................................................................................10 General policy attributes .............................................. 164 Notes on altering hard drive partition sizes .......................................... 146 Troubleshooting restores ................................................. 148 Requirements for IDR ................................................................................................ 150 Configuring NetBackup policies for IDR .......... 153 Creating bootable diskettes ................ 150 About the DR files .....................................................................................................................................................................................exe to create or update a DR file ...... 144 Restore from the NetBackup master server ..... 152 Choosing the bootable media ... 145 Notes about restores .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................145 Troubleshooting backups ............... 159 Updating IDR diskettes only ............ 146 Chapter 5 Intelligent Disaster Recovery Changes for NetBackup 6............................ 142 Backup selections ........................................... 160 Using drfile................... 158 Updating bootable diskettes ........................................................................................................................ 163 Step 3: Disaster recovery wizard ............................................................... 162 Step 2: Windows setup in IDR recovery .................... 156 Creating IDR diskettes ................................................................. 148 Supported Windows editions ........................................................................................ 144 Restores ............................................................................................................................. 144 Backups ................................................................................................................................... 143 Exclude and include lists ................ 151 Backing up the protected computer ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................144 Manual backup ............... 144 Automatic backup ............................................ 158 Updating a bootable CD .................................................................................. 145 Troubleshooting ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 142 Backup selection list directives .............

................................................167 Recovering the dell PowerEdge 6100/200 with RAID ..............................................................11 Notes on recovering specific platforms ....................169 ........................168 Recovering IBM computers ...........................................................................................169 IDR frequently asked questions ......................168 Recovering Compaq computers .....................

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are optional. NetBackup multiplexes the backups sequentially onto the media. Separate volume pools or media IDs are not necessary. in most instances. Multiplexed and unmultiplexed backups can reside on the same volume.Chapter 1 Additional configuration This chapter explains settings that. . The sections in this chapter include the following: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ “Multiplexing” on page 13 “Using multiple NetBackup master servers” on page 20 “Using multiple media servers with one master server” on page 21 “Adding a media server” on page 23 “NetBackup configuration options” on page 27 “Direct I/O for backups” on page 44 “Dynamic host name and IP addressing” on page 45 “Configuring email notifications” on page 50 “Specifying the locale of the NetBackup installation” on page 51 Multiplexing NetBackup multiplexing sends concurrent backups from one or several clients to a single storage device.

Therefore. In addition to providing parallel data streams. Note: To reduce the impact of multiplexing on restore times. set the storage unit maximum fragment size to a value smaller than the largest allowed value. Instances in which NetBackup uses software compression. The parallel data streams take advantage of whatever network capacity is available. are also improved. How to configure multiplexing Multiplexing must be set in two places in the NetBackup configuration: . the storage device transfer rate is maximized. NetBackup finds the media and restores the requested backup. incremental backups). Multiple slow networks. The performance in the following situations would be improved by using multiplexing: ■ Slow clients. Many short backups (for example. ■ ■ Multiplexing reduces performance on restores because it uses extra time to read the images. Clients Disk Server Removable media or magnetic disk Disk Disk When to use multiplexing Multiplexing is generally used to reduce the amount of time that is required to complete backups. which normally reduces client performance. multiplexing reduces the time each job waits for a device to become available.14 Additional configuration Multiplexing No special action is required to restore a multiplexed backup.

other drives are available for non-multiplexed jobs. The number can range from 1 through 32. reduce the Maximum Streams Per Drive setting for the storage unit. Consider the following to estimate the potential load that multiplexing can place on the central processing unit: ■ The maximum concurrent jobs that NetBackup can attempt equals the sum of the concurrent backup jobs that can run on all storage units. If multiplexed jobs are confined to specific drives. Volume I. where 1 is the default and specifies no multiplexing. Regardless of the setting on a schedule. where 1 is the default and specifies no multiplexing. Maximum streams per drive for a storage unit The Maximum Streams Per Drive setting for a storage unit specifies how many backups NetBackup can multiplex onto any single drive in the storage unit. see “Enable multiplexing” on page 228 in the NetBackup Administrator’s Guide. the maximum jobs that NetBackup starts never exceeds the Maximum Streams Per Drive value for the storage unit. . The maximum concurrent jobs that can run on a storage unit equals the Maximum Streams Per Drive value. The value is set for each storage unit. For more information. ■ Media multiplexing for a schedule In addition to the Maximum Streams Per Drive setting for a storage unit. it does not take effect until the next time a schedule runs.Additional configuration Multiplexing 15 ■ ■ Storage unit Schedule Note: If you change these values. specify a Media Multiplexing value for each schedule. see “Media multiplexing” on page 148 in the NetBackup Administrator’s Guide. If the server cannot perform other tasks or runs out of memory or processes. Choose a value that is based on the ability of the central processing unit to handle parallel jobs. Volume I. For more information. The Media Multiplexing value specifies the maximum number of backups from the schedule to be multiplexed onto any single drive in the configuration. The Media Multiplexing setting ranges from 1 through 32. memory is also important. NetBackup attempts to add multiplexed jobs to drives that are already use multiplexing. multiplied by the number of drives. Because extra buffers are required.

The storage unit’s Maximum streams per drive setting. when the Schedule A limit is reached on Drive 1. unshaded numbers denote a job starting. In the following figure. For example. 9 denotes the completion of job A1 on Drive 1.16 Additional configuration Multiplexing When NetBackup multiplexes jobs. it continues to add jobs to a drive until the number of jobs on the drive matches either of the following: ■ This schedule’s Media Multiplexing setting. Shaded numbers denote job completion. NetBackup can add jobs from more than one schedule to a drive. 1 denotes the start of job A1 on Drive 1. In the following figure. If the limit is reached for a drive. NetBackup sends jobs to other drives. NetBackup adds Schedule A jobs to Drive 2. ■ .

Schedule A Media Multiplexing limit of 2 is reached for this drive. However. other drives are available for non-multiplexed jobs. assume that Allow Multiple Data Streams is enabled. job A5 starts on Drive 1. Also. NetBackup attempts to add multiplexed jobs to drives that already use multiplexing. Jobs B3 and B4 from client otter start on drive 2. 11 12 Job A3 from client cat finishes on drive 2 and job B1 from client fox finishes on drive 1. All jobs are now running for schedule B. Storage Unit Max mpx is reached for drive 2. 1 3 5 7 2 4 6 8 Jobs A1 and A2 from client dog start on drive 1. Job A5 from client cat starts on drive 1. jobs B1 and B2 for client fox 9 10 continue to run. Schedule A Media Multiplexing limit of 2 prevents job A5 from starting on drive 1. Jobs A3 and A4 from client cat start on drive 2. Therefore.Additional configuration Multiplexing 17 Figure 1-1 Schedule A Media Multiplexing per drive = 2 dog 1 2 9 10 Multiplexing and schedules Storage Unit Max mpx per drive = 4 A1 A2 A5 13 Drive 1 B2 6 B1 Schedule B Media Multiplexing per drive = 4 fox 5 12 cat 3 11 A3 Drive 2 4 A4 B4 8 B3 7 otter Assume schedule A begins first (note that the schedules can be in the same or in different policies). Jobs A1 and A2 from client dog finish on drive 1. JobA5 is the last job for schedule A. If multiplexed jobs are confined to specific drives. 13 . Job B2 is the only job currently running on drive 1. Jobs B1 and B2 for client fox start on drive 1. so a client can have multiple data streams. Storage unit max mpx is reached for this drive. Schedule A Media Multiplexing limit of 2 prevents job A5 from starting on Drive 2. Schedule A Media Multiplexing limit of 2 is reached for this drive.

Maximum Jobs Per Client appears on the Global properties dialog box. Delay On Multiplexed Restores appears on the General Server properties dialog box. (A1 in this example. When the maximum number of jobs on the client is reached. see “Maximum data streams” on page 386 in the NetBackup Administrator’s Guide.18 Additional configuration Multiplexing Note: If the backup window closes before NetBackup can start all the jobs in a multiplexing set. it prevents NetBackup from fully using the storage unit’s multiplexing capabilities. MPX restore delay The Delay On Multiplexed Restores property applies to multiplexed restores. . The property specifies how long the server waits for additional restore requests of files and raw partitions in a set of multiplexed images on the same tape. Figure 1-1 on page 17 assumes that the Activity Monitor shows A1 through A5 as queued and active. the client setting does not affect multiplexing. If the window closes before any jobs have started. For more information. Maximum jobs per client The Maximum Jobs Per Client property limits the number of backup jobs that can run concurrently on any NetBackup client. consider a case where jobs from different schedules on the same client go to the same storage unit. Maximum jobs this client You can also set the maximum number of jobs that are allowed on a specific client without affecting other clients. the maximum number of jobs that are permitted on the client would be reached before the multiplexing limit is reached for the storage unit. see “Limit jobs per policy” on page 104 in the NetBackup Administrator’s Guide. Volume I.) Other configuration settings to consider using multiplexing Limit jobs per policy Set Limit Jobs Per Policy high enough to support the specified level of multiplexing. For example. Volume I. NetBackup completes only the jobs that have started. For more information. Usually. NetBackup does not perform the other jobs that are in the set. However. If only A1 and A2 start before the window closes. In this case. then only the first queued and active job starts and completes.

Duplication allows one multiplexed backup at one time to be copied from the source media to the target media. do not include the -mpx option on that command. Note: If you use the bpduplicate command instead of the NetBackup Administration Console. the target contains a single demultiplexed copy of each duplicated backup. Do not select Preserve Multiplexing in the Setup Duplication Variables dialog box when backups are duplicated. Use duplication to demultiplex a backup.Additional configuration Multiplexing 19 Demultiplexing Demultiplexing speeds up future restores and is useful for creating a copy for off-site storage. .) The duplicate copy can be made into the primary copy. (The target can also contain other backups. When duplication is complete.

Workstations Network A1 Mass Storage NetBackup Master Server A Workstations Network A2 Mass Storage Network B1 Workstations Router Workstations Network B2 NetBackup Master Server B . You can also create a configuration where one server is the master and the other is a media server. You divide the clients between the servers as necessary. The following figure shows a multiple-server configuration where the two sets of networks (A1/A2 and B1/B2) each have enough clients to justify separate servers.20 Additional configuration Using multiple NetBackup master servers Using multiple NetBackup master servers For a large site. the two NetBackup server configurations are completely independent. you can use multiple NetBackup master servers to optimize the backup loads. In this environment.

which reduces network traffic because the data does not traverse the network. its NetBackup media servers. A NetBackup master server is a media server for itself but cannot be a media server for another master server.Additional configuration Using multiple media servers with one master server 21 Using multiple media servers with one master server You can set up a NetBackup protection domain as follows: ■ ■ One master server. . Multiple media servers. This strategy also distributes the backup load between the master and the media servers. The master server directs the data from the client to the client’s peripherals. which controls all backup scheduling. a client can have backups directed to any device on any server in the group. Two important points to remember about master and media servers: ■ ■ There can be only one master server in a group. which write the backup images to disk or removable media. A common alternative strategy is to install extra peripherals on the clients that produce large amounts of data. ■ A protection domain refers collectively to the NetBackup master server. and its NetBackup clients. which send their data to the media servers. Multiple protected NetBackup clients. In a group of NetBackup servers. They may have peripheral devices to provide additional storage.

. Software on each server Applies to NetBackup Enterprise Server only. and Restore user interface from a Windows client that has the Remote Administration Console installed. Administration Interface* User Interface (BAR) Master Server NetBackup Catalogs Configuration files Image database User Interface (BAR) NetBackup Client Storage Device Information in relational databases (about devices. The NetBackup installation program has choices for master and media server installation. Install NetBackup server software on each NetBackup server that has a peripheral that you want to include in a storage unit. volumes) Administration Interface* User Interface User Interface (BAR) Storage Device NetBackup Media Server NetBackup Media Server Storage Device Remote Admin Console* Remote Admin Console* * You can also use the Backup. Archive. The following topics provide more details on master and media servers and a procedure to configure them.22 Additional configuration Using multiple media servers with one master server The following figure shows where software is installed and where the NetBackup catalogs are located (by default).

The catalogs include the media and the volume database (emm_data. Prepare the device drivers on the new media server host’s operating system as explained in the NetBackup Device Configuration Guide. If the EMM server resides on a host other than the master server.Additional configuration Adding a media server 23 NetBackup catalogs Applies to NetBackup Enterprise Server only. 2 3 . Note: To avoid problems with NetBackup. For example. The master server is the default location for the NetBackup catalogs. add the new media server to the additional servers list on that host. Note: The NetBackup Enterprise Media Manager service must be active when you add a media server. For help. Add the new media server to the additional servers list of the master server and of the clients the new media server backs up. and backup or restore clients. see the vendor’s documentation. select Clients. The volume database contains the media usage information and the volume information that are used during the backups. ensure that the host name you use in NetBackup matches the host name in your TCP/IP configuration. to add the new media server to clients. attach the devices and install any software that is required to drive the storage devices. configure devices and volumes. To add a media server 1 On the new media server host. add it to the additional servers list on all media servers in the group. To add the new media server to the additional servers list. Adding a media server The following section applies to NetBackup Enterprise Server only.db). If the new media server is part of a server group. Use the following procedure to add a media server to an existing NetBackup environment. do the following: a Select NetBackup Management > Host Properties > hosttype.

Configure the drives and robots as explained in ”Devices” in the NetBackup Administrator’s Guide. On the master server. and the media servers on which you added the new server name. Volume I. c d e f g Select the Servers properties. do the following to the NetBackup configuration: .ini file. For more information. add the new media server name by using a SERVER entry in the bp. Install the NetBackup media server software as explained in the NetBackup Installation Guide. Volume I.24 Additional configuration Adding a media server b Select the host that you want to change in the right pane. hold down the Shift key and select all the hosts that you want to change in the right pane. Click Add next to the Additional servers window and type the name of the new server. On NetWare target clients. Configure the volumes as explained in “Media” in the NetBackup Administrator’s Guide. To select more than one host. 4 5 6 7 8 9 Restart the NetBackup services on the master server. Select Actions > Properties. Volume I. the EMM server. see “Servers properties” on page 467 in the NetBackup Administrator’s Guide. h Click OK. Click Close. Click Add to add the server to the additional server list for all selected hosts.

c 10 Test your configuration by performing a user backup or a manual backup that uses a schedule that specifies a storage unit on the media server. Paths on a UNIX media server: media_server_name:/usr/openv/netbackup/db media_server_name:/usr/openv/var media_server_name:/usr/openv/volmgr/database Configure the NetBackup policies and schedules to use the storage units that are configured on the media server.major_level. and manage devices. cold catalog backup method: Add the catalog paths for the media server to the NetBackup catalog backup configuration. Registering a media server If the EMM server is not running when you add a media server.Additional configuration Adding a media server 25 a b Add storage units to the media server. configure. run the following command (use the host name of the media server): nbemmcmd -addhost -machinename hostname -machinetype media -masterserver server_name -operatingsystem os_type -netbackupversion level. the media server is not registered. To register a media server 1 2 Start the EMM service on the EMM server. You must register the media server with the EMM server. To use the offline. hot catalog backup method: NetBackup enters the paths automatically. You cannot discover. Always specify the media server as the media server for the storage unit.minor_level . Enter the catalog paths if necessary: To use the online. “NetBackup Catalog” on page 273 in the Administrator’s Guide. Volume I. Paths on a Windows media server: media_server_name:install_path\NetBackup\db media_server_name:install_path\NetBackup\var media_server_name:install_path\Volmgr\database Where install_path is the directory where the NetBackup software is installed on the media server. For more information. On the EMM server host. see Chapter 4.

ensure that the host name you use in NetBackup matches the host name in your TCP/IP configuration. For nbemmcmd command usage. see NetBackup Commands for UNIX and Linux or NetBackup Commands for Windows. .26 Additional configuration Adding a media server Note: To avoid problems with NetBackup.

conf file as explained in this chapter.conf file contains configuration entries for media and device management.conf file) NetBackup administration options The following NetBackup configuration options cannot be configured by using the NetBackup Administration Console. To change a default value.Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options 27 NetBackup configuration options NetBackup configuration options allow an administrator to customize NetBackup to meet specific site preferences and requirements. Generally. ■ ■ NetBackup administration options Media and device configuration options (vm. The commands are described in NetBackup Commands for Windows. . under Host Properties. use the bpgetconfig command to obtain a list of configuration entries. these options are configured in the NetBackup Administration Console. The vm. then use bpsetconfig to change the entries as needed. Options for configuring media and device management in the vm. some options cannot be configured by using the NetBackup Administration Console. However.

No equivalent exists in the NetBackup Administration Console host properties. using no cached EMM information. full evaluations include matching job resource requests with available resources. a pending request queue can include. NBRB_REEVAL_PENDING The NBRB_REEVAL_PENDING entry serves as a performance tuning option for the Intelligent Resource Manager. . No equivalent exists in the NetBackup Administration Console host properties.exe) queues. NBRB_REEVAL_PERIOD indicates the time between evaluations if an outstanding request is not satisfied. No equivalent exists in the NetBackup Administration Console host properties. NBRB_FORCE_FULL_EVAL The NBRB_FORCE_FULL_EVAL entry serves as a performance tuning option for the Intelligent Resource Manager. Default: 1 (true). For example. This entry indicates whether the Resource Broker caches states of resource requests. jobs awaiting resources. This entry indicates the number of seconds (default: 60) that can elapse between the cleanup of obsolete information in the NetBackup Resource Broker (nbrb) database. NBRB_ENABLE_OPTIMIZATIONS The NBRB_ENABLE_OPTIMIZATIONS entry serves as a performance tuning option for the Intelligent Resource Manager. and if no other requests or resources have been released. This entry indicates the number of seconds that can elapse between full evaluations of all NetBackup Resource Broker (nbrb. Default: 5 minutes passes before the initial request is reevaluated. NBRB_REEVAL_PERIOD The NBRB_REEVAL_PERIOD entry serves as a performance tuning option for the Intelligent Resource Manager and NetBackup Resource Broker (nbrb.exe). This entry indicates the number of seconds (default: 60) that can elapse between evaluations of the pending request queue.28 Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options NBRB_CLEANUP_OBSOLETE_DBINFO The NBRB_CLEANUP_OBSOLETE_DBINFO entry serves as a performance tuning option for the Intelligent Resource Manager. (Default: 1800 seconds/30 minutes. No equivalent exists in the NetBackup Administration Console host properties. No equivalent exists in the NetBackup Administration Console host properties.) For example.

28. See Chapter 7 in the Administrator’s Guide.exe) waits for a new job to appear before a tape is unloaded.Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options 29 NBRB_RETRY_DELAY_AFTER_EMM_ERR The NBRB_RETRY_DELAY_AFTER_EMM_ERR entry serves as a performance tuning option for the Intelligent Resource Manager. REQUIRED_NETWORK The REQUIRED_NETWORK entry specifies the required route for backup traffic in an environment where the network traffic is segregated. nbrb. During restores. Default: 300 seconds (5 minutes). (Default: 10 seconds. an environment may contain a production network at 145.21.exe uses the maximum value of NBRB_MPX_GROUP_UNLOAD_DELAY and the Media mount timeout host property setting when unmounting the tape.0 Note: If the variable is set and the network is not available. This entry indicates how long NetBackup waits after an EMM error before attempting again.conf file: REQUIRED_NETWORK = 192.28. . For example. This host property is found in the NetBackup Administration Console under NetBackup Management > Host Properties > Select master server > Timeouts > Media mount timeout. For example. During user backups. The RE_READ_INTERVAL entry determines how often NetBackup checks disk storage units for available capacity.132. NBRB_MPX_GROUP_UNLOAD_DELAY The NBRB_MPX_GROUP_UNLOAD_DELAY entry serves as a performance tuning option for the Intelligent Resource Manager. not NBRB_MPX_GROUP_UNLOAD_DELAY. This entry indicates the number of seconds that the NetBackup Resource Broker (nbrb. if a media server is down. (Default: 60 seconds.132.14. Media mount timeout is used.0. To indicate that NetBackup should use only the backup network. add the following entry in the bp.) This setting can help avoid unnecessary reloading of tapes and applies to all backup jobs. No equivalent exists in the NetBackup Administration Console host properties.) The error must be one where a retry is possible.0 and a backup network at 192. all connections fail and no backups are performed. Volume I for more details.

conf file” on page 43 for an example configuration file. the ACS media type is mapped to the specified Media Manager media type.conf file contains configuration entries for media and device management. see “Media Type Mappings tab” in the NetBackup Administrator’s Guide for Windows. Volume I. ACS_mediatype ACS_mediatype = Media_Manager_mediatype This configuration entry applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server If this entry is used in vm. In an ACS robot with multiple library storage modules (LSMs). pass-through mechanisms may move ejected media to the media access port (MAP). ADJ_LSM ADJ_LSM = robot_num ACS_ID. You can specify more than one ACS_mediatype entry. If this entry is specified in vm. The NetBackup component reads this configuration file on the host where the component runs. NetBackup determines the appropriate MAP to complete the media eject using a nearest-MAP algorithm. A pass-through mechanism passes media from one LSM to another. See “Example vm. Use this entry on every NetBackup media server that functions as an ACS robot control host. This entry is read and interpreted on the host on which vmcheckxxx and vmupdate run during a robot inventory operation. any MAP_ID entries in vm.conf are ignored. This algorithm is only for the cases where more than one MAP has been requested to handle the eject. daemon. it must be created to add entries.conf options for media servers The install_path\volmgr\vm. For a list of the valid ACS_mediatype entries. you do not need to know which MAP (or ACS CAP) to select for efficient ejects. If this algorithm is used.conf.30 Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options vm. This travel time can be excessive when media must pass through several LSMs.conf. The host may be a NetBackup administration client or a server where administration operations are requested. NetBackup may create this file. process. . Use this entry to specify the physical orientation of the LSMs in an ACS robot.LSM_ID This configuration entry applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. The NetBackup component is a command.LSM_ID ACS_ID. or utility. This nearest-MAP algorithm is based on the physical orientation of the LSMs that defined with this entry. but if it does not exist.

3 0.1 0.2 0. NetBackup assumes that all LSMs are interconnected with pass-through ports. The LSMs are interconnected in a line formation.4 0.1 0. .5 The robot has pass-through mechanisms between 7 LSMs.6 0. Figure 1-2 Pass-through example Interconnections for Robot 700 1 0 6 5 4 2 3 API_BARCODE_RULES API_BARCODE_RULES This configuration entry applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server.6 0. It is not available from the NetBackup Administration Console.1 0. except for the first LSM and the last LSM.2 0.6 0. ACS_ID and LSM_ID are the coordinates of the LSM.0 0.4 0. Without this entry present. the following entries are required to specify the physical layout of LSM interconnections for robot number 700 (Figure 1-2 on page 31): ADJ_LSM ADJ_LSM ADJ_LSM ADJ_LSM ADJ_LSM ADJ_LSM ADJ_LSM ADJ_LSM = = = = = = = = 700 700 700 700 700 700 700 700 0.Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options 31 Note: The nearest-MAP capability is only available using the vmchange command with the -map option or the Vault administrative interface. For example.2 0.0 0. robot_num is the robot number.3 0.

For maximum security. This entry is read and interpreted on media servers on which the NetBackup vmd service runs. the vm. this entry is read and interpreted on the host . depending on how the drive was configured. NetBackup tries to discover attached devices and then automatically update the device configuration for any device paths that are incorrect. The drive must be configured using different drive types such as hcart or hcart2. any NetBackup server can monitor and control devices on this host. AUTO_PATH_CORRECTION AUTO_PATH_CORRECTION = YES|NO If this entry is specified in vm.conf file also must include a SERVER entry for every media server that controls devices on this host. but write data at different densities. AUTHORIZATION_REQUIRED AUTHORIZATION_REQUIRED This entry specifies that NetBackup should use the vm. barcode rule support for API robots is enabled. NetBackup barcode rules allow default media mappings to be overridden. If the value is YES. If the value is NO.conf. Therefore. a robot inventory operation configures all media of type STK1R as either hcart or hcart2. the device configuration remains unchanged when the NetBackup Device Manager service (ltid) is started. it specifies whether automatic device path remapping is enabled or disabled. the saved device configuration may be different than the actual configuration after you change devices and restart the server. This entry is read and interpreted on the media server on which the NetBackup vmd service runs.conf. On Windows computers. You can specify a barcode rule for a series of barcodes to configure some of the media as hcart2.conf file SERVER entry to control which hosts can monitor and control devices on this host. Without this entry.32 Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options If this entry is specified in vm. Symantec recommends that you use this entry and SERVER entries. For example STK 9940A and STK 9940B drives use STK1R media.conf. Barcode rules are especially useful when multiple generations of the same tape drive use the same type of media. If this entry is specified in vm. If no AUTHORIZATION_REQUIRED entry exists and no SERVER entries exist. Other STK1R media not in this barcode range are configured as hcart (the default for STK1R).

On some server operating systems (Windows. On UNIX and Linux computers. Symantec recommends that this entry not be used with partitioned libraries. AVRD_SCAN_DELAY AVRD_SCAN_DELAY = number_of_seconds If this entry is specified in vm. This entry only operates with the TL8 or TLD robots that post a unit attention when their MAP has been opened. and HP-UX). A value of zero is converted to 1 second. Most robotic libraries with multiple partitions do not post a unit attention when the MAP has been opened. The minimum for number_of_seconds is zero.5 seconds.Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options 33 on which the NetBackup Device Manager service runs. NetBackup delays mount requests by an average of 7. The maximum is 255. If a value is used that is greater than the default. avrd waits number_of_seconds between normal scan cycles. . It is disabled by default on all other servers. Use this entry to minimize the display of this misleading status. AVRD_PEND_DELAY AVRD_PEND_DELAY = number_of_seconds If this entry is specified in vm. This entry is read and interpreted on the host on which avrd runs. avrd waits number_of_seconds before it displays a pending status (PEND) in the Device Monitor. Use this entry to minimize tape mount times. The minimum for number_of_seconds is 1. AUTO_UPDATE_ROBOT AUTO_UPDATE_ROBOT Use this entry to inject media automatically from the Media Access Port (MAP) into a TL8 or TLD robot and update the EMM database. The maximum is 180.conf. NetBackup reports PEND if the drive reports Busy when a volume is unmounted.conf. this entry is read and interpreted on the host on which ltid runs. Tru64. The default value is 15 seconds. The default value is 180 seconds. NetBackup delays mount requests and drive status updates in the Device Monitor. Device path remapping is enabled by default on Windows and Linux servers. Without this entry. Media are injected if the robot generates a unit attention message. This entry is read and interpreted on the host on which avrd runs.

The default value is 30 and a value of zero is converted to the default value of 30. CLEAN_REQUEST_TIMEOUT CLEAN_REQUEST_TIMEOUT = minutes Use this entry to specify how long NetBackup waits for a drive to be cleaned before it removes the cleaning request from the cleaning queue. Data loss may occur. Use the gethostname() name.conf.conf. This entry is read and interpreted on the host on which vmd runs. Use the REQUIRED_INTERFACE entry if present in vm. . Use the same name that NetBackup uses. minutes can be from 1 to 144000 (100 days). A value of zero is specified for start. NetBackup may not detect media changes. CLUSTER_NAME CLUSTER_NAME = cluster_alias This entry and the following two entries determine the name other NetBackup servers and clients should use when they refer to this server: MM_SERVER_NAME = host_name REQUIRED_INTERFACE = host_name The algorithm for determining the server name is as follows: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Use the CLUSTER_NAME entry if present in vm. Use the MM_SERVER_NAME entry if present in vm. CLIENT_PORT_WINDOW CLIENT_PORT_WINDOW = start end Use this entry to specify the range of non-reserved ports on this host that are used to connect to vmd on other hosts.conf.34 Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options Caution: If number_of_seconds is set to a value that allows media to be changed within one scan cycle. the following entry permits ports from 4800 through 5000: CLIENT_PORT_WINDOW = 4800 5000 The operating system determines the non-reserved port to use in the following cases: ■ ■ A CLIENT_PORT_WINDOW entry is not specified. For example. Unprocessed requests to clean a drive are removed from the queue after 30 minutes.

or use only the daemon’s port number. A value of 1 specifies to use vnetd only to connect to a daemon on the server. By default this client .conf. CONNECT_OPTIONS CONNECT_OPTIONS = server_name 0 0 [0|1|2] Add this entry in vm. specify the DAS client name that the TLM robot uses for communications with the DAS/SDLC server. Specify zero for these options. server_name is the name of the media server to connect to. The third option specifies the connection method to use to connect to server_name as follows: ■ A value of 0 specifies to use vnetd to connect to a daemon on the server. A value of 2 specifies to use the traditional port number of the daemon to connect to the daemon on the server. ■ ■ Examples The following entry specifies to use either vnetd or the daemon’s port number to connect to server shark: CONNECT_OPTIONS = shark 0 0 0 The following entry specifies to use vnetd only to connect to server dolphin: CONNECT_OPTIONS = dolphin 0 0 1 The following entry specifies to use the daemons’s port number only to connect to server perch: CONNECT_OPTIONS = perch 0 0 2 DAS_CLIENT DAS_CLIENT = client_name This configuration entry applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server If this entry is specified in vm. The default value is 2. connect by using the traditional port number of the daemon. If vnetd is not active.5 or higher for vnetd to operate correctly.conf to specify the options that enhance firewall efficiency with NetBackup.Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options 35 This entry is read and interpreted on the host on which the required interface is needed. The first and second options currently are not used. CONNECT_OPTIONS entries can be specified for multiple servers. The server must be at NetBackup level 4. Server connection options can be any of the following: use vnetd or the daemon’s port number. use only vnetd.

specify the number of days to keep debug logs before vmd deletes them. Only change the value of this vm. you must restart the vmd and the ltid daemons / services. EMM_CONNECT_TIMOUT EMM_CONNECT_TIMOUT = number_of_seconds This value applies for broken connections between the vmd and the ltid daemons and the NetBackup Enterprise Media Manager. Default: 20 seconds. EMM_REQUEST_TIMOUT EMM_REQUEST_TIMOUT = number_of_seconds The vmd and the ltid daemons use this entry to determine how many seconds to allow a request to the NetBackup Enterprise Media Manager to complete. see the NetBackup Troubleshooting Guide for UNIX. Default: 300 seconds. If you add this entry to the vm. A value of zero means that the logs are not deleted.conf file or change this value. Windows. . This entry does not impact debug logs created by Unified Logging. you must restart the vmd and the ltid daemons / services. For more information about Unified Logging.conf file entry when directed to do so by your NetBackup support representative. DAYS_TO_KEEP_LOGS DAYS_TO_KEEP_LOGS = days If this entry is specified in vm. This entry is read and interpreted on the host where tlmd is running. EMM_RETRY_COUNT EMM_RETRY_COUNT = number_of_retries The vmd and the ltid daemons use this entry to determine how many times to retry requests to the NetBackup Enterprise Media Manager. If you add this entry to the vm. This entry is read and interpreted on the hosts where vmd is running.conf file entry when directed to do so by your NetBackup support representative.conf.36 Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options name is the host name of the media server. Only change the value of this vm. Default: one retry. The vmd and the ltid daemons use this entry to determine for how long they should try to reconnect to the NetBackup Enterprise Media Manager.conf file or change this value. and Linux. The default is zero.

ENABLE_ROBOT_AUTH NetBackup encourages the use of Symantec Product Authentication and Authorization for NetBackup Access Control (NBAC) instead of legacy security implementations. Used to filter robot inventory results in ACS or TLH robot types. robot_number is the number of the robot as was configured in NetBackup.. This entry is read and interpreted on the host on which vmcheckxxx and vmupdate run. mode is BY_ACS_POOL for ACS or BY_CATEGORY for TLH. If you add this entry to the vm.0 documentation. see the NetBackup Security and Encryption Guide.] This configuration entry applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. see the NetBackup 6. .Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options 37 Only change the value of this vm. robot_type can be ACS or TLH. Use this entry to configure the default Media Access Port (MAP) to use to eject media from Automated Cartridge System (ACS) robots. For information about the ENABLE_ROBOT_AUTH configuration entry. For information on Symantec Product Authentication and Authorization. Note: This entry may be required for an ACS robot and the ACS library software host was an STK Library Station. Newer versions of STK Library Station allow robot inventory commands to function correctly so filters are not required.conf file or change this value. This entry must be added to the configuration file (vm.conf file entry when directed to do so by your NetBackup support representative. you must restart the vmd and the ltid daemons / services.conf) on the NetBackup server on which the inventory operation is invoked. See the following examples: INVENTORY_FILTER = ACS 0 BY_ACS_POOL 4 5 INVENTORY_FILTER = TLH 0 BY_CATEGORY FFFA CDB0 MAP_ID MAP_ID = robot_num map_ID This configuration entry applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. INVENTORY_FILTER INVENTORY_FILTER = robot_type robot_number mode value1 [value2 . This default is highlighted as a choice in the NetBackup Administration Console but you can also select other Media Access Ports for ejects..

NetBackup uses the smallest MAP that can hold the number of media to be ejected. MAP_ID = 700 0. If this entry is specified in vm. see “ADJ_LSM” on page 30. it controls NetBackup media ID generation. For more information. . By default. the SCSI robotic daemons wait the specified number of seconds before they time out.38 Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options If the MAP is not available or the vm. A timeout can occur while waiting for a reply from the user to continue after removing volumes from the media access port. The following example specifies the MAP ID for ACS robot number 700. If this entry is specified in vm.0 MAP_CONTINUE_TIMEOUT MAP_CONTINUE_TIMEOUT = seconds This entry applies only when the vmchange command is used and the -w option is specified. NetBackup uses the nearest-MAP algorithm rather than the MAP that is specified in the MAP ID entry.comf file does not contain this entry. seconds cannot be zero and values greater than 1200 (20 minutes) may cause the robotic daemon to cancel the operation. the robot must support barcodes and the robot type cannot be an API robots. The default timeout value for seconds is 300 (5 minutes). map_ID is in the format of an ACS CAP (Cartridge Access Port) ID and cannot contain any spaces.conf. If NetBackup selects multiple MAPs. MEDIA_ID_BARCODE_CHARS MEDIA_ID_BARCODE_CHARS = robot_num barcode_length media_ID_rule Note: To use this entry.conf. A timeout results in the operation being aborted. robot_num is the robot number. The ACS CAP ID of 0. This entry is read and interpreted on the host on which the SCSI-controlled robotic daemon or process runs.0 is used.1. NetBackup uses the default MAP selection process. This entry is read and interpreted on the host on which vmcheckxxx and vmupdate run as part of the robot inventory operation. Caution: Non-mount activities such as a robotic inventory can not occur during this timeout period.1.

The following is an example rule and the resulting generated media ID: Barcode on the tape: 032945L1 Media ID rule: #N:2:3:4:5:6 Generated media ID: N32945 Also see “Media ID generation rules” on page 102. This entry is read and interpreted on the host where vmcheckxxx and vmupdate are running as part of the robot inventory operation. However. Use rules to create media IDs of many different formats. For example. The best way to add media to a robot is to use the Robot Inventory Update Volume Configuration operation. specify media ID generation for each robot or for each barcode format that has different numbers of characters. it defines the media ID prefixes to use for media without barcodes.conf file. A media_ID_rule consists of a maximum of six fields that colons delimit. If no MEDIA_ID_BARCODE_CHARS entries exist or the entry is invalid. robot_num is the robot number. For example. 2 in a field extracts the second character from the barcode. Multiple entries can be added to the vm. MEDIA_ID_PREFIX MEDIA_ID_PREFIX = media_id_prefix If this entry is specified in vm. The multiple entries allow flexibility for multimedia. If the pound sign (#) prefixes a character.Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options 39 Choose how NetBackup creates media IDs by defining the rules that specify which characters of a barcode on tape NetBackup uses. NetBackup uses the rightmost six characters of the barcode to create its media ID. if the generated media ID is different from the label on the media. MM_SERVER_NAME MM_SERVER_NAME = host_name This entry determines the name other NetBackup servers and clients should use when they refer to this server: CLUSTER_NAME = cluster_alias . that character is inserted in that position in the generated ID. barcode_length is the length of the barcode.conf. Numbers in the fields define the positions of the characters in the barcode that NetBackup extracts (from left to right). The numbers can be specified in any order. Any alphanumeric characters must be valid for a media ID. media management may be more difficult. Alphanumeric characters can be specified to be inserted in the ID.

TL8 robots execute the SCSI command PREVENT MEDIUM REMOVAL.conf.conf. This entry is read and interpreted on the host on which the required interface is needed. The robot's main door or the MAP cannot be opened while the robotic control daemon runs. To override PREVENT_MEDIA_REMOVAL Do one of the following: ◆ ◆ Use the test utility and run allow media removal. NetBackup allows the removal of media. For information on Symantec Product Authentication and Authorization. PREFERRED_GROUP NetBackup encourages the use of Symantec Product Authentication and Authorization for NetBackup Access Control (NBAC) instead of legacy security implementations. when volumes are added or moved. see the NetBackup Security and Encryption Guide. For information about the PREFERRED_GROUP configuration entry. Without this entry present. Use the same name that NetBackup uses. Use the gethostname() name. Use inject or eject for access. This entry is read and interpreted on the host on which the TL8 robot control daemon or process (tl8cd) runs. RANDOM_PORTS RANDOM_PORTS = YES|NO . Use the MM_SERVER_NAME entry if present in vm.40 Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options REQUIRED_INTERFACE = host_name The algorithm for determining the server name is as follows: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Use the CLUSTER_NAME entry if present in vm.conf. Use the REQUIRED_INTERFACE entry if present in vm. see the NetBackup 6. Specifying this entry changes the default operation for TL8 robots. If this entry is specified in vm. PREVENT_MEDIA_REMOVAL Applies to the TL8 robots only.0 documentation.conf.

To force NetBackup to connect through a specific network interface. Use the MM_SERVER_NAME entry if present in vm.conf. A NetBackup server can have more than one network interface. REQUIRED_INTERFACE REQUIRED_INTERFACE = host_name This entry and the following two entries determine the name other NetBackup servers should use when they refer to this server: CLUSTER_NAME = cluster_alias MM_SERVER_NAME = host_name The algorithm for determining the server name is as follows: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Use the CLUSTER_NAME entry if present in vm. To specify no random ports in the NetBackup configuration file ◆ Do one of the following: ■ ■ Specify RANDOM_PORTS = NO in the bp.conf file on UNIX. If YES or no entry exists (the default). If random ports are not specified in the NetBackup configuration. Use the NetBackup Host Properties on Windows. then tries the next highest. This entry is read and interpreted on hosts on which vmd runs.conf. Use the gethostname() name.conf. NetBackup chooses port numbers randomly from those that are available in the allowed range. Use the same name that NetBackup uses. and by default the operating system determines the one to use. Use the REQUIRED_INTERFACE entry if present in vm.Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options 41 Use this entry to specify whether NetBackup chooses port numbers randomly or sequentially for communication with other NetBackup servers. NetBackup chooses numbers sequentially. specify RANDOM_PORTS = NO in the vm. and so on until a port is available. This entry is read and interpreted on the host on which the required interface is needed. SERVER SERVER = host_name . NetBackup begins with the highest number in the allowed range. If NO. use REQUIRED_INTERFACE and specify the network host name of that interface.conf file.

Only one of the hosts that share a drive scan the drive. the entries that allow only specific hosts to access the devices must be added remotely. any NetBackup server can monitor and control devices on this host. It is read and interpreted on the host on which ltid runs.conf entry is for the Shared Storage Option (SSO) for Tape feature only. SSO_DA_RETRY_TIMEOUT SSO_DA_RETRY_TIMEOUT = minutes This configuration entry applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. This vm. The default for the reregistration interval is 5 minutes. . Use the SSO_DA_RETRY_TIMEOUT entry to tune this delay period. Use the SSO_DA_REREGISTER_INTERVAL entry to tune this interval. If the vm.conf file contains any SERVER entries. For security. This vm. ltid delays before trying again. the vm. ltid on a scan host periodically registers its shared drives with EMM/DA to ensure that it is still provides the drive scanning function. The default value for the delay is 3 minutes. This entry is read and interpreted on media servers on which the NetBackup vmd service runs. After the entry is added.conf file must include a SERVER entry for every media server that controls devices on this host. If no AUTHORIZATION_REQUIRED entry exists and no SERVER entries exist. This reregistration allows conditions such as a device allocator restart to have minimal impact on use of shared drives. If ltid encounters problems during communications with EMM/DA or a failure while trying to reserve a shared drive. it also must include a SERVER entry for itself or it cannot manage its own devices. stop and restart ltid for the change to take effect.42 Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options SERVER entries in the vm.conf entry is for the Shared Storage Option (SSO) for Tape feature only.conf file are used for NetBackup media server security. SSO_DA_REREGISTER_INTERVAL SSO_DA_REREGISTER_INTERVAL = minutes This configuration entry applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. It is read and interpreted on the host on which ltid runs. The SERVER entries work with the AUTHORIZATION_REQUIRED entry to control which hosts can monitor and control devices on this host. stop and restart ltid for the change to take effect. After the entry is added. If the AUTHORIZATION_REQUIRED entry exists.

This entry is read and interpreted on the host where vmcheckxxx and vmupdate are running as part of the robot inventory operation. TLM_mediatype TLM_mediatype = Media_Manager_mediatype This configuration entry applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. Use this option only if problems occur or if requested by Symantec support. If this entry is specified in vm. If this entry is specified in vm. VERBOSE If this entry is specified in vm. This vm. IBM ATL media types in Tape Library Half-inch (TLH) robots are mapped to Media Manager media types.conf. This entry is read and interpreted on the host where vmcheckxxx and vmupdate are running as part of the robot inventory operation. Example vm.conf.conf entry is for the Shared Storage Option (SSO) for Tape feature only. reserve. remove the debug logs or add a DAYS_TO_KEEP_LOGS entry. TLH_mediatype TLH_mediatype = Media_Manager_mediatype This configuration entry applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server.conf file. After the problem is resolved. This entry specifies the name that the current host uses to register.Additional configuration NetBackup configuration options 43 SSO_HOST_NAME SSO_HOST_NAME = host_name This configuration entry applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. and release shared drives with EMM/DA. on host server1: SERVER = server1 SERVER = server2 MEDIA_ID_PREFIX = NV MEDIA_ID_PREFIX = NETB ACS_3490E = HCART2 .conf file The following is an example of a vm. all Media Manager components on the host are started with verbose logging enabled. It is read and interpreted on the host on which ltid runs. The default is the local host name.conf. DAS/SDLC media types in Tape Library Multimedia (TLM) robots are mapped to Media Manager media types.

An increased buffer size can improve backup speed.44 Additional configuration Direct I/O for backups Direct I/O for backups By default. backups written to that storage unit automatically use direct I/O. SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS_DISK overrides the value in SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS. the following conditions must be met: ■ ■ ■ ■ The storage unit must be owned by a Windows media server. Possible values to include in SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS_DISK or SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS include the following: Table 1-1 Absolute byte values for SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS_DISK. At this time. The touch file that disables direct I/O must not be present (install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\DISABLE_DIRECT_IO). The storage unit must be either a Basic Disk or an Array Disk storage unit. 32 64 96 128 160 192 224 . SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS enter this touch file value 32768 65536 98304 131072 163840 196608 229376 For a data buffer of this size (kilobytes). To increase the buffer size. The backup to be stored cannot be multiplexed. To increase the buffer size. create one of the following touch files on the media server that owns the storage unit: ■ For backups to disk: install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\db\config\ SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS_DISK For backups to disk or tape: install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\db\config\ SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS ■ If both touch files are present. the buffer size for disk storage units is 256K. Symantec recommends using SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS_DISK. If the buffer size is set to a value greater than 256K.

a portable machine that plugs into a LAN and obtains IP addresses from a DHCP server. read this entire section. Note: All clients configured to use dynamic addressing and host names must trust each other. remember that the NetBackup servers still require fixed IP addresses and host names. For example. A direct I/O backup triggers the following message: “Enabling direct I/O. Buffer size: <buffer size>. NetBackup dynamic host name and IP addressing allows you to define NetBackup clients that do not have fixed IP addresses and host names. 256 Data buffer sizes continue in multiples of 32. NetBackup requires that IP addresses of clients have a network host name. 1 Configure your network to use a dynamic IP addressing protocol like DHCP. The following steps are required to support the configurations that use dynamic IP addressing for NetBackup. a remote machine that dials into a PPP server.Additional configuration Dynamic host name and IP addressing 45 Table 1-1 Absolute byte values for SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS_DISK. This assumption makes it difficult to back up any clients that have network host names that might change. . similar to the NetBackup altnames feature. Be sure to define network host names for the range of dynamic IP addresses in the hosts file and (or) DNS on your network. a NetBackup server assumes that a NetBackup client name is the same as the network host name of the client machine. SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS enter this touch file value 262144 For a data buffer of this size (kilobytes). Or. Note: If you use dynamic addressing. Before you make changes to a configuration. create the following touch file on the media server that owns the storage unit: install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\DISABLE_DIRECT_IO Dynamic host name and IP addressing By default. Multiply the buffer size by 1024 for the touch file value.” Disabling direct I/O To disable direct I/O.

select Network.) Open the client properties for the Windows client(s). Create the entries by using the bpclient command. Configure the system to notify periodically the master server of the machine's NetBackup client name and current network host name. 5 6 c Setting up dynamic IP addresses and host names Configure your network to use a dynamic IP addressing protocol. Check the Announce DHCP Interval checkbox. The NetBackup client name that is assigned to a client is permanent—do not change it.conf file to include a CLIENT_NAME entry with the correct NetBackup client name for the machine. A protocol like DHCP has a server and several clients. Configure the system to notify the master server of the machine's NetBackup client name and current network host name during startup. and Restore user interface on the client. For example.46 Additional configuration Dynamic host name and IP addressing 2 Determine the NetBackup client names for the machines that have dynamic IP addresses and network host names. These NetBackup client names are used in step 3 and step 6. Each NetBackup client must have a unique NetBackup client name. when a DHCP client starts up. The bpdynamicclient command is used to notify the master server. Under the Windows Client host properties. Make changes on each dynamic NetBackup UNIX client: a b Modify the bp. Archive. (Select NetBackup Management > Host Properties > Clients. it requests an IP address from the DHCP server. Make changes on the master server: a b Create NetBackup policies with client lists that include the names from step 2. Select File > NetBackup Client Properties. Select the General tab. Create entries in the NetBackup client database for the client names from step 2. enable the Announce DHCP Interval option: Open the NetBackup Administration Console and navigate to the Host Properties for clients. The NetBackup Client Properties dialog box appears. . Change the Client Name to the correct NetBackup client name for the machine. On the master server. The server then assigns an IP address to the client from a range of predefined addresses. 3 4 Make changes on each dynamic NetBackup Windows client: Start the Backup.

list.71 123.123.Additional configuration Dynamic host name and IP addressing 47 NetBackup requires that the IP addresses of NetBackup clients have corresponding network host names.123. suppose you have 20 machines that share the IP addresses as previously defined. The bpclient command is in the following directory: install_path\NetBackup\bin\admincmd ■ To create a dynamic client entry: . and DNS on your network. nbclient20 Configuring the NetBackup master server On the master server.70 123.123. If you want these machines to be NetBackup clients.123.123.123. use the NetBackup client names (for example.73 . The dynamic IP addresses and host names might be: 123. . As an example. The host name should be defined in the host file. If the NetBackup client names are changed or are not unique. you might assign them these NetBackup client names as follows: nbclient01 nbclient02 nbclient03 nbclient04 .79 dynamic00 dynamic01 dynamic02 dynamic03 dynamic09 Assign a unique NetBackup client name to each NetBackup client that might use one of these dynamic IP addresses. and delete client entries with the bpclient command.123. . The client database consists of directories and files in the following directory: install_path\NetBackup\db\client You can create. create your NetBackup backup policies. The client name that is assigned to NetBackup clients with dynamic IP addressing must not be the same as any network host names on your network. Ensure that each IP address that could be assigned to NetBackup clients has a network host name.72 123. create the client database on the master server.123. update. For client name lists. 123. . Next.123. suppose that you have 10 dynamic IP addresses and host names available. The NetBackup client name that is assigned to a client is permanent and should not be changed. nbclient01) rather than the dynamic network host names (for example.123. backup and restore results are unpredictable. dynamic01). NIS. For example. .

exe -L -All In our example. run bpclient as follows: install_path\NetBackup\bin\admincmd\bpclient -L -All The output is similar to the following: Client Name: nbclient01 Current Host: Hostname: *NULL* IP Address: 0.0 Connect on non-reserved port: no Dynamic Address: yes .0 Connect on non-reserved port: no Dynamic Address: yes . . . you can enter these commands to create the 20 clients: cd install_path\NetBackup\bin\admincmd bpclient -add -client nbclient01 -dynamic_address bpclient -add -client nbclient02 -dynamic_address bpclient -add -client nbclient03 -dynamic_address bpclient -add -client nbclient04 -dynamic_address . but that is unnecessary and adversely affects performance.0.exe -L -client client_name ■ To list all client entries: bpclient. . The -dynamic_address 1 argument indicates that the client uses dynamic IP addressing. bpclient -add -client nbclient20 -dynamic_address 1 1 1 1 1 To see what is currently in the client database.0.0 Connect on non-reserved port: no Dynamic Address: yes Client Name: nbclient02 Current Host: Hostname: *NULL* IP Address: 0.0. .exe -delete -client client_name ■ To list a client entry: bpclient.0. You can create entries with -dynamic_address 0 for static IP addressing.48 Additional configuration Dynamic host name and IP addressing bpclient.0.exe -add -client client_name -dynamic_address 1 where client_name is the NetBackup client name. Client Name: nbclient20 Current Host: Hostname: *NULL* IP Address: 0. ■ To delete a client entry: bpclient.0.

install NetBackup on the Windows client. stop and restart the NetBackup Client service to have the changes take effect. On the client. In the NetBackup Administration Console. install the NetBackup client software. bpdynamicclient exits and does not connect to the master server. If bpdynamicclient successfully informs the server. bpdynamicclient writes the current network host name into file_name. and IP Address fields display the values for that NetBackup client. the Current Host. Select the General tab.conf file.Additional configuration Dynamic host name and IP addressing 49 The NetBackup client notifies the NetBackup server of its NetBackup client name and network host name. For more information. If file_name exists. Archive. Use the CLIENT_NAME entry to specify the NetBackup client name for the machine. as follows: CLIENT_NAME = nbclient00 You must run the bpdynamicclient command once when the system first starts up. For a DHCP client. and Restore user interface on the client and then select File > NetBackup Client Properties. bpdynamicclient notifies the NetBackup server of the machine's NetBackup client name and current network host name. Start the Backup. If the host names do not match. Configuring a dynamic UNIX NetBackup client If not already installed. Hostname. The bpdynamicclient command is in the directory: /usr/openv/netbackup/bin The format of the bpdynamicclient command is as follows: bpdynamicclient -last_successful_hostname file_name When bpdynamicclient starts up. This value specifies how many minutes the client waits before it announces that it will use a different IP address. set Announce DHCP Interval. Volume I. Then. If . bpdynamicclient connects to the master server and informs the server of its NetBackup client name and host name. The server is not notified if the default value of 0 is used. Change the Client Name to specify the NetBackup client name for the Windows client. see “Announce DHCP interval” on page 457 in the Administrator’s Guide. Configuring a dynamic Microsoft Windows client If it is not already installed. bpdynamicclient determines if the host name that is written in the file is the same as the current network host name. The NetBackup Client Properties dialog box appears. Edit the /usr/openv/netbackup/bp. it checks for the existence of file_name. a good value to use is one-half of the lease period. If the host names match.

you can create a script in the /etc/rc2. bpdynamicclient deletes file_name. a good interval to use between calls to bpdynamicclient is one-half of the lease period.d directory on a Solaris system: # cat > /etc/rc2. Configure NetBackup to email these notifications by specifying the server administrator’s address with the NetBackup master server Global Attribute property.d/S99nbdynamicclient Ensure that the dynamic client startup script is called after the machine obtains its IP address. Administrator’s E-mail Address.50 Additional configuration Configuring email notifications bpdynamicclient cannot inform the server. or a backup of the NetBackup databases occurs. You must also create a root crontab entry to call periodically the bpdynamicclient command.d/S99nbdynamicclient <<EOF #! /bin/sh rm /usr/openv/netbackup/last_successful_hostname /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/bpdynamicclient -last_successful_hostname \ /usr/openv/netbackup/last_successful_hostname EOF # chmod 544 /etc/rc2.) . For example. (See the NetBackup Administrator’s Guide for Windows. Configuring email notifications You can configure NetBackup to send email notifications to users and administrators with the results of backup. Notify server administrators when a scheduled backup. For example. archive. the following entry (one line) calls bpdynamicclient at seven minutes after each hour: 7 * * * * /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/bpdynamicclient -last_successful_hostname /usr/openv/netbackup/last_successful_hostname If you use DHCP. and restore operations. administrator-directed manual backup. Most UNIX systems provide a facility to define startup scripts. Volume I.

conf file contains information on the supported locales. The fourth and the fifth fields define the date and the time fields and associated separators for that supported locale is as follows: You can modify the existing formats to change the default output. see the comments in the . the default locales (TL lines) are: TL 1 C :hh:mn:ss /mm/dd /yyyy TL 2 ov :hh:mn:ss/mm/dd /yyyy Note that C and ov are synonymous. If the .conf file contains very specific instructions on how to add or modify the list of supported locales and formats. date. days. . The Regional and Language Options dialog box provides access to the predefined number.conf file. UNIX The /usr/openv/msg/. The . See the Microsoft Help pages for further assistance. the TL lines and the TM lines. and years would be as follows: TL 1 C :hh:mn:ss -yyyy-mm-dd or: TL 1 C :hh:mn:ss/dd /mm/yy You can add more TL lines. Table 1-2 Platform Windows To specify the locale of a NetBackup installation Directions To access the regional settings. However. The . the format of the file is summarized here.conf file is not accessible. This file defines the date and the time formats for each supported locale.conf file is divided into two parts. For example. the TL line for the C locale is: TL 1 C :hh:mn:ss/mm/dd /yyyy An alternate specification to the order of months. configurable source to define the locale conventions. TL Lines The third field of the TL lines defines the case-sensitive locales that the NetBackup applications support.Additional configuration Specifying the locale of the NetBackup installation 51 Specifying the locale of the NetBackup installation NetBackup applications can display a wide range of international date and time formats as determined by the locale of the installation. To help ensure consistency among the applications. double-click Regional and Language Options in the Windows Control Panel. NetBackup uses a single. and time formats.

. as the default locale is C (ov). The third field of the TM lines defines the unrecognized locale.conf file is not accessible. The fifth field defines the supported equivalent that is identified in the TL lines. use the following TM line to map the unrecognized locale french to the supported locale fr. the TM line is: TM 6 french 2 fr To map french to C TM 6 french 1 C To add more TM lines. no default TM lines exist. see the specific instructions in the .conf file. For example.52 Additional configuration Specifying the locale of the NetBackup installation Table 1-2 Platform To specify the locale of a NetBackup installation (continued) Directions TM Lines The TM lines define a mapping from unrecognized locales to those supported by NetBackup. If the . as defined by the TL lines.

Chapter 2 Reference topics The topics in this chapter provide additional information about various aspects of NetBackup configuration and management: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ “Rules for using host names in NetBackup” on page 54 “Reading backup images with tar” on page 58 “Factors that affect backup time” on page 59 “Determining NetBackup transfer rate” on page 60 “How NetBackup builds a worklist” on page 65 “Determining backup media requirements” on page 67 “NetBackup notify scripts” on page 68 “Media and device management best practices” on page 84 “Using TapeAlert” on page 87 “Drive cleaning overview” on page 90 “Volume pool and volume group overview” on page 93 “Barcode overview” on page 98 “Changing your hardware configuration” on page 102 “How NetBackup selects drives” on page 106 “How NetBackup reserves drives” on page 107 “How NetBackup selects media” on page 116 “Media formats” on page 120 “Media Manager commands” on page 122 “Device discovery overview” on page 124 “Correlating tape drives to device files or addresses” on page 128 .

NetBackup determines the IP address of a connection and then uses the IP address to look up the host name with gethostbyaddr(). If the network environment contains multiple domains. This practice is not recommended. WINS. That is. The correct use of host names during configuration is essential to the proper operation of NetBackup. or the local %Systemroot%\system32\drivers\etc\hosts file (if necessary). For more information. the short host name of a computer is adequate. For example. use a name such as mercury.54 Reference topics Rules for using host names in NetBackup ■ “Correlating tape drives to device files or addresses” on page 128 Rules for using host names in NetBackup NetBackup uses host names to identify. The host name and address resolution must be set up correctly in DNS. NetBackup validates its connections by performing a reverse host name lookup. and initiate processes on NetBackup client and server computers. . communicate with. see “Dynamic host name and IP addressing” on page 45. These topics also address considerations to choose host names. qualify host names to the extent that servers and clients can identify each other in a multi-domain environment. Note: Do not change the host name of a NetBackup server.bdev. How NetBackup uses host names The following topics discuss how NetBackup stores and uses host names. Note: Place the system host name and IP address in the %Systemroot%\system32\drivers\etc\hosts file to accelerate name lookups. In many cases. Qualifying host names A major consideration is the extent to which you qualify host names.bdev rather than only mercury. It can be necessary to import all previously used media to the server before you can use it under the new host name.null.com or mercury. NetBackup uses TCP/IP host names to connect to NetBackup servers and clients.

if applicable.) Catalog backup information Applies to NetBackup Enterprise Server only. shark instead of shark. If the same name is not used. Qualified names are necessary because they allow the master server to connect to the media server. Each of these backup records contains the host name of the server on which the backup was written.Reference topics Rules for using host names in NetBackup 55 Policy configuration The configured name for a client is the host name as it is added to a policy. Always use qualified host names to add clients to a policy so that all NetBackup servers can connect to the clients.and administrator-action is required to restore from some of the backups. Error catalog NetBackup uses entries in the error catalog for generating reports.com. always use the same name in all cases. These entries contain the host name of the server that generates the entry and the client’s configured name. the server uses the peer name of the client. The peer name (identified from its TCP connection) is used to determine the client’s configured name. or restore request to the NetBackup server.null. . qualify the host name of the media server in the file path. Image catalog A subdirectory in the image catalog is created for a client when a backup is first created for that client. the client cannot view all the files that are backed up on its behalf. When a client makes a user backup. In this case. archive. The subdirectory’s name is the client’s configured name. (For example. file restores become complicated because both user. This name is how the client is identified in the NetBackup configuration. Every backup for a client has a separate file in this subdirectory. If you add a client to more than one policy. If you include a media server’s catalog files in the NetBackup catalog. The server host name is normally the server’s short host name. The server uses the client’s configured name to connect to the client and start the processes that satisfy client requests.

For example. and Restore client interface. Archive. (See the online help in the Backup.) On UNIX clients. Use the following steps to update the NetBackup configuration if a client’s host name is changed. You do not need to reinstall NetBackup software on the client. ■ Note: If users on UNIX clients have a bp. Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\db\images\client2 a b c 2 On the client: ■ On PC clients.56 Reference topics Rules for using host names in NetBackup How to update NetBackup after a host name changes Note: Do not change the host name of a NetBackup server. change the client name setting either through the user interface or in a configuration file. 1 On the master server: ■ Delete the client’s old name from all policies where it exists and add the client’s new name to those policies. the ALTPATH file is created in the following location: Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\db\images\client1\ ALTPATH Create a directory for the new client2 in the \images directory: Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\db\images\client2 On the first line of the client1\ALTPATH file. client software sends the name that it obtains through its gethostname library function. If the name is unknown to . The client continues to have access to all previous backups. The path is the only entry in the ALTPATH file. Special considerations for Domain Name Service (DNS) In some requests to the master server. A name change might require that all previously used media be imported to the server before the host can be used under the new name. if the client name is client1.conf file to the new name. users must change CLIENT_NAME in that file to the new name. Create a file named ALTPATH in the image catalog directory. specify the path to the directory for the new client.conf file in the $HOME directory. change the CLIENT_NAME value in the bp.

The master server’s network services gethostbyname library function did not recognize the name xxxx. The substitution resolves the problem if the following conditions are true: ■ ■ When gethostname is run on the client. The value must be sent to the server in the request.Reference topics Rules for using host names in NetBackup 57 the master server Domain Name Service. This possible situation depends on how the client and the server are configured. The name must match the name in the NetBackup configuration on the master server and must also be known to the master server’s network services. Each line is left-justified. ■ ■ Consider the following example: 0 xxxx xxxx. The file forces the translation of NetBackup client host names. client_as_known_by_server is the name to substitute for hostname_from_client for request responses.com.eng.xlate file contains three elements: a numeric key and two host names. hostname_from_client is the value to translate.com The line specifies that when the master server receives a request for a configured client name (numeric key 0). the master server may not be able to reply to client requests. problems occur.aaa. And.xlate Each line in the host. ■ . the name xxxx. install_path\NetBackup\db\altnames\host. which indicates a configured name translation. The client name must correspond to the name that is obtained by running the client’s gethostname. The client was configured and named in the NetBackup configuration as xxxx.aaa. Another option is to create a special file in the altnames directory on the master server.com always replaces xxxx.eng. this name is also known to network services on the master server. and a space character separates each element of the line: key hostname_from_ client client_as_known_by_server Where ■ key is a numeric value used by NetBackup to specify the cases where translation is to be done.aaa. it returns xxxx. If gethostname on the client returns host the names that DNS on the master server cannot resolve.eng. Currently this value must always be 0. One possible solution is to reconfigure the client or the master server DNS hosts file.

VxFS named data streams cannot be restored to a client. ACL information. Another possibility is to use tar on the fragments. To use tar on fragments may allow recovery of any file in the backup other than the one that spanned the media. they provide only limited restore capabilities. NetBackup can understand compressed files. you must read and combine the fragments from the media to give to tar. sparse files. Effects of a non-NetBackup tar Non-NetBackup versions of tar do not supply all of the restore capabilities that the NetBackup /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/tar provides. Note: You cannot use the NetBackup modified-GNU tar on UNIX or tar32. though NDMP vendors may have tools or the utilities that may perform a restore directly from the media. ■ ■ ■ ■ . By using the modified tar.58 Reference topics Reading backup images with tar Reading backup images with tar NetBackup for UNIX uses a modified GNU tar for reading backup images. long pathnames. Multiplexed backups cannot be recovered. the system’s dd command may be useful. Possible problems result. (Includes FlashBackup images. Backups cannot be recovered that contain raw partitions. It offers features similar to those in cpio. Although non-NetBackup versions of tar can be used to restore files.) NDMP client backup images cannot be restored. If the backup spans more than one piece of media. Solaris extended attributes cannot be restored to a client. To combine the fragments. The directory is no longer hidden and the name of the directory has a + appended to it. The following is a list of some effects that a non-NetBackup tar may encounter in certain situations: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Compressed backups cannot be recovered. HP CDFs are restored with non-NetBackup versions of tar.exe on Windows to extract files from a NetBackup for Windows backup image. Non-NetBackup versions of tar may have trouble with sparse files and often skip sparse files.

mtime. The importance of time is particularly true for the sites that handle large amounts of data. The total amount of data also depends on whether the backup is a full backup or an incremental backup. the total backup time can exceed the time that is allotted to complete backups and interfere with normal network operations.Reference topics Factors that affect backup time 59 Some versions of the HP9000-800 /bin/tar command are known to give a directory checksum error for the second fragment of a backup that crossed media. Differential incremental backups include only the data that has changed since the last full or incremental backup. ■ Full backups involve all the data. ■ Some versions of Solaris tar combine the atime. Transfer rate The transfer rate depends on the following factors: ■ The speed of the backup device. ■ ■ For incremental backups. The following formula shows the major factors that affect backup time: Backup = time Total data Transfer rate x Compression factor (optional) + Device delays Total data The total amount of data to back up depends on the size of the files for each client included the policy. incremental backups are larger. The time to back up files can also give an indication of how long it may take to recover the files. the amount of data depends on the frequency with which files change. For example. Backups that are sent to tapes with a transfer rate of 800 kilobytes per second are generally faster than tapes with . Cumulative incremental backups include all the data that has changed since the last full backup. Therefore. Factors that affect backup time The time NetBackup requires to complete a backup is an important factor in setting up schedules. and ctime strings with the file name and create the file paths that are not desirable. Longer backup times also increase the possibility of a problem that disrupts the backup. If a large number of files change frequently. a full backup usually takes longer than an incremental backup.

Network configuration can affect performance. Device delays Device delays can be due to the following factors: the device may be busy or slow to load the media. see “Determining NetBackup transfer rate” on page 60. . The available bandwidth is less than the theoretical network bandwidth and depends on how much other network traffic is present.60 Reference topics Determining NetBackup transfer rate a transfer rate of 400 kilobytes. server speed also varies with the hardware platform and depends on the other applications that run on the platform. Like client speed. For more information. see “Using the system monitor” on page 62. is faster than a backup for 20. the throughput is significantly reduced. multiple backups occurring on the same network compete for bandwidth. The speed with which the client can process the data. the device may be slow to find the location on the media at which to start writing the backup. The number of concurrent backups being performed also affects server speed. Network transfer rate The network transfer rate is the rate provided in the All Log Entries report. The speed varies with the hardware platform and depends on the other applications that run on the platform.) ■ The available network bandwidth. Clients can process larger files faster than smaller ones. File size is also an important factor. when some machines run full-duplex and some run half-duplex in an Ethernet environment. For example. 1 megabyte each. (Assume that other factors allow for the faster transfer rate. For example. A backup for twenty files. The speed with which the server can process the data. Or. Determining NetBackup transfer rate Calculate three variations of the backup transfer rate by using NetBackup report data. The following are the three rates and calculation methods: ■ ■ “Network transfer plus end-of-backup-processing rate” on page 61 “Network transfer plus end-of-backup-processing rate” on page 61 The Microsoft Windows System Monitor also displays the NetBackup transfer rate. These delays can vary widely and depend on the devices and the computing environments. ■ ■ ■ For more information.000 files that are 1 kilobyte each.

This rate ignores the following: ■ ■ The time the device requires to load and position media before a backup. (The total bytes that are transferred is recorded in the All Log Entries report. Sample All Log Entries Report: TIME SERVER/CLIENT TEXT 04/28/06 23:10:37 windows giskard begin writing backup id giskard_0767592458. However. Use the List Client Backups report to calculate the transfer rate by dividing Kilobytes by Elapsed Time (converted to seconds). 04/29/06 00:35:07 windows giskard successfully wrote backup id giskard_0767592458.Reference topics Determining NetBackup transfer rate 61 The network transfer rate considers only the time it takes to transfer data over the network from client to server. . The time that the tape file requires to close and write an additional NetBackup information record to the tape. divide this time (in seconds) into the total bytes that are transferred. . Examples Assume that the reports provide the following data. Network transfer plus end-of-backup-processing rate This rate ignores the time it takes to load and position media before a backup. 1161824 Kbytes at 230. fragment 1. use the All Log Entries report and calculate the time from the message: begin writing backup id xxx until the message successfully wrote backup id xxx To calculate the transfer rate. the rate does include the end-of-backup processing that is ignored in the network transfer rate.325 Kbytes/sec Sample List Client Backups Report: Client: Backup ID: Policy: Client Type: Sched Label: giskard giskard_0767592458 production_servers Standard testing_add_files . To determine this rate.) Total transfer rate This transfer rate includes the time it takes to load and position the media as well as the end-of-backup processing. fragment 1 to media id TL8033 on device 1 .

216 Kbytes per second Using the system monitor NetBackup adds the NetBackup Disk/Tape performance object to the list of objects that the Windows System Monitor monitors. The object instance is removed from the list once the NetBackup operation is completed. Four counters are available for the NetBackup Disk/Tape performance object: ■ ■ ■ ■ Disk/Tape Read Bytes (GB) Disk/Tape Read Bytes/sec (KB) Disk/Tape Write Bytes (GB) Disk/Tape Write Bytes/sec (KB) The NetBackup performance object supports instances in the System Monitor. To monitor NetBackup counters remotely. The System Monitor displays object instances when NetBackup reads or writes from the disk or tape. To attach to the process .62 Reference topics Determining NetBackup transfer rate Schedule Type: Backup Retention Level: Backup Time: Elapsed Time: Expiration Time: Compressed: Kilobytes: Number of Files: Full one week (0) 04/28/06 23:07:38 001:27:32 05/05/06 23:07:38 no 1161824 78210 The following three rates were compiled with the backup data from the sample reports: Network transfer rate: 1161824 Kbytes at 230. The read or write counters are updated depending on the type of NetBackup operation performed. the initiating computer attaches to the target computer’s WinLogon process through RPC.325 Kbytes per second Network transfer plus end-of-backup processing rate: 23:10:30 . the object instance exists after the NetBackup operation is complete. In this case. the object instance is removed when performance monitoring stops.157 Kbytes per second Total transfer rate: Elapsed time = 01:27:32 = 5252 seconds 1161824 Kbytes/5252 = 221. If the performance is monitored locally or remotely during a NetBackup read or write operation. The instances can be drive names or absolute paths to which NetBackup writes. or from which NetBackup is reads.00:35:07 = 01:24:30 = 5070 seconds 1161824 Kbytes/5070 = 229.

A NetBackup job must be active (a drive is in use). Select NetBackup Disk/Tape from the Performance objects drop-down list. Instances are displayed when NetBackup begins to read or write from the disk or the tape drives. Available counters are: ■ ■ ■ ■ Disk/Tape Read Bytes (GB) Disk/Tape Read Bytes/sec (KB) Disk/Tape Write Bytes (GB) Disk/Tape Write Bytes/sec (KB) 4 Select one or more object instances from the list of instances. Click the plus sign (+) to add a counter to the display. thus. The Performance dialog box appears. the object instances remain until the system is rebooted.Performance data collection is enabled (select Host Properties > Media Servers > Universal Settings > Enable performance data collection). . Note: In order for the NetBackup objects to be available for selection. 3 Select the counter to display from the list of available counters. .The user must have permissions to read the Windows registry.The drive must be connected to a Windows media server (or SAN media server). the following conditions must be met: . . To use the system monitor with NetBackup 1 2 Open the System Monitor on your Windows system. .Reference topics Determining NetBackup transfer rate 63 locks the object instances.

. The number of bytes that are read or written is updated dynamically.64 Reference topics Determining NetBackup transfer rate 5 Click Add. along with the rate. The NetBackup counter you select is displayed in the Performance dialog box.

The number of attempts counts toward the Schedule backup attempts limit. the job becomes Active and begins. active jobs. based on the following factors: ■ ■ ■ When the job ran last How often the job is scheduled to run (the frequency of the job) How soon the next scheduled window is open for the job (if the window is not currently open) c NetBackup sorts the worklist by the due time of each job. Once a job receives the resources it needs. The following items are some of the factors that affect the job order on the worklist: ■ Whether the job finished successfully or whether it failed and is Waiting for Retry. When the job completes. (The time that NetBackup waits before it tries the job again is configurable by setting the Job retry delay Global Attribute master server property. This information is useful to evaluate problems with schedules.Reference topics How NetBackup builds a worklist 65 How NetBackup builds a worklist The following topics explain how NetBackup determines the order in which automatic backups occur for each client. If the job does not succeed after the number of attempts that are allowed. then sorts all the jobs in the worklist in the order that the jobs are due: a b NetBackup builds a worklist that consists of jobs for every client in every policy. NetBackup computes the next due time for the job. The order of the jobs on the worklist is dynamic. ■ .) Whether attempts to run the job exceed the number of attempts that the Schedule backup attempts host property indicates. NetBackup evaluates each job and determines when it is due. NetBackup calculates the due time for each job. Building the worklist (Queue) NetBackup builds an internal worklist that contains all scheduled. and appears on the Jobs tab of the Activity Monitor. The status of the job indicates that the job was not successful. A retried job retains the original job ID. the job is considered Queued. (Found under Host Properties > Global Attributes > Schedule backup attempts. thus the worklist is perpetually calculated and reordered. While a job waits for resources (devices) to become available. the job is considered Done.

To choose a tape with the same retention level reduces delays to mount tapes. To prioritize queued jobs The worklist generally contains jobs from different policies and schedules. To determine how long a backup is overdue. NetBackup tries to start a backup job that has the same retention period as a tape that is currently mounted. assume that client_1 and client_2 are in different policies and that client_1 is in the policy with the highest priority. NetBackup prioritizes backups according to how long they are overdue. NetBackup checks the priority of the job. For example. NetBackup looks for backups with a retention level that is the same as a tape that is currently mounted. The last backup for client_1 ran 25 hours ago and the last backup for client_2 ran 26 hours ago. a tape is mounted that has the same retention level as client_2. assume that the client_1 job is the most overdue. NetBackup checks for the following items when it determines the order in which to run the backups: 1 NetBackup checks for the jobs that are to be multiplexed. a tape is mounted on that drive for the client_1 job. all of the children from that parent job have precedence over other jobs. The precedence includes the children of another parent job. When a parent job is Active. If there is another drive of the correct type available. The jobs join an existing multiplexed group if allowed. The client_2 job runs first because it can be stored on a tape that is already mounted to use resources most efficiently. The schedules for these backup jobs both have a frequency of 1 day. even if a job of higher priority is on the worklist. The clients that are the most overdue have the highest priority. Also. the jobs for client_1 always run before the client_2 jobs. as determined by the policy Job priority setting. If the priorities and retention level are equal. assume that client_1 and client_2 have some backup jobs that are in the same policy and have the same retention level. Backup jobs from the policy with the highest priority run first. NetBackup looks for the backup jobs that are most overdue. 2 3 4 . However. assume that client_1 and client_2 are in the same policy but their schedules have different retention periods. NetBackup subtracts the frequency from the length of time since the last successful backup for that client. (The backup frequency is indicated on the schedule in the policy. For example. Here.66 Reference topics How NetBackup builds a worklist ■ Whether the job is a child job. For example. If policy priorities are equal.

the job of client client_2 is the most overdue and runs first. A tape with many small backups (possibly incremental backups) contains less real data when compared to a tape that contains fewer large backups. Then. worn media. Determining backup media requirements To manage a backup environment efficiently. ensure that enough media is defined to accommodate the data.Reference topics Determining backup media requirements 67 Both clients are overdue for a backup. additional media is required for each different retention level. Allow for the replacement of old. However. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ . Media sharing may be used to help maximize tape usage. Consider the number of backups on one tape. For daily requirements. backup needs may also increase. The daily requirement must be known to ensure that enough media is available for each backup session. consider the following points: ■ How long you want to retain the data. and off-site storage (if required). check the Media Summary report to verify that enough media IDs and disk space are available. If disk usage and capacity increase. Allow for new software releases and other special backups. This approach ensures that a backup that was unsuccessful during its previous backup window has priority over the successful backups. If you have many different volume pools. The priority of the most overdue jobs is important in a busy NetBackup configuration where the backup window can close before all backups can begin. The long-term requirements are necessary to assess costs for acquisition of new media. All backups on a given tape or optical disk have the same retention level unless the Allow multiple retentions per media property is enabled. first determine the approximate amount of data in the files that you back up to each type of media each day. Consider the changes in disk usage patterns over time. Tape marks are created between backups. storage devices. If not enabled. The sizes of the tape marks vary depending on the media type. To plan for the future. Whether duplicates for off-site storage or extra security are needed. A tape that contains many small files has more backup overhead because each file requires an extra 512 bytes for catalog information on the media. determine the amount of media that is required for both daily and long-term use.

68 Reference topics NetBackup notify scripts

NetBackup notify scripts

NetBackup uses the following scripts or batch files for collecting information
and providing notification of events.
The following scripts are active on the master server:
Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\backup_notify.cmd
Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\backup_exit_notify.cm
d
Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\dbbackup_notify.cmd
Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\diskfull_notify.cmd
Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\mail_dr_info.cmd
Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\nbmail.cmd
Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\restore_notify.cmd
Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\session_notify.cmd
Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\session_start_notify
Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\usereq_notify.cmd
Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\goodies\parent_end_no
tify.cmd
Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\goodies\parent_start_
notify
Scripts that run on clients: Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\goodies\bpstart_notif
y.bat
Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\goodies\bpend_notify.
bat
To use the client scripts, the scripts must first be created on the client. Use the procedures as described in “bpstart_notify.bat (Microsoft Windows clients only)” on page 72 and “bpend_notify.bat (Microsoft Windows clients only)” on page 76. For further information, refer to the comments in the scripts. Caution: Applies to NetBackup Enterprise Server only. If you use either the bpstart_notify or bpend_notify scripts, do not include any commands that write to stdout. NetBackup sends the output that is written to stdout to the server as part of the backup. The resulting backup can abort with an error message that pertains to block sizes. Also, ensure that all commands in the scripts are appropriate to the client platform. For example, the -s parameter is invalid for the UNIX mail command on some UNIX platforms. Its use can cause data to be written to stdout or stderr.

Reference topics NetBackup notify scripts

69

backup_notify.cmd
The backup_notify.cmd script runs on the NetBackup server where the storage unit is located. It is called each time a backup is successfully written to media. The parameters that NetBackup passes to this script are:
■ ■

The name of the program doing the backup The backup-image name or path

For example: backup_notify.cmd bptm bilbo_0695316589
Note: Applies to NetBackup Enterprise Server only. If NetBackup backs up files to a UNIX disk storage unit that Storage migratory manages, the backup_notify script notifies Storage migratory to perform migration as quickly as possible. The released script does not, however, have commands to force a backup of the managed file system after NetBackup has stored its backups. To back up the managed file system, modify the script as necessary to meet site requirements for backup.

backup_exit_notify.cmd
The backup_exit_notify.cmd script runs on the master server. It is called to perform site-specific processing when an individual backup completes. Table 2-3 Parameter
clientname policyname schedname schedtype

backup_exit_notify parameters

Description
Name of the client from the NetBackup catalog. Policy name from the NetBackup catalog. Schedule name from the NetBackup catalog. One of the following: FULL, INCR (differential incremental), CINC (cumulative incremental), UBAK, UARC Exit code for the entire backup job.

exitstatus

For example: backup_exit_notify.cmd freddie production fulls FULL 0 backup_exit_notify.cmd Dane production incrementals INCR 73

70 Reference topics
NetBackup notify scripts

bpstart_notify (UNIX clients only)
Note: Ensure that this script can be run by other on the client before it is used. To do so, run chmod 755 script_name, where script_name is the name of the script. On UNIX clients, NetBackup calls the bpstart_notify script each time the
client starts a backup or an archive.
To use this script, copy the following file from the server:
Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\goodies\bpstart_notif
y.bat
And place it to the following location on the UNIX client: /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/
Modify the script and ensure that you have permission to run the script.
The bpstart_notify script runs each time a backup or an archive starts and
initialization is completed. The script runs before the tape is positioned. This
script must exit with a status of 0 for the calling program to continue and for the
backup or archive to proceed. A nonzero status causes the client backup or
archive to exit with a status of bpstart_notify failed.
If the /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/bpstart_notify script exists, it runs
in the foreground and the bpbkar process on the client waits for it to complete
before continuing. Any commands in the script that do not end with an &
character run serially.
The server expects the client to respond with a continue message within the
time that the BPSTART_TIMEOUT option specifies on the server.
The default for BPSTART_TIMEOUT is 300. If the script needs more time than
300 seconds, increase the value to allow more time.
Table 2-4 Parameter
clientname policyname schedname schedtype

bpstart_notify parameters

Description
Name of the client from the NetBackup catalog. Policy name from the NetBackup catalog. Schedule name from the NetBackup catalog. One of the following: FULL, INCR (differential incremental), CINC (cumulative incremental), UBAK, UARC

create script files with a .fulls scripts.schedulename suffix. . The second script affects scheduled backups in the policy that is named production only when the schedule is named fulls.fulls The first script affects all scheduled backups in the policy that are named production.production.policyname[.production /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/bpstart_notify.Reference topics NetBackup notify scripts 71 Caution: The bpstart_notify script also runs for NetBackup catalog backups if a . For example. client. The first stream from a policy. NetBackup uses only one bpstart_notify script and that is the script with the most specific name.production. the following environment variables can be used to support multiple data streams: STREAM_NUMBER indicates the stream number. The following are examples of the strings that are available to the script to use to record information about a backup: BACKUPID=freddie_0857340526 UNIXBACKUPTIME=0857340526 BACKUPTIME=Sun Mar 2 16:08:46 2006 In addition.production. and schedule is 1. The following are two examples of script names for a policy (production) that has a schedule (fulls): /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/bpstart_notify.fulls. NetBackup uses only bpstart_notify. The bpstart_notify script can use the following environment variables: BACKUPID UNIXBACKUPTIME BACKUPTIME The NetBackup bpbkar process creates these variables.schedule] is not specified. A 0 value indicates that multiple data streams is not enabled.policyname or .policyname. For example: bpstart_notify bpstart_notify bpstart_notify bpstart_notify bpstart_notify freddie cd4000s fulls FULL danr cd4000s incrementals INCR hare cd4000s fulls FULL freddie cd4000s user_backups UBAK DangDang cd4000s user_archive UARC To create a bpstart_notify script for a specific policy or policy and schedule combination. Note: For a given backup. if there are both bpstart_notify.production and bpstart_notify.

72 Reference topics NetBackup notify scripts

STREAM_COUNT specifies the total number of streams to be generated from this policy, client, and schedule. STREAM_PID is the pid (process ID) number of bpbkar. RESTARTED can be used for checkpointed restarts or checkpointed backup jobs. A value of 0 indicates that the job was not resumed. (For example, upon first initiation.) A value of 1 indicates that the job was resumed.

bpstart_notify.bat (Microsoft Windows clients only)
For all Windows clients, you can create some batch scripts that provide
notification whenever the client starts a backup or archive.
To use this script, copy the following file from the server:
Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\goodies\bpstart_notif
y.bat
And place it on the client in the same directory as the NetBackup client binaries: Install_path\NetBackup\bin\ Where Install_path is the directory where NetBackup is installed. You can create bpstart_notify scripts that provide notification for all backups or for backups of a specific policy or schedule. To create a script that applies to all backups, name the script bpstart_notify.bat To create a bpstart_notify script that applies only to a specific policy or policy and schedule combination, add a .policyname or .policyname.schedulename suffix to the script name.

The following script applies only to a policy named days: install_path\netbackup\bin\bpstart_notify.days.bat
The following script applies only to a schedule that is named fulls in a policy named days: install_path\netbackup\bin\bpstart_notify.days.fulls.bat

Caution: The bpstart_notify script also runs for NetBackup catalog backups if a .policyname[.schedule] is not specified. The first script affects all scheduled backups in the policy named days. The second script affects scheduled backups in the policy named days only when the schedule is named fulls. For a given backup, NetBackup calls only one bpstart_notify script and checks for them in the following order: bpstart_notify.policy.schedule.bat
bpstart_notify.policy.bat

Reference topics NetBackup notify scripts

73

bpstart_notify.bat For example, if there are both bpstart_notify.policy.bat and bpstart_notify.policy.schedule.bat scripts, NetBackup uses only the bpstart_notify.policy.schedule.bat script. Note: bpend_notify scripts can provide a different level of notification than the bpstart_notify scripts. For example, to use one of each, the script names might be bpstart_notify.policy.bat and bpend_notify.policy.schedule.bat. When the backup starts, NetBackup passes the following parameters to the script. Table 2-5 Parameter
%1 %2 %3 %4 %5 %6

bpstart_notify.bat parameters

Description
Name of the client from the NetBackup catalog. Policy name from the NetBackup catalog. Schedule name from the NetBackup catalog. One of the following: FULL, INCR, CINC, UBAK, UARC Status of the operation is always 0 for bpstart_notify. Results file that NetBackup checks for a return code from the script. NetBackup uses %6 to pass the file name and then expects the script to create the file in the same directory as the script. If the script applies to a specific policy and schedule, the results file must be named

install_path\netbackup\bin\BPSTART_RES.policy.schedule
If the script applies to a specific policy, the results file must be named

install_path\netbackup\bin\BPSTART_RES.policy
If the script applies to all backups, the results file must be named

install_path\netbackup\bin\BPSTART_RES
An echo 0> %6 statement is one way for the script to create the file. NetBackup deletes the existing results file before it calls the script. After the script runs, NetBackup checks the new results file for the status. The status must be 0 for the script to be considered successful. If the results file does not exist, NetBackup assumes that the script was successful.

The server expects the client to respond with a continue message within the time that the NetBackup BPSTART_TIMEOUT option specifies. The default for

74 Reference topics NetBackup notify scripts

BPSTART_TIMEOUT is 300. If the script needs more than 300 seconds, increase
the value to allow more time.
For Windows 2000 clients, the bpstart_notify script can use the following
environment variables for the support of multiple data streams:
STREAM_NUMBER indicates the stream number. The first stream from a policy,
client, and schedule is 1. A 0 value indicates that multiple data streams is not
enabled.
STREAM_COUNT specifies the total number of streams to be generated from this
policy, client, and schedule.
STREAM_PID is the pid (process ID) number of bpbkar.

bpend_notify (UNIX clients only)
Caution: The bpend_notify script is run when the client is finished sending data, but the server has not yet completed writing to media.

Note: Ensure that this script can be run by other on the client before it is used. To do so, run chmod 755 script_name, where script_name is the name of the script. To receive a notification whenever a UNIX client completes a backup or an archive operation, copy the following file from the server: Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\goodies\bpend_notify
And place it to the following location on the UNIX client: /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/bpend_notify
Modify the script and ensure that you have permission to run the script.
The bpend_notify script runs each time a backup or archive completes. For
archives, it runs after the backup but before the files are removed.
If bpend_notify exists, it runs in the foreground and bpbkar on the client
waits until it completes. Any commands that do not end with an & character run
serially.
The server expects the client to respond within the time that the
BPEND_TIMEOUT NetBackup configuration option specifies. The default for
BPEND_TIMEOUT is 300.
If the script needs more than 300 seconds, set BPEND_TIMEOUT to a larger
value. Avoid too large a value because it can delay the server from servicing
other clients.
NetBackup passes the following parameters to the bpend_notify script.

Note: For a given backup. The status is the client status and does not indicate that the backup is complete and successful. The following are two examples of script names for a policy that is named production with a schedule that is named fulls: /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/bpend_notify. exitstatus Caution: The bpend_notify script also runs for NetBackup catalog backups if a . if there are both bpend_notify. the bpend_notify script can use the following environment variables: BACKUPID UNIXBACKUPTIME .policyname. due to a failure on the server.fulls. INCR (differential incremental). CINC (cumulative incremental). One of the following: FULL. For example. The client can display a status 0 when.production and bpend_notify. NetBackup uses only bpend_notify. create script files with a . UARC Exit code from bpbkar.schedule] is not specified. NetBackup uses only one bpend_notify script and that is the one with the most specific name. Schedule name from the NetBackup catalog.production /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/bpend_notify.production.policyname or . For example: bpend_notify freddie pol_1 fulls FULL 0 bpend_notify danr pol_1 incrementals INCR 73 To create a bpend_notify script for a specific policy or policy and schedule combination.Reference topics NetBackup notify scripts 75 Table 2-6 Parameter clientname policyname schedname schedtype bpend_notify parameters Description Name of the client from the NetBackup catalog. the All Log Entries report displays a status 84. UBAK.fulls The first script affects all scheduled backups in the policy production. The second script affects scheduled backups in the policy production only when the schedule is named fulls. Policy name from the NetBackup catalog.schedulename suffix.production.0 or later software.fulls scripts.policyname[.production. If the UNIX client is running NetBackup 3.

The first stream from a policy. FINISHED can be used for checkpointed restarts of backup jobs. A value of 0 indicates that the client was not finished sending all of the data.bat ■ .bat The following script applies only to a schedule that is named fulls in a policy named days: Install_path\netbackup\bin\bpend_notify.policyname or .policyname. client. ■ The following script applies only to a policy named days: Install_path\netbackup\bin\bpend_notify.bat To create a script that applies only to a specific policy or policy and schedule combination. you can create some batch scripts that provide notification whenever the client completes a backup or archive. STREAM_COUNT specifies the total number of streams to be generated from this policy.76 Reference topics NetBackup notify scripts BACKUPTIME The NetBackup bpbkar process creates these variables. A value of 1 indicates that the client was finished sending all the of data.days.fulls.bat (Microsoft Windows clients only) For Windows clients. bpend_notify. name the script bpend_notify. client.schedulename suffix to the script name. add a . STREAM_PID is the pid (process ID) number of bpbkar.bat Where Install_path is the directory where NetBackup is installed.days. To create a bpend_notify script that applies to all backups. and schedule is 1. You can create bpend_notify scripts that provide notification for all backups or for backups of a specific policy or schedule. These scripts must reside on the client and in the same directory as the NetBackup client binaries: Install_path\NetBackup\bin\bpend_notify. and schedule. A 0 value indicates that multiple data streams is not enabled. The following are examples of the strings that are available to the script for use to record information about a backup: BACKUPID=freddie_0857340526 UNIXBACKUPTIME=0857340526 BACKUPTIME=Sun Mar 2 16:08:46 2005 The following environment variables can be used for the support of multiple data streams: STREAM_NUMBER indicates the stream number.

bat scripts.bat bpend_notify.schedule. NetBackup calls only one bpend_notify script and checks for them in the following order: bpend_notify.schedule] is not specified.policy. the status is the value associated with that error. UARC Status of the operation.bat. The second script affects scheduled backups in the policy named days only when the schedule is named fulls. When the backup completes.bat For example.bat bpend_notify. Note: bpstart_notify scripts can provide a different level of notification than the bpend_notify scripts. NetBackup passes the following parameters to the script.schedule. CINC. UBAK. Policy name from the NetBackup catalog. they could be bpstart_notify. NetBackup uses only bpend_notify.bat. For example.policy.policy.schedule.schedule. The status is 0 for successful backups and 1 for partially successful backups. If an error occurs.policyname[.policy.policy. For a given backup.policy. One of the following: FULL. Table 2-7 Parameter %1 %2 %3 %4 %5 bpend_notify parameters Description Name of the client from the NetBackup catalog. Schedule name from the NetBackup catalog. if there are both bpend_notify. It is the same as sent to the NetBackup server.policy.Reference topics NetBackup notify scripts 77 Caution: The bpend_notify script also runs for NetBackup catalog backups if a .bat and bpend_notify. if you had one of each.bat and bpend_notify. The first script affects all scheduled backups in the policy named days. . INCR.

STREAM_COUNT specifies the total number of streams to be generated from this policy.policy If the script applies to all backups.78 Reference topics NetBackup notify scripts Parameter %6 Description Results file that NetBackup checks for a return code from the script. The default for BPEND_TIMEOUT is 300. If the script needs more than 300 seconds. and schedule. STREAM_PID is the pid (process ID) number of bpbkar.cmd NetBackup calls the dbbackup_notify. NetBackup checks the new results file for the status. The status must be 0 for the script to be considered successful. . The first stream from a policy. increase the value to allow more time. If the script applies to a specific policy and schedule. The script runs on the server that receives the data for the offline catalog backup.cmd script each time NetBackup completes an offline. NetBackup assumes that the script was successful. NetBackup passes the following parameters to this script: Table 2-8 Parameter device dbbackup_notify parameters Description Device type the backup was written to. A 0 value indicates that multiple data streams is not enabled.policy. the results file must be named Install_path\netbackup\bin\BPEND_RES. client.schedule If the script applies to a specific policy. the bpend_notify script can use the following environment variables for the support of multiple data streams: STREAM_NUMBER indicates the stream number. and schedule is 1. cold catalog backup. the results file must be named Install_path\netbackup\bin\BPEND_RES. The server expects the client to respond with a continue message within the time that the BPEND_TIMEOUT option specifies. client. After the script runs. the results file must be named Install_path\netbackup\bin\BPEND_RES An echo 0> %6 statement is one way for the script to create the file. NetBackup deletes the existing results file before it calls the script. For Windows 2000 clients. dbbackup_notify. If the results file does not exist. NetBackup uses %6 to pass the file name and then expects the script to create the file in the same directory as the script.

The script can be modified to send a notification to an email address. Modify this script to produce a printed copy of the media ID to which the catalog backup was done. however. For example: dbbackup_notify. Path to the file being written. The default action is to report the condition and immediately try to write the data again. Note: Applies to NetBackup Enterprise Server only. Table 2-9 Parameter programname pathname diskfull_notify parameters Description Name of the program (always bpdm). the dbbackup_notify script notifies Storage Migrator to perform migration as quickly as possible.cmd DISK /disk1/bpsync1 SUCCESS dbbackup_notify. Or modified to perform actions such as removing other files in the affected directory or file system.Reference topics NetBackup notify scripts 79 Parameter vsn_or_path status Description Volume serial number (for tape) or path (for disk) used for the backup.cmd OPTICAL AA0001 FAIL dbbackup_notify.cmd TAPE XYZ047 SUCCESS You must be able to identify the most recent catalog backup. have commands to force Storage Migrator to back up its own catalog after a backup of the NetBackup catalog. If the NetBackup catalog files are backed up to a UNIX disk storage unit that Storage Migrator manages.cmd script runs on the NetBackup server that contains the storage unit. NetBackup passes the following parameters to this script. You must modify the script to meet site requirements for backup of the Storage Migrator catalog. The script does not. (The file being written is kept open by the active bpdm). The disk media manager (bpdm) calls this script if it encounters a disk full condition while it writes a backup to a disk storage unit. For example: .cmd The diskfull_notify. diskfull_notify. Specifies whether the backup was successful and must have a value of either SUCCESS or FAIL.

80 Reference topics NetBackup notify scripts diskfull_notify.cmd is present in Install_path\NetBackup\bin.cmd bpdm /disk1/images/host_08193531_c1_F1 Note In previous releases.cmd Place it into the following location: Install_path\NetBackup\bin\mail_dr_info.cmd script. The message file name. (For example. enter email1. blat. Note: All NetBackup email notifications require that a public domain SMTP mail client be configured. copy the following script from the master server: Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\nbmail.cmd parameters Description The recipient's address.cmd script default condition was to sleep for five minutes when a disk storage unit became full. NetBackup checks to see if mail_dr_info. Update the script using the following script parameters.email2 The subject line. see the comments in the nbmail.cmd to send NetBackup disaster recovery information to specified recipients after running an online.old_revision_number script to netbackup/bin/diskfull_notify. .cmd Use mail_dr_info. either: ■ Copy the netbackup/bin/diskfull_notify. to change sleep 0 to: sleep 300 ■ mail_dr_info. If mail_dr_info. To create the script. To retain this behavior upon upgrade.cmd exists.) For details.cmd. hot catalog backup. Table 2-10 Parameter %1 %2 %3 %4 mail_dr_info. NetBackup passes the parameters to the script. The attached file name. the diskfull_notify. For multiple addresses. or Modify the script.

Update the script using the following parameters. Table 2-12 Parameter clientname policyname parent_end_notify parameters Description Name of the client from the NetBackup catalog.cmd script each time a parent job ends.cmd Use nbmail. UNIX platforms have a built-in SMTP transfer method.cmd parameters Description The recipient's email address. parent_end_notify. This is generated by another script. If nbmail. copy Install_path\VERITAS\NetBackup\bin\nbmail.cmd exists is present in Install_path\NetBackup\bin.cmd NetBackup calls the parent_end_notify. The recipients email addresses must also be configured in the host properties. %2 %3 %4 NetBackup checks to see if nbmail. The file that is sent in the body of the email.email2 The contents of the subject line.cmd exists. Policy name from the NetBackup catalog. To create the script on a client. Update the script using the following script parameters. The attached file name.cmd from the master server into Install_path\NetBackup\bin of each client that is to receive the notification. Windows systems also require that an application to transfer messages using the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol be installed in order to accept script parameters.cmd to send specified recipients notifications about scheduled backups. NetBackup passes the parameters to the script. Table 2-11 Parameter %1 nbmail. . enter email1. see “Universal Settings properties” on page 480. For more information. For multiple addresses.Reference topics NetBackup notify scripts 81 nbmail.

Update the script using the following parameters. status streamnumber restore_notify.cmd script runs on the server that contains the storage unit. One of the following: FULL. UBAK.cmd Note: Applies to NetBackup Enterprise Server only. The script is called regardless of whether data is sent. CINC (cumulative incremental). Schedule name from the NetBackup catalog. CINC (cumulative incremental).82 Reference topics NetBackup notify scripts Parameter schedname schedtype Description Schedule name from the NetBackup catalog. If the files are restored to a UNIX disk storage unit that Storage Migrator manages. The restore_notify. The stream number for a parent job is always -1. INCR (differential incremental). Table 2-13 Parameter clientname policyname schedname schedtype parent_start_notify parameters Description Name of the client from the NetBackup catalog. UBAK. NetBackup passes the following parameters to this script: . the restore_notify script notifies Storage Migrator to perform migration as quickly as possible after the restore is complete. UARC Exit code for the entire backup job. The NetBackup tape or disk manager (bptm or bpdm) calls the script when it is finished sending data to the client during a restore. One of the following: FULL. UARC Exit code for the entire backup job. The stream number for a parent job is always -1. status streamnumber parent_start_notify.cmd script each time a parent job starts. Policy name from the NetBackup catalog.cmd NetBackup calls the parent_start_notify. INCR (differential incremental).

cmd bptm bilbo_0695316589 duplication session_notify.cmd The session_start_notify. NetBackup passes no parameters to this script.cmd The session_notify. When a set of backups is due to run.cmd The userreq_notify. session_start_notify. Scheduling is suspended until this script completes. It is called at the end of a backup session if at least one scheduled backup has succeeded. manual_backup. list Defines the client name.Reference topics NetBackup notify scripts 83 Table 2-14 Parameter programname pathname operation restore_notify parameters Description Name of the program doing the restore or other read operation. archive. NetBackup passes no parameters to this script. duplication. or restore You can alter this script to gather information about user requests to NetBackup. so no other backups can start until that time. import For example: restore_notify. restore. userreq_notify. NetBackup calls this script to do any site-specific processing before it starts the first backup.cmd script runs on the master server. One of the following: restore.cmd script runs on the master server. NetBackup passes the following parameters to this script. verify.cmd script runs on the master server. archive. Table 2-15 Parameter action userreq_notify parameters Description Defines the action and can have the following values: backup. NetBackup calls it each time a request is made to: ■ ■ List files that are in backups or archives Start a backup. Path to the backup name or path. clientname .

84 Reference topics Media and device management best practices Parameter userid Description Defines the user ID. You may also want to back up the vm. master server databases and the EMM database). Many of these practices also reduce the time and effort that are required to administer your configuration. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ .cmd manual_backup mercury jdoe userreq_notify. For a list of supported devices.cmd restore mercury jdoe userreq_notify. Also. server platforms.com. http://entsupport. Always back up the NetBackup catalogs. periodically restore files to prove that restores work correctly. If you follow these recommendations. use backups from the same point in time.cmd list mercury jdoe Media and device management best practices The following are best practices for NetBackup media and device management.conf (UNIX system) files on your media servers. you can minimize problems. For example: userreq_notif. and the latest device mapping file. Following these best practices should save you time.symantec. The release notes also contain information about all new functionality in each release. see the NetBackup support web site.conf and bp. Refer to the NetBackup release notes to see if the methods you use are eliminated in the current release or eliminated in future releases.cmd archive mercury jdoe userreq_notify. General practices The following are general best practices for media and device management: ■ Use only Symentec documented and Symentec supported options for NetBackup commands. Those files contain configuration settings. Periodically verify your backups using NetBackup Management > Catalog in the NetBackup Administration Console.cmd backup mercury jdoe userreq_notify. When you restore the NetBackup catalog (for example. Use the documented methods for terminating the NetBackup Media Manager daemons and services.

Investigate the causes of all drives that are down. To use devices with other applications and NetBackup controls those devices.Reference topics Media and device management best practices 85 ■ Ensure that all names and numbers for devices and all media IDs and barcodes are unique across the entire enterprise. Read the NetBackup Device Configuration Guide before configuring devices on media servers (or SAN media servers). Do not use the robotic test utilities while running backup or restore jobs. and use TapeAlert for automatic drive cleaning if the drives support automatic cleaning. ■ . ■ ■ ■ ■ Device management The following are device management best practices: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Monitor the NetBackup system log for device errors encountered. Although NetBackup can handle a port that is not empty. A common convention is a prefix that identifies the type of media. Use barcode naming conventions to differentiate between data and cleaning tapes and different physical media types. see the NetBackup hardware compatibility list on the NetBackup support site. Monitor devices by using the NetBackup Device Monitor. For supported devices. tape drives and tape drivers. Replace old cleaning media also. ■ Media management The following are media management best practices: ■ ■ ■ Use the robot inventory update operation for media management. you must down the drive if the drive is in the UP state. some libraries may have problems. Replace old media according to the life-span recommendations of the manufacturer. Configure cleaning cartridges for your tape drives. Before performing inject or eject commands. Use only robots. and server platforms and hardware that are tested and supported by Symatec. Use barcode rules for media type assignment when you inventory multimedia libraries. ensure that the media access port is empty. Use a scratch pool for unassigned media. Use robotic libraries that have a barcode reader and use only barcode labels that the robot vendor recommends.

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Performance and troubleshooting The following are performance and troubleshooting best practices: ■ Use the performance-tuning documents available on the NetBackup support Web page. When possible. Always install the latest NetBackup release updates that are available from Symantec. Do not load vendor medium-changer drivers on Microsoft Windows hosts. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ . Download and install the latest device mapping file from the NetBackup support web site before you use the Device Configuration wizard. use dlt as the logical drive type for all DLT7000 drives. Use the NetBackup Device Configuration wizard to configure your devices. Do not disable the operating system TCP_NODELAY functionality. Use only a dedicated server for the NetBackup master server and Enterprise Media Manager (EMM) server. Verify all SCSI-related operating system configuration files (for example. Do not use the NetBackup DISABLE_RESOURCES_BUSY touch file. Do not use a server that hosts other applications or stores data.conf file). Plan periodic maintenance periods for all of your backup servers. consult the vendor for firmware upgrades and consult the NetBackup hardware compatibility list for supported firmware levels. The default Microsoft medium-changer driver is acceptable (but is not required) for use with NetBackup. For example. For problems with devices. Use consistent logical drive types for all physical drive types on all servers in your environment. when you install operating system release updates. the Solaris st. Always configure and use pass-through paths for robotic libraries and drives.86 Reference topics Media and device management best practices ■ Use only fully-serialized devices. Consult the Troubleshooter in the NetBackup Administration Console or the NetBackup Troubleshooting Guide for all error conditions. Use persistent bindings for fibre-attached devices. A fully-serialized SCSI library should report a serial number for the robot and also a serial number for each drive in the robot. use SCSI reserve.

the TapeAlert firmware monitors the drive hardware and the media. all of the following conditions must be true. TapeAlert checks for errors of the following types: ■ ■ ■ Recoverable read and write drive problems Unrecoverable read and write drive problems Hardware defects . To clean drives using TapeAlert. NetBackup writes TapeAlert conditions into: ■ ■ ■ ■ The bptm log The error log The job details log The system log on UNIX and Event Viewer on Windows For more information. see the NetBackup Device Configuration Guide. To determine if a drive supports TapeAlert. Using TapeAlert TapeAlert is a tape drive status monitor and message utility. and informational states are logged on a TapeAlert log page. For the tape drives that support TapeAlert. and the TapeAlert must be enabled on the drive. warning. see the Symantec support site. For more information. ■ The drive must support the TapeAlert capability. Refer to the device’s documentation for the list of codes that are supported by the device. also see “Reactive cleaning (TapeAlert)” on page 91. ■ ■ ■ TapeAlert log codes TapeAlert codes are derived from the T10 SCSI-3 Stream Commands standard.Reference topics Using TapeAlert 87 ■ See the NetBackup Shared Storage Guide before you install and configure the NetBackup Shared Storage Option. No additional configuration is needed. a cleaning tape is configured and available in NetBackup for the robotic library. Requirements for using TapeAlert To use TapeAlert. The TapeAlert utility can detect tape quality problems. or SharedDisk. The cleaning tape has not reached its end of life. Passthru device files must be configured on UNIX media servers. and the need to clean drives. defects in tape drive hardware. Error. OpenStorage.

WRN Warning .WRN Critical .CRT Critical .FRZ Freeze media .FRZ Freeze media .CRT Warning .FRZ None None None Warning ..WRN Warning . CARTRIDGE FAILURE UNREC.WRN Critical . Table 2-16 TapeAlert log codes Error type Warning .FRZ None None Error message READ WARNING WRITE WARNING HARD ERROR MEDIA READ FAILURE WRITE FAILURE MEDIA LIFE NOT DATA GRADE WRITE PROTECT NO REMOVAL 0x0b None CLEANING MEDIA 0x0c None UNSUPPORTED FORMAT REC.FRZ Critical .CRT Informational INFO Informational INFO Informational INFO Critical .WRN Critical .FRZ Freeze media . CARTRIDGE FAILURE MIC FAILURE FORCED EJECT READ ONLY DIRECTORY CORRUPTED ON LOAD 0x0d Freeze media . MECH.CRT Critical .CRT Warning .FRZ Freeze media .CRT TapeAlert code Default action 0x01 0x02 0x03 0x04 0x05 0x06 0x07 0x08 0x09 0x0a None None None Freeze media .CRT 0x0f 0x10 0x11 0x12 Freeze media .WRN Warning .FRZ 0x0e Freeze media .WRN Warning . Table 2-16 on page 88 describes the TapeAlert codes. An additional set of conditions are defined that can cause a drive to be downed.WRN .88 Reference topics Using TapeAlert ■ ■ ■ Wrong or worn-out media Expired cleaning tapes Abnormal errors A set of TapeAlert conditions are defined that can cause the media in use to be frozen. MECH.

CRT Warning .WRN 0x1d 0x1e 0x1f 0x20 0x21 0x22 0x23 0x24 0x25 0x26 0x27 0x28 .CRT Warning .0x31 None Down drive .WRN Warning .FRZ CLEAN NOW CLEAN PERIODIC EXPIRED CLEANING MEDIA INVALID CLEANING TAPE RETENSION REQUESTED DUAL-PORT ERROR COOLING FAN FAILURE POWER SUPPLY FAILURE POWER CONSUMPTION DRIVE MAINTENANCE HARDWARE A HARDWARE B INTERFACE EJECT MEDIA DOWNLOAD FAIL DRIVE HUMIDITY DRIVE TEMPERATURE DRIVE VOLTAGE PREDICTIVE FAILURE DIAGNOSTICS REQ.WRN Critical .WRN Warning .CLN Freeze media .CRT Critical .WRN Warning .WRN 0x1c None Warning .CRT Warning .CLN Clean drive .WRN Critical .FRZ Error message NEARING MEDIA LIFE 0x14 0x15 0x16 Clean drive .CRT TapeAlert code Default action 0x13 Freeze media .WRN Informational INFO .WRN Critical .FRZ Critical .WRN Warning .Reference topics Using TapeAlert 89 Table 2-16 TapeAlert log codes (continued) Error type Informational INFO Critical .WRN Critical .WRN 0x19 0x1a None None Warning .DOWN None None None None None None None None None Warning .CRT Warning .WRN 0x1b None Warning .DOWN Down drive .CRT 0x18 None Warning . UNDEFINED 0x17 Freeze media .

WRN 0x3c Freeze media .FRZ Error message LOST STATISTICS DIRECTORY INVALID ON UNLOAD SYSTEM AREA WRITE FAILURE SYSTEM AREA READ FAILURE NO START OF DATA LOADING FAILURE UNREC.CRT 0x36 0x37 0x38 Freeze media .CRT 0x35 Freeze media .FRZ Critical .WRN Warning . UNLOAD FAILURE AUTOMATION INTERFACE FAILURE FIRMWARE FAILURE WORM MEDIUM INTEGRITY CHECK FAILED WORM MEDIUM OVERWRITE ATTEMPTED UNDEFINED 0x34 Freeze media .90 Reference topics Drive cleaning overview Table 2-16 TapeAlert log codes (continued) Error type Warning .FRZ Warning .FRZ Critical .WRN 0x3d .FRZ Warning .CRT 0x39 None Critical .CRT 0x3a 0x3b None Freeze media .CRT Critical .0x40 None Informational INFO Drive cleaning overview The following types of drive cleaning are available using NetBackup: ■ Reactive cleaning Symantec recommends that you use reactive cleaning.FRZ Freeze media .CRT Critical .WRN Warning .FRZ Freeze media . Library-based cleaning Frequency-based cleaning Operator-initiated cleaning ■ ■ ■ .WRN TapeAlert code Default action 0x32 0x33 None Freeze media .FRZ Critical .

the drives sets a CLEAN_NOW or CLEAN_PERIODIC flag when a threshold is reached. see “Requirements for using TapeAlert” on page 87. In addition. TapeAlert cleaning A drive with TapeAlert capability tracks how many read and write errors it has encountered within a certain time period. the NetBackup bptm process polls the drive for status from TapeAlert. For more information. Although a drive can recover from these errors. If a drive supports the TapeAlert capability and it is enabled on the drive. depending on the setting for the cleaning frequency. if the CLEAN_NOW or CLEAN_PERIODIC TapeAlert flags are set by the drive. Not all platforms. When you use TapeAlert without frequency-based cleaning. TapeAlert and frequency-based cleaning Using TapeAlert with frequency-based cleaning ensures that a drive is cleaned at least every x hours. TapeAlert allows reactive cleaning for most drive types. a drive is cleaned only when the drive sets its CLEAN_NOW or CLEAN_PERIODIC flags. These different methods often interfere with NetBackup robotic control operations. robots. Before the next backup or restore to the drive. you can configure and use frequency-based cleaning. see “Frequency-based cleaning” on page 92 and “TapeAlert and frequency-based cleaning” on page 91. or firmware levels support this type of reactive cleaning. Library-based cleaning NetBackup does not support library-based cleaning (also known as robotic cleaning or auto cleaning) for most robots because robotic library and operating systems vendors have implemented this cleaning in different ways. The drive determines and initiates the cleaning when needed. For the drives that do not support TapeAlert. Symantec recommends that you use reactive cleaning. If bptm detects that either of these flags is set. . the drive may be cleaned sooner. it performs a cleaning at one of the following times: ■ ■ At the end of a backup or a restore to the drive. drives. For more information.Reference topics Drive cleaning overview 91 Reactive cleaning (TapeAlert) Reactive cleaning (also known as on-demand cleaning or TapeAlert cleaning) using TapeAlert is a function of the tape drive.

For example. The cleaning frequency is configured when you add a drive to NetBackup. Frequency-based cleaning is not supported for drives in ACS or TLH libraries that are under API robotic control. Drive cleaning never causes an unmount in the middle of an active backup. Media can remain in a drive for extended periods. The robotic library software controls the drive cleaning. NetBackup cleans the drive immediately after a tape is unmounted. drive cleaning occurs when the accumulated mount time exceeds the time you specified for cleaning frequency: ■ ■ ■ The drive is in a robotic library that supports drive cleaning. if cleaning is due after the first tape is full. The mount time is reset after the drive is cleaned. NetBackup updates the mount time for the drive each time a tape is unmounted. . use the robot vendor interfaces. The cleaning tape has cleanings that remain. The cleaning frequency value remains the same. NetBackup cleans the drive before it mounts the next tape. A cleaning tape is configured and available for the robotic library. Frequency-based cleaning limitations The following applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. Frequency-based cleaning Frequency-based cleaning occurs when the accumulated mount time exceeds the time you specify for the cleaning frequency. Because TapeAlert provides the same type of cleaning as library-based cleaning. Symantec recommends that you disable library-based cleaning when using TapeAlert. It does not affect cleaning frequency because NetBackup increments the mount time only when NetBackup assignes the media to a process. A cleaning can occur within a backup if the backup spans tapes. To manage drive cleaning for these robots. If the following conditions are met.92 Reference topics Drive cleaning overview NetBackup does not define cleaning media that is used for library-based cleaning. You can also change the cleaning frequency by changing the drive properties or by using the Media and Device Management Device Monitor. and the robotic library manages the cleaning media.

The comment field of the output from the tpclean -L command. You can clean stand-alone drives or robotic drives if a cleaning tape of the correct media type and residence for the drive was added to NetBackup. cleaning delays may occur (due to excessive tape position operations) and drives may be downed. This number is decremented with each cleaning. You can use a new cleaning tape or increase the number of cleanings that are allowed for the tape. NetBackup stops using the cleaning tape.Reference topics Volume pool and volume group overview 93 Operator-initiated cleaning You can initiate a drive cleaning regardless of the cleaning frequency or accumulated mount time of the drive. Volume groups are convenient for updating a . Symantec suggests that you follow the recommendations from cleaning tape vendors for the amount of tape usage. The TapeAlert CLEAN_NOW or CLEAN_PERIODIC flag is set. A volume group is a logical grouping that identifies a set of volumes that reside at the same physical location. If you use a cleaning tape past its recommended life. The Tape Cleaning Comment column of the Drive List in the Devices node of the NetBackup Administration Console. and either of the following conditions are true: ■ ■ NetBackup displays NEEDS CLEANING as follows: ■ ■ Using a cleaning tape Note: NetBackup does not control the cleaning tapes that library-based cleaning uses. The drive is a stand-alone drive and no cleaning tape has any cleanings that remain. The drive is a stand-alone drive and a cleaning tape is not defined. When the number of cleanings is zero. You can specify the number of cleanings that are allowed for a cleaning tape. NetBackup reports that a drive needs cleaning if either of the following conditions are true: ■ ■ The value for the mount time is greater than the cleaning frequency. Volume pool and volume group overview A volume pool is used to identify a logical set of volumes by usage.

Volume pools The volume pool concept is relevant only for NetBackup storage units and does not apply to disk storage units. If you move a volume physically. and as you add volumes. You can create volume pools for applications or other reasons. NetBackup creates volume pools named None. ■ ■ . Volume groups are convenient for tracking the location of volumes. Volume groups let you perform operations on a set of volumes by specifying the group name rather than each individual media ID of each volume. Operations include moves between a robotic library and a stand-alone location or deletetions from NetBackup. Rules for assigning volume groups The following are the rules for assigning volume groups: ■ All volumes in a group must be the same media type. and DataStore. Volume groups Volume groups show the location of a volume. You can also move unassigned volumes to a different pool. However. You specify volume pools and volume groups when you add volumes to NetBackup. such as the robot in which it resides. All volumes in a robotic library must belong to a volume group. you also must move it logically (a logical move means to change the volume attributes to show the new location). such as the case when a volume is moved off-site. and DataStore volume pools. You cannot add volumes to a robotic library without specifying a group or having Media Manager generate a name for the group. NetBackup. With the exception of the CatalogBackup. By default. associate them with the appropriate pool. a media type and its corresponding cleaning media type are allowed in the same volume group (such as DLT and DLT_CLN). NetBackup. The only way to clear a volume group name is to move the volume to stand-alone and not specify a volume group.94 Reference topics Volume pool and volume group overview configuration when you move volumes (for example. Volumes pools protect volumes from access by unauthorized applications. you must create a volume pool before you can add volumes to it. CatalogBackup. from robotic to stand-alone).

. you cannot add a group (or part of a group) to a robotic library if it already exists in another robotic library. Figure 2-3 Volume pool with multiple volume groups Standalone Robotic Group 1 Group 2 NB_pool Off-site 1 Group 3 Group 4 Off-site 2 In Figure 2-4 on page 96. In this example. Note that the data is stored on separate volumes by assigning different volume pools.Reference topics Volume pool and volume group overview 95 ■ More than one volume group can share the same location. For example. standalone1. That is. members of the same volume pools are in different volume groups. and off-site volume groups. All volumes. a robotic library can contain volumes from more than one volume group and you can have more than one stand-alone volume group. volumes can be moved between the groups in the robotic library and any groups that are off-site. In this example. however. All volumes in a group must be in the same robotic library or be stand-alone. ■ Volume pool and volume group example Figure 2-3 on page 95 shows an example with one volume pool (named NB_pool) and several volume groups. the volumes in the pool NB_pool_dept_1 are spread among the rob_A. remain in the same pool. These groups also have volumes from more than one pool (though the volumes in each group must all be the same type). The volumes in a pool can be in more than one physical location and in more than one volume group.

96 Reference topics Volume pool and volume group overview Figure 2-4 Robot A Group rob_A Volume groups with multiple volume pools Standalone Standalone Group standalone1 Group off-site NB_pool _dept_1 NB_pool _dept_2 Robot B Group rob_B NB_pool _dept_3 You also can configure a scratch pool from which NetBackup can transfer volumes when a volume pool has no media available. so Media Manager attempts to assign one from NB_pool_dept_1 in Robot C. Robot C has no unassigned volumes available in the NB_pool_dept_1 pool. the scratch pool is named Scratch_pool. For more information. Scratch volume pools The scratch pool is an optional volume pool that you can configure. If a scratch pool is configured. Scratch pool example In Figure 2-5 on page 97. The three robots contain volumes from that pool in addition to those from other pools. NetBackup moves volumes from that scratch pool to other pools that have do not have volumes available. see “Scratch volume pools” on page 96. Assume the following sequence of events: ■ NetBackup requires a DLT volume. ■ .

NetBackup moves it to NB_pool_dept_1. Media Manager returns expired media to the scratch volume pool automatically (media that is returned must have been originally in the same scratch pool).TL8 Group rob_B NB_pool_dept_2 Scratch pool usage The following list contains important notes about scratch pool usage: ■ If the scratch pool contains assigned volumes.Reference topics Volume pool and volume group overview 97 ■ NetBackup searches the scratch pool for an unassigned DLT volume in Robot C. NetBackup does not assign volumes while they are in a scratch pool. Scratch pool example Robot C . Media Manager does not move assigned volumes to other pools as it does with unassigned volumes. For example if a NetBackup policy or schedule specifies the scratch pool. all requests for those volumes are denied. ■ ■ .TL8 Group rob_A Scratch_pool Robot B . Otherwise. these volumes remain in the scratch pool.DLT Group rob_C NB_pool_dept_1 Figure 2-5 Robot A . NetBackup logs a media unavailable status. If a volume is available.

Barcode overview When a robotic library has a barcode reader. Symantec suggests that you use media with barcodes in the robots that can read barcodes. However. ■ . NetBackup moves volumes to the other pools as they are needed. When you add new media to a robot. Barcodes offer the following advantages: ■ Automatic media ID assignment. and NetBackup does not support barcodes for optical disk libraries (ODL robots). More accurate tracking of volume location. Not using barcodes can adversely affect performance for some robots. if a tape does not have a barcode. Barcode advantages NetBackup functions well whether or not barcodes are used. ■ ■ Barcode best practices When you select barcodes for your volumes. NetBackup is able to assign media IDs according to the criteria that you specify. Barcodes are not generally used on optical disks. the robot retries the scan multiple times. consider the following: ■ Barcodes usually appear on the labels that you attach to the outside of tape volumes. degrading performance.98 Reference topics Barcode overview ■ To have Media Manager manage the allocation of your volumes to your volume pools. it scans the media for barcodes and saves the results. The results associate the slot number and the barcode with the media in that slot. NetBackup obtains barcode and slot information from the robotic library. but do not add any volumes to the pools. However. do the following: a b Create volume pools as required. The robot stores the correct barcode in memory or verifies a previously saved barcode. Increased performance. The maximum barcode length that NetBackup supports depends on the type of robot. Define a scratch pool and add all of your volumes to it. A robot inventory update can determine which volumes are in a robot. A robot that reads barcodes performs a scan each time it moves a tape.

The barcode rules are stored on the EMM server . always follow the robotic library vendor’s recommendations. Also. TLH. In NetBackup. NetBackup verifies that the media type in the rule is compatible with the media type you specified for the update. This volume identifier is used as the NetBackup media ID. This volume identifier is the volume serial number in ACS. the robot or NetBackup may not read them correctly. For API robots. NetBackup actions for barcodes When a robot inventory update operation uses NetBackup barcode rules and a new barcode is detected in the robot: ■ NetBackup searches the list of rules (from first to last) for a rule that matches the new barcode. you should use barcodes to differentiate between data tapes and cleaning tapes or to differentiate between volume pools. Barcodes can represent any combination of alpha and numeric characters. See the robot vendor’s documentation to determine the requirements for a specific robot type.Reference topics Barcode overview 99 ■ When you purchase barcode labels for use with NetBackup. you choose whether to use barcode rules when you set up the robot inventory update operation. Otherwise. You can match barcodes to media IDs by getting custom labels in the same series as your media IDs. Volumes in an API robot have a real or a logical barcode. For example. at the end. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Barcode rules A barcode rule specifies criteria for assigning attributes to new robotic volumes. ■ . you should assign specific characters in the barcode to different media types using media ID generation rules. to match a set of media IDs from AA0000 to ZZ9999. or between any characters). but different robots support different lengths of barcodes. NetBackup assigns these attributes using the barcode for the volume that the robotic library provides and your barcode rules. and TLM robots. get barcode labels in that series. When a robotic library can contain more than one media type. Use barcodes without spaces (at the beginning. If a rule matches the barcode tag. the barcode for a volume must be identical to the NetBackup media ID. Ensure that the barcodes have the correct number of characters.

The attributes include the media type. If the barcode on the volume does not match the barcode in the EMM database. the automatic volume recognition daemon reads the label and the drive is assigned to the request. NetBackup: ■ May assign the request a pending status (for media-specific jobs such as a restore) May use another volume (for backup or duplicate jobs) May fail the job (cold catalog backup jobs) ■ ■ If a requested volume is not in a robot. Example barcode rules The following table shows some example barcode rules. Checking barcodes In the robots that have barcode readers. and resubmit the request. the operator manually assigns the drive to the request. NetBackup assigns the attributes in the rule to the volume. a pending request message appears in the NetBackup Administration Console Device Monitor. and description. If the volume is unlabeled and not associated with a robot. update the volume configuration to reflect the correct location for the media. maximum number of mounts (or number of cleanings).100 Reference topics Barcode overview ■ If the media types match. NetBackup verifies the barcode to ensure that the robot loads the correct volume. which are always located at the end of the list. Note: NetBackup does not use barcode rules if a volume already uses a barcode. Move the volume into the robot. The operator must then find the volume and do one of the following: ■ Check the Device Monitor to find a suitable drive and mount the requested volume in that drive. ■ If the volume is labeled (tape or optical platter). volume pool. Two exceptions are the <NONE> and <DEFAULT> rules. Table 2-17 Barcode tag 0080 DLT Example barcode rules Media type 8MM DLT Volume pool b_pool d_pool Max mounts / cleanings 55 200 Description new 008 volumes dlt backup . Rules are sorted first according to the number of characters in the barcode tag and then by the order you add them.

Assume that you select the following media settings (update options) for the update operation for a new 8-mm volume in a TL8 robot: Media Type = 8MM Volume Group = 00_000_TL8 Use Barcode Rules = YES Volume Pool = DEFAULT If a new volume in this robotic library has a barcode of TL800001.Reference topics Barcode overview 101 Table 2-17 Barcode tag CLD CLT TL8 TL <NONE> <DEFAULT> Example barcode rules (continued) Media type DLT_CLN 8MM_CLN 8MM 8MM DEFAULT DEFAULT Volume pool None None t_pool None None NetBackup Max mounts / cleanings 30 20 0 0 0 0 Description dlt cleaning 8-mm cleaning 8-mm backup 8-mm no pool no barcode other barcodes Refer to the previous table for example barcode rules for the following examples. NetBackup uses the rule with the barcode tag of TL and assigns the following attributes for the volume: Media ID = 000001 (last six characters of barcode) Volume Group = 00_000_TL8 Volume Pool = None Max Mounts = 0 (no maximum) . NetBackup uses the rule with the barcode tag of TL8 and assigns the following attributes for the volume: Media ID = 800001 (last six characters of barcode) Volume Group = 00_000_TL8 Volume Pool = t_pool Max Mounts = 0 (no maximum) If a new volume has a barcode of TL000001.

you can control how NetBackup creates media IDs by specifying which characters of a barcode are used in the media ID. Controlling hardware compression NetBackup tries to turn on hardware compression on all tape drives that support compression. Multiple rules allow flexibility for the robots that support multiple media types. the same media ID for the two barcodes would be created (0006L1) . If this file exists. NetBackup disables hardware compression for all tape drives that it uses. To disable compression. two eight-character barcodes are S00006L1 and 000006L1. “Decommissioning a media server” on page 104. Changing your hardware configuration The following are advanced topics for changing an existing NetBackup configuration: ■ ■ “Replacing devices” on page 102. NetBackup also . the serial number of the new device is different than the old device.102 Reference topics Controlling hardware compression Media ID generation rules Note: To use media ID generation rules. Using media ID generation rules allows you to override the default media ID naming method NetBackup uses. NetBackup recognizes the change and updates the EMM database without restarting ltid.conf). In this example. Media ID generation rules are saved in the Media Manager configuration file (vm. In a rule. Replacing devices If you replace an existing device in your configuration. For example. the robot must support barcodes and the robot cannot be an API robot. The default method uses the last six characters of the barcode the robot provides to generate the media ID. create a file named install_path\NetBackup\Volmgr\NO_COMPRESSION. You can define rules to specific robots and for each barcode format that has different numbers of characters in the barcode. You also can specify that alphanumeric characters are to be inserted into the ID. If you do not specify any media ID generation rules. NetBackup uses the last six characters of the barcode to generate its media IDs. You can define multipe rules to accommodate your robots and the barcode lengths.

0 and later. NetBackup integrity checks that query the device serial number and compare it with the serial number in the database may fail. a device may be unusable (such as the tape drive may be downed). In the Device Monitor. rediscovery. down the drive using the vmoprcmd command with the -downbyname drive_name option. In upgrades from NetBackup environments earlier than 6. 2 3 . specify the same SCSI ID for the new drive as the old drive. see the NetBackup Device Configuration Guide. select Down Drive. devices retain their serial numbers. select the new drive. In NetBackup 6. and possibly a reboot of the operating system. For more information. “To swap a shared serialized drive or to update drive firmware on a shared drive” on page 104 ■ ■ Disable runtime serial number checks by using the AUTO_PATH_CORRECTION vm. To swap a serialized drive or to update drive firmware on a single host 1 Down the drive.0. Replace the drive or physically update the firmware for the drive.x hosts. If so. configure the new drive by using the NetBackup Device Configuration wizard. Integrity checks occur when ltid performs automatic path correction or when the run-time Plug-n-Play code (Windows only) performs serial number checks. From the Actions menu. For procedures. select Up Drive. you must restart ltid before NetBackup recognizes the new device.conf option. If you replace the drive. a change to a serial number formatting algorithm may affect a small number of tape drives and robotic libraries. If you replace a drive with a drive of a different type or replace a serialized drive with an unserialized drive. In the Device Monitor. Those devices may be configured as unserialized or configured with a different serial number. From the Actions menu. select the drive to swap or update. see ■ “To swap a serialized drive or to update drive firmware on a single host” on page 103 For a shared drive. Device configuration may require remapping. In such cases: ■ Update the serial number or reconfigure the device so that the new serial number to be stored in the EMM database.Reference topics Changing your hardware configuration 103 recognizes device firmware upgrades. Therefore. For devices on NetBackup 5. Alternatively. Up the drive. The drive must first be recognized by the operating system of each server.

run the device configuration wizard on all servers that share the drive. Alternatively. If any devices attached to the media server contain NetBackup media. To produce a list of new and missing hardware. 4 5 6 7 Decommissioning a media server This topic is a NetBackup Enterprise Server topic. The tpautoconf command reads the serial number from the new hardware device and then updates the EMM database. specify the same SCSI ID for the new drive as the old drive. You must perform several steps to decommission a media server and remove it from a NetBackup configuration. From the Actions menu. From the Actions menu. select Down Drive. run tpautoconf -report_disc on one of the reconfigured servers. Up the drive. If you replace the drive. select the drive to swap or update. Ensure that all servers that share the new hardware are up and that all NetBackup services are active. Replace the drive or physically update the firmware for the drive. If you do not do the following and a subsequent restore requires media that is associated with the old media . Run tpautoconf with the -replace_drive drive_name -path path_name options or -replace_robot robot_number -path robot_path options. if the media is no longer usable or valid. In the Device Monitor. contact Symantec Consulting for help with this task. If the new device is an unserialized drive. This command scans for new hardware and produce a report that shows the new and the replaced hardware. If the new device is a robot. you must move that media to a new NetBackup media server. Note: If you use NetBackup Vault and plan to decomission a media server. run the device configuration wizard on the server that is the robot control host. select the new drive.104 Reference topics Changing your hardware configuration To swap a shared serialized drive or to update drive firmware on a shared drive 1 2 3 Down the drive. In the Device Monitor. you must delete it from the NetBackup configuration. select Up Drive. Use the following procedure to decommission a server (the old_server) and move its media to a new media server (the new_server).

5 6 7 b c . FORCE_RESTORE_MEDIA_SERVER = old_server new_server 4 Use the NetBackup Administration Console to move the tapes that are in the robots that are attached to the old_server to non-robotic status (stand-alone). Use the NetBackup Administration Console to delete the drives and then the robots from the old_server. The -l option produces one line of output per tape. highlight all of the tapes. If any robots from the old_server are reused on other media servers.conf file on the master server. Select each robot that is attached to the old_server. Verify that the operating systems on the new media servers recognize the robots. The command allows restores from the media that are associated with the old_server to occur from a new_server. Importing media consumes more time than performing the following procedure.Reference topics Changing your hardware configuration 105 server. To decommission a media server 1 Run the bpmedialist command to determine which tapes on the old_server contain NetBackup images that have not expired. you must import the media. do the following: a Power down the affected servers. You can use the NetBackup Device Configuration wizard. Use the NetBackup Administration Console to delete all storage units that use the robots that are associated with the old_server. Use the NetBackup Administration Console to create the appropriate NetBackup storage units. and move them to stand-alone. Run the bpmedia command for each tape that has active images as identified in step 1. disconnect the robots from the old servers. Use the NetBackup Administration Console to add the robots and drives to those media servers. bpmedia -movedb -ev media_ID -oldserver old_server -newserver new_server 3 Add the following command to the end of the bp. and then connect them to the new media servers. bpmedialist -mlist -l -h old_server 2 Select another server or the master server (new_server) to manage the tapes from the old_server. The command replaces the old_server with the new_server in the EMM database and updates the images database on the master server.

The drive allows the requested media density. Run nbemmcmd -listhosts to verify that all references have been removed. if applicable. If the volume is in the EMM database.106 Reference topics How NetBackup selects drives d Use the NetBackup Administration Console to inventory the robots that are attached to the new_server.conf files on the NetBackup master server and all NetBackup media servers. ■ ■ ■ The drive is configured. The drive is in the robotic library that contains the media. These policies must be changed to point to any other defined storage units in the NetBackup configuration or to Any Available. The EMM server (nbemm) manages the drives and requests for locally-attached or shared drives in the EMM domain by doing the following: ■ Determines which of the drives are currently available. as appropriate. The mount request is forwarded to the appropriate robotic daemon (UNIX) or process (Windows) based on the location of the media. Location is the robotic library and the storage slot number. How NetBackup selects drives NetBackup stores media information and device configuration and status information in the EMM database. A drive is available if it is: ■ ■ ■ Configured as UP Not assigned. When a robotic mount request is issued. 8 Modify any policies that explicitly specified any of the storage units on the old_server. 11 Update the server list on all clients to no longer refer to the old_server. the NetBackup Resource Broker (nbrb) queries the EMM database for the media ID of the volume requested. Remove all reference to the old_server in the bp. Compatible with the media type .conf files (UNIX only) and vm. 9 10 Use the nbemmcmd command to remove the host aliases and host names that reference the old_server. A drive must meet the following criteria to be selected for the mount request. the media request is matched with a compatible drive in the robot. Restart the NetBackup daemons (or services) on any system that was updated. The inventory updates the location of all tapes in these robots.

Alternatively. you should thoroughly analyze your . The first drive in the drive configuration is used first.) Access protection on a tape drive prevents an HBA that is not the reservation owner from issuing commands to control the drive.4. Therefore.) You want very high drive availability.3. NetBackup has used SPC-2 SCSI reserve since NetBackup 3.Reference topics How NetBackup reserves drives 107 ■ Not reserved by another host (NetBackup Enterprise Server only). You can see the drive order in the configuration by using the tpconfig -d command. NetBackup selects the robotic-based drives over stand-alone drives unless the corrrect media already is loaded in a stand-alone drive. NetBackup chooses a nonshared drive first (if one is available). SPC-2 SCSI reserve is effective for most NetBackup environments. the new SCSI persistent reserve method may be more effective in either of the following environments because it provides device status detection and correction: ■ You operate NetBackup media servers in a cluster environment. The only commonly available technique for this purpose is SPC-2 SCSI reserve and release functionality. The following applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. device-level access protection is required to avoid unintended sharing of tape devices and possible data loss problems. NetBackup can resolve NetBackup drive reservation conflicts and maintain high drive availability. and it is the default tape drive reservation method in NetBackup. NetBackup can recover and use a reserved drive after a failover (if NetBackup owns the reservation). All tape drive vendors support the SPC-2 SCSI reserve method. (Shared Storage Option is a multiple-initiator environment. SCSI access protection operates at the SCSI target level and depends on correct operation of the fibre-to-SCSI bridge or the native fibre device hardware. ■ Picks an available drive that was used least recently.) ■ However. (With SPC-2 SCSI reserve. (SPC-2 SCSI reserve provides no method for drive status detection. Shared drives require the Shared Storage Option. How NetBackup reserves drives In multiple-initiator (multiple host bus adapter) environments. a drive reset usually is required because the reservation owner is inoperative. NetBackup chooses a shared drive first so the shared drives can be used on other hosts that share the drives. If some of the drives are shared drives. the SCSI persistent reserve method is not supported or not supported correctly by all device vendors. then the second drive. and so on.

You can override the media server setting for any drive path. . which NetBackup uses to resolve reservation conflicts within NetBackup. The protection setting configures tape drive access protection for all tape drive paths from the media server on which the setting is configured. NetBackup fails the job. ■ ■ You can configure access protection for each NetBackup media server. The devices must conform to the SCSI Primary Commands . The reservation prevents other host bus adapters (HBAs) from issuing any commands that can cause data loss. The command removes both the reservation and the registration. The following are the protection options: ■ SCSI persistent reserve. NetBackup unloads the drive and sends a persistent reserve clear command to the drive.108 Reference topics How NetBackup reserves drives environment to ensure that all of your hardware supports SCSI persistent reserve correctly. NetBackup lets you configure either SCSI persistent reserve or SPC-2 SCSI reserve. (The default option.3 (SPC-3) standard. SPC-2 SCSI reserve. When the NetBackup process is finished with the drive. SCSI persistent reserve process The NetBackup process that reads from or writes to the media in a drive (bptm) issues SCSI persistent reserve commands to do the following: ■ Register with the tape drive’s device server (the server is a logical unit within a drive that processes SCSI tasks) Request an exclusive access reservation ■ If the tape drive’s device server grants the reservation. Other HBAs can send the commands that may cause a loss of data to the tape drives. No protection. SCSI persistent reserve also provides device status detection.) This option provides SPC-2 SCSI reserve protection for SCSI devices. SCSI access protection is used on tape drives only.2 standard. The devices must conform to the reserve and release management method in the SCSI Primary Commands . This option provides SCSI persistent reserve protection for SCSI devices. If the reservation fails. the NetBackup process has exclusive use of the device. SCSI reservations provide protection for NetBackup Shared Storage Option environments or any other multiple-initiator environment in which drives are shared.

Therefore. If a conflict exists. such as Inquiry or Request Sense. Based on the drive status. NetBackup sends SCSI commands to unload the drive. or bpbackupdb. NetBackup acquires a reservation. Preempted by an SCSI persistent reserve command.Reference topics How NetBackup reserves drives 109 The reservation does not prevent other applications on the host that has the reservation from using the same device and from causing data loss. . For example. SPC-2 SCSI reserve process The NetBackup process issues an SPC-2 SCSI reserve command to the tape drive that contains the media. NetBackup reports a pending status in the Device Monitor. NetBackup on the active cluster node detects the persistent reservation and clears the reservation. an application can clear another HBAs reservation (although it should not do so). Therefore. For example. NetBackup attempts to resolve conflicts with other NetBackup reservations. the device fails the command by returning a status of RESERVATION CONFLICT. the mt command may take control of the drive. it does not process commands from any other HBA until the HBA that owns the SCSI persistent reservation clears the reservation. A device stays reserved until one of the following occurs on the device: ■ ■ ■ Released by the HBA that reserved it. other HBAs can clear or release an SCSI persistent reservation. In cluster environments after a failover event. bprecover. Power cycled (usually). If an application sends a command to a reserved device. SCSI persistent reserve commands When a device receives an exclusive access type SCSI persistent reservation command. NetBackup does not clear a NetApp persistent reservation. Also. NetBackup regains use of the drive without power-cycling the drive. The reservation owner must clear the reservation before NetBackup can use the drive. NetBackup tries to unload the drive again by using additional information to release or preempt the persistent reservation. The only exceptions to this action are several commands that cannot interfere with the reservation. SCSI persistent reserve conflicts NetBackup uses unique reservation keys. If NetBackup does not own the persistent reservation. if a user on the same host issues a UNIX mt command.) If the device is not reserved. (The process can be bptm.

Released by a TARGET or a LOGICAL UNIT RESET. it issues an SPC-2 SCSI command to release the reservation during the unmount operation. the mt command may take control of the drive. SCSI reserve does not provide a method to determine if a device is reserved. After the NetBackup process has finished with the media. PLOGO. ■ ■ A negative consequence of SPC-2 SCSI reserve occurs if the HBA that owns the reservation fails. A device stays reserved until one of the following occurs on the device: ■ ■ Released by the HBA that reserved it. If the HBA that owns the reservation fails. NetBackup fails the job. If the reservation fails. or TPRLO action or failed discovery (link actions). PRLI. These resets are protocol dependent and differ between parallel SCSI and FCP (SCSI on fibre channel). Only the original HBA can remove the reservation. Released by fibre channel LOGO. A device that an HBA reserves stays reserved until the reservation is removed or broken. such as Inquiry or Request Sense. If an application sends a command to a reserved device.110 Reference topics How NetBackup reserves drives The drive does not process commands from any other host bus adapters (HBAs) until NetBackup releases the reservation or the reservation is broken. it does not process commands from any other HBA until the HBA that owns the reservation issues the release command. The only exceptions to this action are several commands that cannot interfere with the reservation. if a user on the same host issues a UNIX mt command. the device must be reset by any of the following: ■ ■ SCSI reset Bus device reset . To break a reservation. it cannot remove the reservation. Therefore. These resets may be issued from any HBA. these limitations do not interfere with NetBackup operations in most environments. Power cycled. Only the reservation owner (the host bus adapter) can release the reservation. PRLO. which means the system must be available. the reservation must be broken. However. the device fails the command by returning a status of RESERVATION CONFLICT. The release frees the device for access by another HBA. The reservation does not prevent other applications on the host that has the reservation from using the same device and from causing data loss. For example. SPC-2 SCSI reserve commands When a device receives an SCSI reserve command.

If a conflict occurs. SCSI reservation conflicts The NetBackup Automatic Volume Recognition process (avrd) manages access to tape devices. the NetBackup Administration Console Device Monitor or the output from the vmoprcmd command shows PEND in the Control column. When avrd starts. even for a failover server in a cluster environment. the following message is written to the log: Reservation Conflict status cleared from DRIVENAME (device NUMBER) Forcing a release To force a release of an unavailable HBA’s SPC-2 reservation.Reference topics How NetBackup reserves drives 111 ■ ■ ■ LUN device reset Power cycle Fibre channel link actions may break reservations. due to a system crash or hardware failure). avrd changes the status of the device to PEND and writes the following message in the system log: Reservation Conflict status from DRIVENAME (device NUMBER) Also. If avrd gets a reservation conflict message. When the conflict is resolved. nondisabled tape drive paths that are currently in the Up state. it issues an SPC-2 SCSI release to all configured. Issue the vmoprcmd command on the host that is the device allocator (DA host). A properly configured NetBackup environment and properly configured tape devices should not receive a reservation conflict message from a tape drive. You must force a release or break the reservation to make the drive available. The DA host is also the EMM server. Alternatively. SPC-2 SCSI reserve commands are mandatory for all SCSI-2 and SCSI-3 devices. use the -h option of the command to specify the DA host. it cannot release the reservation. you can use the following NetBackup vmoprcmd command and option: vmoprcmd -crawlreleasebyname drive_name This option requests that all hosts that are registered to use the drive issue SPC-2 SCSI release commands to the drive. a reservation problem may exist. See the SCSI 2 standard for a detailed description of SCSI reserve command operation and behavior. NetBackup cannot release or break an SPC-2 SCSI reservation automatically. If the HBA that reserves the drive is unavailable (for example. . The command releases all devices that were SPC-2 reserved at the time of a system reboot or crash. The SCSI release command returns tape devices to general availability after a system crash.

Loss of data is also possible. A power cycle breaks SPC-2 SCSI drive reservations (and usually breaks SCSI persistent drive reservations). To break an SPC-2 reservation on HP-UX ◆ Issue st -f drive_path_name -r. See the st(1m) man page for more information. if the following operating system commands cannot break the reservation. Issue mt -f drive_path_name release. To break an SPC-2 reservation on AIX ◆ Issue tctl -f drive_path_name reset. you can power-cycle the drive. You should first try alternate methods to break the reservation on a device (using switch and bridge hardware). Breaking a reservation If you cannot release an SPC-2 SCSI reservation. The procedure depends on the operating system type. Lastly. See the tctl man page (in the IBM AIX Commands Reference) for more information. do not issue this command during backups. To break an SPC-2 reservation on Solaris 1 2 Issue mt -f drive_path_name forcereserve. SCSI reserve requirements and limitations The following are the requirements to use SCSI persistent reserve or SPC-2 SCSI reserve: . Caution: The reset operation may reset other devices in your configuration. See the mt(1) man page for more information. see NetBackup Commands for UNIX and Linux or NetBackup Commands for Windows.112 Reference topics How NetBackup reserves drives Caution: You can use this command after a PEND status has been displayed in the NetBackup Administration Console Device Monitor. For more information about using the vmoprcmd command. A device reset breaks a reservation. you can try to use an operating system command that forces a device reset. However.

Third-party copy configurations must be configured correctly. For instruction. HP Tru64 is a system that uses dynamic path sharing. backups and restores fail. ■ ■ ■ The NetBackup implementation of SCSI persistent reserve and SPC-2 reserve has the following limitations: ■ SCSI persistent reserve and SPC-2 reserve do not apply to NDMP drives. AIX and Solaris may require such a change. You must configure the operating systems on the NetBackup media servers so they allow NetBackup to control SCSI persistent reserve or SPC-2 SCSI reserve. see the NetBackup Snapshot Client Administrator's Guide. Therefore. ■ ■ ■ . The NDMP filer is responsible for providing exclusive device access. With SPC-2 SCSI reserve. Do not use SCSI persistent reserve on the drive paths that are used for third-party copy backups. Depending on your tape drives. The passthru driver must be installed and all required paths must be created.Reference topics How NetBackup reserves drives 113 ■ There must be passthru driver access to all shared drives. you must disable the operating system's use of SPC-2 SCSI reserve. You cannot use SPC-2 SCSI reserve if the following are true: the failover does not break the device reservations and those devices that were in use during the failover must be available without manual intervention. On HP-UX systems. see “Enabling SPC-2 SCSI reserve” in the “Hewlett-Packard HP-UX” chapter of the NetBackup Device Configuration Guides. If a drive path changes. You can use SCSI persistent reserve. If you cannot disable dynamic path sharing. you may have to disable the operating system’s use of SPC-2 SCSI reserve. jobs fail in cluster environments or any multipath environments that share paths dynamically. see the appropriate operating system chapter of the NetBackup Device Configuration Guide. For procedures. devices may remain reserved after a failover in cluster environments or multipath environments with failover capability. see the NetBackup Device Configuration Guide . For more information. For information about how to configure and use the passthru driver for UNIX operating systems. you cannot use SPC-2 SCSI reserve or SCSI persistent reserve in NetBackup. you must configure the NetBackup mover.conf file. To retain reservation of a tape device during a third-party copy backup.

NetBackup cannot share tape devices with other applications.114 Reference topics How NetBackup reserves drives SCSI reservation logging The bptm process logs SCSI reservation-related commands. If access protection is enabled on all NetBackup media servers. If you use other applications. In addition. the following may cause data loss: any third-party or operating system utilities that run on the server that runs the NetBackup backup job. the following occurs: ■ ■ ■ The tape is frozen. SCSI reservation commands are labelled SCSI PERSISTENT RESERVE or SCSI RESERVE in the log. the bptm process reads the tape position and then verifies the actual position against the expected position. . multiple master servers. The following error message entry is written to the bptm log: FREEZING media id xxxxxx. The backup fails. all data on media is lost Possible data loss causes If tape drive access protection is not enabled on your NetBackup media servers. incorrect Shared Storage Option configurations. information about the SCSI persistent reservations that are broken are also written to the NetBackup Problems report. the following may cause data loss: configuration errors. These operating systems also may report PEND if the drive reports Busy when a volume is unmounted. Therefore. and third-party or operating system utilities. You should examine the bptm log on all NetBackup media servers to ensure that the SCSI operations are logged. You can use the AVRD_PEND_DELAY entry in the vm. If the actual position is less than the expected position at the end of the backup process.conf configuration file to filter out these extraneous reports. PEND appears in the Device Monitor if another application controls the tape drive. incorrect paths. Checking for data loss To detect data loss. External event caused rewind during write. Server operating system limitations This topic applies to Tru64 and Windows servers. Tru64 and Windows operating systems cannot distinguish between a reserved device and a busy device. you should use the NetBackup tpreq command or Down the drive before you use the drive.

Checking for tape and driver configuration errors To detect data loss.conf file on a Solaris system. . A less common error may be in the tape driver's configuration data. such as in the /kernel/drv/st. If so. Configuring SCSI reserve The SCSI reserve protection setting configures tape drive access protection for all tape drives from the media server on which the setting is configured. you can import the image using the NetBackup bpimport command so the data is available for restores. the following occurs: ■ ■ ■ The tape is frozen. The most common configuration error is a failure to configure the driver for variable length blocks.Reference topics How NetBackup reserves drives 115 Unfortunately. For information about tape driver configuration. To override the media server protection setting: use the NetBackup Administration Console to set the drive path property Override SCSI reserve settings when you add a drive or change a drive’s properties. You must use the bpexpdate command to expire the images for the lost backup sessions. The following error message entry is placed in the bptm log: FREEZING media id xxxxxx. and you can override the global setting for any drive path. data loss cannot be prevented only recognized after the fact. To configure SCSI reserve protection on a media server: use the NetBackup Administration Console to set the media server host property Enable SCSI Reserve on the Media tab. You can configure the protection for each media server. If a configuration problem causes the actual position to be greater than the expected position at the end of the backup process. see the NetBackup Device Configuration Guide. NetBackup does not remove catalog information about the backup sessions that were lost. The backup fails. Common configuration problems You must identify and fix the source of the configuration problem that causes data loss. check tape/driver block size configuration The backup data may be usable. too many data blocks written. the bptm process reads the tape position and then verifies the actual position against the expected position.

In the volume pool that is required by the backup. NetBackup automatically mounts and assigns it. position the heads to the beginning of the volume. if the NetBackup Media host property Allow multiple retentions per media is specified for the server. NetBackup does one of the following: ■ ■ ■ Pends a mount request if the request is media-specific (restore. If a suitable volume is not in a robot but is in a stand-alone drive. it searches the EMM database for the media ID. ■ If a suitable volume is in a robot. and the file name that is used to link to the device that is assigned. NetBackup uses it. No manual intervention is required. If a suitable volume is found. . No manual intervention is required. FROZEN. A request for a volume includes the media ID. ■ If NetBackup cannot find a mounted volume that satisfies all of the previous conditions. Of the same density that is required by the requested backup andin the robot that is requested by the backup. NetBackup detects tape format after the volume is mounted. If a suitable volume is not in a robot or a stand-alone drive. However. or tpreq). Not currently in use by another backup or a restore. NetBackup does not search by retention level. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Not written in a protected format.116 Reference topics How NetBackup selects media How NetBackup selects media How NetBackup selects media depends on whether the media is in a robot or a stand-alone drive. NetBackup selects a volume in a robot in the following order: ■ NetBackup searches the media catalog for a volume that is already mounted in a drive and meets the following criteria: ■ Configured to contain backups at the retention level that the backup schedule requires. and assign it to the request. If the volume is in a protected format. or SUSPENDED state. The external media ID should correspond to the NetBackup media ID. Selecting media in robots When NetBackup receives a request for a volume. Not in a FULL. NetBackup unmounts the volume and resumes the search. device density. import. it checks the media catalog for any volume that is suitable. IMPORTED. NetBackup issues the commands that move the volume to a drive.

Is in the correct volume pool. If there are no unassigned volumes of the requested type. ■ Selecting media in stand-alone drives The following subsections explain media selection and other aspects of stand-alone drive operations. ■ If the media catalog does not have a suitable volume or if a suitable volume is at end of media (EOM). In this case. Is located in the requested robotic peripheral (if applicable). automatic media selection depends on whether NetBackup is configured to allow backups to span media. the backup terminates with an error message that no media was available. ■ Spanning media After an end of media (EOM) is reached. Is not expired (if an expiration date is defined in NetBackup). NetBackup then adds it to the media catalog and assigns it the specified retention level. NetBackup uses another volume to start the next fragment and the resulting backup is composed of fragments on different volumes. Schedule backup attempts. . as follows: ■ NetBackup spans media if the NetBackup Media host property Allow backups to span media is specified for the server. Is for the correct robot type (if applicable). a new volume is assigned. NetBackup may assign a new volume even if a volume is not full (because NetBackup received an EOM message from the drive). The new volume must meet all of the following criteria: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Is the correct media type. NetBackup chooses the volume that was least recently used. the backup terminates abnormally and the operation is retried according to the NetBackup Global Attributes host property. Is not currently assigned (not already allocated to NetBackup). ■ If more than one volume qualifies. NetBackup does not span media if Allow backups to span media is not specified. Has not exceeded the maximum number of mounts allowed. Resides on the requested host.Reference topics How NetBackup selects media 117 ■ Attempts to to use another volume (for backup jobs where any other media can be used). In this case.

A00000. You can specify the -u parameter ito force assignment of a specific drive index.118 Reference topics How NetBackup selects media Media selection using stand-alone drive extensions With NetBackup stand-alone drive extensions. If an appropriate drive contains a volume. the NetBackup Media ID prefix (non-robotic) is used as the first characters of the media ID. Disabling stand-alone drive extensions You can disable the stand-alone drive extensions by clearing the NetBackup media server host property. . FROZEN. ■ ■ If the unused media is not labeled. If a media ID prefix is not specified. This capability is enabled by default during installation. If a media ID is added. For example. and an operator must manually insert the volume and assign it to a drive. NetBackup tries to use any labeled or any unlabeled media that is in a stand-alone drive. NetBackup selects a volume as explained in “How NetBackup selects media” on page 116. NetBackup uses media that was not used previously. you can label it by using the bplabel command. if the NetBackup Media host property Allow multiple retentions per media is specified for the server. the default prefix is the letter A. or SUSPENDED. NetBackup adds a media ID to the volume configuration. However. The Device Monitor shows the mount request. NetBackup tries to select and use that volume. NetBackup adds the requested volume pool to the volume configuration (if the backup policy specifies a volume pool). Enable standalone drive extensions. which eliminates the need to assign the drive manually. ■ A volume that has been used previously for backups must meet the following criteria: ■ ■ Not be FULL. NetBackup does not require a specific retention level. NetBackup uses the same method to select media for stand-alone drives as it uses for robotic drives. If the media is unlabeled. the following actions occur: ■ ■ NetBackup labels the media. The media selection process is as follows: ■ If a backup is requested and an appropriate stand-alone drive does not contain a volume. if necessary. Contain backups at the retention level and be in the same volume pool as the backup that requires a volume. If you clear this property.

specify the Media request delay media server host property. and so on.) To direct NetBackup to wait. The operation is rescheduled according to the master server host property Schedule backup attempts. One standalone drive may be ready and contain suitable media. The wait period is helpful when a gravity feed tape stacker takes a long time to load the next media in the drive. NetBackup also waits to generate a pending mount request during tape span operations. NetBackup attempts to use an unassigned volume rather than one that already has images on it. as follows: ■ NetBackup spans media if the media server host property. ■ After an EOM condition. Keeping stand-alone drives in the ready state To leave stand-alone drives in a ready condition after a backup or restore completes. Allow backups to span media. If a suitable unassigned volume is unavailable. See the NetBackup Commands for Windows for detailed information on the nbemmcmd command. When NetBackup spans media and an EOM is encountered on a stand-alone drive. The backup terminates abnormally when the end of media is reached. and the resulting backup has data fragments on more than one volume. ■ ■ NetBackup does not span media if Allow backups to span media is not specified. This property specifies the number of seconds NetBackup waits to use a volume that is loaded in a compatible drive before looking for another drive. is specified for the server. the media is ejected if the drive needs to be used with another media or the media needs to be used with another drive. NetBackup does not eject the tape after an operation completes. Also. (A gravity feed tape stacker is not controlled by software. . NetBackup selects another volume to begin the next fragment. in the correct volume pool. NetBackup checks the EMM database for a volume that is the correct media type.Reference topics How NetBackup selects media 119 Spanning media Media selection after an end of media (EOM) condition depends on whether NetBackup is configured to allow backups to span media. The media is still ejected if EOM is reached or an error is encountered. NetBackup then does not search for other media or generate a pending mount request. NetBackup selects a volume. use the nbemmcmd command to enable the -do_not_eject_standalone option. The Media request delay property is effective only when stand-alone drive extensions are enabled. you can direct NetBackup to wait until a volume is loaded in a compatible stand-alone drive.

which is used for position validation. The EH is overwritten by a BH and the backup proceeds. Tape mark. Backup Headers (1024 bytes). the format for the backups that are not multiplexed is as follows: MH * BH Image * BH Image * BH Image * EH * When you add a new backup image. The following symbols are used in the media format descriptions in the following subsections. NetBackup does not write empty backup headers (EH). the tape is positioned to the EH and the position is verified.120 Reference topics Media formats Media formats NetBackup writes media in a format that allows the position to be verified before appending new backups. QIC/WORM tape format This format is used for quarter-inch cartridge (QIC) and WORM media. it terminates the tape with two tape marks and does not write an EH. . a new EH is written for future positioning validation. Empty Backup Header. The format for tape and optical media differs slightly because of characteristics of the media. Backup Header (1024 bytes). When complete. One for each job that is part of the set of jobs being multiplexed Data from the backup.. NetBackup positions to the end of data (EOD) and then starts the next backup. Unlike the standard tape format.. When NetBackup encounters the end of media during a write. The format is as follows: MH * BH Image * BH Image * BH Image * To append backup images to QIC media. Symbol MH * BH BH1 . BHn Description Media Header (1024 bytes). Image EH Standard tape format For all tape media except quarter-inch cartridge (QIC) and WORM.

The following are some benefits of image fragmentation: ■ For multiplexed backups. Each block also contains 512 bytes that are reserved for multiplexing control information and to identify the backup to which the block corresponds. Fragmented backups For fragmented backups.Reference topics Media formats 121 Optical media format For optical media. Storage Migrator does not have to retrieve the entire 500 MBs. Multiplexing format The tape format for multiplexed backups is as follows: MH * BH1 . When a job ends or a new job is added to the multiplexing set. The difference is that NetBackup breaks the backup image into fragments of the size that you specify when you configure the storage unit. For example. the format is as follows: MH BH Image EH BH Image EH BH Image EH Optical disk media have no tape marks to delimit backups.. . Because optical disks can seek to a random position. Faster restores from any backup images that NetBackup Storage Migrator migrated. ■ Note: If an error occurs in a backup.. the media format is similar to the standard tape format. if a 500-MB backup is stored in 100-MB fragments. Exception: checkpoint and restart backups resume from the last checkpoint fragment.. find operations and verify a position operations are a fast. the entire backup is discarded and the backup restarts from the beginning. The following is an example: MH * BH1 BH2 BH3 Image* BH2 BH3 Image* BH2 BH3 BH4 Image. NetBackup writes a tape mark and starts multiplexing the revised set of jobs. The following is an example: MH * BH Image (frag 1)* BH Image (frag 2)* BH Image (frag n) * EH * Fragmentation is intended primarily for storing large backup images on a disk type storage unit. faster restores because NetBackup can advance to the specific fragment before starting its search for a file. It does not restart from the fragment where the error occurred. .. The data on an optical disk is recorded in successive sectors. BHn Image. the data image is in 64-kilobyte blocks. Storage Migrator has to retrieve only the fragment that has the files. By default.

. Note Applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. and automatic volume recognition daemons. Starting ltid also starts the robotic... Table 2-18 Command acsd Starting services and processes Description The Automated Cartridge System robotic process.. avrd The Automatic Volume Recognition process. Media Manager volume. *BHn Image (frag 1) * * The following is the second tape format: MH * BHn Image (frag2)* . This process is started by ltid. This process is started by ltid. ltid tl4d . The first fragment on the next tape begins with the buffer of data where the end of media occurred. These commands are located in install_path\VERITAS\Volmgr\bin. Note: Services should be started and stopped using the Services tool available in Administrative Tools in the Windows control panel. and terminates the tape with two tape marks): MH * .122 Reference topics Media Manager commands Spanning tapes By default. This process is started by ltid. * EH * Media Manager commands See the NetBackup Commands for Windows for detailed information about the commands shown in the following tables. Starts the NetBackup Device Manager service. some services will occupy that NetBackup Console session until they are stopped. The following is the first tape format (NetBackup does not write an EH. NetBackup spans a backup image to another tape if it encounters the end of media during a backup. The Tape Library 4MM robotic process. If they are started from the command line. The format is the same as described for fragmented backups. robotic control.

vmd The NetBackup Volume Manager service. This process is started by ltid. The Tape Library 8MM robotic process. Stops the Tape Library DLT robotic-control process. vmscd is started by nbemm on the same host as the EMM server if one or more NetBackup 5. robotic. Applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. Starts the Tape Library Half-inch robotic-control process. This process is started by ltid. This process is started by ltid. Starts the Tape Library DLT robotic-control process. vmscd Table 2-19 Command stopltid Stopping services and processes Description Stops the device. Applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. and robotic-control services. This process is started by ltid. This process is started by ltid.Reference topics Media Manager commands 123 Table 2-18 Command tl8cd Starting services and processes (continued) Description Starts the Tape Library 8MM robotic-control process. tlmd The Tape Library Multimedia process. Stops the Tape Library 8MM robotic-control process. This process is started by ltid.x servers are present in the configuration. The NetBackup Status Collection service. Note tl8d tldcd tldd tlhcd tlhd The Tape Library Half-inch robotic process. This process is started by ltid. This process is started by ltid. The Tape Library DLT robotic process. Note tldcd -t tl8cd -t . Applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server.

For information about configuring the devices in your operating systems. NetBackup determines device relationships by comparing serial numbers from multiple sources that refer to the same device. . Most robots and drives support device serialization. ■ Each robot and each drive returns a unique serial number. A unique serial number identifies a device. Device serialization Device serialization is a firmware feature that allows device identification and configuration. the device is not discovered. the following actions occur when the Device Configuration Wizard queries the devices. and so on).124 Reference topics Device discovery overview Table 2-19 Command tlhcd -t Stopping services and processes (continued) Description Stops the Tape Library Half-inch robotic-control process. The goal of device discovery is to provide information to enable fully or partially automatic configuration of peripherals for use with NetBackup. otherwise. Device discovery overview NetBackup discovers devices and configures them automatically on all supported operating system server platforms (except NetWare servers) and for supported peripherals. Note Applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. Device discovery is an exploratory method used to determine which peripheral devices a host can detect. Detection depends on physical attachment (SCSI. NetBackup can determine the drive's position (or address) in the robotic library. Fibre. If a device supports serialization. and host-based system device-layer configuration. see the NetBackup Device Configuration Guide. If both a robotic library and a drive fully support serialization. Device discovery provides data that correlates the devices that are interconnected across multiple hosts or multiple host bus adapters on the same host. device state (on and responding or off and not responding). A pass-through path to a device must exist. Discovery sends SCSI commands through operating system device files (on UNIX) or APIs (on Windows) that support SCSI pass through.

If you know that your devices do not support serialization. NetBackup uses the information to construct your configuration. The wizard uses the information to determine the correct drive number for each drive in the robot. SCSI over IP (reported). The greater the number of drives and robots in your configuration that do not support serialization. ask the vendor for the new firmware that returns serial numbers. some devices require the vendor to perform another action to enable serialization for the device. Fibre Channel Protocol (FCP) and FC-AL (loop) connections. and stackers). make sure that you follow the maximum configuration limits that they allow. The robot returns the number of drives and the serial number for each of the drives in the robot. the wizard issues an additional command. Devices that can be discovered NetBackup can discovery the following types of devices: ■ ■ ■ SCSI-based robotic libraries (such as changers. ACS. ■ ■ ■ Device discovery in NetBackup This topic is a NetBackup Enterprise Server topic. NDMP devices that run NDMP version 3 or later. Native parallel SCSI. the greater the chance of configuration problems using the Device Configuration Wizard. Even with the proper firmware. TLM. The EMM database contains the primary attribute information that the following NetBackup components need to use devices: ■ ■ ■ ■ The NetBackup Administration Console used on the master server Device configuration wizards that are used on the master server The tpconfig command that is used locally on each media server An internal API .Reference topics Device discovery overview 125 ■ For any robots in the configuration. autoloaders. These configurations are persistent for robotic libraries and tape or optical drives in the NetBackup Enterprise Media Manager (EMM) database. SCSI-based tape drives. If a device does not support serialization. NetBackup is based on a static configuration of devices. and TLH robots.

For shared tape drives. the wizard configures it. you can use the Device Configuration wizard again. Components on the same host communicate by using shared memory IPC or socket protocols. The EMM database ensures consistency between drives. NetBackup can be configured to run an automated form of device discovery during ltid startup (which is the default behavior for Windows). ltid is stopped and restarted to activate the latest device configuration. Device discovery in the Device Configuration Wizard The NetBackup Device Configuration Wizard uses device discovery. Socket protocols are used between components across multiple hosts.126 Reference topics Device discovery overview The EMM database also contains the discovered device attributes that are required for device correlation and for validation of consistency in the configuration. you do not have to move devices. storage units. Device discovery and shared tape drives This topic is a NetBackup Enterprise Server topic. If the devices are fully serialized. robotic libraries. and media for jobs. media. Therefore. For a list of hosts to be discovered. NetBackup polls locally-attached non-shared tape drives on the hosts where they are configured when they are in the UP state and are not in use. However. drive path. the wizard issues device discovery queries to all the hosts and correlates the data returned. Automated discovery detects differences between the actual device configuration and the device configuration that is defined in the EMM database. Command line interfaces are available to obtain run-time (shared memory) information and static device configuration information. If the device configuration changes or if it needs to be verified. NetBackup then can reconcile those differences. ensure that no jobs are active when you start the Device Configuration wizard. The wizard changes the device configuration as needed on all hosts on which device discovery was requested. You can drag and drop devices between specific addresses in a robotic library and the group of stand-alone (non-robotic) drives. When the device manager ltid starts up. it reads device information from the EMM database into a shared memory segment. only the scan host polls drives until a mount request is received . and volume pools across multiple servers. You can use the Device Configuration wizard after initial configuration. The EMM server contains information for all media servers that share devices in a multiple server configuration. ltid cannot be stopped and restarted while NetBackup activity is in progress. The NetBackup scheduling components use the EMM database information to select the server.

Viewing and verifying the device configuration You can view your device configuration by using one of the following device configuration interfaces available in NetBackup: ■ ■ ■ Media and Device Management in the NetBackup Administration Console Menu-based device configuration interface (tpconfig on UNIX) Command line interface for device configuration (tpconfig -d command) You can verify your device configuration by running the Device Configuration wizard. you can use Media and Device Management in the NetBackup Administration Console or the tpconfig command. The arbitrating component also provides a network drive reservation system so that multiple NetBackup media servers can share a drive.Reference topics Device discovery overview 127 from NetBackup. During a mount request. . automated device path correction when the ltid device manager starts is limited. Each tape drive can potentially have its own scan host that switches dynamically to process errors and continue availability. Polling a shared tape drive allows dynamic loop switching and reduces the number of device accesses and reduces CPU time. it cannot detect connectivity breaks (for example. discontinuity in the Fibre Channel fabric) until I/O occurs. For the devices that NetBackup cannot discovered or that do not have serial numbers. However. However. Adding devices without discovery Symantec recommends that you use device discovery and the Device Configuration Wizard to add storage devices to NetBackup and to update the NetBackup device configuration. NetBackup also supports some devices that require user intervention during the discovery process. Each tape drive needs to be detected only from a single host. some details of a device configuration cannot be validated without attempting tape mounts. However. To add and configure those devices. A central device arbitrating component manages scan host assignments for shared drives.) This design enables NetBackup to support Dynamic Loop Switching or SAN zones. NetBackup uses the host that requests the mount to poll the shared drive. You can use the NetBackup robtest utility to mount tapes and validate the configuration. NetBackup supports some devices that cannot be discovered automatically. (A scan host is the host from which the automatic volume recognition process (avrd) scans unassigned drives.

128 Reference topics Correlating tape drives to device files or addresses

Device mapping file
NetBackup uses a file to determine which protocols and settings to use to
communicate with storage devices.
In some cases, you can add support for new or upgraded devices without waiting
for a release updates from Symantec. For information about how to update this
file, see the NetBackup Administrator’s Guide, Volume I.

Related topics

Correlating tape drives to device files or addresses
If your tape drives do not support device serialization, you may have to determine which device file, logical device name, or SCSI address matches the physical drive. For shared drives, see the NetBackup Shared Storage Guide for more information. (NetBackup Enterprise Server only.)

Correlating devices and device files on UNIX hosts
Correlate device files to physical drives when you create the device files for each drive. The NetBackup Device Configuration Guide provides guidance to help you create device files. The following is a general procedure: To correlate device files 1 Determine the physical location of each drive within the robotic library. The location usually is shown on the connectors to the drives or in the vendor’s documentation. Physically connect the drives to SCSI adapters in your host. Record the adapter and SCSI addresses to which you connected each drive. Create device files for each drive; use the SCSI addresses of the drives and adapters. Add the device file using your notes from step 3 to complete the correlation between device files and physical drive location. Configure the robot in NetBackup and then add the drives. When you add the drives, verify that you assign the correct drive address (for example, robot drive number) to each device path.

2 3 4

5

Optionally, use the appropriate NetBackup robotic test utility to verify the configuration. For information about the robotic test utilities, see the NetBackup Troubleshooting Guide.

Reference topics Correlating tape drives to device files or addresses

129

After you create device files and configure NetBackup, you can verify the
configuration.
To verify the configuration (UNIX)
1 2 Stop the NetBackup device daemon (ltid).
Start ltid, which starts the Automatic Volume Recognition daemon (avrd). You must stop and restart ltid to ensure that the current device configuration has been activated. The following point applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. If robotic control is not local to this host, also start the remote robotic control daemon. Use the robotic test utility to mount a tape on a drive. Use the NetBackup Administration Console Device Monitor to verify that the tape was mounted on the correct robot drive.

3 4

Verify configuration example For example, assume a TLD robot includes three drives and the operating system includes the following device paths:
■ ■ ■

Drive 1: /dev/rmt/0cbn Drive 2: /dev/rmt/1cbn Drive 3: /dev/rmt/3cbn

Also assume that in step 3 in “To verify the configuration (UNIX),” you requested that the tape be mounted on drive 1. If the device path for the drive is configured correctly, the Device Monitor shows that the tape is mounted on drive 1. If the Device Monitor shows that the tape is mounted on a different drive, the device path for that drive is not configured correctly. For example, if the Device Monitor shows that the tape is mounted on Drive 2, the device path for drive 1 is incorrect. Replace the drive 1 device path (/dev/rmt/0cbn) with the correct device path (/dev/rmt/1cbn) for drive 2. You may need to use a temporary device path while making these changes. You also know that the device path for drive 2 is incorrect. Possibly, the device paths were swapped during configuration. Use the robotic test utility to unload and unmount the tape from drive 1. Repeat the test for each drive. The following point applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. If the path to the drive where the tape is mounted is not on the host with direct robotic control, you may have to unload the drive with a command from another host or from the drive’s front panel.

130 Reference topics
Correlating tape drives to device files or addresses

Correlating devices and names on Windows hosts
Use the following procedure to match the logical device name with the drives: To correlate SCSI addresses 1 2 Note the SCSI target of the drive. Correlate the SCSI target to the drive address by using the robot’s interface panel. Alternatively, examine the indicators on the rear panel of the tape drive. Determine the physical drive address (for example, number) by checking labels on the robot. Configure the robot in NetBackup and then add the drives. When you add the drives, nsure that you assign the correct drive address to each set of SCSI coordinates.

3 4

Optionally, use the appropriate NetBackup robotic test utility to verify the configuration. For information about the robotic test utilities, see the NetBackup Troubleshooting Guide. To verify the configuration (Windows) 1 2 Stop the NetBackup Device Manager (ltid). Restart ltid, which starts the Automatic Volume Recognition process (avrd). You must stop and restart ltid to ensure that the current device configuration has been activated. The following point applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server. If robotic control is not local to this host, also start the remote robotic control daemon. Use the robotic test utility to mount a tape on a drive. Use the NetBackup Device Monitor to verify that the tape was mounted on the correct robot drive.

3 4

Verify configuration example For example, assume a TLD robot includes three drives at the following SCSI addresses:
■ ■ ■

Drive 1: 5,0,0,0 Drive 2: 5,0,1,0 Drive 3: 5,0,2,0

Also assume that in step 3 in “To verify the configuration (Windows),” you requested that the tape be mounted on drive 1. If the SCSI coordinates for the

If the data path to the drive where the tape was mounted is not on the host with direct robotic control. Possibly. For example.1. the SCSI coordinates were swapped during configuration. if the Device Monitor shows the tape mounted on drive 2. Use the robotic test utility to unload and unmount the tape from drive 1.0) with the correct SCSI coordinates (5.0) for drive 2.0. You also know that the SCSI coordinates for drive 2 are incorrect. Replace the drive 1 SCSI coordinates (5. you may have to unload the drive with a command from another host or from the drive’s front panel.0. Repeat the test for each drive. the SCSI coordinates for that drive are not correctly configured. The following point applies only to NetBackup Enterprise Server.0. the Device Monitor shows that the tape is mounted on drive 1. . the SCSI coordinates for drive 1 are incorrect.Reference topics Correlating tape drives to device files or addresses 131 drive are configured correctly. If the Device Monitor shows that the tape is mounted on a different drive.

132 Reference topics Correlating tape drives to device files or addresses .

Chapter 3 UNIX reference topics This chapter contains information that pertains specifically to administering UNIX NetBackup clients or media servers from a Windows NetBackup master server. This chapter includes the following sections: ■ ■ ■ “Cross mount points” on page 134 “Exclude and include lists on UNIX clients” on page 136 “Schedules for user backups or archives” on page 140 . Most administrative tasks on the UNIX systems can be performed by using the NetBackup administration interface on a Windows NetBackup server or administration client.

This lets you back up a file path such as root (/) without backing up all the file systems that are mounted on it (for example. ■ How cross mount points setting interacts with follow NFS To back up NFS mounted files. Back up NFS files if the file path is (or is part of) an NFS mount. . Usually. regardless of the file system. The Cross Mount Points attribute controls whether NetBackup crosses file system boundaries during a backup or archive on UNIX clients or whether NetBackup enters volume mount points during a backup or archive on Windows clients. Follow the specified path across mount points to back up files and directories (including NFS). NetBackup backs up root (/) and all files and directories under it in the tree. Cross local mount points but not NFS mounts. Disable Cross Mount Points to back up only the files and directories that are in the same file system as the selected file path. /usr and /home). Table 3-20 summarizes the behavior of Cross Mount Points and Follow NFS: Table 3-20 Cross mount point behavior Follow NFS Disabled Enabled Disabled Enabled Cross mount points Disabled Disabled Enabled Enabled Resulting behavior No crossing of mount points (default). regardless of the file system where they reside. if you specify root (/) as the file path. If the raw partition that is backed up is the root partition and has mount points for other file systems.134 UNIX reference topics Cross mount points Cross mount points The following information applies specifically to UNIX clients. ■ Notes on cross mount points ■ Cross Mount Points has no effect on UNIX raw partitions. to back up all files and directories in the selected path. For example. Do not use Cross Mount Points in policies where you use the ALL_LOCAL_DRIVES directive in the backup selection list. other than those available through NFS. this means all the client’s files. ■ Enable Cross Mount Points. the other file systems are not backed up even if you select Cross Mount Points. select Follow NFS.

including those under /home/njr and /net/freddie/home. leave / out of the list and separately list the files and directories you want to include. NetBackup backs up all the files and directories in the tree. Example 2 Assume that you select Cross Mount Points and Follow NFS and include only / in the backup selection list. Another file system named /home/njr exists on disk d2 and is mounted on /home. disk d3 contains a directory named /net/freddie/home that is NFS-mounted on /net/freddie. the client has /. /(root) /usr d1 /home /home/njr /net /net/freddie /net/freddie/home NFS Disks on Local System d2 d3 Disk on Remote System Here. and /home in separate partitions on disk d1. /usr. To prevent the policy from backing up everything. The following backup selection list backs up only /usr and individual files under /: /usr /individual_files_under_root . It does not back up /home/njr or /net/freddie/home. NetBackup considers only the directories and files that are in the same file system as the backup selection list entry it process. In this case. In these examples. Example 1 Assume that you clear Cross Mount Points and Follow NFS and have the following entries in the backup selection list: / /usr /home In this case. assume the client disks are partitioned as shown.UNIX reference topics Cross mount points 135 Cross mount point examples The next two examples illustrate the cross mount point concepts. In addition.

/usr/tmp Man pages Software that you can restore from original installation tapes Automounted directories CD-ROM file systems NetBackup automatically excludes the following file system types: ■ ■ ■ ■ mntfs (Solaris) proc (all UNIX platforms) cdrom (all UNIX platforms) cachefs (AIX. NetBackup uses the contents of the file as a list of patterns.o files core files a. UnixWare) .136 UNIX reference topics Exclude and include lists on UNIX clients Exclude and include lists on UNIX clients Note: Exclude and include lists do not apply to user backups and archives. you create the exclude and include lists in the following files on the client: /usr/openv/netbackup/exclude_list /usr/openv/netbackup/include_list The following topics explain the rules for creating these lists on UNIX clients.out files Files that begin or end with ~ (backups for editors) Files and directories under /tmp. NetBackup skips the files during automatic full and incremental backups. Creating an exclude list on a UNIX client If a /usr/openv/netbackup/exclude_list file exists on a UNIX client. SGI. On UNIX clients. Note: Exclude and include lists do not apply to user backups and archives. The following types of files appear in an exclude list: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ *. Solaris.

NetBackup normally interprets a backslash literally because a backslash is a legal character to use in pathnames. Only one pattern per line is allowed. precede each bracket with a backslash as in /home/abc/fun\[ny\]name ■ Note: A backslash (\) acts as an escape character only when it precedes a special or a wildcard character. if you want to exclude a file named /home/testfile (with no extra space character at the end) and your exclude list entry is /home/testfile (with an extra space character at the end) NetBackup cannot find the file until you delete the extra space from the end of the file name. For example. Files can be excluded by using / or * or by using both symbols together (/*). NetBackup must wait for a timeout before proceeding. ■ . assume the brackets in the following are to be used literally: /home/abc/fun[ny]name In the exclude list. if they are not mounted at the time of a backup. Check with users before any files are excluded from backups. Do not include extra spaces unless they are part of the file name. For example. precede the character with a backslash (\).UNIX reference topics Exclude and include lists on UNIX clients 137 Note: Veritas suggests that you always specify automounted directories and CD-ROM file systems in the exclude list. The following special or wildcard characters are recognized: [] ? * {} To use special or wildcard characters literally. Spaces are considered legal characters. Syntax rules The following syntax rules apply to exclude lists: ■ ■ ■ Blank lines or lines that being with a pound sign (#) are ignored. Otherwise. ■ If all files are excluded in the backup selections list. NetBackup backs up only what is specified by full path names in the include list.

■ ■ Example of an exclude list In this example. /home/doc. /usr/test). enter the name without a preceding slash. To exclude all files with a given name. /home/test/). does not match the exclude list entry. the following files and directories are excluded from automatic backups: ■ ■ ■ ■ The file or directory named /home/doe/john. All files or directories named test that are two levels beneath home. /usr/home/doc. All files or directories named core at any level. NetBackup excludes both files and directories with that path name. ■ . The directory /home/doe/abc (because the exclude entry ends with /). The file is still backed up in this case because the actual directory path. For example. If the pattern does not end in / (for example. regardless of the directory path. For example: test rather than /test This is equivalent to prefixing the file pattern with a slash: / /*/ /*/*/ /*/*/*/ and so on.138 UNIX reference topics Exclude and include lists on UNIX clients ■ End a file path with / to exclude only directories with that path name (for example. Do not use patterns with links in the names. assume /home is a link to /usr/home and /home/doc is in the exclude list. All files or directories named temp that are two levels beneath the root directory. an exclude list contains the following entries: # this is a comment line /home/doe/john /home/doe/abc/ /home/*/test /*/temp core Given the exclude list example.

workstations.schedulename suffix.policyname or .policyname. The exclude list in that example causes NetBackup to omit all files or directories named test from all directories beneath /home/*/test. if there are files named: exclude_list. To illustrate the use of an include list.policyname.policyname or . The following two file examples use a policy that is named wkstations. The same syntax rules apply as for the exclude list. For example.wkstations /usr/openv/netbackup/exclude_list. The policy contains a schedule that is named fulls: /usr/openv/netbackup/exclude_list. use a .wkstations and exclude_list.wkstations. In this case. /usr/openv/netbackup/include_list. Note: Exclude and include lists do not apply to user backups and archives. create a /usr/openv/netbackup/include_list file. The second file affects backups only when the schedule is named fulls. add a file named /home/jdoe/test back into the backup by creating an include_list file on the client. Create an exclude_list file with a . For a given backup.wkstations.UNIX reference topics Exclude and include lists on UNIX clients 139 Exclude lists for specific policies or schedules NetBackup allows you to create an exclude list for a specific policy or for a policy and a schedule combination. The following are two examples of include list names for a policy that is named wkstations that contains a schedule that is named fulls. we use the example from the previous discussion.fulls The first file affects all scheduled backups in the policy that is named workstations.workstations /usr/openv/netbackup/include_list.wkstations. The second file affects backups only when the schedule is named fulls.fulls NetBackup uses only: exclude_list.schedulename suffix.fulls The first file affects all scheduled backups in the policy that is named wkstations. . Add the following to the include_list file: # this is a comment line /home/jdoe/test To create an include list for a specific policy or policy and schedule combination. NetBackup uses a single exclude list—the list that contains the most specific name.fulls Creating an include list on a UNIX client To add back in a file that is eliminated with the exclude list.

NetBackup uses only one include list: the list with the most specific name.140 UNIX reference topics Schedules for user backups or archives For a given backup.fulls as the include list.workstations include_list. Schedules for user backups or archives To have NetBackup use a specific policy and schedule for user backups or archives of a UNIX client. ■ ■ ■ ■ BPARCHIVE_POLICY BPARCHIVE_SCHED BPBACKUP_POLICY BPBACKUP_SCHED These options can also be added to a user’s $HOME/bp.workstations.workstations.conf file on the client. .conf file. Given the following two files: include_list. add the following options to the /usr/openv/NetBackup/bp.fulls NetBackup uses only include_list.

Installation System requirements ■ The AFS file servers that can be NetBackup AFS clients: ■ ■ ■ Solaris 7 and HP-UX 11.Chapter 4 Using NetBackup with AFS This chapter explains how to install. and use NetBackup to back up AFS file servers.1 clients AFS level 3.) Note: AFS is no longer available from IBM and IBM has ended support for AFS.x or 6.6 or later installed Server and client installation The NetBackup software that is needed to support AFS is automatically installed with the server and client.3 platforms NetBackup 5. except for the differences that are mentioned here. create separate policies. add an AFS policy to the NetBackup configuration on the master server. The requirements are the same as for other NetBackup policies.3.0 or 5. (AFS is an acronym for Andrew File System. configure.x clients that run under 5. or IBM AIX 4. AFS continues to be supported with NetBackup 5.5 clients. Configuration To configure backups for NetBackup AFS clients.0 servers. .0. AFS is not supported with 6. To back up the files and directories that are not in AFS volumes.

backup copies also ensures that the backups include the latest changes. all the volumes in the partition are backed up one at a time.* In this instance. this directive is useful if an automated mechanism is not in place to create . Client list In the client list.backup volumes before it performs the backup. specify the AFS volumes and vice partitions to be backed up. Creating . specify the names of the AFS file servers to be backed up. When the list includes a vice partition. Backup selection list directives The following directives can be in the backup selection list in an AFS policy: ■ CREATE_BACKUP_VOLUMES This directive causes NetBackup to create . The following example shows both volumes and vice partitions: user. Because NetBackup backs up only the .142 Using NetBackup with AFS Configuration General policy attributes Specify AFS as the policy type in the policy’s general attributes.backup copy of AFS volumes. If a . Backup selections In the backup selection list for the AFS policy. NetBackup overwrites it to create a more recent copy. Note: NetBackup supports the maximum AFS 3. .abc /vicepb /vicepc/user.6 volume size of 8 GB. NetBackup backs up the following: ■ ■ ■ The volume user.backup volume already exists.abc All volumes in vice partition vicepb All volumes in vicepc that begin with user. These systems must have the NetBackup client installed.backup copies.

Add vice partitions without having to change the backup selection list. include the CREATE_BACKUP_VOLUMES directive in the backup selection list or AFS volumes are not backed up.backup copies. Split volumes and vice partitions on AFS file servers into groups that can be backed up by separate policies. The different groups allow for concurrent backups or multiplexing. These are useful to perform the following actions: ■ ■ ■ Add or move volumes without having to change the backup selection list.Using NetBackup with AFS Configuration 143 Caution: If an automated mechanism is not in place to create . NetBackup skips volumes ≤ 5 KB.backup volumes that are created using the CREATE_BACKUP_VOLUMES directive or created by another mechanism.backup volumes after performing the backup. try to place directives at the top. ■ REMOVE_BACKUP_VOLUMES This directive causes NetBackup to remove . For example: SKIP_SMALL_VOLUMES ■ The following rules also apply to the directives: ■ ■ Directives must be all upper case. the size defaults to 2 KB. Specify any number for the volume size. The directive removes . Although directives can be located anywhere in the backup selection list.[a-m]* /vicep[a-c] .abc /vicepb Regular expressions NetBackup supports regular expressions in backup selection list entries. SKIP_SMALL_VOLUMES This directive allows small or empty volumes to be skipped during backups. For example: SKIP_SMALL_VOLUMES=5 (do not include spaces on either side of the = sign) In this example. If no number is specified. For example: CREATE_BACKUP_VOLUMES SKIP_SMALL_VOLUMES /user. The following examples use regular expressions: user.

An exclude list cannot contain vice partitions but it can contain individual volumes within a vice partition. see Chapter 3 of the NetBackup Administrator’s Guide. Backups and restores Backups Note: User backups or archives of AFS volumes are not allowed. Manual backup The administrator on the master server can use the NetBackup Administration Console to run manually a backup for an AFS policy. To restore a vice partition. Restores are performed on the basis of volumes. An include list adds volumes to the backup that were specified in the exclude list. and Restore interface to restore volumes to that . All changes or files that were created since the last backup are lost. the volumes are overwritten. For information about manual backups. unattended backups. Archive. Caution: If the Overwrite Existing Files option is selected. Automatic backup The most convenient way to back up NetBackup for AFS clients is to configure an AFS policy and set up schedules for automatic. Restores The administrator performs all restores on either the NetBackup AFS client or the master server. Restore from the NetBackup for AFS client An administrator on a NetBackup AFS client (AFS file server) can use the NetBackup Backup. the include list can add back specific volumes within the range. if a range of volumes is excluded. For example. Volume I.144 Using NetBackup with AFS Backups and restores Exclude and include lists Exclude lists can be created on the client to exclude certain specific volumes from automatic backups. the administrator must select all the volumes in that partition.

enable the Overwrite Existing Files option. NetBackup adds an R to the name of the restored volume. A redirected restore restores a volume to another volume or another vice partition. An administrator can perform a redirected restore as well. ■ Troubleshooting The following sections provide tips and information for troubleshooting problems with NetBackup for AFS. Notes about restores ■ If the administrator does not specify Overwrite Existing Files or an alternate name for the volume. Archive. In this case. Restore from the NetBackup master server The administrator can use the NetBackup Backup. the entire volume is overwritten.documents1 ■ ■ To specify an existing volume to restore to an alternate path. to perform a redirected (or server-directed) restore. For example: ■ If the volume name is less than 22 characters long. the first character of the original volume name is replaced with an R.Using NetBackup with AFS Troubleshooting 145 client. see the online help in the Backup. See the NetBackup Troubleshooting Guide for UNIX and Windows for overall troubleshooting information. the restore fails.) For example: If the volume name is: /AFS/shark/vicepa/engineering.abc If the volume name is 22 characters long. To restore a volume to an alternate vice partition.abc The restored name is: /AFS/shark/vicepa/Ruser. the vice partition must exist or the restore fails. NetBackup adds a leading R to the name of the restored volume. (The maximum allowable length for a volume name is 22 characters.documents1 The restored name is: /AFS/shark/vicepa/Rngineering. For example: If the volume name is: /AFS/shark/vicepa/user. Or. For instructions. and Restore interface. . and Restore interface on the master server to restore volumes to the same NetBackup AFS client (AFS file server). If Overwrite Existing Files option is not enabled. Archive.

check the restore process log for additional information. (An extension release update is needed. Create the following debug log directory on the NetBackup for AFS client: /usr/openv/netbackup/logs/bpbkar If the AFS backup terminates with a status code of 9.) If the AFS backup terminates with a status code of 78. examine the /usr/openv/netbackup/listvol file on the NetBackup client for irregularities. (If the cached listvol file was created less than four hours before the backup.conf file on the NetBackup for AFS client. Create a /usr/openv/netbackup/logs/tar debug log directory if a vos restore command failure is indicated. Also. Run the vos command manually to attempt to duplicate the problem.) ■ Troubleshooting restores If the restore of an AFS volume fails. retry the operation and check the resulting log to see that the vos restore command was run. Then. The bpbkar debug log shows the command that was run. (afs/dfs command failed) The NetBackup Problems Report provides additional information as to why the command failed. .146 Using NetBackup with AFS Troubleshooting Troubleshooting backups To increase the level of detail in the logs: ■ Add the VERBOSE option to the /usr/openv/netbackup/bp. The vos listvol command can demand much from system resources so NetBackup caches the output of the vos listvol command in this file. NetBackup uses the cached listvol file to obtain the volume list instead of running another vos listvol command. the code indicates an AFS vos command failure. the code indicates that NetBackup AFS client software was not properly installed.

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ . “Backing up the protected computer” on page 152 explains that you must back up the computer before you create the bootable media that is used in recovery. The IDR wizards help administrators prepare for disaster recovery and recover computers to their state before the disaster. “Updating IDR media” on page 158 explains how and when to update the IDR media so it is always ready when it is needed. “Creating IDR media” on page 152 explains how to use the IDR Preparation Wizard to prepare the bootable media that is used to recover data.0 and later.0 and later” on page 148 explains limited supported for IDR in NetBackup 6. “Supported Windows editions” on page 148 documents the Windows versions that IDR supports.Chapter 5 Intelligent Disaster Recovery Intelligent Disaster Recovery (IDR) for Windows is an automated disaster recovery solution. This chapter contains the following sections: ■ “Changes for NetBackup 6. “About the DR files” on page 150 introduces the Disaster Recovery files and explains their importance in disaster recovery “Configuring NetBackup policies for IDR” on page 151 explains how to configure the policies that contain the clients that use IDR. “Overview of IDR use” on page 150 explains the main steps that are involved in using the disaster recovery software. It allows administrators to recover Windows computers quickly and efficiently after a disaster.

and Professional. Small Business Server.0 and later ■ “Recovering your computer” on page 161 explains how to perform disaster recovery. Windows 2000 Server. Backup jobs for NetBackup 6. Enterprise Edition. you can use Intelligent Disaster Recovery on NetBackup 6. ■ ■ ■ .0 release.0 or later clients return a status of 1 (partially successful).148 Intelligent Disaster Recovery Changes for NetBackup 6. To protect NetBackup 6.x media server to back up the client.0 and later Bare Metal Restore replaces Intelligent Disaster Recovery beginning with the NetBackup 6. “IDR frequently asked questions” on page 169 answers questions that are frequently asked about IDR. The NetBackup server tries to collect IDR information from those clients and is unable to do so. Advanced Server.0 Enterprise Server. To generate bootable media for supported clients (master server only). “Notes on recovering specific platforms” on page 167 provides information on data recovery for specific types of platforms.0 or later client computers. the NetBackup master server must be licensed for IDR. Supported Windows editions IDR lets you protect and recover the following Windows computers: ■ Windows Server 2003 (Standard Edition.0 clients. and Workstation editions with Service Pack 6A or later. ■ ■ Changes for NetBackup 6.0 and later clients. Windows XP 32-bit versions. If no other problems exist. Windows NT 4. Backup jobs for NetBackup clients earlier than 6. and Web Edition).1 and 5.0 return a status of 0 (successful).0 and later servers as follows: ■ ■ To protect NetBackup 5.0 clients.1 or 5. the client data is backed up. If a backup policy is configured to collect IDR information: ■ ■ If you use IDR with NetBackup 6. However. use the Bare Metal Restore option for NetBackup.0 or later to protect NetBackup 5. You cannot use IDR to protect or recover NetBackup 6. Requires a supported NetBackup 5.

Intelligent Disaster Recovery Requirements for IDR 149 Requirements for IDR The following are the requirements for IDR: ■ NetBackup client software must be installed on the Windows computers that you want to protect. The IDR software is installed automatically when that client software is installed. In addition. see “Supported Windows editions” on page 148. The partition on the first physical drive on the protected computer must be the boot partition and must be labeled C:\. The protected computer must be an Intel computer that runs a supported Windows operating system. For example. For more information. This section contains a list of cards that have passed Microsoft compatibility tests without service packs. The NetBackup master server that collects the disaster recovery information must be licensed for IDR. for 128 MB of RAM. Windows must support the required driver of the CD-ROM drive on a protected computer. the minimum swap that is used is 128 MB. At least 40 MB of hard drive space to hold the minimal recovery computer on the protected computer. for a total of 1. The IDR software is not required (and cannot be installed) on UNIX computers. A protected computer must use a network card that does not require a Windows service pack to be installed. select a driver to use. In that case. Refer to the “Network LAN Adapters” section of the “Hardware Compatibility List” that accompanies the Microsoft Windows software. The NetBackup master server that collects the disaster recovery information can reside on either a Windows or UNIX computer. The protected computer must contain sufficient space to accommodate the restored data. it must contain 128 MB plus 40 MB. The IDR Preparation Wizard that runs on the client computer generates recovery media only for the computers that have the same IDR version installed. The protected computer must contain sufficient swap space to support the computer’s RAM.8 GB of data.0 and later client computers. For a 2-GB partition that stores 1. Symantec ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ . IDR is not installed on NetBackup 6. the required hard drive space for that partition is 1. Windows NT computers: The IDR Preparation Wizard may detect that the driver on the protected computer is different than the driver on the Windows NT installation CD.97 GB.8 GB.

Licensing. The protected computers should be backed up regularly by NetBackup. To activate IDR for backups. IDR is not installed on NetBackup 6. About the DR files The disaster recovery (DR) files are mentioned frequently in this chapter and in the wizard screens. The IDR software is installed automatically when that client software is installed. Recovery. and media preparation steps are necessary for to recover a Windows computer through a network connection to a NetBackup server. use the SCSI driver currently installed on the computer.0 and later client computers. .150 Intelligent Disaster Recovery Overview of IDR use recommends using the SCSI drivers currently installed on the protected computer because the drivers on the Windows CD may not be up to date. Preparing the IDR media. backup. Use the Disaster Recovery Wizard to help rebuild the protected computer and restore data to that computer. A DR file contains the following information about the protected computer: ■ Hard disk partition information. select the Collect disaster recovery information general attribute when setting up the policy configuration for protected clients. The IDR software is not required (and cannot be installed) on UNIX computers. An initial full backup must be completed of a protected computer before you create IDR media. you must enter an IDR license key on the master server. Backup. Use the IDR Preparation Wizard on the client computer to help prepare the media that is used to recover protected computers. Overview of IDR use Using IDR involves the following steps: ■ NetBackup client software must be installed on the Windows computers that you want to protect. You can use a NetBackup master server on either a Windows or UNIX computer to collect disaster recovery information. Also. you should back up your computer frequently and update the DR files often. On the NetBackup master server. For IDE hard disks greater than 8 GBs. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ The installation. configuration. Configuration.

The server must be configured to collect disaster recovery information for NetBackup to create a DR file. That is. If a client does not have IDR installed. NetBackup stores a copy on the client and the master server after each of the following backups: ■ ■ ■ ■ Full backup Incremental differential or incremental cumulative backup User backup User archive NetBackup stores the DR file for each client in the install_path\NetBackup\Idr\data directory on the client.dr.) On the NetBackup master server. If not. Select the Collect disaster recovery information policy attribute for at least one of the MS-Windows-NT policies that backup protected clients. (Use the format computer_name. NetBackup configuration information necessary to restore data files. ■ The NetBackup master server that collects disaster recovery information must be licensed for IDR. If the NetBackup client name is different. For example. A successful backup in this instance ■ . The DR files that are generated after a backup are named in the format netbackup_client_name. The automatic recovery of an IDR-protected computer requires a copy of the DR file for that computer. Ensure that all the clients in this policy have IDR installed. Note: IDR requires that the DR file name match the computer name of the client. the DR files for all clients are stored in the NetBackup catalog on the server. the backups for that client by this policy can never end with a status of 0.Intelligent Disaster Recovery Configuring NetBackup policies for IDR 151 ■ ■ Network interface card information.dr.dr.dr. the DR file is bison. the Collect disaster recovery information attribute cannot be selected. Configuring NetBackup policies for IDR Set up the policy configuration on the NetBackup master server as follows: ■ ■ Ensure that each protected client is in an MS-Windows-NT type policy. the DR file must be named bison. IDR must be installed on the server and client. if the client name is bison. if the network recognizes the computer name bison. rename the DR file that is created after each backup before using it in a recovery.

The status is a result of NetBackup being unable to find a DR file to store in its catalog after each backup. You can prepare IDR bootable media if differential or incremental backups have occurred since the full backup. If the names do not match. ■ NetBackup 6. Ensure that any utility partitions are backed up. System-specific drivers and the Disaster Recovery Wizard. A set of IDR media includes the following: ■ The bootable media that is used to boot the computer and install and configure the operating system. However. you must have: . The NetBackup master server that performs the backup must be configured to collect disaster recovery information. Windows Automated System Recovery files. Ensure that the client name that is used in the NetBackup policy configuration matches the client’s computer name. (Use the format computer_name. Utility partitions are small partitions created on the hard drive. use the same IDR version to prepare the IDR media. The backup information that is collected is used to create the DR file. The disaster recovery (DR) file.dr. usually by the computer vendor. ensure that System State is backed up.0 and later collects the DR information from the clients that run versions of NetBackup earlier than 6. Ensure that all local drives are backed up. ■ ■ ■ To create IDR media. you must use the IDR software revision on the client to prepare the bootable media for that client. For Windows 2000 computers. which includes the DR file used in recovery.0. rename the DR file that is created after each backup before using it in a recovery. For Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 computers. For example.152 Intelligent Disaster Recovery Backing up the protected computer shows a status of 1 (partially successful). for a NetBackup 5.1 client.) ■ Backing up the protected computer Perform a full backup of the protected computer before you prepare the IDR media. that may contain computer configuration and diagnostic utilities. Creating IDR media The IDR Preparation Wizard helps you to create the IDR media that is used in recovery.

A device that can create bootable media: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ CD-R drive (CD Recordable CD-ROM) CD-RW drive (CD Rewritable CD-ROM) Diskette drive (IDR does not support bootable diskette media for Windows XP or Windows Server 2003) More information about media is provided later in this chapter. Diskettes require the Windows installation CD during recovery. Administrative privileges for the protected computer. diskettes hold SCSI driver information for only one computer. Choosing the bootable media For Windows NT and Windows 2000. Windows XP. ■ ■ ■ ■ . To use one set of diskettes to protect multiple computers. Consider the following factors to decide between diskettes and CD-ROM media: ■ Diskettes work on most computers but require more time for preparation and recovery than CDs. you should also try booting from the media before a disaster occurs to ensure that your hardware can boot from it. For CD-R or CD-RW. You must prepare the media before a disaster.Intelligent Disaster Recovery Creating IDR media 153 ■ ■ At least one full backup of the computer to be protected. For more information. For computers with different SCSI drivers. The Windows installation CD for the version and language that is installed on the protected computer. CD media has enough space to store SCSI driver information for multiple computers. The license key for the Windows 2000. see “Step 1: Boot your computer” on page 162. or Windows Server 2003 operating system. the IDR Preparation Wizard can create both bootable diskettes and bootable CD-Recordable (CR-R) or CD-Rewritable (CR-RW) media. CDs require less time for preparation and recovery than diskettes. choose one computer that represents all the other computers and create bootable media for it. Use a single CD for multiple computers during disaster recovery. Note: IDR does not support bootable diskette media for Windows XP or Windows Server 2003. Because of space limitations. create a set of diskettes for each computer with a different driver.

The utility is on the Windows installation CD. You also need the Windows 2000 license key. either during bootable diskette preparation or during recovery. Intelligent Disaster Recovery Diskettes that contain the computer-specific information that is necessary to perform disaster recovery. The IDR Preparation Wizard creates these diskettes. Note: Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 do not support bootable diskettes. Note: The Windows installation CD is required both to prepare disaster recovery diskettes and for disaster recovery using those diskettes. A full set of IDR diskette media includes the following: ■ Windows setup diskettes.154 Intelligent Disaster Recovery Creating IDR media ■ CD media requires that the protected computer have a BIOS that supports a CD boot. With both diskettes and CDs. The IDR Preparation Wizard modifies these setup diskettes for use specifically with NetBackup for Windows. The software is also required if the IDR Preparation Wizard cannot detect the CD writer that is attached to the protected computer. . The protected computer does not require a CD writer. third-party CD writing software is required if the protected computer does not have a CD writer. ■ ■ ■ Creating bootable diskettes The IDR Preparation Wizard helps create a full set of diskette media to boot a computer during recovery and to run the Disaster Recovery Wizard. CD media requires CD writing hardware. The CD hardware and software must be able to write ISO 9660 CD images. For CD media. A Microsoft Windows utility creates the Windows Setup diskettes. The IDR Preparation Wizard creates a bootable image to write to a CD on any computer that contains a CD writer. formatted 1.44-MB diskettes for each set of disaster recovery diskettes. ■ Windows NT requires five and Windows 2000 requires six blank. prepare separate media for each operating system level and language being protected.

The Starting Bootable Diskettes Creation screen appears. You can use the same diskettes 2 through 5 for all of the . Click Next to continue.Full Set of Diskettes to boot the Windows Installation CD and click Next. 5 To modify diskette sets for use with multiple Windows 2000 computers To use the same diskettes 2 through 5 for all IDR-protected Windows 2000 computers. The option appears on the Select Computer for Diskette Preparation screen of the wizard. Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 do not support bootable diskettes. The Create or Update IDR Boot Media screen appears. select Start > Programs > Veritas NetBackup > Intelligent Disaster Recovery PrepWizard. 2 3 4 Select Create . Windows NT requires five diskettes and Windows 2000 requires six. The IDR Preparation Wizard Welcome screen appears. Follow the prompts until the IDR Preparation Wizard is completed.Intelligent Disaster Recovery Creating IDR media 155 To create bootable diskettes 1 Format the diskettes. do not select Let IDR Automatically Partition the Boot and System Drive. To prepare the diskettes.

156 Intelligent Disaster Recovery Creating IDR media

Windows 2000 computers. However, you have to create a different diskette 1 for each computer protected with IDR. Diskette 1 contains a file named winnt.sif. It is the script used to automate the installation of Windows 2000 for disaster recovery. This scripted installation of Windows 2000 requires that the name of the computer being recovered be listed in the winnt.sif file. Therefore, for each Windows 2000 computer that shares diskettes 2 through 5, make a copy of diskette 1 (and its files). For each copy of diskette 1, edit the winnt.sif file and change the computer name to the name of the computer to be protected. If you do not change the computer name, duplicate computer names on the network may occur. The duplicate names may prevent the recovered computer from participating on the network.

Creating a bootable CD image
The IDR Preparation Wizard helps create a bootable CD image. Then write the
image to a CD using the IDR Preparation Wizard or other writing software. The
computer where you run the IDR Preparation Wizard may not have a CD-R or
CD-RW drive. If it does not, write the image onto a CD on a different computer
using third-party CD writing software.
The CD image contains all the necessary IDR files unless you choose to store the
Windows Server 2003 Automated System Recovery files on a diskette. If you
store them on the CD, the ASR files always are read from the CD even if more
recent versions are on a diskette. For example, suppose you create a bootable CD
and then later create IDR diskettes. During recovery, the ASR files are read from
the CD even though the IDR diskettes contain more recent versions.
The Windows installation CD is required only during media preparation.
The license key for your Windows 2000, Windows XP, or Windows Server 2003
operating system is required. If you do not enter the license key while creating
the bootable CD, you must enter it during recovery.
Note: On Windows NT 4.0 computers, the IDR software cannot write to a CD; therefore, you must use other CD writing software to create the CD. To create a bootable CD image 1 Select Start > Programs > Veritas NetBackup > Intelligent Disaster Recovery PrepWizard to prepare the bootable CD image. The IDR Preparation Wizard Welcome screen appears. Click Next to continue.

2

Intelligent Disaster Recovery Creating IDR media

157

The Create or Update IDR Boot Media screen appears.

3

Select Create - Bootable CD Image for Use with CD Writers (ISO 9660) and click Next. The Starting CD Image Creation screen appears. Follow the prompts until the IDR Preparation Wizard is completed.

4

Caution: Test your bootable CD to ensure that your computer can boot from it. (See “Step 1: Boot your computer” on page 162.)

Creating IDR diskettes
Two formatted, 1.44 MB floppy diskettes are required to create IDR diskettes. To create IDR diskettes 1 Select Start > Programs > Veritas NetBackup > Intelligent Disaster Recovery PrepWizard to prepare the IDR diskettes. The Welcome screen for the IDR preparation wizard appears.

158 Intelligent Disaster Recovery Updating IDR media

2

Click Next to continue. The Create or Update IDR Boot Media screen appears.

3 4

Select Create - IDR Diskettes Only (Includes ASR Files for XP/2003) and click Next. The Creating the IDR Diskettes screen appears. Follow the prompts until the IDR Preparation Wizard is completed.

Updating IDR media
Update the IDR media if the hardware configuration changes, if SCSI drivers
were updated, or if other computer drivers were updated.
Also, Symantec recommends periodic IDR diskette updates so the diskettes
contain the latest DR files.

Updating a bootable CD
You cannot update a bootable CD, you must create a new bootable CD image and then burn a new CD. If you install new hardware or change components on a protected computer, create a new bootable CD. For procedures, see “Creating a bootable CD image” on page 156.

Update the diskettes: ■ ■ ■ ■ After hardware changes. To update IDR bootable diskettes 1 Select Start > Programs > Veritas NetBackup > Intelligent Disaster Recovery PrepWizard to prepare the IDR diskettes. The Create or Update IDR Boot Media screen appears.Intelligent Disaster Recovery Updating IDR media 159 Updating bootable diskettes Use the IDR Preparation Wizard to update the set of bootable diskettes. When you already have a full set of bootable diskettes that you want to update. The Welcome screen for the IDR preparation wizard appears. Click Next to continue. Follow the prompts until the IDR Preparation Wizard is completed. After other computer driver updates. . 2 3 4 Select Update .Full Set of Diskettes Used to Boot the Windows Installation CD and click Next. After SCSI driver updates.

exe file from a command prompt to create a new DR file. run the drfile. see “Using drfile. To update the DR file only. The Create or Update IDR Boot Media screen appears. The Welcome screen for the IDR Preparation Wizard appears. to prepare the IDR diskettes.exe program on the client to update only the DR file. Copy the DR file to the diskette. run the drfile. 2 3 4 Select IDR Diskettes Only (Includes ASR Files for XP/2003) and click Next. Using drfile. For more information.exe to create or update a DR file” on page 160.160 Intelligent Disaster Recovery Updating IDR media Updating IDR diskettes only You can update the IDR diskettes with the latest DR file (and ASR files for Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 computers) by using the IDR Preparation Wizard. To update IDR diskettes using IDR preparation wizard 1 Select Start > Programs > Veritas NetBackup > Intelligent Disaster Recovery PrepWizard.exe to create or update a DR file If IDR diskettes have already been created. Click Next to continue. Then copy the DR file to the diskette that . Follow the prompts until the IDR Preparation Wizard is completed.

Insert the diskette that contains the DR file and copy the DR file to it. even if it differs from the name that is used in the NetBackup policy configuration. If the NetBackup client name is different than the computer name. The latest DR file for the computer being recovered.exe program creates (or updates) the DR file that is located in the install_path\NetBackup\Idr\Data directory on your computer. The drfile. or backup set information. If the NetBackup client name is different than the computer name. you must rename the DR file so it can be used in a recovery. Use the NetBackup IDR Disaster Recovery wizard to restore your computer to its pre-disaster state and restore your data files. Step 2: Windows setup in IDR recovery. The name of the DR file must match the computer name of the client. insert the separate diskette when prompted for the DR file during disaster recovery. If you use a separate diskette. 1 Go to install_path\NetBackup\bin and double-click drfile. The name is required.dr. rename the DR file. Use the previously prepared IDR bootable media to boot the computer being recovered. it may contain out-of-date hard disk partition. ■ ■ Automating the recovery with the Disaster Recovery wizard requires the following: ■ A NetBackup server that can restore the latest backups to the computer being recovered. 2 3 Recovering your computer To use IDR to restore a computer to its pre-disaster status includes the following steps: ■ Step 1: Boot your computer. Use the Windows installation program to partition and format the computer drive on the computer being recovered. The name of the DR file should match the computer name of the client (the name that IDR requires). The IDR bootstrap process loads and runs the Windows installation program from the Windows installation CD. Step 3: Disaster recovery wizard.Intelligent Disaster Recovery Recovering your computer 161 contains the DR file.exe. The DR file name is in the form computer_name. The diskette can be one of the IDR diskettes or a separate diskette. ■ . If you have not updated the DR file since the last backup. network-interface-card driver.

Special drivers are the drivers that are not on the operating system installation program. you may have to press a function key to boot from the CD drive. To boot a computer using a bootable diskette 1 2 3 Insert the bootable diskette. To boot from a bootable CD 1 2 Insert the bootable CD. Reinstall the partitions by using the OEM-supplied installation program. During recovery.162 Intelligent Disaster Recovery Recovering your computer ■ ■ Bootable IDR CD media or the original Windows installation CD. The computer being recovered must have a device capable of booting from the bootable media. The NetBackup Intelligent Disaster Recovery Bootstrap screen appears. the ASR files for the computer being recovered. For example. a driver for a network interface card (NIC) supplied by the manufacturer. For Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 computers. select the option to partition and format the drives manually. For example. Start the computer. the hard drives on those computers may be partitioned and formatted. Step 1: Boot your computer You can recover a Windows computer by using the bootable diskettes or the CD that was created during disaster preparation. Start the computer and perform the tasks necessary to boot from the CD. Caution: Disconnect any storage area network or cluster computers that are attached to the computer being recovered. ■ ■ Note: Windows 2000: if Let IDR Automatically Partition the Boot and System Drives was not selected during IDR preparation. Perform one of the following actions: 3 .reinstall any utility partitions before the recovery process begins. If your network adapter requires special driver software. use the installation program that the CD manufacturer provides. If they are not disconnected. The license key for your Windows operating system (if you did not enter the license key during preparation of the IDR bootable media). Follow the on-screen boot process instructions and continue with “Step 2: Windows setup in IDR recovery” on page 163.

If you booted from diskette. press Enter to continue with the boot process. To perform disaster recovery. FAT or NTFS file system. the DR boot process uses the Windows Setup program to partition and format the computer drive on the recovery computer. During Windows Setup. For Windows NT. 4 . Select FAT format for the C drive. go to “Step 2: Windows setup in IDR recovery” on page 163. For Windows NT and Windows 2000. you may have to make choices about the following: ■ 2 For Windows NT. For Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. you must choose which file system format to use. the system prompts you to insert the Windows installation CD so the Windows Setup can be started. If a new hard drive is detected. ■ 4 Depending on the computer. If you have an ASR diskette. If you booted from the IDR bootable CD. Use Custom Setup if SCSI drivers are not present on the boot media or if RAID hardware needs to be reconfigured. Usually. To use Windows setup in IDR recovery 1 Follow the on-screen instructions to continue the boot process. ■ 3 Ensure that no diskettes or CDs are in the drives when prompted to reboot. Windows Setup is started from that CD. perform one of the following actions: ■ ■ 5 Continue by going to “Step 2: Windows setup in IDR recovery” on page 163. Express Setup or Custom Setup.Intelligent Disaster Recovery Recovering your computer 163 ■ To test the CD to determine if it can boot the computer. press Esc to exit. Express Setup is the best choice. Go to “Step 3: Disaster recovery wizard” on page 164. place it in the floppy disk drive so the ASR files can be loaded. Press Enter to reboot the computer. Then remove the CD from the drive. Step 2: Windows setup in IDR recovery During the recovery process. press F2 to load the ASR files when prompted by the boot process. IDR cannot partition to the old layout if you build the partition as NTFS. the program prompts you to insert the Windows installation CD. If you booted from diskette. the Disaster Recovery Wizard starts automatically. After the reboot. The Windows Setup program is loaded and performs the tasks necessary to partition and format drives and install a limited version of the operating system.

a driver for a network interface card (NIC) supplied by the manufacturer. the process is similar to the following. select the DR file for the computer to recover and click Next. click Run Disk Administrator or Run Disk Manager. Note: If a DR file does not exist. see the operating system documentation. click Pre-install Custom Network Driver. These instructions do not provide a procedure because different conditions affect the process. Run the Windows Disk Administrator (or Disk Manager) program.dr file. click Yes to continue in manual mode. ■ . The program lets you make additional changes to the partition information. However.164 Intelligent Disaster Recovery Recovering your computer Step 3: Disaster recovery wizard After Windows Setup finishes. Perform one of the following actions: ■ If your network adapter requires special driver software. For more information about Disk Administrator and fault tolerant configurations. To use the Disaster Recovery Wizard 1 When the wizard prompts you. click Next to continue the recovery process. Follow the prompts to find and install the appropriate driver software. To make partition changes. click Next and go to step 5 to continue the recovery. For example. To continue. Otherwise. When the wizard notifies you that you did not select a recovery file. see “Notes on altering hard drive partition sizes” on page 167. ■ 3 For Windows 2000. click Next to proceed. 2 One or more screens about hard disk layout may appear. For more information. Follow the instructions to recover the computer. a Completed IDR Phase 1 dialog box appears. the Disaster Recovery Wizard starts as part of the recovery process. The name of a DR file matches the computer for which it was created. as follows: ■ Whether to replace the current hard drive partition with the partition information contained in the DR file or to keep the current hard drive partitions. For example. if the computer is named carrot look for the carrot. Special drivers are the drivers that are not on the operating system installation program.

The Windows NT Networking Installation dialog box appears. perform one of the following actions: ■ ■ a Click Select from list if the network adapter requires a manufacturer-supplied setup diskette. If the network adapter does not require a manufacturer-supplied setup diskette. you are asked to select either Automatic Restore or Manual Restore for network installation. A list of network adapters appears. If you do not want to use DHCP. b c The next screen lists the default network protocols. select Manual Restore. Perform one of the following actions: ■ If your network adapters use the drivers and the software that is included with the operating system. Enter the name of the workgroup or domain for your computer and click Next. To select the network adapter.Intelligent Disaster Recovery Recovering your computer 165 4 For Windows NT only. you are prompted to use DHCP. For automatic network installation to succeed.) Note: If additional screens about setting up your network interface card appear. Then click Have Disk. If your network adapters require special drivers and software. Proceed to step a. Click Next. Click Finish to complete the network installation. Proceed to step 5 to continue the recovery. ■ Note: If your network adapter is not listed. d If TCP/IP is selected as the network protocol. the Windows NT installation program must be able to recognize the network interface card being used. enter a TCP/IP number. click either Select from list or Start search. Select Wired to the Network and click Next. e f . it may include the appropriate network drivers if the drive were found during the IDR preparation process. Click Next to start the network and complete the installation of the networking components. (If you created a bootable CD. select Automatic Restore. Select the networking protocols that are used on the network. Windows NT is ready to install the networking components. Click Next to continue. click Select from list. respond as appropriate. Insert the Windows NT installation CD or the IDR bootable CD into the CD-ROM drive. Then click Have Disk add an adapter to the Network Adapter List.

To prevent merging the registries. click Next and proceed to step 8. continue with step a: a b Start a command window by pressing F1. then press Enter. g 5 Click Finish to complete the network installation and continue with recovery. %SYSTEMROOT% is usually C:\Windows) : %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\VERITAS\NetBackup\Bin Type the following command. If you select Manual. Click Start Restore to submit the restore request to the selected server. Navigate to the following directory (the default location. The hardware registry settings are identical to the setting in the saved version of the registry. If the hardware has not changed. The files are restored and the hardware information from the current live version of the registry is merged with the saved version of the registry. When the recovery is complete.166 Intelligent Disaster Recovery Recovering your computer Note: Symantec recommends that you enter the name of a temporary workgroup rather than the name of a domain. If you selected Automatic. the computer is restored to its original workgroup or domain. If the hardware changed. W2KOption -restore -display -same_hardware 1 The following output appears: c NetBackup Restore Options ----------------------------------------SYSVOL Restore: Primary Hard Link Restore: Perform secondary restore Same Hardware Restore: Assume different hardware NetBackup Restore Options ----------------------------------------SYSVOL Restore: Primary Hard Link Restore: Perform secondary restore Same Hardware Restore: Assume same hardware . click Next and proceed to step 6. Select either Automatic or Manual: ■ ■ 6 The restore process merges hardware information from the current live version of the registry into the saved version of the registry when recovering the registry. you do not have to merge the live version and the saved version of the registry. select the server from which you want to restore files.) The registry merger ensures that the computer reboots after the restore if the hardware changed. (The saved version is the registry version that was backed up. Go to step 7.

The recovery computer may contain a larger hard drive than before the recovery. The Windows NT Disk Administrator program is accessible during the IDR recovery process within the Recovery Wizard. you can make changes to the NetBackup configuration and you also have more control over the restore. close the Backup. (See the NetBackup Backup. see the following.Intelligent Disaster Recovery Notes on recovering specific platforms 167 d 7 8 Make sure that Assume Same Hardware is displayed in the Same Hardware Restore field. After the restore is complete. When the restore is complete. There may be unused and unallocated hard drive space. Notes on altering hard drive partition sizes Note: This section applies only to Windows NT and Windows NT 4. or Windows Server 2003. and Restore Getting Started Guide for more information on using the interface. Notes on recovering specific platforms For information about specific platforms. click Next. Archive. For information about fault tolerant configurations. Windows XP. Run the Windows NT Disk Administrator program to alter the partition sizes to match the larger hard drive size. Archive. 9 10 Remove any diskettes from drive A and click Finish to reboot the computer. click Next.) When the restore is complete. Select Start NetBackup Interface to start the NetBackup Backup. . Using this interface. and Restore interface and any other open NetBackup windows. then continue with the restore process. Archive.0. Formatting and partitioning is not supported on Windows 2000. For example. Go to step 10. a larger hard drive may have been installed or the DR file may be from a computer with a smaller hard drive. IDR defaults to restore hard drive partitions to their pre-recovery size. please refer to the Windows NT Server 4. and Restore interface.0 Resource Kit.

After the additional drivers are loaded. press S again to specify loading another device. Follow the on-screen instructions to load the PowerEdge RAID II controller software. The general procedure is the same for any computer that requires the use of third-party drivers. . Insert IDR diskette 2 and press and hold the F6 key again.168 Intelligent Disaster Recovery Notes on recovering specific platforms Recovering the dell PowerEdge 6100/200 with RAID Note: This section discusses how to restore a Dell computer. you must load the PowerRaid II driver manually. Use the IBM Reference Diskette to reconfigure the computer. press and hold down the F6 key. a Setup screen appears that lets you specify additional devices. Release the F6 key and press the S key. To recover a Dell PowerEdge 6100/200 with RAID configuration is different from recovering a regular computer with one hard drive. After both pieces of third-party software are loaded. Load the Adaptec controller driver manually after loading the PowerRaid II driver. To load Windows on this type of computer. Follow the on-screen instructions to load the Adaptec controller software next. Use the following steps with your IDR recovery diskette set 1 2 3 When the Windows blue Setup screen appears after booting with the IDR boot diskette. press Enter and proceed as normal to recover the computer. reconfigure the computer before you recover it. Windows prompts for IDR diskette 2. After the PowerEdge RAID software is loaded. Failure to follow these steps results in Windows being unable to recognize any hard drive partitions on the computer. 4 5 6 7 8 Recovering IBM computers If the drive that contains the computer’s configuration information fails. which is not bundled with the Windows operating system.

Q.Intelligent Disaster Recovery IDR frequently asked questions 169 Recovering Compaq computers If the drive that contains the System Configuration Partition fails. It may be unbootable even though the operating system has been restored. an IDR restore may render the computer unbootable. Because of the many different boot managers on the market. No. Be sure that the hard drive and controller configuration matches the original configuration before a disaster occurs. the OS/2 boot manager resides in its own hard drive partition that NetBackup cannot access. you may be able to control the numbering of the hard drive. Keep in mind that this chart can change if third-party drivers are used. What happened? A. Windows Hard Drive Numbering Scheme Primary IDE Master Server Media Server Master Server Media Server Secondary IDE . because boot managers usually are installed at a very low level that NetBackup cannot protect.exe to create or update a DR file” on page 160. Q. In this case. However. If the original configuration does not match. Generate it manually as explained in “Using drfile. For some reason. IDR recreates the partition on the new hard disk. reinstalling the boot manager should fix the problem. For example. IDR frequently asked questions Q. I ran a full backup of my computer but when I run the IDR Preparation Wizard again. use the Compaq SmartStart utilities to update the computer partition. the DR file was not generated automatically. Can I restore boot managers such as System Commander or OS/2 Boot Manager with Intelligent Disaster Recovery for Windows? A. I do not see a disaster recovery file. The minimal version of Windows that runs the recovery wizard may have detected the hard drives in a different order than originally configured. Why does the recovery wizard warn me that one or more of my hard drives are smaller than the originals? A. The following chart lists the order that Windows uses to assign disk drive numbers.

If the recovery wizard reports drives greater than 8 GBs as being only 8 GBs.... Then.. set up hard drive partitions manually. SCSI ID 7 (or 15 is Wide SCSI) SCSI ID 0 SCSI ID 1 .. use the Windows NT Disk Administrator option within the Disaster Recovery Wizard. continue with the automated restore of the backup media. Note: Windows NT: If the IDR Recovery Wizard does not detect the hard drive order.170 Intelligent Disaster Recovery IDR frequently asked questions Windows Hard Drive Numbering Scheme (continued) SCSI Adapter 0 (In order of the lowest I/O port address) SCSI ID 0 SCSI ID 1 . SCSI ID 7 (or 15 is Wide SCSI) SCSI Adapter 1 SCSI Adapter n Other types of mass storage controllers are usually seen as SCSI controllers by Windows. SCSI ID 7 (or 15 is wide SCSI) SCSI ID 0 SCSI ID 1 . create bootable diskettes.. . To do so. enable the Use SCSI drivers currently installed on this computer option. To do so.

vm. 113 CLUSTER_NAME.xlate file 56 Andrew File System (AFS) backup selection list 142 directives 142 installing 141 regular expressions 143 restores 144 troubleshooting 145 Announce DHCP interval property 46 API robots 99 API_BARCODE_RULES. vm.conf entry 35 crawlreleasebyname.conf entry 30 ADJ_LSM. AFS 142.conf entry 33.conf entry 33 multiplexed 58 session_notify script 83 session_start_notify script 83 barcodes 98.conf entry 34 clients changing host names 56 dynamic UNIX client 49 exclude files list. vm.conf entry 32 auto cleaning 91 AUTO_PATH_CORRECTION.conf entry 32 AUTO_UPDATE_ROBOT. vm.conf file 105 UNIX client options 50 bpdynamicclient 49 bpend_notify script UNIX client 74 Windows client 76 bpstart_notify script UNIX client 70 Windows client 72 C catalog backups backup notification script 78 catalogs offline. vm. vmoprcmd option 111 B backup selection list. vm.conf entry 32 AUTHORIZATION_REQUIRED.conf entry 34 cleaning frequency-based 92 library-based 91 reactive 91 times allowed 93 CLIENT_PORT_WINDOW. vm.conf entry 34 Compaq computers.Index A ACS_ vm.conf entry 33 AVRD_PEND_DELAY. host. vm. vm. vm. recovering with IDR 169 compressed backups 58 CONNECT_OPTIONS. 99 boot managers and IDR 169 booting a computer with IDR bootable media 162 bp. 114 AVRD_SCAN_DELAY. cold backups 78 cdrom file system 136 CLEAN_REQUEST_TIMEOUT. vm.conf entry 30 Administrator’s e-mail address property 50 AIX cachefs file system 136 Allow Backups to Span Media 117 alternate client restores. 143 backup_exit_notify script 69 backup_notify script 69 backups backup_exit_notify script 69 backup_notify script 69 bpend_notify script UNIX client 74 Windows client 76 bpstart_notify script UNIX client 70 Windows client 72 compressed 58 diskfull_notify script 79 estimating time required 59 media requirements 67 . UNIX 136 include files list 139 cluster environments 34.

updating 160 DR files obtaining from server 151 overview 150 update with drfile. vm. altering sizes 167 E e-mail notifications 50 EMM_REQUEST_TIMOUT. when to use 163 diskettes preparing 152 updating 159 diskettes. vm. vm.xlate file and alternate client restores 56 I IBM computers.conf entry 35 DataStore volume pool 94 DAYS_TO_KEEP_LOGS. recovering with IDR 168 include files list 139 Intelligent Disaster Recovery (IDR) bootable media choosing type 153 creating CD image 156 preparing 152 configuration 151 custom setup.exe 160 frequently asked questions 169 hard disk partition changes 164 hard drive partition. vm. updating 160 procedure 161 disk administrator 167 disk overhead. for catalogs 67 diskfull_notify script 79 Domain Name Service (DNS) hostnames 56 drfile.conf entry 37 escape character on UNIX 137 Exclude files list UNIX 136 exclude lists creating 136 example 138 files on UNIX 136 for specific policies and schedules 139 .conf entry 36 EMM_RETRY_COUNT. 56 client peername 55 correct use 54 short 55 host. vm.conf entry 36 dbbackup_notify script 78 decommission a media server 104 Dell PowerEdge 6100/200 with RAID recovering with IDR 168 device delays 60 discovery 124 DHCP server 45 directives for AFS 142 disaster recovery diskettes.172 CREATE_BACKUP_VOLUMES 142 cross mount points effect with UNIX raw partitions 134 examples 135 setting 134 syntax rules 137 wildcards in 137 extended attribute files 58 F FlashBackup 58 Follow NFS mounts with cross mount points 134 format description for optical 121 fragmented backups 121 frequency-based drive cleaning 92 D DAS_CLIENT.exe command 160 drives cleaning manual 93 operator-initiated 93 overview 90 Dynamic host name and IP addressing 45 G GNU tar 58 H hardware compression 102 host names changing client name 56 changing server name 54.conf entry 36 Enable performance data collection property 63 ENABLE_ROBOT_AUTH.

vm. vm.173 overview 150 preparation wizard 152 recovery wizard 161 requirements for using 149 supported Windows editions 148 updating bootable media 158 updating IDR media recovery diskettes 159.cmd 80 MAP_CONTINUE_TIMEOUT. vm. using with NetBackup 63 PREFERRED_GROUP.conf entry 39 mntfs file system 136 multiple servers 20 multiplexing (MPX) backups 121 O optical disk format 121 OS/2. vm.conf entry 36. vm. vm.cmd 81 NBRB_CLEANUP_OBSOLETE_DBINFO 28 NBRB_ENABLE_OPTIMIZATIONS 28 NBRB_FORCE_FULL_EVAL 28 NBRB_MPX_GROUP_UNLOAD_DELAY 29 NBRB_REEVAL_PENDING 28 NBRB_REEVAL_PERIOD 28 NBRB_RETRY_DELAY_AFTER_EMM_ERR 29 NDMP 58. 119 using tar to read images 58 Media Manager best practices 84 configuration file 30 security 42 MEDIA_ID_BARCODE_CHARS. 37 demultiplexing 19 Maximum jobs per client property 18 recovering backups 58 schedule media multiplexing 15 storage unit max per drive 15 tape format 121 N named data streams VxFS 58 nbmail. boot manager and IDR 169 P peername.conf entry 40 PREVENT_MEDIA_REMOVAL.conf entry 40 raw partitions 58 reactive cleaning 91 reconfiguring devices in a shared drive configuration 103 register a media server 25 regular expressions.conf entry 39 MM_SERVER_NAME.conf entry 38 MAP_ID. client 55 Performance Monitor. vm. 113 NetBackup Access Control (NBAC) use of 37. vm. 40 network transfer rate 60 notification scripts 68 L library-based cleaning 91 M mail_dr_info. vm. 160 using drfile.exe 160 when to update 158 using boot managers 169 Windows disk administrator 164 editions supported 148 setup 163 wizards disaster recovery 161 IDR preparation 152 INVENTORY_FILTER. 117 server register 25 spanning 117.conf entry 38 MEDIA_ID_PREFIX.conf entry 40 proc file system 136 R RANDOM_PORTS.conf entry 37 maximum barcode lengths 98 media determining requirements 67 formats 120 ID generation rules 102 pool 93 selection algorithm 116. AFS file list 143 remove a server from a configuration 104 REMOVE_BACKUP_VOLUMES 143 replacing a device in a shared drive .

conf entry 43 stand-alone drive extensions. for catalogs 67 spanning 117.cmd 68 notification 68 parent_end_notify 68 parent_start_notify 68 restore_notify 68 session_notify 68 session_start_notify 68 userreq_notify 68 SCSI persistent reserve 108 SCSI reserve/release break a reservation 110. 112 requirements 112 RESERVATION CONFLICT 110. 91 log codes 87 requirements 87 tar GNU 58 to read backup images 58 TLH_ vm.conf entry 41 RESERVATION CONFLICT status 111 restore_notify script 82 restores AFS clients 144 restore_notify script 82 robotic cleaning 91 S schedules how processed 65 scratch pool 96 scripts backup_exit_notify 68 backup_notify 68 bpend_notify 68 bpstart_notify 68.conf entry 43 vm. vm. 119. vm. using with NetBackup 62. vm.conf file ACS_ entries 30 ADJ_LSM entries 30 . vm. disabling 118 System Commander and IDR 169 System Monitor. vm. 122 SSO. vm. 63 T tape overhead.conf entry 43 transfer rate 59. 114 overview 108 PEND status 111. 119 tape format fragmented 121 multiplexed 121 non-QIC 120 QIC/WORM 120 spanned tapes 122 TapeAlert 87. 70. vm.174 configuration 102 REQUIRED_INTERFACE 29 REQUIRED_INTERFACE.conf entry 43 TLM_ vm. 112 error recovery 111 limitations 113.conf entry 42 SSO_DA_RETRY_TIMEOUT. 111 SERVER. 56 NetBackup master 21 media 21 multiple 20 session_notify script 83 session_start_notify script 83 SGI cachefs file system 136 SKIP_SMALL_VOLUMES 143 Solaris extended attributes 58 file systems 136 spanning media 117.cmd 68 nbmail.conf entry 41 servers changing host names 54. 72 dbbackup_notify 68 diskfull_notify 68 mail_dr_info.conf entry 42 SSO_HOST_NAME. 60 troubleshooting AFS backups 145 U UnixWare cachefs file system 136 userreq_notify script 83 using Media Manager devices with other applications 85 V VERBOSE.conf entries 43 SSO_DA_REREGISTER_INTERVAL.

prioritizing 66 .175 API_BARCODE_RULES entries 32 AUTHORIZATION_REQUIRED entries 32 AUTO_PATH_CORRECTION entries 32 AUTO_UPDATE_ROBOTentries 33 AVRD_PEND_DELAY entries 33 AVRD_SCAN_DELAY entries 33 CLEAN_REQUEST_TIMEOUT entries 34 CLIENT_PORT_WINDOW entries 34 CLUSTER_NAME entries 34 CONNECT_OPTIONS entries 35 DAS_CLIENT entries 35 DAYS_TO_KEEP_LOGS entries 36 ENABLE_ROBOT_AUTH entries 37 INVENTORY_FILTER entries 36. 37 MAP_CONTINUE_TIMEOUT entries 38 MAP_ID entries 37 MEDIA_ID_BARCODE_CHARS entries 38 MEDIA_ID_PREFIX entries 39 MM_SERVER_NAMEentries 39 overview 30 PREFERRED_GROUP entries 40 PREVENT_MEDIA_REMOVAL entries 40 RANDOM_PORTS entries 40 REQUIRED_INTERFACE entries 41 SERVER entries 41 SSO_DA_REREGISTER_INTERVAL entries 42 SSO_DA_RETRY_TIMEOUT entries 42 SSO_HOST_NAME entries 43 TLH_ entries 43 TLM_ entries 43 VERBOSE entries 43 volume group rules for assigning 94 pool configuring a scratch pool 96 overview 93 VxFS named data streams 58 W wildcard characters in AFS file list 143 in exclude lists 137 UNIX escape character 137 wizards disaster recovery 161 IDR preparation 152 worklist.

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