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PIZZA • SUBS • SALADS • WINGS • PIZZA • SUBS • SALADS • WINGS • PIZZA • SUBS • SALADS • WINGS









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944 E. Fifth St.
419-692-2202
It Doesn’t Get Any Better Than This!
Just heat and serve
• Chicken Noodle • Vegetable Beef • Cream of Broccoli
• Cream of Potato • Beef Stew • French Onion • Chili
“CHILI” WEATHER IS HERE!
We carry
SOUP SUPREME SOUPS
FORMERLY SOLD AT DELPHOS FOOD LOCKER
SUEVER’S TOWN HOUSE
15”
$
10
5
pizza up to
of your choice
items
Classic
Combo
Sub
$
2
00
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2011
DELPHOS HERALD
THE
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Pro-life groups push beartbeat
bill, p3

St. John’s football preview, p6
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Farm 7
Classifieds 8
TV 9
Index
Partly cloudy
Friday with
50 percent
chance of show-
ers and high
in low 60s. See page 2.
www.delphosherald.com
Project Recycle
set Saturday
Delphos Project Recycle
is set for 9 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. Saturday at Delphos
Fuel and Wash north of
Double A Trailer Sales
on East Fifth Street.
Newspaper, phone books
and aluminum cans need to
be in separate containers. All
other items are taken to the
Van Wert Recycle Center.
Cardboard, magazines and
plastic shopping bags also
need to be separated. All tin,
plastic and glass contain-
ers need to be rinsed clean.
Labels can be left on items
and they can be co-mingled.
No window or plate
glass, nor light bulbs, orna-
mental, Pyrex or cookware
glass will be accepted.
Computers, etc., are
also accepted but no
monitors or TVs.
Jennings needs
votes on video
The Fort Jennings stu-
dents’ video entry into the
Glee/National Conference
of Music Educators
Contest is now playing
at gleegiveanote.com.
The most popular entries
by vote will advance to
the final judging round for
a chance to share in the
$1,000,000 prize pool.
Support the local video
submission by visiting the
website, clicking on vote,
clicking on State-ohio; the
Fort Jennings video is on
page two of Ohio entries.
Each website address can
vote once per day until Nov. 7.
Directions to Sidney High
School
For fans heading to
Sidney High School for the
Jefferson/Sidney Lehman
football game Friday (7:30
p.m. kickoff), Jefferson
Principal/AD John Edinger
has provided directions:
Merge onto I-75 South
toward Dayton. Take the
OH-47 exit (EXIT 92) toward
Sidney/Versailles. Turn left
onto W. Michigan St./OH-47;
follow OH-47 (Save-A-Lot in
Sidney Plaza is on the left).
Turn right onto S. 4th Ave.
(just past Wilson Ave.).
The stadium is located at
750 S. 4th Ave. (on the left).
All tickets at the
gate are $4 for students
and $6 for adults.
School takes
stand against
voucher bill
BY MIKE FORD
mford@delphosherald.com
FORT JENNINGS —
During its regular meeting
for the month, the Jennings
Local School Board passed
a resolution opposing Fourth
District Representative Matt
Huffman’s (R-Lima) school
voucher bill in the Ohio
House. Superintendent Nick
Langhals said the district’s
concern is not in having to
compete with private schools
and those institutions are in
no way opposed but legisla-
tors must not give them spe-
cial treatment.
“We are standing up to
defend ourselves a little bit
here — we’ve been rated
‘Excellent’ for 10 years and
we are providing a good edu-
cation to our students. Now,
they want to give our stu-
dents a chance to go some-
where else and take public
dollars with them. We already
have open enrollment but that
doesn’t take public dollars
away from public education.
We’re willing to compete but
we have to be on a level play-
ing field,” he said.
“If they want public dollars
and our legislators want to do
that, we all have to be held to
the same requirements and be
held accountable in the same
ways. We educate every stu-
dent who comes through our
doors, so they should have
to accept every student who
comes to them; offer the same
programs and all the different
things public schools around
here offer their students.”
Aside from taking a stand,
Langhals would like legisla-
tors to take heed when the
number of public schools
passing similar resolutions
stacks up.
“We’re all saying the same
thing — we are not against
private schools but if they are
going to get public dollars,
they have to be held account-
able in the same ways we
are. We are not against pri-
vate schools and we are not
afraid to compete with them.
Public education is the basis
of everything and, right now,
it seems like the legislators
are moving toward privatiza-
tion,” he said.
In part, the resolution reads
as follows:
“Whereas, the operation of
the proposed program would
take dollars directly from the
already financially-beleaguered
local public school districts
resulting in fewer resources
for the education of remain-
ing students; now therefore, be
it resolved, that the Jennings
Local School District Board of
Education does hereby express
its opposition to this legisla-
tion, HB 136.”
The resolution passed
unanimously.
In other business:
• The board accepted a
donation from the activ-
ity boosters to the band trip
fund for $3,378.91 and a $50
library donation from Larry
and Charlie Streets;
• All school book bills
were approved;
• The senior trip to
Washington, D.C., on April
19-22 was approved;
• Neil Wittler was approved
as junior high basketball
coach and Dave Luersman to
the boys elementary basket-
ball program;
• The list of persons to call
upon as substitute teachers
was approved; and
• The board commended
the seniors and Rosemary
Warnecke on this year’s class
play.
On the upcoming school
events calendar, the grades 6-12
Fall Band and Choir Concert
will be held at 7 p.m. Oct. 20;
Red Ribbon Week will be cel-
ebrated Oct. 24-28; parent/
teacher conferences Nov. 2 and
3; and the Fall Athletic Banquet
at 6 p.m. Nov. 8.
“If they want
public dollars and
our legislators
want to do that,
we all have to be
held to the same
requirements and
be held account-
able in the same
ways. We educate
every student who
comes through
our doors, so they
should have to
accept every stu-
dent who comes
to them; offer the
same programs
and all the dif-
ferent things
public schools
around here offer
their students.”
— Nick Langhals,
Fort Jennings superintendent
Kroger recalls ice cream for nuts
CINCINNATI (AP)
— Kroger Co. is recalling
ice cream sold in 10 states
because it may contain pea-
nuts not mentioned on the
label.
Kroger says people with
peanut allergies could have
a serious or even life-threat-
ening reaction if they eat the
Private Selection Extreme
Moose Tracks ice cream
being recalled.
The recall involves only
16-ounce pints of the product
with a sell-by date of June
18, 2012 and the UPC code
11110 52909.
The ice cream was sold
at Kroger stores in Alabama,
Georgia, Illinois, Indiana,
Kentucky, Michigan,
Missouri, Ohio, South
Carolina and Tennessee.
Kroger says shoppers
should return the product to
supermarkets for a refund or
replacement.
Stacy Taff photos
Children’s fair opens 99th annual Fall Festival
Above: Madilyn Conley reaches to pick her prize for winning the bean bag toss
at the St. John’s Children’s Festival Wednesday afternoon. The event kicks off the
festival. Below: St. John’s Elementary students work on sand art projects. The 99th
annual Fall Festival will be held this weekend with homestyle chicken and beef din-
ners and fun and games in the gym, as well as booths, crafts, a Country Store and
Treasure Island. Prizes will be won and $2,511 in cash will be given away. Dinners
will be available for dine-in or carry out, serving 4:30-7 p.m. on Saturday and 4-7
p.m. on Sunday. The cost is $8 for adults, $6 for children 5th grade and younger.
Library puts eBooks on hold
BY STACY TAFF
staff@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Keeping
current with technology and
social trends, the Delphos
Public Library may offer
eBooks in the near future.
Kindles, Nooks and other
electronic reading devices
are growing in popularity, so
the library is inquiring with
the state for grant funds and
discussed the matter during
Wednesday’s meeting.
“If we are going to offer
eBooks, it has to be run
through SEO, which we
aren’t currently a member
of,” Assistant Librarian
Margaret Suever said. “Now,
it’s pretty expensive to join
but the state is giving out
grants for those who want to
join, so we wouldn’t be pay-
ing much of the cost. Right
now, we have somewhere
around 58,000 items in our
library but if we joined SEO,
we would have access to 6.7
million items. That includes
more than just eBooks.”
Suever advised the board
to wait until next year to
begin the program to avoid
potential complications and
added costs due to incom-
patible systems.
“They’re currently in the
process of changing their
system and we have the sys-
tem they’re changing it to,”
Suever said. “If we wait
until next year to join, it will
cost less for us because our
system will be compatible
with theirs.”
The board decided to
invite a program repre-
sentative to speak at the
November meeting.
“This is something we
should definitely consider
because it is the future,”
board member Leila Osting
said. “Part of what we want
to do with this is keep peo-
ple interested in reading.”
In other news, Library
Director Nancy Mericle said
there has been some plan-
ning for a celebration during
the 2012 National Library
week.
“The main reason we
were talking about doing
this is it will be 100 years
of service for the library
in 2012,” she said. “So
we thought it would be
interesting to have some
refreshments and then the
girls were talking about
maybe having some mem-
bers of the Lima Symphony
Orchestra come over and do
a performance. We could
also take the opportunity to
have an open house for the
First Edition building.”
On the subject of the new
building, Osting announced
the arrival of the new win-
dow blinds.
Chicken & Beef Dinners
Adults
$
8
00
Children
$
6
00
(5th grade & younger)
Serving: Saturday 4:30-7:00 p.m.
Sunday 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Eat In
or Carry Out
*Dinner tickets may be purchased by calling the high school
office at 419-692-5371 or
grade school office at 419-692-8561.
Tickets also available in the elementary school hallway
the days of the event.
F
o
o
d



G
a
m
e
s



F
u
n
In
T
h
e
G
y
m
Oct. 15 & 16 Sat. & Sun.
$
2511
in Cash
to be given away
Booths, Cr
a
fts
Cou
n
tr
y
Stor
e
Tr
ea
su
r
e Isla
n
d
Delphos St. John’s
99
th
Annual
2
Students can pick up their
awards in their school offices.
St. John’s Scholar of the
Day is Brett
Schwinnen.
Congratulations
Brett!
Jefferson’s Scholar of the
Day is Jace
Stockwell.
Congratulations
Jace!
Scholars of the Day
2 – The Herald Thursday, October 13, 2011
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARY
FUNERAL
BIRTHS
LOTTERY
CLUB WINNER
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
POLICE REPORT The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 98
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily
except Sundays, Tuesdays and
Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $1.48 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $97
per year. Outside these counties
$110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $1.48
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
At 4:28 p.m. on Monday
while on routine patrol in
the 600 block of Lima Ave.,
Delphos police stopped a
vehicle at which time they
located Kelley Bean, 47, of
Delphos as a passenger in the
vehicle.
Upon checking, it was
found Bean had an active
warrant for her arrest issued
out of Akron on the charge of
felonious assault.
Bean was arrested on the
warrant and was transport-
ed to the Allen County Jail,
where she is being held until
the Akron Police Department
can make arrangements to
take custody of her.
Woman arrested on assault warrant
Bean
At 4 p.m. on Tuesday,
Delphos police arrested Garret
Dienstberger on an order of
arrest issued out of Van Wert
Common Pleas Court Adult
Probation Department.
The order stems from
a burglary charge from
September.
Dienstberger was located
in the area of 202 Holland
Ave., Lot 49. He was trans-
ported to the Van Wert County
Jail where he is being held.
Man arrested on warrant
Dienstberger
At 11:37 a.m. on Monday,
Delphos police were called to
the 800 block of Elida Ave. in
reference to a burglary com-
plaint.
Upon officers’ arrival, the
victim stated someone had
gained entry into the resi-
dence by kicking open a door
and had taken money from
inside the residence.
The case has been forward-
ed to the Detective Bureau for
further investigation.
Police probe residence burglary
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Wednesday:
Classic Lotto
02-05-18-24-35-46
Estimated jackpot: $48.89
million
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $30
million
Pick 3 Evening
1-8-4
Pick 4 Evening
0-7-6-4
Powerball
1 0 - 1 2 - 2 3 - 4 3 - 4 7 ,
Powerball: 18, Power Play: 3
Estimated jackpot: $86
million
Rolling Cash 5
10-14-26-32-33
Estimated jackpot:
$110,000
Ten OH Evening
10-12-25-31-35-37-40-41-
43-45-46-49-52-54-55-59-
64-68-73-76
Delphos Fire Assoc.
300 Club
Oct. 6 — Craig Beining
Oct. 12 — Laura Waldron
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TONIGHT: Showers like-
ly in the evening. Then chance
of showers after midnight.
Lows in the lower 50s. South
winds 5 to 10 mph shifting
to the west after midnight.
Chance of rain 60 percent.
FRIDAY: Mostly cloudy
in the morning then becoming
partly cloudy. A 50 percent
chance of showers. Cooler.
Highs in the lower 60s. West
winds 15 to 25 mph with
gusts up to 35 mph.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Partly
cloudy in the evening then
becoming mostly clear. Lows
in the lower 40s. West winds
10 to 15 mph.
EXTENDED FORECAST
SATURDAY: Mostly
sunny. Highs around 60.
SATURDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear in the evening
then becoming partly cloudy.
Lows in the upper 40s.
A Van Wert man’s car was
assailed by two hay bales
Tuesday morning after an
unsecured load on a truck
driven by Steven Hemker, 55,
of Delphos shifted.
Hemker was traveling
eastbound in the outside
lane on East Fifth Street and
approached the traffic signal
at Fort Jennings Road. As
Hemker slowed for the stop
light, his load shifted and two
bales of hay fell off the truck
and landed on a vehicle drive
by Bruce Tribolet, 51, of Van
Wert, traveling eastbound in
the inside land of East Fifth
Street.
Hemker was cited for hav-
ing an unsecured load.
The Tribolet vehicle sus-
tained functional damage.
No one was injured.
Hay bales fall
off truck, land
on car
DUNLAP, Helen I., 86, of
Delphos, funeral services begin
at 11 a.m. Friday at Harter and
Schier Funeral Home, Pastor
Mark Walls officiating. Burial
will follow in the church cem-
etery in Rimer. Friends may
call from 2-4 p.m. and 6-8
p.m. today and for an hour
prior to the service Friday at
the funeral home. Memorials
are to the American Cancer
Society.
A Scott man was cited for
failure to stop at an assured
clear distance Wednesday fol-
lowing a two-vehicle accident
at the intersection of North
Pierce and East Fifth streets.
Nicholas Calvelage, 60, of
Delphos was traveling east-
bound on Fifth Street and
stopped for the traffic sig-
nal behind another vehicle at
North Pierce Street. Richard
Akom, 72, of Scott, was also
traveling eastbound in Fifth
Street and failed to stop behind
the Calvelage vehicle, striking
it in the rear.
No one was injured. Both
vehicles sustained non-func-
tional damage.
No injuries in
two-vehicle crash
Delphos weather
High temperature
Wednesday in Delphos was
64 degrees, low was 57. High
a year ago today was 75, low
was 47. Record high for today
is 84, set in 1975. Record low
is 26, set in 1988.
A boy, Evan David, was
born Oct. 1 at Toledo Hospital
to Trent and Denise Miller.
He weighed 7 pounds was
20 1/2 inches long.
Grandparents are Dennis
and Deborah Siefker and
Gregg and Nata Miller.
Great-grandparents are
Thomas and Irma Buettner,
Laverne and LaDonna Siefker
and Clarice Miller
ST. RITA’S
A boy was born Oct. 12 to
Jessica and Clint Roberts of
Elida.
Lucas
faces up
to 19 years
Andrew Lucas, 26, of
Delphos could face up to
19 years in prison after he
pleaded guilty Wednesday in
Allen County Common Pleas
court to aggravated burglary
and felonious assault.
Lucas was arrested on
July 22 in connection with
the July 21 assault of an
elderly female that occurred
in the 600 block of Dewey
Street in Delphos.
City police reports indi-
cates an 88-year-old vic-
tim told police that around
9 p.m. on July 21, a man
had forced his way into her
home after she had refused
him entrance. The man then
entered her residence and
physically assaulted her by
striking her repeatedly in the
face. The victim received
visible injury during the
assault and was taken to
St. Rita’s Medical Center
for medical treatment of her
injuries.
Lucas will receive his
sentence on Nov. 23.
He has remained in the
Allen County Jail since his
July arrest.
Corn: $6.37
Wheat: $5.87
Beans: $11.85
Violeta E. Wienken, 83,
of Delphos, died today at St.
Rita’s Medical Center.
Arrangements are incom-
plete at Harter and Schier
Funeral Home.
Violeta E. Wienken
Story idea ...
News release ...
email Nancy Spencer,
editor ...
nspencer@delphosherald.com
Comments ...
1
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Open Monday-Saturday 9-6; Sunday 12-4
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Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
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Pets Welcome
Flowers
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Florist &
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940 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
(419) 692-6856
flowersonfifth@woh.rr.com
Delivery area includes Delphos, Elida, Lima and surrounding communities
Sweetest Day
Saturday, October 15, 2011
Open Saturday 8am to 4pm
DOZEN ROSES
$24.99
Order early for best selection
419-692-6856
Candleberry Candles, Gift Baskets, Balloon
Bouquets and Beautiful Floral Arrangements
Thursday, October 13, 2011 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
BRIEFS
www.delphosherald.com
E - The Environmental
Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: What is the environ-
mental impact of so many people now using
sites like Facebook and spending so much
time online?
— Bob Yearling, Paris, TX
The environmental impact of so much
online time really boils down to energy usage,
which in turn affects the amount of green-
house gases we pump into our atmosphere.
For one, each of us can help by limiting com-
puter time (whether surfing the ‘net or not)
and shutting them down or putting them into
sleep mode when we aren’t using them (this
can be automated via the computer’s power
management control panel).
Also, when shopping for a new computer,
consumers and businesses alike can opt for
models certified by the federal government
as energy efficient with the Energy Star label.
If all computers sold in the U.S. met Energy
Star requirements, Americans could pocket
$1.8 billion annually in saved energy costs
and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by an
amount equivalent to taking some two million
cars off the road.
Individual responsibility aside, the creation
and management of more efficient data centers
by the major online hubs—especially as we
enter the age of “cloud” computing whereby
most of the software, content and services we
look to our computers for resides online and
is served to us as-needed—is what can have
the biggest impact. Google, Facebook, and
Amazon.com are already deeply committed to
the cloud computing model, with Microsoft,
Yahoo and others following suit accordingly.
For its part, Google has been a real leader
in the building of green data centers, even
powering them with renewable energy. The
company recently released environmental
footprint scores for several of its data cen-
ters. While the energy usage required to run
its cloud services (Google Search, Google+,
Gmail and YouTube) seems huge in the
aggregate—it used 260 megawatt hours to
power its data centers in 2010—it boils down
to only 7.4 kilowatt hours worth of energy
annually per user. Google reports that to
provide an individual user with its services
for a month uses less energy than leaving a
light bulb on for three hours. And because the
company has been carbon neutral since 2007,
“even that small amount of energy is offset
completely, so the carbon footprint of your
life on Google is zero.”
In an April 2011 report entitled “How Dirty
is your Data?” the non-profit Greenpeace
examined energy sources for the 10 largest
IT companies involved in cloud computing,
finding Apple, Facebook and IBM especially
guilty of getting significant amounts of power
from coal-fired power plants. (Facebook had
come under fire earlier this year when report-
ers uncovered that the company planned to
buy electricity for its brand new eco-friendly
data center in Prineville, Oregon—one of the
greenest such facilities ever designed and
constructed—from a utility that derives most
of its power from coal.) Yahoo, Amazon.com
and Microsoft scored best in use of renewable
alternative energy sources for cloud services.
In the long run, analysts think that the
widespread shift to cloud computing will be
a great boon to the environment. A report
released in September 2011 by Pike Research,
“Cloud Computing Energy Efficiency,” pre-
dicts that because of the shift to cloud com-
puting and increasing efficiencies, data center
power consumption will decrease by 31 per-
cent between 2010 and 2020.

EarthTalk® is written and edited by
Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a reg-
istered trademark of E - The Environmental
Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send ques-
tions to: earthtalk@emagazine.com.
The environmental impact of so much
online time really boils down to energy
usage, which in turn affects the amount of
greenhouse gases we pump into our atmo-
sphere. Google, which has been carbon
neutral since 2007, has been a real leader
in the building of green data centers, even
powering them with renewable energy.
Jurgen Plasser/Flickr photo
The YWCA of Van Wert
County will hold its Craft and
Vendor Fair from 8 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. Nov. 5.
The craft and vendor fair is
part of the YWCA Festival of
Trees’ Gingerbread Junction
Event.
This is the third year for
the event and the historic and
beautiful YWCA building
will be abuzz with activity.
The vendor booths will be set
up in the lobby, parlor and
rendezvous room this year,
while the gingerbread work-
shop will take place in the
gym. More than 150 children
with accompanying adults
attend this event.
The booth fee is $25 again
this year. To attain a registra-
tion form that explains all the
particulars please visit our
website, facebook page, or
stop in the YWCA.
The YWCA general oper-
ating hours are from 6:30
a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday –
Thursday; 6:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Friday; and 7:30-11:30 a.m.
Saturday.
For more information,
contact Executive Director
Stacy Looser at 419-238-
6639 or visit ywca.org/van-
wertcounty.
YWCA craft
and vendor fair
spots available
The Marion Township
Trustees held their regular
scheduled meeting on Monday
at the Marion Township Office
with the following mem-
bers present: Howard Violet,
Jerry Gilden and Joseph
Youngpeter.
The purpose of the meeting
was to pay bills and conduct
ongoing business. The minutes
of the previous meeting were
read and approved as read.
The trustees then reviewed the
bills and gave approval for 22
checks totaling $22,827.71.
Road Foreman Elwer
reported that the Road and Sign
Inventory for September has
been completed also that the
mowing has been completed
within the township.
Fiscal Officer Kimmet gave
the Trustees the Fund Balance
and Bank Reconciliation
Report for September to be
reviewed and signed.
He also gave the trustees
the additional information they
requested from Centurylink
regarding work to be done
along St. Rt. 66, at which time
the Trustee signed the applica-
tion approving the work to be
done.
Trustee Gilden state that
Dan Osting had contacted him
regarding a road tile west of his
lane on Mericle Road and Elwer
said this tile was sufficient to
handle township water.
There being no further busi-
ness, a motion to adjourn by
Trustee Gilden was seconded
by Trustee Youngpeter and
passed unanimously.
By ANN SANNER and
JULIE CARR SMYTH
The Associated Press
COLUMBUS — A nation-
wide coalition of pro-life
groups said Wednesday it is
preparing to push legislation
in all 50 states requiring that
pregnant women see and hear
the fetal heartbeat before hav-
ing an abortion.
The effort follows the
introduction of similar legis-
lation at the federal level by
Republican presidential can-
didate and U.S. Rep. Michele
Bachmann of Minnesota.
Ohio Right to Life direc-
tor Mike Gonidakis, whose
group is part of the coalition,
said the 50-state push was not
a response to a bill moving
through the Ohio Legislature
that would outlaw the pro-
cedure at the first detectable
heartbeat. His group has
not endorsed the Ohio bill
because of legal concerns,
though Bachmann has said
she supports it.
“We know it can with-
stand a judicial challenge, and
we know it’s an approach
that’s worked over the years,”
Gonidakis said of his coali-
tion’s proposal. “Hundreds
of thousands of babies are
alive now because their moth-
ers heard the heartbeat and
changed their minds.”
Should the Ohio bill
become law, it would impose
the nation’s most stringent
abortion limit. The legisla-
tion has divided the pro-life
community in Ohio, the home
state of International Right to
Life founder Jack Willke.
Ohio Right to Life has
withheld its support for the
so-called “heartbeat bill,”
contending the measure could
not withstand a court chal-
lenge under Roe v. Wade.
The landmark U.S Supreme
Court ruling sought to strike a
balance between states’ rights
to limit the procedure and a
woman’s right to privacy.
The Ohio bill ties an abor-
tion ban to the detection of
the fetal heartbeat and has the
potential to prevent abortions
as early as six weeks into
pregnancy — before many
women know they are preg-
nant.
Scores of restrictions
aimed at reducing access to
abortion have been approved
so far in state legislatures this
year. Five states — Alabama,
Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, and
Oklahoma — have passed
measures banning virtually
all abortions after five months
of pregnancy.
The informed-consent bill
that’s being pushed in the 50
states would require abortion
practitioners to make the fetal
heartbeat audible and visible
to pregnant women before an
abortion. It’s being backed by
the National Right to Life, the
U.S. Conference of Catholic
Bishops, Americans United
for Life, Susan B. Anthony
List and Family Research
Council Action.
While the separate strat-
egies show internal differ-
ences, their purpose is the
same, said Kellie Copeland,
executive director of NARAL
Pro-Choice Ohio, an abor-
tion-rights group.
“Let’s be clear, they all
want to take away a woman’s
ability to make personal, pri-
vate decisions by outlawing
abortion,” Copeland said.
Gonidakis said the coali-
tion’s plan has been in the
works for six months, and
has been vetted with coalition
lawyers.
“This is it,” Gonidakis said.
“This is the one that’s going
to continue to save lives in
the current court environment
we have.”
The Ohio heartbeat bill
cleared the state’s House in
late June, though it has been
stalled in the Senate.
Pro-life groups
push heartbeat bill
CINCINNATI (AP) —
Ohioans protesting corporate
greed who have been ticketed
for occupying a Cincinnati
public park have taken their
fight to the courthouse.
Occupy Cincinnati marched
to the county Justice Center
on Wednesday. Lawyers
submitted not guilty pleas in
Municipal Court for demon-
strators who had been cited.
An attorney for the protest-
ers says he will file a motion
to consolidate about 80 cases.
The past three nights, offi-
cers have written tickets to
demonstrators who refused to
leave downtown Cincinnati’s
Piatt Park after closing time.
Each ticket carries a $105
fine.
Protesters fight
tickets in court
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Ohio’s elections chief has
refused to accept 1,000-plus
signatures submitted by
Democrats trying to get a
repeal issue on the state’s
new congressional map on
next year’s ballot.
Secretary of State Jon
Husted, a Republican, says
the redistricting legislation
laying out the new U.S.
House districts contained an
appropriation and took effect
immediately, so it isn’t sub-
ject to referendum.
Democrats say this bol-
sters their legal standing
before the Ohio Supreme
Court. They have a case
pending there arguing the
maneuver by Republicans to
add the spending component
to the bill shouldn’t block it
from a ballot challenge.
The lawsuit cites a 2009
case where the high court
said an effort to legalize
racetrack slots was sub-
ject to repeal despite being
included in the appropria-
tion-laden state budget.
GOP Secretary
of State refuses
to accept map
fight signatures
Answers to Wednesday’s questions:
Utah has the highest per capita consumption of Jell-O
in the U.S.
Esau and Jacob (Genesis 25:23-26) were the first twins
mentioned in the Bible.
Today’s questions:
What is the standard tip in an American restaurant?
How much does it increase if the waitress draws a smiley
face on the check?
What year did Mahatma Ghandi win the Nobel Peace
Prize?
Answers in Friday’s Herald.
Today’s words:
Lenitic: living in quiet waters
Windrow: a row of racked-up, drying hay
Marion Township Trustees
“A hero cannot be a hero unless in a heroic world.”
– Nathaniel Hawthorne, American author (1804-1864)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Thursday, October 13, 2011
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year Ago
• Kalida Elementary Librarian aide Mary Lou Hoffman read
“The Snowy Day” to Kalida Elementary students. This was
all part of the fifth annual Jumpstart Read for the Record, a
campaign designed to bring children and adults throughout the
world together to read the same book on the same day and to
break the world record.
25 Years Ago — 1986
• Michelle Buettner, senior at Jefferson Senior High School,
was first runner-up in the Allen County Junior Miss pageant.
She received a $200 cash scholarship award, the runner-up
award and a special award for poise and appearance. She is the
daughter of Linda and Steve Buettner of Delphos.
• The Ottoville class of 1946 held its 40th reunion recently
at Lock 16, Ottoville. Dinner, trivia questions and answers
from grades one through 12 and music of the 40s were enjoyed
by the group. Their class motto: “Beginning, Not Ending”
was the theme for the evening. Those who attended mass on
Sunday for living and deceased members, had breakfast later
at Dew Drop Inn.
• Senior Kristi Odenweller, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Philip
Odenweller, was crowned Jefferson Senior High School home-
coming queen Saturday prior to the Jefferson-Perry football
game. Jefferson scored a 33-0 first-quarter lead and rolled to a
46-0 win over Perry.
50 Years Ago — 1961
• Two Delphos young men, Thomas E. Groves and Ralph
M. Osting, were recently initiated into fraternities at Ohio
Northern University. Groves, who is a freshmen majoring
in liberal arts, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Groves. He
became a member of Sigma Pi Fraternity. Osting is a junior
at the university in its college of pharmacy. He is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Clem Osting. He became a member of Phi Delta
Chi.
• “Kickapoo Kapers” will be the theme of this month’s
social event at the Delphos Country Club slated for Oct. 21.
Hi-jinx and hillbilly antics will add to the “sho-nuff” hillbilly
atmosphere planned by the committee in charge. Refreshments
will be available during the evening and a midnight snack will
be served and will include Hawg Jowls, Hominy Grits and
Turnip Greens.
• The Woman’s Society of Christian Service of Trinity
Methodist Church met Wednesday evening in the social rooms
of the church with the president, Mrs. Harold Heitzman pre-
siding. Mrs. Don R. Yocum opened the meeting with a prayer
after which Mrs. Howard Sadler and Mrs. Yocum were in
charge of the program.
75 Years Ago — 1936
• Members of St. John’s Catholic parish in this city and
many other residents of Delphos are in mourning as a result
of the passing away Tuesday of the Right Rev. Monsignor
F. Rupert, the venerable and beloved rector of St. John’s.
Monsignor Rupert had been in failing health for several years
past. He spent more than a quarter of a century here, having
come to Delphos in February 1910.
• An organization which will do much to aid the Jefferson
High School band was formed Monday night at a meeting held
in the music room at the Jefferson building. Officers were
elected as follows: Mrs. H. F. Buchholtz, president; Mrs.
Robert Wilkins, vice president; Mrs. J. Howard Apger, secre-
tary; and Mrs. S. J. Thompson, treasurer.
• The Knights of Columbus held their annual Columbus
Day card party and dance in their rooms Monday night. Five
hundred and pinochle was played. In pinochle Mrs. William
Gladen was high and Mrs. John Metzner, second of the women.
John Metzner was high for the men with Henry Imholt second.
Albert Hempfling was high of the men and Joseph Bonifas was
second in five hundred. Mrs. Cornelius Buettner was high and
Mrs. O. S. Schosker second of the women in five hundred.
By JIM ABRAMS
Associated Press

WASHINGTON —
Congress approved free
trade agreements today with
South Korea, Colombia and
Panama, ending a four-year
drought in the forming of new
trade partnerships and giving
the White House and Capitol
Hill the opportunity to show
they can work together to
stimulate the economy and
put people back to work.
In rapid succession, the
House and Senate voted on
the three trade pacts, which
the administration says could
boost exports by $13 billion
and support tens of thousands
of American jobs. None of
the votes were close, despite
opposition from labor groups
and other critics of free trade
agreements who say they
result in job losses and ignore
labor rights problems in the
partner countries.
“We don’t do much
around here that’s bipartisan
these days,” said Sen. Rob
Portman, R-Ohio, who was
U.S. Trade Representative
during the George W. Bush
administration. “This is an
example of where we can
come together as Republicans
and Democrats realizing that
with 14 million Americans
out of work, we need to do
things to move our economy
forward.”
President Barack Obama
said passage of the agree-
ments was “a major win for
American workers and busi-
nesses.”
“Tonight’s vote, with
bipartisan support, will sig-
nificantly boost exports that
bear the proud label ‘Made
in America,’ support tens of
thousands of good-paying
American jobs and protect
labor rights, the environment
and intellectual property. ... I
look forward to signing these
agreements.”
The agreements would
lower or eliminate tariffs
that American exporters face
in the three countries. They
also take steps to better pro-
tect intellectual property and
improve access for American
investors in those countries.
The last free trade agreement
completed was with Peru in
2007.
The House also passed
and sent to Obama for his
signature a bill to extend aid
to workers displaced by for-
eign competition. Obama had
demanded that the worker aid
bill be part of the trade pack-
age.
Years in the making, the
votes come just a day after
Senate Republicans were
unified in rejecting Obama’s
$447 billion jobs creation ini-
tiative
The agreement with South
Korea, the world’s 13th larg-
est economy, was the big-
gest such deal since the
North American Free Trade
Agreement with Mexico and
Canada in 1994.
The votes were 278-151
for South Korea, 300-129
for Panama and 262-167 for
Colombia. The Senate votes
were 83-15 for Korea, 77-22
for Panama and 66-33 for
Colombia.
Despite the strong majori-
ties, the debate was not with-
out rancor.
Lori Wallach, director of
Public Citizen’s Global Trade
Watch, said the “job-killing”
agreements were a “complete
flip-flop for President Obama,
who won crucial swing states
by pledging to overhaul our
flawed trade policies.”
In Cartagena, Colombian
President Juan Manuel Santos
said, “Today is a historic
day for relations between
Colombia and the United
States.” He added that the
agreement with his country
“is going to generate much
well-being for our peoples.”
But Tarsicio Mora, presi-
dent of Colombia’s CUT labor
federation, said Colombia’s
economy was not ready to
compete with the U.S.
“Our country isn’t devel-
oped, it does not have the
expertise much less the
requirements for trade at this
level,” Mora said. “The coun-
try should be clear as to who
is responsible for the coming
massacre, because industry,
large and small businesses
are going to be hit because
we are not in a condition to
compete.”
Congress passes three
free trade agreements
By JULIE PACE
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Is
President Barack Obama
running for re-election as an
against-the-odds underdog or
the confident front-runner?
Sometimes even Obama
himself doesn’t seem to know
for sure.
As the president travels the
country, he tells supporters
he expects to win re-election
because he believes his ideas
and vision for the country
are better than those of his
Republican rivals.
But he is also quick to cast
himself as the underdog, run-
ning for a second term amid
a shaky economy for which
he acknowledges he’s at least
partly responsible.
In trying to have it both
ways, Obama is looking to
assure supporters of a path
to victory while infusing his
incumbent bid for the White
House with some of the
enthusiasm of his long-shot
campaign in 2008. But run-
ning as the underdog may not
be as true a fit for Obama this
time around given the inher-
ent power of the presidency
and, well, that he has already
won once.
So which is it? Underdog
or favorite?
To be sure, Obama’s
chances of winning a second
term appear weakened by the
country’s economic woes and
Washington’s inability to do
anything to lower an unem-
ployment rate that has been
stuck above 9 percent for
months. The president’s poll
numbers have plummeted,
falling to the mid- to low-40s
in many recent polls.
But even accounting for
those troubling numbers, the
perks of being the incumbent
make the underdog label a
tricky fit for Obama. There’s
the pageantry of Air Force
One arrivals in swing states, a
monopoly on the Democratic
fundraising network and a
national profile unmatched
by any Republican rival.
“If you’re the underdog
and you’re the incumbent
president, something has gone
terribly wrong,” Republican
strategist John Feehery said.
Even some Democrats
are skeptical of the notion
that Obama is running from
behind.
“It’s hard to argue that
the person residing in the
White House is ever really
the underdog,” said Donna
Brazile, an adviser to Bill
Clinton’s two presidential
campaigns.
Obama says the role suits
him.
“I don’t mind it. I’m used
to being the underdog,” he
said in a recent interview,
embracing the label as soon
as he was asked about it.
Politicians often own being
the underdog as a way to
build enthusiasm and urgency
among their base. Obama did
it himself in 2008. But back
then, he clearly was.
As Obama reminds his
supporters, he was a relative-
ly unknown, first-term sena-
tor with a funny name when
he beat the odds-on favorite,
Hillary Rodham Clinton, in
the 2008 Democratic prima-
ry. He went on to defeat the
more-seasoned Republican
nominee, Sen. John McCain,
in the general election, carry-
ing 53 percent of the popular
vote and winning not only
the traditional battlegrounds,
but also states like North
Carolina and Virginia that
typically lean Republican.
Obama’s success hinged
in part on turning his status as
an underdog and Washington
outsider not only into a
groundswell of support, but
also an unprecedented grass-
roots campaign and small-
donor network.
Now, nearly three years
into the president’s term, it’s
not hard to see why his cam-
paign might want to recapture
some of that underdog energy.
Obama may still have solid
support among Democrats,
but the enthusiasm is less
palpable. And some liberal
backers are downright angry
over some of the president’s
policies and what they see
as a tendency to give in to
Republicans too easily. They
may vote for the president in
the end, but Obama says he
needs more than that.
Obama seeks to recapture underdog appeal
By CHARLES
BABINGTON and
KASIE HUNT
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Mitt
Romney seems firmly in
command in a Republican
presidential field that hasn’t
figured out how to stop him.
Twelve weeks before the
first party voting, the GOP
establishment is coalesc-
ing around the former
Massachusetts governor. He
has more campaign experi-
ence, money and organiza-
tion than anyone else. He
showed again this week that
he’s the best debater in the
bunch. And President Barack
Obama’s campaign is treating
him almost as the presump-
tive nominee — even though
Romney still faces challenges
in some early voting states.
The biggest question in
Republican circles is when
and how Texas Gov. Rick
Perry will use his own sub-
stantial campaign funds to
buy TV ads hitting Romney’s
record on health care, abor-
tion, gay rights and job cre-
ation.
Perry’s campaign, which
seems best-positioned to
challenge Romney, dropped
broad hints Wednesday that
the moment is near.
“Now that the field is
full, the air war will start
soon,” said Katon Dawson,
former chairman of the South
Carolina GOP and Perry’s
top adviser in the state. “We
seem to be inside a 100-
day window,” Dawson said.
“Governor Perry will be
extremely competitive on the
air.”
The tone is different up
the coast in New Hampshire.
Among rank-and-file
Republicans there, even those
who favor other candidates
have a sense that Romney has
gained an air of inevitability.
“It’s very frustrating,” said
state Rep. Jim Waddell, of
Hampton, who backs former
Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman.
Some go even further
about Perry’s recent drop. “In
New Hampshire, he certain-
ly is done,” said GOP state
Rep. Keith Murphy, who is
uncommitted in the race.
Perry’s advisers say there’s
plenty of time to overtake
Romney in key states. They
are frustrated by bad reviews
of the Texan’s debate perfor-
mances, including Tuesday’s
in New Hampshire. They say
it’s Romney who is ripe for
sharp criticism of his revised
positions on abortion, gay
rights and gun control, all
now markedly more conser-
vative than in the 1990s and
early 2000s.
In the debates so far, Perry
has generally fallen flat when
hitting Romney’s “flip-flops”
and the health care initiative
that required Massachusetts
residents to obtain medical
insurance. Perry’s advisers
say aggressive TV ads will
do a far more powerful job.
Although Republican
and Democratic insiders see
Romney as the front-runner,
several signs give Perry
and the other rivals hope.
Most Republican polls show
Romney falling well short of
a majority of support, as rest-
less voters consider one alter-
native after another.
An NBC-Marist College
poll in Iowa found that tea
party supporters prefer Cain.
In national polls, combined
support for Cain, Perry and
Bachmann exceeds Romney’s
support.
Romney inevitable? Perry poised to attack with ads
ATLANTA (AP) — If
there’s a policy star in the
Republican presidential pri-
mary it may be Herman Cain’s
9-9-9 tax overhaul plan.
It has helped fuel the
Georgia businessman’s sud-
den surge in the GOP race.
But behind the catchy slo-
gan is a reality: Experts say
it will raise taxes on some
Americans.
Roberton Williams, senior
fellow at the nonpartisan
Urban-Brookings Tax Policy
Center, said under Cain’s plan
taxes would rise on the elder-
ly and the poorest Americans
who earn less than $20,000
a year.
“The top end earners
would see a big tax cut and
the bottom end would see a
big tax increase,” Williams
said. “Where in the middle it
would break even we don’t
know because we don’t have
the details of the plan.”
The proposal would elimi-
nate the capital gains as well
as payroll taxes that fund
Social Security and Medicare.
Corporations wouldn’t pay
a tax on dividends and the
9-9-9 plan would lower the
corporate income tax from 35
percent to 9 percent.
The plan would also imple-
ment a new national sales tax,
which draws little enthusiasm
among the GOP’s conserva-
tive base.
Still, 9-9-9 has placed the
charismatic Cain in the thick
of the primary battle. Now
the trick will be staying there.
On Wednesday, Cain pledged
to ramp up his ground game
in the early primary states of
New Hampshire and Iowa,
an effort to capitalize on his
momentum.
The plan would scrap the
current tax code and replace
it with a 9 percent tax on
personal income and corpora-
tions as well as a new 9 per-
cent national sales tax.
Cain argues the 9-9-9 pro-
posal would expand the tax
base so more Americans are
contributing to government
coffers while at the same time
getting government out of the
business of picking winners
and losers through the tax
code.
The final phase of Cain’s
plan would move to a so-
called fair tax, eliminating the
income and corporate income
taxes in favor of a national
sales tax.
“It’s bold,” Jeanne Seaver,
co-founder of the Savannah,
Ga., tea party. “I like that you
know where you stand with
his plan.”
But while some are swayed
by the plan’s simplicity — it
can fit on a bumper sticker
compared with Mitt Romney’s
160-page plan — critics on
the left say it would place a
greater tax burden on middle-
and low-income Americans
by stripping away deductions
that currently complicate the
federal tax code.
Most low-income families
currently pay less than 9 per-
cent of their income in federal
taxes. Nearly half of all U.S.
households — mostly low-
and middle-income families
— pay no federal income
taxes, according to the Joint
Committee on Taxation.
Cain argued Tuesday
night that low-income work-
ers would pay less because
he would eliminate payroll
taxes, which total 15.3 per-
cent of wages.
9-9-9 plan gives
Cain a boost
1
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ALL PROCEEDS
BENEFIT
ST. JOHN’S SCHOOLS!
Interested sponsors
call The Delphos
Herald Public
Service Dept.
419-695-0015
This message
published as a public
service by these
civic minded firms.
Thursday, October 13, 2011 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Delphos Welcome Sign
OCT. 14
Michael Camper
Josh Stewart
Cathy Kramer
Ted Verhoff
Eric Peters
Harry Hodgson
Kaitlyn Kirk
Parker Brantley
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
8 p.m. — American Legion
Post 268, 415 N. State St.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-
In, 924 E. Fifth St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9-11:30 a.m.— Delphos
Project Recycle at Delphos
Fuel and Wash.
9 a.m. to noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal
Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
8-11:30 a.m. — Knights
of Columbus benefit for St.
John’s School at the hall,
Elida Ave.
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
Kitchen
Press
Kitchen
Press
Go back to your child-
hood with the sweet crunch
of candy apples. For an
easier version, dip apple
slices into the sweet mixture.
Cookies and Cream
6 Granny Smith apples
1 bag white chocolate
chips
2 tablespoons shorten-
ing
10 chopped Oreo cook-
ies
Insert sticks into apples.
In a large bowl, combine
the chips and shortening.
Microwave 1 minute, stir-
ring halfway through. Dip
apples in chocolate mix-
ture. Drain and place on
tray lined with foil. Let set
for 30 seconds, and then
top with chopped cookies.
Makes 6.

Spicy Cinnamon
6 Rome apples
2 cups cinnamon can-
dies (red hots)
4 tablespoons water
Red sprinkles (optional)
Insert sticks into apples.
In a large bowl, combine
the candies and water.
Microwave 4-5 minutes,
stirring every 30 seconds,
until melted. Dip apples in
liquid. Drain and place on
foil coated with cooking
spray. Top with red sprin-
kles. Makes 6 apples.

Peanut Butter and
Toffee
6 Gala apples
1 1/4 cups peanut butter
chips
1 tablespoon shortening
2 bags unwrapped cara-
mels
3 tablespoons water
2 chopped toffee bars
(Skor)
Insert sticks into apples.
Microwave chips and
shortening in bowl for 1
minute. In another bowl,
microwave caramels and
water for 2 minutes, stir-
ring often. Dip apples in
caramel and set on foil,
coated with nonstick spray.
Sprinkle with chopped tof-
fee bars and drizzle with
peanut butter mixture.
Makes 6 apples.
If you liked these reci-
pes, made changes or have
one to share, email kitch-
enpress@yahoo.com
SENIOR
LUNCHEON CAFE
THRIFT SHOP WORKERS
OCT. 13-15
THURSDAY: Sue Vasquez, Darla Rahrig, Janet Kroeger,
Margie Cross, Delores German and Carlene Gerdeman.
FRIDAY: Mary Jane Watkins, Darlene Kemper, Dolly
Mesker and Carol Hohman..
SATURDAY: Delores Gerker, Rita Wrasman, Eileen
Martz and Alice Grothouse.
REGULAR THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 5-7 p.m.
Thursday; 1-4 p.m. Friday; and 9 a.m.- noon Saturday.
To volunteer, contact Catharine Gerdemann, 419-695-
8440; Alice Heidenescher, 419-692-5362; Linda Bockey
419-692-7145; or Lorene Jettinghoff, 419-692-7331.
If help is needed, contact the Thrift Shop at 419-692-
2942 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. and leave a message.
WEEK OF OCT. 19-23
MONDAY: Pork chops,
redskin potatoes, Capri-blend
veggies, bread, margarine,
applesauce, coffee and 2%
milk.
TUESDAY: Meatloaf,
baked potato, broccoli, bread,
margarine, lemon dessert, cof-
fee and 2% milk.
WEDNESDAY: Beef and
noodles, mashed potatoes and
gravy, carrots, bread, marga-
rine, tropical fruit, coffee and
2% milk.
THURSDAY: Herb-baked
chicken, scalloped potatoes,
green beans, peach cobbler,
coffee and 2% milk.
FRIDAY: Salmon patty,
cauliflower, bread, margarine,
blushing pear, coffee and 2%
milk.
Donovan to lead discussion on SAD
Roberta Donovan, LISW,
at Foundations Behavioral
Health Center of Celina will
lead discussion on Seasonal
Affective Disorder (SAD) at
the 6 p.m. Monday meeting
of the National Alliance on
Mental Illness (NAMI).
Donovan is a graduate of
Bluffton University and has
a master’s degree in social
work. She presently serves
on the NAMI Board of
Directors.
Those with Seasonal
Affective Disorder or their
families notice periods
of depression that seem to
accompany seasonal changes
during the year. Usually they
become depressed in the fall
and winter and feel better
during the spring and sum-
mer. Depression is usually
mild to moderate and can be
treated with good results.
Meetings are held at the
Challenged Higher Peer
Support Drop-In Center at
407 N. Franklin, Van Wert,
which is just south of Vantage
Vocational School.
The public is always wel-
come.
www.delphosherald.com
To subscribe: 419-695-0015
Please notify the Delphos
Herald at 419-695-0015 if
there are any corrections
or additions to the Coming
Events column.
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6 – The Herald Thursday, October 13, 2011
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
Tuesday Merchant
Oct. 4,2011
Surveyor’s 36-12
Adams Automotive 32-16
Delphos Spt. Goods 28-20
Topp Chalet 28-20
Ace Hardware 28-20
R C Connections 26-22
Caballero’s 23-25
Kerns Ford 20-28
Unverferth Mfg. 13-35
Men over 200: Todd Merricle 258,
Matt Metcalfe 201-217-201, Scott Scalf
248-212, Ryan Kies 213, Mike Hughes
224-235, Greg Clouse 221, Jason Teman
211, Don Rice 216-236-245, Dan Grice
233-223-235, Josh DeVelvis 205, Russ
Wilhelm 217-214, Andrew Schimmoller
208-220, Kyle Early 247-223, Zach
Sargent 235-225-203, John Jones 237-
234, Jeff Lawrence 205, Joe Geise 201,
John Adams 202-218, Larry Etzkorn
219-220-223, Bruce VanMetre 237-254,
Alex VanMetre 279-258, Dan Stemen
279, Dave Stemen 202-268, David
Newman 234-224, Kevin Kill 202-215,
Ron Wilhelm 209, Derek Kill 215-203-
225, Bruce Haggard 202-226, Mark
Biedenharn 203-213, Dan Wilhelm 243-
244-201, Jason Mahlie 226-227
Men over 550: Matt Metcalfe 619,
Scott Scalf 642, Jerry Mericle 557, Ryan
Kies 580, Mike Hughes 652, Greg Clouse
554, Don Rice 697, Dan Grice 691,
Josh DeVelvis 566, Russ Wilhelm 610,
Andrew Schimmoller 602, Kyle Early
639, Zach Sargent 663, John Jones 652,
Jeff Lawrence 572, Denny Dyke 570,
John Adams 588, Larry Etzkorn 662,
Bruce VanMetre 659, Alex VanMetre
720, Dan Stemen 648, Dave Stemen
650, David Newman 654, Kevin Kill
607, Derek Kill 643, Bruce Haggard 606,
Mark Biedenharn 597, Dan Wilhelm 688,
Jason Mahlie 625
Wednesday Industrial
Oct.5,2011
K&M Tire 42-6
Moe’s Dougout 32-16
D R C 13th Frame Lounge 30-18
Topp Chalet 28-20
Rustic Cafe 21-27
Villager Tavern 21-27
Delphos Restaurant Supply 18-30
Cabo’s 18-30
D&D Grain 16-32
Neideckens 14-34
Men over 200: Jordan Riggs 223,
Coda Henze 204, Todd Dunlap 223-217-
247, Matt Lautenheiser 201, Ben Jones
202-236, Charlie Beckner 224, Bob White
202, Frank Miller 236-218-209, Charlie
Lozano 205-216, John Allen 203-201,
John Jones 237-216, Dale Riepenhoff
212, Lenny Hubert 226-203-247, Scott
German 222-268-202, Sean Hulihan 201,
Brent Hollar 201, Ted Furley 243-222,
John Beebe 223-201, Don Rice 225-
218-227, Dale Metzger 205-210, Brian
Gossard 247-278, Bruce VanMetre 202,
Dan Grice 258-204-229, Clint Harting
224, Shawn Stabler 211-221, Butch Prine
Jr. 210, Jeff Kreischer 228-213-260, Matt
Hoffman 202
Men over 550: Jordan Riggs 595,
Coda Henze 584, Todd Dunlap 688, Ben
Jones 634, Charlie Beckner 581, Duane
Kohorst 555, Frank Miller 663, Joe Geise
561, Charlie Lozano 604, John Allen
588, John Jones 610, Lenny Hubert 676,
Scott German 692, Terry Trentman 563,
Brent Hollar 557, Ted Furley 661, John
Beebe 599, Don Rice 670, Dale Metzger
594, Brian Gossard 719, Bruce VanMetre
562, Dan Grice 691, Clint Harting 595,
Shawn Stabler 577, Butch Prine Jr. 551,
Jeff Kreischer 701, Matt Hoffman 575,
Josh DeVelvis 551
Thursday National
Oct. 6,2011
K-M Tire 42-14
Sportsman Club-Van Wert 38-18
Day Metals 34-22
First Federal 34-22
V F W 32-24
D R C Big Dogs 28-28
Westrich 26-30
Bowersock Hauling 24-32
Wannemacherís 18-38
Men over 200: Frank Miller 217-256,
Tim Koester 246-249, Ted Wells 220,
Brad Thornburgh 248, Doug Milligan
Sr. 233-206, John Jones 237-215, Danny
Schleeter 211, Jerry Mericle 246, Ray
Geary 231-242-226, Don Honigford 225,
Ron Mericle 201, Tom Schulte 214-
216, Chuck Verhoff 233, Dave Miller
264-208-232, Jeff Menke 213, Brian
Schaadt 238, Don Eversole 225, Bruce
VanMetre 246, Don Rice 204-244-225,
Sean Hulihan 245, Brian Gossard 234-
213-256, Rob Ruda 244-236, Lenny
Hubert 225-217, Jeff Lawrence 233-211-
226, Jim Looser 210, Lenny Klaus 213,
Dave Moenter 211-216, Dan Wilhelm
258-259-237, Randy Fischbach 226-201,
Jason Mahlie 265-238
Men over 550: Frank Miller 631,
Tim Koester 688, Ted Wells 593,
Brad Thornburgh 578, Doug MIlligan
Sr. 619, John Jones 615, Jerry Mericle
593, Ray Geary 699, Don Honigford
577, Ron Mericle 569, Tom Schulte
623, Chuck Verhoff 561, Todd Menke
551, Dave MIller 704, Jeff Menke 563,
Brian Schaadt 579, Don Eversole 615,
Bruce VanMetre 611, Don Rice 673,
Sean Hulihan 619, Brian Gossard 703,
Rob Ruda 651, Lenny Hubert 634, Jeff
Lawrence 670, Lenny Klaus 614, Dan
Wilhelm 754, Randy Fischbach 612,
Jason Mahlie 690
Monday Hi-Roller
Oct. 3, 2011
Agri-Tech 40-8
Cabo 38-10
Adam’s Automotive 30-18
Dick’s Chicks 30-18
A&G Cash Reg. 20-28
Studio 320 18-30
C.M.S. 14-34
Ladies over 150: Connie Paddubny
157-167-163, Joy Early 232-214-207,
Kely Hubert 203-192, Marianne Mahlie
168, Judy Landwehr 151-155, Carol
Ricker 154, Donna Culp 150, Robin
Allen 169-156-177, Denise Courtney
166-163, Brittany VanMetre 215-169-
190, Anita Stewart 191, Lisa VanMetre
245-171-222, Mikki Rice 180, 153, 188,
Millie Minnig 163, Sherri Fetzer 165-
166.
Ladies over 500 total: Kelly Hubert
533, Robin Allen 502, Brittany VanMetre
574, Nikki Rice 521.
Ladies over 600 total: Joy Early 653,
Lisa VanMetre 638.
Monday Rec
Oct. 3, 2011
Duke’s Sharpening 20-12
Honda of Ottawa 18-14
The Pittsters 18-14
Topp Chalet 18-14
Schrader Realty 16-16
Jennings Mowers Mopend 14-18
NAPA 12-20
Fumduckers 12-10
Men over 160: Dave Sterling 180-
205, Mike Rode 170, Willy Joseph
178-166, Dylan Wright 203, Carlos
Delgado 172, James Schrader 225-192,
Tim Martin 182-182-164, Scott German
209-233-246, Bruce VanMetre 238-225-
231, Kyle Richards 189-191-235, Butch
Prine Jr. 217-213-176, Tom Elmerick
184-191-160, Darrell Myers 192, Mark
Radabaugh 165-169, Rob Ruda 197-183-
180, Terry Lindeman 184-204-208, Tom
Honigford 179-190-187, Jeff Rostorfer
216-190-209.
Men over 550 total: Scott German
688, Bruce VanMetre 694, Kyle Richards
615, Butch Prine Jr. 606, Rob Ruda 560,
Terry Trentman 596, Tom Honigford
556, Jeff Rostorfer 615.
Tuesday Master
Oct. 4, 2011
Bestone Tires 38-10
Strayer’s Auto Repair 31-17
Delphos Rec Center 28-20
Lear’s Martial Arts 24-24
Westrich’s 19-29
Men over 160: Chet Dilworth 286-178,
Jeff Milligan 193-236, Neil Mahlie 160-
192-216, Kenny Wrasman 161, Jeff Rode
169, Mike Swick 183, Shane Lear 212-
194-207, Bruce VanMetre 201-176-210,
Dean Bowersock 188, Chuck Wilson
164-169, Alex VanMetre 234, Dave
Knepper 181-245-235, Travis Sherrick
193-202-214.
Men over 550: Chet Dilworth 604, Jeff
Milligan 579, Neil Mahlie 568, Shane
Lear 613, Bruce VanMetre 587, Dave
Knepper 661, Travis Sherrick 609.
Tuesday Early Birds
Oct. 4, 2011
Delphos Rec Center 36-12
Bellmann’s Party Shop 28-20
The Grind 26-22
Floor’s Done by One 20-28
Pin Pals 18-30
Ladies over 150: Val Maag 164-
179, Janice Kaverman 193-177, Holly
Schrader 190, Kendra Norbeck 157,
Nicole Glass 154, Sue Karhoff 150-
153, Lisa VanMetre 174-179-182,
Jodi Bowersock 197-169-201, Tammy
Ellerbrock 158.
Ladies over 500: Janice Kaverman
510, Lisa VanMetre 535, Jodi Bowersock
6567, Chris Mahlie 551.
Wednesday Early Lucky Ten
Oct. 5, 2011
Ladies over 150: Doris Honigford
181, Robin Allen 151-182-191, Sherry
Fetzer 179, Jodi Moenter 161-157,
Tara Bowersock 171-200-168, Trina
Schuerman 160, Jodi Johns 157-215-213,
Alicia Odenweller 152, Sue Odenweller
161, Niki Schleeter 167-168, Deb
Rostorfer 166, Pat Hunt 150, Mary White
169, Lisa VanMetre 228-245-216, Nikki
Rice 190-152-162.
Ladies over 500: Doris Honigford
506, Robin Allen 524, Tara Bowersock
539, Jodi Johns 585, Nikki Rice 504.
Ladies over 600 total: Lisa VanMetre
689.
BOWLING ROUNDUP
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
St. John’s is coming off a
last-minute loss to Coldwater
last Friday night.
Fort Recovery lost 34-14
to Anna a week ago.
Both are looking to
get back on track this
Friday at Stadium Park
in a Midwest Athletic
Conference tussle.
The Jays enter at 4-3,
4-1 in the MAC, while
the Indians are 3-4, 1-4
in the MAC.
“Fort Recovery con-
tinues to get better and
their program seems to get
better each year. They have
the three wins and they lost
to Parkway in overtime two
weeks ago,” St. John’s men-
tor Todd Schulte explained.
“They do some different
things this year instead of
just the spread offense; they
have lined up in 2-tight for-
mations with a running back
and a 2-running back set with
a tight end. They are more
balanced between the run and
the pass. The two go-to guys
outside are (Aaron) Vagedes
and (Derek) Gaerke. They
have good speed and they try
to get them the ball quickly.
Our biggest concern is they
run something like 22 dif-
ferent formations; that forces
your defense to quickly rec-
ognize and figure out their
tendencies in those forma-
tions.
“Defensively, we have
seen them in their traditional
4-4 and also a 5-man line
of some sort. We are pre-
pared for either of
them, especially the
4-man front; we have
seen that the last two
weeks.”
The Jays will try
to get their running
game going this week
after struggling most
of the season, aver-
aging 139 yards per
game and 231.1 overall (19.6
points). Jordan Bergfeld (73
rushes, 345 yards, 10 scores)
is the top rusher, followed
by Tyler Jettinghoff (54 for
286, 3). Mark Boggs (33-
of-71 passing, 489 yards, 3
TDs, 6 picks) will look to
top target Tanner Calvelage
(21 grabs, 363 yards, 2).
Senior left tackle Alex Wehri
leads the linemen with 13
pancake blocks and fellow
senior Bryce Schulte has six.
Senior Alex Clark will pos-
sibly return after missing the
last 5 1/2 games due to an
injury.
The defense, giving up
12.9 points and 263.3 yards
per game, has top dogs in
Brent Schwinnen (40 solo
tackles, 29 assists), Kyle
Neumeier (25 and 34) and
Jettinghoff (33 and 16) — the
three linebackers — along
with Cody Looser (22 and
21), Logan Looser (17 and
25), Ryan Densel (24 and 12;
3 picks, 1 TD) and Calvelage
(4 picks).
Schulte hopes his
team can move on from
that tough loss to the
Cavaliers.
“When we looked
at the film Saturday
morning, there were
a lot of ‘what-ifs,
would’ves, could’ves
and should’ves’ but
in the end, you try to
move on. We have to
learn from a game like that
and not dwell on the past but
move on and try to get bet-
ter,” Schutle added.
Tribe coach Brent
Niekamp can commiserate
with that assessment.
“We have had a couple
of games that went against
us that we felt we should’ve
won had a play or two gone
our way. We’ve also had a
couple of games we could’ve
lost but won because we made
those plays,” Niekamp noted.
“We played tough against
Versailles, for example, and
led them after three quarters
but ended up losing. Really,
it has been a year that when
we have not made the plays
we needed, the other team
had a player or players that
did; they made something
happen.
“The one constant has
been how hard my guys have
played every game. That has
not been an issue.”
Leading the Tribe offense
has been quarter-
back Jason Pottkotter
(1,400-plus yards
passing), leading rush-
er Kenny Wenning
and wideouts Vagedes
and Gaerke (both over
500 yards receiving).
On the defensive side
of the ball, Gaerke
has four picks and
Vagedes three.
“When we see St. John’s
on video, we see the same
defense and a lot of fast kids
that run to the ball very well.
They are so well-coached,
they aren’t going to give
up the big play,” Niekamp
added. “Offensively, we see
the same attack with the run-
ning game.
“We have to be the aggres-
sors this game. Offensively,
we have to be patient and
disciplined enough to con-
sistently move the football.
Defensively, we have to do
our best to take away their
strength, which is that run-
ning game.”
Kickoff is at 7:30 p.m.
Jays try to get running game untracked vs. Tribe
Clark
Looser
Hank Williams Jr. has been associ-
ated with Monday Night Football for
two decades with his “Are You Ready
for Some Football?” theme song.
It’s taken its place alongside “Turn
Out The Lights, the Party’s Over”
crooning done by the late Dandy Don
Meredith and the late Howard Cosell’s
long-winded and generally irrelevent
rantings.
It will be very different not hearing
that during the leadup to the telecast.
There is a difference of opinion as to
the whether ESPN fired him or he quit
after his comparison of President Obama
playing golf with House Speaker John
Boehner to “Adolf Hitler playing golf
with Benjamjin Netanyahu.”
He claims that he was only using
this analogy to note the polar opposites
of these two men — I try to give the
benefit of the doubt and take him at face
value in these situations until I am con-
vinced otherwise — but that his words
were taken out of context and made to
sound much different than they were
intended.
That is very possible — in this day
and age of political correctness run
amok, that is very likely.
At the same time, you cannot expect
that this WON’T happen in this day and
age of heightened tensions amongst all
the political parties; with everything
that’s going on around the world; with
an economy that doesn’t really seem
to be getting better; with the “Occupy
Wall Street” crowd still doing its thing:
and so forth.
Even if what he says is true — he
was only using this extreme to make
a valid point — you have to know that
people in the media, Hollywood, etc.,
are going to come at you with fists
a-flying.
Just because you have a right to
say something because the Constitution
says so doesn’t mean you have a right
not to expect ramifications.
I go back to that great American phi-
losopher, Peter Parker/The Spectacular
Spiderman, and his “with great power
comes great responsibility.”
Usually, people say we have a right
to so and so but they forget that respon-
sibility/duty comes with it; as the power
of the person increases, so does the
duty.
You can argue that ESPN could have
stood by him — after all, this has been
a long-time association of trust that has
been built up — and made the “we don’t
agree with this statement but we also
give the benefit of the doubt” disclaimer
— or words to that effect.
We have seen others making similar
statements about this or that politician
and yet not lose their jobs, so it does
invite a charge of double standard.
In this day and age, though, when the
stakes have never been higher, one can
hardly blame them for taking the action
they did.
Hank Williams Jr. ain’t gonna go
away, though. He’s a fighter — he gets
it honestly and has paid his dues to get
where he is.
We’ll see who replaces him.
We’ll miss you, Hank Williams — for now
Metcalfe’s
Musings
JIM METCALFE
Elida, Bath draw
in girls soccer
ELIDA — Elida and Bath
drew 2-2 in Western Buckeye
League girls soccer action
Wednesday at the Elida Soccer
Complex.
Scoring goals for the Lady
’Dawgs (5-7-3, 2-4-3 WBL)
were Lindsey Hall and Beth
Boyle. Brett Pauff added an
assist.
Scoring for the WildKittens
(8-3-4, 4-2-2 WBL) were Ali
Manley and Taylor Dackin.
Kaitlyn Morrisey for Elida
stopped nine of 11 shots on-
goal, while Bath keeper Audrey
Brandon saved four of seven
Elida shots.
Elida hosts Fort Jennings at
noon Saturday.
-----
Beavers improve to 7-3-1 with
6-0 shutout of Grace Bible
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. -
The Bluffton University wom-
en’s soccer team put up its third
consecutive shutout in a 6-0 vic-
tory at Grace Bible College on
Wednesday.
The Beavers, who have out-
scored their opponents 14-0 dur-
ing the past three matches, upped
their record to 7-3-1. Grace fell
to 3-10 on the season.
Freshman Taylor Fultz
(Camden/Preble Shawnee)
used a feed from sophomore
Jessica Ramirez (Archbold) to
put Bluffton up 1-0 at the 10:46
mark with her team-best eighth
goal of the season.
A miscue by Grace Bible
allowed the visitors to take a 2-0
lead midway through the first
period.
Junior Maddie Moore (Linn
Grove, Ind./South Adams) made
the score 3-0 with her unassisted
tally less than five minutes into
the second stanza.
Eight minutes later, Moore
connected with sophomore
Megan Moreo (Spencerville/
Delphos Jefferson) for a 4-0
lead.
With just under 14 min-
utes to play, freshman Danielle
McQuillin (Delta/Pike-Delta-
York) found senior Monique
Devol (Lancaster/Bloom
Carroll) for her first goal of the
season before McQuillin capped
the scoring with a goal of her
own at the 83:56 mark.
Everybody got into the action
as Bluffton blasted its way to a
71-0 advantage in shots, includ-
ing 41 on frame. The Beavers
finished with three more fouls
(5-2) and a 6-0 advantage in cor-
ner kicks. Bluffton’s sixth shut-
out equaled the school record for
most blankings in a season with
five matches to play.
McQuillin paced Bluffton
with 10 shots, six on frame.
Moore and freshman Kayleen
Meardith (Kinsman/Badger)
both fired eight shots (four on
goal), while Fultz and Elizabeth
Webb (Ashland) chipped in
with six and five, respectively.
Kourtney Lewis (Arlington/
Riverdale), Moreo and Katie
Reid (Midlothian, Va./
Manchester) all added five shots
to the Bluffton attack.
Bluffton moves back into
Heartland Conference action
with a crucial match at Franklin
College under the lights on
Saturday. The women’s match
is slated for 8 p.m. follow-
ing the men’s contest with the
Grizzlies.
-----
Bluffton men pick up second
consecutive win at Grace Bible
College
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. -
The Bluffton University men’s
soccer team stayed on the win-
ning side of the ledger with a
2-0 Wednesday shutout at Grace
Bible College.
The Beavers upped their sea-
son mark to 2-11, while Grace
slipped to 6-6 overall.
Bluffton needed less than 12
minutes to find the back of the
net when Andrew Shroll (Van
Buren) gave the Beavers a quick
1-0 lead. That would be the
score when the teams went to
the break after 45 minutes of
action.
Senior Seth Hertenstein (St.
Marys/Memorial) tallied his first
goal of the season 10 minutes into
period two as the visitors stayed
hot for their second straight
victory. Nate Byrum (London)
hooked up with Hertenstein for
his second assist this year.
Bluffton fired 19 shots, 11
more than the home team. The
Beavers committed one more
foul (15-14) while piling up a
12-1 advantage in corner kicks.
Senior keeper Dan Saville
(Toledo/Central Catholic) picked
up three saves while freshman
Jorge Becerril (Sturgis, Mich.)
came up with two saves. Jared
Minderman (Cincinnati/Lakota
West) came off the bench
and led the visitors with five
shots, including three on frame.
Hertenstein and Byrum both
added four shots, while Shroll
chipped in with three attempts,
all of which were on goal.
The Beavers return to action
when they travel to Franklin
College on Saturday. The men’s
contest is slated for 6 p.m. under
the lights.
-----
DC’s Sierra lands
on D3football.com
Team of the Week
MINNEAPOLIS – Just two
days after being tabbed as the
Heartland Collegiate Athletic
Conference Special Teams
Player of the Week, Defiance
College’s Tony Sierra has been
named to the D3football.com
Team of the Week for the third
time in his career.
Sierra ran back the first punt
of the day 84 yards for a 7-0
lead for the Jackets just min-
utes into Saturday’s contest.
The touchdown return set a new
Defiance College record for the
longest punt return in program
history and propelled the Purple
and Gold to a 23-13 victory at
Mount St. Joseph.
The Warren, Mich., native
also added four tackles, one hit
for lost yardage and one pass
breakup from his strong safety
position, while averaging 48.5
yards per punt return in the win.
Sierra is averaging 20.2 yards
per punt return this season and
ranks eighth in the nation in that
category.
Sierra and the Jackets (1-4,
1-2 HCAC) will host Earlham
(0-6, 0-4 HCAC) on Saturday
for a 1:30 p.m. start inside of
Justin F. Coressel Stadium.
The Defiance College athlet-
ics program will host the final of
three ‘Pink Out’ events during
the game.
The event is designed to raise
money and awareness for the
fight against breast cancer. All
proceeds will go towards the
Susan G. Komen For The Cure
Foundation. Fans are encour-
aged to wear pink to the game as
a sign of support for the cause.
There will be raffled items and
donations will also be accepted.
For more information on the
event, contact Missy Jensen at
mjensen@defiance.edu, or Brian
Boveington at bboveington@
defiance.edu.
-----
Defiance shuts out Spartans
to even HCAC record
NORTH MANCHESTER,
Ind. – The Yellow Jackets’
men’s soccer team used a stel-
lar defensive performance to
defeat Heartland Collegiate
Athletic Conference opponent
Manchester College by a score
of 2-0 on Wednesday afternoon.
Coming off a key HCAC
victory on Saturday, DC was
determined to keep the positive
momentum going as it traveled
to Manchester College.
The first half began with
neither team finding a rhythm
offensively but just before the
halftime whistle, senior Joe
Loftis came up with his team-
leading fifth goal of the season
to put the Jackets in front 1-0.
Assisting on the play was fellow
senior Kevin Elson.
The goal gave Defiance the
lead going into the break despite
being outshot by the Spartans
7-3.
After the half, the Purple and
Gold dug in defensively and
stifled Manchester’s attack. The
Jackets’ defense only allowed
the Spartans to muster one shot
in the entire second half.
In the 87th minute, sopho-
more forward Jaiden Henderson
put the match on ice when he
scored his fourth goal on the
year and gave DC a 2-0 advan-
tage with only minutes remain-
ing.
The win raises Defiance’s
conference record to 2-2 and
its overall record to 4-8-1. The
Yellow Jackets have now won
their last two matches and three
of its last four. This was DC’s
second shutout victory of the
season.
The Jackets are next in action
on Saturday at 3 p.m. When they
host HCAC foe Transylvania
University.
LOCAL ROUNDUP
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JEFFERSON SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
RT. 66 - DELPHOS
Thursday, October 13, 2011 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
AGRIBUSINESS
Home invaders of
the autumn months
BY GLEN ARNOLD,
Ag educator,
OSU-Extension,
Putnam County

Large populations of bee-
tles are flying around our
homes as soybeans ripen
and harvest begins. The two
beetle species that are most
notable and have become
the biggest nuisance this fall
are the bean leaf beetle and
the multicolored Asian lady
beetle. Because these pests
rarely damage anything in
the home, they generally are
considered to be nuisance
pests.
The bean leaf beetles are
a soybean pest that overwin-
ters as an adult beneath leaf
litter in wood lots adjacent
to soybean fields. The adult
bean leaf beetle is pest that
is at least 1/4-inch in length
that can be red, orange, tan
or gray in color. The dot and
stripe markings may vary
among individuals or popu-
lations; however, all adults
possess a black triangle at
the base of their forewings.
These adults will feed on
soybean or other host plants
before moving into over-
wintering sites sometime in
October. They are attracted
to the sun-light reflecting
off a house but generally
are more of an outside nui-
sance.
The multicolored Asian
lady beetle is considered
beneficial because both the
growing stage larvae and the
adult beetles eat aphids and
other soft-bodied insects.
The name “multicolored”
refers to the many different
color forms of the adult lady
beetles. The various color
forms found in the United
States include shades of yel-
low, orange, or red, either
with or without black spots
on the wing covers.
The adult multicolored
Asian lady beetle is about
one-quarter inch long and
oval shaped, about two-thirds
as wide as it is long. Some
have 19 black spots while
others have faded spots that
vary in number and size. In
addition, markings on the
white pronotum, the small
area between the head and
the wing covers, resemble
a large, black capital “M”
when viewed from the rear of
the insect.
As autumn approaches,
the adult multicolored Asian
lady beetles leave their sum-
mer feeding sites in soy-
bean fields for protected
places to spend the winter.
Unfortunately, homes and
buildings are one such loca-
tion. The multicolored Asian
lady beetle becomes a nui-
sance factor during October
when they defy all our efforts
to keep them outside and off
our walls, curtains, and light
fixtures.
The beetles do not harm
humans or pets but are a
nuisance by their presence
inside the home or when
these lady beetles defend
themselves by emitting a
yellow-orange body fluid,
which has a foul odor and
can permanently stain walls,
drapes, carpeting, and cloth-
ing. Although an uncommon
occurrence, multicolored
Asian lady beetles have been
reported to nibble, nip, or
“bite” humans.
If you are not a lover of all
things with jointed legs scur-
rying about your home there
are several steps to take. The
first is to search out the point
of entry. Even a small crack
in a door, a split in a founda-
tion, or a hole in a wall less
than an eighth of an inch can
allow insects to enter. Seal all
entry points to prevent any-
thing from crawling in. With
a home, especially an older
country home, it is nearly
impossible to find and seal
every opening.
For more information on
the Asian lady beetle and how
to keep it from your home visit
the OSU Fact Sheet HSE-
1030-01 at http://ohioline.
osu.edu/hse-fact/1030.html

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FIRST DEFIANCE 14.39 +0.12
FST FIN BNCP 16.27 +0.43
FORD MOTOR CO 11.38 +0.14
GENERAL DYNAMICS 62.52 +1.04
GENERAL MOTORS 23.41 +0.91
GOODYEAR TIRE 11.85 +0.41
HEALTHCARE REIT 47.53 +0.23
HOME DEPOT INC. 34.72 +0.01
HONDA MOTOR CO 30.26 +0.14
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LOWES COMPANIES 20.62 +0.09
MCDONALDS CORP. 88.36 +-0.98
MICROSOFT CP 26.96 -0.04
PEPSICO INC. 62.70 +1.75
PROCTER & GAMBLE 64.89 +0.32
RITE AID CORP. 1.03 +0.04
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TIME WARNER INC. 32.91 +0.47
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STOCKS
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EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business Oct. 12
The Associated Press
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
American League
All games televised by Fox
Texas 3, Detroit 1
Wednesday’s Result: Texas 7, Detroit 3,
11 innings
Today’s Game: Texas (Wilson 16-7) at
Detroit (Verlander 24-5), 4:19 p.m.
National League
All games televised by TBS
St. Louis 2, Milwaukee 1
Wednesday’s Result: St. Louis 4,
Milwaukee 3
Today’s Game: Milwaukee (Wolf 13-10)
at St. Louis (Lohse 14-8), 8:05 p.m.
Friday’s Game: Milwaukee (Greinke 16-6)
at St. Louis, 8:05 p.m.
WORLD SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
All games televised by Fox
Wednesday, Oct. 19 at National League
Thursday, Oct. 20 at National League
Saturday, Oct. 22 at American League
Sunday, Oct. 23 at American League
x-Monday, Oct. 24 at American League
x-Wednesday, Oct. 26 at National League
x-Thursday, Oct. 27 at National League
Post Season Glance
Northwest Ohio Football
Standings – 2011
Reg. Season League All Games
BLANCHARD VALLEY
CONFERENCE
Liberty-Benton 6-0 7-0
Leipsic 6-0 6-1
McComb 5-1 5-2
Arcadia 4-2 5-2
Cory-Rawson 3-3 3-4
Arlington 2-4 3-4
Van Buren 2-4 3-4
Pandora-Gilboa 2-4 2-5
Vanlue 0-6 1-6
Hardin-Northern 0-6 0-7
THREE RIVERS ATHLETIC
CONFERENCE
Tol. Whitmer 4-0 7-0
Findlay 3-1 6-1
Tol. St. John’s Jes. 3-1 6-1
Tol. Cent. Cath. 3-1 5-2
Fremont Ross 2-2 5-2
Tol. St. Francis DeS. 1-3 2-5
Lima Senior 0-4 1-6
Oregon Clay 0-4 1-6
MIDWEST ATHLETIC
CONFERENCE
Marion Local 5-0 6-1
Coldwater 5-0 6-1
St. John’s 4-1 4-3
Minster 3-2 5-2
Versailles 3-2 5-2
Anna 2-3 4-3
Fort Recovery 1-4 3-4
Parkway 1-4 2-5
St. Henry 1-4 1-6
New Bremen 0-5 0-7
NORTHWEST CENTRAL
CONFERENCE
Waynesfield-Goshen 3-0 4-3
Fairbanks 3-1 4-3
Ridgemont 2-2 2-5
Perry 1-1 2-5
Upper Scioto Valley 1-1 1-6
Riverside 0-4 0-7
NORTHWEST CONFERENCE
Lima Central Catholic 5-0 7-0
Ada 4-1 6-1
Spencerville 4-2 5-2
Crestview 3-2 4-3
Jefferson 3-3 3-4
Bluffton 2-3 4-3
Columbus Grove 2-3 4-3
Allen East 1-5 1-6
Paulding 0-5 0-7
WESTERN BUCKEYE LEAGUE
Kenton 6-0 7-0
Wapakoneta 6-0 7-0
Ottawa-Glandorf 4-2 5-2
Bath 3-3 4-3
Defiance 3-3 4-3
Elida 3-3 4-3
St. Marys 2-4 3-4
Shawnee 2-4 3-4
Celina 1-5 1-6
High School Standings
The Associated Press
Rangers 7, Tigers 3
DETROIT — Nelson Cruz
made the throw. Mike Napoli
endured the collision.
Then this Texas tag team put
the game away with their bats.
Cruz made a rocket throw
to Napoli at the plate to keep
the score tied, then hit a crush-
ing 3-run homer in the 11th
inning off Jose Valverde that
helped send the Rangers over the
Detroit Tigers 7-3 Wednesday
night for a 3-1 lead in the AL
championship series.
Napoli put Texas ahead with
an RBI single earlier in the 11th
and Cruz — whose grand slam
in the 11th inning won Game
2 — once again starred for the
Rangers in a game delayed at
the start for more than two hours
by rain.
With Detroit runners at the
corners in the eighth and the
score 3-all, Cruz caught Delmon
Young’s fly ball to right field and
made a strong peg to Napoli to
nail Miguel Cabrera. The Detroit
slugger bowled over Napoli but
the catcher held on to the ball
and Cabrera never touched the
plate.
Texas tries for its second
consecutive AL pennant today,
sending C.J. Wilson to the
mound to face Detroit ace Justin
Verlander.
Napoli blooped a go-ahead
single in the 11th and Cruz soon
added his fourth home run of the
ALCS. Cruz became the first
player in major-league history to
hit a pair of extra-inning homers
in the same postseason series.
Brandon Inge hit a solo home
run in the Detroit seventh that
tied it. The Tigers wasted a ter-
rific chance an inning later fol-
lowing some risky Texas strat-
egy.
With one out and nobody on,
the Rangers intentionally walked
Cabrera, practically daring the
rest of the struggling Detroit
lineup to beat them. The AL
batting champion had hit a 2-run
double earlier in the game.
Victor Martinez, who hurt his
rib cage on a home run swing in
Game 3, followed with a single
to right and Cabrera lumbered
around to third.
Young, another Tigers starter
who has been banged up lately,
managed to lift the ball to medi-
um right. Cruz caught it and
made a perfect, one-hop throw
to the plate that beat Cabrera by
several feet.
Austin Jackson was hit by a
pitch with one out in the 10th
but Napoli threw him out trying
to steal second; reliever Scott
Feldman made it through the
inning without further trouble.
The out on the bases may have
cost Cabrera a chance to bat with
a runner on. He was on deck
when the inning ended.
Feldman got the win and
Texas closer Neftali Feliz
worked the 11th.
Cruz tried to contribute with
his legs, too. He was on first
base with two outs in the ninth
and tried to steal second while
Tigers reliever Joaquin Benoit
was holding the ball. The pitcher
stepped and threw to second to
retire Cruz.
Valverde had already pitched
a perfect 10th but he couldn’t
hold off Texas for another
inning. Cruz was mobbed by
teammates at the Texas dug-
out after his homer and Detroit
fans began heading for the exits.
Some of those that remained
began applauding Valverde, who
hasn’t blown a save all year but
was unable to keep this game
going for another inning.
The teams waited through a
rain delay of 2 hours, 13 minutes
before the first pitch. The game
was supposed to begin at 4:19
p.m. EDT but the rain didn’t let
up until around 5:30. Fans then
began filling the seats closest to
the field and, about 20 minutes
later, the grounds crew came out
to remove the tarp.
A misty rain began falling
again around the end of the sec-
ond inning and umbrellas started
popping up all over the ballpark.
Water would kick up as the ball
hopped along the grass but the
rain wasn’t a factor in the late
innings.
Cabrera hit his 2-run double
in the third but Texas scored
three times in the sixth.
Inge tied it with a stunning
homer off Alexi Ogando in the
seventh. The Detroit third base-
man hit .170 against right-hand-
ers during the regular season
with no homers in 171 at-bats
but lifted a high drive to left field
that seemed to stay in the air for-
ever before clearing the fence to
make it 3-all.
Rangers relievers allowed
only one run in 15 innings
through the first three games of
the ALCS — and they allowed
only one in Game 4.
Detroit’s Rick Porcello
allowed three runs — two earned
— and eight hits in 6 2/3 innings.
He struck out six with no walks.
Matt Harrison allowed two
runs and three hits in five innings
for Texas.
Cardinals 4, Brewers 3.
ST. LOUIS — Chris
Carpenter matched a franchise
record set by Bob Gibson with a
most un-Gibson-like outing.
Far from his best, the
Cardinals ace lasted just five
innings in a 4-3 victory over
the Milwaukee Brewers on
Wednesday night that gave St.
Louis a 2-1 edge in the NL
championship series.
The bullpen that got no work
in Carpenter’s division-series
clinching win over Roy Halladay
and the Philadelphia Phillies
came up aces with four relievers
retiring the last 12 Milwaukee
batters in order.
Albert Pujols had one of three
RBI doubles during a 4-run first
inning against Yovani Gallardo
for the wild-card Cardinals, who
suddenly are front-runners —
and against the team that put
them away early en route to the
NL Central title.
All thanks to unsung
Fernando Salas, Lance Lynn,
Marc Rzepczynski and Jason
Motte, who struck out three of
the four batters he faced for the
save.
The Brewers set a franchise
record with 96 victories and took
the Central lead for good on July
27. Now, they’ve got to come
from behind.
Yuniesky Betancourt’s infield
single with one out in the fourth
was the last of the Brewers’ six
hits. The rest of the way they had
only two baserunners.
The Brewers have lost eight
in a row on the road in the post-
season, a stretch that extends to
Game 1 of the 1982 World Series
in St. Louis on a shutout by Mike
Caldwell. It’s the longest current
streak in the majors.
The matchup of star pitchers
fizzled, with both starters done
after five innings. Gallardo tied
an NLCS record with three wild
pitches, while Carpenter surren-
dered all but one run of a 4-run
cushion.
The game was played in a
steady drizzle.
Kyle Lohse, pitching on 12
days’ rest, starts Game 4 today
for Cardinals against Randy
Wolf.
Motte had two saves last-
ing more than an inning in
September and another in Game
2 of the division series against
the Phillies. Salas worked the
sixth, Lynn also got four outs
and Rzepzcynski struck out
Fielder in the eighth.
The Cardinals scored in the
first inning for the fifth straight
game and batted around against
Gallardo. Pujols delivered an
RBI double and then singled in
the second to give him six hits in
seven at-bats.
St. Louis had its chances to
break away later but hit into
three double plays and stranded
nine runners.
Mark Kotsay started ahead
of slumping Nyjer Morgan
and homered for the Brewers.
Betancourt had two singles and
an RBI and Gallardo, a .221 hit-
ter with a homer and four RBIs,
had a sacrifice fly in the second.
Jon Jay and David Freese
added RBI doubles in the first
for St. Louis, which was 3-for-4
with runners in scoring position
to start the game but 0-for-7 the
rest of the way.
Gallardo, who’s 1-7 with
a 5.66 career mark against the
Cardinals, trailed 2-0 after his
first 12 pitches and barely made
it out of the first trailing 4-0.
The right-hander walked three,
one of them intentional, and the
Brewers had Chris Narveson
up in the bullpen before Yadier
Molina grounded into a double
play, scoring the fourth run, for
his first outs.
MLB Playoff Capsules
8 – The Herald Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
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•LAWN MOWING•
•FERTILIZATION•
•WEED CONTROL
PROGRAMS•
•LAWN AERATION•
•FALL CLEANUP•
•MULCHING & MULCH
DELIVERY•
•SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
950 Construction
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
950 Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
950 Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
Place Your Ad Today
Service
AT YOUR
MANUFACTURING OPPORTUNITIES
AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast alumi-
num wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals America,
our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction has helped
us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 23 years of steady
employment. Now, our business is growing again, creating the following new
employment opportunities:
MACHINE REPAIR TECHNICIANS:
To perform installation, troubleshooting, and repair of various machinery and
equipment. Qualifications must include:
• At least three (3) years of multi-trade experience--including industrial
electrical, mechanical, hydraulics/pneumatics, robotics, and PLC’s
• Working knowledge of precision measuring instruments, gauges, test
equipment, and blueprints/schematics
• High school diploma or equivalent and related vocational training
CNC MACHINING SET-UP/OPERATORS:
To perform set-ups, tool changes, and operation of CNC lathes, machining
centers, and robots; Enters and edits machine programs. Qualifications must
include:
• At least one (1) year of related experience in the set-up and operation
of CNC machines
• Working knowledge of precision measuring instruments, gauges to
verify dimensions of finished parts
• High school diploma or equivalent and related vocational training
PRODUCTION OPERATORS:
To perform machine operations, handling, inspection, and testing of products.
Qualifications must include:
• Prior manufacturing, production operator experience
• Commitment to teamwork and continuous improvement
• High school diploma or equivalent
In return for your expertise, AAP offers a competitive salary plus profit-shar-
ing and excellent fringe benefits--including medical, dental, life, vision, and
disability insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company matching,
paid vacation, paid holidays, and more. If you’re looking for a career oppor-
tunity with a growing company, then we want to hear from you. Please send
your qualifications with salary history to:
AAP St. Marys Corporation
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, Ohio 45885
Attention: Human Resource-DH
005

Lost & Found
FOUND: BEAGLE on cor-
ner of 5th and Clay Mon-
day, Oct. 10th. Cal l
(419)692-1075.
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
DELPHOS TRADING
POST
We Buy - Sell -
Trade
Anything of
Value
More Value
for
Your Buying $$$
WE BUY
GOLD & SILVER
528 N.
Washington
419.692.0044
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
DANCER LOGISTICS
Services LLC, 900 Gres-
sel Drive, Delphos, Ohio
45833 Truck Dri vers
Needed -Dedicated Lanes
Available -Home Daily
Dedi cated Runs Now
Available -We also need
long haul, regional and
part-time company drivers
-We also welcome Owner
Operators to apply -Great
benefits package and
modern equipment- Quali-
fications are a good MVR,
Class A CDL and two
years OTR experience
- Cal l Shawn at
888-465-6001 ext. 806 for
details or apply in person
10am thru 3pm
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
PART-TIME HELP local
business for retail. Send
replies to Box 159 c/o Del-
phos Herald, 405 N. Main
St., Delphos, OH 45833
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
VISA
MC
DISCOVER
PUBLIC
AUCTION
Every Saturday
at 6pm
Large Variety of
Merchandise
Everyone Welcome
Porter Auction
19326 CO. Rd. 60
Grover Hill, OH
For info call
(419) 587-3770
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
BED: NEW QUEEN
pillow-top mattress set,
can deliver $125. Call
(260)749-6100.
340

Garage Sales
16719 BETWEEEN Rimer
and Vaughnsville on St.
Rt. 189
Thurs., Fri., & Sat.
9am-6pm
Baby to adult clothes. car
sterio, misc. items.
19243 LINCOLN Hwy.
Middle Point
Thurs-Fri, 9am-5pm
Exercise bike, baby swing,
porcelain dolls, Sony sur-
round sound system, port-
able DVD player, CD
player, Dean electric gui-
tar, books, sport cards,
collectibles, Med-2XL la-
dies scrubs, plus size
men’s & women’s clothing,
sports cleats, decorations,
lots of misc.
600

Apts. for Rent
1BR APT for rent, appli-
ances, electric heat, laun-
dry room, No pets.
$400/month, plus deposit,
water included. 320 N.
Jefferson. 419-852-0833.
ONE BDRM Apt., 537 W.
Thi rd St . , Del phos.
$ 3 2 5 / m o . C a l l
4 1 9 - 6 9 2 - 2 1 8 4 o r
419-204-5924
751

Resort & Vac.
Property
SPEND THE winter in
Paradise (Naples, FL).
2 BR, 2 BA condo. For
details (419)692-2709.
800

House For Sale
LAND CONTRACT or
Short term Rent to own
homes. Several available.
Addresses and pictures at
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com.
419-586-8220
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
MEMBER: 912 345 678
RAABE FORD LINCOLN MERCURY DEALER
(800) 589-7876
Owner Advantage is our
way of rewarding you for
bringing your vehicle in for
service. You’re rewarded
for each visit. Membership
is easy – ask your Service
Advisor for details!
Taking care of
your vehicle
has its rewards.
Over 85
years
serving
you!
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
FORD-LINCOLN
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8 ; T.-F. 7:30-6:00; Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
2 FEMALE adult llama’s
$50 or best offer. Call
419-695-6889
CARPET 20’ 6” X 14’ 8”
multi-colored green and
g o l d . $ 5 0 Ca l l
419-695-1154
FREE 2 yr. old male
Golden Retriever mix,
needs new home. House-
broken. Very loving dog.
Ph. 419-532-2913
NFL BENGALS, Carson
Palmer Jersey, Size Y-XL
new with tags $17. Call
419-204-9383
270

Auctions
Shop Herald
Classifieds for
Great Deals
Place a House
for Rent Ad
In the Classifieds
Call
The Daily
Herald
419 695-0015
Is It
Broken?
Find A
Repairman
To fix It
In The
Service
Directory
In
The
Delphos
Herald
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Prohibit
4 Marble block
8 Now, to Caesar
12 Actress -- Hagen
13 Sound in body
14 Ess molding
15 Home in the woods
(2 wds.)
17 Lumber along
18 Work, as clay
19 Mr. Gretzky
20 Once named
22 Call in sick
23 FBI agent (hyph.)
26 Say uncle
28 Cat’s foot
31 McEntire of music
32 Sturm -- Drang
33 Forty-niner’s quest
34 Moon or planet
35 Livy’s trio
36 La -- tar pits
37 Harpers Ferry st.
38 Envelope abbr.
39 Caboose’s spot
40 Experiment with
41 College stat
43 Main
46 Sibilates
50 Lemon peel
51 Buffet staple (2 wds.)
54 A Guthrie
55 Suggestion
56 Lennon’s wife
57 Horse color
58 Garden hopper
59 Omelet ingredient
DOWN
1 Massiveness
2 Like -- -- of bricks
3 More than fume
4 Cool place
5 Chocolate-colored dog
6 Frazier foe
7 Pa Cartwright
8 Prickly pear
9 Hideous
10 Flashy sign
11 Grant
16 Huge blossom
19 Ingenuity
21 Justice
22 Facilitating
23 Increase
24 Vanna’s boss
25 “Waterloo” group
27 Volt or watt
28 Sponge feature
29 Territory
30 Exhaust
36 Make pigtails
38 Dog’s bark
40 Wyoming range
42 Beseech
43 Movie mogul
44 Ulysses or Superman
45 Cuba, to Castro
47 Moccasin or pump
48 Twinge
49 Urban blight
51 Took the bait
52 Uproar
53 Mauna --
Answer to Puzzle
Allen County
American Township
Federal Home Loan
Mortgage Corp. to Joseph
Sweigart, 500 Sandpiper
St., $34,000.
Tillie A. and Greg T.
Schiffler to Kristen F. and
Micah Sobota, 3917 Bur
Oak Trail, $350,000.
Moolchan M. and
Cynthia Seenarine to Mark
A. and Pauline R. McElroy,
5002 Lobo St., $122,000.
Michelle A. Boedicker
and Sheriff Samuel A.
Crish to U.S. Bank, 1005
Logan, $18,000.
Jamie and Michelle
Modica to Paul E. and
Cynthia A. Webel, 2975
Hanover Drive, $85,000.
City of Delphos
Marilyn M. and
Richard S. Brabant to
Jordan J. Martin, 827 N.
Washington, $62,000.
Melissa Wagoner and
Nicole L. Dray adminis-
tratrix et al. and Sheriff
Samuel A. Crish to Federal
Home Loan Mortgage
Corp., 709 S. Washington,
$1,400.
Village of Elida
Robert A. Szuch trustee
et al. to James P. Harvey,
107 Howard, $95,000.
Martha J. and Ivan
A. Vazquez to Carl D.
Metzger, 205 Sunnydale
St., $70,000.
Marion Township
Jenny S. Decamp trust-
ee et al. to Lawrence E.
and Carol J. Swords trust-
ees et al., 3755 N. Grubb
Road, $72,000.
Ted W. and Laura A.
Brenneman to Matthew
J. and Sarah K. Hemker,
14863 Landeck Road,
$150,000.
Eugene Fischer et al.
to Danile E. and Mary L.
Fischer, North Defiance
Trail, $21,500.
Melvin Fischer et al.
to Eugene and Carolyn
Fischer LLC, Buettner
Road, $130,000.
Jean F. Lucke-Kerns
trustee et al. to Eugene
and Carolyn Fischer LLC,
North Defiance Trail,
$16,000.
Donnie R. Sargent
trustee et al. to Michael J.
and Lori J. Baldauf, 8989
Ridge Road, $71,500.
REAL ESTATE
TRANSFERS
DEAR DOCTOR K: I know
I should drink plenty of water
every day, but sometimes I get
tired of drinking plain water.
So I reach for club soda, seltzer
water or sparkling mineral water.
But I’ve heard that
carbonated drinks
could be bad for
my bones. Is this
true?
D E A R
READER: Several
of my patients
have asked the
same question.
S o m e t i m e s
they are not
asking about
carbonated water,
but carbonated
beverages that contain caffeine
(like colas) and sugar or
sweetener. I’ll tell you what I
tell them.
There is a theory that
phosphoric acid (phosphate),
found in some carbonated
beverages, can interfere with
calcium absorption. But there’s
no good evidence that consuming
a lot of phosphate affects bone
metabolism or bone density.
Researchers have looked at the
effect of carbonated beverages
on bone health in adults. One
study found that non-cola
carbonated drinks (like the
carbonated water drinks you
asked about) were not associated
with low bone density.
Another study compared
two groups of healthy
postmenopausal women. Both
groups drank one quart of either
carbonated or non-carbonated
mineral water per day. After eight
weeks, there was no difference
in bone turnover between the
two groups. So I don’t put
much stock in the theory that
carbonated water weakens your
bones.
On the other hand, in the
same study I just talked about,
women who drank cola had
lower hip bone density. The
more cola a woman drank, the
lower her bone mineral density
(BMD). Some scientists suspect
that the caffeine in cola may
have a harmful effect on BMD,
but there’s no proof of that.
So the good news is that
drinking carbonated water
doesn’t appear to be bad for
your bones. On the other hand,
don’t overdo the caffeinated
beverages, carbonated or not.
And make sure that carbonated
water isn’t taking the place of
other healthy beverages in your
diet, such as calcium-rich, low-
fat milk.
Finally, in talking about
the carbonation in carbonated
beverages, let’s not forget about
the real culprit that makes some
types of carbonated beverages
unhealthy: sugar.
A few years ago a patient of
mine asked me if the carbonation
in the 10 cans of cola she drank
a day was bad for her bones. I
told her that the carbonation in
colas might be a problem for her
bones, but that was the least of
her problems with colas. The
sugar in all those colas was a
definite problem for her whole
body. The weight gain associated
with sugary sodas puts a big
strain on the heart, blood vessels
and joints.
So my advice is to feel
free to enjoy carbonated water
without worrying. However, I
reserve the right to change my
mind, when and if new evidence
emerges. And if it does, I’ll let
you know.
Dr. Komaroff is a physician
and professor at Harvard Medical
School. Go to his website to send
questions and get additional
information: www.AskDoctorK.
com.
COPYRIGHT 2011 THE
PRESIDENT AND FELLOWS OF
HARVARD COLLEGE
DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL
UCLICK FOR UFS
1130 Walnut, Kansas City, Mo.
64106
Ask
Dr. K.
DR. ANTHONY KOMAROFF M.D.
Do carbonated beverages
harm your bones?
Go anywhere with a
newspaper.
Newspapers provide
a daily source of
information from
around the globe.
The Delphos Herald
405 k. Muin 5I. º 0elphes Ph. 4T?·6?5·00T5
www.delphosherald.com
8 – The Herald Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Lawn Care
SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare &
Snow Removal
21 Years Experience • Insured
Commercial & Residential
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
•LAWN MOWING•
•FERTILIZATION•
•WEED CONTROL
PROGRAMS•
•LAWN AERATION•
•FALL CLEANUP•
•MULCHING & MULCH
DELIVERY•
•SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
950 Construction
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
950 Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
950 Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
Place Your Ad Today
Service
AT YOUR
MANUFACTURING OPPORTUNITIES
AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast alumi-
num wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals America,
our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction has helped
us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 23 years of steady
employment. Now, our business is growing again, creating the following new
employment opportunities:
MACHINE REPAIR TECHNICIANS:
To perform installation, troubleshooting, and repair of various machinery and
equipment. Qualifications must include:
• At least three (3) years of multi-trade experience--including industrial
electrical, mechanical, hydraulics/pneumatics, robotics, and PLC’s
• Working knowledge of precision measuring instruments, gauges, test
equipment, and blueprints/schematics
• High school diploma or equivalent and related vocational training
CNC MACHINING SET-UP/OPERATORS:
To perform set-ups, tool changes, and operation of CNC lathes, machining
centers, and robots; Enters and edits machine programs. Qualifications must
include:
• At least one (1) year of related experience in the set-up and operation
of CNC machines
• Working knowledge of precision measuring instruments, gauges to
verify dimensions of finished parts
• High school diploma or equivalent and related vocational training
PRODUCTION OPERATORS:
To perform machine operations, handling, inspection, and testing of products.
Qualifications must include:
• Prior manufacturing, production operator experience
• Commitment to teamwork and continuous improvement
• High school diploma or equivalent
In return for your expertise, AAP offers a competitive salary plus profit-shar-
ing and excellent fringe benefits--including medical, dental, life, vision, and
disability insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company matching,
paid vacation, paid holidays, and more. If you’re looking for a career oppor-
tunity with a growing company, then we want to hear from you. Please send
your qualifications with salary history to:
AAP St. Marys Corporation
1100 McKinley Road
St. Marys, Ohio 45885
Attention: Human Resource-DH
005

Lost & Found
FOUND: BEAGLE on cor-
ner of 5th and Clay Mon-
day, Oct. 10th. Cal l
(419)692-1075.
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
DELPHOS TRADING
POST
We Buy - Sell -
Trade
Anything of
Value
More Value
for
Your Buying $$$
WE BUY
GOLD & SILVER
528 N.
Washington
419.692.0044
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
DANCER LOGISTICS
Services LLC, 900 Gres-
sel Drive, Delphos, Ohio
45833 Truck Dri vers
Needed -Dedicated Lanes
Available -Home Daily
Dedi cated Runs Now
Available -We also need
long haul, regional and
part-time company drivers
-We also welcome Owner
Operators to apply -Great
benefits package and
modern equipment- Quali-
fications are a good MVR,
Class A CDL and two
years OTR experience
- Cal l Shawn at
888-465-6001 ext. 806 for
details or apply in person
10am thru 3pm
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
PART-TIME HELP local
business for retail. Send
replies to Box 159 c/o Del-
phos Herald, 405 N. Main
St., Delphos, OH 45833
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
VISA
MC
DISCOVER
PUBLIC
AUCTION
Every Saturday
at 6pm
Large Variety of
Merchandise
Everyone Welcome
Porter Auction
19326 CO. Rd. 60
Grover Hill, OH
For info call
(419) 587-3770
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
BED: NEW QUEEN
pillow-top mattress set,
can deliver $125. Call
(260)749-6100.
340

Garage Sales
16719 BETWEEEN Rimer
and Vaughnsville on St.
Rt. 189
Thurs., Fri., & Sat.
9am-6pm
Baby to adult clothes. car
sterio, misc. items.
19243 LINCOLN Hwy.
Middle Point
Thurs-Fri, 9am-5pm
Exercise bike, baby swing,
porcelain dolls, Sony sur-
round sound system, port-
able DVD player, CD
player, Dean electric gui-
tar, books, sport cards,
collectibles, Med-2XL la-
dies scrubs, plus size
men’s & women’s clothing,
sports cleats, decorations,
lots of misc.
600

Apts. for Rent
1BR APT for rent, appli-
ances, electric heat, laun-
dry room, No pets.
$400/month, plus deposit,
water included. 320 N.
Jefferson. 419-852-0833.
ONE BDRM Apt., 537 W.
Thi rd St . , Del phos.
$ 3 2 5 / m o . C a l l
4 1 9 - 6 9 2 - 2 1 8 4 o r
419-204-5924
751

Resort & Vac.
Property
SPEND THE winter in
Paradise (Naples, FL).
2 BR, 2 BA condo. For
details (419)692-2709.
800

House For Sale
LAND CONTRACT or
Short term Rent to own
homes. Several available.
Addresses and pictures at
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com.
419-586-8220
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
MEMBER: 912 345 678
RAABE FORD LINCOLN MERCURY DEALER
(800) 589-7876
Owner Advantage is our
way of rewarding you for
bringing your vehicle in for
service. You’re rewarded
for each visit. Membership
is easy – ask your Service
Advisor for details!
Taking care of
your vehicle
has its rewards.
Over 85
years
serving
you!
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Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Prohibit
4 Marble block
8 Now, to Caesar
12 Actress -- Hagen
13 Sound in body
14 Ess molding
15 Home in the woods
(2 wds.)
17 Lumber along
18 Work, as clay
19 Mr. Gretzky
20 Once named
22 Call in sick
23 FBI agent (hyph.)
26 Say uncle
28 Cat’s foot
31 McEntire of music
32 Sturm -- Drang
33 Forty-niner’s quest
34 Moon or planet
35 Livy’s trio
36 La -- tar pits
37 Harpers Ferry st.
38 Envelope abbr.
39 Caboose’s spot
40 Experiment with
41 College stat
43 Main
46 Sibilates
50 Lemon peel
51 Buffet staple (2 wds.)
54 A Guthrie
55 Suggestion
56 Lennon’s wife
57 Horse color
58 Garden hopper
59 Omelet ingredient
DOWN
1 Massiveness
2 Like -- -- of bricks
3 More than fume
4 Cool place
5 Chocolate-colored dog
6 Frazier foe
7 Pa Cartwright
8 Prickly pear
9 Hideous
10 Flashy sign
11 Grant
16 Huge blossom
19 Ingenuity
21 Justice
22 Facilitating
23 Increase
24 Vanna’s boss
25 “Waterloo” group
27 Volt or watt
28 Sponge feature
29 Territory
30 Exhaust
36 Make pigtails
38 Dog’s bark
40 Wyoming range
42 Beseech
43 Movie mogul
44 Ulysses or Superman
45 Cuba, to Castro
47 Moccasin or pump
48 Twinge
49 Urban blight
51 Took the bait
52 Uproar
53 Mauna --
Answer to Puzzle
Allen County
American Township
Federal Home Loan
Mortgage Corp. to Joseph
Sweigart, 500 Sandpiper
St., $34,000.
Tillie A. and Greg T.
Schiffler to Kristen F. and
Micah Sobota, 3917 Bur
Oak Trail, $350,000.
Moolchan M. and
Cynthia Seenarine to Mark
A. and Pauline R. McElroy,
5002 Lobo St., $122,000.
Michelle A. Boedicker
and Sheriff Samuel A.
Crish to U.S. Bank, 1005
Logan, $18,000.
Jamie and Michelle
Modica to Paul E. and
Cynthia A. Webel, 2975
Hanover Drive, $85,000.
City of Delphos
Marilyn M. and
Richard S. Brabant to
Jordan J. Martin, 827 N.
Washington, $62,000.
Melissa Wagoner and
Nicole L. Dray adminis-
tratrix et al. and Sheriff
Samuel A. Crish to Federal
Home Loan Mortgage
Corp., 709 S. Washington,
$1,400.
Village of Elida
Robert A. Szuch trustee
et al. to James P. Harvey,
107 Howard, $95,000.
Martha J. and Ivan
A. Vazquez to Carl D.
Metzger, 205 Sunnydale
St., $70,000.
Marion Township
Jenny S. Decamp trust-
ee et al. to Lawrence E.
and Carol J. Swords trust-
ees et al., 3755 N. Grubb
Road, $72,000.
Ted W. and Laura A.
Brenneman to Matthew
J. and Sarah K. Hemker,
14863 Landeck Road,
$150,000.
Eugene Fischer et al.
to Danile E. and Mary L.
Fischer, North Defiance
Trail, $21,500.
Melvin Fischer et al.
to Eugene and Carolyn
Fischer LLC, Buettner
Road, $130,000.
Jean F. Lucke-Kerns
trustee et al. to Eugene
and Carolyn Fischer LLC,
North Defiance Trail,
$16,000.
Donnie R. Sargent
trustee et al. to Michael J.
and Lori J. Baldauf, 8989
Ridge Road, $71,500.
REAL ESTATE
TRANSFERS
DEAR DOCTOR K: I know
I should drink plenty of water
every day, but sometimes I get
tired of drinking plain water.
So I reach for club soda, seltzer
water or sparkling mineral water.
But I’ve heard that
carbonated drinks
could be bad for
my bones. Is this
true?
D E A R
READER: Several
of my patients
have asked the
same question.
S o m e t i m e s
they are not
asking about
carbonated water,
but carbonated
beverages that contain caffeine
(like colas) and sugar or
sweetener. I’ll tell you what I
tell them.
There is a theory that
phosphoric acid (phosphate),
found in some carbonated
beverages, can interfere with
calcium absorption. But there’s
no good evidence that consuming
a lot of phosphate affects bone
metabolism or bone density.
Researchers have looked at the
effect of carbonated beverages
on bone health in adults. One
study found that non-cola
carbonated drinks (like the
carbonated water drinks you
asked about) were not associated
with low bone density.
Another study compared
two groups of healthy
postmenopausal women. Both
groups drank one quart of either
carbonated or non-carbonated
mineral water per day. After eight
weeks, there was no difference
in bone turnover between the
two groups. So I don’t put
much stock in the theory that
carbonated water weakens your
bones.
On the other hand, in the
same study I just talked about,
women who drank cola had
lower hip bone density. The
more cola a woman drank, the
lower her bone mineral density
(BMD). Some scientists suspect
that the caffeine in cola may
have a harmful effect on BMD,
but there’s no proof of that.
So the good news is that
drinking carbonated water
doesn’t appear to be bad for
your bones. On the other hand,
don’t overdo the caffeinated
beverages, carbonated or not.
And make sure that carbonated
water isn’t taking the place of
other healthy beverages in your
diet, such as calcium-rich, low-
fat milk.
Finally, in talking about
the carbonation in carbonated
beverages, let’s not forget about
the real culprit that makes some
types of carbonated beverages
unhealthy: sugar.
A few years ago a patient of
mine asked me if the carbonation
in the 10 cans of cola she drank
a day was bad for her bones. I
told her that the carbonation in
colas might be a problem for her
bones, but that was the least of
her problems with colas. The
sugar in all those colas was a
definite problem for her whole
body. The weight gain associated
with sugary sodas puts a big
strain on the heart, blood vessels
and joints.
So my advice is to feel
free to enjoy carbonated water
without worrying. However, I
reserve the right to change my
mind, when and if new evidence
emerges. And if it does, I’ll let
you know.
Dr. Komaroff is a physician
and professor at Harvard Medical
School. Go to his website to send
questions and get additional
information: www.AskDoctorK.
com.
COPYRIGHT 2011 THE
PRESIDENT AND FELLOWS OF
HARVARD COLLEGE
DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL
UCLICK FOR UFS
1130 Walnut, Kansas City, Mo.
64106
Ask
Dr. K.
DR. ANTHONY KOMAROFF M.D.
Do carbonated beverages
harm your bones?
Go anywhere with a
newspaper.
Newspapers provide
a daily source of
information from
around the globe.
The Delphos Herald
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Thursday, October 13, 2011 The Herald – 9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Feuds can be
their own beast
Dear Annie: Two of my
married children have been
in a feud for more than three
years. It started with com-
ments made about one of
their children and has accel-
erated to the point where one
won’t attend a family func-
tion if the other is there. Now
it is spreading to my other
children, who refuse to be in
the same room with feuding
people. It breaks my heart.
My husband and I arranged
a family dinner where we
suggested every-
one simply forgive
each other, but it
didn’t work. We
have written let-
ters and talked to
our children indi-
vidually. We even
postponed our
family reunion
because so many
of them weren’t
going to attend
and I couldn’t
handle it myself.
I do not know what to
do and would appreciate any
suggestions. -- Nameless
Dear Nameless: What a
shame that your children
cannot appreciate their sib-
ling relationships enough to
put this aside. Unfortunately,
such feuds can take on a life
of their own, making rec-
onciliation harder as time
passes. Everyone loses.
Ask if any of the children
would agree to seek family
counseling with you. Those
who are willing could ben-
efit, and it will help you
develop better coping skills.
Continue to see your chil-
dren individually, and occa-
sionally remind them of the
good times they had togeth-
er when they were younger.
Regretfully, there is only so
much you can do in such a
situation.
Dear Annie: A few years
back, my father, “Peter,” died
after a long and awful illness.
Within a year of his death,
my best friend decided to
adopt a dog. She told me she
was naming the dog after a
character in one of her favor-
ite TV shows, “Peter.”
I was surprised by her
choice, especially since it’s
not a common name for a pet.
It apparently didn’t occur to
her that it might make me
uncomfortable. At the time,
I didn’t say anything, fearing
it would seem self-involved
and overly sensitive of me.
However, when my mother
heard about the dog’s name,
she was quite offended. My
brother was also not happy
about a dog sharing a name
with a beloved family mem-
ber so soon after his death.
I find that I still resent my
friend’s choice. Too much
time has passed for me to say
anything now, but I am won-
dering whether we are right to
be unhappy about this. Was it
inappropriate for my friend to
give her dog the same name
as my recently deceased
father? Or is this OK since
she claims to be naming it
after a completely different
person? -- Confused
Dear Confused: Did your
friend address your father by
his first name? If not, the con-
nection may not have been as
obvious to her as it was to
you. Or you could choose to
believe that she was trying
to honor your dad. And of
course, it’s equally possible
that she is simply obtuse and
insensitive. People can name
their pets what they wish,
and you can’t help
how you feel about
it. However, since
this still bothers
you after so many
years, you may as
well mention how
much it upset you.
We suspect she
hasn’t a clue.
Dear Annie:
This is for
“Lonesome,” the
woman who joins
groups and does
volunteer work, but doesn’t
find any lasting friendships.
It may not be her.
I have joined my share of
groups and have found that
many people simply are liv-
ing in their own little world
comprised of their family and
immediate circle of friends.
They feel no desire to add
anyone else.
It can be hard to make
friends with people whose
lives are often filled with
long commutes and work
hours, day care, after-school
activities, caring for aging
family members, etc. All you
can do is keep trying. Things
are not the way they used to
be 20 years ago. -- Not in My
Own Little World
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie’s Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777
W. Century Blvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
FRIDAY, OCT. 14, 2011
Both a little bit of chance and a
lot of Lady Luck
are likely to play
prominent roles in
your personal affairs
during coming
months. Although
both factors will
make your life easier, one particular
event will be especially outstanding.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Don’t waste your time dealing with
a subordinate instead of the head
honcho, because you must know
you’re not going to get anywhere. Go
directly to the head of the class.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
Once you have thought an important
decision through, act in accordance
with the way you have reasoned
things out. Don’t yield to an impulsive
reaction.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- An imaginative product of your
ingenuity may actually have profitable
possibilities. If you follow your plans,
you have a chance for good results.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Two separate situations in which
you’re involved might have a chance
of fusing together very nicely. It’ll be
to your advantage to tie them together
to see what you can do.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Both your instincts and logic will
be operating at full force, so see if you
can link them together in order to more
greatly enhance your possibilities for
success.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- There is a strong possibility that a
chance remark made by someone who
works in a place where big things are
happening will put you onto something
substantial. Keep your ears open.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
If you’re doing reasonably well with
your work and seem to be on a roll,
don’t be too eager to call it a day. Get
things done while everything is going
your way.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Don’t count your social involvements
as wasted hours. You need some
interaction with fun people as a break
from the harshness of the working
world. Make time for them, because
they’ll lift your spirits.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- Play it cool for best results. Don’t
disclose the hand you’re holding until
your counterpart reveals his or hers.
Chances are you’ll be the one who is
holding a trump.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- It
might fall to you to mediate a sticky
situation between two close friends.
Don’t back off from this unwanted
responsibility if you know you can
resolve things.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Don’t
delay going after an important
objective if you believe the favorable
conditions you’re now experiencing
may only be temporary. Strike while
the iron is smoking.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If
you think you have a solution that
would resolve a misunderstanding
between two close friends, speak up.
It’s important you do so while both
parties are in a forgiving mood.
COPYRIGHT 2011 UNITED FEATURE
SYNDICATE, INC.
2
10 – The Herald Thursday, October 13, 2011
www.delphosherald.

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