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The Graeco-Roman museum, Arabic version

The Graeco-Roman museum, Arabic version

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Published by Mohamed Mansour

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Published by: Mohamed Mansour on Oct 14, 2011
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}-2 Coptic ejlr!h~nware and architectural Jewelry 4 Textiles 5 Coptic stucco 6 Serapis adoration 7·8 Egyptian Monume ••ts

elements

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9 Crocodile Temple

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11 Greek Egyptian Art

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12-17 s.,ulpture

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of pottery jNlI~-

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18a. EI Tanagra

18'19 Department

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10 11 12

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21994: A "laster mask Late period of Nero

for

11

delicate

woman.

21994 : MaS(IUe en pliHrc d'une

dame de

FEp()(IUC de l'Empereur

Neron

7380 : A plaster mask for an Asian lady. Firs! quarter of 2m! Century A.n. 7380 ; MaS{IIlC de !,HHre d'une dame asiatique, 2icmc siecle de notre ere

.:r
7384 : A plaster musk for half of 2nd Century A.n.
II

J)~I ~

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.

~w. ,~

.rJ.-I .:r tW VV''' t u;~'l\,,\1 JWI .;,)ill

young lady. First

7384 : MnS(IUe en plarre d'une .iCIIIIC dame, 2clllc siecle de notre ere

\Wi

21634 : A plaster period of Nero

mask for

II

Roman

Indy. The

21634 : MaS(IIiC en IJlfltrc d'une dame romaine de I'Epo<IIIC de I'Empereur Neron

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21736 : A piece of II coloured 1II0SlIic, represnling II Indy with a hat ill the shape of a sl~l) front

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2173(j : Piece coloree en Mosaique representant unc dame portant lin chapeau en forme de bateau

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--.il:J..1

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21729: Piece coloree en mosaique representant WI(' dame portant un chapeau SOliS forme de p r () II C

21739 : A piece of a coloured mosaic, representing a lady with a hal ill the sh!IIJC of II ship 1'1'O1l1

"J~~ Jp.1
7311 : A mummy fro III the Roman period, Over the 1II1l11111lY'S face is placed II (minted portrait of the deceased.Trom Fayoum - the second

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7311 ; Momic d'epoque romaine avec le visage reconvert d'un portrait £III defunt ( Trouve II Fayoum )

Century A.D.

.wi

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.l",:ll ;",l:.", J ~,JI 24201 : A gilded silver cup decorated Dionysos, god of wine with

cJ,ls- '( t r • , c!' ;i,.wJ _rJ-1

2il201 : Gobe!cl ell argent orne d'une represenration de Dionysios dieu du vin

22902 : A bronze head representing the Roman emperor Hadrian

229()2 : Tete en Bronze rpresentant Hadrien

24042 : SHverlors{)

of AIJllwdiie

( Venus )

24042 : Terse de Venus en Argent

3795 : The upper half of Cupid the god or lovewinged lind in the Iorm of II sleeping child.

3795 : Buste d'Eros ( Cupidon ) aile SOliS forme
d'enf'ant dormant

3402 : A marble head representing tile great

Alexander

34()2 : TNe Grand

ell

marbre representant

Alexandre

le

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25773 : A chis! statuette of the goddess IsisDemeter, wearing the crown of Hathor and holding a cornueopla ill her lett hand. Her lower half is that of a serpent

25773 : Une Statuette en shistc de 111 deesse IsisDemeter portant sur In tete hi couronue de Bathol' et tenant dans III main gauche la corne d'ubondunce .. Le tronc est CII forme de Serpent

3243 : A while marble iue:ul representingJulius Caesar

3243 :Tctc en marbre representant

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-

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3961 : Flacon en verre Polychrome 3962 . Flacon en
Vl~ITC

)_,6.I1 .biJ.. wfol t~}I

1.1' 'W!

n'\

Y

Polychrome

3961 : A coloured 3962 : A coloured

glass vessel, {rom Rhodes glass vessel, from Rhodes

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0y.JL.,,11

~,Js; ~I 15564 : Statuette of a standing hat, and wearing a himatton 21837 : Statuette of a standing with large conical hut woman with, 11

4>J~:l...,i

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nAry Cllfl

4lA;

young woman

Ull

15564 : Statuette d'unc femme debout chapeau et hahillee d'un himation 21837 : Statuette d'une un chapeau conique femme debout

portant portant

0}1I

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9043 : Statuette of ~~ woman wearing a himation 90Sl ; Statuette of II standing young woman wearing himation coloured in pink and blue 9043 : Statuette d'une femme Habillee d'himalion

90Sl : Statuette d'UIH! [eune fcmllle debout hahillee d'himatlon coloree de rose et de bien

: SI.llillwil,c
ORC

harp

il426 :

26(116: A rated with

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27029 : ./\ coloured piece of a tomb from Wardian representing a countryside scene

El of

two cows

1I11d II

wheel

27029: A part of 11 tomb from representing a coloured countryside

el-Wardian scene

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decorated with of Creek mythology ( the marriage of Ariadne, daughter of tine king 01 Crete with DioIlYS()S, god of
SllI'COHIIH~gIlS,

17927 : A marble

1I relief representing

II talefrorn

wine

17927 : Sarcophage eli marbre blanc d(,corc en relic!' de scencs Mytologlques ( le manage d ' Ariune Iille <Ill roi de Crete) avec Dionvsios dieu du vin

~~

r~

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3951 : A bath of well polished black basalt, which was probably used afterwards as S!lJ'COphag. The yare decorted with 1I lion's head 011 the sides

3951 : UN balgnoire en busalte noir employe l'OIllIlIC sarcophage. SII Surface laterule est cst decoree des tete de lions

: .A marble panel silowilng Saint [\ltemns, ill relief', sllmdillg between ilis two camels

22237 : Panneau ell marlin' presentant SantMemls debout entre deux Charneaux

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14145 : A limestone panel, in high relief .showing two women silting ill the shade of a big tree between them is 1I basket full of fruit

14145 : Panneau representant deux Iemmesn
nues assises
II

t'omhre

dun

grand arbre

appuyees

Sill'

un panier de fruits

13298 : A

ivory represeuting relief

il

man and

a

WOIWIIUI ill

13398 : A piece of iwory representing relief

Satyr ill

13298 : Piece ell ivoire representant ct line femme ell relief 13398 : Piece en ivoire representant en rclief'e

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homme

un Satyre

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23352 : A wood statue of Serapis, Roman epoch, Fayoum

from the

23352 : Statile ell marble de Serapls.

Periode

Romaine

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3275 : A marble oval faced crowned head, Believed to be of Berienice II , wife of Ptolemy III

3275 : Tete en marble d'une figure ovule couronnee dite de Berinlce II Epouse de Ptolemee III

u'J.y"

,u~ ,Jyc"''''

):,iJ I

3936 : AImarble colossal statue of an eagle in I'CjJOSC, it is of fine workmanship, from the ptolemaic period

3936 : Une statue colossaie ell marbre representant un aiglc ell I'CIIOS ( 1EllOIJUe Ptolemaique )

]4)Il6,!j : Two sHver eoins

IJ[Il wlnid!

A!e)ullld~w

i!!~il!if~'il i!l 1'~lfDW~:O/<ffllt'J!ll
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<ell I!lt!l1Pl1i

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: VIQJ,\,

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the

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oml (me filee, ~mll pi!mp 011

IIII? other
251HiII: Pike de mmlllll!lloe en or ilJiq1ll1 All!!mlIuulre Ie Grilli! esi rCllrc!!elllle sur I'une des fl!!ces Jet

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de mOillllaAe

ell

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M'loleme iv

15304 : A goM coln lin which Ptolemy

IV is

2530~: iP'iike de monnele rl()U~me Il
.5§.,,')J

en or rellr~!lhll!1l1

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150 III : Piece de monnale ~'lol.ell1lll~ ~I AIr!;!liO

til

or reIP11"li\smmbIlHI¢

254121 : Il"i.oc~ IliIf monnale Jusino

en or wellw~llll!mi

500 autres en alluminiurn dans quelques lucarnes du Musee, Developpement du reseau electrique : 1° Changement de tout Ie reseau electrique et etablissement d'un eclairage indirect. 2° Montage d'un reseau d'alarme automatique contre l'incendie. 30 Installation d'un reseau de television pour Ie controle des objets exposes dans toutes les salles ainsi que Ie contrele des entrees principales. 4° Installation d'un reseau de radiodiffusion dans toutes les salles afin de pouvoir diffuser une musique Iegere et donner des instructions et des informations. Installation d'un peste de Video et de television pour presenter des films culturels et touristiques sur les monuments du Musee,

Restauration de J'entree generaie : 1° Restauration des jardins situes des deux cOtesde l'entree 2° Restauration de I'entree principale. 3 Preparation des salons reserves aux grands visiteurs et installation d'un parterre decore de dessins a l'entree, 4° Arnenagement d'ouverture a l'entree pour donner plus d'espace aux groupes touristiques. So Le bureau de police sera transfere a la place de l'entree annexe. 6° Le Musee fut muni d'un atelier pour la restauration, d'un autre atelier pour menuiserie, d'une cafeteria, d'un coin pour la vente des souvenirs, des moulages et des publications de I'Organisation des Antiquites.
0

Musee et d' Alexandrie, avec des illustrations permettra de donner plus de renseignement sur I'epoque greco-romaine, RESTAURATION PRECISE

Des equipes competentes de restauration de I'Organisation des Antiquites ont examine les vestiges archeologiques qui ont besoin d'etre restaures ou bien simplement consolides ou bien preserves de I'humidite. Les collections telles que les tissus, les pierres, le marbre, les terre-cuite, les meraux, le verre etc ... ont ete bien servies, chacune selon sa matiere, de la meme maniere que dans les autres Musees qui ont subi des restaurations. Ces travaux de restauration ont concerne, non seulement les vestiges exposes, mais encore ceux qui sont dans'les magasins pour depot. Les restaurations s'occuperent de preserver les monuments du danger de l'hurnidite des murs en les separant par une couche impermeable. RESTAURATION ARCHITECTURALE En ce qui concerne la restauration architecturale : Tous les parterres formes de dalles en pierre calcaire ont ete changes en d'autres parterres en marbre blanc; surface totale: 2500 m", y compris la couverture des bases de statue et

l'entree,
2° Decapage de la peinture sur les murs et nouvelle peinture des parois interieures et exterieures dont la surface est 12000 m? ; peinture d'une surface de 1()()()() comprenant m' l'exterieur et l'interieur des salles. Installation de 120 nouvelles vi trines convenables. Changement des fenetres et installation de

3° 4°

pour Ia grande collection de numismatique que possede Ie Musee, Ces pieces de monnaie remontent a l'epoque qui precede I' ere d' Alexandre le Grand, ainsi qu'a I'epoque ptolemaique et l'epoque romaine et byzantine. Le Musee possede encore une grande collection de pieces de monnaie remontant Ii l'epoque musulmane. En ce-qui concerne Ie jardin: les pieces archeologiques qui l'encombraient, ont ete transferees aux sites archeologiques d' A1exandrie, ou quelques unes ont ete exposees et les autres emmagasinees dans les depets. Le jardin contient a present, des sarcophages decores de guirlandes portees par les dieux; la Meduse est egalement representee pour preserver le tombeau des voleurs. Ces sarcophages remontent a l'epoque romaine. D'apres la Mythologie grecque, la Meduse transformait en pierre quiconque la regardait. D'autres statues d'importance speciale, sont encore exposees telles que la statue de Marc Antoine.
Le jardin va etre bien garni de verdure et de fleurs; l'atelier de menuiserie, le petit magasin pour depOt vont etre demolis et remplaces par une cafeteria et un coin pour la vente des souvenirs et des photographies des monuments archeologiques. II n'y a pas de doute que Ie Musee a un rOle, a la fois culturel et educatif sur les etudiants et les concitoyens en general. Des moyens audio-visuels seront mis a la disposition des visteurs; des fiches d'explications dans les trois langues, arabe, anglais et francais, accompagneront chaque vestige. Un petit guide du

influence sur l'histoire de l'Egypte et d' Alexandrie en particulier, comme Alexandre le Grand, Ptolemee IV, Cleopatre VII, Ptolemee V, Jules Cesar, qui, a son arrivee en Egypte, Rome prit le pouvoir, Des sculptures greco-romaines de toute parts d'Egypte, sont egalement exposees. 3
D )

40)

Une evolution a ete faite a cette section pour montrer quelques points de vue artistique de l'art des terre-cuites et du verre. Une nouvelle collection de vases en faience a ete exposee; ces vases sont connus sous le nom de vases reines, remontant a l'epoque ptolemaique, Les vases en terre cuite sont arranges dans l'ordre chronologique de sorte que le visiteur et l'etudiant en particulier puissent suivre les differentes etapes de l'histoire; les statuettes en terre-cuite representant les differents dieux connus durant l'epoque greco-romaine et ont ete influences par les dieux egyptiens et la civilisation de I'Ancienne Egypte. L~etude de la collection des lampes, remontant a l'epoque ptolemaique et a l'epoque romaine a pris une grande importance. La salle XXII a ete reservee pour I'exposition des fragments de verre. L'exposition revele l'evolution de la fabrication du verre qui fut une des plus renommees de l'Ancienne Alexandrie. Cette derniere exportait le verre fabrique a Rome et aux pays de la Mediterranee durant l'epoque hellenestique. Cabinet de Numlsmatlque Le nouveau plan de l'edifice fut concu de facon a permettre aUKvisiteurs une circulation facile et a creer une branche complete

Section des Terre-Cultes

2°")

Vue I'importance de cette religion, il etait done necessaire d'exposer encore, dans cette Salle, les dieux egyptiens, tels que: Isis et Harpocrate qui exercerent une grande influence sur cette epoque. Une collection de monuments egyptiens est encore exposee; tels que les statuettes en bronze, les momies pharaoniques, les statues en granit et en basalte, cedees au Musee, soit par les donnateurs, soit par les trouvailles et les fouilles accomplies par Ie Departement des Antiquites a Aboukir; des monuments du Fayoum refletant I'influence de l'art egyptien sur l'art architectural des prolemees; un exemple : Ie Temple du Crocodile. trouve a Theadelphie (actuellement Batn Herit) qui fut transfere au Musee et qui pour sa grandeur, fut expose dans le jardin. Section des Sculptures ( Salles onze a salle 17 ) Une grande collection de steles funeraires de l'epoque greco-romaine et dont quelques une forment les specimens les plus interessants de I'influence de Part egyptien sur Part grec d'abord, et ensuite sur l'art romain. Certaines reproduisent.des scenes egyptiennes avec inscriptions g recques et vice-versa. L'exposition de ces steles a ete faite commeil se doit permettant une bonne conservation : securite absolue contre I'humidite des murs de la salle. Ce travail a ete accompli par le personnel competent des restaurateurs de I'Organisation des Antiquites, aides par de jeunes etudlants d'Universites et d'Instituts. Les Salles 12 a 14 sont reservees pour les sculptures grecques et romaines : des tetes de rois egyptiens de l'epoque ptolemaique, des empereurs romains qui ont exerce une

La visite commencant par la salle VI se termine Ii l'entree generale, sans difficulte, suivant l'ordre topographique et l'ordre chronologique des monuments exposes. L'Organisation des antiquites a entrepris la restauration du bll timent et la reunion de l'aile occidentale avec l'aile orientale de l'ediflce, permettent ainsi une circulation facile au public: l'entree par la gauche du vestibule et la sortie par la droite et ne pas obliger les visiteurs Ii revenir sur leurs pas; cela etant Ie point essentiel des travaux de restauration. Etapes du d~veloppement du Musee

L'evolution concerna non seulement Ie batiment, mais encore la facon de l'exposition des pieces archeologiques suivant l'ordre chronologique. Ainsi les salles furent arrangees nologique: par ordre chro-

1° )

Introductions" la civUisation d' Alexandrie La Salle No. 6 reflete l'histoire d' Alexandrie, fondee par Alexandre Ie Grand et dont Ia statue occupe la principale place du Musee ; des tableaux en ceramique de l'Ancienne Alexandrievrepresentee sous forme de femme. Pour unir les egyptiens et Ies grecs, un culte fut cree par Ies ptolemees a Alexandrie, Ce culte etait represente par le boeuf Apis, chez les egyptiens et par le dieu Zeus, Ie principal dieu des grecs, chez les ptolemees, Cette nouvelle religion fut connue, par Ies deux peuples, sous Ie nom de culte de Serapls qui se propagea tout Ie long de la Mediterranee.

Date de la fond.tlon du Musee Greco·Romain L'idee de la fondation d'un musee a A1exandrie naquit en 1891 environ et eela pour conserver les vestiges disperses, un peu partout, en collections privees, par exemple celle de Jean Antoniadis.
Le Musee fut d'abord fonde en 1893; it occupait en ce temps la, un petit bAtiment a 1a rue Rosette ( Actuellement Avenue El-Horreya ).

Mais bientOt ce local se trouva insuffisant, de telle sorte que la Municipalite decida de construire un edifice. En 1895, Ie nouveau siege, contenant onze salles, fut inaugure ( le bAtiment aetuel ).
Le plan du

Musee fut execute par Dietrich et

Stenon, L'ouverture du Musee a ete faite par Ie Khedive Abbas Helrni II, Ie 26 Septembre 1895. Comme c'etait a prevoir, I'activite archeologique et les nombreuses fouilles amenerent la construction de nouvelles salles; c'est alors que la Municipalite d' Alexandrie augmenta le nombre de salles qui devint 23.

a

L'Organisation des Antiquites s'occ upa toujours, au cours des annees, du Musee, quant a la restauration et a l'evolution de l'exposition. Le plan du Musee n'etant pas semblable a celui des autres Musees universels, Ie visiteur trouvait des difficuites au cours de sa visite. L'essentiel du travail de restauration entre pris par l'Organisation des Antiquites fut que Ie Musee reponde, dans ses lignes generales, au schema . suivi dans les autres Musees.

ELECTRICAL NETWORK RENOVATION 1Changing & improving the lighting network and making it indirect lighting. Installation of a fire alarm network. 2Installation of T.V. earners for the security 3of all the halls and the main entries. 4- Installation of an acoustic broadcasting network for transmitting any orders or information as well as light music in all the halls. 5Installation of a video and coloured T. V. sets for showing cultural and touristic films showing all the monuments of the museum. RENOVATION OF THE MAIN ENTRANCE: IThe gardens on either side of the entrance have been renovated. 2The main entrance has been renovated to fit the touristic position of the museum. 3Rooms were furnished for official visitors; the pillars were veneered; the floor of the entrance was constructed with -ornamentation of Greek style. 4Two openings were made in the entrance in order to widen it to receive the delegations of tourists. 5The police office was removed from the main entrance and has been established beside the subsidiary one to be far from the touristic tours. 6Essential servicessuch as : A laboratory for restoration. A small carpentery workshop. A cafeteria and a gift shop selling booklets printed by the Egyptian Antiquities Organization, have been added to the museum.

languages to give a total idea about the museum contents provided with photos. The restoration teams of the organization specialized in the museulogical restoration examined the monumental objects which require restoration. They also put the strengthening and insolating materials on those requiring no restoration, this has been done to all monuments of different kinds such as textiles stones, marbles. pottery. metals and glass etc. Works of restoration are also extended to stored monuments although the original plan was to release as many objects as possible. It is worthy of note that the stone pieces have been isolated by a distance from the walls lest dampness should reach them as it was used wrongly before.
I

FINE RESTORATION:

ARCHITECTURAL ~TORATION

:

In the field of architectural restoration the following deeds have been achieved. All concrete floors. cement and mosaic tiles have been removed and replaced with Karllra (white Marble) an area of about 2S00 2 m. in addition to veneering all statue bases and the main entrance.
SECOND: FIRST:

The old wall plaster was removed and new plastering has been made to all the facades and the interior walls. It is an area of 1200()2 m. An area of about 100001m. including the external parts and the interior halls were also painted.
THIRD:

. 120 new show cases have been constructed keeping pace with the modern ways.
FOURTH:

The windows were changed and SOO windows of aluminium have been constructed. The museum, then, has got back its appropriate appearance.

glass models museulogically to show the improvement of glass manufacture famous in Alexandria which was one of the first cities to export its productions to Rome and other states of the mediterranean in the Hellenistic epoch. FOURTH: Coin section: With the new planning of the museum and the modification of the southern section which completed the visitors Tour, the Organization of Antiquities thought of making the new hall a complete museum of the coins. Owned by the museum, this collection of coins represents a period before Alexndria, the Ptolemaic, the Roman, and the Bizantine periods. Moreover, the museum possesses a large collection of Islamic coins. The monumental objects accumulated in the garden of. the museum were moved to the archaeological sites around Alexandria. The sound examples have been exhibited and the unsound ones have been stored. Now the garden contains monumental sarcophagi dated to the Roman period. These sarcophagi decorated with pink girlands were carried by gods or heroes. The Medusa head was sculptured on the sides of these sarcophagi to protect the tombs from the thieves. According to the Greek myth the medusa turns anyone looking at her into stone. Other statues . of famous persons like Antonyo are also present. The garden will also be rearranged. It was agreed upon removing the rooms occupied by carpentery workshop and a small magazine and redesigning them to be a simple cafeteria and a shop for gifts and postcards for visitors . For the fields of culture and education, the Egyptian Antiquities Organization has provided the museum with acoustic and optic means. Explanatory labels were also reprinted in Arabic, English and Frensh to explain every monument, as well as printing pamphilets and booklets in the same

SECOND: Sculpture section (halls 11-17) exhibits grave stones representing original Greek art, and some pieces show the influence between the two arts Egyptian and Greek, then followed by original Roman art affected by the old Egyptian one. These are exhibited in a modern manner after insolating them from the walls to prevent humidity under the supervision of the restorers of the Organization of Antiquities with the aid of the university students. For the Roman and Greek sculpture art (halls 12-14) are devoted to exhibit portraits representing the Kings of Egypt from the Ptolemaic epoch and also emperors of Roman time which had the influence on the Egyptian and the Alexandrian history. Most famous of all, are Alexander and Ptolemy IV, Cleopatra VII, Ptolemy V, and also Julius Caesar, whose coming started a change and path over the authority to Rome and to his successors. There is also a show of the Greek and the Roman sculpture works from different parts of Egypt. THIRD : Pottery section : This section has been rearranged to show some of the artistic views of pottery and glass whereas a new collection, of pottery for vessels known as the "Vessels of Queens" which are dated back to the Ptolemaic epoch, has been exhibited for the first time. Besides that, the pottery has been rearranged and classified in a chronological sequence to help the visitors and specially the reseachers in following the different historical stages, in addition to a collection of earthenware statuettes representing the different Gods known. through the Graeco-Roman period affected by the ancient Egyptian art. For the first time, the exhibition and development of the Graeco-Roman oil lamps have been concentrated on. Hall No. 22 has been devoted to show

ELEMENTS OF RENOVATION The renovation works of the museum were not only confined to the structure artistic works but also included the ways of exhibition, as the monuments of different periods were mixed together in some halls. Therefore the exhibition was arranged in the halls according to the chronological sequence and development. That can be summerized as follows : FIRST: Introduction to the history of Alexandria hall No.6 which reflects the history of Alexandria built by Alexander the great, this appears in all the objects shown in it. Boards of mosaic representing the old city of Alexandria in the shape of a woman were also shown. As the new religion inspired by the ptolemies in the city of Alexandria played a major role in bringing the Greek and Egyptian cultures together and which was presented to the Egyptian in the form of Apis the bull and to the Greek in the form Zeus the God of" Gods known by the name of cult "Serapis", This new religion spread in the Mediterranean. And to complete the exhibition it was necessary to provide the hall with old Egyptian Gods which affected and were affected by this epoch-such as Isis and her son Harpocrates. The exhibition of the old Egyptian monuments continued in general-such as bronze statues and mummies of the Pharaonic epoch and some statues of granite and basalt which were gifts received or supplied by the excavation in "Abu Kif", Fayium and others to the museum. The influence of the Egyptian art on the Ptolemaic art was revealed 0\'1 their . architecture-such as the temple of crocodile found in Thiadelphia known at present as "Batn Hereit" and removed to the museum and put in its garden.

THE FOUNDATION

or THE

MUSEUM

a museum in the City of Alexandria came into being in the year of 1891, and this to store a few private collections donated by several cultured citizens of the city, such

The thought of constructing

as John Antoniadis.
At first the museum was founded in Rue Rosette ( EI Horya Now ) in 1893. It consisted of five rooms only, Later on it became necessary to have a proper

place for the museum, Dietrich and Stienon constructed it in 1985 and EI-Khedive Abbas Helmy II inaugurated it. It consisted of eleven Halls.

Due to the increase of the Archaeological excavation and research the need to increase the number of exhibtion halls arose to comply these new foundings. Accordingly the governorate of Alexandria increased the number of exhibition halls to 23.at present.
I

The Egyptian Antiquities Organization put into mind the total renovation of the museum to achieve the modern way of exhibition; this to correct the late state as the cirulation of tours through the museum •• was not exsisting. Presently the museum Achieved its proper state and can boast a chronological circulating tour through its halls, and this starting at hall No.6 and ending at the main entrance. The foundation stone in the renovation was to come to the mentioned uninterrupted circulation which was achieved by renovating the building connecting it with the museum's body from both East and west sides, complying to the starting and finishing points,

Designed & Executed by : Amal M; SafwatEI.Alfy Printed by : Egyptian Antiquities Organization Press.

MINISTRY OF CULTURE

EGYPTIAN ANTIQUITIES ORGANIZATION

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