Problem Overview

Problem Title: Garden Kit Course: Algebra 1 Author(s): Michelle Sweeny

Problem Gardiner’s Garden Supplies is creating a new garden fencing kit for their catalog. It will have a 4 foot gate on two sides of the garden. On each of the other two sides there will be a 2 foot decorative element panel. The remainder of the kit will be eight fencing sections of equal length. If the kit is intended for a 250 square foot garden, how long should those pieces of fencing be?

Standards/Big Ideas Addressed

Students graph and solve quadratic functions e) Solve quadratic equations using the quadratic formula f) Apply quadratic equations to physical problems
Likely units/big ideas that came before this problem
Multiplication of binomials (FOIL, lattice, distributive property) Solving linear equations Sketching graphs of functions (linear, quadratic, exponential, absolute value) Quadratic expressions, equations, functions. Standard format for a quadratic equation.

Likely units/big ideas that come after this problem
Solving quadratic equations using completing the square. Graphing quadratic equations.

Assumptions about Student Prior Knowledge
Students will be able to: Solve linear equations Write an expression for a physical Write an expression for the area of a rectangle Identify a quadratic equation

Phase

Facilitation Notes Anticipated Student Notes/tips – including time for

Assessment

Action Roll out (k/ntk/next steps)
In groups of 2 or 3 students look at problem and make a know/need to know list. Projected Know/Need to Know Know: 250 square foot garden 2 gates, 4 foot each 2 decorative sections, 2 foot each Eight equal length pieces Need to know: How long should the eight pieces be? What should the length and width of the garden be? Projected Next steps: Write expressions for the length and width of the garden Try different lengths and widths that create an area of 250 square feet

phase
1. Get students into groups of 2 or 3. 2. Provide problem. Give students 5 – 10 minutes to read problem and record knows/need to knows. 3. Read problem aloud as a class. 4. Share out and record knows/need to knows. (5 min.) Notes on K/NTK: Students might want to look at perimeter to try to solve the problem. You may want to insert a discussion about perimeter and area. 5. Give students 5 – 10 min. to come up with next steps. Go to each team and discuss next steps. Make sure each group has at least one next step. 6. Share out of next steps. (5 min) Journal - Knows/Need to Knows or Next Steps Can be assessed for critical thinking or information literacy.

Student work time

Begin next steps, brainstorm strategies Share strategies. Write an equation for the area of the garden Determine a strategy and begin to solve problem.

1. Let students begin attempting to solve problem; it should require only 5 minutes. Circulate around to get a feel. Give hints to teams that need it or facilitate a class discussion as necessary. 2. When the groups have made some progress, or some are just stuck, then ask for a volunteer to briefly explain the group’s strategy. Ask for at least one other group to come up as well, so that the class can see a variety of approaches. Students should be able to write expressions for the length and width of the garden and write an equation for the area of the garden. Students may at first write an equation with length and width as variables. Facilitate class discussion so students realize that there is only one variable. (5 – 10 min, depending on how much teams are struggling) 3. Continue work time. (5 – 15 min) This is a good place for a review workshop on multiplying binomials/polynomials. All teams should be able to multiply the

Assess collaboration through observation.

Sharing out

Each team shares out their progress and where they are in the problem. Students should have new need to knows. NTK: How do I solve this equation for x?

Work time*

Propose solution methods, graphing, trial and error, etc.

binomials and come up with a quadratic equation that needs to be solved. Circulate around to get a feel. Give hints to teams that need it or facilitate a class discussion as necessary. Ask for a volunteer team to show their work so far and why they have a new need to know. Have class participate in likes and wonders for their work. Each team should leave the share out with a quadratic equation to solve. The equation will need to be put into ax2+bx+c =0 format. The teacher should judge whether direct instruction is needed here or if student work time here is more appropriate. 1. Let students begin attempting to solve problem; it should require only 5 minutes. Circulate around to get a feel. Give hints to teams that need it or facilitate a class discussion as necessary. 2. When the groups have made some progress, or some are just stuck, then ask for a volunteer to briefly explain the group’s strategy. Ask for at least one other group to come up as well, so that the class can see a variety of approaches. Students’ approaches will depend on the extent of previous exposure to quadratics. Some options: graph the equation, trial and error. (5 – 10 min, depending on how much teams are struggling) Workshop on solving quadratic equations using quadratic formula.

Informal assessment of students’ ability to multiply binomials to create a quadratic equation.

Assess collaboration through observation.

Direct instruction * (this can occur at different times, as long as students work on the problem first) Work time*

Taking notes, participating in classwork and class discussions.

Self direction assessment for completion of classwork. Informal assessment of students’ ability to use the quadratic formula. Assess collaboration through observation.

Work on final solution to the problem.

Final Action on Problem

Students participate in a class discussion to come to consensus about the advantages of each strategy.

Circulate around while students are working on final solution. Offer hints and support as necessary. Make a class chart of the answers and justifying reasons. Ask clarifying questions as necessary. (5 min per team)Have teams come to a consensus about the advantages of each strategy (“I likes” and “I wonders” are a good way to get at

Collaboration assessment for participation in class discussion.

this, with an open discussion afterwards). (15 min) Provide direct instruction/corrective direction if necessary.

*These are typically optional, depending upon the nature/quality of the initial sharing out of students.

Extension

Follow Up Solving simpler quadratic problems using square roots: 1. The area of a square garden is 1600 m2. How much fencing do you need to fence in the entire perimeter of the garden?

2. A particular reflective material can produce 100 W/sq ft of aperture area in a parabolic dish solar cooker. What would the radius of the dish need to be to generate 600 Watts of energy?

√ k2 = 49 x2 + 16 = 0 x2 – 9 = 0 4r2 = 25 b2 +3b – 4 = 0 n2 = 6n 2c2 7c = 5 2x2 + 5x + 3 = 0

Practice Problems

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Solution to Problem (just cut/paste below this bar)

Solution to problem: One version:

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