FALL 2011 • NO.

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table of contents
5 What’s Up Sweet Paul? 7 Contributors 10 Recipe Monday 12 Keep Your Eye On 16 Gorg-wanna Handmade 18 My Happy Dish 20 Smorgasburg 24 Crafty Friday 26 Gorg-wanna Design 28 Wine 31 Cupcake 33 Will’s Picks 36 From Mormor’s Kitchen 38 Gorg-wanna Kids 40 Galette, How Do I Love Thee! 42 Woof 44 Message In a Bottle 46 Beets 56 Food From the Forest 68 Dip It! 76 Mexican 86 Silhouettes 94 Pear 106 Harvest 116 Black Halloween 124 Bradley Farm 132 Nordic Cooking 142 Go Camping 150 Avocado 158 Pantry Confections

features

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What’s Up Sweet Paul?
for mom:
This issue is dedicated to my wonderful mom who passed away in early August. She had been struggling with cancer for over a year, and finally let go one morning. She was an amazing person–everyone who met her loved her. Creative, fun, amazing taste, and in my eyes the most beautiful mom ever. I have so many great memories of her that will live on inside me. One of her many wonderful features was that she was always there whenever I needed her, just like a mom should be. She was always eager to give advice on anything from food to more serious stuff, or send me money when I was broke. I think one of my fondest memories is when one late fall morning, she woke me up early by telling me that it had snowed outside. She pulled back the curtains and boy, had it snowed. We got dressed and ran outside and played in the snow. After, we came back in and had hot cocoa with whipped cream. I can still remember this so clearly, even though it’s now about 40 years ago. Dear Mom, this issue is all dedicated to you, I know you are reading it where you are. Enjoy, and I love you!

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Contributors
”What is your favorite fall comfort food?”

COLIN COOKE Photographer, New York A dinner of kale salad, Pecorino Romano cheese, crushed garlic, lemon juice, and extra virgin olive oil with butternut squash risotto and sage and parmesan cheese. Heaven.

SARAH OSTER SHASHA Writer, New York In September we’re usually in Israel for Rosh Hashanah so I’d have to say my favorite comfort food for fall is my father-in-law’s Shakshuka (eggs poached in spicy tomato sauce). Although, I could easily eat it every single day.

ALEXANDRA GRABLEWSKI Photographer, New York Spicy black bean soup with lots of cheddar cheese sprinkled on top—the perfect dinner when it starts getting brisk and I’ve been out all day. Oh yeah... or anything involving bread. Or hot tea. Or pie.

SARAH GOLDSCHADT Crafter and Art Director, New York S’mores! Preferably consumed under a star-filled sky in front of a camp fire.

JIM HENSLEY Photographer and Writer, Oslo I have no official fall comfort food! But lately I’ve been making my own variations of Ponzo sauce as best I can. Squeezing limes into soy sauce and spooning cilantro and a white wine/brown sugar syrup into it. This I have taken to splashing over the tomatoes I pick, or raw vegetables. And when that fateful day comes, I might just baste the turkey with it.

ELLEN SILVERMAN Photographer, New York Once the extreme heat of summer begins to subside I begin to look forward to the crispness of the fall; to clear blue skies. The first bit of chill in the air makes me crave the sweetness of pears, the tartness of apples, and the intoxicating perfume of quince. Once these fruits begin to appear in our farmers market I bring bags of them home and start to turn them into my family’s favorite dessert, tarte tatin, which I make alternatively with each of these fruits, adding a bit of fresh rosemary or thyme and serve with a generous spoonful of creme fraiche.

HECTOR SANCHEZ Photographer, New York The thought of my favorite fall comfort food takes me right back to the first time I discovered Tamal en Cazuela (Cuban-style soft polenta with pork). The literal translation is “Tamale in a pot.” Here is a link that is very similar to the way my family would prepare this delightful dish, but you’ll have to use a spanish translator to follow this recipe. Good luck!

WILL TAYLOR Writer, London Every Bonfire Night growing up my mum would cook a chili con carne and serve it in a bowl of steaming, fluffy rice. We would all sit outside on the patio watching fireworks as we ate; the heat of the chili warming us on many a cold November night. Ever since, the dish has always been a regular fall staple.

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ERIN PHRANER Food Stylist, New York Cornbread French toast with warm syrup!

LINDA PUGLIESE Photographer, New York Throughout fall I eat as much roasted butternut squash with browned butter and sage as I can.

JENNIFER NOLAN Photographer, New York So many fall favorites, however, caramelized butternut squash is at the top of the list.

MEG SMITH Photographer, Napa Valley I’ve been making The Silver Palate’s Chili for a Crowd recipe since I was about 10. It’s a classic.

VIOLA SUTANTO Stylist, San Francisco Shabu-shabu. Everyone gathers around a simmering, giant hot pot, filled with thinly-sliced meats, seafood, and vegetables. It’s as much about the gathering of family and friends as it is about the food.

JOLINE RIVERA Art Director, Chicago Whether I’m enjoying homemade mac-n-cheese, baked acorn squash, pot roast, or a spicy bowl of chili during a Sunday football game, I always crave my favorite red wine...it’s crush season in Napa and I think of Chimney Rock’s; Tomahawk Vineyard.

NELLIE WILLIAMS Graphic Designer, Chicago I love everything about fall, including the food. Pork roast, mashed potatoes, baked apples, cornbread...I could really go on forever.

JEANNE LURVEY Prop Stylist, New York Dad’s apple pie.

TINA SCHULTHEISS Food stylist, Sonoma Homemade chicken pot pies with butternut squash in ramekins made with my girls.

FRANCES JANISCH Photographer, New York My favorite fall dish is usually something comforting.... a stew or a Sunday roast. Glass of red wine and apples for dessert.

LAURA KATHLEEN MAIZE Copy Editor, Toronto Pho with rare beef from one of Toronto’s many Vietnamese restaurants. You can’t beat that soothing broth. It will knock any chill right out of you!

LISA HOMA Food Stylist, New York For me, fall comfort food harkens back to youth and a love of gnawing on juicy pork chops. I long for roast pork basted in cider with caramelized onions and apples. I can taste the sweet, salty, burnt richness of it now! Follow that by a warm pear galette and it’s a done deal.

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R E C I P E M O N D AY

John’s Pretzels
Food+styling by Paul Lowe Photography by Alexandra Grablewski

My friend John made these pretzels a while back and I have been hooked ever since. Serve them warm with a hot and sweet mustard.

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Makes 20 2 teaspoons active dry yeast 1 1⁄3 cups warm water 1 ⁄3 cup light brown sugar 41⁄ cups plain flour 2 1 tablespoon baking soda gourmet sea salt 1. Dissolve yeast in warm water. 2. Add sugar and flour and mix until you have a smooth and elastic dough. 3. Cover with plastic and let rise for 45 minutes. 4. Heat oven to 475ºF. 5. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. 6. Add baking soda, and stir until the soda is dissolved. 7. Cut the dough into 20 pieces, and roll each piece into a long sausage. 8. Roll each sausage into a snail shape. The pretzels should look like two buns meeting in the middle. 9. Place them one at a time in the water, and let them cook for 10 seconds on each side. 10. Take them out and place them on a parchment paper–lined baking sheet. 11. Sprinkle with salt. 12. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes or until dark golden. 13. Cool on a wire rack.

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KE E P YOUR EYE ON

It’s All in the Details

Often times, people (myself included) don’t always notice the little things. After meeting Eloise Corr Danch, I can easily say I stop to smell the roses much more often.
Text by Sarah Oster Shasha Photography by Jennifer Nolan

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KEEP YOUR EYE ON

The sought-after Brooklyn artist makes her living creating sculptures out of paper. Although she’s well known for dresses, fruits, and stars, some of her most exceptional work has been with flowers. “My priorities in making art have always been beauty, color, and silhouette. Flowers have all three.”
Where did you start your career? I worked on a windows/visual team in Chicago for Saks Fifth Avenue. It was there that I met Brian and Claude from Ruffian and stayed in touch with them over the years. When I moved to New York I helped them out for a couple weeks before fashion week, and assisted backstage for their SS06 collection show, and since that collection I’ve tried to helped them every fashion week I could. The first project we collaborated on was an event that the New York Observer was hosting. The party was a paper soirée and Ruffian asked me to collaborate with them to create a historical costume paper dress that would be on display at the party. That was the first paper dress I built. The next one was for Anthropologie. That dress was on display at the New York City flagship store and was a Baroque design inspired by the Velázquez painting Las Meninas.

I also collaborated with Ruffian on a third historical costume paper dress for the opening gala of the “Slash: Paper under the Knife” exhibition at the Museum of Art and Design. I am constantly attracted to the place where fashion and art hold hands. How did you start making flowers? I have been really lucky to work with Macy’s, one of my favorite clients! I had been in contact with Macy’s because I was very eager to work with them and they asked me if I had ever done flowers, so after a lot of trial and error, I was able to start coming up with shapes that worked. So then I (and my team of very talented assistants) created thousands of paper flowers that we assembled into garlands and headdresses for the mannequins that

appeared in all the windows along 34th Street for the 2009 Macy’s Flower Show. How did you choose paper? I’ve tried all sorts of paper. I prefer drawing paper and pastel paper. The first reason is the strength–the flowers really hold their shape once they are assembled, as opposed to more delicate papers like tissue or crêpe, which are less sturdy. The second reason I use art paper is the range of colors–between the three paper companies that I use, you can find virtually every color you want. Why did you choose flowers? I feel like they chose me. I set out to be a fashion illustrator. I feel really lucky that the wave kind of drifted to sculpture. My parents are both very creative and my dad is a carpenter and a maker of things. So I know 3D is in my blood, but until recent years I always was drawn more to 2D and drawing. My priorities in making art have always been beauty, color, and silhouette. Flowers have all three. Why paper as a medium? It’s very versatile, and paper was a very accessible medium for me since I didn’t have a background in sculpture. Also, I find it interesting to build on my fashion experience and use draping and flatpattern techniques on paper, to make something curve or bend a way a flat plane wouldn’t normally. What inspires you? A desire to do new things and create new things. To travel as much as I can. I am always fascinated with the natural world. What would be your dream project? Any project that would allow me to travel, especially overseas. I’d like to design the sets and costumes for a play or ballet. I would also like to make a stop motion movie about flowers and growing, maybe with an educational bent. I’d also like to volunteer my time more.

“My priorities in making art have always been beauty, color, and silhouette. Flowers have all three.”

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G O R G -WA N N A
HANDMADE

Made With Love

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Photo by Coco Amardell

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4. 1. “Moustache Man” embroidered linen lavender sachets, $ 17.00, etsy.com/shop/BelleCoccinelle 2. “Call your mother” wool felt pillow, $89.00, alexandraferguson.com 3. Wearable planter garden pot neckless, $44.50, etsy.com/shop/ ARTISANIEeurope 4. “Patty” handprinted pillow, $ 56.00, lacerisesurlegateau-eshop.com 5. “Grandma’s” tea towel with handprinted dress, $21.00, lacerisesurlegateau-eshop. com 6.Nesting bowl set in stoneware and porcelain, $150.00, etsy.com/shop/clamlab 7. A forest for your fridge, wood magnets, $16.00, etsy.com/shop/iamhome 8. Sterling silver pencil neckless, $50.00, etsy.com/shop/huiyitan (opposite page) “Simone” handprinted pillow, $ 56.00, lacerisesurlegateau-eshop.com

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M Y HAPPY DISH

Fall Stew

Styling by Paul Lowe Photography by Linda Pugliese

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MY HAPPY DISH

This dish makes me happy because it tastes like autumn. Beany and cinnamony, it’ll steam up the windows and make you happy with glowing cheeks and a full belly. The sauce is velvety smooth and christmasy smelling, and it’s totally simple to make.
Fall Stew With Cinnamon, Cumin, & Chili Serves 6 2 tablespoons soya butter 1 red chili, deseeded and chopped 2 cloves garlic, chopped 2 medium white onions. chopped 2 tsp ground coriander 1 tsp turmeric 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp cinnamon 5.5 oz of new potatoes, halved 15 oz cannned mixed beans 45 oz canned chopped tomatoes 1 ⁄ pint vegetable stock 4 2 cups cubed butternut squash, cubed salt & pepper to taste 1 small bunch fresh spinach, coarsely chopped 1 ⁄ cup chopped cashews 4

1. Melt the soya butter in a large saucepan and add the chili, garlic, and onions. Fry for 3 to 4 minutes until they get soft. 2. Add all the spices and the potatoes. Fry another minute. Note the wonderful Christmas smell. 3. Stir in the tomato with the juice and the vegetable stock. 4. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and cover the pan. 5. Simmer for 10 minutes, then add the beans and squash and simmer another 10 minutes. 6. Season with salt and pepper. 7. Right before serving add spinach and cashews. *Eat it with some crusty bread for the juice. Tastes even better the next day!

NUTS AND BEANS: GOOD. SQUASH: GOOD. EVERYTHING IN IT: GOOD. SO ZERO GUILT.

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Smorgasburg
By Paul Lowe | Photography by Colin Cooke

A foodie’s 4th of July, Christmas, and birthday all rolled up into one.

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Have you ever had the feeling that something must have been made just for you?
I totally had that feeling walking into the new food market in Williamsburg, called Smorgasburg–or “Smorg” as the hipsters in the area call it. The market can best be described as a gravel-filled football field by the river with an amazing view of Manhattan. The photo ops are great. There is so much to take in: the smells are divine, the food all looks amazing, and the vibe of the place is so great. You just can’t help being sucked in. I found myself surrounded by homemade jams, cakes, herbs, oils, and food from every corner of the world–even corners I’ve never heard about! I think I must have looked rather silly, because after a while I noticed that I was walking around with a big grin on my face. And then there’s the sampling. How I love sampling. You go from booth to booth and sample the vendors’ goods. Consider it an amuse-bouche for what’s to follow, because in the back are all the food vendors just waiting for you. You can get thin crust pizza, lobster rolls, dumplings, mexican food, gourmet donuts, grilled cheese, and so much more. I tell you, it’s impossible to leave without having something to eat. The food is simply too good and too fresh to leave behind. What were my highlights? -The organic grass-fed beef jerky–try the Korean BBQ, it was awesome. -The Red Hook Lobster Pound’s lobster rolls. Better then any I had in Maine (and I had a lot)! -Porkschetta, the best roasted pork in a bun ever! -Shaved ice with homemade rhubarb syrup. -Milk’s cookies and cereal ice cream, wow! So, if a trip to New York is on the agenda, don’t forget Smorgasburg. And if you see a big guy with a bow tie and a huge smile, don’t be alarmed. It’s just me.

Smorgasburg

Every Saturday 9–5 North 6th Street, by the river. Williamsburg brooklynflea.com/smorgasburg

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C R A F T Y F R I D AY

Not Your Granny’s Shade

I have always loved old doilies, something about them makes me very happy. I love using them in craft projects like this one.

Styling by Paul Lowe | Photography by Alexandra Grablweski

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It’s great to take something “granny” and turn it into something cool.

You will need: old, stripped lampshade old doilies (try flea markets, Ebay or Etsy) pins needle & thread 1. Start with pinning the doilies to the lampshade, that way it’s easy to move them around until you found a “pattern” that works for the shade. 2. Once they are in place, sew them to the shade with small stitches.

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G O R G - WA N N A D E S I G N

Row, Row, Row Your Boat...

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Photo: Bodie and Fou

2. 1. ”Bulb Lamp” by Sofie Refer, $124.00, BODIEandFOU.com 2. ”ad Color”, Paul Smith for Stelton, from $ 270.00, shophorne.com 3. Clock from Artis, $ 49.00, etsy.com/shop/ ArtisEverything 4. Brass Muse Bottle Opener, $98.00, jonathanadler.com 5. Mango Wood Radio from Singgih Kartono, $ 220.00, shophorne.com. 6. Celebrating gay marriage in New York with Madam & Eve dinner plate, $74.00, etsy.com/shop/BurntOfferingsLTD 7.”Racer” pendant in stainless streel, $ 47.00, polli.com.au 8. Modern Abstract Print, $26.00, etsy. com/shop/twoems 9. New Norm Kettle Teapot from Menu, $ 79.95, shophorne.com 10. “Claude” walnut chest of drawer, $ 2,095.00, jonathanadler.com (opposite page) “Lido” wallpaper from Whitby, $ 89.00 a roll, BODIEandFOU.com 5.

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WINE

The Thrill of Defeat
Text+Photography by Jim Hensley

Defeat can be difficult to handle, but after many, many years of drinking wine and eating food, I have had to admit that I don’t really know which bottle goes with which dish.

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WINE

I have tried to master the esoteric art of wine/food pairing from time to time, but if the bells rang it was more a matter of luck then prowess. I suffer from culinary laziness, coupled with a good dose of oenophilic self indulgence. In other words–I pretty much just eat and drink what I like.
I came to this realization just as summer was winding down, and I took on the responsibility of finding some magical menu that would do honor to the last sunset we would witness on Ibiza, off the coast of Spain. Honestly, there wasn’t much to fuss over. When in Spain, get a steak, and a grill… pick some roadside rosemary, and steal a couple of lemons from the neighbor–you don’t need any more than that. The rule I use at the butcher shop is simple. If you want the best, look for the cut with the highest price. It’s an international constant. Unfortunately this rule doesn’t translate so well in the wine shop. Sure, I know the routine. I don’t serve red Bordeaux with sushi, even though I am fond of both. Generally speaking, white with fish and red with meat will take you a long way, even if the angels might not sing for you every time. Dry before sweet is a rule I’ve heard, although I break that one often. Lots of people swear by young before old as if dinner were a parade, but if I’m opening a bottle that’s been lying cozy in the cellar for some years, I don’t want to have had many tough young glasses on my palate. Also, I want it known here and now that most cheese tastes better with white wine, and most cheeseburgers too for that matter. Try a Pinot Noir with grilled cod for a pleasant surprise. Red wine can go well with fish provided the wine isn’t overly tannic or oaked. The sweetness of Sauternes can be contrasted with salty crackers and blue cheese, and if you need to feel normal and serve it with dessert, make sure the food isn’t as sweet as the wine. Forget pretty much all wine with chocolate. This is basically the extant of what I know for certain. I see no reason to save a really good bottle for something more respectable than homemade pizza. Nothing is more respectable than homemade pizza. Back on the island, the sun is sinking faster than I’m comfortable with, and I’m stuck in a wine shop. This happens to me a lot: the bear-like man who runs the shop had his wine glass in one hand and the success of my mission in the other, so to speak. “Look,” he says, “we can do this one of two ways…I can take a guess and find you something that might be right, or I can find you one I know you’ll like.” He steered me to where he kept the Ribera del Duero. Ribera del Duero is in the Castilla y Leon district in Northern Spain. Vines have been planted along the Duero River for as long as 2,000 years. Almost all of the vines are of the Tempranillo variety common throughout that part of Spain. Whenever You Want You might have to settle for something from the outlying district of Castilla y Leon, but it’s no hard luck choice. Quality has really taken off recently, and the prices with it. Try Bodegas y Viñedos de Ribera del Duratón and Dominio Dostares. Whenever You Can Legaris Reserva might be considered a bargain. It’s made for the cellar, but if you’re impatient you might want to air it out as the grill warms up. Astrales is always welcome with any meal that calls for red wine. It has everything a good Ribera should have: spice, berries, and black pepper. Once in a Lifetime Vega-Sicilia Unico is the pride of Spain. Famous for staying alive in its bottle for a generation or more, it is said to peak at around 30 years old. I wouldn’t know firsthand, but they make a wine called Valbuena 5 that I can go good for. Really go good for.

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SWEET PAUL FOOD STYLING & PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP
THIS WORKSHOP IS FOR CHEFS, COOKS, BLOGGERS, AMATEURS & PROFESSIONALS.
On Saturday, October 15, 2011 Join Editor/Food Stylist Paul Lowe and Food Photographer Colin Cooke for a one day workshop (10-5) of cooking and shooting an assignment for Sweet Paul Magazine.
We will start the day as Paul goes over the principals involved in getting food ready for camera, discuss the importance of prop and surface selection and arranging the food for camera readiness. Using Natural Light, Colin will show you that you don’t need an expensive lighting system to take great shots. We will use Colin’s Canon digital camera connected to a computer screen so everyone can see. Colin will talk about lighting, fill cards, shapes and color considerations for shooting. We will capture the best shots and make 4x5/5x7 prints so everyone can take home a photograph. You are welcome to bring your camera and shoot the food yourself. The workshop will conclude with Paul leading us in the making of one of his favorite cocktails.

Price: $ 450.00, including lunch, a print from the day and a copy of the latest issue of Sweet Paul Magazine. Location: Shooting Kitchen, Tribeca Want to join us? Email us at info@sweetpaulmag.com

CUPCAKE

Chocolate & Mascarpone Cupcakes
Makes 12 4 oz good quality dark chocolate, chopped 1 ⁄3 cup water 4 tablespoons mascarpone cheese 1 ⁄3 cup vegetable oil 3 ⁄ cup sugar 4 2 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla essence 1 1⁄3 cups plain flour 1 teaspoon baking powder chocolate ganache, for serving blueberries, for serving 1. Preheat oven to 375ºF. 2. Place chocolate and water in a small pot and stir until the chocolate is disolved. 3. Remove from heat and add mascarpone. Mix well. 4. In a bowl, mix oil, sugar, egg, and vanilla. Stir until sugar has dissolved. 5. Add the chocolate and mix well. 6. Add flour and baking powder and mix well. 7. Pour batter into paper liners. 8. Bake until the cupcakes are firm to the touch, about 18 minutes. 9. Cool on a wire rack. *Cupcakes can be eaten on their own or garnished with some chocolate ganache and blueberries.

Food+styling by Paul Lowe | Photography by Frances Janisch

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[Marmie Bags Ad?]

Want to see your ad in Sweet Paul Magazine? Email us at advertising @sweetpaulmag.com

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W I L L’ S P I C K S

A Seasonal Soirée

Planning a fall gathering? Take a moment to escape with us to a remote, log-cabin retreat for decorating inspiration and market picks to make your party this season’s best in town.
By Will Taylor

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PHOTO BY : THE LEXINGTON COMPANY

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Will’s tip! With their simplistic style and form, wooden spools make for perfect placeholders in a fall tablescape. Make your own, or buy these from BHLDN.

PHOTO BY : THE LEXINGTON COMPANY

The Fall Tablescape Transport your guests to a place of pared-back beauty, where the luxuries are simple and natural, and the textures tactile and welcoming; this is a tablescape that embraces the calm and reflection of the change in season. Think earthenware materials, plaid patterns, sumptuous textiles, and simple ceramics. With the pomp and splendour of soon-to-arrive holiday festivities, this is an opportunity to create an unassuming, classic tabletop for your fall dinner; warming, comfort food and gently fragranced, flickering candles are the foil to the checked tablecloth and classic flatware that adorn the table. The furniture, too, should be kept modest: let the classic shape and textures of an oak Bentwood chair naturally complement the rustic, untreated wooden table. If the temperature still allows, make the most of the alfresco entertaining by giving guests coordinated throws to keep them warm come sundown–create atmosphere with gentle lighting and a crackling fire.

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Will’s tip! Add whimsy and interest to your soirée table with unexpected takes on classic fall items, such as this wire pumpkin.

1. Cotton reel placename holders, BHLDN, $12.00 bhldn.com 2. Wire pumpkin, Terrain, $22.00 shopterrain.com 3. Seabourne flatware, Anthropologie, $94.00 anthropologie.eu 4. Kieran table, Jayson Home and Garden, $2,495.00 jaysonhomeandgarden.com 5. Birch votives, Rowen & Wren, from $13.00 rowenandwren.co.uk

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W I L L’ S P I C K S
The Fall Guest Bedroom In the bedroom continue with the theme of understated luxury with traditional bedding detailing subtle, ticking pattern broken only by occasional tartan additions. Provide a stack of wool, velvet, and cashmere throws and bedspreads to let guests choose their material of choice for keeping off the early morning chill; upon a stack of old suitcases place a nickel-finished reading lamp and a softly scented candle. Finally mix in a few small but thoughtful details, such as a posy of fragrant, seasonal blooms or a stack of your guest’s favourite magazines–these will be the perfect compliments to this unpretentious, yet indulgent guest room.

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1. Forest canopy bed, Anthropologie, $2436.00 anthropologie.eu 2. Alslev rug, IKEA, $19.99, ikea.com 3. Barometer work lamp, IKEA, $49.99 ikea.com 4. Cushion cover, H&M Home, $21.00.hm.com 5. Linen throw, H&M Home, $55.00 hm.com

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BEDROOM LIFESTYLE IMAGES BY : THE LEXINGTON COMPANY

MORMOR’S KITCHEN

FROM

The Apple Cider That Will Cure The World

I am convinced that the world would be a much better place if everyone just had a sip of Mormor’s warm apple cider.
I was quite the child growing up. There were only very little kids nearby, so most of my days were spent with two little old ladies–my grandmother and great aunt. We lived next to a large forest with rivers, tracks, foxes, deers, and I’m sure a troll. I loved going on picnics in that forest. My grandmother would pack an old-fashioned basket with a blanket, a pillow (I would not sit on the ground), real china (would not eat or drink out of plastic), and homemade sandwiches and cakes. What a child I was! They should have put me out to the wolves. One fall afternoon I really wanted to go on a picnic, but both ladies were taking a nap. So I packed the basket myself with a pillow, a plate, a cup, some cookies, and a soda. I forgot the bottle opener, but I was at least smart enough to put a note on the fridge.

Text+styling by Paul Lowe | Photography by Alexandra Grablewski

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FROM MORMOR’S KITCHEN

So off I went. It was a clear but chilly day. I tried to find our regular track that would lead me to the little river I loved so, but somehow I got lost and could not find it. I walked for a long time but nothing looked familiar to me. I remember I started to cry and was sitting on a tree stub (with my pillow) when I heard my father call. The joy! I can still remember the relief of hearing his voice. When I got home my grandmother had hot apple cider ready for me. To this day whenever I feel like life gets a little scary I make warm apple cider. I think the world would be a much better place if everyone did.

Mormor’s Hot Apple Cider Serves 4 4 cups non-alcoholic apple cider juice of 1⁄ lemon 2 1 tablespoon honey 1 apple, sliced 1 orange, sliced 2 cinnamon sticks 2 inches fresh ginger, peeled and sliced 4 black pepper corns 1. Place all the ingredients in a large saucepan and bring to a boil. 2. Let the cider simmer for 5 minutes, remove from the heat. *Let it cool off a little before serving it.

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G O R G -WA N N A KIDS

Child’s Play

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Photo by Jaell und Tofta

G O R G -WA N NA KIDS
4. 1. 3.

2.

5. 6.

1. White rabbit lamp, $ 80.00, bodieandfou.com 2. Red large mushroom lamp, $ 112.00, bodieandfou.com 3. ”Moustache” apron, $ 27.00, lacerisesurlegateau.fr 4. “Rocky” bed, to be launched soon, jaellundtofta.de 5. Handmade race-car with driver, $ 32.00 , nolinoli.com 6. Mirabelle the Bunny, $ 46.00, blablakids.com 7. The wild bunch, printable kit, $ 5.30, etsy.com/shop/mibostudio (opposite page) “LieseLotte”, the chair, the horse and new best friend, $ 546.00, jaellundtofta.de

7.

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Galette, How Do I Love Thee!
(Let me count the ways…)
By Lisa Homa | Photography by Alexandra Grablewski

Now that my six-year-old son Ellis is of sous-chef age, I’ve found the galette a quicker, less fussy option that we delight in making together. Galettes are simply free-form pies with an inverted crust that comes together in the middle–creating a literal pie hole– allowing hot, juicy fruit to bubble out. While I enjoy making galettes with seasonal fruit at any time of the year, I especially love baking them in the fall– nothing like cranking up the oven and filling the house with the evocative smell of apples, pears, and spices. Here are my top 10 reasons why galettes are great to make with kids: • fun with flour • eed only a few basic ingredients that you’re likely to have n

in your kitchen • for fussy eaters, any fruit will do • require much less sugar than a standard pie • hey don’t have to be sweet. Savory ones are great, too. t Try prosciutto, figs, and mascarpone or swiss chard, onion, raisin, with fromage blanc. • aking perfection has no place here. Its free form means b just about anything goes. Plus, its rustic shape adds all the more appetite appeal. • no pie plates, no soggy bottom crust • atching fruit bubble through the oven window beats w anything on TV • ear instant gratification: bakes in almost half the time of n a regular pie • galette à la mode!

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In our house, cake makes a rare appearance; we’re pretty much pie people.
Pear Galette Serves 5 to 6 1 single crust of pie dough 4 or 5 pears, peeled, halved, and cored 1 ⁄ lemon 4 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 ⁄ teaspoon ground cardamom 2 1 1 ⁄ tablespoons flour and extra for dusting 2 1 ⁄3 cup sugar 1 tablespoon butter drizzle of honey 1. Preheat oven to 425˚F. 2. Roll dough out on floured surface, about 1⁄ ” thick and roughly a 12” circle. 3. Transfer 8 to a parchment-lined baking sheet. Allow to rest in the refrigerator. 4. Slice pears. In large bowl, toss them with a squeeze of lemon, spices, flour, and sugar. 5. Arrange fruit mixture in the center of the dough, leaving a 2 or 3” border. 6. Fold dough over fruit, pleating your way around. 7. Dot center with butter and drizzle with a tablespoon of honey. 8. Bake for about 35 minutes. The crust will be golden brown and fruit will be bubbling. 9. Add another drizzle of honey when serving. *Great with a scoop of vanilla ice cream! Pie Crust Dough Makes 2 single 9” pie crusts or 2 galettes 2 cups all purpose flour 1 ⁄ teaspoon salt 4 1 cup cold unsalted butter, cut into small chunks 1 cold egg whisked with enough cold water to make 1⁄3 cup 1. Add flour, salt, and butter to bowl of food processor fit with blade attachment. Process until butter forms small peas. 2. Add 1⁄ cup of egg/water combo. Pulse until dough starts 4 to pull together (if it’s too dry you can add a touch more water). 3. Turn out onto floured surface. 4. Pull together and divide into two discs. 5. Wrap individually in plastic wrap. 6. Refrigerate to rest for at least 1 hour. *The dough can be frozen for 1 month. Defrost for use. Dough should be cool to touch for rolling, not room temperature.

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WOOF

Wash and Go…

Did you know that you can make your own dog shampoo? It’s safe, mild, and gets the dirt out!
Homemade Dog Shampoo 1 pint gentle dishwashing detergent (Ivory or Dawn is great) 1 pint water 1 pint apple cider vinegar 4 oz glycerine (you can buy this at your local pharmacy) 1. Combine all the ingredients until they’re all mixed well. 2. Pour into airtight bottles. 3. Call in your pooch and fill that tub.

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Styling by Paul Lowe | Photography by Colin Cooke

1. 1. Custom stamped pet ID in brushed aluminium, $16.00, etsy.com/shop/theCopperPoppy 2. Fine art print of Hugo, $45.00, etsy.com/shop/DeLaBelle 3. Dog collar, can be custom made, $26.00, etsy.com/shop/ChloesCollars 4.”Kip” the wiener Dachshund toy, $ 26.00, etsy.com/shop/ blackbirdfashion 5. Posters by Lisa Bengtsson, $ 35.00, huset-shop.com 6. Thank you cards, $ 10.00, for a set of 4, etsy.com/shop/corelladesign

2. 4.

3.

6. 5.

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Message in a Bottle

Text by Sarah Oster Shasha | Photography by Jennifer Nolan & Dana Gallagher

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every now and then something comes along and makes you think, “why hasn’t anyone thought of this before?” such was the case with common good, a cleaning product company founded by two former prop stylists. intrigued? so were we.
“The concept was born of the idea that we use too much plastic. We were already using green products but burning though bottle after bottle,” insists co-founder Sacha Dunn, “So we came up with a way for people to buy bulk refills at their grocery store.” Their packaging is clean and simple and the formulas are safe for people, animals, and the environment. “We had to have great products so we had to have great formulations.” Using only 100 per cent readily biodegradable ingredients, they left out anything they thought unnecessary like dyes and “brighteners.” With two little kids, I’m pretty convinced Dunn knows a thing or two about getting stains out. Her favorite tip? “Rub a little detergent into the stain a few minutes before washing.” The second best tip on stain removal? Find the Common Good refill station near you on their website, commongoodandco.com.

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ONE FOR THE
SEASON

Beets

One of fall’s most amazing vegetables: sweet, tender, and tasty. Try some of my favorite recipes with beets.
Food+styling by Paul Lowe | Photography by Colin Cooke

Roasted Beets
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ONE FOR THE SEASON

Pasta Salad with Beets, Chèvre, & Honey Vinaigrette

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ONE FOR THE SEASON

Beet Soup

Polenta with Beet Leaves & Pancetta

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Beet Salad with Pancetta & Peas

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Golden Beet Salsa

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ONE FOR THE SEASON

Scallops with Beets & Sage

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ONE FOR THE SEASON

Pasta Salad with Beets, Chèvre, & Honey Vinaigrette Such a great salad. The sweet beets and the somewhat sour cheese goes so well together. Serves 4 1 squash, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons olive oil 400 g cooked pasta 6 beets, roasted and peeled 1 bunch baby spinach, washed 100 g chevre 4 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon honey salt & pepper to taste 1. Heat the oil in a pan and sauté the squash until golden. 2. Drain it on some paper towel. 3. Slice the beets. 4. In a large serving bowl mix together squash, pasta, beets, and spinach. 5. Crumble the cheese on top. 6. In a bowl mix oil and honey and season with salt and pepper. Beet Salad with Pancetta & Peas The smoky, salty pancetta is such an amazing flavor to go with the sweet beets and peas. Serves 4 3 golden beets, roasted and peeled 3 red beets, roasted and peeled 100 g pancetta, cubed 4 cups salad greens 50 g macadamia nuts 50 g fresh peas Dressing: 5 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon lemon juice salt & pepper to taste 1. Thinly slice the beets and place them on 4 plates. 2. Fry the pancetta golden in a pan. Drain it on some paper towel. 3. Sprinkle over the beets. 4. Add salad greens, macadamia nuts, and peas. 5. In a bowl, whisk together olive oil, mustard, and lemon juice. 6. Season with salt and pepper. 7. Divide the dressing among the plates and serve.

Beet Recipes
Roasted Beets Roasting beets is very easy. Just remember to roast red and golden beats separately, otherwise the juice from the red beats will turn the golden beats red too. Serves 4 8 golden or red beets, washed and trimmed 4 tablespoons olive oil 1. Preheat oven to 450ºF. 2. Place the beets in a baking dish and drizzle with olive oil. 3. Cover the dish with foil and bake for about 40 to 45 minutes. 4. Use a small knife to pierce them and check if they are tender. 5. Remove from oven and cool. 6. Rub the beets gently with your fingers to remove the skin. Now they are ready to use. Golden Beet Salsa Perfect to serve with cheese. This can be made a day in advance. Serves 4 4 large golden beets, roasted and peeled 1 spring onion, thinly sliced 12 cherry tomatoes, cut in half 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar salt & pepper to taste 1. Cut the beets into small cubes and place them in a bowl. 2. Add spring onion, tomatoes, olive oil, and balsamic. 3. Stir well and season with salt and pepper. 4. Let the salsa stand at room temperature for 1 hour before serving.

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Scallops with Beets & Sage Serves 4, as an appetizer 4 salad green leaves 1 red beet, roasted, peeled, and sliced 4 large scallops 1 tablespoon butter salt & pepper to taste 4 large sage leafs olive oil balsamic vinegar 1. Place the salad leaves on 4 small plates. 2. Place a slice of roasted beet on top. 3. Heat the butter in a pan and sauté the scallops for 30 seconds on each side. 4. Place the scallops on top of the leaves and beet. 5. In the same butter, sauté the

sage leaves until crisp, this will only take a few seconds. 6. Place the sage leaf on top of the scallop. 7. Drizzle with a little olive oil and balsamic vinegar.

Polenta with Beet Leaves & Pancetta You can also use the beet leaves for cooking. They have a slightly bitter taste, almost like endives. Serves 4 100g pancetta, cubed 2 shallots, thinly sliced 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced leaves from 1 bunch of beets, washed and chopped 3/4 cup chicken stock 2 tablespoons sherry salt & pepper to serve 4 portions polenta to serve 1. Sauté the pancetta golden in a pan. 2. Add shallots and garlic and sauté until the shallots are soft. 3. Add beet leaves, stock, and sherry. 4. Let the mixture cook for 2 minutes. 5. Season with salt and pepper. 6. Serve over freshly cooked polenta. Beet Soup My take on the classical Bosch Soup. Can be served hot or cold, but I prefer cold. Serves 4 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 small yellow onion, finely chopped 1 carrot, finely chopped 1 leak, only the white part, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons dill, chopped 4 cups chicken stock 6 large beets, roasted, peeled, and chopped salt & pepper to taste 1 ⁄ cup sour cream 2 1. Heat the oil in a pan and sauté onion, carrot, and leak until soft. 2. Add dill and stock and bring to a boil. 3. Add the beets and let the soup simmer for 15 minutes. 4. Pour the soup into a blender and blend until smooth. 5. Season with salt and pepper. 6. Cool and serve in glasses with sour cream.

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features

FA L L 20 1 1 • I S SU E N O. 6 food from the forest • dip it mexican silhouettes • pears • harvest black halloween • bradley farm nordic cooking • go camping • avocados

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food from the forest
in a forest stands a table. it’s just waiting for you, filled with great fall dishes. maybe not, but that would be something, right?

Food+styling by Paul Lowe | Photography by Colin Cooke
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pizza bianca such a great bread to bake– and really easy. fennel & rosemarybaked lamb
(opposite page)

fennel seeds get the most amazing taste and aroma when heated up, just you wait!

pappardelle with mushrooms a mix between a soup and a pasta dish, great for those cold evenings.

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espresso & cinnamon cake with nuts & honey such a great cake, perfect for picnics–in or out of the forest. honey-baked fall vegetables
(opposite page)

this is a great side dish to any meat. i just love the sweetness these veggies get from the honey.

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fennel & mushroom salad when shaved thinly, fennel is amazing. it has a mild anise flavor that goes so well with the sour goat cheese.

fall bruschetta one of my favorite, easy fall dishes. fast and tasty.

food from the forest recipes

1. Cut the baguettes in half, lengthwise. 2. Drizzle with olive oil and place on a baking tray. 3. Bake under the broiler until golden. 4. Clean the mushrooms and cut the large ones in half. 5. Heat 3 tablespoons of oil in a pan and sauté mushrooms and garlic until the mushrooms are golden. 6. Season with salt and pepper and fresh thyme. 7. Arrange the baguettes on a plate and add the mushrooms. *Serve hot. Fennel & Mushroom Salad When shaved thinly, fennel is amazing. It has a mild anise flavor that goes so well with the sour goat cheese. Serves 4 2 oz mushrooms 1 small bulb of fennel, thinly sliced (use a mandolin if you have one) small bunch beet greens 20 blackberries 2 oz goat cheese, crumbled olive oil salt & pepper to taste 1. Clean the mushrooms and cut the large ones in half. 2. Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a pan and sauté mushrooms until golden. 3. Arrange fennel, beet greens, blackberries, goat cheese, and mushrooms on plates. 4. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Honey-Baked Fall Vegetables This is a great side dish to any meat. I just love the sweetness these veggies get from the honey. Serves 4 3 red beets, peeled and cut in half 3 golden beets, peeled and cut in half 3 turnips, peeled and cut in half 8 carrots, peeled 1 whole head of garlic, just cut off the top 5 tablespoon olive oil 2 tablespoon honey fresh thyme salt & pepper to taste 1. Heat oven to 360°F. 2. Place all the vegetables in an oven-proof dish and drizzle with olive oil and honey. 3. Sprinkle with thyme and salt and pepper. 4. Bake until soft. *Serve warm.

Pappardelle with Mushrooms A mix between a soup and a pasta dish, great for those cold evenings. Serves 4 5 oz assorted mushrooms 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 shallots, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 3 cups chicken stock 6 oz pappardelle, cooked salt & pepper to taste fresh thyme 1. Clean the mushrooms and cut the large ones in half. 2. Heat the oil in a large pot and sauté mushrooms, shallots, and garlic until the mushrooms are golden. 3. Add stock and bring to a boil. 4. Add the cooked pasta, season with salt and pepper, and serve with fresh thyme. Fall Bruschetta One of my favorite, easy fall dishes. Fast and tasty. Serves 4 2 small baguettes olive oil 5 oz mushrooms 1 clove garlic, thinly sliced salt & pepper to taste fresh thyme

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Pizza Bianca Such a great bread to bake–and really easy. Makes 2 2 teaspoon active dry yeast 2 cups warm water 1 tablespoon honey 5 cups flour 3 tablespoons olive oil flaky salt fresh rosemary 1. In a large bowl, dissolve yeast in water and honey; let stand for 5 minutes. 2. Add in flour a little at a time and stir well. 3. Add oil and salt, and stir until dough comes away from the bowl. 4. Knead for 1 minute. 5. Cover with plastic wrap and set in a warm area to rise, about 2 hours. 6. Heat oven to 450ºF. 7, Divide dough into 2 balls and flatten out each on a floured surface. 8. Transfer to baking trays covered with parchment paper. 9. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and rosemary. 10. Bake for 7 to 8 minutes until golden. Fennel & Rosemary-Baked Lamb Fennel seeds get the most amazing taste and aroma when heated up, just you wait! Serves 4 4 double lamb chops salt & pepper to taste fennel seeds 4 rosemary twigs 2 tablespoons olive oil juice from 1 lemon 1. Heat the oven to 400°F. 2. Start with rubbing the salt and pepper and fennel seeds into the lamb chops. 3. Using kitchen twine, tie a rosemary twig onto each chop. 4. Heat the oil in a pan, fry the chops 1 minute on each side. 5. Drizzle with lemon juice and place in the oven. 6. Bake for 5 minutes. *Serve warm.

Espresso & Cinnamon Cake with Nuts & Honey Such a great cake, perfect for picnics–in or out of the forest. Serves 8 1 1⁄ stick butter 2 3 ⁄ light brown sugar 4 1 egg 1 cup plain flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 ⁄ cup strong espresso 4 1 ⁄ teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 1 ⁄ cup milk 4 3 oz unsalted nuts 5 tablespoon honey 1. Preheat the oven to 320°F. 2. Beat butter and sugar until fluffy. 3. Add the egg and mix well. 4. Add flour, baking powder, cinnamon, espresso, and milk and mix well. 5. Pour the batter into a greased, round baking dish. 6. Bake until firm, about 1 hour. *Cool and serve with the nuts and honey on top.

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Styling by Paul Lowe | Photography by Hector Sanchez
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It’s really amazing–by dipping an object in a can of paint you can transform it into something that looks much more “designer” and expensive. It’s super easy, fast, and fun!

So just dip it!
Fill a plastic container with the paint–make sure it’s big enough to dip the bigger items in.

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UTENSILS You will need: wooden utensils oil based paint 1. Dip your utensil in the container of paint. 2. Hold it over the container for a while so that most of the excess paint can drip off. *Once dry they are ready to use. But of course, no dishwasher. I would say these are mostly for decor. SHOES You will need: canvas sneakers oil based paint 1. Dip the shoe and hold it over the container for a while so that most of the excess paint can drip off. 2. Hang the shoe over newspaper by their laces. Make sure they hang straight, otherwise the perfect paint line will be not so perfect. *Once dry they are ready to use.

VASES AND BOWLS You will need: simple white vases or plain bowls, mine are from westelm.com oil based paint 1. Dip the vase or bowl and then hold it over the container for a while so that most of the excess paint can drip off. 2. Place it on a newspaper. Move the vase or bowl every 5 minutes so that it doesn’t get stuck to the paper. *Once dry they are ready to use. LAMPS You will need: wicker lamps, mine are from ikea.com paint Here I cheated. As the shades are too large to dip I simply painted them with a large brush. Just follow the wicker stripes to make the edges sharp.

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SPOONS You will need: old spoons oil based paint 1. Dip the spoon in the paint. 2. Hold it over the container for a while so that most of the excess paint can drip off. *Once dry they are ready to use. But of course, no dishwasher.

CHAIR You will need: chair, I got this one at ikea.com oil based paint This is easier to do before you assemble the chair. 1. Dip each leg in the paint and let it dry on newspaper. *Once 100 per cent dry you can assemble the chair and use it. TABLE You will need: wooden table, this one is from ikea.com oil based paint 1. Paint the top of the table and dip the top of the legs in paint 2. Let them dry on newspaper and assemble the table. *Now it’s ready to use.

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Mexican

I was never a big mexican food fan until I had some real mexican food in Arizona a few years back.

Enough lime, homemade salsa, and tortillas are the key words here.
The flavors are crisp and clean.
Food+styling by Paul Lowe Photography by Colin Cooke
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Mexican Crab Soup Homemade Tortillas

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Chilaquiles with Chicken Tomatillo Salsa

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Pulled Pork with Pickled Onion Fish & Avocado Tortillas

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Flan

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Mexican Recipes
Mexican Crab Soup This is such a great soup, and easy to make. You can even make it a day in advance. Serves 4 1 cup tomato juice 3 ⁄ cup clam juice 4 3 tablespoons lime juice 1 teaspoon Tabasco salt to taste 1 small yellow onion, finely chopped 14 oz fresh crab meat 8 cooked and cleaned shrimps 12 cherry tomatoes, cut in half red chili flakes 1. In a large bowl mix together tomato juice, clam juice, lime juice, and Tabasco. 2. Season with salt. 3. Add onion, crab meat, shrimps, and tomatoes. 4. Chill and serve with a sprinkling of red chii flakes. Homemade Tortillas I promise you that these are awesome, and nothing like store-bought tortillas. Makes 12 2 cups plain flour 1 teaspoon salt 1 stick butter, in cubes 1 ⁄ cup water 4 1. In a large bowl mix flour and salt. 2. Add the butter and use your hands to work it into the flour. The result should be a very coarse mixture. 3. Add water and knead the dough together. If it seems too dry, just add some more water. 4. Cover with plastic wrap and let it rest in the fridge for 1 hour. 5. Cut the dough into 12 pieces, and roll each piece out to a round tortilla. 6. Cook in a dry skillet over high heat, about 40 seconds on each side. 7. Keep warm in a towel. *Serve and enjoy while warm. Tomatillo Salsa This fiery salsa takes food to a new level. Makes 2 cups 2 lbs tomatillos, cleaned and coarsely chopped 4 serrano chilies, coarsely chopped 3 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped 1 ⁄ cup chopped cilantro 2 1 small yellow onion, chopped 2 teaspoons salt 1. Place all the ingredients in a food processor and blend until they’re a smooth salsa. *Keeps in the fridge for 5 to 6 days.

Chilaquiles with Chicken A great salad, perfect for lunch. Serves 4 2 chicken breasts 1 teaspoon red chili flakes 1 ⁄ teaspoon salt 2 1 tablespoon olive oil 4 tortillas, sliced into strips 4 tablespoons corn oil 4 oz feta cheese, crumbled lettuce tomatillo salsa (see recipe) 1 lime, cut into wedges 1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. 2. Rub the chicken with chili flakes, salt, and olive oil. 3. Place in an ovenproof dish and bake for 15 minutes. 4. Take out the breasts and let them rest for 10 minutes. 5. Pull the meat apart and place in a bowl. 6. Heat the oil in a pan and fry the tortilla strips until crispy. 7. Add the strips to a bowl with the feta, lettuce, and chicken. *Serve with tomatillo salsa and lime.

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Fish & Avocado Tortillas These are my favorite. I use cod, but you can use any form white fish you want. Serves 4 1.3 lbs cod filet 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon red chili flakes 1 tablespoon olive oil lettuce 1 avocado, sliced 12 cherry tomatoes, cut in half tomatillo salsa juice from 1 lime fresh cilantro 1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. 2. Rub the cod with chili flakes, salt, and olive oil. 3. Place in an ovenproof dish and bake for 12 to 15 minutes, or until the flakes start falling apart. 4. Fill the tortillas with lettuce, cod, avocado, tomatoes, tomatillo salsa, lime juice, and cilantro. Pulled Pork with Pickled Onion This is the perfect finger food. Or just make them into big tortillas! Serves 8 1 red onion, thinly sliced 1 ⁄ cup white wine vinegar 2 1 ⁄ teaspoon salt 2 4 lbs pork shoulder 2 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon cumin 1 ⁄ teaspoon all spice 4 1 ⁄ teaspoon pepper 2 1 tablespoon oregano 1 ⁄ cup orange juice 2 1 ⁄ cup white wine vinegar 4 mini tortillas tomatillo salsa sour cream, for serving

1. Place onion, vinegar, and salt in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. 2. Let the mixture boil for 1 minute, remove from heat, and let the mixture sit for 4 hours. 3. Heat oven to 260°F. 4. Rub the pork shoulder with all the spices and place it in a large ovenproof dish. 5. Pour orange juice and vinegar over the shoulder, and cover with foil. 6. Bake for 3 hours or until the meat falls apart. 7. Pull the meat apart and place it in a bowl. Add some of the cooking liquid. *Serve with the onion, on mini tortillas, with tomatillo salsa and sour cream. Flan Nothing beats a velvety-golden flan. Serve it with some strong coffee. Serves 6 3 ⁄ cup sugar 4 1 1⁄ cup sweet condensed milk 2 31⁄ cups full fat milk 2 5 large eggs seeds from 1⁄ vanilla bean 2 1 ⁄ teaspoon salt 8 1. Preheat oven to 325°F. 2. Place the sugar in a small saucepan and let it melt on medium heat. 3. Pour into a 9-inch round pie dish. 4. In a large bowl stir together condensed milk, milk, eggs, vanilla, and salt. 5. Pour into the pie dish. 6. Fill the pie dish with warm water until it’s 3⁄ full. 4 7. Cover with foil. 8. Bake for about 1 to 1 1⁄ hours. The flan 4 should be firm while still a little wiggly. 9. Let cool. Loosen the edges with a shape knife and turn it onto a platter. *Serve with whipped cream.

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Silhouettes
I’ve always loved old-fashioned silhouettes. I remember some in our house growing up. I’ve tried to drag them into our time.
Styling by Paul Lowe Photography by Alexandra Grablewski

The Basic Silhouette
Take a photo of someone, and hold it up against a window. The image will be backlit, so the person in front will be dark. Then it’s really easy to cut it out. A good tip is to add an eyelash where the eye is, it looks better that way and your silhouette gets more depth. Use your cutout as a template, you can scan it and make it smaller or bigger.

Book Pages

Here I printed out the silhouettes on old book pages using my home computer. The trick is to just make one at a time, since the paper can be brittle.

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Lampshade

Here I traced silhouettes of people to the fabric using a fabric pen.

I embroidered the people with small stitches of cotton embroidery yarn. Then I added a blue line to match the blue cord. After, I hot glued the fabric on to the shade. Embroidery by Paul Vitale.

Plates

Here I printed out silhouettes of walking people on lazertran decal paper. I cut them out and transferred them to the plates.

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Bag
There is a ton of silhouettes online that you can use. This is a really cute one. I printed it out on lazertran paper for fabric, cut it out, and ironed it to the tote bag (muji.com).

Pillowcases

Here I traced the silhouette onto the pillowcase using a fabric marker and embroidered the silhouette with small stitches. I added “you” and “me” to them as a little something extra. Embroidery by Paul Vitale.

Pillows

I found some cute dog silhouettes online. I printed it out on lazertran paper for fabric, cut it out, and ironed it to the pillows.

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Vase
I printed out the silhouette on lazertran decal paper (lazertran.com). It becomes a decal that you can transfer to any surface.

Necklace

I printed out some mini silhouettes and glued them with a hot glue gun to small jewelry frames. Then I fastened them all to a silver necklace using thing silver wire.

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one of fall’s most amazing fruits. sweet paul shows you how they can be used.
food+styling by paul lowe photography by hector sanchez

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pear soup thyme-roasted chicken with pears (left)

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dried pear slices

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pears in a pot pear & hazelnut pie (left)

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pizza with pear, manchego, & red onion

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Thyme-Roasted Chicken with Pears This is perfect for a Sunday lunch. It’s easy to make, and everything is conveniently in one tray. Can’t beat that! Serves 4 1 large organic chicken 2 tablespoons olive oil salt & pepper to taste 1 small bunch of fresh thyme 2 pounds fingerling potatoes 3 pears, cut into 4 pieces 1 head of garlic, broken up juice of 1 lemon 1 ⁄ cup olive oil 4 1. Preheat oven to 350°F. 2. Rub the chicken with olive oil and salt and pepper. 3. Gently lift the skin of the chicken breasts and place a few sprigs of thyme in the cavity. 4. Place in a large ovenproof dish and bake for about 45 minutes. 5. Mix fingerling potatoes with pears, garlic, lemon juice, and olive oil, and place around the chicken. 6. Roast for another 40 to 45 minutes. 7. Let the chicken cool for about 10 minutes before carving. Pizza with Pear, Manchego, & Red Onion I just love a good pizza, and for me a good pizza is one without tomato sauce. This one is amazing! Serves 4 pizza dough: 1 cup lukewarm water 1 tablespoon honey 1 tablespoon dry yeast 1 ⁄ cups flour 2 2 1 teaspoon salt 4 tablespoons olive oil filling: 2 pears, thinly sliced 2 oz manchego, crumbled 1 ⁄ red onion, thinly sliced 2 fresh thyme flaky sea salt 1. To make the dough, mix water, honey, and yeast in medium-sized bowl. 2. Let sit for 5 minutes as the yeast

starts to work. 3. Add flour, salt, and oil. 4. Work the dough together. 5. Cover with plastic wrap until it rises, around 1 hour. 6. Preheat oven to 450°F 7. On a baking tray press the dough out with your fingers to form a large pizza. 8. Add pear, manchego, and onion. 9. Sprinkle with thyme and salt. 10. Bake for about 5 to 6 minutes, or until golden and crisp. Pear Soup A great fall soup, sweet and filling and perfect for cold nights. Serves 4 1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 small onion, chopped 1 small carrot, cubed 1 small squash, cubed 3 pears, peeled and cubed 4 cups vegetable stock 1 cup heavy cream salt & pepper to taste 4 tablespoons toasted pumpkins seeds fresh thyme for garnish 1. Melt butter and oil in a large saucepan 2. Sauté onion, carrot, squash, and pears until onion is soft. 3. Add stock. Reduce heat and let the soup simmer for 15 minutes. 4. Pour the soup into a food processor and purée until creamy. Transfer the mixture to a saucepan and add cream. 5. Season with salt and pepper. 6. Pour into bowls and garnish with pumpkin seeds and thyme. Pork with Warm Fall Slaw This fall slaw can be served with any type of meat. Serves 4 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 red onion, chopped 5 beets, peeled and quartered 2 pears, quartered 1 ⁄ cup white vine vinegar 4 2 tablespoons brown sugar 1 ⁄ red cabbage, shredded 4 4 large pork chops salt & pepper to taste butter fresh thyme

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1. Heat the oil in a large pan and sauté onion and beets until the onion is soft. 2. Add pears and sauté for 3 minutes. 3. Add vinegar and sugar and mix well. 4. Add the cabbage and cook for another 3 to 4 minutes. 5. Rub the porkchops with salt and pepper and fry in butter for about 4 minutes on each side. 6. Serve with the hot slaw. Maple Syrup–Baked Pears A really fast and easy dessert. It almost makes itself. Serves 4 4 pears 1 ⁄ cup maple syrup 2 2 tablespoons butter 1. Preheat oven to 400°F. 2. Peel the pears and cut them in half. 3. Place pears in an oven proof dish and pour on the maple syrup. 4. Add butter. 5. Bake for 10 minutes, turn them over and bake for another 10 minutes. 6. Serve à la mode. Pear & Hazelnut Pie A really great fall pie, the hazelnut filling has a crunch to it, and is so perfect with the sautéed pears. Serves 8 pie crust: 1 1⁄3 cups plain flour 2 tablespoons sugar 1 stick butter, in pieces 1 egg 1 tablespoon cold water filling: 1 1⁄ cups ground hazelnuts 4 1 1⁄ cup sugar 2 3 egg whites, whipped to a soft peek 4 pears, peeled and cubed 2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons sugar seeds from 1⁄ vanilla pod 2 1. To make the crust, place flour, sugar, and butter in a food processor and blend until mixture looks like breadcrumbs. 2. Add the egg and cold water and blend until it all comes together. 3. Wrap in plastic and and refrigerate for 1 hour. 5. Preheat the oven to 350ºF. 6. Press the cold dough into a greased (round or square) 9-inch pie tin. 7. Trim the edges with a knife. 8. Prick the base with a fork. 9. Bake for 8 minutes. 10. In a large bowl mix together hazelnuts, sugar, and egg whites. 11. Spoon the mixture into the pie and bake for 10 minutes.12. Cool on a wire rack. 13. Place pears, butter, sugar, and vanilla in a pan and cook for 5 minutes. 14. Pour the mixture over the pie and serve.

Pears In a Pot A really fun dessert, every guest gets their own cake. No fighting over the last piece on the cake stand. Serves 4 1 cup ground hazelnuts 1 1⁄ cup sugar 4 1 cup plain flour 1 stick butter, melted 2 tablespoons dark rum 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 6 egg whites, soft peaks 4 pears, peeled 1. Preheat oven to 380ºF. 2. In a large bowl mix together hazelnuts, sugar, and flour. 3. Add butter and vanilla and mix well. 4. Fold the egg whites into the batter. 5. Fill 4 ramekins with the batter and place a pear in each one. 6. Bake for about 20 minutes or until golden. Serve warm. Dried Pear Slices Use as decoration on cakes, cupcakes, or simply place in your tea. 1. Preheat oven to 300ºF. 2. Cut the pear into thick slices. 3. Dip slices in lemon juice and then in sugar. 4. Place on a parchment-lined baking tray and bake for 10 minutes. Then turn them over and bake for another 10. 5. Let cool.

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Har

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rvest

Food by Tina Schultheiss | Styling by Viola Sutanto | Photography by Meg Smith

Fall is the perfect time for a good old bake sale, so come and get it!

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Walnut Apricot Harvest Loaf

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Car

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ramel Apples with Walnuts

Harvest Spiced Cider
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Spiced Popcorn

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Harvest Recipes
Spiced Popcorn Makes 2 quarts 1 ⁄3 cup white popcorn kernels 3 tablespoons vegetable oil 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted 1 teaspoon salt 1 ⁄ teaspoon chili powder 2 1 ⁄ teaspoon ground allspice 4 1 ⁄ teaspoon ground cumin 4 1 ⁄ teaspoon curry powder 2 1 ⁄ teaspoon cayenne pepper 4 1. In a small saucepan melt the unsalted butter on low heat. 2. Add the salt, chili powder, ground allspice, ground cumin, curry powder, and cayenne pepper and stir to combine. Leave the butter and spice mixture on the lowest heat while popping the corn. 3. Pour 3 tablespoons of canola oil and 1 ⁄3 cup popcorn kernels (or enough to cover the bottom of the pan no more than one kernel deep) into a heavy 3-quart pan (or larger) with a lid. 4. Cover and gently shake the pan over medium-high heat, allowing steam to escape the pan. Remove the pan from the heat when kernels have stopped popping. 5. Carefully pour popped kernels into a large bowl and pour the butter and spice mixture over the popcorn. 6. Stir or gently shake the bowl to cover the kernels with the butter mixture. *Don’t wait too long before serving. Walnut Apricot Harvest Loaf Serves 8 to 10 3 ⁄ cup coarsely chopped dried apricots 4 1 cup water 1 1⁄ cups wheat flour 2 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 ⁄ teaspoon salt 2 1 ⁄ cup brown sugar 2 1 ⁄ teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 1 ⁄ teaspoon ground nutmeg 2 1 large egg 1 ⁄ cup vegetable oil 2 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 teaspoon grated orange zest 1 ⁄ cup fresh orange juice 2 1 cup coarsely chopped walnuts 1 ⁄ cup chopped walnuts for the top of the loaves 4 1. Position a rack in the lower third of the oven. 2. Preheat the oven to 350ºF. 3. Grease 4 mini loaf pans (that hold about 2 cups of batter per loaf) or one 9 x 5 inch loaf pan. 4. In a small saucepan, place coarsely chopped apricots and water. 5. Bring to a simmer, then remove pan from heat and set aside to cool. 6. In a bowl stir together wheat flour, baking soda, salt, brown sugar, cinnamon, and nutmeg. 7. In a large bowl whisk together egg, vegetable oil, vanilla, orange zest, orange juice, and the apricot mixture. 8. Slowly add the flour mixture. Fold until all dry ingredients are moistened. 9. Add the coarsely chopped walnuts, stirring just a few times to distribute walnuts into the batter. 10. Pour the batter into the mini loaf pans, about 3⁄ of the way full. 11. Evenly distribute 4 the chopped walnuts on top of each mini loaf. 12. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. If using a 9 x 5 loaf pan bake for 40 to 45 minutes or until toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. 13. Let cool in the pan on a rack for 10 minutes before taking the loaf out to cool completely on the rack.

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Caramel Apples with Walnuts Serves 6 6 gala or red delicious apples 6 wooden sticks from a craft store, washed and dried 14 oz package individually wrapped caramels, unwrapped 2 tablespoons water 1 ⁄ teaspoon almond extract 2 1 cup walnuts, chopped small 1. Wash the apples to get as much wax off as possible, and dry completely. 2. Insert wooden sticks ½ of the way into the stem end of each apple. 3. Place apples on a cookie sheet covered with parchment paper. 4. Place the chopped walnuts into a small bowl, and set aside. 5. Combine caramels and water in a saucepan over low heat. Cook, stirring often, until caramel melts and looks smooth. 6. Stir in the almond extract. 7. Dip each apple into the caramel about ¾ of the way up the apple. Scrape excess off the bottom of the apples on the side of the saucepan. 8. Roll the caramel apple in the bowl of chopped walnuts to cover caramel. 9. Place on the parchment covered cookie sheet and repeat with all of the other apples. *Refrigerate the tray of apples until ready to serve. Harvest-Spiced Cider Serves 4 4 cups unfiltered apple cider 3 cinnamon sticks 3 star anise, whole 1 teaspoon cloves, whole zest of 1 orange dried persimmon or slices of orange peel for garnish 1. Place the cinnamon sticks, star anise, and cloves into a large saucepan over medium heat. 2. Lightly toast the spices in the pan for about 1 minute, until fragrant. 3. Add the apple cider to the spices, simmer for 10 minutes without letting it boil. 4. Reduce the heat to low, add the orange zest, and stir. 5. Using a small handstrainer remove as many of the whole spices as you can. 6. Ladle the cider into mugs, making sure not to include any whole spices that you might have missed. Garnish with dried persimmon pieces or slices of orange peel. *Cider can also be served room temperature in small mason jar.

Cornhusk Doll Cornhusk dolls are one of the oldest forms of dolls known in the Americas. You will need: small natural-colored string or twine scissors bag of corn husks, which can be easily purchased at a local craft store. bucket of water small fall-colored scraps of fabric fall-colored yarn 1. Soak the corn husks in a bucket of water until they are pliable. 2. Take four corn husks and arrange them on top of one another with the straight ends all lined up. 3. Tie the straight ends together tightly with a small piece of string. 4. Trim and round the straight edges with the scissors. 5. Turn upside down and pull long jagged edges of the husk over the trimmed edges–2 husks on each side. 6. With a small piece of string tie about 1 inch down from where it folds over to form the “head.” 7. Take another husk and roll it tightly into a cylinder. Cut the cylinder to measure four to five inches long. Tie at each end with the string, this forms the dolls “arms.” 8. Fit the arms through the center of the doll, right under the neck. 9. Use another piece of string to tie a “waist.” 10. Using small scraps of fall-colored fabric, wrap around the doll to make clothing. 11. Use fall-colored yarn to tie the clothing onto the doll.

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Black Halloween
We are in a spooky halloween mood this time of year at Sweet Paul Magazine. This halloween is all black, just like the soul of a witch.

Styling by Paul Lowe | Photography by Linda Pugliese
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Big and Black

They don’t come much bigger… This funkin is painted black with flat paint to get that dry effect. It looks great on an old chair.

Scary Walls

Just in case you can’t scream yourself… Simply trace the letters onto the fabric and sew with white embroidery thread. Frame in old frames and hang. Embroidery by Paul Vitale.

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Still Life

Scary corner…. By painting some objects in a flat paint they become, all of a sudden, really spooky. The candlestick (momastore.org) is painted, and the bottle has dripping paint on the inside.

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Skeleton Family

A nasty bunch… I bought a bunch of these old photographs at a flea market. I printed out pictures of skulls from online. You can google “old skulls.” Cut them out and glue the skulls on top of the faces.
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Glitter Pumpkin

A little scary/glam… I painted a funkin black, then used German Glass Glitter to glitter one of the ridges of the pumpkins. The leaves are glittered paper that is hot glued to the pumpkin.

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Black Animals

They will eat your soul… These plastic animals are painted with a flat paint. The eyes are pushpins that I cut the pins off, and hot glued them to the heads, Then used a marker to make the pupils.

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Vampire Spiders

They don’t bite, just nibble… I made two pompons, one larger and one smaller, and hot glued them together. The eyes are pushpins and the fangs are paper. Hot glue them into place. The legs are pipe cleaners that are hot glued in place and bent to look like legs.

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happy Halloween

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BRADLEY FARM

Text by Sarah Oster Shasha | Photography by Ellen Silverman
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Ray Bradley will be the last one to tell you, but he’s got groupies. Greenmarket loyalists will argue that Ray’s the real thing; his meats and produce are the stuff of legend, and don’t even get us started about his heirloom tomatoes. Starting out as a chef, it’s fair to say that Ray’s always had a passion for great ingredients and it was this enthusiasm that inspired his sustainable farm in New Paltz, NY. Friends and fans have visited over the years to help harvest, plant, and most recently, eat. “There is no better way for me to combine my passions for cooking and farming than to open up the farm for farm-to-table dinners,” explains Bradley. Decisions on what to serve are based on what is in season, and how well the crop has done. A couple months ago, we were invited to one of these (now totally sold out) dinners. Surrounded by friends, neighbours, and family, the food was delicious and the scenery breathtaking. We left with the recipe (he’d rather call it “cooking tips”) for his incredible Clam Chowder. You can thank us later. To visit and even volunteer, email: info@raybradleyfarm.com

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RAY-INSPIRED CLAM CHOWDER
Inspired by Jasper White’s book, 50 Chowders, this chowder includes a roux and a velouté, making the potatoes a garnish rather than a thickener. Serves 10 1 1⁄ lbs shucked, soft shell clams, chopped fine 2 21⁄ cups liquor from clams 2 5 lbs Ray’s bacon ends, trimmed and diced to ½” 4 tablespoons unsalted butter 3 stalks celery, cleaned and diced to 1⁄3” 2 large onions, peeled and diced to ½” 4 cloves of garlic, peeled and finely chopped 4 sprigs thyme 1 ⁄ teaspoon dried oregano 2 2 bay leaves 1 ⁄ cup all-purpose flour 2 2 small cans clam broth 1 tablespoon Worcester sauce 1 dash Tabasco sauce 1 ⁄ cup heavy cream 2 4 large potatoes, diced

1. Heat a 20 qt pot over low heat and add the bacon. When it has rendered some fat, increase the heat to medium and cook until the bacon is crisp. Remove the bacon from the pot and set it aside. 2. Add the butter and garlic. Cook for 30 seconds. 3. Add the onions,celery, thyme, oregano, and bay leaves. Cook, stirring them until they are soft, but don’t let them brown. 4. Reduce the heat and add the flour, stirring constantly to incorporate it in the vegetable/fat mixture. 5. After a few minutes, when it had become sticky and difficult to stir, add clam broth, stirring vigorously to loosen up any flour that is stuck. 6. Add one can of broth, Worcester sauce, and Tabasco. Stir thoroughly. 7. Add the second can. Stir thoroughly. 8. Add clams and bacon, simmer for 10 minutes. 9. Take the mixture off the flame until cool, then refrigerate over night. 10. The next day, add cream and potatoes and simmer until the potatoes are tender.

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THERE IS NO BETTER WAY FOR ME TO COMBINE MY PASSIONS FOR COOKING AND FARMING THAN TO OPEN UP THE FARM FOR DINNERS”

FARM-tO-tABLE
Ray’s whole crop was flooded by hurricane Irene. Please visit raybradleyfarm.com for donations.

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NORDIC COOKING

These are my takes on some of my grandmother’s favorite recipes.
Food+styling by Paul Lowe | Photography by Ellen Silverman

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DILL-CURED SALMON

MUSSEL SOUP

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FISH PIE

BAKED COD WITH EGGS & CAPER SAUCE

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PASTA WITH SMOKED SALMON, CAPERS, & LEMON

APPLES & CREAM
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NORDIC COOKING RECIPES
Fish Pie My take on her fish pie. Hers was much heavier, with tons of butter and cream. Serves 4 2 lbs cod filets, skin removed 2 tablespoons butter 4 shallots, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons plain flour 1 ⁄ cup milk 2 1 ⁄ cup cream 2 1 tablespoon horseradish 2 tablespoons chopped parsley salt & pepper to taste 12 cherry tomatoes 4 thick slices of white bread, torn 2 tablespoons butter, melted 1. Preheat the oven to 390ºF. 2. Put water in a large pot and bring to a boil. 3. Add the fish and turn the heat down. It should be just below the boiling point. 4. Let the fish simmer for 6 minutes. 5. Take it out and flake. 6. Melt the butter in a large pot and add the shallots. 7. Sauté until soft. 8. Stir in the flour. 9. Add milk and cream and stir until there are no lumps of flour left. 10. Add horseradish and fish. 11. Season with salt and pepper. 12. Stir in tomatoes. 13. Spoon the mixture into a greased, ovenproof dish and sprinkle with bread bits. 14. Pour the butter over and bake until golden. *Serve warm with potatoes and carrots.

Dill-Cured Salmon I so loved this dish growing up, it was one of my favorites. Always serve with a sweet mustard. Serves 12 1 side of the best quality wild salmon, skin left on 1 large bunch dill, chopped finely 2 tablespoons pink peppercorns left whole rind of one lemon 1 ⁄ cup white sugar 2 1 ⁄ cup Maldon salt 2 3 tablespoons cognac or vodka 1. Mix dill, lemon rind, peppercorns, sugar, and salt in a bowl. 2. Lay salmon out on a flat dish and press mixture onto the fish, patting it down firmly as you go. 3. Slowly pour the liquor over the fish, then cover with plastic wrap. 4. Place in the fridge for 48 hours, turning every 12 hours. 5. Slice thinly and serve with sweet mustard. Pasta with Smoked Salmon, Capers, & Lemon This is such an easy dish, I can still remember her making this one. It was my favorite home-from-school dish. Serves 4 8 oz smoked salmon, in pieces 1 ⁄ cup olive oil 4 juice from 1 lemon 3 tablespoon capers fresh parsley grated zest from 1 lemon 1 pound pasta, any kind salt to taste 1. Mix together smoked salmon, oil, lemon juice, capers, parsley, and lemon zest in a large bowl. 2. Cook pasta al dente in salted water. Drain and add to the bowl. 3. Toss well and serve.

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Baked Cod with Eggs & Caper Sauce Cod was a big thing in our family, we all loved it and still do. This sauce is my take on a Nordic classic. Serves 4 3 eggs 2 tablespoons capers, finely chopped 2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley 1 ⁄ cup olive oil 2 salt & pepper to taste 4 cod filets, about 6 to 7 oz each olive oil 1. Preheat oven to 390ºF. 2. Hard boil the eggs, peel them, and place the egg yolks in a bowl. 3. Mash them with a fork. 4. Add capers, parsley, and olive oil. 5. Stir well and season with salt and pepper. 6. Place the fish on a rimmed baking tray and drizzle with olive oil. 7. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. 8. Bake for about 12 to 15 minutes, or until the cod is flaky. *Serve warm with the sauce, potatoes, and carrots. Mussel Soup It’s not fall without mussel soup. This one is so easy and tasty. Serves 4 2 lbs mussels, cleaned 2 tablespoons butter 4 shallots, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1 cup dry white wine 1 cup fish stock 1 1⁄ cup heavy cream 2 salt & pepper to taste 1. Discard any mussels that have opened. 2. Melt the butter in a large pot and sauté shallots and garlic until soft. 3. Add the mussels and wine, put on a lid, and let them steam for about 6 minutes. 4. Remove the mussels, and discard the ones that have not opened. 5. Add stock and cream. 6. Let the soup simmer until it’s reduced by 1⁄ . 7. Season with salt 4 and pepper. 8. Add the mussels and serve.

Apples & Cream Whenever I eat this dish it almost bring tears to my eyes. I still remember all the happy moments when we all ate this dessert together. Serves 4 2 tablespoons butter 4 golden delicious apples, peeled, cored, and diced 2 tablespoons honey 4 tablespoons water 2 tablespoons Calvados 1 ⁄ teaspoon cinnamon 2 1 ⁄ cup breadcrumbs 2 1 tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon cinnamon whipped cream 1. Heat the butter in a pan and sauté apples for 2 minutes. 2. Add honey, water, Calvados, and cinnamon and let me mixture cook until the apples are soft but not mushy. 3. Let cool. 4. Toast the breadcrumbs with sugar and cinnamon in a dry pan. 5. Fill a bowl with the apples, then a layer of cream, and finally the breadcrumbs. 6. Chill before serving.

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Weather too bad outside to go camping? Throw a camping party instead.
Photography by Linda Pugliese | Crafts by Sarah Goldschadt Food by Erin Phraner | Props by Jeanne Lurvey

CAMPING!

GO

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cake toppers

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double-chocolate cake
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gift tags

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recipes
Simple Double-Chocolate Cake Serves 8 to 10 For the cake: unsalted butter, for the pan 3 ⁄ cup unsweetened Dutch cocoa powder, 4 plus more for the pan 2 large eggs 1 ⁄ cup sour cream 2 1 cup warm water 3 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1 1⁄ cups all-purpose flour 2 1 1⁄ cups granulated sugar 2 1 1⁄ teaspoons baking soda 2 3 ⁄ teaspoon baking powder 4 1 ⁄ teaspoon salt 2 For the frosting 3 sticks unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 oz melted unsweetened chocolate, cooled slightly 1 ⁄ teaspoon vanilla 2 2 to 3 cups confectioners sugar, sifted 1. Preheat the oven to 350˚F. 2. Butter 2 6-inch or 8-inch round cake pans and line with parchment paper (you will have leftover batter if using the smaller pans; use it to make cupcakes!) 3. Butter the parchment and dust with cocoa powder. 4. Whisk the eggs, sour cream, water, vegetable oil, and vanilla in a large bowl until smooth. 5. Beat the flour, cocoa powder, sugar, baking soda, baking powder, and salt together with an electric mixer. 6. Slowly beat in the egg mixture and continue beating until smooth, about 2 minutes. 7. Divide the batter among the prepared pans, filling each about 3⁄ of the way. 8. Bake in the center of the oven until a 4 toothpick comes out clean, about 40 minutes. 9. Cool the pans on a rack for 20 minutes, then invert the cakes onto the rack to cool completely. 10. Beat the butter in a large bowl with an electric mixer until fluffy. 11. Add the melted chocolate and vanilla, then slowly beat in the confectioners sugar until smooth. 12. Place the cakes on serving plates. Spread the frosting over the tops and sides of the cakes, or stack the cakes to create two layers; spread frosting between layers, then frost the top and sides of the cake.

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Cake Toppers You will need: printer (or upload to a printing center online) card stock toothpicks clear tape scissors 1. Download CAMPGROUND pattern and cut out. 2. Tape a toothpick to the back with clear tape.

Gift Tags You will need: printer (or upload to a printing center online) punch tool baker’s twine card stock scissors kraft paper 1. Download GIFT TAG pattern and cut out. 2. Punch hole in center. 3. Wrap gifts with kraft paper. 4. Attach gift tag with baker’s twine.

Cloud Garland You will need: printer (or upload to a printing center online) card stock scissors thread needle bamboo skewers tree base (optional) 1. Download CLOUD pattern and cut out. 2. Thread needle and use a running stitch going through the front of the cloud first so the stitch is in the back. It is also best to keep the stitches on the top of the cloud so it hangs better. 3. Tie each end to a bamboo skewer. 4. Drill a hole or use a screw to make a hole in the tree base. Place bamboo skewer in each hole. All templates can be found on sweetpaul.typepad.com

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Food+styling by Paul Lowe | Photography by Frances Janisch

avocados

*Thanks to Sydney Spencer for supplying us with the wonderful avocados.

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not many things are

BETTER a RIPE avocado.

than

When your fingers touch the skin and you press gently and the meat gives in just a little, then you know you have a good avocado in your hands.

Avocado with Toast, Lemon, & Chili

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Pizza with Caramelized Onions, Gorgonzola, & Avocado

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avocado
TIPS!
once you cut the it can go brown very

a few

when the

avocado
IS RIPE
easier
you can put it in the fridge, that stops the ripening &

MEAT

KEEPS IT LONGER.
It’s

fast, so drizzle with
to prevent it.

LIME OR LEMON JUICE

to peel and cut a

COLD AVOCADO.

Grilled Avocado Salad with Warm Bacon Vinaigrette

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Avocado & Corn Soup

more

60%
potassium
so they’re not only

AVOCADOS have

then a

banana,

GOOD,
they’re also

for

US.
Pasta with Lobster, Capers, & Avocado

good

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Beer Deep-Fried Avocado

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avocado

RECIPES
Avocado & Corn Soup Serve this soup chilled, it has lots of awesome flavor. Serves 4 2 tablespoons olive oil fresh corn from 2 cobs 1 onion, chopped 1 garlic clove, chopped 4 cups vegetable stock 2 ripe avocados, chopped 2 tablespoons lime juice salt & pepper to taste 1. Heat the oil in a large pot. 2. Sauté corn, onion, and garlic until the onion goes soft. 3. Remove 4 tablespoons of the mixture, set aside. 4. Add stock and let the soup simmer for 20 minutes. 5. Remove from the heat and cool. 6. Place the soup, avocados, and lime juice in a blender and blend until smooth. 7. Season with salt and pepper. 8. Chill and serve in bowl with the extra corn and some chopped avocado. Pasta with Lobster, Capers, & Avocado If you think lobster is too much of a luxury, you can change it to shrimp. Serves 4 cooked meat from 1 lobster, coarsely chopped 1 ⁄ cup olive oil 4 juice from 1 lemon 3 tablespoon capers 2 ripe avocados, peeled and cubed 1 tablespoon dill grated zest from 1 lemon 1 pound pasta, any kind salt to taste 1. Mix together lobster, oil, lemon juice, capers, avocado, dill, and lemon zest in a large bowl. 2. Cook pasta al dente in salted water. Drain and add to the bowl. 3. Toss well and serve.

Avocado with Toast, Lemon, & Chili This is my go-to dish when I need a snack. It’s easy, tasty, and quite healthy. Serves 4 2 ripe avocados 8 slices of good bread, toasted flaky salt chili flakes 1 lemon, in wedges olive oil 1. Cut the avocados in half, remove the pit, and gently peel of the skin. 2. Cut into wedges. 3. Place the toast on plates, add avocado, and sprinkle with salt and chili. 4. Drizzle with lemon juice and olive oil and serve. Beer Deep-Fried Avocado I know, sounds like overkill, but you just wait and taste… Serves 4 3 ripe avocados 1 ⁄3 cup beer 1 1 cup plain flour vegetable oil, for frying flaky salt 1. Peel the avocados and cut them in 4 pieces. 2. In a large bowl mix together beer and flour until it becomes a smooth batter. 3. Heat the oil to 365ºF in a large pot. 4. Working in batches, toss two avocado wedges in the batter at a time, and then put them into the pot. 5. Fry them, turning once, for about 1 to 2 minutes. They should be golden. 6. Transfer with a slotted spoon to paper towels to drain. 7. Sprinkle with salt. *Serve while warm.

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Grilled Avocado Salad with Warm Bacon Vinaigrette We are pushing things here, but believe me, grilling brings out the avocado flavor and takes it to a new level. Serves 4 4 strips of bacon, in pieces 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons balsamico salt & pepper to taste 1 ⁄ teaspoon red chili flakes 4 olive oil 3 ripe avocados, peeled and quartred 3 tomatoes, cut into wedges boston lettuce 1. In a pan, fry the bacon until crisp. 2. Remove some of the fat from the pan, you will need 2 tablespoons. 3. Add the olive oil and balsamic. 4. Season with salt and pepper, and red chili flakes. 5. Rub all the avocado wedges in with the olive oil. 6. Heat a grill pan and grill the avocado 1 minute on each side. 7. Transfer to a large bowl and add tomatoes and lettuce. 8. Drizzle the vinaigrette over the salad and serve. Pizza with Caramelized Onions, Gorgonzola, & Avocado Love this pizza. So many amazing flavors together. Adding some honey to the dough makes it extra crispy. Serves 4 1 cup warm water 1 tablespoon honey 1 tablespoon dry yeast 2.5 cups flour 1 teaspoon salt 4 tablespoon olive oil

1. To make the dough, mix water, honey, and yeast in a bowl. 2. Leave it for 5 minutes so that the yeast starts to work. 3. Add flour, salt, and oil. 4. Work the dough well together. 5. Cover with plastic and let it rise for 1 hour. 6. On a baking tray press the dough out with your fingers to form a large pizza. Filling: 1 large onion, thinly sliced 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons water 3 oz gorgonzola, crumbled 2 table spoons olive oil 1 avocado, peeled and cubed fresh parsley salt & pepper to taste 1. Preheat oven to 400°F 2. Place onion, oil, and water in a pan and sauté until the onion turns light brown and is soft. 3. Divide it over the pizza together with gorgonzola. 4. Drizzle with oil. 5. Bake until golden, about 12 minutes. 6. Take it out and add avocado, parsley, and salt and pepper.

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Pantry Confections
Styling by Paul Lowe Photography by Linda Pugliese

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He brought fun and color back into our homes. Jonathan Adler shares his ups and downs in the kitchen with us.

Do you have any secret tools in the kitchen, anything that you could never live without? I couldn’t live without my collection of vintage Dansk cookware in bright yellow and tomato red. They aren’t the most ergonomic or technologically advanced pots and pans, but they make me happy. If you could change anything about your kitchen, what would it be? I would want it to be teeming with sous-chefs. Other than that, I’m pretty happy with my kitchen. What do you always have stocked in your kitchen? Any specific products you always want to have on hand? I am married to a Brit and our kitchen is overflowing with tea. Tea, tea, tea! Our cabinets look like we’re crazy hoarders who are stockpiling tea to prepare for a life spent underground after nuclear armageddon. Tea! And our main topic of conversation is who made the last round of tea, who didn’t fill the kettle, etc. We’re like a working class family on Coronation Street. What’s your go-to dish to make at home? Roast chicken! Easy, breezy, delicious! The availability of store-bought roast chickens has made people forget about how delicious a home-roasted chicken is, especially if you fill the pan with yummy fixings–onions, parsnips (yum!), garlic. And I think that rotisseries are the most overrated invention. I don’t want my chicken spinning around all the time. I want it in a good, proper roasting pan, stewing in its own juices.

What was your most nightmarish kitchen situation? Any major catastrophes? I’m a potter and I’ve had some real disasters with my kiln which is kind of like a giant oven. In my youth I accidentally burnt down buildings and melted down a kiln or two, so in my dotage I’ve become hyper vigilant about avoiding any fire catastrophes. If you could only eat one thing for the rest of your life, what would it be? Besides the aforementioned roast chicken, I’ve had a lifelong commitment to apple pie. Are there any foods you can’t stand? I would be very happy to live in a world without capers.

What does home cooking mean to you?

HEALTH, COMFORT, CONVERSATION, LAUGHTER, & HAPPINESS.

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