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Making the Connection: Food Security and Public Health

Making the Connection: Food Security and Public Health

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Published by carysbriddon815
Making the Connection: Food Security and Public Health
Making the Connection: Food Security and Public Health

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Published by: carysbriddon815 on Oct 19, 2011
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10/19/2011

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Poor eating habits follow food production, processing, distribution and
marketing trends. Canadians of all ages, are consuming less than ad-
equate, or minimally adequate, intakes of most food groups .
Table 5 reveals that Canadian adolescents ingest 33 percent of their
energy daily from “other” foods (pop, chips, candy and sweets). Simi-
larly the 1988–1994 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination
Survey showed that “energy-dense, nutrient-poor” foods now account
for more than 30 percent of American children’s daily energy intake,
with sweeteners and desserts jointly accounting for nearly 25 percent.
(Centres for Disease Control and Prevention 2002b)

19

TABLE 5Percent of macro-nutrients by food group in the diet of a Canadian
male adolescent (13–17)
Grains

Fruits &

Milk

Meats &

Mixed

Other

VegetablesProductsAlternatesFoods

Energy

20

11

14

15

7

33

Carbohydrate

28

16

9

2

6

39

Protein

15

5

23

38

9

10

Fat

8

5

19

26

8

34

The eating habits of BC residents also fare poorly. A recent report
from the Provincial Health Officer revealed that 25 percent of adult
residents are consuming more than 35 percent of their daily calories
from fat (BC Ministry of Health Services 2002). Taking into account the
contribution of both food and supplements, the report further revealed:
•The majority of BC residents eat less than the recommended amounts
of fruits, vegetables and milk products;
•Many BC adults have inadequate intakes of folate, vitamin B6 and
B12, vitamin C, magnesium and zinc;
•Calcium and fibre intake was below recommended levels for all adults;

•10 to 14 percent of pre-menopausal women had inadequate iron
intake;
•Supplement use is widespread among BC adults and increases with

age;

•80 percent of women 71 years and older reported taking nutritional
supplements.

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