P. 1
Sports Social Media 2011

Sports Social Media 2011

|Views: 44|Likes:
Published by Jennifer Van Dijk
New report on navigating the complexities of digital sports marketing to the Hispanic market.
New report on navigating the complexities of digital sports marketing to the Hispanic market.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Jennifer Van Dijk on Oct 20, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/16/2012

pdf

text

original

 

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  
   

Social Media and Sports: The Winning Pair  
    Produced  by  The  Adam  R  Jacobson  Editorial  Services  and  Research  Consultancy  

         

  Distributed  exclusively  by  

 

   
 

    Presented  by      

   
     

 
 

 

 

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

2    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

 

TABLE  OF  CONTENTS
  INTRODUCTION                

 
      p.    3   p.    4   p.    7   p.  13   p.  15   p.  18   p.  22   p.  27   p.  28   p.  30  

THE  MOBILE  EXPLOSION:  HERE  AND  NOW    

THE  POWER  OF  SPORTS:  EMOTION  IN  THE  MOMENT  

BEING  SOCIAL:    THE  MARKETER’S  KEY  TO  SOCIAL  MEDIA       AN  ESSENTIAL  COMPONENT  OF  THE  ‘NEW  360’     A  FAST  START,  THANKS  TO  SOCIAL  MEDIA     THE  NETWORK  SOCIAL:  A  MEDIA  EMBRACE     A  COMPONENT  FOR  YOUR  EVERYDAY  LIFE     CASUAL  OR  CORE:  REACHING  ALL  FANS   AT  THE  FOREFRONT  OF  THE  FUTURE                                

HISPANIC  MARKET  OVERVIEW  reports  are  produced   by  The  Adam  R  Jacobson  Editorial  Services  and   Research  Consultancy  and  distributed  through  a   strategic  partnership  with  HispanicAd.com.  
©  2011  Adam  R  Jacobson.  Use  of  this  report  is  prohibited  without  the   expressed  written  consent  of  the  content  creator.  Unauthorized   distribution  and  online  hosting  of  this  report  is  subject  to  criminal   prosecution  under  intellectual  property  laws  administered  by  the   state  of  Florida  and  as  applicable  under  Federal  legislative  action.    

Advertising  Sales  Representative:     Manny  Ballestero  -­‐-­‐  973-­‐540-­‐8859  (office);    973-­‐214-­‐1972  (cell)   mballestero@hispanicad.com  

2    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

3    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

INTRODUCTION  
Social  media.     We  read  about  it  every  day,  in  what  has  become  a  never-­‐ending  flow  of  news  stories  gushing  about  its   potential  for  marketers,  and  how  advertisers  are  already  engaging  with  consumers  through  Twitter  and   Facebook  fan  pages.   Social  media  and  the  Hispanic  consumer  is  another  topic  that’s  received  much  attention  in  recent  years.   As  multiple  research  studies  have  shown,  Latinos  overindex  when  it  comes  to  the  use  of  social  media.   They’re  also  leading  the  mobile  revolution,  shattering  the  “digital  divide”  by  eschewing  broadband  and   laptops  or  PCs  by  investing  in  tablet  devices  and  smartphones,  and  using  those  devices  as  their  primary   internet  connection  point.   There’s  much  to  be  learned  about  how  to  properly  target  consumers  through  social  media,  in  particular   those  that  may  prefer  to  communicate  in  Spanish.  Yet  one  conversation  that  has  yet  to  dominate   discussions  on  social  media  involves  sports  and  social  media  in  the  U.S.  Hispanic  market.   Think  about  it:  Sports  fans  are  actively  engaged  in  social  media.  From  checking  scores  to  chiming  in  with   an  opinion  on  a  Twitter  feed  or  Facebook  page,  the  time  spent  engaged  with  other  fans  and  sports   properties  continues  to  grow.  At  the  same  time,  Latinos  are  taking  part  in  these  social  media  platforms   while  using  a  mobile  device  –  not  a  computer.     Media  companies  including  Univision,  Telemundo  and  ESPN  Deportes  are  actively  developing  new  Apps   for  the  Hispanic  sports  fan,  and  looking  for  ways  in  which  an  advertiser  can  become  a  sponsor  to  existing   Apps.  Sports  media  –  as  are  sports  teams  and  leagues  –  also  seek  to  perfect  ways  in  which  a  sponsor  can   become  a  part  of  a  conversation  without  it  morphing  into  just  another  delivery  vehicle  for  an  advertising   message.     This  Hispanic  Market  Overview  discusses  the  latest  trends  in  social  media  and  how  sports  properties  are   developing  digital  and  mobile  tools  with  sports  fans  –  and  advertisers  –  in  mind.     With  the  2012  Upfront  season  still  in  progress,  we  hope  advertisers  and  marketers  gain  a  greater   understanding  of  social  media,  and  why  reaching  Hispanic  consumers  through  one  the  most  passionate   touchpoints  in  the  Latino  marketplaces  may  make  perfect  sense  for  a  CMO  or  brand  manager.        

Adam R Jacobson

3    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

4    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

THE  MOBILE  EXPLOSION:  HERE  AND  NOW  
The  laptop  is  so  2004.  The  desktop  computer  is  about  as  fashionable  as  a  portable  CD  player.   Smartphones  and  tablet  devices  are  swiftly  revolutionizing  how  we  interact  with  friends,  relatives  and   businesses.  They  are  also  playing  a  highly  integral  role  in  how  we  shop,  and  how  we  may  be  influenced   in  our  decision-­‐making  when  it  comes  time  to  purchase  a  good  or  service.   Marketers  and  advertisers  have  taken  notice.  According  to  eMarketer  data  for  September  2011,  U.S.   mobile  ad  spending  is  set  to  surge  from  $743  million  in  2010  to  nearly  $4.4  billion  in  2015.  Why?  By  New   Year’s  Day  2012  38  percent  of  all  mobile  phone  users  in  the  U.S.  will  possess  a  smartphone.  Of  these   smartphone  users,  41  percent  will  use  the  mobile  internet  at  least  once  per  month.     eMarketer  estimates  include  spending  on  display  ads,  such  as  banners,  video  and  rich  media.  But,  more   importantly,  it  factors  in  the  key  growth  areas  of  paid  search  advertising  and  SMS-­‐based  advertising.  Ads   viewed  on  both  mobile  phones  and  tablets  are  included  in  eMarketer’s  forecast.   As  of  fall  2011,  message-­‐based  formats  comprise  $442.6  million  of  the  $1.2  billion  invested  in  mobile  ad   spending  in  the  U.S.  However,  text-­‐based  advertising  has  peaked  –  eMarketer  predicts  that  in  2012   banners  and  rich  media  and  search  will  account  for  66  percent  of  all  mobile  ad  spending,  accounting  for   nearly  $595  million.  Messaging  is  expected  to  account  for  just  14  percent  of  all  mobile  ad  dollars  in  four   years.   Video  is  also  expected  to  enjoy  a  swift  rise  in  ad  dollar  allocation,  growing  from  $57.6  million  in  2011  to   $395.6  million  in  2015.   INTERNET  MEDIA:  THE  GROWTH  ENGINE  OF  U.S.  ADVERTISING     Total  advertising  expenditures  through  the  first  half  of  2011  grew  3.2  percent  year-­‐over-­‐year,  to  $71.5   billion,  according  to  data  released  in  September  2011  by  Kantar  Media.  For  Q2  2011,  year-­‐over-­‐year   spending  grew  2.8  percent  -­‐-­‐  a  slowdown  attributed  to  ongoing  uncertainty  about  the  “durability  of  an   advertising  recovery  that  is  into  its  second  year,”  says  Kantar  Media  North  America  SVP  of  Research  Jon   Swallen.  “Key  ad  spend  indicators  are  painting  a  mixed  picture.  On  one  hand,  a  majority  of  media  types   actually  improved  their  performance  from  Q1  to  Q2.  On  the  other,  spending  growth  for  the  Top  100   advertisers  stalled  in  Q2.”   While  cable  television  and  outdoor  ad  expenditures  enjoyed  strong  growth,  it  is  internet  media  that   continues  to  see  explosive  growth.  Overall,  the  category  enjoyed  10.4  percent  year-­‐over-­‐year  growth  in   the  first  half  of  2011.  Internet  media  represented  more  than  50  percent  of  the  dollar  gain  in  total  ad   expenditures  during  the  first  half  of  2011.  Online/digital  display  ad  spending  increased  13  percent  from   the  first  half  of  2010;  investment  in  search-­‐based  online  advertising  rose  9  percent.  Each  form  of  online   advertising  benefitted  from  a  surge  of  investment  from  the  travel,  local  services  and  insurance   categories.     By  comparison,  television  grew  1.8  percent  from  the  first  half  of  2010;  Spanish-­‐language  television   improved  1.7  percent  primarily  due  to  investment  from  financial  service  providers.  This  offset  spending   dips  from  telecom  companies  such  as  T-­‐Mobile,  AT&T,  Sprint  and  Verizon  Wireless.    

4    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

5    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

THE  DIGITAL  BRAND  LEADERS  
Procter  &  Gamble  Co.  has  long  been  one  of  the  most-­‐active  advertisers  in  U.S.  Hispanic  media.  Although   the  corporation’s  year-­‐over-­‐year  spending  declined  nearly  8  percent,  it  is  still  the  No.  1  overall   advertiser,  with  $1.38  billion  invested  in  all  media  during  the  first  six  months  of  2011.  Spanish-­‐language   media  has  benefited  from  shifting  budgets  at  P&G,  but  dollars  placed  in  internet  media  are  arriving  at   the  expense  of  magazines  and  both  cable  and  network  television.     The  No.  2  overall  advertiser  during  the  first  six  months  of  2011  was  AT&T,  with  total  ad  expenditures   down  2.6  percent,  to  $1.13  billion.  The  primary  reason  for  the  dip:  AT&T’s  contested  merger  with  T-­‐ Mobile,  now  under  U.S.  Justice  Department  scrutiny.  Even  so,  Verizon  sliced  its  1H  2011  budget  by  22.5   percent  from  the  first  half  of  ’10,  to  $808.7  million,  marking  the  steepest  budget  cut  among  the  top  10   advertisers.     Interestingly,  the  top  total-­‐market  online  advertisers  aren’t  the  same  as  the  top  television  advertisers.  In   fact,  only  General  Motors,  Verizon,  Comcast  and  the  aforementioned  AT&T  and  P&G  are  present  on   both  top  10  lists.  The  top  television  advertiser  in  the  first  half  of  2011  was  AT&T,  with  ad  spending  down   3.7  percent,  to  $789.4  million.  At  the  same  time,  AT&T’s  internet  advertising  expenditures  surged  25.4   percent,  to  $140.7  million.     The  10  largest  total-­‐market  Internet   advertisers  invested  $1.3  billion  in   search  and  display  campaigns   during  the  first  six  months  of  2011,   up  25  percent  from  the  same  period   in  2010.       AT&T,  Verizon  and  Sprint  each  made   the  list;  given  the  swift  growth  of   smartphone  use  and  internet   connectivity  through  a  mobile   device,  this  activity  will  likely  continue  to  be  strong  for  several  years.  This  could  lead  to  long-­‐term   investment  opportunities  for  digital  and  online  platforms  targeted  to  Latinos,  in  particular  sports-­‐ minded  Hispanic  consumers.   We  also  take  note  of  the  internet  advertising  activity  from  Progressive  Corp.,  up  more  than  100  percent   from  the  first  six  months  of  2010,  pushing  the  insurance  company  ahead  of  Verizon.  Given  the  growth  of   the  insurance  sector,  in  particular  with  Hispanic  consumer,  that  could  be  seen  in  the  next  decade,   competing  insurers  including  Allstate,  GEICO,  State  Farm  and  American  Family  Insurance  could  benefit   from  following  Progressive’s  lead.  As  Allstate  and  State  Farm  are  highly  involved  with  Hispanic  sports   properties,  extending  their  brand  messages  to  the  digital  space  through  social  media  platforms  seems   like  a  natural  step  for  this  important  category.  

5    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

6    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

CONNECTION  COMPREHENSION  
According  to  Nielsen’s  State  of  the  Media:  The  Social  Media  Report  released  in  September  2011,  U.S.   internet  users  spend  25  percent  of  their  time  using  the  internet  engaged  in  social  networks  and/or   blogs.  Of  those  that  engage  in  social  media,  40  percent  access  content  from  a  mobile  device.       If  that  doesn’t  entice  marketers,  this  will:     • More  than  half  of  active  adults  on  social  networks  follow  a  brand,  Nielsen  notes.  

As  Hispanics  overindex  with  respect  to  use  of  smartphones  and  mobile  internet  devices,  it  is  highly   essential  for  marketers  and  advertisers  to  actively  engage  with  Latino  consumers  through  social  media.   The  relative  youth  of  the  U.S.  Hispanic  market,  compared  to  the  total  population,  also  makes  the   digitally  connected  Latino  highly  desirable  to  CMOs  and  brand  managers  who  seek  to  gain  market  share   in  a  challenging  economy.   The  most  active  social  media  participants  are  women  between  the  ages  of  18  and  34.  They  are  just  as   likely  to  be  Hispanic  as  they  are  Asian  or  Anglo,  and  are  less  likely  to  be  African-­‐American.  They  are   highly  educated  and  are  on  their  way  to  incremental  income  growth,  as  they  are  early  in  their   professional  development  and  careers.     What  are  people  using?  Facebook  is  the  dominant  social  media  service,  followed  by  professionally   focused  LinkedIn,  Twitter  and  Tumblr,  which  has  surged  in  popularity  among  female  teens  since  2010,   Nielsen  finds.  What  is  Tumblr?  It  can  best  be  described  as  Twitter-­‐style  short  messaging  to  followers   with  a  wide  variety  of  content-­‐sharing  capabilities,  including  music,  video,  photos  and  blogging   platforms.  According  to  Captura  Group’s  Lee  Van,  Tumblr  has  grown  exponentially  among  Hispanics  and   is  now  a  platform  any  online  marketer  should  seriously  consider  when  seeking  Latino  consumers.  In  May   2011,  as  Captura  Group’s  Vann  reports,  787,000  Hispanics  visited  Tumblr,  according  to  comScore.   Latinos  comprised  9  percent  of  the  social  media  network’s  total  U.S.  traffic.  By  July  2011,  Tumblr’s   Hispanic  visitor  count  exploded  to  1.5  million,  accounting  for  11  percent  of  all  domestic  traffic.     Latino  smartphone  and  tablet  users  are  also   highly  active  on  YouTube,  the  dominant  portal   for  video  content  (legal  and  illegal);  “check-­‐in”   social  networks  such  as  FourSquare;  and   MySpace,  which  still  attracts  large  numbers  of   users  –  many  of  them  Latino,  according  to  a   recent  Mintel  report.  Yelp  and  Chowhound   Source:  comScore,  July  2011   attract  large  numbers  of  foodies  eager  to  share   their  opinions  on  a  restaurant;  TripAdvisor  is  one     of  several  travel-­‐focused  social  media  platforms  offering  individuals  the  chance  to  praise  or  pan  a  hotel.   Countless  other  social  media  platforms  exist.  Visitors  to  www.jakeadams.net  can  share  stories  posted  to     the  WordPress  site  on  Blogger,  Digg,  Delicious,  StumbleUpon,  Reddit,  Mixx,  Technorati,  FriendFeed,   Newsvine,  7Live7,  Adfty,  Arto,  Bebo,  Blip,  Brainify,  Current,  Corkboard,  Xanga  and  several  other  social   media  platforms.  Are  all  of  these  platforms  viable?  Perhaps  that’s  not  the  question  to  ask.  Rather,  one   should  be  asking  which  one  of  these  platforms  will  be  the  next  to  explode  in  popularity.   WHAT  LATINOS  VISIT  WHEN  ON  THE  INTERNET   Univision.com  –  3.5  Million  Hispanic  visitors     Tumblr  –  1.5  Million  Hispanic  visitors     MSN  Latino  –  1.5  Million  Hispanic  visitors   Terra.com  –  740,000  Hispanic  visitors     AOL  Latino  –  650,000  Hispanic  visitors   6    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

7    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

THE  POWER  OF  SPORTS:  EMOTION  IN  THE  MOMENT  
Social  media  marketing  to  Hispanics  presents  myriad  opportunities  for  advertisers  and  brand  managers   seeking  to  capture  and  cultivate  a  devoted  consumer  base.   Engaging  with  Latinos  through  sports-­‐minded  digital  and  mobile  platforms  could  yield  even  richer   dividends  for  marketers.     Global  sports  and  entertainment  marketing  agency  Wasserman  Media  Group  works  closely  with  CMOs,   brand  managers,  sports  properties,  networks,  leagues,  teams  and  athletes  in  developing  the  most   appropriate  digital  and  mobile  sponsorship  strategies.  An  entire  division  of  the  company  is  devoted  to   the  Hispanic  market  in  the  US  and  Latin  America.     Heidi  Pellerano,  who  serves  as  Wasserman’s  vice  president  of  Hispanic  marketing  based  in  the   company’s  LA  global  headquarters,  strongly  believes  that  social  media  is  a  great  catalyst  for  brands  to   tap  into  a  group  of  people  that  are  eager  to  share  their  emotions  in  a  digital  platform.   “There  is  a  very  strong  emotion  that  is  evoked  when  it  comes  to  sports,”  she  says.  “It  is  DVR-­‐proof,  and   these  live  experiences  create  moments.  And  one  of  the  first  things  fans  want  to  do  is  share  these   moments  with  their  friends.”   Jennifer  Van  Dijk,  who  works  on  Wasserman’s  digital  consulting  team  and  assists  Pellerano  on  Hispanic   efforts,  adds,  “It’s  all  about  what’s  delivered  in  real  time.”     How  does  a  brand,  or  sports  property,  properly  participate  in  the  conversation?  It’s  a  question  that  can’t   easily  be  answered.  But  Van  Dijk  suggests  that  engaging  with  Latino  sports  fans  on  platforms  such  as   Facebook  and  Twitter  will  help  a  brand  in  achieving  its  ultimate  business  objective  –  attracting  more   consumers.   Pellerano  adds,  “People  are  trying  to  figure  out  how  to  monetize  six  different  screens.  How  properties   aggregate  all  of  this  and  then  tell  a  story  to  an  advertiser  is  going  to  be  key.”   At  first,  social  media’s  main  objective  was  to  bring  traffic  back  to  a  portal  or  main  website,  which   continues  to  attract  the  bulk  of  internet  traffic.  According  to  Van  Dijk,  that’s  no  longer  a  smart  strategy.   “That  model  is  dramatically  changing,”  she  says.  “Social  media  is  all  about  putting  the  experience  in   front  of  the  user  no  matter  where  they  are.”   Van  Dijk  believes  Major  League  Baseball’s  mobile  site  attracted  more  internet  users  this  past  July  than   the  main  MLB.com  site  –  thanks  to  the  proliferation  of  smartphones  and  tablet  devices.  ESPN  enjoys  a   mobile  audience  of  between  16  million  and  18  million  per  month,  with  roughly  20  percent  of  this   audience  going  back  to  ESPN.com,  she  says.   With  Google  and  Yahoo  each  forming  teams  devoted  to  Hispanic  social  media  marketing,  brands  possess   an  opportunity  to  get  in  on  the  ground  floor  of  an  advertising  segment  that  is  set  to  explode.  Still,   misperceptions  persist  about  how  to  proceed,  Pellerano  says.  “The  statistics  are  still  pretty  meaningful,   as  many  Hispanics  overindex  against  the  rest  of  the  population.  Many  in  marketing  circles  were   expecting  a  major  shift  in  dollars  after  the  release  of  the  Census  2010  data.  But  the  timing  of  its  release   7    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

8    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

didn’t  allow  marketers  to  do  anything  really  impactful  in  2011.  It  will  be  intriguing  to  see  how  it  will   affect  their  budgets  in  2012.”   While  budgets  are  on  the  rise,  they’re  not  where  they  need  to  be  when  marketing  to  the  Hispanic   consumer,  Pellerano  says.  “The  bulk  of  the  dollars  are  still  going  to  the  media  with  the  broadest  reach  –   television.”   While  not  engaged  in  sports  platforms,  Pellerano  singles  out  Kmart  for  its  efforts  in  engaging  consumers   through  its  MyKmart.com  online  community,  which  is  tied  to  engagement  efforts  on  Twitter,  Facebook,   MySpace  and  YouTube.    Reviews,  discussions  and  guides  accompany  product  information  and   purchasing  opportunities.   Engagement  with  online  community  members  does  not  necessarily  mean  that  two-­‐way  communication   is  imperative.  As  Van  Dijk  points  out,  half  of  Twitter  followers  are  reading  what  is  being  posted  but  not   offering  Tweets  themselves.  This  has  created  the  notion  of  “Influencers,”  those  that  hold  sway  over   consumers.  At  the  same  time,  members  of  an  online  community  that  offer  product  opinions  or  travel   reviews  others  may  find  helpful  also  gain  clout.  Of  those  actively  using  the  “Living  Social”  social  media   platform,  close  to  40  percent  base  their  final  purchasing  decisions  on  what  they  read  from  community   members,  Van  Dijk  says.   Some  sports  leagues  and  teams  have  been  aggressive  in  their  efforts  on  Facebook.  However,  they   haven’t  engaged  their  fans  as  much  as  they  could,  Van  Dijk  notes.  Thus,  they’ve  fallen  into  the  biggest   pitfall  for  companies  with  a  Facebook  presence:  it’s  become  another  push-­‐marketing  tool.     There’s  also  concern  among  some  brands  about  negative  posts  that  could  wreak  havoc  on  its  image  and   send  its  public  relations  team  into  a  tizzy.  “There  is  an  opportunity  here,”  Van  Dijk  believes.  “A  brand   could  say,  ‘Your  opinion  matters.  We  listen  –  and  we  take  action  about  it.’  Those  are  the  brands  that  will   resonate  beyond  the  transaction,  the  same  thing  goes  for  sports  teams.”   Is  there  too  much  social  media?   “From  a  consumer  perspective  I  don’t  think  there  will  ever  be  enough,”  Pellerano  believes.  “For  the   advertiser,  the  focus  should  be  on  how  best  to  move  their  business.”  This  means  selecting  a  couple  of   social  media  platforms  and  excelling  in  those  environments,  rather  than  muddling  through  social  media   activities  on  a  wide  variety  of  services.     Van  Dijk  is  educating  clients  on  the  vast  amount  of  social  media  platforms  that  exist.  Beyond  that,   marketers  may  be  surprised  to  hear  about  unique  access  points  where  Latino  consumers  are  sharing   their  thoughts  and  informing  themselves  about  sports-­‐related  news  and  views.   “We’re  looking  at  private  WiFi  sites,  such  as  Starbucks,  as  well  as  airport  WiFi,”  she  says.  “We’re  also   looking  at  platforms  such  as  YouTube.”  Pellerano  adds  that  online  vendors  including  StubHub,  where   individuals  can  buy  or  sell  tickets  to  sporting  events,  also  provide  a  forum  for  dialogue  between  a  brand   and  a  sports  fan.  

8    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

9    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

“One  of  the  things  we’ve  always  talked  to  our  clients  about  is  figuring  out  how  to  add  to  the  social   media  experience,”  Pellerano  says.  For  the  brand,  social  media  activity  often  requires  a  three-­‐pronged   strategy  –  engaging  consumers  before  a  sporting  event,  during  an  event,  and  following  the  event.   For  example,  the  Boston  Red  Sox  engaged  in  a  dialogue  with  fans  early  in  the  2011  season  when  a   baseball  game  conflicted  with  a  Boston  Bruins’  Stanley  Cup  finals  match.  The  team  used  social  media  to   check  with  fans  if  it  would  be  better  for  them  if  they  +  moved  their  game’s  start  time  to  accommodate   the  hockey  game;  fans  shared  their  opinions  and  the  team  acquiesced.  “Social  media  provides  that   added  experience  for  teams  and  brands  to  speak  directly  with  their  fans,  and  those  that  focus  on  that   dialogue  instead  of  just  pushing  information  could  reap  great  benefits,”  Pellerano  notes.   A  great  example  of  this  is  American  Express,  who  is  highly  involved  with  digital  and  mobile  platforms   devoted  to  golf.  As  attendees  of  the  US  Open  are  prohibited  from  using  their  mobile  devices,  per   tournament  rules,  AmEx  stepped  in  to  give  golf  fans  a  better  experience  by  providing  interactive   locations  on-­‐course  for  attendees  to  be  able  to  post  to  their  own  social  media  sites  about  their   experience  at  the  tournament.     ADAPTING  TO  DIGITAL  PLATFORMS   When  asked  if  Wasserman  Media  Group  has  conversations  with  companies  about  how  its  websites  will   look  on  digital  devices,  Pellerano  and  her  team  gave  a  hearty  laugh  from  the  firm’s  Westwood  offices.   For  many  companies,  budgets  are  tight  and  resources  are  spread  to  the  max,  preventing  many  of  them   from  offering  mobile-­‐friendly  websites.  At  the  same  time,  there  is  no  clear  understanding  among  some   CMOs  of  how  to  properly  connect  to  the  tablet  user  and/or  someone  using  a  smartphone  browser.     “Once  it’s  proven  and  it’s  not  a  risk,  then  they’ll  move  forward,”  Pellerano  laments.  Van  Dijk  adds  that   many  companies  seek  to  replicate  the  functionality  of  their  main  websites  on  their  mobile  platform.   “That  just  doesn’t  work,”  she  says.     Van  Dijk  says  cost  is  a  major  factor  in  creating  a  platform  that  looks  good  on  every  mobile  device.  Major   League  Baseball  invested  significant  resources  that  gave  the  league  an  opportunity  to  connect  with  fans   on  multiple  platforms,  creating  a  monetization  strategy  that  allowed  them  to  attract  sponsors  and   generate  revenue.     She  notes  that  the  development  of  Apps,  not  a  cheap  endeavor,  is  now  being  scrutinized  by  the  most   common  operating  systems.  For  example,  Apple’s  iPhone  and  Android-­‐based  smartphones  will  largely   enjoy  the  most  number  of  Apps;  Blackberry  Apps  are  being  phased  out,  with  the  National  Basketball   Association  declining  to  renew  its  Gametime  App  for  Blackberry  devices.  Older  phones  with  other   operating  systems  such  as  Sprint’s  Samsung  Instinct  are  quickly  becoming  outdated,  with  The  Weather   Channel  on  October  1  ending  its  Opera  Mobile  App.  

9    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

10    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

10    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

11    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

Marketers  who  seek  to  start  a  social  media  plan  or  perfect  their  current  endeavors  should  consider   the  following  four  tips  from  Pellerano:   • • • • Ask  yourself  what  the  business  need  is  of  your  social  media  effort.   Ask  yourself  who  the  target  consumer  is  when  developing  your  social  media  plan.   Understand  how  consumers  that  engage  in  social  media  behave.   Discover  why  consumers  who  are  active  in  social  media  are  there.  

Once  this  is  done,  marketers  can  then  move  forward  with  a  sound  strategy  for  social  media.   SPORTS:  THE  GREAT  CONVERSATION  CATALYST   Sports,  along  with  music,  are  proven  passion  points  for  Hispanic  consumers.  Of  the  top  sports  that   resonate  with  Latinos,  soccer  is  king.  But  basketball,  action  sports,  Mixed  Martial  Arts  (MMA),  boxing,   NFL  football,  and  Major  League  Baseball  also  attract  large  swaths  of  Hispanic  sports  fans.   “Sports  is  a  great  vehicle  if  you’re  trying  to  build  that  cultural  connection  with  the  Latino  consumer,”   Pellerano  says.  “It’s  one  of  those  great  conversation  catalysts.  Being  able  to  understand  the  importance   of  various  sports  in  the  Latino  community,  and  their  propensity  to  be  a  very  social  group,  will  allow  a   brand  to  create  programs  at  that  intersection,  which  allows  for  a  more  meaningful  conversation  with   the  consumer.  That’s  where  brands  can  win.”   Brands  should  also  understand  that  the  before,  during,  and  after-­‐event  elements  to  a  good  social  media   effort  shouldn’t  be  confined  to  the  two  to  three  months  bookending  a  tournament  or  the  FIFA  World   Cup  as  an  example.  “Consumers  may  not  be  in  the  buying  cycle  during  this  time,”  Pellerano  warns.   “Social  media  should  not  happen  during  a  bleep  in  time.  Brands  need  to  get  better  in  continuing  the   conversation  year-­‐round.”   Pellerano  like  many  Latinos  lives  in  two  worlds.  Her  brother’s  three  children  all  born  in  the  U.S.  all  speak   Spanish.  If  not,  they’d  have  no  way  to  communicate  with  their  98-­‐year-­‐old  great  grandmother.  Should   marketers  invest  in  Spanish-­‐language  social  media?  It  all  depends  on  what  the  brand’s  consumer  target   is.  That  being  said,  she  says,  “If  you  ignore  Spanish  speakers,  you’ll  be  missing  out  on  an  important   consumer  segment.  Especially  when  you  consider  that  many  Hispanics  live  in  multi-­‐generational   households  and  pass  on  their  language  to  their  children.  The  Hispanic  consumer  is  very  important  to  any   marketer  in  any  business  today.  One  in  four  births  comes  from  Hispanic  women.  You  cannot  choose  to   ignore  that  Hispanics  are  playing  and  will  continue  to  play  a  large  role  in  consumer  behavior.”

11    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

12    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

12    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

13    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

BEING  SOCIAL:    THE  MARKETER’S  KEY  TO  SOCIAL  MEDIA      
Juan  José  Nuñez,  founder  and  CEO  of  pan-­‐Latin  online  marketing  and  advertising  firm  Vertical3  Media,   has  some  critical  guidance  for  companies  that  are  actively  engaged  in  social  media.     “Social  media  is  social,  above  all,”  says  Nuñez,  who  served  as  COO  of  Orange-­‐owned  pan-­‐Latin  portal   starMedia  until  launching  his  own  company  in  2010.  “Some  make  the  mistake  of  wanting  to  promote   their  products,  services,  and  more  through  social  media  by  using  a  method  that  has  nothing  social  about   it.”   For  example,  here’s  what  not  to  do  if  you’re  a  marketer:  Throw  an  idea  or  a  comment  onto  a  social   network  that  serves  a  promotional  tool,  and  then  do  nothing  else  with  it.   “The  nature  of  social  media  is  that  you’re  not  only  responding  to  other  users,  but  that  you’re  having  a   public  conversation,”  Nuñez  says.  “If  all  you’re  doing  is  trying  to  promote  your  product,  that’s  not  going   to  build  an  audience.”   Nuñez  suggests  that  companies,  brand  managers  and  CMOs  seek  ways  to  create  a  meaningful   relationship  with  their  fans  so  that  they’re  no  longer  just  a   brand  or  a  company.  This  involves  becoming  a  part  of  one’s   “The nature of social media is circle  of  “friends”  or  an  active  part  of  their  interest  groups.     that you’re not only responding “This  is  what  will  keep  them  coming  back  to  your  blog,   Twitter  or  Facebook  page,”  he  says.  “Social  media  is  used  to   engage  customers,  which  is  a  totally  new  form  of   marketing.  A  lot  of  companies  still  haven’t  realized  this,  and   they  continue  to  treat  social  media  as  just  another  outlet   for  traditional  marketing.”   to other users, but that you’re having a public conversation. If all you are doing is trying to promote your product, that is not going to build an audience.” – Juan José Nuñez, CEO, Vertical3 Media

The  insertion  of  too  much  advertising  in  a  social  platform   persists,  and  Nuñez  reminds  marketers  that  social  network  users  are  there  to  interact  with  people  –  not   to  look  at  display  ads  on  the  side  of  the  screen.  “Many  users  aren’t  comfortable  with  having  too  much   advertising  thrown  at  them  in  an  environment  like  a  social  network.  They  aren’t  usually  looking  for  news   and  information  or  entertainment  like  they  could  be  by  visiting  other  types  of  sites.     According  to  ExactTarget,  64  percent  of  Facebook  users  have  liked  a  brand  on  Facebook,  but  43   percent  of  Facebook  users  who  “unlike”  a  brand  do  so  because  of  too  much  push  marketing.   According  to  Mintel,  1  in  5  Latinos  use  a  smartphone  as  a  primary  connectivity  device  to  the  internet.   Thus,  on-­‐the-­‐go  connectivity  may  eclipse  broadband/PC  access  in  a  matter  of  years.  How  vital  is  it  for   social  media  platforms  to  focus  on  Apps  and  to  be  mobile-­‐friendly?  It’s  essential,  says  Nuñez.   “Everything  is  moving  toward  mobile,  and  that  won’t  stop.”    Being  mobile-­‐friendly  isn’t  indispensable  just  for  social  media  platforms,  but  for  all  other  media  and  all   companies.  Nuñez  notes  that  Microsoft’s  Windows  8  will  feature  a  newly  created  App  store.     13    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

14    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

According  to  the  Association  of  National  Advertisers,  62  percent  of  shoppers  claim  to  use  their  phones   for  buying  physical  goods.  “There  is  another  study  that  claims  sage  of  mobile  devices  for  shopping  will   increase  dramatically  within  the  next  five  years,”  Nuñez  says.     Nearly  two-­‐thirds  of  smartphone   owners  have  used  their  devices  to  make   purchases.  More  than  80  percent  have   used  them  to  assist  in  purchasing   decisions  through  product  research  at   least  once  in  the  past  year.   Nuñez  see  advertisers  entering  the  social  media  realm   through  integration  efforts.  “TV  and  radio  are  used  to   advertise  the  product  or  brand  and  to  bring  traffic  to  a   website,  which  is  used  to  showcase  –  and  sell  –   products,”  Nuñez  notes.  “Social  media,  used  to  engage   consumers  and  for  branding  purposes,  will  ultimately   drive  people  to  the  product  itself.”    

It  need  not  matter  if  the  consumer  completes  the  purchase  online  or  at  a  brick-­‐and-­‐mortar  retailer,  he   adds.  “All  media  is  related  and  veered  toward  one  same  objective:  getting  the  brand/product/campaign   out  to  the  customers.”   What’s  Nuñez’s  opinion  on  the  proliferation  of  social  networking  sites?  “There  are  too  many  out  there!”   However,  he  singles  out  Ning  -­‐-­‐  the  world’s  largest  platform  for  creating  custom  social  websites.  He  also   cautions  marketers  and  media  companies  that  are  considering  the  creation  of  their  own  social  media   platform.   “Building  your  own  platform  could  be  savvy,  but  I  think  it’s  too  risky,”  he  says.  “  With  Twitter,  Facebook   and  now  Google+  getting  all  of  the  attention,  it’s  not  easy  to  get  into  the  market  and  play  with  the  big   guys  …  unless  you  have  your  own  Mark  Zuckerberg  hidden  somewhere!   Once  active  on  a  social  media  platform,  how  does  a  marketer  take  into  account  the  all-­‐important  Return   On  Investment?  Nuñez  remarks,  “ROI  in  social  media  is  a  topic  that  has  been  discussed  many  times.  The   need  to  measure  what  is  being  invested,  to  know  whether  your  strategy  is  working  or  not,  is  real.  But   there  came  a  moment  when,  after  trying  to  explore  different  ways  to  measure  social  media  and  its   return  on  participation,  or  return  on  engagement,  or  return  on  involvement,  or  return  on  trust,  we  came   to  realize  that  measuring  ROI  in  social  media  is  not  the  same  as  the  ROI  measurement  in  “traditional”  ad   formats.”   Simply  put,  the  ad  formats  are  not  the  same,  and  neither  are  the  measuring  tools.  Geotargeting,  he   notes,  is  much  more  difficult  in  social  media  than  in  other  advertising  outlets.  “The  main  goals  of  social   media  for  companies  are  to  promote  their  products  and  services  by  interacting  with  the   customer/fan/user  in  ways  that  fall  outside  of  the  traditional  interaction  between  the  company  and  the   customer,”  Nuñez  says.  “It’s  a  different  type  of  marketing  and  a  different  type  of  advertising  –  a  more   subtle  type,  if  you  can  call  it  that.”   Are  Hispanic-­‐focused  social  media  efforts  growing?  Very  slowly,  he  says.  “Even  though  the  figures  are   eye-­‐opening,  many  companies  still  dedicate  very  small  budgets  to  anything  Hispanic.”        

14    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

15    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

AN  ESSENTIAL  COMPONENT  OF  THE  ‘NEW  360’  
“There  is  no  longer  a  question  of  whether  you  should  do  social  media  or  not  –  it  is  a  must  and  quickly   becoming  an  essential  component  of  ‘the  new  360’,”  says  Ivan  Perez,  Vice  President  of  Network  Sales  at   soccer-­‐focused  network  GolTV,  which  offers  both  English-­‐language  and  Spanish-­‐language  feeds.  “Fans   are  looking  to  engage  on  the  social  and  personalized  level  and  we  need  to  provide  that  opportunity  in   order  to  interact  with  the  consumer/viewer.”   GolTV  is  establishing  itself  in  the  social  media  realm  by  tapping  into  its  fan  base,  engaging  with  them  in   conversation  across  multiple  media.  “We’re  also  building  strategic  partnerships  that  will  help  us  offer   more  of  what  our  viewers  want,  and  what  advertisers  are  looking  for,”  Perez  says.   As  sports  has  long  been  a  very  effective  way  for  marketers  to  reach  Hispanic  consumers,  Perez  believes   the  inclusion  of  sports  in  social  media  “is  a  natural  fit.”  At  GolTV,  the  network  has  been  leveraging  its   relationships  with  leagues  and  sports  properties  to  drive  viewers  to  its  website  and  mobile  home,   ultimately  leading  fans  to  its  social  media  sites.     “We  understand  the  importance  and  value  of  social  media,  and  for  the  upcoming  year  we’ll  be  investing   in  and  adding  to  our  social  media  efforts,”  Perez  says.  “The  goal  here  is  to  build  a  viable  media  platform   that  clients  will  want  to  get  involved  in.”   Perez  does  not  look  at  the  implementation  of  a  sports-­‐related  promotion  across  social  media  and  mobile   platform  as  a  risk.  As  he  sees  it,  social  media  offer  a  unique  opportunity  to  not  only  speak  to  your   consumer,  but  –  more  importantly  –  listen  to  your  consumer,  regardless  of  their  gender.   “We  know  that  women  can  be  just  as  passionate  about  their  soccer  teams  as  any  other  guy,”  Perez  says.   “Therefore  GolTV  has  never  been  one  to  ‘focus’  only  on  male  viewers.  Our  focus  has  always  been  on  the   soccer  fan,  regardless  of  gender.  Everything  we  do,  whether  it’s  a  sweepstakes  or  simply  an  online  poll,   we  always  stay  focused  on  one  thing:  the  soccer  fan.”   GolTV’s  website,  powered  by  Telefónica  Group’s  Terra  Networks,  boasts  videos,  news,  blogs,  and  team   rankings  for  soccer  leagues  around  the  world.  At  press  time,  a  banner  advertisement  for  Procter  &   Gamble  Co.’s  Head  &  Shoulders  shampoo  features  a  Major  League  Baseball  logo  and  Minnesota  Twins   star  Joe  Maurer.    It’s  not  simply  a  banner  ad,  however.  A  fun  social  media  component  allows  users  to   create  their  own  virtual  baseball  card  by  liking  Head  &  Shoulders  Facebook  fan  page.     The  Latino-­‐targeted  “Quitarse  El  Sombrero”  effort  is  a  section  of  Head  &  Shoulders’  main  Facebook  fan   page,  with  most  of  its  efforts  targeting  English-­‐proficient  general  audiences.  Spanish-­‐language  content   also  includes  a  link  to  Head  &  Shoulders  for  Women  –  a  nod  to  the  female  sports  fanatic.  A  link  for   information  on  the  Sony  PlayStation  3  baseball  video  game  “MLB  11  The  Show”  is  also  displayed.     As  of  October  7,  2011,  the  fan  page  was  “liked”  by  76,676  Facebook  users.  An  additional  4,212  “are   talking  about”  the  fan  page.  

15    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

16    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

“Adding  a  social  component  to  what  you  can  provide  a  marketer  is  becoming  very  important,”  says   Fernando  Rodríguez,  CEO  of  Terra  Networks.  “It  amplifies  the  distribution  of  content  and  offers  social   engagement.  This  allows  for  more  reach  for  a  brand.”   While  Terra.com  offers  a  wide  range  of  content  on  a  variety  of  subjects,  Rodríguez  calls  sports  “one  of   the  main  pillars”  of  why  internet  users  travel  to  Terra  –  not  only  at  Terra.com  but  through  social  media   platforms.  “We’re  using  all  of  the  social  engagement  tools,  and  in  April  2010  implemented  Facebook   connectivity,”  he  says.     The  promotion  and  distribution  of  content  is  one  of  the  main  purposes  of  what  Terra  does  through   social  media.  For  Rodríguez,  it  is  the  simple  call  to  action  that  will  lead  to  the  user  engagement  that’s  so   craved  by  advertisers  today.  “This  could  be  as  simple  as,  ‘Vote  for  your  favorite  team’  in  a  tournament.”   Indeed,  Terra  teamed  with  Hispanic-­‐focused  online  community  QuePasa  for  a  contest  that  asked  visitors   to  Terra.com  to  explain  why  “their  country”  will  win  the  2011  Pan  American  Games,  held  October  14-­‐30   in  Guadalajara,  Mexico.  The  grand  prize  for  the  contest  was  a  trip  to  the  Games;  others  won  team   jerseys.   Being  platform  agnostic  is  very  much  a  part  of  Terra.com’s  mindset.  “If  someone  has  an  iPhone,  we  have   an  App  for  that,”  says  Rodríguez.  Users  get  a  different  experience  than  when  visiting  the  main  Terra   website,  and  techies  have  noticed.  In  June  2011,  Terra  was  honored  for  the  “Best  iPad  Experience”  at   the  first  annual  User  Experience  Awards  during  Internet  Week  in  New  York.     With  tablets  and  smartphones  rapidly  eclipsing  PCs  and  laptops  as  internet  connectivity  devices,  Terra   continues  to  find  ways  to  connect  with  its  users  in  ways  that  go  beyond  its  portal.  A  significant  amount   of  traffic  can  regularly  be  seen  on  its  dedicated  YouTube  page,  Terra  Deportes  USA.   Having  a  presence  on  YouTube  isn’t  counter-­‐productive  for  Terra,  Rodríguez  insists.  “It  is  a  great   streaming  platform,  and  we  believe  it  is  additive,  and  not  cannibalizing.”  He  notes  that  a  sports  property   or  brand  can  easily  work  with  YouTube’s  design  team  for  customized  skins,  allowing  a  brand  to  own  the   page.  MetroPCS  sponsors  the  video-­‐intensive  microsite,  with  advertising  appearing  in  English.     Is  the  right  language  a  critical  issue  for  marketers  that  seek  to  connect  to  sports  fans  through  social   media?  GolTV’s  Perez  says,  “This  debate  has  been  going  on  for  years,  but  mainly  by  people  that  still   want  to  see  the  world  as  only  being  English  or  Spanish.  There  are  many  bilingual  Hispanics  who  feel   comfortable  consuming  media  in  either  language.  Language  is  secondary,  and  culture  relevance  is  more   important  to  the  viewer.”             Top  Video  Sites  among  Hispanic   Internet  Users   Univision.com   Justin.tv   Ustream.tv   Blinx   Livestream.com  

 

 
source:  ComScore,  M ay  2011  

16    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

17    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

17    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

18    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

A  FAST  START,  THANKS  TO  SOCIAL  MEDIA  
In  March  2009,  Azucena  Maldonado  sent  an  email  invitation  to  Hispanic  women  in  greater  Los  Angeles   to  learn  about  a  fledgling  group  that  combined  professional  development  with  golf.  To  her  delight,   nearly  100  Latinas  showed  up.   Since  then,  the  Latina  Golfers  Association  has  rapidly  gained  notice  throughout  the  Southwest  and  is   now  seeking  a  national  presence,  with  Maldonado  in  attendance  at  the  2011  U.S.  Hispanic  Chamber  of   Commerce  Business  Expo  in  Miami.  About  800  women  have  participated  in  the  association’s  golf  clinics.   A  total  1,500  Latinas  have  asked  for  membership.   The  association’s  growth  couldn’t  have  been  possible  without  Facebook  and  Twitter.  “That  was   imperative,”  Maldonado  says.  “It  was  how  we  got  the  word  out.  I  couldn’t  have  done  this  without  it.”   From  corporate  offices  to  sororities,  Maldonado  is  learning  about  how  to  offer  the  right  type  of  content.   She’s  also  becoming  a  bit  savvier  on  how  to  monetize  the  association’s  social  media  platforms.  “Luring   sponsors  is  the  top  discussion  right  now,”  she  says.     Presenting  users  of  all  social  media  with  an  advertising  message  requires  tact  and  the  right  approach.   “There  is  a  line  where  ads  become  a  turnoff  for  a  consumer,”  says  Bridget  Carey,  Senior  Editor  at  CBS   Interactive’s  CNET  TV.  “Why  are  we  motivated  to  use  a  social  network?  To  chat,  and  to  communicate.   When  the  advertising  becomes  a  little  too  personal,  it  will  be  interesting  to  see  if  it  goes  over  the  line.”   Privacy  concerns  for  many  social  media  users  go  unnoticed.  Save  a  major  platform  change,  such  as   Facebook’s  recent  adjustments  to  status  updates,  most  users  are  unaware  of  the  vast  amount  of   personal  data  that’s  been  collected  and  awaiting  an  eager  marketer.  Younger  social  media  users  don’t   seem  as  alarmed  as  older  generations  when  it  comes  to  how  easy  it  is  for  anyone  to  gain  access  to  their   personal  information,  Carey  says.     Liking  a  Facebook  page  will  give  a  brand  steward  the  ability  to  learn  about  every  user  who  “likes”  the   page.  This  can  assist  marketers  with  how  to  best  promote  a  particular  product  or  service  to  this   audience,  while  concurrently  providing  Facebook  users  with  offers,  content  and  other  incentives.   Sadly,  Carey  says,  many  companies  that  have   launched  social  media  initiatives  don’t  get  this.  “The   most  successful  Facebook  fan  pages  are  the  ones   that  give  me  a  reason  to  go  back  to  them.    There’s  a   fan  page  about  my  toothpaste?  That’s  something  I’m   not  very  passionate  about.  But  what  if  there’s  an   invite  for  a  trip  to  Hawaii?  Sure,  I’ll  go  and  sign  up  for  the  chance  to  win,  but  if  I  am  not  actively  going  to   the  fan  page,  I’m  not  engaged.  You  have  to  make  someone  feel  special,  and  that’s  the  No.  1  challenge   facing  marketers.  You’ve  got  me  as  a  fan  –  now  you  have  to  interact  with  me.”   You  have  to  make  someone  feel  special,  and   that’s  the  No.  1  challenge  facing  marketers.   You’ve  got  me  as  a  fan  –  now  you  have  to   interact  with  me.”  –  Bridget  Carey,  Senior   Editor,  CNET  TV  

18    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

19    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

THE  SEARCH  FOR  SOCIAL  ROI  
CNET’s  Carey  laughs  at  the  concept  of  “Twitter  parties,”  which  may  involve  an  online  gathering  of   bloggers  and  active  Tweeters  who  have  been  judged  as  “influential”  by  a  marketer.   “A  lot  of  marketing  agencies  have  no  idea  what  to  do  and  are  scrambling  to  find  the  ROI,”  she  says.   “They  go  in  with  the  desire  to  give  people  good  experience  and  to  get  their  product  in  the  hands  of   these  influencers.  A  few  advertisers  don’t  mind  throwing  products  out  and  have  the  Twitter  user  and   blogger  glow  about  the  product,  but  it’s  just  like  spraying  bullets  all  over  the  place,  hoping  to  make  it   stick.”   Manny  Ruiz  would  disagree.  On  September  14,  the  Hispanicize  co-­‐founder  and  “papiblogger”  hosted  a   90-­‐minute  Twitter  party  three  days  before  a  highly  anticipated  boxing  match  between  Floyd   Mayweather  and  Victor  Ortiz.  Verizon  FiOS  sponsored  the  virtual  fiesta,  using  the  opportunity  to   promote  the  fight’s  availability  to  fiber-­‐optic  television  service  subscribers.  Flat-­‐screen  TVs  were   awarded  to  participants.   What  was  the  point  of  it  all?  “Hispanic  males  are  not  targeted  aggressively  by  marketers,  but  when  they   are  they  are  largely  targeted  through  sports,”  Ruiz  says.  Soccer  and  boxing  are  sports  that  are  regularly   in  discussion  with  marketers,  and  it’s  his  belief  that  blogger  outreach  offers  considerable  value  to  a   brand.     “People  are  attracted  to  bloggers  that  have  a  very  loyal  audience  and  are  very  influential,”  Ruiz  believes.   “For  example,  if  you  write  about  Ferraris,  you’ll  probably  have  a  smaller  audience  than  a  blogger  who   writes  about  all  cars.  But  if  you  have  an  audience  that  cares  only  about  Ferraris,  I’m  going  to  be  much   more  interesting  to  you  and  can  engage  with  you.”   While  CNET’s  Carey  suggests  that  one  or  two  social  media  platforms  should  be  selected  and  perfected,   going  beyond  Facebook  to  connect  with  a  group  of  sports  devotees  also  may  prove  successful.  That’s   where  a  blogger  can  wield  their  power  to  convince  consumers.   Ruiz  cautions,  however,  that  influence  does  not  equal  credibility.  “Influence  is  gauged  in  different  ways   by  brands,”  he  says.  “For  the  blogger  to  truly  become  influential,  they  need  to  become  the  target  of   brands  that  seek  your  website  users,  and  those  that  meet  the  psychographic  profile  of  those  visiting  a   blog.  That’s  the  biggest  attraction  of  it  all.”   Of  the  thousands  of  bloggers  active  in  the  U.S.  and  Puerto  Rico,  Hispanicize  estimates  that  500  update   their  sites  at  least  three  to  four  times  per  month.  “There  are  opportunities,”  Ruiz  says.  “There  are  a  lot   more  bloggers  who  are  coming  online,  and  there’s  room  for  a  lot  more  bloggers  in  places  like  Miami.”   For  any  blogger,  the  trick  is  to  generate  a  “hip  factor”  and  gain  the  ability  to  create  a  large-­‐scale  viral   campaign,  Ruiz  says.  He  points  to  the  Facebook  fan  page  for  “Being  Latino,”  which  has  nearly  61,500   followers.     “We  are  in  the  age  of  the  citizen  journalist,  and  the  day  and  age  when  you  could  be  kept  quiet  and  have   a  gatekeeper  are  gone,”  Ruiz  says.  “Does  it  trump  traditional  media?  No.  TV  is  not  severely  threatened  

19    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

20    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

by  it,  but  they  need  to  think  of  other  platforms.  Traditional  media  was  created  to  inform,  not  to  engage.   Social  media  is  different.”   What  happens  when  traditional  media  seeks  to  build  its  brand  by  engaging  social  media?  Additional   revenue  may  not  be  the  No.  1  ROI  gauge.     “When  you  have  a  brand  that  cuts  through  the  clutter,  you’ll  find  that  people  will  engage  with  you   through  social  media,”  says  Jim  Kalmenson,  president  of  Lotus  Communications,  which  owns  ESPN   Deportes  Radio  flagship  KWKW-­‐AM  1330  in  Los  Angeles.  “We  have  Facebook,  we  do  social  media,  but   we  do  it  not  so  much  to  sell  advertising.  We  do  it  to  engage  listeners.”   That’s  not  to  say  KWKW  won’t  entertain  interest  from  its  advertisers.  “We’ll  include  social  media  when   requested.  But  we  won’t  push  it,”  Kalmenson  says.     Kalmenson’s  take  on  social  media  is  likely  intricately  tied  to  KWKW’s  billing  performance.  According  to   BIAfn,  KWKW  is  the  highest-­‐billing  Spanish-­‐language  AM  radio  station  in  the  U.S.  This,  he  says,  is  in  large   part  to  the  long  Time  Spent  Listening  seen  by  ESPN  Deportes  Radio’s  audience.  Kalmenson  notes,   “Sports  radio  listeners  are  not  song-­‐shopping.  They  aren’t  spending  time  dialing  around.  What  drives  our   bus  is  direct  response  advertising  on  the  air.”   KWKW  has  seen  success  with  text-­‐to-­‐win  promotions.  But  is  this  social  media?  Carey  says  no.  “You’re   not  connecting  to  people.  Social  media  is  about  sharing  a  conversation  with  many  people.”  

20    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

21    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

21    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

22    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

THE  NETWORK  SOCIAL:  A  MEDIA  EMBRACE    
Erase  any  concerns  that  social  media,  and  the  proliferation  of  digital  and  mobile  applications,  will   cannibalize  the  bread-­‐and-­‐butter  revenue  generators  for  a  media  brand.  From  portals  reinventing   themselves  to  radio  and  television  companies  seeking  to  expand  their  360-­‐degree  approaches,  social   media  is  being  warmly  embraced  by  many  Hispanic  media.   ESPN  Deportes  has  invested  heavily  in  social  media,  and  has  taken  the  lead  with  regard  to  innovation.   ESPN  Deportes  Radio’s  App,  available  for  iPhone,  Droid  and  Blackberry  devices,  is  user-­‐friendly  and   interactive.  Air  personalities  can  receive  text  messages  through  the  App  from  users;  sports  news  and   scores  are  easily  viewed  from  the  touch  of  a  button.  Bringing  advertising  sponsors  into  the  mix  is  the   next  step  for  the  network.   Oscar  Ramos,  senior  director  and  GM  for  ESPN  Deportes  Radio,  strongly  believes  social  media  is  a   natural  extension  of  what  the  audience  craves  –  especially  in  the  sports  world.  “It  isn’t  just  a  platform  to   distribute  content  but  also  to  interact  with  our  audience,  and  make  them  feel  as  they  are  a  part  of  that   content,”  he  says.  Social  media  allows  that  to  happen.   Ramos  believes  social  media  presents  the  sports  fan  with  multiple  options  for  communicating  with  ESPN   Deportes  Radio.  It  makes  perfect  sense,  as  the  network  has  multiple  delivery  options  for  bringing  its   content  to  the  end  user.  “Social  media  allows  ESPN  Deportes  to  have  a  broader  audience  reach,”  he   says.   It  can  also  provide  consumers  with  added  content  that  goes  beyond  the  main  delivery  methods.  “You   can’t  limit  yourself  to  audio  just  because  your  primary  vehicle  is  audio,”  Ramos  notes.  “We  offer  video   podcasts,  we  have  the  interaction  module  …   we’ve  asked  ourselves  how  to  superserve  the   “We’ve  asked  ourselves  how  to  superserve  the   audience  and  not  limit  yourself  to  what  already   exists  and  what  you’ve  traditionally  done.”   audience  and  not  limit  yourself  to  what   Luring  sponsors  has  resulted  in  different   approaches  based  on  the  individual  objectives   done.”  –  Oscar  Ramos,  ESPN  Deportes  Radio   of  the  advertiser,  Ramos  says.  “We’ll  do   something  in  combination  with  traditional   media,  interweaving  the  brand  message  in  many  ways.”  Brand  messaging  on  the  ESPN  Deportes  Radio   App  will  also  appear  on  the  main  website.   COMPANY-­‐WIDE  COMMITMENT   Social  media  has  become  an  integral  tool  for  just  about  every  division  of  Univision,  the  nation’s  largest   Hispanic  media  company.  Charlie  Echeverry,  Univision’s  executive  vice  president  of  interactive  media   sales,  believes  social  media  can  further  the  communications  company’s  desire  to  reach  its  audience  on   all  levels.  “Our  viewers  are  on  Facebook  and  Twitter,  and  they  want  to  interact,”  he  says.  “It’s  the   horizontal  piece  that  ties  integrated  marketing  all  together.”   Echeverry  sees  social  media  as  a  distribution  point  for  Univision’s  intellectual  property,  as  well  as  a  way   to  bring  traffic  back  to  Univision.com,  the  most-­‐visited  website  among  online  Hispanics.  Additionally,   22    |  P a g e     already  exists  and  what  you’ve  traditionally  

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

23    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

Univision’s  social  media  efforts  seek  to  bring  audience  to  the  70-­‐plus  local  sites  and  15  national  sites   that  the  network  also  administers.     Beyond  Univision’s  own  websites  are  more  than  200  web  partners,  where  the  network’s  content  and   relationships  with  other  entities  have  resulted  in  dynamic,  co-­‐branding  opportunities.  For  Latino  fans  of   the  National  Football  League  who  prefer  to  consume  Spanish-­‐language  media,  NFL.com/espanol    offers   a  full  digest  of  news,  schedules,  videos,  Spanish  game-­‐day  audio  and  a  section  devoted  to  Fantasy   Football  fanatics.  The  site  is  “optimized  by  UnivisionDeportes.com.”   Univision  Interactive  Media  launched  the  site  in  2009.  Today,  the  NFL  is  regularly  featured  on  the   Univision  Deportes  Facebook  page.  The  NFL  also  has  a  Twitter  feed  and  Facebook  fan  page  of  its  own,   but  it  is  mainly  geared  toward  audiences  in  Mexico.     Apart  from  Univision,  the  NFL  has  attracted  advertising  partners   for  its  own  mobile  platform,  NFL  Mobile.  Formerly  available   exclusively  from  Sprint,  the  NFL  switched  to  Verizon  Wireless  with   the  2010-­‐11  season.  Today,  Verizon  heavily  advertises  on  the  NFL   Mobile  as  part  of  its  agreement  with  the  league.   That’s  not  to  say  Univision  isn’t  involved  in  NFL  Mobile  –  Verizon   smartphone  users  can  listen  to  all  games  available  in  Spanish,   provided  by  Univision  Radio.  This  includes  a  32-­‐game  broadcast   schedule  including  Monday  Night  Football,  Thanksgiving  Day   games,  playoffs,  Super  Bowl  XLVI  and  the  Pro  Bowl.     Beyond  the  NFL,  Univision  is  working  with  advertisers  on  the   Copa  Oro  and  Copa  America  soccer  tournaments  on  the   sponsorship  of  streaming  media  and  display  advertising,  while   also  suggesting  a  sponsor  tab  in  a  Facebook  fan  page  execution,   Echeverry  says.  

“You  have  to  be   focused  on  all  things   mobile.  Consumption   of  content  happens  to   be  on  the  best  screen   for  that  moment  in   time.”  –  Charlie   Echeverry,  Univision  

He  stresses  that  moving  beyond  the  main  delivery  vehicle  for  a   media  company’s  content  is  necessary  in  today’s  on-­‐the-­‐go   consumer  environment.  “You  have  to  be  focused  on  all  things   mobile,”  Echeverry  says.  “Consumption  of  content  happens  to  be  on  the  best  screen  for  that  moment  in   time.”   It’s  one  of  the  reasons  why  Univision  developed  a  “DeportesFútbol”  application  for  smartphones  that,   while  launched  around  the  2010  FIFA  World  Cup,  was  not  a  World  Cup  App.  “Once  the  Cup  passed,  we   wanted  to  have  a  good,  functional  App  that  could  be  used  beyond  the  tournament.  If  an  App  is  too   narrow,  it  may  not  bring  in  the  audience  size  needed  to  attract  an  ad  partner.  They  just  don’t  get  the   install  base  that  is  meaningful  for  any  advertiser.”   Comcast-­‐owned  Telemundo,  Univision’s  biggest  media  rival,  also  partnered  with  Verizon  Wireless  in  a   digitally  enhanced  sports  sponsorship.  In  September  2011,  it  became  the  title  sponsor  of  “Domina  La   Acción,”  a  sports  segment  airing  during  local  evening  newscasts  at  Telemundo  stations  in  Los  Angeles,  

23    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

24    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

New  York,  Miami,  Houston,  Dallas,  Chicago,  Phoenix  and  San  Francisco.  Promotion  of  the  partnership   included  online  and  mobile  elements.      “Building  on  the  strength  of  our  local  sports  coverage,  Telemundo  and  Verizon  are  committed  to   delivering  this  content  in  an  engaging  interactive  experience  to  immerse  fans  in  the  game,”  Enrique   Perez,  senior  vice  president  of  local  sales  and  marketing  at  Telemundo,  said  in  prepared  comments.       An  over-­‐the-­‐air  call-­‐to-­‐action  campaign  is  designed  to  drive  users  to  Telemundo  station  websites  and   Verizon  Wireless’  “Fan  of  the  Week”  section  to  submit  photos  and  videos  of  fans  wearing  NFL  gear.  Fan   photos  and  videos  will  be  featured  during  the  on-­‐air  segments,  as  well  as  in  an  online  gallery.     Mobile  content,  optimized  for  smartphone  users,  features  enhanced  graphical  elements  and  video   streams  available  via  Telemundo’s  “A  La  Mano”  localized  Apps,  which  are  available  for  iPhone,  Android   and  Blackberry  users.  Facebook  integration  of  the  sponsored  sports  segments  and  dedicated  tweets  on   local  Telemundo  station  Twitter  feeds  are  also  a  part  of  the  promotional  efforts.   The  sports  initiative  is  tied  to  the  February  2011  launch  of  Social@Telemundo,  a  strategic  social  media   unit  led  by  Telemundo  vice  president  of  digital  media  and  integrated  solutions  Borja  Perez.     Fox  Deportes  also  engages  with  fans  through  Twitter  and  a  Facebook  page  that  boasts  326,200  “likes.”   There’s  a  bevy  of  interaction,  with  hundreds  of  users  commenting  on  various  posts.  The  fan  page  also   includes  a  large  selection  of  videos,  and  Fox  Deportes  exclusives.     ImpreMedia,  publisher  of  some  of  the  nation’s  largest  Spanish-­‐language  newspapers,  actively  promotes   its  multichannel  marketing  platforms,  including  digital  and  mobile.    The  impreMedia  Digital  Network   offers  advertisers  multiplatform  advertising  on  the  national  and  local  level  that  includes  online  banner   campaigns  and  rich  media,  landing  pages,  channel  sponsorships,  customized  e-­‐mail  and  integrated   cross-­‐media  packages.   The  company  not  only  has  its  main  portal,  impre.com,  but  oversees  10  unique  websites  for  its  daily  and   weekly  titles  across  the  U.S.  As  is  the  case  with  most  newspaper  online  homes,  sport  plays  a  big  role  in   the  content  mix.  The  Deportes  channel  includes  links  to  Twitter  and  Facebook;  it  is  sponsored  by  ESPN   Deportes.   DEDICATED  TO  THE  FUTURE   ESPN  Deportes  employs  three  fully-­‐dedicated  people  for  its  social  media  engagement  and  fan   interaction.  With  its  Facebook  fan  page  approaching  90,000  “likes,”  ensuring  that  the  network  is   interacting  with  its  thousands  of  active  online  consumers  is  essential.   “Our  shows  have  feeds  on  Twitter,  and  Facebook  fan  pages  managed  by  each  show’s  producer,”  says  say   Mario  Fraticelli,  who  manages  ESPN  Deportes’  social  media  efforts.  Updates  occur  four  to  six  times  per   day;  round-­‐the-­‐clock  updates  are  on  the  way.   So  is  advertiser  activity,  says  the  network’s  Director  of  Digital  Ad  Sales,  Jeff  Zahn.  “Advertisers  can  rally   around  a  certain  theme  or  an  idea,  and  social  media  can  be  rolled  into  it.”  

24    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

25    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

Gillette  has  teamed  with  the  network  on  a  poll  asking  ESPN  consumers  what  they  believe  is  the  best   sports  trade  of  all  time.  Ford  enjoys  a  formidable  presence  on  La  Conexión,  a  section  of  the  ESPN   Deportes  web  site  that  aggregates  all  of  the  URLs  for  its  many  shows  through  one  central  location.   While  Zahn  stresses  with  marketers  on  a  routine  basis  on  how  Hispanics  overindex  on  smartphone   usage,  making  Facebook  and  Twitter  a  mobile  play  for  reaching   Latinos,  he  admits  that  ESPN  Deportes  is  still  struggling  with  how   to  best  effectively  bring  in  a  sponsor.  “Our  Apps  are  more  news-­‐ ESPN  Deportes  in   and-­‐information-­‐focused,  but  there  will  be  a  redesign  to  make  it   September  2011  selected   more  advertiser-­‐friendly,”  he  says.   Newlink  America  as  its   That’s  not  to  say  advertisers  aren’t  interested  in  finding  the   solution.  Mexican  beer  brand  Modelo  enjoyed  a  successful  trial   from  teaming  with  ESPN  Deportes.  “We  placed  sponsor   integration  into  the  App  as  a  demo,  and  after  two  months  there   were  substantial  impressions  and  traffic,”  Zahn  says.  “Now  we   want  the  advertiser  message  to  go  beyond  a  simple  logo  to  include   animation.”   Fraticelli  and  Zahn  work  very  closely  in  making  sure  new  social   media  platforms  are  advertiser-­‐friendly  and  relevant  to  ESPN   Deportes  consumers,  who  seem  to  be  shifting  from  broadband  to   mobile  swifter  than  anticipated.  Advertisers  are  eager  to   understand  how  swiftly  the  shift  is  occurring,  and  how  to  get  on   board,  Zahn  notes.  

public  relations  and  social   media  agency  of  record.   Newlink  will  be  managing   media  relations  and  work   closely  with  ESPN’s  digital   team,  providing  strategic   recommendations  and   engaging  content  for  various   social  media  platforms.  

“The  advertiser  wants  to  be  able  to  say  social  media  is  a  part  of  the  media  landscape,  but  they  really  just   want  to  be  a  part  of  something  where  they  say,  ‘Hey,  we’re  doing  social  media,’”  he  says.  “They  are   trying  to  find  out  what  works,  and  what  doesn’t  work.  It  is  something  that  they  are  learning  from  us,  but   as  of  now  they’re  still  not  deeply  involved  in  social  media.”  

25    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

26    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

26    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

27    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

A  COMPONENT  FOR  YOUR  EVERYDAY  LIFE  
There’s  been  much  chatter  in  recent  months  about  Google+,  a  social  media  platform  that  “aims  to  make   sharing  on  the  web  more  like  sharing  in  real  life.”   Mark  López,  head  of  U.S.  Hispanic  audience  for  Google,  believes  Google+  gives  marketers  a  great   opportunity  to  connect  to  Hispanic  consumers.  “We  are  integrating  social  activities  into  our  digital  lives,   and  this  even  includes  online  search,  e-­‐mail  and  viewing  online  content.”   Sports  will  have  a  significant  presence  on  Google+,  López  says.  Discussions  with  content  partners  are   heating  up,  and  it  is  these  discussions  that  are  essential  for  Google’s  success:  Google  doesn’t  create  its   content,  nor  does  it  have  a  desire  to.   “We’re  looking  at  partnerships  and  bringing  the  best  content  to  our  delivery  systems,  including   YouTube,”  says  López  of  the  Google-­‐owned  video  hub.  On  YouTube,  one  can  view  English-­‐language   broadcasts  of  live  Copa  América  matches;  Spanish-­‐language  coverage  can  be  accessed  in  Latin  America.   Meanwhile,  the  “Google  search”  is  getting  a  facelift:  Google  is  developing  algorithms  that  will   personalize  results  –  presenting  a  potential  marketing  boon  to  advertisers.     “Today  when  someone  does  an  online  search,  they  get  results,”  López  says.  “But  what  if  the  results  were   recommended  by  friends  in  a  certain  circle?  That’s  where  we’re  headed.”   As  Latinos  are  extremely  social  and  enjoy  tight  relationships  with  family  and  friends,  López  sees  the   internet  as  a  long-­‐term  investment  for  marketers  seeking  to  connect  with  Hispanic  consumers.   “We’re  really  in  the  first  inning,”  he  says.  “This  is  something  that  is  just  starting  for  us,  but  we  believe   that  the  conversation  with  the  consumer  has  to  happen.  Social  media  can  do  this,  and  be  aligned  and   integrated  into  traditional  sports  habits.”    

27    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

28    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

CASUAL  OR  CORE:  REACHING  ALL  FANS  
Sports  teams  have  taken  various  approaches  to  connecting  with  their  fans.  Some  superserve  the  “sports   geek,”  the  fan  who  devotes  hours  to  expressing  their  opinions  about  a  player  or  team  on  Twitter  or  a   Facebook  fan  page.   The  National  Basketball  Association’s  Orlando  Magic  puts  a  heavy  emphasis  on  appealing  to  both  the   casual  fan  and  the  Superfan.  The  team’s  Facebook  fan  page  has  well  over  1  million  “likes,”  and  the   Magic  enjoys  over  1  million  Twitter  followers,  making  it  second  in  the  NBA.   Despite  a  crippling  lockout  that  has  already  canceled  the  2011-­‐12  pre-­‐season  and  could  erase  games   from  the  regular-­‐season  schedule,  the  Magic  is  actively  engaging  with  its  fans.  Hispanics  are  very  much  a   part  of  the  mix,  with  Twitter  and  Facebook  homes  for  those  who  prefer  to  use  Spanish.   ElOrlandoMagic.com,  a  landing  page  tied  to  the  team’s  main  website,  has  actively  engaged  Latino  fans   since  2010.     The  team’s  Spanish-­‐language  Facebook  fan  page  has  about  2,250  “likes,”  and  there’s  not  much   conversation,  with  messages  posted  by  the  team  failing  to  start  an  online  dialogue.  However,  with  the   NBA  on  hold  and  limited  discussion  points,  the  team  is  limited  in  what  it  can  do.  Once  games  begin,   activity  will  likely  accelerate.     That  won’t  include  a  barrage  of  promotional  messages,  says  Joel  Glass,  the  team’s  vice  president  of   communications.  “You  don’t  want  to  overmarket  on  a  social  media  site,”  he  notes.    To  find  the  right   balance,  the  team  will  work  with  sponsors  for  specific  projects  that  can  include  social  media.  Companies   actively  engaged  in  these  conversations  include  AirTran  Airways,  one  of  the  Magic’s  biggest  sponsors,     and  Orlando-­‐based  Tex-­‐Mex  quick  service  restaurant  chain  Tijuana  Flats.     In  the  2010-­‐11  season,  Tijuana  Flats  sponsored  a  promotion  in  which  it  would  give  out  a  free  taco  should   an  Orlando  Magic  player  hit  10  three-­‐point  shots  in  a  single  game.  “We  promoted  that  on  Twitter,  and  it   generated  a  400  percent  increase  in  redemption,”  Glass  says.  “Our  sponsors  are  very  bright  and  on  the   ball,  and  we’re  moving  forward  with  social  media.”   Targeting  Hispanics  in  Central  Florida  will  very  much  be  a  part  of  those  efforts.  “Look  at  where  we’ve   come,”  Glass  notes.  “We  have  been  offering  Spanish-­‐language  coverage  for  all  home  and  away  games   for  13  years  and  we  have  19  games  in  Spanish  on  TV.  We  believe  in  the  Latino  sports  fan.”  

28    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

29    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

29    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

30    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

AT  THE  FOREFRONT  OF  THE  FUTURE  
“The  Latino  community  will  be  at  the  forefront  of  mobile  applications  because  they’ve  not  embraced   online  opportunities.”   That’s  the  view  of  Kevin  Baxter,  who  covers  Hispanic-­‐focused  sports  topics  for  the  Los  Angeles  Times.     “They  don’t  need  a  computer  and  don’t  have  to  overcome  20th  Century  thinking,”  says  Baxter,  who   spent  many  years  at  the  Miami  Herald  before  shifting  to  the  West  Coast.  “Hispanics  will  be  a  real  target   for  some  of  these  sports-­‐focused  Apps.”   From  his  perch  as  a  sportswriter  at  a  major  metropolitan  daily  newspaper,  Baxter  sees  the  social  media   proliferating  in  use  not  only  by  his  peers,  but  by  athletes  themselves.  This  provides  direct  access   between  a  fan  and  those  they  admire.   That  could  be  ghastly  for  a  public  relations  executive,  or  the  athlete’s  agent.   “Athletes  can  go  straight  to  their  followers  without  a  filter,  which  means  the  stupid  stuff  they  say  goes   right  out  there,”  he  notes.  “On  the  positive  side,  a  lot  of  college  athletes  are  using  Twitter  to  tell  you   when  they’ve  signed  a  letter  of  intent.”   Convincing  teams  to  allow  their  players  unfettered  access  to  fans  has  proven  to  be  a  bit  uneven,  Baxter   observes.  “The  Mexican  national  soccer  team  is  very  wary  of  the  press.  They  want  to  interact  fans,  but   on  their  terms.”   The  Los  Angeles  Angels  of  Anaheim,  led  by  manager  Mike  Scioscia,  are  well  aware  of  the  power  of   Twitter.  “Scioscia  runs  a  very  tight  clubhouse,  but  everyone  in  the  organization  on  Twitter  is  listed  in  its   media  feed.  They  may  not  be  monitoring  everything  and  want  to  censor  anything,  but  they’re  certainly   aware  of  what  their  players  are  saying.”   Baxter  notes  that  a  lot  of  the  comments  are  far  from  insightful.  But  Twitter  has  helped  in  unexpected   situations.  On  June  1,  2011,  the  Angels’  charter  flight  from  Kansas  City  was  forced  to  make  an   emergency  landing  at  Los  Angeles  International  Airport.  Thank  social  media  for  delivering  the  story  to   reporters  across  the  Southland.   “The  news  broke  pretty  fast,  and  we  were  monitoring  many  of  the  players’  Twitter  feeds,”  Baxter  recalls.   “We  based  our  news  story  on  what  was  being  Tweeted.”   The  Los  Angeles  Dodgers,  which  have  seen  many  unwanted  headlines  in  2011  due  to  the  bitter  divorce   of  owner  Frank  McCourt  and  the  beating  of  a  San  Francisco  Giants  fan  early  in  the  season,  have  taken  to   bloggers  to  provide  a  positive  image  of  the  baseball  team  to  the  world.     “There’s  a  blogger  seat  in  the  front  row  of  the  press  box,  and  the  team  invites  a  different  blogger  to   every  home  game,  giving  them  full  access  to  the  team,”  Baxter  says.  “These  are  primarily  those  who   have  fan  blogs  and  live  and  breathe  Dodgers  baseball.”    

30    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

31    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

At  ESPN  Deportes,  its  in-­‐studio  hosts  connect  with  its  audience  via  Twitter.  Lino  Garcia,  the  network’s   General  Manager,  notes  that  host  José  Ramon  Fernandez  is  the  top  Tweeter  for  ESPN  Deportes.  Others   highly  active  on  Twitter  include  “Chronómetro”  host  David  Faitelson,  MLB  reporter  Carolina  Guillen,  NFL   reporter  John  Sutcliffe  and  Fernando  Palomo,  who  heads  the  network’s  coverage  of  Spain’s  La  Liga.     Garcia  marvels  at  the  rapid  advancement  of  social  media  initiatives  across  the  sports  world.  “Three   years  ago  it  wasn’t  even  a  part  of  the  conversation.  One  year   ago  we  had  drips  and  drabs  of  social  media.”  The  floodgates   opened  in  April  2011,  when  ESPN  Deportes  fully  unveiled  its   “While  Latinos  are  late  to  the   social  media  efforts.     game  when  it  comes  to  a  lot  of   José  Ulloa,  a  reporter  known  as  “The  Cyber  Guy”  at  Fox   social  media  Apps,  they  are   affiliate  KTTV-­‐Channel  11  in  Los  Angeles,  sees  potential  from   active  with  it  and  are   underserved  sports  –  in  particular,  on  the  high  school  level.   embracing  new  technologies.”   “This  is  the  biggest  untapped  sports  market,  and  someone  is   –  José  Ulloa,  “The  Cyber  Guy”,   going  to  come  up  with  an  App  that  reflects  this  generation’s   KTTV-­‐FOX  11/Los  Angeles   interest  in  it,”  he  says.  “That’s  the  point  …  the  development     of  social  media  is  generational.”   Given  the  rapid  growth  of  Hispanics  under  the  age  of  21  throughout  the  West  Coast,  Ulloa  says   marketers  should  truly  work  to  understand  how  the  younger  generation  is  beginning  to  maximize  its  use   of  current  technology  as  they  begin  to  delve  into  other  Apps  on  their  smartphones  or  tablets.   CMOs  and  brand  managers  should  also  keep  their  eye  on  women,  even  in  a  sports-­‐minded  social  media   initiative.  “Women  will  be  driving  technology,  and  soon  women  will  be  gravitating  toward  a  particular   App  that  may  include  sports,”  Ulloa  notes.  “In  multiethnic  communities  women  wield  a  lot  of  power.   They  gravitate  to  things  they  think  makes  them  look  good  and  feel  good.  While  Latinos  are  late  to  the   game  when  it  comes  to  a  lot  of  social  media  Apps,  they  are  active  with  it  and  are  embracing  new   technologies.”   GET  IN  THE  GAME   What  should  advertisers  who  aren’t  thinking  about  sports-­‐focused  social  media  be  concerned  about?     Getting  trumped  by  a  competitor.     “If  you’re  not  in  it,  I  think  you  have  some  explaining  to  do,”  says  ESPN  Deportes’  Garcia.  “But  it  is  not  too   late  to  be  in  it.  Make  your  social  media  marketing  efforts  organic.  We  are  in  the  business  of  entertaining   fans  who  are  highly  engaged.  We  can  even  insert  video  in  Facebook,  and  it  just  has  to  feel  as  if  it  is  not  a   commercial.  There  is  an  art  to  this,  and  it  there  is  a  better  connection  to  the  sports  fan  through  this.”        

 
31    |  P a g e    

HISPANIC MARKET OVERVIEW  

32    

Social  Media  and  Sports:  The  Winning  Pair  

 

ABOUT  THE  AUTHOR  
ADAM  R  JACOBSON  is  a  veteran  journalist  and  marketing  strategist  who  launched  a  media   marketing  and  public  relations  consultancy,  primarily  focused  on  the  U.S.  Hispanic   market,  in  January  2010.  A  15-­‐year  veteran  Hispanic  market  media  professional,  Jacobson   is  the  author  and  lead  advertising  representative  for  the  quarterly  Hispanic  Market   Overview  series  of  reports  produced  and  distributed  in  association  with  HispanicAd.com.   Through  his  consultancy,  Jacobson  serves  as  the  principal  analyst  for  Arbitron’s  Hispanic   Radio  Today  series  of  reports  and  as  an  assistant  analyst  for  global  research  firm  Mintel.   Jacobson  has  served  as  a  senior  editor  at  Hispanic  Market  Weekly,  assisted  in  the  launch   of  Latina  Style  Magazine  and  began  his  career  in  1993  at  HISPANIC  Magazine.  Jacobson’s  articles  on  Hispanic   culture  and  business  have  appeared  in  The  Miami  Herald,  Latin  Trade  and  LatinBusinessToday.com.  He  spent  more   than  a  decade  at  former  industry  trade  publication  Radio  &  Records,  helping  to  develop  the  Latin  music   department  while  serving  as  an  editor  in  various  capacities.    

  ADAM  R  JACOBSON  Editorial  Services  &  Research  Consultancy   1228  West  Avenue,  Suite  1003  ·∙  Miami  Beach,  FL  33319   East  Coast:  954-­‐417-­‐5146  ·∙  West  Coast:  818-­‐231-­‐1546   adam@jakeadams.net  
  Advertising  Sales  Representative:     Manny  Ballestero  -­‐-­‐  973-­‐540-­‐8859  (office);    973-­‐214-­‐1972  (cell)   mballestero@hispanicad.com     ©  2011  Adam  R  Jacobson  Editorial  Services  and  Research  Consultancy.    

32    |  P a g e    

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->