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Mysteria

Mysteria

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Published by Dawne_Berry
History of the secret doctrines & mystic rites of ancient religions, and Medieval & modern secret orders. By Dr. Otto Rhyn
CONTENTS (partial)
Part 1 - Mysteries of the East & Barbarous Nations
1) Introduction
2) The Gods
3) Egypt
4) The Higher Development of Egyptian Religion
5) A Reformation in the Land of the Nile
6) The Egyptian Realm of the Dead
7) The Secret Teaching of the Priests of Nileland
8) Babylon & Nineveh
9) Zoroaster & the Persians
10) Brahmans & Buddhists
11) Secret Leagues of Barbarous Peoples
Part 2 - The Grecian Mysteries & the Roman Bacchanalia
1) Hellas
2) Hellenic Divine Worship
3) The Hellenic Mysteries
4) The Eleusinian Mysteries
5) The Mysteries of Samothrace
6) The Mysteries of Crete
7) The Dionysia
8) The Roman Bacchanalia
9) Debased Mysteries From the East
Part 3 - The Pythagorean League & Other Secret Associations
1) Pythagoras
2) The Pythagoreans
3) The Orphici
4) Mysterious Personages of Ancient Times
Part 4 - Son of Man, Son of God
1) Hellenism & Judaism
2) The Essenes
3) Christianism
4) Jesus
5) The Early Christians
6) The New Testament
7) The Elements of the Church
Part 5 - A Pseudo-Messiah. A Lying Prophet
1) Apollonius of Tyana
2) Alexander, the False Prophet
Part 6 - The Knights Templar
1) The Middle Age
2) The Templars
3) The Secrets of the Templars
4) The Downfall of the Knights Templar
There are several more parts to this book including the Freemasons and Illuminati.
History of the secret doctrines & mystic rites of ancient religions, and Medieval & modern secret orders. By Dr. Otto Rhyn
CONTENTS (partial)
Part 1 - Mysteries of the East & Barbarous Nations
1) Introduction
2) The Gods
3) Egypt
4) The Higher Development of Egyptian Religion
5) A Reformation in the Land of the Nile
6) The Egyptian Realm of the Dead
7) The Secret Teaching of the Priests of Nileland
8) Babylon & Nineveh
9) Zoroaster & the Persians
10) Brahmans & Buddhists
11) Secret Leagues of Barbarous Peoples
Part 2 - The Grecian Mysteries & the Roman Bacchanalia
1) Hellas
2) Hellenic Divine Worship
3) The Hellenic Mysteries
4) The Eleusinian Mysteries
5) The Mysteries of Samothrace
6) The Mysteries of Crete
7) The Dionysia
8) The Roman Bacchanalia
9) Debased Mysteries From the East
Part 3 - The Pythagorean League & Other Secret Associations
1) Pythagoras
2) The Pythagoreans
3) The Orphici
4) Mysterious Personages of Ancient Times
Part 4 - Son of Man, Son of God
1) Hellenism & Judaism
2) The Essenes
3) Christianism
4) Jesus
5) The Early Christians
6) The New Testament
7) The Elements of the Church
Part 5 - A Pseudo-Messiah. A Lying Prophet
1) Apollonius of Tyana
2) Alexander, the False Prophet
Part 6 - The Knights Templar
1) The Middle Age
2) The Templars
3) The Secrets of the Templars
4) The Downfall of the Knights Templar
There are several more parts to this book including the Freemasons and Illuminati.

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Published by: Dawne_Berry on Oct 17, 2008
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The wild disorder

attending the

irruption of the

Gothic nations

having subsided, society, which had lost

its

bearings, had to

organize itself anew. The first

step

toward this end was taken when society's task was dis-

tributed

among innumerable fractional

parts of itself, each

fraction

trying to do its own share of the work; the next

step was the

uniting of all these fractional

parts under

one religious idea that of Christianism, and under one

political law that of feudalism. The Pope and the Em-

peror represented the

religious and the

political ideas re-

spectively. As long as one was true to

Pope and

Empe-

ror i.e., was a

good Christian and a

good subject all

was well with him, and he

might, in all other

matters, do

as he pleased. The principle of

Justice was not

regarded :

no wrong act was punished as

violating right, but

always

as

doing harm. Even murder was not

regarded as in-

fringement of human right to

life, but

simply as harm

done to the

people of the murdered one. If one was

without relatives, his

slayer went unpunished; but if

the murdered man left a

family or

kinsmen, the

murderer,
on paying to them a certain sum, went forth free. Thus,

the utmost unrestraint

prevailed in the several small

ag-

gregations of

people, and the utmost

diversity between

147

148

.

(MYSTEHUA

one little

community and another. Of bureaucratic, cen-

tralized, cast-iron

government there was nc faintest

foreshadow; nor was government a function assigned to

any one, but, like the administration of

justice, an ac-

quired right. In a

given province this one had

acquired

the

government, that one the civil and a third the crimi-

nal

judiciary; one was obeyed in

peace, another com-

manded the

people in war.

Jurisdictions were undefined

and

inextricably mixed

up a

consequence of the feudal

system, under which the

King granted rights now to one

man, again to

another, as favors, never

inquiring how

these

might consist with

rights previously granted to

others. In this

way it became possible in the Middle

Age for such

juristic abnormities as the

Femgerichte to

come into existence. The

Femgerichte resulted from

the confusion

existing in

judiciary affairs, just as the

religious abnormity of the monastic orders of

knights re-

sulted from the

veiy opposite condition of

things in the

Church the excess of

regulation. For the confusion

(ab-

sence of

regulation) and the excessive regulation were

near akin; they both

sprang out of the unrestraint of

private life in the Middle Age, which unrestraint natu-

rally produced, under the rule of the

Church, a multitude

of monastic rules

(e.g., the Rule of St.

Augustin, of

St.

Benedict, of St. Columba, etc.); while, on the

contrary, the feebleness of the

Empire, due to the

jeal-

ousy of the

Popes and the ambition and avarice of the

feudal lords, was fatal to

any organization of the admin-

istrative and judicial functions, and

though there were

many codes of law, there could be no standard for dis-

tinguishing right and

wrong.

The cause of this difference of

development between

State and Church was, that the Church had

grown from

THE FEOMGE'RTCrHTE

149

the

top downward, from the hierarchy down to the

peo-

ple; while the State, on the contrary, had

grown from

below

upward. During1

the

process of

migration and set-

tlement, each nation or horde was self-governed, per-

fectly free and independent: hence, the

popular, genial,

oftentimes even jovial and humorous cast of Teutonic

law, as

compared with the hard, pedantic, abstruse, aus-

tere character of the

Jus Romanum. Roman law has

only a

corpus juris ; Teutonic law has Wise Saws, Juristic

Proverbs, Juristic Drolleries, Juristic Myths (Weistuemer,

Rechtssprichtwoerter, Rechtsschwoernke, Rechtssagen).

Originally, among the Germans, the freemen them-

selves were the court and chose their

president, the Graf

(graf now equals count). Not until the time of Karl the

Great

(Charlemagne) did the

grafs become standing offi-

cials, and later an

hereditary order and lords

proprietary.

As the functions of

government were by degrees entrusted

to fewer and ever fewer

hands, being transferred from

the

people to favored feudal lords, and from them passing

finally into the hands of an individual

sovereign a

quite

natural

process, for while the

people increased in number

they did not become better educated, and therefore

grew

ever less fitted for

self-government so, too, judgment,

quitting the

open, embowered courts amid the lindens,

with heaven's breezes

whispering among the

leaves, and

heaven's blue dome overarching all, withdrew behind

dank and

frowning walls, from the countenance of the

whole

people to a

meeting of a small bench of stern

judges.

Thus

gradually were the

rights of the freemen di-

minished. The freemen was less and less

frequently

called to sit in

judgment, for the

president of the

court,

the

graf. was no longer an

equal, but a

great lord, their

150

MYSTEBIA

superior, who made up the court as to him seemed best,

and who even cared

nothing for the

Emperor.*

Westphalia was the

original home of the

Femge-

richte, and

they owed their rise to the fact that there the

royal ban

(Koenigsbann), that is to

say, the

right pos-

sessed

by the

King alone, of

conferring the

grafship on

the

grafs, was still

alive, in modified form

indeed, yet

with its substance

unimpaired. Owing to the

granting

of various

privileges to ecclesiastical and secular

mag-

nates the

jurisdiction of the

grafs was in time divided

up. Besides, there were

special courts for

freemen, and

special courts for the half-free and the

unfree, the former

courts

being under the free

grafs, and the other under the

gaugrafafs (district grafs). Now, as the

majority of the

population were under the

gaugrafs, the

possession oi

a

gaugrafship developed into

sovereignly; while the

posi-

tion of the free

grafs became peculiar : the office was often

sold and passed from hand to hand. The free

grafs, who

were often

persons of little

means, in1

order to maintain

their

dignity, had to lean on the

King's ban, or

warrant,

obtainable from the

King alone. But often the free

graf-

ships died out, or

they were consolidated with

gaugraf-

ships. But nowhere did

they retain so much of their

original character as in

Westphalia a

geographical ex-

pression of various

meanings, indeed, but in

general it

denoted the region between the Rhine and the Weser.

The term Freigraf dates from the twelfth

century.

*What folfloiws regarding1

tlh& Femgeri'cMe is teased on

T(h'eodor Dimdmier's work, "Die Feimgerichte/' Miinslter and Fa-

derborn, 1888. (Whatever may Wave been the original meaning

of tihe word "fern" in "femgeriohit," it is eniou)g*h to kntaw thait

in udage.it is equivalent to "-secret"; hence fem-g-ericht secret

Judgmenlt, or secret tribunal.)

THE FEIMGEIRICHTE

151

Not only the

King but the duke also had influence

over the free

grafships. After the

break-up of the ancient

duchy of

Saxony, every princely land

proprietor within

its

territory was duke of

Westphalia; this is

specially

true of the

Archbishop of

Cologne, and also of the

bishops of

Muenster, Osnabrueck and Minden, and of the

Duke of

Saxe-Lauenburg dukes of

Westphalia all,

but with more or less limitation.

Probably the duke was

entitled to

preside over

any free

court, and to summon to

his own tribunal, the

"botding," the free

grafs. So, too,

the stuhlherT

(lord of the

manor) possessed the

right of

presiding, even when he was no prince, but

only a

graf ;

and often he assumed that the free

graf gave judgment

only in his

(the lord's) name, and so

granted release from

the

jurisdiction of the free courts, to cities, for

example.

The free

graf and his

assessors, the schoeffen

(a lower

grade of

judges), afterward called

freischoeffen, consti-

tuted the

freigericht (free court), afterward known as fem-

gericht. These offices

might fall to

any freeman and

any one was reckoned a freeman who had "his own

smoke," i.

e., a house of his own.

In the latter half of the Hth and the first half of the

1

5th century the

emperors bestowed on the

archbishops

of

Cologne, as dukes of

Westphalia and lieutenants of the

Emperor, the

right of investiture of all free

grafs and

supervision of them all over

Westphalia, A chapter of

free

grafs was held

yearly at

Arnsberg, and hence the

Arnsberg tribunal obtained the first rank.
As the free

grafs held their investiture from the

king,

they looked on themselves as

king's officers, and little

by little went on

extending their

jurisdiction over the

whole empire a

design favored

by the confusion

reign-

ing everywhere, and even

approved by the

emperors

152

HYSTERIA

themselves. At last the free

grafs began to think that

they

were

higher than the emperor, and had no need of his

meddling: this

arrogance was at its

height in the

reign

of

Sigmund, and it was still to be seen under Frederic

VII. ; in

fact, Frederic, for

having taken

steps to

punish

some insubordinate free

grafs, was summoned

by free

grafs to stand trial.
Some of the

emperors did, indeed, set

up free

graf

tribunals outside the limits of

Westphalia; but these never

prospered. In the

I5th century it was an axiom that

such courts could exist

only in

Westphalia, or, as the

say-

ing was, "on red

earth," a

phrase that does not occur

prior to

1490, and the sense of which is not

quite clear;

for neither is the soil of all

Westphalia red, nor is red soil

confined to

Westphalia: and the same criticism

may be

made if "red earth" be taken for "blood-stained earth."

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