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CRS-Iran, May 3, 2010

CRS-Iran, May 3, 2010

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Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses
Kenneth Katzman Specialist in Middle Eastern Affairs May 3, 2010

Congressional Research Service 7-5700 www.crs.gov RL32048

CRS Report for Congress
Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress

Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

Summary
The Obama Administration has not changed the Bush Administration’s characterization of Iran as a “profound threat to U.S. national security interests,” a perception generated not only by Iran’s nuclear program
Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses
Kenneth Katzman Specialist in Middle Eastern Affairs May 3, 2010

Congressional Research Service 7-5700 www.crs.gov RL32048

CRS Report for Congress
Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress

Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

Summary
The Obama Administration has not changed the Bush Administration’s characterization of Iran as a “profound threat to U.S. national security interests,” a perception generated not only by Iran’s nuclear program

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Published by: Confederation of Iranian students on Oct 23, 2011
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07/20/2013

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President Obama came into office articulating a policy of engagement with Iran as a means of
persuading it to verifiably limit its nuclear program to purely peaceful uses and to curb Iran’s
propensity to fund and arm militant movements in the region. Administration officials say the
policy was a genuine attempt to present Iran with a choice to be accepted internationally and
better integrated into the world economy.

President Obama said in his inaugural speech that the United States would be responsive to an
Iranian “unclenched fist,” and that the Administration would pursue consistent and broad direct
diplomacy with Iran. In concert with that approach, Obama Administration officials have not
indicated support for military action should Iran continue to pursue its nuclear program—
although neither that option, nor any other option, was explicitly “taken off the table.” No
Administration official publicly supported “regime change” in Iran to accomplish U.S. goals,
even at the height of the election-related protests, although some Administration officials were
said to see in the Green movement a potential opportunity to achieve that result. Some saw the
Administration’s offer to engage the regime as assisting the Green challenge by depriving the
regime of identifying the United States as a hidden hand behind the opposition movement.

Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

Congressional Research Service

45

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