GUIDANCE NOTES ON

CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL
POWER SYSTEMS
MAY 2006
American Bureau of Shipping
Incorporated by Act of Legislature of
the State of New York 1862
Copyright © 2006
American Bureau of Shipping
ABS Plaza
16855 Northchase Drive
Houston, TX 77060 USA



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GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS
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Foreword
Harmonics (or distortion in wave form) has always existed in electrical power systems. It is harmless
as long as its level is not substantial. However, with the recent rapid advancement of power
electronics technology, so-called nonlinear loads, such as variable frequency drives for motor
power/speed control, are increasingly finding their way to shipboard or offshore applications.
Harmonics induced by these nonlinear loads are a potential risk if they are not predicted and
controlled.
The ABS Guidance Notes for Control of Harmonics in Electrical Power Systems has been developed
in order to raise awareness among electrical system designers of the potential risks associated with the
harmonics in electrical power systems onboard ships or offshore installations. These Guidance Notes
encompass topics from the fundamental physics of harmonics to available means of mitigation to
practical testing methods. These Guidance Notes are intended to aid designers to plan an appropriate
means of harmonics mitigation early in the design stage of the electrical power distribution systems to
make the system robust and predictable.




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GUIDANCE NOTES ON
CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL
POWER SYSTEMS
CONTENTS
SECTION 1 Introduction ............................................................................ 1
1 Background............................................................................1
2 The Use of Electric Drives in Marine Applications.................5
3 Main Propulsion Drives..........................................................7
4 The Future? ...........................................................................9

FIGURE 1 Input Waveforms (440 V) to 6-Pulse DC SCR
Drive.............................................................................2
FIGURE 2 Line-to-line Voltage (440 V) at Input to a 6-Pulse DC
SCR Drive ....................................................................2
FIGURE 3 415 V Line-to-line Volts on Ship with Four 1100 kW/
1500 HP AC SCR Converter-fed Thruster Motors.......3
FIGURE 4 Primary Voltage (11 kV) of Transformer Supplying a
2 MW (2680 HP) Variable Frequency Drive ................3
FIGURE 5 Typical Power System Single Line Diagram for DP
Class 3 Drilling Rig.......................................................5
FIGURE 6 Electrically-driven Podded Propulsor...........................8
FIGURE 7 Dynamically-positioned Shuttle Tanker Equipped
with AC Electric Variable Speed Main Propulsion
and Thrusters...............................................................8

SECTION 2 The Production of Harmonics............................................. 11
1 Production of Harmonics .....................................................11
2 Characteristic Harmonic Currents........................................15
3 Effect of Harmonic Currents on Impedance(s) ....................19
4 Calculation of Voltage Distortion..........................................20
5 Harmonic Sequence Components.......................................22
6 Line Notching.......................................................................22
7 Interharmonics .....................................................................25
8 Subharmonics......................................................................27

TABLE 1 Harmonic Sequence Components for 6-Pulse
Rectifier ......................................................................22

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GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS
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FIGURE 1 Voltage and Current Waveforms for Linear Load ......11
FIGURE 2a Single Phase Full Wave Rectifier...............................11
FIGURE 2b Load and AC Supply Currents ...................................11
FIGURE 3a Simple Single Line Diagram......................................12
FIGURE 3b Load Current and Volt Drop Waveforms....................12
FIGURE 4 How Voltage Distortion is Produced (Simplified) .......12
FIGURE 5 Typical Computer Nonlinear Load .............................13
FIGURE 6 Single-phase Switched Mode Power Supply.............13
FIGURE 7 Harmonic Spectrum of Currents Drawn by
Computer Switched Mode Power Supply ..................14
FIGURE 8 Construction of Complex Wave .................................14
FIGURE 9 Computer Power Supply with Single-phase Full
Wave Bridge Rectifier ................................................16
FIGURE 10 Computer SMPS Input Current Waveform ................16
FIGURE 11 Typical Waveform from Computer Switched Power
Supply ........................................................................17
FIGURE 12 Typical 6-Pulse PWM AC Drive .................................17
FIGURE 13 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current Waveforms
for One Phase............................................................18
FIGURE 14 Typical Harmonic Spectrum for 6-Pulse AC PWM
Drive...........................................................................18
FIGURE 15 Distorted Currents Induce Voltage Distortion ............19
FIGURE 16 How Individual Harmonic Voltage Drops Develop
Across System Impedances ......................................19
FIGURE 17 Simple Three-phase SCR Bridge for Phase
Control........................................................................23
FIGURE 18 Exaggerated Example of “Line Notching” ..................23
FIGURE 19 Voltage Notching due to SCR Bridge
Commutation..............................................................24
FIGURE 20 SCR Line Notching and Associated “Ringing” ...........24
FIGURE 21 Cycloconverter Current Spectrum – Includes
Interharmonics ...........................................................25
FIGURE 22 Waveform Containing both Harmonics and
Interharmonics ...........................................................26
FIGURE 23 Peak Voltage Deviations due to Interharmonics
Voltage.......................................................................27

SECTION 3 Effects of Harmonics........................................................... 29
1 Generators ...........................................................................29
1.1 Thermal Losses...............................................................29
1.2 Effect of Sequence Components.....................................30
1.3 Voltage Distortion............................................................30
1.4 Line Notching and Generators.........................................32
1.5 Shaft Generators.............................................................33

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2 Transformers........................................................................33
2.1 Thermal Losses............................................................... 33
2.2 Unbalance, Distribution Transformers and Neutral
Currents .......................................................................... 34
2.3 Transformer Derating or K-factor Transformer ................ 34
3 Induction Motors ..................................................................36
3.1 Thermal Losses............................................................... 36
3.2 Effect of Harmonic Sequence Components .................... 37
3.3 Explosion-proof Motors and Voltage Distortion............... 38
4 Variable Speed Drives .........................................................39
5 Lighting ................................................................................41
5.1 Flicker ............................................................................. 41
5.2 Effects of Line Notching on Lighting................................ 42
5.3 Potential for Resonance.................................................. 42
6 Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS).................................42
7 Computers and Computer Based Equipment ......................43
8 Cables..................................................................................45
8.1 Thermal Losses............................................................... 45
8.2 Skin and Proximity Effects .............................................. 45
8.3 Neutral Conductors in Four-wire Systems....................... 47
8.4 Additional Effects Associated with Harmonics ................ 48
9 Measuring Equipment ..........................................................48
10 Telephones ..........................................................................51
11 Circuit Breakers ...................................................................51
12 Fuses ...................................................................................52
13 Relays ..................................................................................52
14 Radio, Television, Audio and Video Equipment ..................53
15 Capacitors............................................................................53

FIGURE 1 Equivalent Circuit for a Generator .............................31
FIGURE 2 Low Pass Filter for Generator AVR Sensing on
Nonlinear Loads.........................................................33
FIGURE 3 Typical Transformer Derating Curve for Nonlinear
Load ...........................................................................35
FIGURE 4 Proposed NEMA Derating Curve for Harmonic
Voltages .....................................................................38
FIGURE 5 AC PWM Drive Current Distortion on Weak
Source........................................................................40
FIGURE 6 PWM Drive “Flat Topping” due to Weak Source........41
FIGURE 7 Voltage “Flat Topping” due to Pulse Currents ...........43
FIGURE 8 Effect of DC Bus Voltage with Flat Topping...............43
FIGURE 9 Flat Topping Reducing Supply Ride-through.............44
FIGURE 10 Cable AC/DC Resistance, k
c
as a Function of
Harmonic Numbers....................................................46
FIGURE 11 4/0 AWG Cable – Proximity and Skin Effect due to
Harmonics..................................................................47

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FIGURE 12 12 AWG Cable – Proximity and Skin Effect due to
Harmonics..................................................................47
FIGURE 13 Peak and rms Values of Sinusoidal Waveform..........49
FIGURE 14 Difficulties Conventional Meters Have Reading
Distorted Waveforms .................................................49

SECTION 4 Sources of Harmonics......................................................... 55
1 Distribution Systems with Single-phase Nonlinear
Loads ...................................................................................55
1.1 Three-wire Distribution Systems......................................55
1.2 Four-wire Distribution Systems........................................55
2 Single-phase Nonlinear Loads.............................................58
2.1 Computer-based Equipment............................................58
2.2 Fluorescent Lighting........................................................60
2.3 Televisions ......................................................................64
2.4 Single-phase AC PWM Drives.........................................64
3 Three-phase Nonlinear Loads .............................................65
3.1 DC SCR drives................................................................66
3.2 AC PWM drives...............................................................70
3.3 AC Cycloconverter Drives ...............................................76
3.4 AC Load Commutated Inverter (LCI) ...............................84
4 Additional Three-phase Sources of Harmonics ...................90
4.1 Rotating Machines...........................................................90
4.2 Transformers...................................................................90
4.3 UPS Systems ..................................................................91
4.4 Shaft Generators.............................................................92

FIGURE 1 Four-wire System Linear Phase Currents Return
via Neutral Conductor where Balanced Phase
Current Cancel Out ....................................................56
FIGURE 2 Triplen Harmonics Add Up Cumulatively in Neutral
Conductors with Single-phase Nonlinear Loads in
Four-wire System.......................................................56
FIGURE 3 Neutral Current due to Triplen Harmonics (150 Hz
for 50 Hz Supply) on Four-wire System.....................57
FIGURE 4 Harmonic Spectrum Associated with Neutral
Current Waveform Shown in Figure 3 .......................57
FIGURE 5 Typical Switched Mode Power Supply for
Computer Based Equipment......................................58
FIGURE 6 Typical Voltage and Current Waveforms
Associated with a Switched Mode
Power Supply.............................................................59
FIGURE 7 Harmonic Current Spectrum of Typical Switched
Mode Power Supply - I
thd
is 128%..............................59
FIGURE 8 Typical Neutral Current due to Triplen Harmonics
in Connected Loads on a Four-wire System..............60
FIGURE 9 Waveforms for Lighting Panel Comprising
Fluorescent Lighting with Magnetic Ballasts
and T-12 Lamps.........................................................61

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FIGURE 10 Neutral Current Waveform on Distribution Panel
with Fluorescent Lighting with Magnetic Ballasts
and T-12 Lamps on a Four-wire System...................61
FIGURE 11 Same Lighting Panel as per Figure 9, but with
Electronic Ballasts (Instead of Magnetic Types)
and T-8 Lamps...........................................................62
FIGURE 12 Neutral Current Waveform on Same Fluorescent
Lighting Panel as Figure 10, but with Electronic
Ballasts and T-8 Lamps on Four-wire System...........62
FIGURE 13 Comparison of Phase Current Harmonic Spectrum
for Magnetic and Electronic Ballasts for Typical
Fluorescent Lighting Distribution Panel
I
thd
was 12.8% and 16.3%, Respectively ...................63
FIGURE 14 Comparison of Neutral Current Harmonic Spectrum
for Magnetic and Electronic Ballasts for Typical
Fluorescent Lighting Distribution Panel
I
thd
was 171.28% and 44%, Respectively ..................63
FIGURE 15 Television – Typical Current Waveform.....................64
FIGURE 16 Television – Typical Harmonic Current Spectrum.....64
FIGURE 17 Single-phase AC PWM Drive – Typical I
thd

is 135%......................................................................65
FIGURE 18 Single-phase AC PWM Drive Current Spectrum.......65
FIGURE 19 Typical 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive with Shunt-wound
DC Motor....................................................................66
FIGURE 20 Concept of “Constant Torque” and “Constant Power”
with DC Shunt-wound Motors ....................................67
FIGURE 21 Typical Dual Converter for DC Shunt-wound
Motor ..........................................................................68
FIGURE 22 Concept of “Four Quadrant Control” for DC Motors
and Dual Converters..................................................68
FIGURE 23 Typical 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive Current Waveform
at 100% Load.............................................................69
FIGURE 24 Harmonic Current Spectrum of Typical 6-Pulse DC
SCR Drive at Rated Load ..........................................69
FIGURE 25 Typical AC PWM Drive Block Diagram......................70
FIGURE 26 Pulsed Nature of AC PWM Drive Input Current.........71
FIGURE 27 Typical AC PWM Drive Output (Inverter) Bridge
Configuration..............................................................72
FIGURE 28 Basic Principle of Pulse Width Modulation ................72
FIGURE 29a AC Motor/PWM Drives Standard Speed/Torque
Characteristics ...........................................................73
FIGURE 29b AC Motor/PWM Drives Standard Speed/Power
Characteristics ...........................................................74
FIGURE 30 Input Current – 150 HP AC PWM Drive with 3% DC
Bus Reactor – I
thd
= 39.23%.......................................75
FIGURE 31 Harmonic Current Spectrum of 150 HP AC PWM
Drive with 3% DC Bus Reactor – I
thd
= 39.23%.........75
FIGURE 32 Single-phase-to-Single-phase Cycloconverter ..........76
FIGURE 33 Waveforms for Single-phase-to-Single-phase
Conversion.................................................................77

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FIGURE 34 Three-phase 6-Pulse Cycloconverter ........................79
FIGURE 35 Simplified Connection of Intergroup Reactor on One
Phase of Circulating Current Cycloconverters...........80
FIGURE 36 Waveforms for Blocking Mode Cycloconverters........80
FIGURE 37 Waveforms for Circulating Current Mode
Cycloconverters .........................................................81
FIGURE 38a Input Current Associated with a 20 MW, 12-Pulse
Cycloconverter ...........................................................82
FIGURE 38b Harmonic Current Frequency Spectrum Associated
with a 20 MW, 12-Pulse Cycloconverter....................82
FIGURE 39 2-Pulse Cycloconverter with Three-phase
Synchronous Motor....................................................83
FIGURE 40 Harmonic Spectrum of 12-Pulse Cycloconverters
Including Interharmonic Sidebands............................84
FIGURE 41 Typical 6-Pulse ASCI CSI Inverter with a Squirrel
Cage Induction Motor.................................................85
FIGURE 42 Output Voltage Commutation Spikes – CSI with
Squirrel Cage Induction Motor ...................................85
FIGURE 43 12-Pulse Load Commutated Inverter with
Synchronous Motor....................................................86
FIGURE 44 12-Pulse Load Commutated Inverter with Squirrel
Cage Motor and Output Filter ....................................87
FIGURE 45 Output Voltage of LCI with Synchronous Motor or
Squirrel Cage Motor with Output Filter ......................87
FIGURE 46 Six Step Square Wave Current – LCI with
Synchronous Motor....................................................88
FIGURE 47 Input Waveform of 6-Pulse Load Commutated
Inverter .......................................................................89
FIGURE 48 Harmonic Spectrum Associated with a 6-Pulse
Load Commutated Inverter ........................................89
FIGURE 49 Input Voltage and Current Waveforms of 6-Pulse
37.5 kVA, 480 V, 60 Hz UPS.....................................91
FIGURE 50 Harmonic Input Current Spectrum for 6-Pulse
37.5 kVA, 460 V, 60 Hz UPS.....................................91
FIGURE 51 Traditional Shaft Generator System...........................92
FIGURE 52 Inverter Output Voltage Waveform............................93

SECTION 5 Harmonics and System Power Factor ............................... 95
1 Power Factor in Systems with Linear Loads Only...............95
2 Power Factor in Power System with Harmonics..................95
3 How the Mitigation of Harmonics Improves True Power
Factor ...................................................................................97

FIGURE 1 Power Factor Components in System with Linear
Load ...........................................................................95
FIGURE 2 Power Factor Components in System with
Harmonics..................................................................96


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SECTION 6 The Effect of Loading on Harmonic Current Distortion.... 99
1 Total Harmonic Voltage Distortion (V
thd
) ..............................99
2 Total Harmonic Current Distortion (I
thd
) and Reduced
Loading ................................................................................99
2.1 AC PWM Drives .............................................................. 99
2.2 DC SCR Drives ............................................................. 102
2.3 Load Commutated Inverters.......................................... 103
2.4 Cycloconverters ............................................................ 103
2.5 Conclusion: Harmonic Current Magnitude and its
Effect on Voltage Distortion........................................... 105

FIGURE 1 Typical 6-Pulse PWM Drive (with 3% AC Line
Reactor) at 100% Load – I
thd
Measured at 37.5%....100
FIGURE 2 Typical Harmonic Spectrum of AC PWM Drive
(with 3% AC Line Reactor) at 100% Load – I
thd

Measured at 37.5%..................................................100
FIGURE 3 Typical AC PWM Drive (with 3% AC Line Reactor)
at 30% Load – I
thd
Measured at 65.7%. ...................101
FIGURE 4 Typical Harmonic Spectrum of AC PWM Drive
(with 3% AC Line Reactor) at 30% Load – I
thd

Measured at 65.7%..................................................101
FIGURE 5 6-Pulse DC Drive at 70% Loading – I
thd
is 35.1%....102
FIGURE 6 Harmonic Current Spectrum of 6-Pulse DC Drive
at 70% Loading – I
thd
is 35.1%.................................103
FIGURE 7 Multiple 6-Pulse Cycloconverters Input Current
and Voltage Harmonic Spectrums at Low Output
Frequency/Low Load ...............................................104
FIGURE 8 Multiple 6-Pulse Cycloconverters Input Current
and Voltage Harmonic Spectrums at High Output
Frequency/High Load...............................................104

SECTION 7 Influence of Source Impedance and kVA on
Harmonics........................................................................... 107
1 “Stiff” and “Soft” Sources ...................................................107
2 Illustrations of the Effect of kVA and Source Impedance
Harmonics.........................................................................108
3 Parallel Generator Operation and Calculation of
Equivalent Short Circuit Ratings........................................116

TABLE 1 Variation of I
thd
and V
thd
with Variation of kVA and
Impedance (or X
d
″)...................................................115

FIGURE 1a 2000 kVA and 5.2% Impedance – I
SC
/I
L
= 33.3:1,
I
thd
= 24.2%, V
thd
= 4.7%...........................................108
FIGURE 1b Current and Voltage Waveforms for 2000 kVA/
5.2% Impedance Source with 950 HP AC PWM
Drive Load and 180 kW Linear Load .......................109
FIGURE 2a 2000 kVA and 14% Subtransient Reactance
I
SC
/I
L
= 29.1:1, I
thd
= 19.1%, V
thd
= 9.8%..................110

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FIGURE 2b Current and Voltage Waveforms for 2000 kVA/
14% Subtransient Reactance Source with
950 HP AC PWM Drive Load and 180 kW
Linear Load ..............................................................111
FIGURE 3a 4000 kVA and 5.2% Impedance – I
SC
/I
L
= 67.1:1,
I
thd
= 27.1%, V
thd
= 2.7%...........................................112
FIGURE 3b Current and Voltage Waveforms for 4000 kVA/
5.2% Impedance Source with 950 HP AC PWM
Drive Load and 180 kW Linear Load .......................113
FIGURE 4a 4000 kVA and 14% Subtransient Reactance
I
SC
/I
L
= 26.6:1, I
thd
= 22.9%, V
thd
= 5.8%...................114
FIGURE 4b Current and Voltage Waveforms for 4000 kVA/
14% Subtransient Reactance Source with
950 HP AC PWM Drive Load and 180 kW
Linear Load ..............................................................115
FIGURE 5 Paralleling of Generators .........................................116
FIGURE 6 Example of Paralleled Generators...........................117

SECTION 8 The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage
Distortion............................................................................ 119
1 Balanced Systems .............................................................119
2 Unbalanced Systems.........................................................119
2.1 Definition of Voltage Unbalance ....................................120
2.2 Effect of Unbalanced Loading on Rotating
Machines.......................................................................121
2.3 Effect of Unbalanced Loading on Harmonics ................123
2.4 Voltage Unbalance and Multi-pulse Drives and
Systems.........................................................................125
2.5 Background Voltage Distortion and Multi-pulse Drives
and Systems..................................................................127
2.6 The Effect of Voltage Unbalance and Background
Voltage Distortion Using Software Modeling .................128
2.7 Drive Mitigation – Unbalance and Background
Voltage Distortion..........................................................134

TABLE 1 Variation in I
thd
and V
thd
with Voltage Unbalance
and Pre-existing Voltage Distortion .........................134

FIGURE 1 Balanced System.....................................................119
FIGURE 2 Unbalanced System.................................................119
FIGURE 3 Symmetrical Components of an Unbalanced
System.....................................................................120
FIGURE 4 Reduction of Insulation Life with Temperature ........122
FIGURE 5 Derating on Induction Motors of Unbalanced
Supplies ...................................................................123
FIGURE 6 Typical 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current
Waveform on Balanced Voltages.............................124
FIGURE 7 Typical 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current
Waveform on 5% Voltage Unbalance......................124

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FIGURE 8 Typical 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current
Waveform on 15% Voltage Unbalance....................124
FIGURE 9 Harmonic Spectrum of 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive on
Unbalanced Voltages (Fundamental Component
Removed).................................................................125
FIGURE 10 Unbalance and the Effect on 12-Pulse Drives.........126
FIGURE 11 Unbalance and the Effect on 18-Pulse Drives.........126
FIGURE 12 Effect of Background Voltage Distortion on
18-Pulse AC PWM Drive..........................................127
FIGURE 13a No Voltage Unbalance, No Pre-existing V
thd

I
thd
= 5.2%, V
thd
= 4.9%.............................................129
FIGURE 13b Voltage and Current Waveforms No Voltage
Unbalance, No Pre-existing V
thd
...............................129
FIGURE 14a 2% Voltage Unbalance, No Pre-existing V
thd

I
thd
= 14.5%, V
thd
= 5.2%...........................................130
FIGURE 14b Voltage and Current Waveforms 2% Voltage
Unbalance, No Pre-existing V
thd
...............................130
FIGURE 14c Three-phase Current Waveforms 2% Voltage
Unbalance, No Pre-existing V
thd
...............................131
FIGURE 15a No Voltage Unbalance, 5% Pre-existing V
thd

I
thd
= 10.9%, V
thd
= 6.2%...........................................131
FIGURE 15b Voltage and Current Waveforms No Voltage
Unbalance, 5% Pre-existing V
thd
..............................132
FIGURE 16a 2% Voltage Unbalance, 5% Pre-existing V
thd

I
thd
= 18.5%, V
thd
= 6.0%...........................................132
FIGURE 16b Voltage and Current Waveforms 2% Voltage
Unbalance, 5% Pre-existing V
thd
..............................133
FIGURE 16c Three-phase Current Waveforms 2% Voltage
Unbalance, 5% Pre-existing V
thd
..............................133

SECTION 9 Resonance.......................................................................... 135
1 What is Resonance?..........................................................135
2 The Conditions under which Resonance Occurs ..............135
2.1 Series Resonance......................................................... 135
2.2 Parallel Resonance....................................................... 136
3 Prevention of Resonance ..................................................137
3.1 The Effect of Adding a Detuning Reactor...................... 139
4 Possibilities of Resonance on Vessels and Offshore
Installations........................................................................140

FIGURE 1a Series Resonance....................................................135
FIGURE 1b Parallel Resonance..................................................135
FIGURE 2 Series Resonance Frequency Response ................137
FIGURE 3 Typical Industrial Drive Application where
Resonance is Possible.............................................138
FIGURE 4 Simplified Connection of Detuning Reactor to
Capacitor Bank ........................................................139


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SECTION 10 Mitigation of Harmonics.................................................... 141
1 Effect of Phase Diversity on Harmonic Currents ...............141
2 Effect of Linear Load on Harmonic Currents .....................142
3 Mitigation of Harmonics on Three-wire Single-phase
Systems .............................................................................143
3.1 Phase Shifting ...............................................................143
3.2 Active Filtering...............................................................144
4 Mitigation of Harmonics on Four-wire Single-phase
Systems .............................................................................144
4.1 Zero Sequence Mitigation of Triplens on Four-wire
Single-phase Systems...................................................144
4.2 Active Filters for Four-wire Systems..............................146
5 Standard Reactors for Three-phase AC and DC
Drives.................................................................................147
5.1 Reactors for AC PWM Drives........................................148
6 AC Line Reactors for DC SCR Drives and AC Drives
with SCR Input Rectifiers...................................................153
7 Special Reactors for Three-phase AC and DC Drives ......156
7.1 Wide Spectrum Filters ...................................................156
7.2 Duplex Reactors............................................................160
8 Passive L-C Filters.............................................................166
9 Transformer Phase Shifting (Multi-pulsing) .......................171
9.1 Double-wound Isolating Transformer Phase Shift
Systems.........................................................................172
9.2 Polygonal Non-isolating Autotransformer Phase Shift
Systems.........................................................................173
9.3 The Effect of Voltage Unbalance on Phase Shift
Performance..................................................................175
9.4 The Effect of Background Voltage Distortion on
Phase Shift Performance...............................................177
10 Transformer Phase Staggering (Quasi Multi-pulse)
Systems .............................................................................178
11 Electronic Filters ................................................................179
11.1 Active Filters..................................................................179
11.2 Hybrid Active-Passive Filters.........................................185
12 “Active Front Ends” for AC PWM Drives............................188

TABLE 1 Estimated Harmonic Current Distortion Using
Quasi-24-Pulse Phase Staggering System .............179

FIGURE 1 Harmonic Voltage Data to 50
th
Harmonic with
Respective Phase Angle Information.......................142
FIGURE 2 Phase Shifting of Three-wire Nonlinear Loads ........143
FIGURE 3 Four-wire System with Nonlinear Loads..................144
FIGURE 4 Operation of a Zero Sequence Transformer............145
FIGURE 5 Zero Sequence Transformer on Four-wire
System.....................................................................145

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FIGURE 6 Zero Sequence Transformer and Combined Phase
Shift Transformer with ZST to Cancel Triplen and
5
th
and 7
th
Harmonic Currents..................................146
FIGURE 7 Block Diagram of Active Filter on Four-wire
Application................................................................147
FIGURE 8 Circuit Diagram of Standard 6-Pulse AC PWM
Drive.........................................................................148
FIGURE 9 Variation of Harmonic Currents with AC Line
Reactance Only .......................................................150
FIGURE 10 DC Bus Reactance Only in AC PWM Drive.............152
FIGURE 11 Variation in 5
th
Harmonic Current for Differing
Values of AC Line Reactance and DC Bus
Reactance................................................................153
FIGURE 12 Primary and Secondary Notching............................154
FIGURE 13 Line Impedance Distribution and the Effect of
Notching...................................................................154
FIGURE 14 Wide Spectrum Filter Schematic..............................157
FIGURE 15 200 HP/150 kW AC PWM Drive with 3% DC Bus
Reactor – I
thd
= 39.9%..............................................157
FIGURE 16 Typical Wide Spectrum Filter Connection
Diagram – AC PWM Drive .......................................158
FIGURE 17 Trapezoidal Output Voltage from
Wide Spectrum Filter ...............................................158
FIGURE 18 Mains Waveform with Wide Spectrum Filter –
I
thd
= 4.6%.................................................................159
FIGURE 19 Typical Wide Spectrum Filter Performance –
350 HP AC PWM Drive with 3% AC Line
Reactance................................................................159
FIGURE 20 Wide Spectrum Filter with 12-Pulse AC
Drive.........................................................................160
FIGURE 21 Duplex Reactor Schematic ......................................161
FIGURE 22a System Voltage Waveform......................................161
FIGURE 22b Duplex Reactor Correction Voltage .........................162
FIGURE 22c “Corrected” System Voltage.....................................162
FIGURE 23 Application of Duplex Reactors on Main
Propulsion Drives.....................................................163
FIGURE 24 Variation of System V
thd
with Number of
Generators on Line (Figure 23) ...............................163
FIGURE 25 Duplex Reactors on Passenger Ships with
2 × 20 MW Cycloconverters.....................................164
FIGURE 26 Application of Duplex Reactors on Shaft
Generators ...............................................................165
FIGURE 27 Application of Duplex Reactors Vessel with
Multiple AC SCR Based Drives................................166
FIGURE 28 Absolute Impedance Characteristics for Tuned 7
th

Harmonic Series Filter .............................................167
FIGURE 29 Common Configuration of Passive Filters ...............168
FIGURE 30 Simplified Connection of Multi-limbed Passive
Filter .........................................................................168

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FIGURE 31 Impedance Characteristics of Multi-limbed Passive
Filter .........................................................................169
FIGURE 32 Simplified “Drive Applied” or “Trap” Filter for
Variable Speed Drives .............................................170
FIGURE 33 12-Pulse AC PWM Drive with Double-wound
Phase Shift Transformer ..........................................172
FIGURE 34 Double-wound 12-Pulse Phase Shift Transformer
Unbalance Between Secondary Voltages ...............173
FIGURE 35 12-Pulse AC PWM Drive with Polygonal
Autotransformer .......................................................174
FIGURE 36 Variation on Harmonic Currents vs. AC Reactance
for a 12-Pulse AC PWM Drive with Polygonal
Autotransformer .......................................................175
FIGURE 37 Typical 18-Pulse Drive System................................176
FIGURE 38 Effect of 2% Unbalance on 18-Pulse Drive..............176
FIGURE 39 Effect of Background Voltage Distortion on an
18-Pulse Drive..........................................................177
FIGURE 40 Quasi-24-Pulse System Using Phase Staggering
Techniques...............................................................178
FIGURE 41 Block Diagram of Shunt Connection Active Filter
with Associated Current Waveforms........................180
FIGURE 42 Simplified Power Circuit of Active Filter ...................181
FIGURE 43 Typical AC PWM Drive Input Current Waveform
(L
L
) as per Figure 41 ................................................182
FIGURE 44 Active Filter “Compensation Current” Waveform
(L
f
) as per Figure 41.................................................182
FIGURE 45 Source Current Waveform (L
S
) as per Figure 41 .....182
FIGURE 46 Typical Active Filter Performance with 150 HP
AC PWM with 3% AC Line Reactor .........................183
FIGURE 47 Theoretical Shunt Passive-Active Hybrid Filter........185
FIGURE 48 Thermal Limits of Shunt Active per Harmonic
Current .....................................................................186
FIGURE 49 Practical Example of Hybrid Shunt Passive-Active
Filter .........................................................................187
FIGURE 50 Application of an IGBT “Active Front End” to an AC
PWM Drive...............................................................188
FIGURE 51 ”Active Front End” Input Current and Voltage
Waveforms...............................................................189
FIGURE 52 Typical Harmonic Current Input Spectrum for AC
PWM Drive with an “Active Front End”. Note the
Harmonic Currents Above the 50
th
...........................190

SECTION 11 Harmonic Limit Recommendations.................................. 191
1 General Systems ...............................................................191
2 Dedicated Systems............................................................191


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SECTION 12 Calculation of Harmonic Voltage Distortion.................... 193
1 Manual Calculation of Voltage Distortion...........................193
2 Software Estimation of Harmonic Distortion......................199

TABLE 1 Summary of Harmonics to 25
th
................................195
TABLE 2 Summary of Harmonics to 25
th
................................198

SECTION 13 Provision of Information on Harmonics........................... 201
1 Information to be requested from Vendors ........................201
2 Information to be included with a Harmonic Analysis........201

SECTION 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment .......... 203
1 Safety Precautions during Harmonic Surveys ...................203
2 Planning the Harmonic Survey or Measurements.............204
3 Information to be recorded from Harmonic
Measurements ...................................................................205
4 Examples of Harmonic Analyzers......................................206
4.1 The Fluke 43B............................................................... 206
4.2 AEMC 3945................................................................... 209
4.3 Hioki 3196..................................................................... 216
5 Measurements on Voltages above 690/750 V AC.............220

FIGURE 1 Fluke 43B Harmonic/Power Quality Analyzer..........206
FIGURE 2 Fluke 43B Harmonics Screen Data Available
(In This Case Current) [Voltage and power
harmonic data are also available.] ...........................207
FIGURE 3 Fluke 43B Can Measure Sags and Swells up to
16 Days on a Per Cycle Basis .................................207
FIGURE 4 Up to 40 Transients (Voltage or Current) Can Be
Captured with the Fluke 41B....................................208
FIGURE 5 True rms Voltage and Current Waveform
Display(s) from Fluke 43B........................................208
FIGURE 6 AEMC 3945 Three-phase Harmonic/Power Quality
Analyzer with Real Time Color Display....................209
FIGURE 7 AEMC 3945 Connected On-site Illustrating
“Wrap-around” Rogowski-type, AmpFlex
6500 A Current Probes ............................................210
FIGURE 8 Sample Displays of Voltage and Current
Waveforms...............................................................211
FIGURE 9 Three-phase Voltage Waveforms ............................211
FIGURE 10 Transient Current Waveforms..................................212
FIGURE 11 Three-phase Voltage Harmonics .............................212
FIGURE 12 Harmonic Direction ..................................................213
FIGURE 13 Harmonic Sequences...............................................213
FIGURE 14 Phasor Diagram.......................................................214
FIGURE 15 AEMC 3945 Configuration via Computer.................214

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FIGURE 16 Real Time Current Waveforms via Computer..........215
FIGURE 17 Real Time Computer Display of Harmonic
Currents ...................................................................215
FIGURE 18 Unbalance in Real Time via Computer ....................216
FIGURE 19 Hioki 3196 Power Analyzer with Voltage and
Current Probes.........................................................217
FIGURE 20 AC VFD Three-phase Voltage and Current
Measurements from Hioki 3196...............................217
FIGURE 21 Harmonic FFT Measurements from Hioki 3196
with 5
th
Harmonic Selected ......................................218
FIGURE 22 Power System V
thd
Trend Recording via Hioki 3196
as a Number of AC VFDs Are Switched On ............218
FIGURE 23 V
thd
of all Three Phases Recorded by Hioki 3196
when Active Filter Switched in on Oil Production
Platform....................................................................219
FIGURE 24 Summary of Data Sampled from Hioki 3196 ...........219
FIGURE 25 Recorded Harmonic Currents by Hioki 3196 on
12-Pulse AC Drive ...................................................220

APPENDIX 1 Recommended Reading.................................................... 221


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S E C T I O N 1 Introduction
1 Background
Over recent years, there has been a significant increase in the installation and use of power electronic
equipment onboard ships and on offshore installations. The operation of this equipment has in many
cases significantly degraded the ship or offshore installation electrical power quality to such an extent
that measures have to be implemented in order to minimize the resultant adverse effects on the
electrical plant and equipment.
The quality and security of voltage supplies are important to the safety of any vessel and its crew and
to the protection of the marine environment. Any failure or malfunction of equipment such as
propulsion or navigation systems can result in an accident at sea or close inshore with serious
consequences. Many power quality issues are transient, for example, the starting of a large electric
thruster motor resulting in a momentary dip before the generator regulators correct the situation and
reinstate the correct level of voltage and frequency.
However, as the title suggests, the specific power quality issue to be addressed in these Guidance
Notes is that of the harmonic distortion of voltage supplies caused by the operation of electronic
devices which draw nonlinear (i.e., non-sinusoidal in nature) currents from the voltage supplies.
These same items of “nonlinear” equipment can also be affected by harmonic currents and the
subsequent voltage distortion they produce, as can the majority of “linear” equipment (particularly
generators, AC motors and transformers). As harmonic distortion is “steady state” and continuous,
the issue of electrical power quality associated with harmonics is an important concern to the marine
safety aspects and in addition, to any adverse effects harmonic distortion has on the performance and
reliability of the majority of marine and offshore systems and equipment.
Examples of the serious impact of harmonics and associated power quality effects on marine and
offshore supply voltage waveforms, in these instances, due to electrical variable speed drives (the
main producer of harmonic currents on marine and offshore installations) are illustrated in Section 1,
Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4.




Section 1 Introduction

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FIGURE 1
Input Waveforms (440 V) to 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive



FIGURE 2
Line-to-line Voltage (440 V) at Input to a 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive





Section 1 Introduction

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FIGURE 3
415 V Line-to-line Volts on Ship with Four 1100 kW/1500 HP AC SCR
Converter-fed Thruster Motors



FIGURE 4
Primary Voltage (11 kV) of Transformer Supplying a 2 MW (2680 HP)
Variable Frequency Drive





Section 1 Introduction

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The American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) is concerned with the effects of harmonic voltage distortion
and the possible resultant consequences should some critical item of equipment malfunction or fail.
This concern is largely a result of the increasing demand for high power nonlinear equipment, such
AC and DC variable speed drives, used for main propulsion, thrusters and other duties. Therefore,
ABS has imposed limitations on the magnitude of harmonic voltage distortion permitted on classed
vessels.
The aim of these Guidance Notes, which solely address the harmonics issue, is to provide information
as to what harmonics are and how they interact with the supply impedances, what effects they have on
the different types of equipment, what items of equipment typically produce harmonic currents and
how harmonic currents can be attenuated or mitigated such that any adverse effects are significantly
reduced.
As indicated in the title, these Guidance Notes are designed to be practical “guidance notes”, not a
reference book on harmonics. It is aimed at the “non-expert”, hence the use of a minimum of
complex math. There are a number of high-quality harmonics and power quality reference books
available, although very few dealing with harmonics and power quality issues specifically from the
marine viewpoint. The Appendix recommends some of these books should the reader wish further
information.
These Guidance Notes will indicate that there are a number of sources of harmonic currents. “Linear”
equipment, such as generators, AC motors and transformers, is also known to produce harmonics,
albeit in limited qualities compared to large “nonlinear loads”. However, in the context of the marine
and offshore installations, it is the electric variable speed drive (a combination of an electric motor
and electronic power converter) whether AC or DC based, which, due to its increased popularity in a
host of applications, is the main source of harmonic currents and subsequent voltage distortion.
Therefore, the electric variable speed drives and harmonic mitigation of this type of equipment will be
a primary focus of these Guidance Notes.
However, single-phase electrical and electronic equipment, including fluorescent lighting, variable
speed drives and computer-based equipment all produce harmonic currents and therefore will distort
the voltage supplies. On large passenger vessels, 4-wire systems [three-phase and neutral (grounded
or insulated)] are now being installed, resulting in potentially high levels of neutral currents due to
arithmetic addition of triplen harmonics in that conductor, up to almost twice the phase current values.
Therefore, lower voltage single-phase equipment down to 110 V is also of significant importance in
many vessels in terms of harmonics and associated effects.
Section 1, Figure 5, below, illustrates the popularity and the reliance some classes of vessel now have
with regard to electrical variable speed drives (in this instance a self-propelled drilling rig).




Section 1 Introduction

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FIGURE 5
Typical Power System Single Line Diagram for DPS-3 Drilling Rig


2 The Use of Electric Drives in Marine Applications
For the first half of the 20
th
century, the majority of vessels were steam turbine or diesel engine
driven. DC generators were common and therefore, ships utilized DC motors to power a host of
applications, including cargo winches, windlasses, pumps, fans and other auxiliary driven equipment.
Speed control was easily achieved using resistance-based control systems for both armature voltage
control (for speed variation up to base speed) and field control (above base speed). As no “voltage
conversion” was taking place (e.g., AC to DC) no harmonic currents were produced by this type of
equipment.
From the early 1960s, AC generators were installed in new vessels as the benefits of AC voltage
supplies became common. With the introduction of AC power, however, the ease in which electric
motor speed control was previously achieved was significantly diminished for all but some
specialized applications. For duties where speed control was considered necessary (for example,
windlass or mooring winch applications), special systems including the “Ward-Leonard” AC motor-
DC generator system were developed. The Ward-Leonard set supplied a DC motor which powered
the driven load. The voltage, and hence speed and torque, of the DC drive motor was controlled by
the excitation of the Ward Leonard DC generator driven by a fixed-speed AC motor and the “field
controller” should speeds above base speed be needed. No “voltage conversion” (AC to DC, in this
case) was necessary. Therefore, harmonic distortion was not an issue that had to be considered.



Section 1 Introduction

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Around the mid-to-late 1960s, the first generation of solid state SCR (“silicon controlled rectifier” or
“thyristor”) based variable speed drive systems were introduced for the control of DC motors. The
power conversion process from AC voltage to DC voltage draws “nonlinear” (non-sinusoidal)
currents from the supply, resulting in harmonic voltage distortion as the harmonic currents produced
interact with supply impedances. It has to be noted that the theory of harmonics with respect to
electrical networks has been known since the start of the 20
th
Century, but until relatively recently,
there was no effective or accurate monitoring equipment available to measure it.
Common applications for DC SCR drives on AC vessels from the mid-to-late 1960s included
windlasses, mooring winches and some cargo winches, while the majority of engine room auxiliaries;
pumps, fans, compressors and other equipment were driven by fixed-speed AC motors with bypass
systems, valve throttling or damper control used to vary flow. It was common on these vessels fitted
with DC SCR cargo handling systems to experience light “flicker”, caused by a combination of “line
notching”, “interharmonics” and harmonic currents interacting with the generator(s), cabling and
other supply impedances when cargo was being worked.
From the mid 1960s, DC SCR drives were used extensively on drilling rigs for main propulsion, mud
pumps, draw-works, anchor windlasses and other duties. As can be seen in Section 1, Figure 5, DC
SCR drives have now largely been replaced by AC drives.
In the late 1970s and early 1980s, AC variable frequency drives (“VFDs” or “inverters”) were
developed in various forms, “quasi square wave drives” and “current source drives”, being two
common examples. However, it was only in the late 1980s that AC drive technology (most notably in
the form of “pulse width modulation” (“PWM”) drives) started to appear on ships in any numbers,
although they were installed on offshore oil production installations from the mid 1980s for a few
duties, especially including down-hole pumps, where the initial benefit was as “soft-starters” for the
pumps. Shortly thereafter, the speed control feature was utilized as oil reservoirs became depleted
and flow rate had to be controlled.
Offshore, on applications where robust, variable speed control was needed, DC SCR drives were most
common. DC SCR drives went largely unchallenged until the early-to-mid 1990s. However, from
that time on, as the physical size, performance, reduction in maintenance of AC motors compared to
DC motors, cost, and reliability of AC drives continued to improve, their popularity increased making
AC drives comparable to DC SCR drives. As can be seen from Section 1, Figure 5, AC PWM drives
have completely replaced DC drives in the majority of drilling rig applications.
With the exception of large main propulsion drives (above 5-8 MW/6700-10700 HP), where “load
commutated inverters” and “cyclo-converters” are still more common, AC PWM drives are popular
(for example, for small main propulsion systems, thrusters, cargo pumps and other LV and HV
applications). The increased installed drive capacity on vessels, whether based on AC or DC
converters, has led to a significant increase in harmonic voltage distortion levels on a large number of
vessels. Although in many cases harmonic mitigation has been used, these may not be sufficient to
attain the levels of attenuation necessary to guarantee compliance with the harmonic limits imposed
by classification societies. In a relatively large number of cases, the harmonic voltage distortion has
reached surprising levels, well in excess of the classification societies’ limitations.
AC PWM drives with “active front ends” (sinusoidal input rectifiers), which offer relatively low
harmonic current levels compared to present “standard” AC converter drives, have been available for
a number of years. There are a number of significant commercial and technological issues still to be
completely resolved, including cost, physical size, increased levels of electro-magnetic interference
(EMI), input bridge carrier frequency suppression which needs large passive reactor-capacitor-reactor
(L-C-L) filters, the production of high order harmonics (usually above the 40
th
or 50
th
) and
compatibility with generator-derived supplies regarding suitably low values of source impedance.
However, despite these issues, their use in marine applications is increasing. There are a number of
harmonic mitigation solutions which, when used with “standard” 6-pulse AC drives, offer similar
levels of performance at less cost, reduced complexity, higher efficiency, less EMI and higher
reliability.



Section 1 Introduction

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DC SCR drives are still operating in older vessels and in new, specialist survey vessels, for example,
where low noise and vibration levels are important. The power ratings of DC drives systems,
however, are largely limited to a few MWs due to restrictions on the brush-gear and mass of the DC
motor armature.
It should be noted that the present power restrictions with AC PWM converters is due to lack of
suitable power semiconductors in terms of current and voltage ratings. It is estimated that ratings up
to 50 MW for AC PWM drives may be available within a few years based on new types of power
devices.
3 Main Propulsion Drives
Electric drives for propulsion have been used onboard ship for the majority of the 20
th
Century, albeit
in very small numbers. Indeed, small inland vessels with DC electric motors for propulsion operated
in the United Kingdom and Russia as early as 1893.
Large seagoing vessels first appeared with full electric propulsion in the 1920s with the introduction
of the Panama Pacific Line ships, Virginia and California, each powered by two synchronous motors
each rated at 6750 HP. In Europe around the same time, four synchronous motors with a total of
116MW (155,500HP) propelled the French passenger liner, Normandie. During the Second World
War, DC propulsion motors were used extensively on US-built T2 tankers. Cruise liners in the 1960s,
including Canberra, were fitted with 30 MW (40,000 HP) synchronous propulsion motors. In the mid
1980s, Queen Elizabeth II was converted from steam turbine to electric propulsion by installing two
40 MW synchronous motors and converters. A large proportion of modern cruise liners also utilize
full electric propulsion, either via conventional shaft arrangements or via podded propulsors.
The application of electric propulsion has increased in the last five years, largely due to the
introduction of new classes of vessels and the expansion of new builds, including Ropax ferries,
offshore supply vessels, survey ships, “floating production storage and offloading” vessels (FPSOs),
shuttle tankers, cable-ships and cruise liners, where electric propulsion provides significant benefits,
including increased cargo carrying capabilities, lower running costs, less maintenance, reduced
manpower, greater redundancy, lower emissions and improved maneuverability (with podded or
azimuth type propulsors – see Section 1, Figure 6.).
As of the year 2000, over 2% of vessels over 500 gross tons were fitted with electrically-driven
propulsion. The percentage of new vessels being built with electric propulsion continues to increase
annually.
Section 1, Figure 7, shows a typical application of an electrically-propelled vessel, in this instance a
dynamically-positioned shuttle tanker using AC drives; 12 MW cycloconverters for main propulsion
and PWM drives for thrusters, fixed and podded, in addition to main cargo pumps.
The decision as to whether to install electric propulsion in a vessel is complex and is usually
dependent on the type of vessel and the operating profile envisaged. Naval warship design, however,
is currently also being significantly changed with the adoption of fully-integrated electric propulsion
systems, which will accrue significant strategic additional benefits from new generations of electric
weapon platforms that will utilize the increased onboard power generating capacity necessary for the
main electric propulsion systems.




Section 1 Introduction

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FIGURE 6
Electrically-driven Podded Propulsor



FIGURE 7
Dynamically-positioned Shuttle Tanker Equipped with AC Electric
Variable Speed Main Propulsion and Thrusters




Section 1 Introduction

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4 The Future?
The use of electric variable speed drives, particularly AC converters, for main propulsion and a host
of other applications within the marine and offshore sectors will continue to increase.
The continual advances in power semiconductors, electromagnetics, control systems, software
engineering and other related technologies will lead to the development of higher performance, more
compact, more cost effective and more efficient types of electric drives and motors.
The majority of the emerging AC drive converter types, including “matrix converters”, “resonant
converters” and “pulse frequency modulated” (PFM) converters will all have low harmonic profiles
compared to the majority of generic drive technologies available at present.
However, it may be some years before these emerging AC drive converter developments permeate
through from mainly military (naval) development programs and are available to commercial
organizations. Their financial viability for any applications other than specialized naval warship
duties may also have to be carefully assessed. In the meantime, the issue of harmonic distortion and
the effects on plant and equipment has to be addressed to ensure the safety of the ship or offshore
installation, the protection of the crew, and where appropriate, the passengers and the marine
environment.





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S E C T I O N 2 The Production of Harmonics
1 Production of Harmonics
In a power system, any item of equipment which draws current from the supply which is proportional
to the applied voltage is termed a “linear” load. Examples of linear loads include resistance heaters
and incandescent lamps. The current and voltage waveforms associated with linear loads are shown in
Section 2, Figure 1.

FIGURE 1
Voltage and Current Waveforms for Linear Load
Voltage
Linear Load
Current


The term “nonlinear” is used to describe loads which draw current from the supply that is dissimilar in
shape to the applied voltage. Examples include discharge lighting, computers and variable speed drives.
In order to explain pictorially how nonlinear current distorts the voltage supply waveform it is
necessary to refer Section 2, Figures 2 and 3.
Section 2, Figure 2a illustrates a simple single-phase full wave rectifier supplying a load containing
both inductance and resistance. The impedance of the AC supply is represented by the inductance
L
ac
. Section 2, Figure 2b illustrates the DC load current (I
dc
) and AC input current (I
ac
), respectively.

FIGURE 2a
Single Phase Full Wave Rectifier
FIGURE 2b
Load and AC Supply Currents





Section 2 Production of Harmonics

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Section 2, Figure 3a shows a simple single line diagram comprising source voltage (u) and source
impedance (L
N
). The harmonic current (i
N
) passing through the source impedance produces a voltage
drop (U
L
) according the following formula:
dt
di
L U
N
N L
. = .................................................................................................................... (2.1)
Section 2, Figure 3b illustrates the nonlinear current (i
N
) and voltage drop (U
L
) waveforms.

FIGURE 3a
Simple Single Line
Diagram
FIGURE 3b
Load Current and Volt Drop
Waveforms


The voltage drop across the source impedance (U
L
) is subtracted from the induced voltage (u),
resulting in the distortion of the supply voltage waveform, as illustrated in Section 2, Figure 4.
Note: The example below has been exaggerated in order to illustrate the principle graphically of how nonlinear current
distorts the supply voltage.

FIGURE 4
How Voltage Distortion is Produced (Simplified)





Section 2 Production of Harmonics

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The majority of nonlinear loads is equipment that utilizes power semiconductor devices for power
conversion (e.g., rectifiers). They include, for example, computer switched mode power systems
(SMPS) for converting AC to DC. Section 2, Figure 5 illustrates a typical current waveform of a
computer switched mode power supplier unit.

FIGURE 5
Typical Computer Nonlinear Load
Voltage
Nonlinear Load
Current


In order to appreciate why the current waveform shown in Section 2, Figure 5 is of a “pulsed” nature,
it is beneficial to consider the design of switched mode power supplies, an example of which is
illustrated in Section 2, Figure 6.

FIGURE 6
Single-phase Switched Mode Power Supply


This type of power supply uses capacitors to smooth the rectified DC voltage and current prior to it
being supplied to other internal subsystems and components. The semiconductor diode rectifiers are
unidirectional devices (i.e., they conduct in one direction only). The additional function of the
capacitor is to store energy which is drawn by the load as necessary. When the input voltage (V
i
) is
higher in value than the capacitor voltage (V
c
), the appropriate diode will conduct and non-sinusoidal,
“pulsed” current will be drawn from the supply. This non-sinusoidal current contains “harmonic
currents” in addition to the sinusoidal fundamental (50 Hz or 60 Hz) current, as illustrated in Section
2, Figure 7.
Note: As can be seen below, the harmonic spectrum contains only “odd” harmonics (1, 3, 5, 7…). This is due to the
“full wave rectification” used in the SMPS. If the SMPS were to use “half wave” rectification “even” order (2, 4,
6, 8…) harmonics would also be present.




Section 2 Production of Harmonics

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FIGURE 7
Harmonic Spectrum of Currents Drawn by
Computer Switched Mode Power Supply


Harmonic voltages and currents are integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. On 60 Hz
supplies, for instance, the 5
th
harmonic is 300 Hz; the 7
th
harmonic is 420 Hz, and so forth. When all
harmonic voltages and currents are added to the fundamental, a waveform known as a “complex
wave” is formed. An example of complex wave consisting of the fundamental (1
st
harmonic) and 3
rd

harmonic is illustrated in Section 2, Figure 8.

FIGURE 8
Construction of Complex Wave
60 Hz Fundamental
180 Hz (3rd Harmonic)
Complex Wave


Section 2, Figure 8 is an example of a symmetrical waveform in which the positive portion of the
wave is identical to the negative portion. It should be noted that symmetrical waveforms only contain
odd harmonics, whereas asymmetrical waveforms (where both positive and negative portions are
different) contain even and odd harmonics and possibly DC components. An example of an
asymmetrical waveform would be that produced by a half wave rectifier.



Section 2 Production of Harmonics

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2 Characteristic Harmonic Currents
Power conversion using full wave rectifiers generates idealized characteristic harmonic currents given
by the formula:
h = np ± 1............................................................................................................................. (2.2)
where
h = order of harmonics
n = an integer 1, 2, 3…
p = number of current pulses per cycle
It should be noted that in the “ideal” harmonic theory, the following hypotheses are assumed for all
rectifiers:
• The impedance of the AC supply network is zero.
• The DC component of the rectifier configuration is uniform.
• An AC line or commutating reactor is not used in front of the rectifier.
• The AC supply network is symmetrical (i.e., balanced).
• The AC supply is sinusoidal, free from harmonics.
• There are no “overlap” or delay angles for the devices.
Note: Any divergence from any of the above hypotheses will introduce “non-characteristic” harmonics, including
possibly DC, into the harmonic series. In practical terms, it has to be noted that supply networks or connected
equipment are never “idealized” (i.e., based on the above hypotheses) and, therefore, any actual harmonic currents
measured will not be exactly as calculated using the above simplified formula.
In addition, in idealized harmonic theory, the magnitude of the harmonic current is stated as the
reciprocal of the harmonic number:
h
I
1
= ................................................................................................................................... (2.3)
Therefore, in theory, the 5
th
harmonic current and 7
th
harmonic current, for example, should represent
20% and 14% of the total rms current, respectively. However, again, this is never transferred into
practical reality as the magnitudes of the various harmonic currents are determined by the per-phase
inductance of the AC supply connected, the rectifier and the impedance of the rectifier as “seen” by
the AC supply.
In rectifiers without added inductance (e.g., AC line reactors) it is not uncommon to measure 5
th

harmonic current up to ~80% on single-phase rectifiers and 65% on three-phase rectifiers.
Section 2, Figure 9 illustrates a typical single-phase computer switched mode power supply with full
wave bridge rectifier.




Section 2 Production of Harmonics

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FIGURE 9
Computer Power Supply with Single-phase Full Wave Bridge Rectifier
Switch Mode
DC-to-DC
I
s
C
f
i
ac
v
ac
Rectifier
Bridge
Smoothing
Capacitor
Load


For the single full wave diode bridge rectifier above, the characteristic harmonic currents based on
two rectified current pulses per cycle (i.e., one per half cycle per phase), as shown in Section 2, Figure
10, converted into DC load will be:
h = np ± 1
h = n ⋅ 2 ± 1
h = 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15…
where
h = harmonic number
n = integer, 1, 2, 3…
p = pulses, (2)

FIGURE 10
Computer Switch Mode Power Supply Input Current Waveform






Section 2 Production of Harmonics

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The harmonic series calculated for a single-phase full wave rectifier is shown in Section 2, Figure 11.

FIGURE 11
Typical Waveform from Computer Switched Power Supply
0
20
40
60
80
100
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15
0
20
40
60
80
100
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15


Note: It should be noted that in four-wire distribution systems (three-phase and neutral), the currents in the three phases
return via the neutral conductor, the 120-degree phase shift between respective phase currents causes the currents
to cancel out in the neutral, under balanced loading conditions. However, when nonlinear loads are present, any
“triplen” (3
rd
, 9
th
…) harmonics in the phase currents do not cancel out but add cumulatively in the neutral
conductor, which can carry up to 173% of phase current at a frequency of predominately 180 Hz (3
rd
harmonic).
This issue will be discussed in more detail in Section 4, “Sources of Harmonics”.

Section 2, Figure 12 shows a typical 6-pulse PWM AC drive, where the rectifier bridge supplies the
DC link section of the drive.

FIGURE 12
Typical 6-Pulse PWM AC Drive




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For a three-phase full wave diode rectifier bridge [also known as a “6-pulse bridge”, as it rectifies six
current pulses (one per half cycle per phase) into the load side of the bridge], the characteristic
harmonic currents will therefore be:
h = np ± 1
h = n ⋅ 6 ± 1
h = 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19…
where
h = harmonic number
n = integer, 1, 2, 3…
p = pulses, (6)
Similarly, the characteristic harmonic currents for a 12-pulse rectifier will be:
h = n ⋅ 12 ± 1
h = 11, 13, 23, 24, 35, 37…
Section 2, Figures 13 and 14, respectively, show the input phase current waveforms and harmonic
current spectrum measured on a typical 6-pulse AC PWM drive.

FIGURE 13
6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current Waveforms for One Phase


FIGURE 14
Typical Harmonic Spectrum for 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive
0
20
40
60
80
100
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25
harmonic
%

F
u
n
d
.








.





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3 Effect of Harmonic Currents on Impedance(s)
Section 2, Figure 15 shows in a simplified form that when a nonlinear load draws distorted
(non-sinusoidal) current from the supply, that distorted current passes through all of the impedance
between the load and power source. The associated harmonic currents passing through the system
impedance cause voltage drops for each harmonic frequency based on Ohm’s Law (V
h
= I
h
× Z
h
).
The vector sum of all the individual voltage drops results in total voltage distortion, the magnitude of
which depends on the system impedance and the levels of harmonic currents at each harmonic
frequency.

FIGURE 15
Distorted Currents Induce Voltage Distortion
Impedance
Distorted
Current
Distorted
Voltage
No
Voltage
Distortion
Source
Nonlinear
Load


Section 2, Figure 16 shows in detail the effect individual harmonic currents have on the impedances
within the power system and the associated voltages drops for each. Note that the “total harmonic
voltage distortion”, V
thd
(based on the vector sum of all individual harmonics), is reduced as more
impedance is introduced between the nonlinear load and the source.

FIGURE 16
How Individual Harmonic Voltage Drops Develop
Across System Impedances


Z
Sh
Z
Th
Z
Ch
~


V
h
@ Source
V
h
@ Transf.
V
h
@ Load
Nonlinear
Load
Harmonic
Current
Source
I
h
Sinusoidal
Voltage
Source
Nonlinear
Load
Cable
Z
Ch
Transf.
Z
Th
Source
Z
Sh




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V = I
h
× Z
h
(Ohm’s Law)
At the load: V
h
= I
h
× (Z
Ch
+ Z
Th
+ Z
Sh
)
At the trans.: V
h
= I
h
× (Z
Th
+ Z
Sh
)
At the source: V
h
= I
h
× (Z
Sh
)
where
Z = impedance at frequency of harmonic (e.g., 250 Hz)
V
h
= harmonic voltage at h-th harmonic (e.g., 5
th
)
I
h
= harmonic current at h-th harmonic (e.g., 5
th
)
V
thd

= total harmonic voltage distortion
4 Calculation of Voltage Distortion
Any periodic (repetitive) complex waveform is composed of a sinusoidal component at the
fundamental frequency and a number of harmonic components which are integral multipliers of the
fundamental frequency. The instantaneous value of voltage for non-sinusoidal waveform or complex
wave can be expressed as:
v = V
0
+ V
1
sin(ωt + φ
1
) + V
2
sin(2ωt + φ
2
) + V
3
sin(3ωt + φ
3
) +... V
n
sin(nωt + φ
n
) .............. (2.4)
where
v = instantaneous value at any time t
V
0
= direct (or mean) value (DC component)
V
1
= rms value of the fundamental component
V
2
= rms value of the second harmonic component
V
3
= rms value of the third harmonic component
V
n
= rms value of the nth harmonic component
φ = relative angular frequency
ω = 2πf
f = frequency of fundamental component (1/f defining the time over which the
complex wave repeats itself)
It is usually more convenient, however, to interpret a complex wave by means of “Fourier Series” and
associated analysis methods. Joseph Fourier, a 19
th
century French physicist introduced a theory that
any periodic function in a interval of time could be expressed by the sum of the fundamental and a
series of higher order harmonic frequencies which are integral multipliers of the fundamental
component.



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Ignoring any DC components in the above formula, where V
1
and I
1
represent the fundamental voltage
and current, respectively, the instantaneous rms voltage, V
h
, can be represented as a Fourier Series:
( ) ( ) ( )
h h
h h
h
t h V t v t v φ ω + = =
∑ ∑

=

=
0
1 1
sin 2 ............................................................................ (2.5)
The rms value of voltage can be expressed as:
( )dt t v
T
V
T
rms

=
0
2
1
=


=1
2
h
h
V =
2 2
3
2
2
2
1
.....
n
V V V V + + + ............................................. (2.6)
( )dt t i
T
I
T
rms

=
0
2
1
=


=1
2
h
h
I =
2 2
3
2
2
2
1
.....
n
I I I I + + + ................................................. (2.7)
The rms voltage or current “total harmonic distortion”, V
thd
and I
thd
, respectively can be expressed as:
% 100
1
2
2
× =


=
V
V
V
h
h
thd
= % 100
........
1
2
4
2
3
2
2
×
+ + +
V
V V V V
n
n
......................................... (2.8)
% 100
1
2
2
× =


=
I
I
I
h
h
thd
= % 100
........
1
2 2
4
2
3
2
2
×
+ + +
I
I I I I
n
........................................... (2.9)
Other simple but practical harmonic formulae include:
Total rms current:
2 2
harm fund rms
I I I + = ................................................................ (2.10)
or
2
100
1 |
.
|

\
|
+ =
thd
fund rms
I
I I ........................................................... (2.11)
Fundamental current:
2
1
thd
rms
fund
I
I
I
+
= ....................................................................... (2.12)
Total fundamental current distortion: 1
2
) (

|
|
.
|

\
|
=
fund
rms
fund thd
I
I
I ............................... (2.13)
Total Demand Distortion (TDD) =
load
h
h
I
I


=2
2
=
load
n
TDD
I
I I I I
I
2 2
4
2
3
2
2
..... + + +
= ....... (2.14)
where
I
load
= maximum demand load current (fundamental) at the PCC
TDD = ‘total demand distortion’ of current (expressed as measured total harmonic
current distortion, per unit of load current. For example, a 30% total current
distortion measured against a 50% load would result in a TDD of 15%).
Note: In the above Equations 2.10 to 2.13, the voltage (V) can be substituted for the current (I).



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5 Harmonic Sequence Components
Each harmonic has an order (number), a frequency which is an integer multiple of the fundamental
frequency and a “sequence”. The sequence refers in vector rotation with respect to the fundamental.
Section 2, Table 1 details the harmonic sequence components for an idealized 6-pulse rectifier.

TABLE 1
Harmonic Sequence Components for 6-Pulse Rectifier
Harmonic 1 5 7 11 13 17 19 23 25….
Sequence + - + - + - + - +
Rotation F B F B F B F B F

Harmonics such as the 7
th
, 13
th
, 19
th
and 25
th
, and so on, which rotate in a forward direction (i.e., in the
same sequence as fundamental) are termed “positive sequence harmonics” whereas the 5
th
, 11
th
, 17
th
,
23
rd
, and so on, which rotate in the opposite direction to the fundamental are termed “negative
sequence harmonics”.
Triplen harmonics (3
rd
, 9
th
…), as produced in single-phase full wave rectifiers, for example, do not
rotate. They are in phase with each other and are therefore termed “zero sequence harmonics”.
The impact of sequence harmonics on rotating machines will be discussed in Section 3, “Effects of
Harmonics”.
6 Line Notching
Although not strictly “harmonics”, “line notching” is a phenomenon normally associated with the
SCR (thyristor) based “phase-controlled” rectifiers such as those utilized in AC and DC variable
speed drives and UPS systems, also sources of harmonics. Diode bridges can also exhibit
“commutation notches”, but to a lesser extent than those associated with SCR bridges. The effects of
“line notching” can have a serious impact on the supply system and other equipment.
Section 2, Figure 17 depicts a simple three-phase full wave SCR bridge network supplying a DC load.
Section 2, Figure 18 illustrates theoretical notching at the terminals of the SCR input bridge and
therefore assumes no additional inductance in the circuit. The voltage notches occur when the
continuous line current commutates (i.e., transfers) from one phase to another. During the
“commutation period”, the two phases are short-circuited (i.e., connected together) for very short
durations through the converter bridge and the AC source impedance. The result is that the voltage,
as illustrated, reduces to almost zero as the current increases, limited only by the circuit impedance.




Section 2 Production of Harmonics

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FIGURE 17
Simple Three-phase SCR Bridge for Phase Control
DC
+

3φAC



FIGURE 18
Exaggerated Example of “Line Notching”


In practical terms, the notches can be present anywhere in the respective half cycles, as the phase
angle of SCRs varies according to the needed output voltage (or current for current source AC drives).
The disturbances associated with line notching tend to progressively reduce nearer to a “stiff” source
impedance (i.e., an impedance of relatively low value with relatively high short circuit capacity) due
to the additional impedances downstream in the circuit, including that associated with cabling.
With reference to Section 2, Figure 19, the area of the notch (depth and width) is dependent on the
volt-milliseconds absorbed in the circuits in the line from the source generator or transformer to the
SCR bridge input terminals. It is common practice to add “commutation reactors” or isolation
transformers in the AC line of the SCR bridge to minimize the notch, but regardless of how much
inductance is added at the bridge terminals, the notch area tends to remain constant as the addition of
AC line inductance will reduce the notch depth but will increase the notch width. It should be noted
that the only real practical way to reduce the notch area is to provide part of the necessary
commutation energy from a capacitor bank.




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FIGURE 19
Voltage Notching due to SCR Bridge Commutation


In severe cases, especially where no additional AC line reactance is present, the voltage can be
reduced to zero creating additional “zero crossovers” (i.e., the points where the voltage would
normally change polarity). Section 1, Figures 2 and 3 illustrates the significant effects of line
notching. The oscillograph in Section 1, Figure 3 refers to a vessel where up to four AC SCR input
bridge drives were operating.
Although secondary to line notching, an important phenomenon associated with SCR phase control is
“ringing”. “Ringing” is the term given high frequency oscillations due to the rapid switching of the
SCRs, as illustrated in Section 2, Figure 20. It is the result of high frequency “resonance” occurring in
the rectifier circuit due to inherent inductance and capacitance in the equipment circuitry.

FIGURE 20
SCR Line Notching and Associated “Ringing”


It should be noted that line notching and associated ringing do not usually influence the V
thd
, as the
harmonics associated with them are of high frequency, usually above the highest measured (i.e., 50
th
).
However, line notching and ringing can have significant effects on voltage quality, as shown in
Section 1, Figure 4. The effects of line notching on generators and other equipment will be discussed
in Section 3.



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7 Interharmonics
Interharmonics are defined in IEC Standard 1000-2-1 as: “Between the harmonics of the power
frequency voltage and current, further frequencies can be observed which are not an integer of the
fundamental. They appear as discrete frequencies or as a wide-band spectrum”.
Interharmonics can therefore be considered as the “inter-modulation” of the fundamental and
harmonic components of the system with any other frequency components. These can be observed
increasingly with nonlinear loads, including large AC frequency converters drives (especially under
unbalanced conditions and/or levels of pre-exiting voltage distortion), cycloconverters (see Section 2,
Figure 21) and static slip recovery drives.

FIGURE 21
Cycloconverter Current Spectrum – Includes Interharmonics


Both harmonics and interharmonics can be defined in a quasi-steady state in terms of their spectral
components over a range of frequencies as detailed below:
Harmonics: f = h ⋅ f
1
where h is an integer > 0
DC: f = 0 Hz (f = h ⋅ f
1
, where h = 0)
Interharmonics: f is not equal to h ⋅ f
1
,
where h is an integer >0
Subharmonics: f > 0 and f < f
1
, where f
1
is the fundamental frequency
Waveforms which contain both harmonics and interharmonics of constant amplitude but differing
frequencies are rarely periodic (i.e., repetitive), as Section 2, Figure 22 illustrates. The effect of
interharmonics on equipment will be discussed in later Sections. See 3/5.1, 3/6, 4/3.3, 6/2.4 and
10/11.1.




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FIGURE 22
Waveform Containing both Harmonics and Interharmonics


Due to the modulation of steady state harmonic voltages, the supply voltage will vary in amplitude
and rms value according to:
v(t) = sin(2πf
1
t) + a sin(2πf
i
t)............................................................................................. (2.15)
where
f
1

= fundamental frequency
a = amplitude (per unit) of the interharmonics voltage
(amplitude of the fundamental voltage = 1.0 per unit *)
f
i

= interharmonics frequency
* The per unit system is based on the formula below. Using this method, quantities are expressed as ratios,
similar to the use of percentage values.
quatitiy base
quantity actual
unit per =
Note: Maximum voltage change in the voltage amplitude is equal to the amplitude of the interharmonics voltage, while
the change in the voltage rms value is dependent on both the amplitude and the interharmonics frequency.
The rms voltage value can be given by:
( ) dt t v
T
V
T
2
0
1

= ...............................................................................................................(2.16)
where the period of integration T = 1/f
1
.
The maximum percentage rms voltage deviation over several periods of the fundamental due to
interharmonics can be calculated by combining Equations 2.15 and 2.16.
In equipment which utilize capacitors on the DC side (for example, AC PWM drives), current is only
drawn from the supply when the AC voltage is greater than the DC side capacitor voltage, and as
such, it is the AC peak voltage which normally recharges the capacitor(s). The resultant integer
harmonics in the voltage supply do not effect the AC peak voltage as these integer harmonics are
synchronized with the fundamental frequency. However, interharmonics are not synchronized with
the fundamental and therefore affect the peak amplitude of the AC supply voltage (see Section 2,
Figure 23) causing deviations of peak voltage which can adversely effect the connected equipment,
both those utilizing capacitors and also several types of lighting.




Section 2 Production of Harmonics

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FIGURE 23
Peak Voltage Deviations due to Interharmonics Voltage


The distorted voltage waveform depicted in Section 2, Figure 23 can be calculated as:
V(t) = V
1
sin(2πf
1
t) + V
n
sin(2πf
n
t)..................................................................................... (2.17)
where
V
1
= amplitude of fundamental voltage
t = time
f
1
= fundamental voltage
V
n
= amplitude of interharmonics n
n = fractional real number of interharmonics order
The variation of the supply voltage amplitude is calculated from the difference between the maximum
and minimum peak values (V
max

and V
min
) recorded over several cycles of the function V(t).
Therefore:
∆V = V
max
– V
min
.................................................................................................................(2.18)
Note: The measurement of interharmonics, compared to that of integer harmonics, poses considerable problems for
traditional harmonic measuring equipment, which uses phase-locked loops and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT)
techniques. This is due to the interharmonic frequency components being non-related to the fundamental
frequency and non-periodic. However, for the measurement and identification of interharmonics it may not be
necessary to perform an analysis which depends on the supply fundamental frequency. Methods of analysis used
in the communication industries have been adapted for use in the measurement and analysis of interharmonics
components.
8 Subharmonics
“Subharmonics” is an unofficial but common definition given to interharmonics whose frequency is
less than that of the fundamental (i.e., f > 0 Hz and f < f
1
). The more technically correct term,
“sub-synchronous frequency component”, is also used to define subharmonics.
Therefore, it should be noted that the calculations provided above associated with interharmonics are
valid for “subharmonics” also.




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S E C T I O N 3 Effects of Harmonics
1 Generators
In comparison to shore-based utility power supplies, the effects of harmonic voltages and harmonic
currents are significantly more pronounced on generators due to their source impedance being
typically three to four times that of utility transformers.
The major impact of voltage and current harmonics is the increase in machine heating caused by
increased iron losses, and copper losses, both frequency dependent. [On shore installations, it is
relatively common practice to “derate” (reduce the output of) generators when supplying nonlinear
loads to minimize the effects of harmonic heating.] In addition, there is the influence of harmonic
sequence components, both on localized heating and torque pulsations.
1.1 Thermal Losses
The iron losses comprise two separate losses, “hysteresis losses” and “eddy current losses”.
The hysteresis loss is the power consumed due to nonlinearity of the generator’s flux
density/magnetizing force curve and the subsequent reversal in the generator’s core magnetic field
each time the current changes polarity (i.e., 120 times a second for 60 Hz supplies). Higher hysteresis
losses occur at harmonic frequencies due to the more rapid reversals compared to those at
fundamental frequency. Hysteresis losses are proportional to frequency and the square of the
magnetic flux.
Eddy currents circulate in the iron core, windings and other component parts of the generator induced
by the stray magnetic fields around the turns in the generator windings. Eddy currents produce losses
which increase in proportion to the square of the frequency. The relationship of eddy current losses
and harmonics is given by:
2
max
1
2
h I P P
h
h
h EF EC ∑
=
= ........................................................................................................... (3.1)
where
P
EC
= total eddy current losses
P
EF
= eddy current losses at full load at fundamental frequency
I
h
= rms current (per unit) harmonic h
h = harmonic number
On linear loads, the eddy current losses are fairly minor but become more significant as the harmonic
loading increases.




Section 3 Effects of Harmonics

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Copper losses are dissipated in the generator windings when current is passed through the winding
resistance. For a given load, when harmonic currents are present, the total rms value of the current
passing through the windings will be increased, thereby increasing the losses according to:
R I P
rms CU
2
= .........................................................................................................................(3.2)
where
P
CU
= total copper losses
I
rms
= total rms current
R = resistance of winding
The copper losses are also influenced by a phenomenon termed “skin effect”. Skin effect refers to the
tendency of current flow to be confined in a conductor to a layer close to its outer surface. At
fundamental frequency, the skin effect is negligible and the distribution of current across the cable is
uniform. However, at harmonic frequencies, skin effect is substantially more pronounced,
significantly reducing the effective cross sectional area of the conductor and increasing its resistance.
The higher the resistance, the higher the I
2
R losses.
The harmonic stator current drawn by the nonlinear load will result in air gap fluxes, similar in shape
to the fundamental but rotating at harmonic frequencies, inducing currents in the rotor iron and
windings, adding to rotor losses and the associated temperature rise.
1.2 Effect of Sequence Components
Harmonic currents occur in pairs each having a negative or a positive sequence rotation. The 5
th

harmonic is negative sequence and induces in the rotor a negatively-rotating 6
th
harmonic; the 7
th

harmonic is positive and similarly induces a positively-rotating 6
th
harmonic in the rotor. The two
contra-rotating 6
th
harmonic systems in the rotor result in “amortisseur” or “damper” winding currents
which are stationary with respect to the rotor, causing additional, localized losses and subsequent
heating. Within the rotor, this effect is similar to that caused by single-phase or unbalanced-phase
operation, and overheating is unlikely provided the rotor pole faces are laminated. Similarly, the 11
th

and 13
th
harmonics will induce both negatively and positively rotating 12
th
harmonics in the rotor.
Harmonic pairs, in addition to causing additional heating, can create mechanical oscillations on the
generator shaft. For 5
th
and 7
th
harmonic frequency, for example, the torque pulsations will be at six
times for fundamental (360 Hz based on 60 Hz fundamental, relative to the stator). These result from
the interaction between harmonic and fundamental frequencies exciting a specific mechanical
resonant frequency. Shafts can be severely stressed due to these oscillations.
1.3 Voltage Distortion
A generator is designed to produce sinusoidal voltage at its terminals, but when nonlinear current is
drawn, the harmonic currents interact with the system impedances to produce voltage drops at each
individual harmonic frequency, thereby causing voltage distortion.
A simplified equivalent circuit for one phase of a three-phase generator is shown in Section 3, Figure
1. Note that the resistances are ignored as they are relatively small compared to the reactance. The
iron and damper windings, D
d
and D
q
, respectively, prevent any rapid flux changes in the rotor.



Section 3 Effects of Harmonics

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FIGURE 1
Equivalent Circuit for a Generator


To calculate the rms harmonic voltage due to the respective harmonic current, the following method
can be used:
V
h
= 3 × I
h
× h × X
gen
....................................................................................................... (3.3)
where
V
h
= L-L rms voltage of the harmonic h
I
h
= harmonic current at order h
X
gen
= generator reactance, in ohms
h = harmonic number
To calculate the L-L rms harmonic voltage as a percentage of rms fundamental voltage:
rms
h
V
V % 100 ×
.......................................................................................................................... (3.4)
where
V
h
= L-L rms voltage of the harmonic h
V
rms
= L-L fundamental rms voltage
Example 1
Calculate the L-L rms 5
th
harmonic voltage for a 480 V generator with reactance X of 0.0346
ohms when the 5
th
harmonic current is 135 A. Also, express the harmonic voltage as a
percentage of the fundamental rms voltage.
V
h
= 3 × I
h
× h × X
gen

= 1.732 × 135 × 5 × 0.0346
= 40.45 V



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5
th
harmonic voltage as a percentage of the fundamental rms voltage:
=
rms
h
V
V % 100 ×

=
480
100 45 . 40 ×

= 8.43%
Note: Other percentage harmonic voltage components can be estimated by performing similar calculations for
each harmonic current.
As detailed in Equation 2.6, V
rms
, the total rms voltage including harmonic voltages, can be calculated
using:
( ) = =

dt t v
T
V
T
rms
0
2
1


=1
2
h
h
V =
2 2
3
2
2
2
1
.....
n
V V V V + + +
Similarly, the V
thd
“voltage total harmonic distortion” can be expressed using Equation 2.8:
% 100
1
2
2
× =


=
V
V
V
h
h
thd
= % 100
........
1
2
4
2
3
2
2
×
+ + +
V
V V V V
n
n

Note: See Subsection 12/1 for practical examples of manual voltage distortion calculations.
1.4 Line Notching and Generators
Harmonic currents can cause significant problems in generators in addition to those attributable to
additional losses and torsional pulsations. Modern generators use electronic governors to regulate the
output voltage, to control the speed, and hence frequency, of the prime mover and to proportionally
distribute the kW load of parallel connected generators.
Many electronic regulator units utilize measurement and control circuits which depend on “zero
crossovers” (the point on a sine wave when the sinusoidal voltage or current cuts through the zero
axis). Where “line notching” or “ringing” occurs, for example with large SCR phase control loads,
additional zero crossovers may appear. The combination of harmonic distortion and line notching can
cause hunting and instability in voltage and frequency regulation control loops. Many of these
problems can be resolved, however, using low pass filters at the input of the appropriate sensing
circuits, as shown in Section 3, Figure 2.
In addition, line notching often makes it difficult to correctly load share when parallel generators are
operating. Load sharing depends on the measurement of the kW load on each generator. The rms
value of current, which assumes fundamental only is normally used in the computation of the kW
loading. When harmonic currents are present, false readings can occur when measurements based on
average values are used. (Based on sinusoidal waveforms, the rms value is 1.11 times the average
value. On waveforms containing harmonics, this assumption is no longer valid.)
Only equipment utilizing “true rms” techniques indicate correct readings for supplies containing
harmonics. This is also valid for switchboard instrumentation. The effect of harmonics on
instrumentation will be discussed in Subsection 3/9.
Note: For generator AVRs subject to voltage distortion, a low pass filter as detailed in Section 3, Figure 2, below, is
recommended. This will result in the majority of the distortion from the voltage control signal being attenuated.




Section 3 Effects of Harmonics

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FIGURE 2
Low Pass Filter for Generator AVR Sensing on Nonlinear Loads


1.5 Shaft Generators
Shaft generators are generally unaffected by the import of external power system harmonics due to the
filtering effects of the generator converter, rotary condenser and line reactors.
2 Transformers
2.1 Thermal Losses
Transformer losses comprise “no load losses”, which are dependent on the peak flux levels necessary
to magnetize the transformer core and are negligible with respect to harmonic current levels, and
“load losses”, which significantly increase at harmonic frequencies when transformers supply
nonlinear current.
The effect of harmonic currents at harmonic frequencies in transformers causes increases in core
losses through increased iron losses (i.e., eddy currents and hysteresis). In addition, copper losses and
stray flux losses which can result in additional heating, winding insulation stress, especially if high
levels of dv/dt (i.e., rate of rise of voltage) are present. Temperature cycling and possible resonance
between transformer winding inductance and supply capacitance can also cause additional losses.
Potential small laminated core vibrations can appear as additional audible noise.
The increased rms current due to harmonics will increase the I
2
R copper losses. The copper losses
can be calculated using Equation 3.2, as shown below:
R I P
rms CU
2
=
where
P
CU
= total copper losses
I
rms
= total rms current
R = resistance of winding



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The eddy current losses can be calculated using Equation 3.5:
2
1
2
max
h I P P
h
h
h EF EC ∑
=
= ............................................................................................................. (3.5)
where
P
EC
= total eddy current losses
P
EF
= eddy current losses at full load at fundamental frequency
I
h
= rms current (per unit) harmonic h
h = harmonic number
The hysteresis loss is the power consumed due to nonlinearity of the transformers flux
density/magnetizing force curve and the subsequent reversal in the transformer core magnetic field
each time the current changes polarity (i.e., 120 times a second for 60 Hz supplies). Higher hysteresis
losses occur at harmonic frequencies due to the more rapid reversals compared to that at fundamental
frequency. Hysteresis losses are proportional to frequency and the square of the magnetic flux.
2.2 Unbalance, Distribution Transformers and Neutral Currents
Distribution transformers used in four-wire (i.e., three-phase and neutral) distribution systems (for
example, those used in some cruise liners) have a delta-wye (delta-star) configuration. Triplen (i.e.,
3
rd
, 9
th
, 15
th
…) harmonic currents cannot propagate downstream but circulate in the primary delta
winding of the transformer causing localized overheating.
With linear loading, the three-phase currents will cancel out in the neutral conductor. However, when
nonlinear loads are being supplied, the triplen harmonics in the phase currents do not cancel out, but
instead add cumulatively in the neutral conductor, which can carry up to 173% of phase current at a
frequency of predominately 180 Hz (3
rd
harmonic), overheating transformers and on occasion,
overheating and burning out neutral conductors.
2.3 Transformer Derating or K-factor Transformer
Transformers are of prime importance in any power system. When supplying nonlinear loads, they
are particularly vulnerable to overheating and early-life failure. In order to minimize the risk of
premature failure, two methods are used by designers:-
• “Derate” the transformer (i.e., oversize it such that it operates at less than the rated load capacity)
or if existing, consider reducing the loading on it.
• Use “K-factor” or “K-rated” transformers. K-rated transformers are specifically designed for
nonlinear loads and operate with lower losses at harmonic frequencies. K-rated transformer
modifications can include additional cooling ducts, a redesign of the magnetic core based on
lower normal flux density by using higher grades of iron, using smaller insulated secondary
conductors wired in parallel and transposed to reduce heating due to skin effect and AC resistance
and enlarging the primary winding to withstand triplen harmonics present on single-phase
nonlinear loads.
K-rated transformers are usually preferred to derated transformers, as they are designed to run at rated
kVA loads in the presence of harmonic currents and also they normally comply with Underwriters
Laboratory (UL) and NEC requirements for transformers supplying nonlinear loads. Section 3, Figure
3 illustrates a typical relationship with transformer derating and K-factor for nonlinear loads.




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FIGURE 3
Typical Transformer Derating Curve for Nonlinear Load


UL developed the K-factor system to indicate the capability of transformers to handle harmonic loads.
The subsequent ratings are described in UL1561. Essentially, the K-factor is a weighting of the
harmonic current loads according to their effects on transformer heating as derived from ANSI/IEEE
C57.110. A K-factor of 1.0 indicates a linear load (i.e., no harmonic loading). The higher the
K-factor, the greater the heating effect on a given transformer. The equation for calculating K-factor
is the ratio of eddy current losses when supplying nonlinear and linear loads:
2
max
1
2 1
h I
P
P
K
h h
h
h
f

=
=
= = ....................................................................................................... (3.6)
where
K = K-factor
P
1

= eddy current losses on linear load
P
f

= eddy current losses on nonlinear load
h = harmonic number
I
h
= harmonic current (per unit)
One acknowledged problem associated with calculating K-factors is selecting the most appropriate
range of harmonic frequencies. Based on the upper limit, for example, of 15
th
, 25
th
or 50
th
harmonics,
the calculations can yield significantly different K-factors for the same load. IEEE 519 (1992)
considers harmonics up the 50
th
. However, in many calculations harmonic orders up to 25
th
are
commonly used.



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In Europe, the K-factor is termed “Factor K”, with significantly more complicated calculations
according to BS 7821 Part 4:
5 . 0
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
(
(
¸
(

¸

|
|
.
|

\
|
|
|
.
|

\
|
|
.
|

\
|
+
+ =

=
+
N n
n
n q
I
I
n
I
I
e
e
K ............................................................................. (3.7)
where
e = eddy current loss at fundamental frequency divided by the loss due to DC current
equal to the rms value of the sinusoidal current, both a reference temperature
n = harmonic number
I = rms value of the sinusoidal current including all harmonics given by:
= ( )
5 . 0
1
2
1
1
5 . 0
1
2
(
(
¸
(

¸

|
|
.
|

\
|
=
|
|
.
|

\
|
∑ ∑
=
=
=
=
N n
n
n
N n
n
n
I
I
I I .................................................................. (3.8)
I
n
= magnitude of n-th harmonic
I
1
= magnitude of fundamental current
q = an exponential constant which is dependent on the type of winding and
frequency. Typical values are 1.7 for transformers with round or rectangular
cross sections in both windings and 1.5 for those with foil low voltage windings.
3 Induction Motors
3.1 Thermal Losses
Harmonics distortion raises the losses in AC induction motors in a way very similar to that apparent in
transformers with increased heating, due to additional copper losses and iron losses (eddy current and
hysteresis losses) in the stator winding, rotor circuit and rotor laminations. These losses are further
compounded by skin effect, especially at frequencies above 300 Hz.
Leakage magnetic fields caused by harmonic currents in the stator and rotor end windings produce
additional stray frequency eddy current dependent losses. Substantial iron losses can also be
produced in induction motors with skewed rotors due to high-frequency-induced currents and rapid
flux changes (i.e., due to hysteresis) in the stator and rotor. The magnitude of the iron losses is
dependent on the iron loss characteristic of the laminations and the angle of skew.
The formulae used to calculate copper losses and eddy current losses used for transformers are also
applicable for induction motors:
R I P
rms CU
2
=
where
P
CU
= total copper losses
I
rms
= total rms current
R = resistance of winding



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The eddy current losses can be calculated using Equation 3.5:
2
max
1
2
h I P P
h
h
h EF EC ∑
=
=
where
P
EC
= total eddy current losses
P
EF

= eddy current losses at full load at fundamental frequency
I
h
= rms current (per unit) harmonic h
H = harmonic number
Motors with deep bar or double cage rotors are susceptible to additional losses, particularly on highly
polluted supplies containing high order harmonics. This can in extreme cases, lead to “hot rotors”
which, due to conduction along the shaft, can degrade the bearing lubrication and result in bearing
collapse. Harmonic currents also can result in bearing currents. This can be prevented through the
use of an insulated bearing, a practice common in AC variable frequency drive-fed AC motors.
Overheating imposes significant limits on the effective life of an induction motor. For every 10°C
rise in temperature (continuous) above rated temperature, the life of motor insulation may be reduced
by as much as 50%. Squirrel cage rotors can normally withstand higher temperature levels compared
to wound rotors.
The motor’s windings, especially if insulation is class B or below, are also susceptible to damage due
high levels of dv/dt (i.e., rate of rise of voltage) such as those attributed to line notching and
associated ringing.
3.2 Effect of Harmonic Sequence Components
Harmonic sequence components also adversely affect induction motors. Positive sequence
components (i.e., 7
th
, 13
th
, 19
th
…) will assist torque production, whereas the negative sequence
components (5
th
, 13
th
, 17
th
…) will act against the direction of rotation resulting in torque pulsations
which are significant. Zero sequence harmonics (i.e., triplens) do not rotate (i.e., they are stationary);
any harmonic energy associated with them is dissipated as heat. The magnitude of torque pulsations
due to sequence components can be estimated as follows to assess possible shaft torsional vibration
problems based on a nominal voltage:
( ) | |
2 / 1
2 2
3
cos 2
− + − + − +
− − + =
n n n n n n k
I I I I T φ φ per unit....................................................... (3.9)
where
I
n+
, I
n–
= per unit values
n+ = represents the 1 + 3k harmonic orders
n– = represents the 1 – 3k harmonic orders
For example, if we consider a 50 Hz supply with 4% voltage distortion based on motor harmonic
currents of 0.03 and 0.02 per unit for the 5
th
and 7
th
harmonics, respectively. Assuming no phase
displacement between harmonics and full value of voltage, the torque will have a varying component
at 300 Hz with an amplitude of torque fluctuation of 0.01 per unit. If the harmonics have the worst
case phase relationship, then the amplitude of the torque fluctuation will be 0.05 per unit



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3.3 Explosion-proof Motors and Voltage Distortion
A practical application of AC induction motors worth noting is that of “explosion-proof motors” (i.e.,
flameproof motors). This type of motor relies on the principle that no matter what happens inside the
flameproof enclosure (e.g., an internal explosion) it cannot transmit to the surrounding hazardous
area. While that may be perfectly valid on pure sinusoidal supplies, it may not be so on supplies
distorted by harmonics. An explosion-proof motor relies on the flameproof enclosure and
shaft-mounted flameproof seals to contain any internal explosion in the event of an escape of gas or
vapor. However, in the presence of harmonics and deep bar or double cage rotors, the rotor may
overheat and degrade the flameproof seals, and if there is an internal explosion (more likely due to
excessive rotor temperatures), it may not be successfully contained but transmit to the external
“hazardous area” with significant consequences. Dependent on the magnitude of the voltage
distortion, the rotor temperature may exceed the motor “T class” [i.e., temperature class (for example,
200°C for T3)]. As detailed above, hot rotors can also result in bearing degradation.
It should also be noted that “explosion-proof motors” are designed and certified based on “clean”
sinusoidal supplies. According to EN60034-1, explosion-proof protection concepts EExd (flameproof
motors), EExe (increased safety) and EExp (pressurised) are permitted only 2% voltage distortion
before they are classed “as operating outside the conditions envisaged when they were certified”.
For EExN motors (non-sparking motor) 3% voltage distortion is permitted under EN60034-12.
Higher levels of voltage distortion can be accommodated for all protection concepts, subject to special
tests and certification.
Where a certified explosion-proof motor is driven by the variable frequency drive, the safety
certificate of the motor is no longer valid unless the safety certification has been based on the tests
using that particular variable frequency drive.
In North America, NEMA standard MG-1 “Application Considerations for Constant Speed motors
used on Sinusoidal Bus with Harmonic Content and General Purpose Motors used with Variable
Voltage or Variable Frequency Controls or both” proposes the amount of motor derating necessary for
both fixed-speed motors on distorted supplies or those fed by variable frequency supplies, as
illustrated by Section 3, Figure 4. MG-1 refers to explosion-proof motors, on distorted supplies, for
use in hazardous areas to NEMA 30.02.2.11.

FIGURE 4
Proposed NEMA Derating Curve for Harmonic Voltages





Section 3 Effects of Harmonics

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The “Harmonic Voltage Factor” (HVF) can be defined as:

∞ =
=
=
n
n
n
n
V
HVF
5
2
............................................................................................................... (3.10)
where
n = odd harmonic, not including triplens
V
n
= per unit magnitude of the voltage at the n-th harmonic
Example 2
Calculate the HVF based on the per unit harmonic voltages of 0.09, 0.065, 0.042, 0.038 for
the 5
th
, 7
th
, 11
th
and 13
th
harmonics, respectively.
HVF =

∞ =
=
n
n
n
n
V
5
2

HVF =
13
038 . 0
.
11
042 . 0
7
068 . 0
5
09 . 0
2 2 2 2
+ + +
HVF = 0.0505 (or 5.05% voltage distortion)
4 Variable Speed Drives
Electrical variable speed drives of all types (i.e., AC or DC) use power semiconductors to rectify the
AC input voltage and current and thereby create harmonics. However, these can be also susceptible
to disruption and component damage due to input line harmonics.
However, harmonics can be beneficial for drives as they cause flattening of the peak voltage (i.e.,
termed “flat topping” – see Subsection 3/7, “Computers and Computer Based Equipment,” for more
details) which reduces the stress on rectifiers. Conversely, large numbers of 2-pulse drives (or other
single-phase nonlinear loads) can increase the peak-to-peak voltage magnitudes, increasing stress the
on rectifiers.
Generally, the larger rating a drive is, the more it is immune to the effects of harmonics and line
notching. Line commutated inverters (LCIs, also known as “current source inverters” when used on
smaller induction motor applications) and cycloconverters are more commonly used in higher ratings
(i.e., above 2000 HP). These are assumed to be relatively immune to the normal level of harmonics.
Both harmonics and line notching effect variable speed drives. The effect of line notching is more
pronounced when the drive(s) is at low speed and high load. Ringing, associated with line notching is
also problematic.
Small, single-phase (2-pulse) PWM drives with no reactors have high levels of I
thd
, often up to
130-140% including a large 3
rd
harmonic which adds cumulatively in the neutral conductor,
significantly increasing the neutral current up to 173% of phase current and increasing neutral-to-
ground voltages. The resultant excessive localized harmonic current can be reflected into the DC bus,
causing overheating on the smoothing capacitors. Ringing associated with line notching increases DC
bus levels at no or light loading with consequential over-voltage tripping.
2-pulse (i.e., single-phase) and small 6-pulse SCR DC drives which do not have commutating reactors
or isolation transformers can misfire in the presence of line notching and/or high levels of harmonic
current.



Section 3 Effects of Harmonics

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Small 6-pulse PWM (“pulse width modulation”) drives (i.e., up to 10 HP/7.5 kW) usually have no AC
line or DC bus reactors. On supplies with line notching, any overshoot may increase the DC bus
voltage on no-load or light load, resulting in drive “over-voltage trip”. Larger PWM drives with a
simple input diode bridge with either AC line or DC bus reactors are usually relatively robust and can
operate in a harmonics environment without significant problems.
AC PWM drives with SCRs for pre-charge (i.e., “soft starting” of DC bus voltage) or for variable
voltage DC bus control may experience misfiring of SCRs due to incorrect or irregular conduction
and excessive heating of DC bus capacitors and smoothing reactors if the supply voltage is
significantly contaminated by line notching or high levels of harmonics. Line notching can also result
in excessive heating of SCR snubber components.
Standard 6-pulse AC PWM drives, the most common type used, are relatively robust and can usually
withstand line disturbances due to harmonics below 5% V
thd
. Above 10-15 HP (7.5-11 kW), most
drives “filter” the harmonics to varying degrees using AC line reactors, and in some cases, passive
filters (i.e., this also applies to drives with “active front ends” which synthesize an input sinusoidal
current wave shape. These need special filtering to attenuate the input bridge carrier frequency
affecting the supply system and to reduce the overall EMI which is significantly more than emitted
from standard diode or SCR pre-charge input stages).
6-pulse SCR DC drives above 10 HP/7.5 kW usually have AC commutating reactors or isolation
transformers installed between the drive and the line to attenuate the line notches on the supply side.
These also reduce the effects of line notching and harmonics impressed on the drive. However, if the
line notching or levels of harmonic current are significant, SCR misfiring can result, possibly blowing
fuses or tripping circuit breakers downstream.
Phase displacement transformers (i.e., for 12-, 18-, 24-pulse…) for AC or DC drives reduce the
effects of downstream harmonics and line notching at the drive terminals.
On weak supplies (i.e., supplies with high source impedance), voltage “flat topping” (see Section 3,
Figures 5 and 6) can occur, reducing the DC bus voltage levels, which prevents the drive from
achieving the nominal power output for drive and the motor. In addition, it can reduce the drive
ride-through in the event of line disturbances and increase the output current to the motor, thereby
raising its temperature due to additional I
2
R losses.

FIGURE 5
AC PWM Drive Current Distortion on Weak Source
0.0 Units
20.0
40.0
60.0
-20.0
-40.0
-60.0
-80.0





Section 3 Effects of Harmonics

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FIGURE 6
PWM Drive “Flat Topping” due to Weak Source
0.0 V×10
20.0
40.0
60.0
-20.0
-40.0
-60.0
-80.0
80.0


Unwanted “electrical noise” (i.e., EMI) can be induced into drive signal and control cables, if power
cabling is not sufficiently segregated from the control cables or if shielding or grounding is not
adequate, resulting in spurious command and feedback signals into the drive. In severe cases, where
rerouting cabling is not feasible, the retrofitting of low pass filters to drive input may be necessary.
Control relays may fail to operate correctly and measuring equipment may be adversely effected.
Note: Filtering of the drive high frequency currents is not normally possible in IT power systems (insulated neutrals).
The voltage across any input EMC filter capacitors would be 1.73 times higher in the event of a ground fault,
damaging or destroying the filter capacitors.
5 Lighting
5.1 Flicker
One noticeable effect on lighting is the phenomenon of “flicker” (i.e., repeated fluctuations in light
intensity). Lighting is highly sensitive to rms voltage changes; even a deviation of 0.25% is
perceptible to the human eye in some types of lamps.
The severity of the flicker is dependent on a number of factors including:
• The type of light (incandescent, fluorescent or high intensity discharge)
• The magnitude of the voltage fluctuations
• The “frequency” of the voltage fluctuations
• The “gain factor” of the lamp (i.e., % relative change in light level divided by % relative fluctuation
in rms voltage)
• The amount of ambient light in lighted area
Superimposed interharmonic voltages in the supply voltage are a significant cause of light flicker in
both incandescent and fluorescent lamps, albeit at different levels of intensity.



Section 3 Effects of Harmonics

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Incandescent lamps at higher voltages are usually more susceptible to voltage changes due to smaller
filaments and shorter time constants than lamps of similar power rating but lower voltage. In
fluorescent lamps, the type of ballast used impacts on the amount of flicker. The older, magnetic type
ballasts are more susceptible to flicker than the more modern, high frequency types.
The luminous flux (i.e., light intensity in “lumens”) of lamps under voltage fluctuations can be
expressed by:
6 . 3
|
|
.
|

\
|
Φ = Φ
n
n V
V
V
for incandescent lamps................................................................ (3.11)
and
8 . 1
|
|
.
|

\
|
Φ = Φ
n
n V
V
V
for fluorescent lamps .................................................................. (3.12)
where Φ
V

is luminous flux at rated voltage, V
n
.
Any voltage fluctuations also impact on the life of lamps, which may have safety implications for the
vessel. In the case of incandescent lamps, the reduction in working life with changes in voltage can
be expressed as:
14 −
|
|
.
|

\
|
=
n
V
V
V
T .................................................................................................................... (3.13)
where durability at rated voltage, V
n
, usually equates to 1000 hrs.
5.2 Effects of Line Notching on Lighting
Line notching will also effects lighting to varying degrees. The consequential reduction in rms
voltage will cause a reduction in the intensity of illumination, especially in incandescent lamps. If the
notches are severe or where ringing occurs, transient suppression may be necessary at lighting
distribution board level to protect the individual light fittings.
Fluorescent fittings used with occupancy sensors which are based on zero crossover detection may
experience difficulties if the notching is severe and multiple crossovers result.
5.3 Potential for Resonance
The interaction between harmonic current and power factor correction capacitors inside individual
fluorescent lighting units can result in parallel resonances being excited between the capacitors and
power system inductances resulting in damage of the lighting units. Ideally, individual power factor
correction should be avoided and group power factor correction with detuning reactors should be
installed at lighting distribution panel level.
6 Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS)
Due to the phenomenal increase in “power quality”-sensitive loads such as computers and navigation
or radio communications equipment, uninterruptible power supplies (UPSs) are now commonly
provided and can range from a 100 VA to several MVA.
UPS are very similar in architecture to variable speed drives. Therefore, the effects of harmonics on
components within UPS systems will be almost identical with additional heating on power devices,
smoothing capacitors and inductors, where installed. Batteries may overheat due to excessive
harmonics and interharmonics on the DC side of the rectifier.



Section 3 Effects of Harmonics

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Excessive voltage distortion or notching/ringing can cause misfiring of input rectifier SCRs possibly
resulting in fuse rupture. On high levels of distortion, bypass sensing circuits may disable the bypass
circuit, inhibiting the alarm system advising of problems in the bypass system.
If resonance occurs, perhaps due to the UPS input filter, UPS may shut down, displaying a “loss of
AC supply” alarm and bypass to inverter mode. In the presence of harmonics, the UPS line side filter
(to reduce the harmonics from the rectifier input stage) may act as a sink (i.e., attract harmonic
currents from upstream) damaging the harmonic filter.
It should be noted that UPS systems do also produce harmonic currents. This will be discussed in
Section 4.
7 Computers and Computer Based Equipment
The majority of computer based equipment derives the internal voltage supplies from switched mode
or similar power supply units and it is often here where harmonic problems are noticed.
Section 2, Figure 7 shows the current drawn from the supply by SMPS with two pulses per cycle
while the SMPS capacitors are charging. As can be seen in Section 3, Figure 7, below, the pulsed
nature of the current causes a voltage drop at the peak of the voltage wave.

FIGURE 7
Voltage “Flat Topping” due to Pulse Currents


Voltage flat topping reduces the operating DC bus voltage (Section 3, Figure 8), resulting in increased
current being drawn and increased I
2
R losses in the equipment and associated cabling, which can
manifest itself in early life failure of components due to high operating temperatures.

FIGURE 8
Effect of DC Bus Voltage with Flat Topping
Higher voltage trace = Normal DC bus level
Lower voltage trace = DC bus volts due to flat topping




Section 3 Effects of Harmonics

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Example 3
Determine the per unit increase in I
2
R losses based on a 10% decrease in DC bus voltage due
to flat topping.
P = V ⋅ I
where
P = power (per unit)
V = voltage (per unit)
I = current (per unit)
If V is 0.9 per unit, 11 . 1
9 . 0
0 . 1
= = =
V
P
I per unit
P
loss
= I
2
R = (1.11)
2
⋅ (1) = 1.23 per unit
Power losses increase by 23%
Note: The above is only valid for circuits where the current is not limited and power control is dominant. If
passive components predominate in the circuit, the impedance will remain mostly unchanged and current
will decrease in proportion with the voltage. In the case of AC PWM drives (single- or three-phase
input), the current is not permitted to rise above a predetermined value by the current control system.
Similarly, Section 3, Figure 9 shows how the reduction in DC bus voltage on the capacitors
reduces the stored energy within the power supply thus reducing its ride-through capability.

FIGURE 9
Flat Topping Reducing Supply Ride-through
Higher voltage trace = Normal DC bus level
Lower voltage trace = DC bus volts due to flat topping


The energy available from the DC capacitors during ride-through can be expressed as:
( )
2
2
2
1
1
V V C
C
W
R
− = ............................................................................................. (3.14)
where
V
1
= normal voltage (per unit)
V
2
= reduced voltage (per unit)
C = value of capacitor



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Example 4
Determine the reduction in ride-through capability in SMPS due to flat topping and 10%
decrease in peak voltage. Assume a system drop-out voltage of 70%.
V
1
= 1 per unit, V
2
= 0.7 per unit
At normal voltage, V
1
⋅ W
R
= (1
2
– 0.7
2
) = 0.51 per unit
At 10% reduction (0.9 per unit) = (0.9
2
– 0.7
2
) = 0.32 per unit
Therefore, reduction in ride-through = % 100
51 . 0
32 . 0 51 . 0
×

= 37%
Note: The above effects are similar to those experiences by single-phase and three-phase AC PWM drives
which a diode rectifier and capacitive DC bus.
8 Cables
8.1 Thermal Losses
Cable losses, dissipated as heat, are substantially increased when carrying harmonic currents due to
elevated I
2
R losses, the cable resistance, R, determined by its DC value plus skin and proximity effect.
As stated in Equation 2.7, the rms current I
rms
in a distorted current waveform can be calculates thus:
( )dt t i
T
I
T
rms

=
0
2
1
=


=1
2
h
h
I =
2 2
3
2
2
2
1
.....
n
I I I I + + +
therefore:
2
100
1 |
.
|

\
|
+ =
thd
FUND rms
I
I I
Example 5
Calculate the rms current carried by a power cable based on a current total harmonic
distortion (I
thd
) of 42% and fundamental current of 600 A.
I
rms
=
2
42 . 0 1 600 +
I
rms
= 651 A
Ignoring the effects of skin and proximity effects, the I
2
R losses in the cable due to harmonic
currents would increase by:
% 100
600
651
2
× |
.
|

\
|
= 17.73% compared to heating effect at fundamental frequency.
8.2 Skin and Proximity Effects
The resistance of a conductor is dependent on the frequency of the current being carried. Skin effect is
a phenomenon whereby current tends to flow near the surface of a conductor where the impedance is
least. An analogous phenomenon, proximity effect, is due to the mutual inductance of conductors
arranged closely parallel to one another. Both of these effects are dependent upon conductor size,
frequency, resistivity and the permeability of the conductor material.



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At fundamental frequencies, the skin effect and proximity effects are usually negligible, at least for
smaller conductors. The associated losses due to changes in resistance, however, can increase
significantly with frequency, adding to the overall I
2
R losses.
The harmonic frequencies produce a ratio of AC to DC resistance, k
c
, which can be defined as:
PE SE
DC
AC
c
k k
R
R
k + + = = 1 ................................................................................................ (3.15)
where
k
SE
= resistance gain due to skin effect
k
PE
= resistance gain due to proximity effect
Skin effect parameter, x, as a function of frequency and DC resistance can be found in cable
handbooks, but can also be expressed as:
DC
R
u f
x
.
027678 . 0 = ......................................................................................................... (3.16)
where
f = frequency, in Hz
u = magnetic permeability of the conductor
R
DC

= DC resistance in ohms/304.8 m (1000 ft)
The resistance gain due to proximity effect can be expressed by:
|
|
.
|

\
|
+
+
=
2 2
312 . 0
27 . 0
18 . 1
σ σ
SE
SE PE
k
k k ............................................................................. (3.17)
where σ is the ratio of the conductor diameter and the axial spacing between conductors.
Section 3, Figure 10 plots the AC/DC resistance ratio, k
c
, at different harmonic numbers of four sizes of
power cable with conductors, 500 kcmil, 4/0 AWG, 1/0 AWG and 12 AWG. The spacing used to obtain
the σ values for the four cable types is based on National Electric Code (NEC) insulation type THHN.

FIGURE 10
Cable AC/DC Resistance, k
c
as a Function of Harmonic Numbers




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Section 3, Figures 11 and 12 illustrate the difference of varying harmonic numbers on both proximity
effect and skin effect for 12 AWG and 4/0 AWG cable, respectively. As can be noted, the proximity
effect is more significant in the smaller cable, whereas with the large cable, the proximity effect may
be more significant at lower frequencies but not at higher frequencies. Therefore, it can be noted that
proximity effects due to harmonics tends to be the more significant in power cables.

FIGURE 11
4/0 AWG Cable – Proximity and Skin Effect due to Harmonics



FIGURE 12
12 AWG Cable – Proximity and Skin Effect due to Harmonics


8.3 Neutral Conductors in Four-wire Systems
On four-wire distribution systems, such as now installed on large passenger vessels, which may have
a large percentage of nonlinear loads (e.g., computers, ballast lighting, etc.), a large component of
triplen harmonics are often present. The phase currents do not cancel in the neutral conductors as
with linear loading but sum in the neutral conductor.



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The overloading on the conductors (and the distribution transformer primary, assuming delta-wye
configuration), can be significant (up to 173% of phase current), therefore, the neutral current should
be dimensioned accordingly or mitigation equipment installed to attenuate the level of triplen
harmonics. In addition, triplen currents are problematic on generators due to the associated additional
temperature rise on the machines.
Refer to 4/1.2 for further information.
8.4 Additional Effects Associated with Harmonics
Harmonic currents can on occasion excite parallel resonance between cable capacitance and system
inductances, especially when very long cable lengths are used. This has been documented on offshore
installations when platforms with no onboard generating capacity are supplied from other platforms a
considerable distance away by long subsea cables.
Harmonic voltages increase the dielectric stress on cables, thereby decreasing the reliability and the
working life of cables in proportion to the crest voltages.
Power cables carrying harmonic loads act to introduce EMI (electromagnetic interference) in adjacent
signal or control cables via conducted and radiated emissions. This “EMI noise” has a detrimental
effect on telephones, televisions, radios, computers, control systems and other types of equipment.
Correct procedures with regard to grounding and segregation within enclosures and in external wiring
systems must be adopted to minimize EMI.
9 Measuring Equipment
Conventional meters are normally designed to read sinusoidal-based quantities. Nonlinear voltages
and currents impressed on these types of meters introduce errors into the measurement circuits which
result in false readings.
Conventional meters are calibrated to respond to rms values. Root mean square (rms) can be defined
as the magnitude of sinusoidal current which is the value of an equivalent direct current which would
produce the same amount of heat in a fixed resistive load which is proportional to the square of the
current averaged over one full cycle of the waveform (i.e., the heat produced is proportional to the
mean of the square; therefore the current is proportional to the “root mean square”).
Refer to Section 3, Figure 13. For a pure sine wave, the rms value is 0.707 times the peak value and
the peak value is 1.414 times the rms value). If the magnitude of the sine wave is “averaged” (i.e., the
negative half cycle is inverted) the mean value will be 0.636 times the peak value or 0.9 times the rms
value.
For a sine wave, these two important ratios relevant to current and voltage measurement can be derived:
value rms
value Peak
factor Peak = ................................................................................................ (3.18)
value Mean
value rms
factor Form = .............................................................................................. (3.19)
Most analogue meters and a large number of digital multi-meters are designed to read voltage and
current quantities based on a technique termed “average reading, rms calibrated”. This technique
entails taking a measurement of the average (or mean) value (0.636 × peak) and multiplying the result
by the form factor (1.11 for a sine wave). The result is 0.7071 times the peak value, which is
displayed as “rms”. This assumption is valid only for pure sinusoidal waveforms.
However, only “true rms” instruments are capable of accurately measure distorted values.



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FIGURE 13
Peak and rms Values of Sinusoidal Waveform


The difficulty in accurately measuring distorted values with conventional meters is illustrated by the
current drawn by a switched mode power supply (Section 3, Figure 14). Using a true rms meter, the
real current is 1.0 A, the peak value of 2.6 A with an average of 0.55 A. Using a conventional
“average reading, calibrated rms” meter the “rms current” displayed would be 0.61 A, almost 40%
lower than the real current value.

FIGURE 14
Difficulties Conventional Meters Have Reading Distorted Waveforms





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The “crest factor” of a waveform can be defined as:
value rms
value Peak
factor Crest = ................................................................................................ (3.20)
For a pure sine wave, the crest factor is 1.414 (1.0/0.707). For pulsed waveforms, this will be
significantly higher. The higher the crest factor a true rms instrument has, the more accurate it will be
in the measurement of distorted waveforms. The use of meters with crest factors less than three (3) is
not recommended.
Standard toroidal-type current transformers used for measuring distorted currents must be of high
quality, with linear response and a very wide bandwidth in order to accurately read frequencies up to
50
th
harmonic (3 kHz based on 60 Hz fundamental). Hall Effect currents transducers, commonly used
with probable instruments (e.g., harmonic analyzers, power meters, etc.) do accurately measure
nonlinear currents, but should be calibrated on a regular basis.
On high voltage networks, magnetic voltage transformers designed to operate on fundamental
frequencies are commonly used. For use up to 11 kV, this type of voltage transformer can measure
harmonic voltages under 5 kHz (i.e., 83
rd
harmonic at 60 Hz fundamental) to an accuracy of around
3%, provided no resonance is introduced which causes phase and ratio errors. The response of the
transformer is largely dependent on the burden used on the LV side, whereas the bandwidth is limited
by the frequency response of the magnetic core, the winding-to-winding, winding-to-ground and turn-
to-turn capacitance, plus other stray capacitance.
The accurate measurement of power factor does present a problem with nonlinear loads when two
different power factors are present (see Section 5): the “displacement power factor”, which is the
power factor of the fundamental component only and the “true” or “real” power factor, which includes
both the fundamental and harmonic components. In a sine wave, the power factor is simply a measure
of the cosine of phase angle between voltage and current; this is not valid for nonlinear loads. The
way to accurately measure nonlinear power factor is to measure the average instantaneous power and
divide it by the product of the true rms voltage and true rms current:
( )
trms trms
inst
I V
P
.
cos True = φ .................................................................................................. (3.21)
where
cos φ = nonlinear load true power factor
P
inst
= average instantaneous power (kW)
V
trms
= true rms voltage
I
trms
= true rms current
The above method is commonly used in digital power instrumentation.
Note: Any telemetry, protection or other equipment which relies on conventional measurement techniques or the heating
effect of current will not operate correctly in the presence of nonlinear loads. The consequences of under measure
can be significant; overloaded cables may go undetected with the risk of catching fire. Busbars and cables may
prematurely age. Fuses and circuit breakers will not offer the expected level of protection. It is therefore
important that only instruments based on true rms techniques be used on power systems supplying nonlinear loads.



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10 Telephones
On ships and offshore installations where power conductors carrying nonlinear loads and internal
telephone signal cable are run in parallel, it is likely that voltages will be induced in the telephone
cables. The frequency range, 540 Hz to 1200 Hz (9
th
harmonic to 20
th
harmonic at 60 Hz
fundamental) can be troublesome. On four-wire systems where a large number of single-phase
nonlinear loads are present (for example, large amounts of fluorescent lighting or large numbers of
lighting dimmers and/or single-phase AC inverter drives on cruise liners), triplen harmonics are
troublesome as they are present in all three-phase conductors and cumulatively add in the neutral
conductor. The use of twisted pair cables and correct shielding/grounding, as well as correct levels of
spacing and segregation should minimize potential problems.
There is also the possibility of both conducted and radiated interference above normal harmonic
frequencies with telephone systems and other equipment due to variable speed drives and other
nonlinear loads, especially at high carrier frequencies. EMI filters at the inputs may have to be
installed on drives and other equipment to minimize the possibility of inference. However, this is
often difficult when the vessel or offshore installation is based on an IT power systems (insulated
neutrals), and in such instances, other measures have to be adopted.
11 Circuit Breakers
The vast majority of low voltage thermal-magnetic type circuit breakers utilize bi-metallic trip
mechanisms which respond to the heating effect of the rms current. In the presence of nonlinear
loads, the rms value of current will be higher than for linear loads of same power. Therefore, unless
the current trip level is adjusted accordingly, the breaker may trip prematurely while carrying
nonlinear current.
Circuit breakers are designed to interrupt the current at a zero crossover. On highly distorted supplies
which may contain line notching and/or ringing, spurious “zero crossovers” may cause premature
interruption of circuit breakers before they can operate correctly in the event of an overload or fault.
However, in the case of a short circuit current, the magnitude of the harmonic current will be very
minor in comparison to the fault current.
The original type peak-sensing, electronic-type circuit breaker responds to the peak value of
fundamental current. When carrying harmonic current, this type of breaker may not operate correctly
due to the peak value of nonlinear currents being higher than for respective linear loads. This type of
breaker therefore may trip prematurely at relatively low levels of harmonic current.
New designs of electronic breakers include both methods of protection; peak current detection and
rms current sensing. The peak detection method of protection, however, may still trip on relatively
low values of peak harmonic current and trip levels therefore may have to be readjusted accordingly.
Similarly, the rms-sensing measures the heating effect of the rms current (as per the conventional
thermal-magnetic type) and may also have to be readjusted to prevent premature tripping on nonlinear
loads.
The failure of large air circuit breakers has on occasion been attributed to harmonic distortion which
delays the operation of the blow-out coils, especially in cases of high levels of distortion and low
current. In these instances, the failure of the blow-out coil prolongs the arcing period and may cause
re-ignition of the arc, resulting in failure of the breaker to operate correctly. Vacuum-type circuit
breakers, which use magnetic blow-out systems, are less susceptible to harmonics.
Note: Guidance may have to be sought from circuit breaker manufacturers regarding trip level adjustments for nonlinear
loads.



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12 Fuses
Fuse rupture under overcurrent or short-circuit conditions is based on the heating effect of the rms
current according to the respective I
2
t characteristic. The higher the rms current, the faster the fuse
will operate. On nonlinear loads, the rms current will be higher than for similarly-rated linear loads,
therefore fuse derating may be necessary to prevent premature opening.
In addition, fuses at harmonic frequencies, suffer from skin effect and more importantly, proximity
effect, resulting in non-uniform current distribution across the fuse elements, placing additional
thermal stress on the device.
At fundamental frequency, the power loss in the fuses equals:
P
N
= I
N
2
⋅ R
N
2
..................................................................................................................... (3.22)
where I
N
and R
N
are the nominal fuse rated current and resistance at the fundamental frequency.
At harmonic frequencies the resistance of the fuse will increase to a value, R
H
therefore the nominal
fuse current rating needs to be decreased to a value, I
H
to maintain the total power losses, and hence
temperature of the fuse elements, within the value at fundamental frequency, P
H
.
The derating factor, F
P
can be expressed as:
H
N
N
H
p
R
R
I
I
F = = .............................................................................................................. (3.23)
where
I
H
= derated value of current due to harmonics
I
N

= fuse nominal current at fundamental frequency
R
H
= fuse resistance due to harmonic frequencies
R
N
= fuse resistance at fundamental frequency
Note: The above formula is used for general guidance only. Fuse manufacturers should be contacted for advice on the
correct level derating for a particular application.
13 Relays
Conventional electro-mechanical control relays are rarely susceptible to harmonic problems as the
operating coils are usually low voltage (e.g., 24 V) or fed via step-down transformers which attenuate
the harmonics. However, where the voltage supply to conventional control relays does contain harmonic
voltages or current, they may tend to operate more slowly and/or with higher pickup values and may
experience early life failure due to additional heating within the coil. Solid state relays may be
stressed when subjected to high levels of harmonic distortion and/or line notching thus reducing reliability.
Protection relays usually fall into three types: electro-mechanical, solid state and microprocessor-
based. Electro-mechanical relays are operated via the torque proportional to the square of the flux
determined by the input current. This type of relay responds to the rms value of current. Solid state
relays normally respond to the peak value of the input signal. The operation of both types of relay
may be affected by harmonics, although the voltage distortion, V
thd
, usually has to reach levels of 10-
20% before significant operational problems occur. The exact performance will vary depending on the
relay specification and the manufacture.
Microprocessor-based relays, which can use either rms current or peak values (or both) are more
sophisticated and normally utilize digital filters to extract the fundamental component of the signal
value. The non-fundamental components can therefore be attenuated.



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14 Radio, Television, Audio and Video Equipment
Radios and televisions are susceptible to interference by harmonics both radiated and conducted,
especially on LW and AM bands, from DC up to 150 kHz, which is above normal harmonic
frequencies (50
th
harmonic at 60 Hz fundamental is 3 kHz) and into RFI frequency ranges (radio
frequency interference).
Audio and video signals can be affected on four-wire systems due to high ground-to-neutral voltages.
15 Capacitors
Conventional power factor correction equipment is rarely installed on ships or offshore installations.
Therefore, it is not necessary to describe the interaction between harmonics and power factor
correction capacitors, which are generally installed in industrial plants and commercial buildings.
Fluorescent lighting, as installed across the shore-based industries, does, however, normally have
capacitors fitted internally to improve the individual light fitting’s own power factor.
In general, the effects of harmonics on general capacitors can be summarized as follows:
• Capacitors act as a “sink” for harmonic currents (i.e., they attract and absorb harmonics) due to
the fact that their capacitive reactance decreases with frequency. The capacitors can become
easily overloaded, destroying capacitors and blowing fuses where fitted.
• Capacitors (and on occasion, cable capacitance) combine with source and other inductances to
form a parallel resonant circuit (see Section 9). In the presence of harmonics, the harmonics are
amplified causing high, often localized, voltages and currents to flow, disrupting and/or damaging
plant and equipment.
• The presence of harmonics, especially voltage harmonics, tend to increase the dielectric losses on
capacitors increasing the operating temperature and reduces the reliability.
The dielectric loss can be expressed by:
( )
2
1
tan
n n
n
V C ω δ


=
............................................................................................................... (3.24)
where
tan δ = R/(1/ωC) is the loss factor
ω
n
= 2πf
n

V = rms voltage of n-th harmonic
For capacitors directly connected to the power system without series reactance, the additional thermal
stress can be approximately calculated via the assistance of a special capacitor weight THD (total
harmonic distortion) factor, defined using:
( )
1
1
2
V
nV
THD
N
n
n
C

=
= ......................................................................................................... (3.25)
where
V
1
= fundamental rms voltage
V
n
= rms voltage of the nth harmonic



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As described in Section 9, the presence of capacitors in the power system can result in series and
parallel resonances leading to over-voltages and high currents, with subsequent damage to equipment
and additional risks to personnel. However, as conventional capacitor-based power factor correction
equipment is rarely used in the marine sector, the possibility of resonance may only exist due to
fluorescent lighting integral power factor correction capacitors, cable capacitance and due to other
equipment using “external” (i.e., directly connected to the power system), for example, starting
capacitors on single-phase motors.



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S E C T I O N 4 Sources of Harmonics

Many types of electrical and electronic equipment which are adversely affected by harmonic voltages
and currents also produce them in varying degrees, due to, for example, semiconductor power
conversion or magnetic saturation in the case of transformers.
1 Distribution Systems with Single-phase Nonlinear Loads
1.1 Three-wire Distribution Systems
Three-wire, distribution systems (i.e., IT power systems with insulated neutrals) are one of the
common types of systems used on vessels for distribution due to the ease of locating and rectifying
ground faults and for security of supply of essential equipment during ground faults.
In three-wire systems, unlike the four-wire system detailed below, no “zero sequence harmonics”
should exist. If they do exist, however, their phase sequence is determined by the phase angle of the
3
rd
harmonic current (and other triplens) and its current magnitude in each of the three phases. In a
three-wire balanced system, therefore, the 3
rd
harmonics usually cancel out.
However, depending on the type and nature of the nonlinear loads(s), other harmonic currents will be
present in the system, usually in the order 5
th
, 7
th
, 11
th
, 13
th
… and perhaps some uncharacteristic
harmonics, including DC and even orders. These harmonics will be very similar to those described
for four-wire systems but with no 3
rd
harmonic present.
1.2 Four-wire Distribution Systems
On large passenger liners, it is now relatively common to use four-wire systems [i.e., three-phase and
neutral (grounded or insulated)] for “domestic” supplies, including lighting, in order to minimize
inconvenience to passengers in the event of a ground fault. Large or multiple single-phase nonlinear
loads can be problematic on four-wire systems due to significant triplen harmonics caused by their
cumulative addition in the neutral conductor, resulting in:
• Overloaded and overheating neutral conductors
• Overheated delta winding in distribution transformers
• High ground-to-neutral voltages
• Distortion of voltage waveform (flat topping)
• Poor power factor
As can be seen in Section 4, Figure 1, the phase current’s return path is via the neutral conductor. In a
four-wire distribution system with only linear loads, the 120-degree phase shift between linear load
currents results in their balanced portions canceling out in the neutral.
However, in distribution systems with nonlinear or mixed linear and nonlinear loads, the current on
one phase will not have a “pulse” on either of the two other phases with which to cancel with (see
Section 4, Figure 2). These current pulses add together in the neutral conductor, which can carry up
to 173% of phase current, even if all phases are completely balanced. The frequency of the neutral
current is predominately 180 Hz (for 60 Hz supplies) and mainly 3
rd
harmonic and other triplens.



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FIGURE 1
Four-wire System
Linear Phase Currents Return via Neutral Conductor
where Balanced Phase Current Cancel Out



FIGURE 2
Triplen Harmonics Add Up Cumulatively in Neutral Conductors
with Single-phase Nonlinear Loads in Four-wire System




Section 4 Sources of Harmonics

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Section 4, Figure 3 illustrates an example of a neutral current waveform on a four-wire installation
with a large number of single-phase nonlinear loads.

FIGURE 3
Neutral Current due to Triplen Harmonics
(150 Hz for 50 Hz Supply) on Four-wire System


Sectoin 4, Figure 4 displays the harmonic spectrum associated with the four-wire system neutral
current waveform illustrated in Section 4, Figure 3. Note the presence of 3
rd
and 9
th
(triplen
harmonics) and relatively low level of fundamental current.

FIGURE 4
Harmonic Spectrum Associated with Neutral Current
Waveform Shown in Figure 3


The importance of large numbers of single-phase, nonlinear loads is often underestimated. Large
vessels such as cruise ships have large hotel loads often comprising large number of televisions,
computers, lighting dimmers, UPS systems, fluorescent lighting, small single-phase cooling fan
variable frequency drives and other nonlinear loads. This produces considerable harmonic currents at
characteristic frequencies.



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On non-passenger vessels, the amount of four-wire (single-phase) nonlinear load can also be
significant. The low voltage supplies, fed via distribution transformers, have relatively high source
impedance resulting in significant distortion of the voltage waveform. The low voltage supplies are
important since the sensitive equipment is connected to it. Appropriate harmonic mitigation may be
necessary on distribution systems to reduce the voltage distortion to within permissible levels, thus
maintaining the safety of the vessel and the operational integrity and reliability of connected
equipment.
2 Single-phase Nonlinear Loads
Computer-based equipment and fluorescent lighting represent substantial loading on marine and
offshore four-wire distribution systems, especially on larger vessels, such as cruise liners.
Other significant nonlinear single-phase loads include single-phase variable speed drives, lighting
dimmers, UPS systems, televisions and video recorders. In small numbers, these types of loads
usually are not problematic. However, on large cruise liners, these loads can be significant, creating
substantial voltage distortion on the four-wire distribution system and with possible additional
overloading of the neutral conductors.
2.1 Computer-based Equipment
The majority of computer-based equipment, for example navigation and control systems, have
switched mode power supply (SMPS) units similar to that depicted in Section 4, Figure 5, below.

FIGURE 5
Typical Switched Mode Power Supply for Computer Based Equipment


As described in Section 2, the SMPS unit only draws current from the supply when the rectified
voltage is greater than the DC bus voltage. Typical resultant current and voltage waveforms are
illustrated in Section 4, Figure 6 with a typical harmonic current spectrum illustrated in Section 4,
Figure 7.




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FIGURE 6
Typical Voltage and Current Waveforms Associated
with a Switched Mode Power Supply



FIGURE 7
Harmonic Current Spectrum of Typical Switched Mode Power Supply
I
thd
is 128%
Typical Switched Mode Power Supply Current Spectrum
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25
Harmonic No
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
a
g
e

h
a
r
m
o
n
i
c

c
u
r
r
e
n
t

d
i
s
t
o
r
t
i
o
n


As can be seen from Section 4, Figure 7, significant odd zero sequence triplen harmonics (3
rd
, 9
th
15
th
,
21
st
) harmonics are generated, which add due to other nonlinear single-phase loads in the neutral
conductor in four-wire systems, as illustrated in Section 4, Figure 8. Note that the frequency of the
neutral current depicted in Section 4, Figure 8 is 180 Hz (60 Hz fundamental).




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FIGURE 8
Typical Neutral Current due to Triplen Harmonics
in Connected Loads on a Four-wire System


2.2 Fluorescent Lighting
Fluorescent lighting represents substantial loading on marine and offshore four-wire distribution
systems, especially larger vessels such as cruise liners.
Fluorescent lights are classed as discharge lamps as they need a “ballast” to initiate the high voltage
between the two electrodes in order to facilitate current flow. Once the arc is initiated and the current
increases, the voltage reduces. After, initiating the high voltage, the ballast also provides a measure
of current limiting for the light fitting.
The total harmonic current distortion (I
thd
) and harmonic current spectrum of fluorescent lighting is
dependent on the type of ballast employed. Two types of ballast are in use; the iron cored magnetic
ballast, essentially a transformer combined with a capacitor, and the newer electronic ballast. The
latter utilizes a switched mode power supply to convert the fundamental frequency to a higher
frequency, usually around 25-40 kHz. A small inductor is also used in the electronic type to limit the
current.
As an example, for comparison purposes, the phase voltage, phase current and neutral current
waveforms associated with distribution panels supplying wholly fluorescent lighting, using both
magnetic and electronic ballasts are illustrated below.
Section 4, Figures 9 and 10, below, depict an electrical load wholly comprising fluorescent lighting
with magnetic ballasts and T-12 lamps. The total harmonic current distortion (I
thd
) for phase currents
was 13.9% and for the neutral current, 141.3%




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FIGURE 9
Waveforms for Lighting Panel Comprising Fluorescent Lighting
with Magnetic Ballasts and T-12 Lamps



FIGURE 10
Neutral Current Waveform on Distribution Panel with Fluorescent
Lighting with Magnetic Ballasts and T-12 Lamps on a Four-wire System


Similarly, Section 4, Figures 11 and 12, below, depict the same lighting panel with electrical load
wholly comprising fluorescent lighting with electronic ballasts and T-8 lamps. The total harmonic
current distortion (I
thd
) for phase currents was 17.2% and for the neutral current, 85.3%.




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FIGURE 11
Same Lighting Panel as per Figure 9, but with Electronic Ballasts
(Instead of Magnetic Types) and T-8 Lamps



FIGURE 12
Neutral Current Waveform on Same Fluorescent Lighting Panel as Figure
10, but with Electronic Ballasts and T-8 Lamps on Four-wire System


As can be seen with reference to Section 4, Figures 13 and 14, fluorescent lighting with electronic
ballast have significantly less triplen harmonics (3
rd
, 9
th
…) than magnetic types, which suggests that
the additive effect in the neutral conductor discussed earlier will be significantly reduced. However,
as can also be seen, electronic ballasts have an increased harmonic spectrum up to around the 33
rd

harmonic. The resultant I
thd
for the phase currents for magnetic and electronic ballasts were 12.8%
and 16.3%, respectively. In the neutral conductors, the difference in I
thd
for magnetic and electronic
ballasts was more significant, at 171.2% and 44%, respectively. The use of electronic ballast would,
from this example, significantly reduce the triplen harmonics produced and carried by the neutral
conductor although would slightly increase the phase current distortion.




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FIGURE 13
Comparison of Phase Current Harmonic Spectrum for Magnetic and
Electronic Ballasts for Typical Fluorescent Lighting Distribution Panel
I
thd

was 12.8% and 16.3%, Respectively
Fluorescent Lighting Comparison - Phase Current Spectrum
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33
Harmonic No
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
a
g
e

H
a
r
m
o
n
i
c

C
u
r
r
e
n
t

D
i
s
t
o
r
t
i
o
n
Magnetic
Electronic



FIGURE 14
Comparison of Neutral Current Harmonic Spectrum for Magnetic and
Electronic Ballasts for Typical Fluorescent Lighting Distribution Panel
I
thd

was 171.28% and 44%, Respectively
Fluorescent Lighting Comparison - Neutral Current Spectrum
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 18 21 23 25 27 29 31 33
Harmonic No
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
a
g
e

H
a
r
m
o
n
i
c

C
u
r
r
e
n
t

D
i
s
t
o
r
t
i
o
n
Magnetic
Electronic






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2.3 Televisions
Section 4, Figures 15 and 16 illustrate the current waveform and harmonic current spectrum, respectively,
from a typical television.

FIGURE 15
Television – Typical Current Waveform



FIGURE 16
Television – Typical Harmonic Current Spectrum


2.4 Single-phase AC PWM Drives
Single-phase AC drives, commonly used up to 5 HP/3.7 kW for applications such as cabin fan drives,
usually have no additional reactance fitted, resulting in an I
thd
up to 135%, as can be appreciated with
reference to Section 4, Figures 17 and 18. Note that these results are similar to those produced by
single-phase UPS. Section 4, Figure 18 depicts a large triplen component. On large installations, this
would result in high neutral currents (as the triplens are additive).




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FIGURE 17
Single-phase AC PWM Drive – Typical I
thd
is 135%



FIGURE 18
Single-phase AC PWM Drive Current Spectrum


3 Three-phase Nonlinear Loads
Onboard ship or on offshore installations, a common type of three-phase nonlinear load is variable
speed drives, either AC or DC. UPS systems and shaft generators both also produce harmonic currents.
The harmonics produced by these nonlinear items will be discussed in Subsections 4/3 and 4/4.
“Linear” equipment, such as rotating machines (generators and motors), produce harmonics, although
relatively minor in magnitude compared to nonlinear loads. In addition, transformers also produce
harmonics. These items of equipment will be mentioned briefly in Subsections 4/1 and 4/2.



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3.1 DC SCR drives
Up until some 5-10 years ago, DC SCR drives were a common choice for low to medium power
electrical variable speed duties on ships, drilling rigs and offshore installations. Common applications
included windlasses, winches, propulsion motors, draw-works motors, mud pumps, cranes, etc.
As can be seen with reference to Section 4, Figure 19, below; the DC converter comprises six SCR
drives (thyristors) in a full wave bridge configuration with a separately-excited shunt field fed by a
full wave diode bridge (note – this can be single- or two-phase supplies). DC motors are available in
various designs, including series-wound, shunt-wound and a number of derivatives of compound-
wound; the application of which specific type is dependent on the necessary speed/torque
characteristic of the given duty. However, the configuration of the SCR drive converter is the same
for each type.

FIGURE 19
Typical 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive with Shunt-wound DC Motor
+

AC
Supply
a
b
c
T1
T4
T3
T6
T5
T2
D1
D2
D3
D4
L
a
R
a
R
f
L
f
Separately
Excited DC
Motor Field
DC Motor
Armature


The above illustration (Section 4, Figure 19) depicts a shunt-wound motor with separately-excited
field, one of the common types of DC motor in general use. L
a
and R
a
are the armature inductance
and resistance, respectively, and similarly, L
f
and R
f
are the shunt field inductance and resistance.
With the shunt field current at constant maximum value, (hence maximum field flux), the speed (and
torque) of the DC motor can be controlled infinitely by varying the mean output voltage from the DC
converters applied to the DC motor armature. This is achieved by modifying the delay angle of the
SCRs over a 120-degree angle (the first 30 deg and final 30 deg of the theoretical 180-degree
conduction period cannot be utilized for commutation reasons).
Thus, the motor speed can be controlled up to “base speed” (based on maximum field flux) using
“armature voltage control”. In this region, the power of the motor is directly proportional to the
applied voltage (less armature reaction), and hence speed. This is termed the “constant torque
region”, as the torque is constant while the power rises in direct proportion to speed.
Speed above “base speed” is achievable by maintaining the armature voltage at a maximum value and
then reducing the shunt field current, hence flux. Therefore, the use of a variable SCR-based field
weakening controller is necessary. Operation above base speed is in the constant power region since
the power is constant, but the available flux hence torque is inversely proportional to speed. Section
4, Figure 20, below, illustrates the concepts of constant torque and constant power.
Note: This concept can also be applied to AC PWM drives and induction motors (see 4/3.2 on AC PWM drives).



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FIGURE 20
Concept of “Constant Torque” and “Constant Power”
with DC Shunt-wound Motors


DC motors with single converters can drive in the forward direction and need either field reversal or
armature voltage reversal in order to drive in the reverse direction. However, if the DC motor is
supplying an overhauling load (i.e., one that feeds converted kinetic energy into the drive) the load
current will remain in the same direction but the DC voltage will be reversed. In these circumstances,
the DC converter voltage opposes the DC voltage back EMF. The DC motor voltage is therefore
limited to a maximum conduction angle of 90 degrees, thus maintaining a stable area of the operation
without the potential of losing control of the DC motor.
They cannot brake regeneratively (i.e., dump the excess electrical energy which has been converted
from kinetic energy during the braking process into the supply) due to the blocking action of the
SCRs, however, DC motors fitted with dual converters (Section 4, Figure 21) are capable of “four
quadrant operation” [i.e., motoring and braking (generating)] in both directions of rotation as
illustrated in Section 4, Figure 22.
In the four quadrant DC drive system depicted in Section 4, Figure 21, “commutating reactors” have
been used to reduce both the line notching and attenuate the harmonic currents. These are
recommended for all DC drives. Most DC motors have sufficient inherent inductance to facilitate
rapid current reversal during braking and reversal. However, for applications where minimizing noise
levels is important (e.g., fishery survey vessels), additional DC side inductors are often used.





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FIGURE 21
Typical Dual Converter for DC Shunt-wound Motor



FIGURE 22
Concept of “Four Quadrant Control” for DC Motors and Dual Converters


The harmonic currents produced by DC SCR drives are a function of the pulse number (“pulse
number ± 1”, so for 6-pulse, 5
th
, 7
th
, 11
th
, 13
th
…) and the delay angle of the SCRs at a particular
operating point as described in Section 6. The harmonic currents will be at a maximum value at full
load. A typical current waveform and harmonic current spectrum at rated load are illustrated in
Section 4, Figure 23 and 24, respectively.




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FIGURE 23
Typical 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive Current Waveform at 100% Load



FIGURE 24
Harmonic Current Spectrum of Typical
6-Pulse DC SCR Drive at Rated Load
6 pulse DC SCR drive
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
5
t
h
7
t
h
1
1
t
h
1
3
t
h
1
7
t
h
1
9
t
h
2
3
t
h
2
5
t
h
2
9
t
h
3
1
t
h
3
5
t
h
3
7
t
h
4
1
s
t
4
3
r
d
4
7
t
h
4
9
t
h
Harmonic
T
o
t
a
l

p
e
r
c
e
n
t
a
g
e

h
a
r
m
o
n
i
c

c
u
r
r
e
n
t

d
i
s
t
o
r
t
i
o
n


For the relationship between the magnitude of the harmonic currents produced and the drive loading,
please refer to Section 6, “The Effect of Loading on Harmonic Distortion”. Note that as the drive
input rectifier is SCR based, the input displacement power factor will vary as a function of the delay
angle of the SCRs.
Due to the use of phase-controlled SCRs (thyristors) line notching will also be present. For further
information on line notching, please refer to Section 2).



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3.2 AC PWM drives
AC voltage-fed pulse width modulated (PWM) drives are a commom type of electrical variable drive
used today in marine, offshore and general industrial applications for low to medium power
applications.
The benefit of being able to control standard squirrel cage induction motors was significant.
However, squirrel cage induction motors are generally designed for pure sinusoidal supplies, and the
effects of the often harmonically-rich output waveforms had to be taken into account with regard to
the level of motor thermal derating, according to the speed range driven load torque characteristic,
high level of dv/dt on motor winding insulation and torque production at low frequencies and bearing
currents (more applicable on large machines). Rotor design was also an important factor, as double
cage and deep bar rotors (e.g., NEMA C and D designs) tended to significantly rise in temperature
when on variable frequency supplies due to considerably increased iron losses, copper losses and skin
effect; in the early days of PWM drives (mid 1980s). Some large motors had to be fitted with copper
rotors due to the increased heating. With hot rotors, bearing lubrication was also a problem. Often
special high temperature grease was necessary.
However, the motor industry took up the challenges in the mid 1990s and currently produces squirrel
cage motors more suitable for variable frequency drive operation, subject of course to the necessary
thermal derating (TEFC squirrel cage motors in constant torque applications usually still need to be
derated according to the speed range). Motors on quadratic duties (centrifugal pumps and fans) rarely
need to be derated. Presently, motor cooling options (for large motors) include forced cooling and
water cooling, reducing the need for derating, and thereby reducing the necessary motor frame size
and rating of the AC PWM drive.
A block diagram configuration of a typical AC PWM drive is shown in Section 4, Figure 25, below.

FIGURE 25
Typical AC PWM Drive Block Diagram
×
×
×
M
~
3 Phase
AC Supply
Diode
Rectifier
PWM
Inverter
AC
Motor I
D
V
D
Control Circuits


With reference to Section 4, Figure 25; the incoming three-phase supply is rectified by the input (or
“front end”) rectifier. In this instance, a diode full wave bridge has been used, but in larger drives
(i.e., above 40 HP/30 kW), SCR “pre-charge” front ends are used to “soft start” the DC bus to
minimize any inrush current. Once the DC bus is fully charged, the SCRs act as diodes (i.e., they are
no longer controlled).
The resultant voltage output from the input bridge is in the form of DC voltage with six peaks; one
peak for each of the positive and negative half cycles of the rectified three-phase input waveform, thus
the term “6-pulse drive”. Similarly, a single-phase AC PWM would be “2-pulse” due to having one
rectified peak per positive and negative half cycle. After rectification, the DC voltage is smoothed by
the action of the DC bus capacitors.



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An AC PWM drive operates similarly to a switched mode power supply. Power is only drawn from
the mains supply when the DC bus voltages falls below that of rectified AC mains level, hence the
pulse nature of the input current, as shown in Section 4, Figure 26. The “intermediate” (i.e., between
the input and output bridges) DC bus serves as a reservoir of energy, only being recharged as
necessary. The DC bus voltage is in the order of 1.35 × the AC L-L rms voltage level (e.g., for 480 V
AC mains the DC bus would be in the order of 648 V DC).

FIGURE 26
Pulsed Nature of AC PWM Drive Input Current


While the operation of the “front end” of an AC PWM drive is relatively simple, the operation of the
output (or “inverter”) bridge is more complex, especially from the control aspect. As can be seen
from Section 4, Figure 25, the input bridge rectifies the three-phase voltage supply which is further
smoothed by the DC bus capacitors, which act as a power storage unit. The DC bus voltage is
maintained at a constant level. The inverter bridge, usually comprises insulated gate bipolar
transistors (IGBTs), controls both the output voltage and the output frequency. A constant
voltage/frequency (V/F) is needed to maintain the desired level of torque in the driven induction
motor.
Section 4, Figure 27, below, depicts a typical IGBT out rectifier. The diodes across the IGBT devices
are termed “flywheel diodes” and are in the circuit to assist commutation (i.e., the transfer of current
from one device to another).




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FIGURE 27
Typical AC PWM Drive Output (Inverter) Bridge Configuration


Pulse width modulation control strategies were introduced in the early 1980s to overcome the heating
and torque pulsations of the then “square wave drives” (also known as “quasi-square wave” or “six
step drives”). The purpose was to reduce the output harmonics, especially the low order harmonics, to
the motor. Since that time, the various PWM strategies have been improved significantly such that
present series of drives usually have output current waveforms (i.e., not the output voltage) which are
relatively sinusoidal. This was achieved due to a combination of PWM techniques and advances in
fast power semiconductors such as IGBTs.
The basic principle of pulse width modulation can be seen with reference to Section 4, Figure 28,
below.

FIGURE 28
Basic Principle of Pulse Width Modulation




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As illustrated in Section 4, Figure 28(a), a saw-tooth waveform (shown as “triangle wave”) is
produced by the control system based on the desired switching frequency. This is compared to a
sinusoidal reference waveform (shown as “reference wave”) whose frequency and output are
proportional to the desired output waveform.
In Section 4, Figure 28(b), the voltage V
AN
is switched high whenever the sinusoidal reference voltage
is larger than the triangular waveform. Similarly, in Section 4, Figure 28(c), V
BN
is controlled in a
similar manner by the triangular waveform, but in this instance, the sinusoidal reference waveform is
shifted by 180 degrees. The result is a phase-to-phase voltage waveform as depicted by Section 4,
Figure 28(d), which is the difference between waveforms V
AN
and V
BN
, which is a series of voltage
pulses whose width is related to the magnitude of the sinusoidal reference waveform at a particular
instance in time. It is the rms value of this voltage which the motor “sees”. If this rms voltage was
superimposed on the waveform in Section 4, Figure 28(d), the voltage would be seen to be
approximately sinusoidal with zero crossovers as per the PWM waveform. The current which the
motor “sees” also approximates a sine wave in nature.
In 4/3.1 on DC SCR drives, the possibility of operating the DC motor above base speed was
described. It is also possible to operate an AC PWM drive and squirrel cage induction motor
similarly, as will be shown in Section 4, Figures 29a and b, below.
Up to base speed (i.e., the motor’s natural synchronous speed) the AC drive maintains a constant
voltage/frequency ratio (e.g., at 50% output frequency on 480 V supplies, the V/F ratio would be
approximately 240 V/30 Hz). Above base speed, it is usually not possible to increase the output
voltage, therefore only the frequency is increased. However, similar to DC drives, the torque
availability with AC PWM drives reduces with increased output frequency above base speed and
limits the maximum frequency achievable. The effect of high speed on the bearings and lubrication
are also often a factor regarding the maximum frequency of operation.

FIGURE 29a
AC Motor/PWM Drives Standard Speed/Torque Characteristics





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FIGURE 29b
AC Motor/PWM Drives Standard Speed/Power Characteristics


As can be seen in Section 4, Figure 29a, the motor has to be thermally derated for constant torque
duty. It is possible, however, to use motors with higher pole numbers (e.g., a 6-pole motor operated at
9-90 Hz in order to obtain a 10:1 speed range at constant torque plus 40% higher starting torque) or
with non-standard winding configurations (e.g., 5-87 Hz on 50 Hz mains for 17:1 speed range at
constant torque).
The harmonic currents produced by AC PWM drives are dependent on the pulse number (with 6-pulse
drives being the most popular) and whether any additional reactance has been installed in the drive
(see Section 10, “Mitigation of Harmonics”). Additional reactance, either in the AC line or in the DC
bus serves additional purposes other than harmonic attenuation and is commonly fitted to drives
above 10 HP (7.5 kW). Section 4, Figure 30, below, illustrates the input current and voltage
waveforms from a 150 HP (110 kW) AC PWM drive with 3% DC bus reactance running at rated load.
The total harmonic current distortion was measured at 39.23% (without the DC bus reactor the I
thd

would be approximately 67%). Section 4, Figure 31 depicts the harmonic current spectrum associated
with this particular drive.
Information on how the harmonic current varies with load can be found in Section 6.
Note: Other AC voltage-fed drive output waveform control technologies exist, such as “field vector orientation” (i.e.,
“vector control”) and “direct torque control” (DTC), both of which provide enhanced motor performance, akin to
flux control in DC motors. These types are also used in marine and offshore applications.
However, as the input bridge and DC bus architecture of these drives are almost identical to that of PWM drives,
the harmonic currents and input waveforms will be similar to those described in 4/3.2 on AC PWM drives.




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FIGURE 30
Input Current – 150 HP AC PWM Drive
with 3% DC Bus Reactor – I
thd
= 39.23%



FIGURE 31
Harmonic Current Spectrum of 150 HP AC PWM Drive
with 3% DC Bus Reactor – I
thd
= 39.23%
150HP 6 pulse AC PWM drive - 39.23% Ithd
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
5
t
h
7
t
h
1
1
t
h
1
3
t
h
1
7
t
h
1
9
t
h
2
3
t
h
2
5
t
h
2
9
t
h
3
1
t
h
3
5
t
h
3
7
t
h
4
1
s
t
4
3
r
d
4
7
t
h
4
9
t
h
Harmonic
T
o
t
a
l

p
e
r
c
e
n
t
a
g
e

h
a
r
m
o
n
i
c

c
u
r
r
e
n
t

d
i
s
t
o
r
t
i
o
n





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3.3 AC Cycloconverter Drives
Cycloconverters are a common form of electrical variable speed drive in the higher power range and,
as such, are used for main propulsion drives.
Unlike other forms of AC drives, for example AC PWM drives and load commutated inverters (LCI),
both of which have an intermediate stage (i.e., DC bus) to facilitate dual conversion [AC to DC and
DC to AC], the cycloconverter is a direct conversion drive which converts one frequency to another
without the need for an intermediate stage. Cycloconverters have been in operation since the 1930s
(then based on mercury arc rectifiers) on applications such as railway transportation, steel works and
coal mine winders.
Cycloconverters are characterized by having a maximum output frequency of 33% of the input
frequency, which often negates the use of gearboxes for final speed reduction with the ability to
provide full four-quadrant control with high torque and high dynamic response. When used to control
the rotor of a wound rotor induction motor, the cycloconverter is termed a “static Scherbius” drive.
In power conversion terms, the operation of a cycloconverter is complex with both positive and
negative bridges necessary per motor phase. In order to briefly describe the operation of
cycloconverters, it is necessary to consider the operation of a single-phase-to-single-phase device with
full wave rectifiers and a resistive load, as shown in Section 4, Figure 32, below:

FIGURE 32
Single-phase-to-Single-phase Cycloconverter


As illustrated in Section 4, Figure 32, V
s
is the input voltage at frequency f
1
. In this example, it is
assumed that the SCRs are acting as diodes with α = 0 degrees firing angle. Note that α
p

and α
n
are
termed the firing angles of the positive and negative bridges, respectively.
Refer to Section 4, Figure 33(b), below. In order to achieve, for example, an output frequency of 25%
of the input frequency (e.g., 15 Hz output for an input of 60 Hz) the positive bridge supplies current to
the load for the first two cycles of V
s

as it rectifies the incoming AC voltage V
s
into four positive half
cycles as illustrated.




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FIGURE 33
Waveforms for Single-phase-to-Single-phase Conversion

(a) Input voltage
(b) Output voltage, V
o
, for 0 deg firing angle
(c) Output voltage, V
o
, with firing angle π/3 rad.
(d) Output voltage, V
o
, with variable firing angle

During the next two cycles of V
s

[Section 4, Figure 33(c)], the negative converter supplies current to
the load in the reverse direction. (Note that the current waveform is not depicted in Section 4, Figure
33 as being wholly resistive. It will have the same wave-shape as the voltage). In the configuration
above, when one bridge is operating, the other is disabled or “blocked”.
As can be seen above, the frequency of the output voltage, V
o
, in Section 4, Figure 33(b) is 25% of the
input voltage V
s
(i.e., f
o
/f
1
= 1/4). The output frequency, f
o
, can be varied by adjusting the number of
cycles the positive and negative converters operate.
Note that cycloconverters can be used for “step up” operation as well as “step down” operation,
although the latter is considerably more common.
As can be seen in the above example, the output frequency can be varied (i.e., up to a maximum of
one-third the input frequency). The single-phase-single-phase cycloconverter can also supply a
voltage based on firing angle, α. The DC output of each bridge would be:
α
π
cos
2 2
V V
d
= ............................................................................................................... (4.1)
where
V = input rms voltage
V
d
= DC output voltage
Note: The DC output voltage per half cycle is shown dotted in Section 4, Figure 33(d).



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The peak fundamental output voltage will be:
( ) α
π π
cos
2 2 4
1
0
V t v = ....................................................................................................... (4.2)
where
V = input rms voltage
V
0
= peak fundamental voltage
Therefore, it follows that the fundamental output voltage v
0

is dependent on firing angle, α. For α = 0
degrees:
do do
V V V = × = 1
1
0
where α
π π
cos
2 2 4
1
0
V v = .
For example, if α is increased to π/3 radians, as illustrated in Section 4, Figure 33(d), then output
voltage
1
0
V = V
do

0.5.
The above is a simplistic explanation regarding the basic theory of cycloconverters. Please note that
operation with a constant firing angle, α, results in a very crude output waveform with considerable
harmonic content. In reality, the square waves shown in Section 4, Figure 33(b) and (c) would be
modified to approximate a sine wave by sinusoidally modulating the firing angle α, as illustrated in
Section 4, Figure 33(d). This would serve to reduce the output harmonics and supply a better wave-
shape to the motor.
Section 4, Figure 34 shows a typical three-phase cycloconverter with three bridges, each phase
displaced by 2π/3 radians (120 degrees).
As mentioned previously, the cycloconverter can operate in all four quadrants. Both positive and
negative bridges can therefore supply voltages of either positive or negative polarity, depending on
the necessary duty at any instance in time. It must be noted the positive bridge can only supply
positive current and the negative bridge can only supply negative current, and that consequently, the
polarity of the current determines which converter supplies the load at that instance. When the
polarity of the load current changes, the respective bridge previously supplying the current is disabled
and the other bridge is enabled in order to reverse the current (e.g., from rectification to inversion).
However, the motor needs the magnitude of the fundamental rms voltage to be continuous at all times,
so during current reversal, the average rms voltage supplied by both bridges are “forced” to be of the
same magnitude in order to prevent voltage jumps and current “spikes” occurring.
Section 4, Figure 34 shows a typical 6-pulse cycloconverter connected to a star-connected induction
motor. However, cycloconverters can be used with both synchronous and squirrel cage induction
machines. There are certain advantages, however, when operating with synchronous motors due to
the machine’s output power factor characteristics. Cycloconverters, whose input displacement power
factor is always lagging, can supply leading, lagging or unity power factor loads. The characteristic
that a synchronous motor can draw variable levels of power factor from a converter is ideally suited to
the cycloconverters, whereas induction motors can only draw lagging current.
The output voltages produced by cycloconverters have a high harmonic content which can be reduced
by careful systemization of the bridge(s) firing angle algorithms. In addition, AC synchronous and
squirrel cage induction motors normally filter (i.e., absorb) the majority of higher order harmonics
and, in addition, attenuate a measure of lower order harmonics due to their inherent leakage reactance.




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FIGURE 34
Three-phase 6-Pulse Cycloconverter


Since current reversal is necessary, standard cycloconverters are usually designed in two formats;
“blocking mode” or “circulating current mode” converters. In the “blocking mode” cycloconverters,
as the name implies, one bridge is disabled or “blocked” while the other is operating. If both bridges
were operating simultaneously, a short circuit would occur across the supply. To avoid this, an
“intergroup reactor” can be connected between the two bridges (per phase), as shown by Section 4,
Figure 35, below, to form a “circulating current mode” converter.
Unlike the “blocking mode” converter; in the “circulating current mode” converter, both bridges are
enabled during current reversal, thus allowing a circulating current to flow between the bridges and
the load. This circulating current is unidirectional due to the blocking action of the other SCR bridge.
Most circulating current cycloconverters operate in a circulating current mode, with both bridges
enabled when running.
There advantages and disadvantages of both types. Blocking mode converters do not need large
intergroup reactors and are therefore physically smaller and less expensive that the circulating current
type. In the blocking mode type, when the current decays to zero, awaiting reversal, both bridges (per
phase) are disabled. During this delay time period, the current distorts the voltage and current
waveforms. It is therefore necessary to program complex harmonic elimination patterns into the
firing control software to minimize the level of distortion. The current reversal process also
introduces added complexity into the firing and protection control systems. However, the blocking
mode converter is more efficient (as only one bridge operates at any one time).




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FIGURE 35
Simplified Connection of Intergroup Reactor on One Phase
of Circulating Current Cycloconverters


The waveforms associated with blocking mode cycloconverters are shown below in Section 4, Figure 36.

FIGURE 36
Waveforms for Blocking Mode Cycloconverters

(a) Positive bridge output voltage
(b) Negative bridge output voltage
(c) Load (motor) voltage




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In the circulating current cycloconverters, both bridges operate simultaneously with fundamental rms
output voltages of similar magnitudes. When one bridge is converting (AC-DC), the other is inverting
(DC-AC). Note that if the output voltage from both bridges were sinusoidal, however, there would be
zero circulating current as the instantaneous potential difference between the two bridges would be
zero. In reality, however, this is not the case, and the intergroup reactor is necessary to facilitate
operation. The waveforms associated with a circulating current cycloconverter and also the voltage
waveform across the intergroup reactor, which is the instantaneous potential difference between the
two bridges, are depicted in Section 4, Figure 37.

FIGURE 37
Waveforms for Circulating Current Mode Cycloconverters

(a) Positive bridge output voltage
(b) Negative bridge output voltage
(c) Load (motor) voltage
(d) Intergroup reactor voltage

The circulating current cycloconverters normally have a smoother output voltage waveform,
containing fewer harmonics, than the blocking mode type. Due to the lack of current reversal
complications associated with the blocking mode converter, control is simplified. The main
disadvantage of the circulating current type is the additional size, weight and cost associated with the
intergroup reactor. However, hybrids have been developed which can provide the advantages of both
types. One example has architecture similar to a circulating current mode converter but with a much
reduced intergroup reactor. When operating unidirectionally, only one bridge is enabled. When the
motor current reverses and decreases below a predetermined level, both bridges are enabled and a
smooth reversal of current occurs. Similarly, when the reversed current increases above the
predetermined level, the other bridge is disabled. The efficiency is still less than the blocking mode
type, however, but it has the advantage of reduced inherent distortion around zero current permitting
less complex firing control compared to the standard blocking mode converter.



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Cycloconverter input current characteristics and associated harmonic content are complex and
dependent on a number of factors, including:
• The pulse number of the cycloconverters
• The relative magnitude of the output fundamental voltage
• The ratio of the input and output frequencies
• The displacement power factor of the load
• The firing control strategy
In applications with large drives, 6-pulse drives are not common. Multi-pulse drives, including 12-
pulse, are the norm to minimize the input harmonic currents and associated disruption of the power
supply system. Section 4, Figure 38(a) illustrates the input current waveform and Section 4, Figure
38(b) the harmonic current frequency spectrum associated with a 20 MW (26,810 HP) 12-pulse
cycloconverter.
Section 4, Figure 39 shows a 12-pulse cycloconverter operating with a three-phase synchronous motor
with the rotor field current controlled by a separate 6-pulse, fully-controlled rectifier.

FIGURE 38a
Input Current Associated with a 20 MW, 12-Pulse Cycloconverter



FIGURE 38b
Harmonic Current Frequency Spectrum Associated
with a 20 MW, 12-Pulse Cycloconverter





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FIGURE 39
2-Pulse Cycloconverter with Three-phase Synchronous Motor


In addition to the production of standard “pulse number ± 1” harmonic currents, cycloconverters often
produce, due to supply unbalance, uncharacteristic harmonics (including even order and triplen
harmonics) in addition to significant magnitudes of interharmonics. Indeed, the attenuation of these
interharmonics is often more difficult than the reduction of the integer harmonic currents.
The characteristic harmonics generated by cycloconverters are:
f
h
= (pm ± 1)f ± 6nf
o
............................................................................................................. (4.3)
where
f
o
= output frequency
f
h
= harmonic current frequency
m = a number, 1, 2, 3....
n = a number, 0, 1, 2…
With reference to Section 4, Figure 40 (and to an extent, Section 4, Figure 38), it should be noted that
each characteristic integer harmonic has a so called “side band” of interharmonics associated with it.
This is a result of the modulation of the constant input current frequency with the varying output
motor frequency. Therefore, both the fundamental current and the characteristic harmonic currents
are accompanied by additional harmonic components of frequencies based on:
f = n ⋅ fL ± k ⋅ 6 ⋅ fM............................................................................................................. (4.4)
where both n and k are integer numbers.



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As mentioned previously, cycloconverter input harmonic currents, including the interharmonics, tend
to vary according to the operating point, so the harmonic spectrum constantly changes with output
frequency.
Section 4, Figure 40 depicts a typical 12-pulse cycloconverter harmonic (including interharmonics)
current spectrum.
Note: Cycloconverters generate significant amounts of reactive power which often have to be compensated for, often
employing high pass harmonic filters instead of conventional power factor correction capacitor banks. These high
pass filters act as a low impedance path for higher order harmonic currents in addition to providing compensation
for the reactive power at fundamental frequencies.

FIGURE 40
Harmonic Spectrum of 12-Pulse Cycloconverters
Including Interharmonic Sidebands


3.4 AC Load Commutated Inverter (LCI)
“Load commutated inverters”, also known as “current source inverters” (CSIs) were, for many years,
common in industrial applications where squirrel cage induction motors (rated 600HP/450 kW and
above); for example: centrifugal pumps and fan loads where high starting torque is not needed.
However, their use has diminished due to availability of the less expensive and physically smaller AC
PWM drives.
The load commutated inverter (LCI), so called due to the fact that the motor current commutates the
inverter bridge (i.e., it facilitates transfer of current from one phase to another). It is characterized by
a large inductor included in the DC bus, as depicted in Section 4, Figure 41, below. Load
commutated inverters are known as “constant current” drives due to the action of the large DC bus
inductor (i.e., it has an “inductive DC bus”), whereas AC PWM drives have a “capacitive DC bus”,
due to the presence of the large capacitor bank.




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FIGURE 41
Typical 6-Pulse ASCI CSI Inverter with a Squirrel Cage Induction Motor


As can be seen from Section 4, Figure 41, the load current source inverter comprises a fully controlled
SCR input bridge which varies the input DC voltage and a large inductor which converts the variable
DC voltage into a current source. The output or “inverter” bridge controls the output frequency to the
motor. The squirrel cage induction motor has a lagging power factor, so forced commutation is
necessary to transfer current through the motor phases.
Another common inverter bridge configuration, used mainly with squirrel cage induction motors, as
illustrated below, was the “auto-sequentially commutated inverter” (ASCI). However, this commutation
process results in transient overvoltages, termed “commutation spikes”, being superimposed on the
output voltage waveform, as shown in Section 4, Figure 42. In recent years, the use of this
configuration has diminished due to the AC PWM drives.

FIGURE 42
Output Voltage Commutation Spikes – CSI with Squirrel Cage Induction
Motor





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Careful design of the squirrel cage motor and the ASCI circuit is necessary to minimize the
commutation spikes. The motor insulation also has to be capable of withstanding the dv/dt (i.e., rate
of rise of voltage associated with commutation spikes). Squirrel cage induction motors for use with
load commutated inverters need a higher level of magnetizing current, to assist commutation,
compared to motors for AC PWM drives or for sinusoidal supplies.
Load commutated inverters are mainly used with synchronous motors. It is the synchronous motors,
therefore, which provide the commutation current for the converter (hence the term “load commutated
inverter”) via the back EMF of the motor. The synchronous motor, therefore, has to operate with a
leading power factor and also needs a special excitation circuit for the rotor, as shown in Section 4,
Figure 43.

FIGURE 43
12-Pulse Load Commutated Inverter with Synchronous Motor


As described above, load commutated inverters with ASCI inverter bridge configurations result in
commutation spikes, the majority of which are within the withstand capability of modern LV motors.
However, if squirrel cage motors are to be operated at higher voltages, then special measures are
necessary so that commutation is provided by the load, as shown in Section 4, Figure 44, below. In
this example, 12-pulse is needed due to the high power necessary, therefore a special output filter
(which supplies a leading power factor to the inverter) is selected which supplies the commutating
current up to around 50% of output frequency. Above 50% output frequency, the commutation is
achieved due to a combination of the output filter and the motor.




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FIGURE 44
12-Pulse Load Commutated Inverter
with Squirrel Cage Motor and Output Filter


As can be seen from Section 4, Figure 45, the output voltage waveform (for squirrel cage or
synchronous motors) does not contain commutation spikes, as associated with ASCI CSIs, but does
contain notches, very similar to that associated with the input of phase-controlled drives, such as DC
SCR and quasi-square wave drives.

FIGURE 45
Output Voltage of LCI with Synchronous Motor
or Squirrel Cage Motor with Output Filter





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One drawback of the load commutated inverter is the difficulty in starting the drive system due to the
fact that below around 10% speed there is insufficient back EMF to commutate the inverter bridge. A
method known as “DC link pulsing” is necessary to initiate commutation. This entails the reduction
of the DC bus current to zero by temporarily operating the inverter bridge in the inversion mode (i.e.,
regenerating into the DC bus), thus permitting the SCRs to regain their blocking capability and
thereby commutate the motor current and rotate the motor. In high power applications, reactive
power may be necessary due to the very low power factor at low output frequencies and low loading.
In order to satisfy the needs of SCRs regarding turn-off, the synchronous motor must, as mentioned
above, be operated with a leading power factor. Similarly, squirrel cage motors need an output filter
with leading power factor.
The starting torque of load commutated inverter-fed squirrel cage motors is poor, as indicated above.
Four-quadrant control is inherent in the design. However, the poor dynamic performance, unless
utilizing vector control or similar control strategies, results in the LCI being unable to be applied to
the more demanding four-quadrant applications. Power factor at 100% load/speed is usually around
0.88 – 0.9, but due to the input SCR bridge, reduces to zero at very low loads. Speed range is usually
restricted to 10:1 due to commutation issues but is improved if vector control or a similar strategy is
applied. For continuous operation below 10%, “pulsed mode” operation is necessary, as a method
needed for starting, and is also necessary in order to minimize torque pulsations and associated
vibration on the motor rotor and driven load, in addition to providing sufficient commutation current
for the inverter bridge.
The output current of a LCI is a “six step” square wave, as shown in Section 4, Figure 46, which
contains significant harmonics, the result of which is additional motor heating and torque fluctuations
at low speeds due to the 5
th
and 7
th
harmonic currents interacting with the fundamental flux to cause
6
th
harmonic torque oscillations. On larger installations, six-phase motors with one “star” and one
“delta” (30-degree phase displacement) supplied by two inverter bridges reduce torque fluctuations by
50%.

FIGURE 46
Six Step Square Wave Current – LCI with Synchronous Motor


The input current wave shape of load commutated inverters, as shown below in Section 4, Figure 47,
is very similar to a DC SCR drive of similar pulse number due to the controlled SCR input bridge and
DC bus inductance.




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FIGURE 47
Input Waveform of 6-Pulse Load Commutated Inverter


A typical harmonic spectrum associated with a 6-pulse load commutated inverter is shown in Section
4, Figure 48.

FIGURE 48
Harmonic Spectrum Associated with a
6-Pulse Load Commutated Inverter
6 pulse load commutated inverter
0
5
10
15
20
25
5
t
h
7
t
h
1
1
t
h
1
3
t
h
1
7
t
h
1
9
t
h
2
3
t
h
2
5
t
h
2
9
t
h
3
1
t
h
3
5
t
h
3
7
t
h
4
1
s
t
4
3
r
d
4
7
t
h
4
9
t
h
Harmonic
T
o
t
a
l

p
e
r
c
e
n
t
a
g
e

h
a
r
m
o
n
i
c

c
u
r
r
e
n
t

d
i
s
t
o
r
t
i
o
n


Load commutated inverters are available for large power systems. For loads with 3-5 MW (4000-7000
HP), inverters of this type are used when the system voltage is above 1kVand would commonly use
multi-pulse rectifiers at the input to reduce harmonic distortion (12-pulse or higher depending on
power and supply limitations) and possibly multi-pulse on the output to reduce the torque ripple on
the machine and the load. (Typically, 12-pulse via two discrete motor windings, 30-degree phase
displaced. Alternatively, two separate converters could supply the motor with either the converters
12-pulse or the motor 12-pulse. This permits operation on 6-pulse should any converter or a motor
winding fail. Typically, the 6-pulse operation is 50% of the rated motor loading).



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4 Additional Three-phase Sources of Harmonics
4.1 Rotating Machines
Linear loads, such as generators and motors, can also be considered a source of harmonics, albeit
relatively small in comparison with electronic nonlinear loads such as adjustable speed drives.
The windings of the rotating machines, irrespective of type, are embedded into slots within the stator
pack. As a result, the magneto-motive force (MMF) is not evenly distributed, and therefore, distortion
will occur which produces harmonics. In larger machines, “coil spanning” (i.e., careful design of
winding/slot profile) is used to attenuate the 5
th
and 7
th
harmonics. However, compared to electronic
nonlinear loads, rotating machine harmonics are relatively small in magnitude and rarely troublesome.
In synchronous machines, the magnitude of harmonic electro-motive force (induced voltage) is
dependent on the following factors:
• The magnitude of the harmonic fluxes
• The effective phase spread of the winding
• The coil span
• Method of interphase connection
By careful choice of the above four factors the magnitude of the harmonic EMFs and associated
harmonics can be minimized.
Harmonics produced by induction motors, are speed dependent and result from the harmonic content
of the MMF distribution within the machine air gap. Harmonic production within induction motors
(i.e., squirrel cage and wound rotor) can also result from voltage unbalance. During testing, the
generator-induced harmonics are usually checked for compliance against the relevant standard.
4.2 Transformers
Harmonics are produced by transformers as a result of the nonlinear relationship between voltage and
current and the magnetic materials used in manufacture. This results in the transformer magnetizing
current being non-sinusoidal and containing harmonics, especially 3
rd
and other triplens. It should be
noted that if the input voltage was perfectly sinusoidal, the current would be nonlinear and would
contain harmonics. Conversely, if the magnetizing current were sinusoidal, the output voltage would
be nonlinear. However, similar to rotating machines, the magnitude of harmonics are rarely
problematic and are almost negligible compared to harmonics from electronic sources.
In order to maintain relatively sinusoidal output voltages, three-phase power transformers are
designed with a delta winding or an ungrounded wye (i.e., Y or star) connection which acts as a block
for 3
rd
and other zero sequence triplen harmonics.
Transformers when in saturation (i.e., overly excited), for example if subject to a large increase in
voltage, tend to produce odd order harmonics (5
th
, 7
th
, 11
th
, 13
th
…). Triplens are also produced, but
are restricted (i.e., absorbed) due to delta or ungrounded wye configuration.
Inrush current, especially in larger transformers, does contain relatively large odd order harmonics,
but as the inrush time is only a few seconds, the effects are usually not significant with regard to the
harmonic distortion. However, it may initiate shutdown of differential protection systems and
ultimately, the generator(s,) although more modern differential protection systems do attempt to
compensate and reduce the likelihood of a shutdown. Unbalance can also produces odd order
harmonics. This is especially true if there is a large DC component on the secondary of the
transformer.



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4.3 UPS Systems
Uninterruptible power supply systems are usually used to provide “secure power” in the event of
generator shutdown or other similar power failure. Dedicated individual computer UPS systems are
usually single-phase and have an input current wave-shape and harmonic current spectrum similar to
that produced by single-phase switched mode power supplies (SMPS).
Three-phase UPS systems are also available. The majority of three-phase UPS systems have a
controlled, SCR input bridge rectifier with characteristic harmonics based on the “pulse number ± 1”
format. Section 4, Figure 49, below, shows the voltage and current waveforms from a typical three-
phase 480 V, 60 Hz UPS rated 37.5 kVA. The I
thd
at the input is 19.1%. Section 4, Figure 50 depicts
the harmonic current spectrum associated with this UPS.
Active front ends (i.e., sinusoidal input rectifiers) and 12-pulse configurations are also now available
which may have better harmonic performance.

FIGURE 49
Input Voltage and Current Waveforms
of 6-Pulse 37.5 kVA, 480 V, 60 Hz UPS


FIGURE 50
Harmonic Input Current Spectrum for 6-Pulse 37.5 kVA, 460 V, 60 Hz UPS




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4.4 Shaft Generators
Shaft driven generators are sometimes provided, as they provide the vessel with electric power when
underway while reducing fuel and decreasing operational costs.
A traditional shaft generator system, shown in Section 4, Figure 51, comprises a synchronous
generator, a converter with SCR input rectifier, DC bus inductor and SCR inverter bridge, AC line
reactor and “synchronous compensator” (also known as a “rotary condenser”). The synchronous
compensator’s duties are to start the system by providing the initial starting voltage for the SCR
inverter and to provide reactive power and to facilitate commutation of the inverter bridge SCRs.

FIGURE 51
Traditional Shaft Generator System


In the above example, the commutation notches in the output voltage waveform (Section 4, Figure 52)
of the inverter bridge are largely due to the subtransient inductance (L
s
″) of the synchronous
compensator; necessary to provide commutation current to the inverter. The provision of the AC line
reactor does serve to reduce the harmonic currents in the output waveform, but the overlap angle of
the output current is increased, increasing the notch area.
The inverter output voltage waveform consists of both harmonics and line notches and may not be of
sufficient quality to supply the load and/or operate in parallel with diesel or other auxiliary generators.




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FIGURE 52
Inverter Output Voltage Waveform


The harmonics produced by the inverter bridge are based on the “pulse number ± 1” format. A
6-pulse system would therefore produce characteristic harmonic currents of 5
th
, 7
th
, 11
th
, 13
th
….
In addition to providing reactive power and commutation current, the synchronous compensator also
provides a measure of harmonic filtering. The low harmonic reactance of the compensator attracts a
relatively large degree of harmonic currents which would otherwise be injected into the load. The
induced voltages in the compensator are essentially sinusoidal; therefore the output voltage will also
be relatively sinusoidal.
The example used was to advise the reader as to the fact that shaft generators, due to their electronic
power conversion, are a source of harmonics. There are a number of other shaft generator systems in
operation which utilize other techniques. Some use double-wound induction motors, others IGBT
converters (very similar to AC PWM drives with “active front ends”) or “duplex reactors”. However,
the object is identical: to minimize the harmonics and notching and to address other power quality
concerns, such that the output voltage is as sinusoidal as practicable.






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S E C T I O N 5 Harmonics and System Power
Factor
1 Power Factor in Systems with Linear Loads Only
In power systems containing only linear loads, the vector relationship between voltage and current,
the “power factor” (cos φ), can be illustrated with reference to Section 5, Figure 1, below:

FIGURE 1
Power Factor Components in System with Linear Load


Where the power factor,
kVA
kW
S
P
= = φ cos ...................................................................................... (5.1)
The apparent power,
2 2 2 2
) ( kVAr kW Q P kVA S + = + = ......................................................... (5.2)
where
P = active power (i.e., it produces useful work), in kW
S = apparent power (kVA)
Q = reactive power, which produces no useful work, (kVAr)
2 Power Factor in Power System with Harmonics
In power systems which contain nonlinear loads, there are essentially two power factors; the
“displacement power factor” (i.e., the power factor of the fundamental component) and the “true
power factor”, which is a measure of the power factor of both the fundamental and harmonic
components in the power system.





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FIGURE 2
Power Factor Components in System with Harmonics


With reference to Section 5, Figure 2 above:
The power factor,
kVA
kW
S
P
≠ = φ cos (i.e., the power factor does not equal
kVA
kW
).
The apparent power, S(kVA)
2 2 2 2 2 2
H
kVAr kVAr kW D Q P + + = + + = ................................ (5.3)
The active power, P can be calculated using:
∑ ∑

=

=
+ + = =
2
1 0
0
cos
h
h h
h
h h
P P P I V P ϕ ............................................................................... (5.4)
where φ
H
is the phase of the n-th harmonic.
Similarly, the reactive power, Q, can also be defined as:
∑ ∑

=

=
+ = =
2
1
1
sin
h
h h
h
H H
Q Q I V Q
rms rms
ϕ .............................................................................. (5.5)
where
ϕ
h

= phase angle between voltage and current of individual harmonics
P
0
= DC component of active power
P
1
/Q
1
= fundamental component of active/reactive power respectively
P
h
/Q
h
= active/reactive component of individual harmonics
The apparent power, S, can also be expressed using the following formulae:
S = V
rms
⋅ I
rms
....................................................................................................................... (5.6)
=


=1
2 2
h
rms
H
rms
H
I V ......................................................................................................... (5.7)
=
2 2
1 1
1 1
I V
rms rms
THD THD I V + + ............................................................................... (5.8)
=
2 2
1
1 1
I V
THD THD S + + ............................................................................................ (5.9)
where S
1
is the apparent power at the fundamental frequency.



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As can be seen from Section 5, Figure 2; in power systems where harmonics are present, the apparent
power, S, comprises active power (P), reactive power (Q) and H (distortion power) where the
distortion power, D, can be defined as:
D
2
= S
2
– (P
2
+ Q
2
) ............................................................................................................ (5.10)
As detailed above, the power factor is the ratio of the active power in kW to the apparent power in
kVA. For systems containing nonlinear loads, the power factor can therefore be expressed as:
Power factor:
dist disp
I V
THD THD
S
P
S
P
φ φ φ cos cos
1 1
1
cos
2 2
1
⋅ =
+ +
= = ..................... (5.11)
Displacement power factor:
1
cos
S
P
disp
= φ ....................................................................... (5.12)
Distortion power factor:
S
S
I
I
V
V
THD THD
rms
rms
rms
rms
I V
dist
1
1 1
2 2
.
1 1
1
cos = =
+ +
= φ ........... (5.13)
where
cos φ
disp
= displacement power factor (fundamental components)
cos φ
dist
= distortion power factor (harmonic components)
Note: Many AC PWM drive manufacturers cite “high power factor at all loads” as an advantage when selling this type of
drive. However, this “high power factor” (typically 0.96-0.98) refers only to the displacement power factor, not
the true power factor. Please note that the majority of utility power factor meters can only read displacement
power factor.
3 How the Mitigation of Harmonics Improves True Power
Factor
As can be seen from Section 5, Figure 2, if the distortion power, D, is reduced by mitigation, the true
power factor will increase accordingly. Any form of harmonic mitigation, passive or active, will
increase the true power factor.
On drives or other loads with fully controlled input bridge rectifiers (e.g., DC drives, AC variable
voltage drives, load commutated inverters, UPS systems) the true power factor will also vary,
depending on the conduction angle of the bridge rectifier, due to changing speed and/or load demands.
On this type of equipment, it can be beneficial, subject to a study of the effects on the power system,
to use passive inductor-capacitor (L-C) filters (see Section 10), tuned to a specific harmonic frequency
(usually 5
th
and 7
th
harmonics). These filters can provide harmonic mitigation and a degree of power
factor correction via the filter capacitors. However, measures may have to be taken at light loads,
such as switching out stages of the filter, to prevent a leading power factor from occurring.
Active filters (see Section 10) can also provide a measure of inherent power factor correction. Active
filters are usually rated based on “harmonic cancellation current” [i.e., based on the magnitude of the
harmonic currents being produced by the load(s)]. This is injected into the power system and
provides the nonlinear load with the harmonic currents it needs in order to function. In theory, and
assuming the active filter is rated correctly, the power system then supplies only the fundamental
current.



Section 5 Harmonics and System Power Factor

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In addition to the harmonic cancellation current, reactive current compensation is also provided which
can correct for a leading or lagging power factor at any load (i.e., this statement is based on an active
filter with digital control system). For example, for a 300 A, 480 V active filter, the available reactive
power would be 249.4 kVAr. However, the reader has to be aware of one type of analog-controlled
active filter which has a tendency to supply uncontrolled reactive current into the power system,
producing a leading power factor when the harmonic load is light or the nonlinear equipment is
switched off. On utility supplies, this may not cause problems, but it will be problematic when the
supplies are generator derived.





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S E C T I O N 6 The Effect of Loading on Harmonic
Current Distortion
1 Total Harmonic Voltage Distortion (V
thd
)
As illustrated in Section 2, in power systems containing nonlinear loads, the total harmonic voltage
distortion (V
thd
) is dependent on the magnitude of each harmonic current at its specific harmonic
frequency acting upon the source impedance and other individual circuit impedances to produce
individual harmonic voltage drops, all of which are summed and compared with the fundamental
voltage to obtain, in percentage terms, the V
thd
.
The resultant voltage distortion, unless resonance is present in the system, tends to decrease the
further it is measured from the harmonic-producing load. It is usually the highest nearer to the
harmonic load and progressively reduces the nearer to the source it is measured, due to the effect of
cables, transformers and other impedances, and to a degree, the amount of linear load (such as
induction motors), which tends to act as a “harmonic sink” (i.e., it absorbs harmonic current) in the
circuit. The higher the magnitude of harmonic current, the higher the voltage distortion for a given
impedance.
2 Total Harmonic Current Distortion (I
thd
) and Reduced
Loading
In nonlinear loads, the magnitude of the characteristic harmonic currents is normally proportional to
the load demand. At rated load, the harmonic current levels tend to be at the highest levels, except
under resonant conditions where specific harmonic currents at the resonant frequency can have
significantly higher values. The effect of loading, therefore, will affect percentage total harmonic
current distortion (I
thd
).
Since the majority of large nonlinear loads installed on marine vessels and offshore installations are
variable speed drives, it may be worthwhile to briefly consider the effect of loading on the more
common types of variable speed drives used in the marine sector, including AC PWM (variable
frequency) drives, AC load commutated inverters (LCIs), DC SCR drives and AC cycloconverters.
2.1 AC PWM Drives
AC PWM drives are the common type used in the marine sector. Recent designs have increased
power ratings and higher voltage levels. As described in Section 4, this type of drive architecture is
characterized by the presence of an input bridge rectifier, a DC bus with capacitor bank and an
inverter output bridge.




Section 6 The Effect of Loading on Harmonic Current Distortion

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Section 6, Figures 1 and 2 illustrate the current time domain waveform and harmonic spectrum,
respectively, of a typical 6-pulse AC PWM drive at rated load. Note that the drive contains a 3% AC
line reactor which reduces the I
thd
and improves the true power factor. Without the AC line (or DC
bus) reactor, the I
thd
and harmonic currents would be significantly higher.
The AC PWM drive illustrated has a total harmonic current distortion (I
thd
) of 37.5% at 100% loading.
True power factor was 0.94 lag.

FIGURE 1
Typical 6-Pulse PWM Drive (with 3% AC Line Reactor) at 100% Load
I
thd

Measured at 37.5%



FIGURE 2
Typical Harmonic Spectrum of AC PWM Drive (with 3% AC Line Reactor)
at 100% Load – I
thd
Measured at 37.5%





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With AC PWM drives, the I
thd
will increase as the loading is reduced due to the more “discontinuous”
nature of the pulsed current drawn from the capacitive DC bus. As described in Section 4, current is
only drawn from the mains supply when the instantaneous AC line voltage exceeds the DC bus
voltage, hence the pulsed nature of the current. As the drive load is reduced, the current pulse will
become “sharper”. Section 6, Figure 3 illustrates this effect on the AC PWM used in this example.

FIGURE 3
Typical AC PWM Drive (with 3% AC Line Reactor) at 30% Load
I
thd
Measured at 65.7%.


Section 6, Figure 4, below, illustrates the harmonic current spectrum associated with the AC PWM
drive waveform based on 30% loading. Note the increased 5
th
and 7
th
harmonic components. True
power factor was 0. 83 lag.

FIGURE 4
Typical Harmonic Spectrum of AC PWM Drive (with 3% AC Line Reactor)
at 30% Load – I
thd
Measured at 65.7%




Section 6 The Effect of Loading on Harmonic Current Distortion

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Although it has been shown that the total harmonic current distortion will increase with reducing load
it is the magnitude of the harmonic currents and the resultant effect on circuit impedances (which
produce voltage distortion) which are more important. However, it should be noted that if AC PWM
drives are “oversized” for any reason, the I
thd
will be higher than expected at any load as the drive is
not “matched” to the load as far as the kW/HP rating is concerned. This may have to be taken into
account when calculating harmonic mitigation.
2.2 DC SCR Drives
Unlike variable frequency drives, DC drives do not have an intermediate circuit between the input
rectifier and the output to the DC motor. The input rectifier directly controls the output voltage (i.e.,
motor armature voltage) by variation of the firing angle of the SCRs. The harmonic current distortion
(I
thd
) is largely determined by the SCR firing angles, with the worse case at reduced load being at
90 degrees firing angle (i.e., low voltage and speed) and rated load.
In common with AC PWM and other drive types, the magnitude of harmonic current is usually
highest at rated load. As DC drives have, due to the presence of the DC armature, primarily
“inductive buses”, the percentage I
thd
will rise with reducing load but be less than with comparable
AC PWM drives which have capacitive buses. DC drives tend to operate in continuous current mode
(see Section 6, Figures 5 and 6) down to around 10-15% load after which the I
thd
will rise more
significantly. However, at low speeds, the magnitude of the harmonic currents is usually relatively
small and non-problematic.

FIGURE 5
6-Pulse DC Drive at 70% Loading
I
thd
is 35.1%


Section 6, Figure 5, above, illustrates the typical current waveform of a 6-pulse DC drive at 70%
loading (35.1% I
thd
). A comparable 6-pulse AC PWM drive with 3% AC line reactor at similar
loading would present an I
thd
of around 42-44%. Section 6, Figure 6, below, depicts the harmonic
current spectrum of the DC drive at 70% loading.




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FIGURE 6
Harmonic Current Spectrum of 6-Pulse DC Drive at 70% Loading
I
thd
is 35.1%


2.3 Load Commutated Inverters
The input harmonic currents and input current waveforms produced by load commutated inverters
(also called current source or current-fed inverters) are similar to those produced by DC SCR drives.
This is due to the large inductance inserted in the DC bus to provide a constant current source. As per
DC drives, the harmonic current distortion (I
thd
) produced by load commutated inverters is also a
function of the input SCR rectifier firing angles, so as with DC drives, the maximum value of I
thd

should occur at very low speed (or zero speed) and high loading.
The variation in I
thd
with load for load commutated converters will be similar to that described for DC
SCR drives.
2.4 Cycloconverters
As described in Section 4, cycloconverters are very complex drives from both the input and output
harmonic perspectives. As also mentioned in Section 4, the characteristic harmonics are generally
less than other drive types of the same pulse number, but the interharmonics are usually significantly
higher.
As stated previously, the characteristic harmonics are related to the pulse number and system
characteristics. Any deviation from the ideal can introduce non-characteristic harmonic currents, such
as the 2
nd
and 3
rd
, whereas the input interharmonic currents are related to the output frequency, the
mode of operation (i.e., blocking mode or circulating mode), the motor loading and the motor ripple
current.
At low frequency operation (i.e., low motor speed and load), the magnitudes of the characteristic
harmonic currents produced are typically similar to DC drives under the same load conditions. At low
speed operation, the interharmonics are generally of low value.
As the output frequency, hence motor speed and load, are increased up to rated speed and load, the
characteristic harmonic currents tend to decrease while the interharmonic current sidebands increase.
For 6-pulse cycloconverters, the interharmonics associated with the fundamental, 5
th
and 7
th

harmonics should not be significant, but above those harmonic frequencies, the magnitude of the
interharmonic side bands can often exceed those of the characteristic harmonics.



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It has to be stated that cycloconverters applied in the marine sector tend to be in the MW range with
12-pulse or higher configurations. Therefore, a measure of both reactive power compensation (i.e.,
power factor correction) and harmonic filtering may be installed to minimize any adverse effects on
the power system of such large drives.
Section 6, Figures 7 and 8 illustrate the effect of output frequency on both the input current and input
voltage harmonic spectrums. This application involved six, 6-pulse cycloconverters on a common
bus, all operating at identical output frequency and loading.

FIGURE 7
Multiple 6-Pulse Cycloconverters Input Current and Voltage Harmonic
Spectrums at Low Output Frequency/Low Load


FIGURE 8
Multiple 6-Pulse Cycloconverters Input Current and Voltage Harmonic
Spectrums at High Output Frequency/High Load





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2.5 Conclusion: Harmonic Current Magnitude and its Effect on Voltage Distortion
It should be re-emphasized that it is not the percentage of total harmonic current distortion (I
thd
) which
is of main concern. It is the magnitude of the harmonic currents associated with the I
thd
which is of
more importance, as it is the magnitudes of these harmonic currents which interact with the system
impedances to produce the individual harmonic voltage drops at the harmonic frequencies which
result in the total harmonic voltage distortion (V
thd
).
It is therefore the total harmonic voltage distortion (V
thd
) which is to be the main concern in order to
minimize any adverse effects on the installed system and equipment. Therefore, it should be the
purpose of any harmonic mitigation measure employed to reduce the total harmonic voltage distortion
(V
thd
) to within the necessary limits under all operating conditions.




This Page Intentionally Left Blank


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S E C T I O N 7 Influence of Source Impedance
and kVA on Harmonics
1 “Stiff” and “Soft” Sources
Power sources in relation to harmonics are often characterized by the terms “stiff source” and “soft
source”, and both have a significant effect on both the nonlinear currents drawn by the load and the
resultant voltage distortion.
“Stiff sources” are often associated with transformers, whether utility-owned or customer-owned
within their system. Their source impedance is often on the order of 5-6% (Z). Generators, however,
are considered as “soft sources” whose “source impedance” is actually the “substransient reactance
(X
d
″),”often in the range of approximately 0.1 – 0.18 per unit.
“Stiff sources”, having higher short circuit capability, permit a given nonlinear load(s) to draw higher
magnitudes of harmonic current for a given kW value of nonlinear load, as it is not as limited by the
leakage reactance of the source. The higher harmonic current does not usually significantly distort the
voltage. The stiffer the source, the higher the harmonic current that will be drawn by the nonlinear
load(s) and the less the subsequent voltage distortion for a given load.
“Soft sources”, such as generators, tend to have reduced short circuit capability and limit the
magnitude of the harmonic currents drawn by the given nonlinear load(s). However, that lower value
of harmonic current will produce significantly higher levels of voltage distortion.
Generators for low harmonic distortion would need a low value of subtransient reactance, X
d
″, such as
that achieved by “oversizing” the kVA rating, which results in an increase in short circuit current.
The generator rotor damper cage, designed for linear loads, is subject to higher levels of current when
nonlinear loads are present. The machine subtransient reactance, X
d
″, should be relatively low to
maintain the voltage distortion within the necessary limits. The damper winding is to be designed
such that the sinusoidal voltage waveform is maintained. The solution will depend on the type of
nonlinear load, the magnitude of the harmonic currents produced and the subsequent voltage
distortion permissible in the power system.
The kVA rating also has an impact on the magnitude of harmonic currents and subsequent voltage
distortion for a given load as the short circuit capability and associated I
SC
/I
L

(load current to short
circuit current ratio) varies. The higher the kVA (or MVA), the higher the harmonic current
distortion, I
thd
, and the lower the resultant harmonic voltage distortion, V
thd
, assuming the source
impedance is unchanged.




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2 Illustrations of the Effect of kVA and Source Impedance on
Harmonics
In order to illustrate the effect of varying kVA and source impedance (or substransient reactance) of
the power source, a harmonic estimated program (SOLV) has been utilized. Note that the illustrations
of the power source do not differentiate between transformer and/or generator derived supplies (the
illustrations are “transformers”), but the subsequent calculations are unaffected (i.e., the effects of
varying the values of impedance (or X
d
″) and kVA are similar for both transformers and generators).
The voltage and current waveforms at the PCC#1 (point of common coupling are also included).
Example 1 – 2000 kVA, 5.2% Impedance
This is based on a transformer rated at 2000 kVA with impedance of 5.2% and secondary
voltage of 480 V, 60 Hz. The loads are two AC PWM drives, one of 600 HP with 3% AC
line reactor and one of 350 HP with 3% DC bus reactor. Linear load is 180 kW at 0.85 lag
power factor.

FIGURE 1a
2000 kVA and 5.2% Impedance – I
SC
/I
L
= 33.3:1, I
thd
= 24.2%, V
thd
= 4.7%




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FIGURE 1b
Current and Voltage Waveforms for 2000 kVA/5.2% Impedance Source
with 950 HP AC PWM Drive Load and 180 kW Linear Load





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Example 2 – 2000 kVA, 14% Subtransient Reactance
This is based on a generator similarly rated at 2000 kVA, with substransient reactance (X
d
″)
of 14% and secondary voltage of 480 V, 60 Hz. The loads are as per Example 1, with two
AC PWM drives, one of 600 HP with 3% AC line reactor and one of 350 HP with 3% DC bus
reactor. Linear load is 180 kW at 0.85 lag power factor.

FIGURE 2a
2000 kVA and14% Subtransient Reactance
I
SC
/I
L
= 29.1:1, I
thd
= 19.1%, V
thd
= 9.8%






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FIGURE 2b
Current and Voltage Waveforms for 2000 kVA/14% Subtransient
Reactance Source with 950 HP AC PWM Drive Load
and 180 kW Linear Load






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Example 3 – 4000 kVA, 5.2% Impedance
The transformer rating is now increased to 4000 kVA, but the impedance of 5.2% and
secondary voltage of 480 V, 60 Hz remain the same. The loads are two AC PWM drives, one
of 600 HP with 3% AC line reactor and one of 350 HP with 3% DC bus reactor and linear
load is 180 kW at 0.85 lag power factor are identical to that illustrated in Example 1.

FIGURE 3a
4000 kVA and 5.2% Impedance – I
SC
/I
L
= 67.1:1, I
thd
= 27.1%, V
thd
= 2.7%





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FIGURE 3b
Current and Voltage Waveforms for 4000 kVA/5.2% Impedance Source
with 950 HP AC PWM Drive Load and 180 kW Linear Load





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Example 4 – 4000 kVA, 14% Subtransient Reactance
The generator is also now increased to 4000 kVA with substransient reactance (X
d
″) of 14%
and secondary voltage of 480 V, 60 Hz maintained. The loads are as per Example 2, with two
AC PWM drives, one of 600 HP with 3% AC line reactor and one of 350 HP with 3% DC bus
reactor and linear load is 180 kW at 0.85 lag power factor retained.

FIGURE 4a
4000 kVA and14% Subtransient Reactance
I
SC
/I
L
= 26.6:1, I
thd
= 22.9%, V
thd
= 5.8%





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FIGURE 4b
Current and Voltage Waveforms for 4000 kVA/14% Subtransient
Reactance Source with 950 HP AC PWM Drive Load
and 180 kW Linear Load


A summary of all four examples above is given in Section 7, Table 1 below:

TABLE 1
Variation of I
thd
and V
thd
with Variation of kVA and Impedance (or X
d
″)
kVA – Z or X
d
″ I
SC
/I
L
I
thd
V
thd

2000 kVA – 5.2% Z 33.3 24.2% 4.7%
2000 kVA – 14% X
d
″ 12.1 19.1% 9.8%

4000 kVA – 5.2% Z 67.1 27.1% 2.7%
4000 kVA – 14% X
d
″ 24.6 22.9% 5.8%

The kVA rating and transformer impedance (Z) or [substransient reactance (X
d
″) for generators] have
an important effect on the magnitude of the harmonic currents drawn and the resultant voltage
distortion. It can be seen that the resultant voltage distortion for a given nonlinear load varies in
proportion to the source impedance (i.e., for generators, the lower the X
d
″, the less the resultant
voltage distortion) and installed kVA.
Achieving a low level of X
d
″ usually involves a special winding design with a high level of excitation
and therefore high magnetic flux or the use of “derated” generators (i.e., of a larger kVA rating than
one based on the kW load.). The value of X
d
″ varies from generator to generator and is inversely
proportional to the square of the generator working voltage.



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In Example 2 above, the 2000 kVA, 480 V, 60 Hz generator used in the illustrations and calculations
above had an X
d
″ of 14% or 0.14 per unit. At 1000 kVA loading, the effective subtransient reactance
(X
d
″) will be:
% 7 % 14
kVA 2000
kVA 1000
"
= × =
d
X
Therefore, at reduced generator loading, the effective X
d
″ will be reduced, thus decreasing the voltage
distortion for given nonlinear load. Modern generators have excitation systems which can cope with
voltage and current distortion provided that they are correctly designed for the nonlinear load(s) in
terms of thermal rating and have an appropriate level of winding insulation.
3 Parallel Generator Operation and Calculation of Equivalent
Short Circuit Ratings
When calculating harmonic voltage and current distortion, either the short circuit rating or the
generator kVA (or MVA) and the subtransient reactance, X
d
″, is necessary. (Similar data is necessary
for transformers with impedance, Z, instead of X
d
″.) The calculation based on one generator running
is straightforward with the generator kVA and X
d
″ inserted into program (or used for manual
calculations).
However, when more than one generator, perhaps of differing values of kVA and X
d
″, are running in
parallel to share the loading, it is significantly more complicated. Therefore, a method of calculating
the parallel system kVA and equivalent X
d
″ (illustrated below) is necessary and is similar to that used
for short circuit calculations.

FIGURE 5
Paralleling of Generators


One of the generators must be selected as the “base unit”. In this case S
1
will be designated “base
unit” in terms of kVA and X
d
″.



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If
1 d
X ′ ′ (S
1
) is the base unit, we must determine
base d
X
2
′ ′

and
base d
X
3
′ ′ , as follows:
2
1
2 2
S
S
X X
d base d
′ ′ = ′ ′ .............................................................................................................. (7.1)
3
1
3 3
S
S
X X
d base d
′ ′ = ′ ′ ............................................................................................................... (7.2)
Once all generators are on the same base, the total system equivalent subtransient reactance can be
calculated, as follows:
base d d
base d d
base d
X X
X X
X
2 1
2 1
2 , 1
′ ′ + ′ ′
′ ′ ⋅ ′ ′
= ′ ′ ................................................................................................. (7.3)
base d base d
base d base d
base d
X X
X X
X
3 2 , 1
3 2 , 1
3 , 2 , 1
′ ′ + ′ ′
′ ′ ⋅ ′ ′
= ′ ′ ........................................................................................ (7.4)
The total system short circuit capacity therefore can be calculated:
base d
base
SC
X
S
S
, 3 , 2 , 1
′ ′
= ............................................................................................................... (7.5)
Example 5
Calculate the equivalent subtransient reactance and short circuit capacity of three paralleled
generators rated at 2 × 2000 kVA/16% X
d
″ and 1 × 1500 kVA/18% X
d
″ depicted in Section 7,
Figure 6, below:

FIGURE 6
Example of Paralleled Generators





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Generator S
1
is, in this example, designated the “base unit” S
base
, therefore:
2
1
2 2
S
S
X X
d base d
′ ′ = ′ ′ %) 24 ( 24 . 0
1500
2000
. 18 . 0 = =
3
1
3 3
S
S
X X
d base d
′ ′ = ′ ′ %) 16 ( 16 . 0
2000
2000
. 16 . 0 = =
base d d
base d d
base d
X X
X X
X
2 1
2 1
2 , 1
′ ′ + ′ ′
′ ′ ⋅ ′ ′
= ′ ′ %) 6 . 9 ( 096 . 0
4 . 0
0384 . 0
24 . 0 16 . 0
24 . 0 . 16 . 0
= =
+
=
base d base d
base d base d
base d
X X
X X
X
3 2 , 1
3 2 , 1
3 , 2 , 1
′ ′ + ′ ′
′ ′ ⋅ ′ ′
= ′ ′ %) 6 ( 06 . 0
256 . 0
01536 . 0
16 . 0 096 . 0
16 . 0 . 096 . 0
= =
+
=
base d
base
SC
X
S
S
, 3 , 2 , 1
′ ′
= = =
06 . 0
2000
33.333 MVA
The results calculated above are based on one set of generator running conditions and will
vary according to the number, kVA and X
d
″ of the generators on line at any one time.
Consequently, both the magnitude and percentage of total harmonic current and harmonic
total voltage will vary also.
Note: The short circuit MVA of parallel transformers can also be calculated using a similar method to that
above.



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S E C T I O N 8 The Effect of Unbalance and
Background Voltage Distortion
1 Balanced Systems
In a power system with balanced sinusoidal voltages, the three line-to-neutral voltages are all of equal
magnitude and displaced by 120 electrical degrees from each other, as shown in Section 8, Figure 1,
below:

FIGURE 1
Balanced System
V
a
V
b
V
c


2 Unbalanced Systems
An unbalanced power system is so called when the magnitudes of the phase voltages are not equal
and/or where the phase shift deviates from the normal phase separation value of 120 degrees, as
depicted in Section 8, Figure 2, below:

FIGURE 2
Unbalanced System
V
a
V
b
V
c




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Deviations from a balanced supply system can be attributed to the following:
• Unequal impedances within the power distribution system
• Asymmetries in AC and DC drive commutation reactances
• Large or unequal distribution of single-phase loads
• Negative sequence fundamental frequency components in commutating voltages
• Harmonic distortion of positive and negative sequence components
• Unbalanced three-phase loads
2.1 Definition of Voltage Unbalance
Power system voltage unbalance can be defined using two methods. The first method is based on the
theory of symmetrical components, which mathematically defines an unbalanced system into three
separate balanced systems termed “positive sequence”, “negative sequence” and “zero sequence”
systems as depicted in Section 8, Figure 3 below.
For a perfectly balanced system, both the negative sequence and zero sequence components would be
absent.

FIGURE 3
Symmetrical Components of an Unbalanced System
V
a1
V
b1
V
c1
V
b2
V
a2
V
c2
V
a0
V
b0
V
c0
Positive Sequence Negative Sequence Zero Sequence


As described in Section 3; when negative sequence components are applied to an induction motor, the
resultant torque opposes the normal direction of rotation. Zero sequence components cannot produce
a rotating magnetic field.
There are generally two definitions using symmetrical components which can be used to determine
unbalance:
i) Negative Sequence Voltage Unbalance Factor =
1
2
V
V
......................................................... (8.1)
ii) Zero Sequence Unbalance Factor =
1
0
V
V
............................................................................. (8.2)
where
V
1
= positive sequence voltages
V
2
= negative sequence voltages
V
0
= zero sequence voltages



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Zero sequence currents cannot flow in three-wire systems. Therefore it is the negative sequence
components which must be used as a measure of unbalance. The negative sequence voltage
unbalance factor, also known as the “Voltage Unbalance Factor” (VUF), or the “IEC definition” can
be expressed as:
Negative sequence voltage unbalance =
β
β
6 3 1
6 3 1
1
2
− +
− −
=
V
V
............................................. (8.3)
where
β =
( )
2
2 2 2
4 4 4
ca bc ab
ca bc ab
V V V
V V V
+ +
+ +
........................................................................................... (8.4)
However, the NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association, in the USA) has a much
simpler definition:
Voltage unbalance =
( )
( )
ca bc ab
ca bc ab
V V V
V V V
, , of Mean
, , of mean from deviation Maximum
........................... (8.5)
Note that in Equations 8.3/8.4 and 8.5, line-to-neutral voltages should not be used, as the associated
zero sequence components will introduce errors. Also note that the IEC definition (Equations
8.3/8.4), being more mathematical, tends to be the more accurate.
When a balanced three-phase load is connected to an unbalanced supply, the currents then drawn from
the supply will also be unbalanced. As it is impossible to guarantee completely balanced supplies, it
is normal to stipulate the amount permissible on a power system in order that equipment, especially
rotating machines, is not adversely affected (see 8/2.2). 2%-2.5% is usually the maximum unbalance
specified.
2.2 Effect of Unbalanced Loading on Rotating Machines
A significant effect of unbalance is that associated with induction motors, which often form a
substantial part of the electric load. As mentioned above on unbalanced voltages, the negative
sequence components in the machine air gap oppose the direction of rotation, causing torque
pulsations and increasing the temperature rise of the motor as it tries to maintain its output torque and
speed. Induction motors on unbalanced supplies will also exhibit additional audible noise.
It is worth re-emphasizing that for every 10°C rise above rated temperature, the life of motor winding
insulation reduces by 50% (i.e., on a 20°C rise the motor insulation life is reduced by 75%) as
illustrated in Section 8, Figure 4.




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FIGURE 4
Reduction of Insulation Life with Temperature


In addition, when a balanced induction motor is connected to an unbalanced supply, the resultant line
currents can be several times that of percentage voltage unbalance as shown below.
For positive sequence voltages the motor slip, S
1
, would be:
s
r s
N
N N
S

=
1
..................................................................................................................... (8.6)
where
N
s
= synchronous speed
N
r

= rotor speed
For negative sequence voltages, the motor slip, S
2
, can be expressed in terms of slip, S
i
, as follows:
s
r
s
r
s
r s
s
r s
N
N
S
N
N
N
N N
N
N N
S 2 2
1 2
+ = +

=
+
=
s
r
s
r s
N
N
N
N N
S − =

= 1
1
, therefore,
1
1 S
N
N
s
r
− =
S
2
= S
1
+ 2(1 – S
1
) = 2 – S
1
.................................................................................................. (8.7)
The impedance of an induction motor is largely dependent on the motor slip. At conditions of high
slip (for example, at start-up or locked rotor), the impedance is small. Consequently, the impedance
will be large at conditions of low slip, such as that associated with normal running conditions.



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Similarly, the positive sequence slip, S
1
, is usually negligible (i.e., almost zero), whereas the negative
sequence slip, S
2
, would be large. Therefore, the ratio of positive sequence to negative sequence
impedance could be expressed by:
running
starting
I
I
Z
Z

2
1
...................................................................................................................... (8.8)
If the positive sequence current is expressed as
1
1
1
Z
V
I = ,
and the negative sequence current by
2
2
2
Z
V
I =
It can be seen therefore that
running
starting
I
I
V
V
I
I
× =
1
2
1
2
.............................................................................. (8.9)
Using the above Equation 8.9, it can be determined that the connection of an induction motor with a
locked rotor current of 600% full load current would result a 30% unbalance in motor currents if
connected to a supply system with 5% unbalance.
In order to minimize the effect on motors due to unbalanced voltages, NEMA has produced
graphically the necessary motor derating factor according to the degree of voltage unbalance (Section
8, Figure 5). Please note that NEMA also do not advise any motor to be operated if the voltage
unbalance is more than 5%, whatever the actual motor loading.

FIGURE 5
Derating on Induction Motors of Unbalanced Supplies


2.3 Effect of Unbalanced Loading on Harmonics
The wave shape and characteristic harmonics of rectifier bridges are significantly affected by voltage
unbalance. Section 8, Figure 6 shows a typical input current waveform from a three-phase 6-pulse
AC PWM drive with additional reactance (AC line reactor or DC bus) on a system with balanced
supplies.




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FIGURE 6
Typical 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current
Waveform on Balanced Voltages


The effect when 5% and 15% voltage unbalance is introduced is illustrated in Section 8, Figures 7 and
8, below:

FIGURE 7
Typical 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current
Waveform on 5% Voltage Unbalance


FIGURE 8
Typical 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current
Waveform on 15% Voltage Unbalance




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The affect of voltage unbalance is to introduce uncharacteristic harmonics, including 2
nd
, 3
rd
, 9
th
, etc.,
and possibly DC in the power system. In addition, the unbalanced currents can lead to increased
thermal stress on the drive components. The magnitude of the drive DC bus voltage on AC PWM
drives would also be reduced, resulting in subsequent tripping on “undervoltage – DC bus”.
Unbalance also contributes to the misfiring of SCRs and other power devices, which further increases
the production of uncharacteristic harmonics and the total harmonic current distortion.
The problem with the nature of uncharacteristic harmonics is that they are difficult to predict and,
consequently, rarely are accounted for in the design of equipment. It is often easier to address the
causes of the uncharacteristic harmonics, such as unbalance, than attempt to “design-out” their effect
with harmonic filters.
Section 8, Figure 9, below, illustrates the effect of unbalance on the harmonic spectrum of a 6-pulse
AC PWM drive. Note the large 3
rd
harmonic and other triplens (6
th
, 9
th
, 15
th
, 21
st
…) and even order
harmonics (e.g., 4
th
and 6
th
) and DC.

FIGURE 9
Harmonic Spectrum of 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive on Unbalanced Voltages
(Fundamental Component Removed)


2.4 Voltage Unbalance and Multi-pulse Drives and Systems
Voltage unbalance (and voltage distortion) significantly degrades the performance of phase shift and
other multi-pulse harmonic mitigation systems (e.g., quasi-multi-pulse). When 12-pulse, 18-pulse and
other configurations are discussed, it is often assumed that there is total harmonic cancellation of
specified harmonics due to the respective phase shift. For example, a 30-degree shift in theory
cancels the 5
th
and 7
th
harmonics (see Section 10, “Harmonic Mitigation,” for full information).
However, due to tolerances in the transformer windings, inter-bridge reactors, rectifier bridges, etc.,
there will be residual 5
th
and 7
th
harmonic currents present after mitigation.
More significantly, the effect of supply unbalance can erode the performance of multi-pulse drives
and other phase-shifted systems. Section 8, Figures 10 and 11 illustrate the effect of 1%, 2% and 3%
voltage unbalance on 12-pulse and 18-pulse drive system, respectively.



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FIGURE 10
Unbalance and the Effect on 12-Pulse Drives



FIGURE 11
Unbalance and the Effect on 18-Pulse Drives





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2.5 Background Voltage Distortion and Multi-pulse Drives and Systems
Background voltage distortion adversely affects the performance of most forms of harmonic
mitigation, especially multi-pulse drive systems, and can cause damage to those types utilizing “front
end” capacitors [i.e., directly subject to high levels of distortion (e.g., EMI and carrier frequency
filters within active filters)]. With a V
thd

of 5% on a marine power systems, it is not known to what
degree background voltage distortion will further degrade the performance of drive systems which
depend on phase shift for harmonic mitigation.
Section 8, Figure 12 illustrates the effect of background distortion on an 18-pulse drive at 50% and
100% loading.
Note: To estimate the effect on 12-pulse drives using double-wound phase shift transformers, add around 5% to the I
thd

figures below. (For example, at 100% load and 1% background V
thd
, the I
thd
would be 5% for 18-pulse, therefore
approximately 10% for 12-pulse, and so on).

FIGURE 12
Effect of Background Voltage Distortion on 18-Pulse AC PWM Drive





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2.6 The Effect of Voltage Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion Using
Software Modeling
Using harmonic estimation software, it is possible to further illustrate the relationship between voltage
unbalance and/or pre-existing voltage distortion on multi-pulse drives (and other types of mitigation),
the subsequent production of total harmonic current distortion and the resultant total harmonic voltage
distortion.
In the examples cited below, a generator rated at 5000 kVA, 480 V, 60 Hz and X
d
″ of 14% was loaded
with two off 900 HP, 12-pulse AC PWM drives (e.g., thruster drives) and 180 kW of linear load. The
12-pulse drives were chosen as being the most common multi-pulse configuration in the marine
sector.
Four sets of supply conditions were modeled:
• 0% voltage unbalance and 0% pre-existing voltage distortion
• 2% voltage unbalance and 0% pre-existing voltage distortion
• 0% voltage unbalance and 5% pre-existing voltage distortion
• 2% voltage unbalance and 5% pre-existing voltage distortion
The examples below illustrate the differing total harmonic current distortion and associated total
voltage distortion and voltage and current waveforms at the PCC#1 for each of the above supply
conditions.
Note: If a smaller generator kVA and/or a higher value of X
d
″ been chosen for the given load, the resultant total voltage
distortion in each supply condition would have been increased. The total harmonic current distortion would be
reduced due to being limited by the leakage reactance of the “softer” source.




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FIGURE 13a
No Voltage Unbalance, No Pre-existing V
thd
– I
thd
= 5.2%, V
thd
= 4.9%


FIGURE 13b
Voltage and Current Waveforms
No Voltage Unbalance, No Pre-existing V
thd





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FIGURE 14a
2% Voltage Unbalance, No Pre-existing V
thd
– I
thd
= 14.5%, V
thd
= 5.2%


FIGURE 14b
Voltage and Current Waveforms
2% Voltage Unbalance, No Pre-existing V
thd






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FIGURE 14c
Three-phase Current Waveforms
2% Voltage Unbalance, No Pre-existing V
thd



FIGURE 15a
No Voltage Unbalance, 5% Pre-existing V
thd
– I
thd
= 10.9%, V
thd
= 6.2%





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FIGURE 15b
Voltage and Current Waveforms
No Voltage Unbalance, 5% Pre-existing V
thd



FIGURE 16a
2% Voltage Unbalance, 5% Pre-existing V
thd
– I
thd
= 18.5%, V
thd
= 6.0%




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FIGURE 16b
Voltage and Current Waveforms
2% Voltage Unbalance, 5% Pre-existing V
thd



FIGURE 16c
Three-phase Current Waveforms
2% Voltage Unbalance, 5% Pre-existing V
thd






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The summary of results for the resultant total harmonic current distortion (I
thd
) and total harmonic
voltage distortion (V
thd
) for the above examples is tabled below:

TABLE 1
Variation in I
thd
and V
thd
with Voltage Unbalance
and Pre-existing Voltage Distortion
% Unbalance % V
thd
I
thd
V
thd

0% 0% 5.2% 4.9%
2% 0% 14.5% 5.2%
0% 5% 10.9% 6.2%
2% 5% 18.5% 6.0%

2.7 Drive Mitigation – Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion
Voltage unbalance and background voltage distortion both have a significant effect on drive harmonic
mitigation, especially those using phase shifting techniques. A complete approach may be therefore
necessary in order to maximize the performance of multi-pulse drives.
A number of so-called “broadband filters” for smaller drives offer good mitigation performance up to
2% unbalance and up to 2% background voltage distortion. Other designs, available up to
significantly higher powers, can offer increased performance on both voltage unbalance and
background distortion, well above 2%. (For example, there is a documented case of one patented
design of “broadband filter” which is operating successfully on a cableship in excess of 22%
background voltage distortion (V
thd
) due to the vessel having full electric propulsion.)
Active filters, usually designed based on IEEE 519 (1992) (i.e., a maximum of <5% V
thd
) may be
unable to function reliably on higher levels of background V
thd

unless specifically designed for the
given application.



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S E C T I O N 9 Resonance
1 What is Resonance?
The presence of capacitance in the power system can have a significant effect on the system
impedance as it varies due to harmonic frequencies. In marine and offshore power supplies,
conventional capacitor-based power factor correction banks may not be common, however directly
connected capacitors are used in fluorescent lighting fittings for power factor correction and in other
equipment. In addition, cable capacitance can also be problematic. Resonance results in high
voltages and/or currents being present in the power system, causing damage to equipment and
endangerment of personnel.
2 The Conditions under which Resonance Occurs
The system inductive reactance (X
L
) is proportional to the frequency, whereas the capacitive reactance
(X
C
) is inversely proportional to frequency. “Resonance” is said to be achieved when the values of X
L

and X
C

are of the same value. There are two forms of resonance which need to be considered: “series
resonance” and “parallel resonance”, as shown below in Section 9, Figure 1.

FIGURE 1a
Series Resonance
FIGURE 1b
Parallel Resonance



2.1 Series Resonance
For the series resistance-inductance-capacitance (RLC) circuit (see Section 9, Figure 1a), the total
impedance at the resonant frequency reduces to the resistance component only. Where this value is
low, high values of current at the resonant frequency will flow in the circuit at relatively low levels of
exciting voltage. Under these conditions, series resonant will exist when:
|
|
.
|

\
|
− =
2
2
C
l
t C
t
s
S
S
Z S
S
f f ...................................................................................................... (9.1)





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where
f
s
= series resonant frequency
f = fundamental frequency
S = transformer (or generator) rating
Z = transformer per unit impedance (or generator X
d
″)
S
C
= capacitor rating
S
t
= load resistive rating
The main area of concern applicable to series resonance is that high capacitor currents can flow at
relatively low levels of harmonic voltages. The actual current magnitudes are determined by the
“quality factor”, Q, of the resonant circuit:
R
X
Q
r
= ............................................................................................................................... (9.2)
where
Q = quality factor
X
r
= reactance at resonance
R = resistance
2.2 Parallel Resonance
In a parallel resonant circuit (Section 9, Figure 1b), the parallel impedance is significantly different.
At the resonant frequency, the impedance is significantly high, resulting in high voltages being
present in the circuit for relatively low source current values, although significantly larger magnitudes
of circulating current also flow in the inductive-capacitance loop.
If the power system impedance is assumed to be entirely inductive, the resonant frequency, f
p
, can be
calculated as:
|
|
.
|

\
|
=
c
s
p
S
S
f f ..................................................................................................................... (9.3)
where
f
p
= resonant frequency
f = fundamental frequency
S
s
= short circuit rating
S
c
= load resistive rating
The above formula can also be written as:
|
|
.
|

\
|
=
cap
sc
p
kVAr
MVA
f f ............................................................................................................ (9.4)
Note: Due to circuit topography, in the majority of systems with series resonance, parallel resonance will also occur,
albeit at a lower frequency, as shown in Section 9, Figure 2, due to the contribution of the source inductance.




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FIGURE 2
Series Resonance Frequency Response


Parallel resonance is, however, generally more common than series resonance as the majority of
equipment is connected in parallel with switchboards. The example illustrated in Section 9, Figure 3
will therefore be based on parallel resonance.
Common problems associated with resonance include capacitor fuse failure and damaged capacitors
(industrial power systems), spurious protective relay tripping, overheating on equipment and
telephone interference.
3 Prevention of Resonance
In order to illustrate a common potential parallel resonance condition and how it can be prevented, it
is necessary to use, as an application (see Section 9, Figure 3), a typical industrial system where AC
variable speed drives are to be connected to a switchboard which also has capacitor-based power
factor correction equipment attached.
The above application has two areas of concern:
i) The possibility of parallel resonance due to the presence of the drive harmonic currents and
the installed capacitance and
ii) The effect of the harmonics produced by the 2 × 110 kW and 2 × 132 kW AC drives on the
capacitors.




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FIGURE 3
Typical Industrial Drive Application where Resonance is Possible


The resonance frequency based on the short circuit capacity of 30 MVA and capacitor bank rating of
600 kVAr can be calculated using the formula below:
|
|
.
|

\
|
=
cap
sc
p
kVAr
MVA
f f
|
|
.
|

\
|
=
kVAr
MVA
f
p
600
30
60
f
p
= 353 Hz
It will be noted at that the fundamental frequency of 50 Hz, the parallel resonant frequency occurs in
the power system illustrated in Section 9, Figure 2 at around the 3rd harmonic (150 Hz). In order to
prevent resonance, a “detuning reactor” has to be connected to “adjust” the parallel resonance point
such that it does not coincide with any major characteristic harmonics (5
th
, 7
th
, 11
th
, 13
th
, etc.).
The usual practice is to reduce the resonance point to below the 5
th
harmonic. The detuning reactor
can be used to tune the circuit to around 225 Hz-235 Hz (4.5
th
-4.7
th
, being typical frequencies). The
tuned resonant frequency may be reduced to below the 3
rd
harmonic if significant triplen harmonics
are also present (more common on four-wire systems). On 60 Hz supplies, the tuned frequencies
would be 20% higher.



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3.1 The Effect of Adding a Detuning Reactor
The addition of the detuning reactor does not protect the capacitors from the effect of harmonic
currents. That problem will still exist. The detuning reactor only prevents resonance with major
characteristic harmonics occurring. However, the connection of the reactor to the capacitor bank does
increase the voltage at fundamental frequency. This is due to the fact that the inductive reactance
subtracts from the capacitive reactance, thus decreasing the circuit reactance overall and increasing
the capacitor bank fundamental current. The higher value of fundamental current significantly
increases the capacitor voltage, as illustrated in Section 9, Figure 4.

FIGURE 4
Simplified Connection of Detuning Reactor to Capacitor Bank


With reference to Section 9, Figure 4 above, the total reactance at fundamental frequency (50 Hz, in
this case) :
X = X
C
– X
L
.......................................................................................................................... (9.5)
X
X
V V
C
sup C
⋅ = ................................................................................................................... (9.6)
where
V
C
= capacitor voltage
V
sup
= supply voltage
X = resultant reactance
X
C
= capacitive reactance
X
L
= inductive reactance



Section 9 Resonance

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For example, using the above formula, a value of reactor 10% the value of the capacitive reactance is
connected to the capacitor bank, therefore:
X = 1 – 0.1 = 0.9
so
9 . 0
1
. 380 =
C
V = 423 V (11% voltage increase)
As capacitor banks are usually rated for a maximum of 10% overvoltage, ignoring any supply
variations and tolerances, the capacitors may have to be replaced. However, a number of reactor
manufacturers do produce designs of detuning reactors which do not increase the capacitor voltage
levels significantly.
However, if the supply voltage is less than the capacitor rated voltage (capacitor voltage ratings are
usually in steps), then it may be possible to retain the original capacitor bank subject to it being
derated (i.e., having its kVAr capability reduced) from nameplate value using the following formula:
2
|
|
.
|

\
|
=
nameplate
C
nameplate actual
V
V
kVAr kVAr .............................................................................. (9.7)
For example, a 460 V rated, 600 kVAr capacitor bank nominally used on 380 V would have to be
derated based on a 10% detuning reactor being connected:
2
460
432
kVAr 600 |
.
|

\
|
=
actual
kVAr = 530 kVAr
4 Possibilities of Resonance on Vessels and Offshore
Installations
The most likely potential for resonance lies with fluorescent lighting fitting power factor correction
capacitors and/or cable capacitance. Resonance is observable when the high voltages and/or currents
cause damage to equipment, especially directly connected capacitors, or where unusually high,
localized voltage or current readings are measured.
There have been instances of resonance on offshore production installationss with large variable drive
installed load, up to 85% of total loading. Fluorescent lights have burned out due to internal capacitor
resonance. There have been other instances, when another platform with no onboard power
generation has been supplied from a “mother” platform, significant parallel resonance problems were
encountered due to the capacitance of the connecting cable between both platforms. Until then, no
resonance was apparent on the larger platform, which had both a power generation plant and a high
level of power system harmonics.
When using a harmonic analyzer, resonance can be seen where there are abnormally high voltages or
current harmonics at particular frequencies which are not characteristic of the type of equipment
connected to the power system (i.e., the magnitude of harmonic voltage or current should decrease in
inverse proportion to the harmonic number). The harmonic frequency at which the high levels of
voltage or current occur is the resonant frequency.
However, damping is usually provided by supply and load resistances, which significantly reduces the
peak impedances (10% resistive loading has a significant impact on peak impedances). Loads such as
induction motors are mainly inductive and provide limited damping. Long cable lengths, however, do
tend to suppress resonance.


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S E C T I O N 10 Mitigation of Harmonics

The majority of electrical nonlinear equipment, especially three-phase types, normally associated with
larger powers will often cause the need for the addition of mitigation equipment in order to attenuate
the harmonic currents and associated voltage distortion to within the necessary limits.
Depending on the type of solution desired, the mitigation may be supplied as an integral part of
nonlinear equipment (e.g., an AC line reactor for AC PWM drive) or as a discrete item of mitigation
equipment (e.g., an active filter connected to a switchboard). The majority of this Section relates to
the mitigation options available for three-phase nonlinear equipment, particularly electronic
converters for AC and DC motors, battery chargers, UPS systems, which often share similar input
rectifier architecture. Mitigation for both individual applications (e.g., per drive basis) and for “global
mitigation” (i.e., a common harmonic mitigation solution for a group of nonlinear equipment) are
described. For single-phase three-wire and four-wire (i.e., three-phase and three-phase + neutral)
systems only “global mitigation” has been addressed.
While a minor amount of “natural mitigation” may occur as described below in Subsections 10/1 and
10/2, mitigation measures may have also to be considered in order that voltage distortion, as a result
of the nonlinear load(s), is maintained within permissible limits. The options available, depending on
the application and desired level of attenuation, are:-
• Neutral current eliminators and phase shift systems (for four-wire systems)
• Standard AC line and DC bus reactors
• Wide spectrum (reactor/capacitor) filters
• Duplex reactors
• Passive L-C (inductance/capacitance) filters
• Multi-pulse (phase shifting)
• Quasi-multi-pulse (phase staggering)
• Active filters
• Active front ends (sinusoidal input rectifiers)
1 Effect of Phase Diversity on Harmonic Currents
On power systems with multiple nonlinear loads, some harmonic cancellation may occur due to
“phase angle diversification” between the multiple harmonic sources. As can be seen in the example
given in Section 10, Figure 1, each harmonic voltage (or current) has a phase angle associated with it.
Note that the first column is the harmonic (H00 is the DC component), the second column is the
percentage harmonic current distortion and the third column is the respective phase angle (note that
the “–” denotes a negative phase angle. The result of multiple harmonic sources is a degree of
harmonic cancellation which is determined by the respective individual harmonic voltages (or
currents) and the associated phase angles.



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FIGURE 1
Harmonic Voltage Data to 50
th
Harmonic
with Respective Phase Angle Information


2 Effect of Linear Load on Harmonic Currents
As detailed in Section 3, linear loads such as induction motors and transformers are adversely affected
by harmonic currents and voltages. While these linear loads do not “absorb” harmonics as such, the
harmonic voltages and currents are dissipated as heat losses within the equipment. Therefore it could
be argued that the distortion would be higher on systems without linear loads compared to those with
linear loads, based on the same magnitude of harmonic currents. (This “opinion” appears to be
confirmed by recent industrial research which suggested that harmonic currents travel to ground
through directly connected induction motors in parallel with the path through the utility supply
transformer, the supply cabling and the nonlinear loads. Calculations suggested a reduction in the
resultant harmonics voltage of some 0.06 per unit on a system with induction motors compared to
without induction motors.)
On systems with mixed load (i.e., linear and nonlinear), the “total demand distortion of current”
(“TDD”), as defined in IEEE 519 (1992), will be lower the greater the proportion of linear load to
nonlinear load. Note that the TDD is not the same as the I
thd
. (The TDD is expressed as the
measure of total harmonic current distortion, per unit of load current. For example, a 30% total
current distortion measured against a 50% load would result in a TDD of 15%.)
Induction motors are naturally inductive and are often citied as increasing the level of distortion by
shifting the natural power system resonant frequency nearer to a significant characteristic harmonic,
whereas purely resistive loads generally dampen possible resonance.



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Induction motors do have higher impedances at higher frequencies and, therefore, can be seen to
“absorb” a portion of the high frequency harmonic currents. However, this does not usually have a
significant effect on the overall harmonic currents and subsequent voltage distortion within the power
system. The type of rotor (i.e., squirrel cage or wound type) and the air gap has an influence on the
absorption of the higher frequency harmonic currents.
3 Mitigation of Harmonics on Three-wire Single-phase
Systems
If large single-phase nonlinear loads (or large numbers of small single-phase nonlinear loads) are
present in the three-wire single-phase distribution system, local harmonic mitigation may be necessary
to minimize the contribution of the single-phase nonlinear load(s) to the overall voltage distortion in
the power system.
Depending on the nature and magnitude of the necessary mitigation and power system configuration,
two common methods of local mitigation can usually be applied:
i) Phase shifting
ii) Active filters
3.1 Phase Shifting
Section 10, Figure 2 shows a typical lighting (or distribution) transformer supplying two fluorescent
lighting distribution panels. One panel has no phase shift and the other has 30 degrees displacement
(i.e., phase shift). (Note: Subsection 10/7, “Phase shifting” describes the theory behind this technique.)
Essentially, the 30-degree phase shift at the input (i.e., primary side) of the phase shift transformer
causes the 5
th
and 7
th
harmonic currents to be in “anti-phase” (i.e., 180 degrees out of phase) with the
5
th
and 7
th
harmonic currents produced by the other lighting panel (and any other connected nonlinear
loads). The result is that the majority of the 5
th
and 7
th
harmonic currents on the busduct are
“cancelled” in theory (some residual will remain due to, for example, unbalance). Since the 5
th
and 7
th

are the largest two characteristic harmonics, the resultant I
thd

and the subsequent V
thd
will normally be
significantly reduced.

FIGURE 2
Phase Shifting of Three-wire Nonlinear Loads




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The above scheme is similar to a “quasi-12-pulse system” for three-phase drives and other large
nonlinear loads (see Subsection 10/8, “Phase Staggering”). Similar schemes are configurable using
larger pulse numbers (and therefore great harmonic cancellation), depending on the number and
ratings of nonlinear loads.
3.2 Active Filtering
Active filters can be used on three-wire lighting and other “domestic” distribution (see 10/4.2 and
10/11.1 for further information regarding the theory and operation of this type of equipment).
4 Mitigation of Harmonics on Four-wire Single-phase
Systems
Some vessels, such as passenger ships, have four-wire systems for “hotel loads”, with either grounded
or insulated neutrals. It is necessary to consider how the harmonic currents in these four-wire
systems, often with a large number of nonlinear single-phase loads, can be mitigated.
As described in Section 4, in a four-wire single-phase power system (i.e., three-phase + N) the three
individual phase currents contain triplens (i.e., odd multiples of three, particularly 3
rd
harmonic)
which add cumulatively in the neutral, often overloading the neutral conductors and distribution
transformers and causing other problems.
Two common methods of addressing the problem of excessive neutral currents due to triplens are
available. These are specially designed “zero sequence” transformers and active filters, the latter
specifically configured to inject into all three phases and the neutral conductor.
4.1 Zero Sequence Mitigation of Triplens on Four-wire Single-phase Systems
As discussed in Section 4, triplen currents (3
rd
, 9
th
, 15
th
…) add cumulatively in the neutral conductor,
resulting in neutral currents being well in excess of phase currents. On some passenger vessels, this
load can be in the range of 5-8 MW. It is therefore important that any excessive neutral currents (and
the associated problems thereof due to nonlinear loads) are attenuated as far as practicable. Section
10, Figure 3 re-emphasizes why that on four-wire systems with nonlinear load the neutral current can
often exceed the phase currents, even when perfectly balanced.

FIGURE 3
Four-wire System with Nonlinear Loads





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An effective method of reducing the neutral currents in a four-wire system is to use “zero sequence
transformers”, also called “zig-zag transformers”. As illustrated in Section 10, Figure 4, below, a zero
sequence transformer comprises multiple windings on a common core. The windings of at least two
phases are wound in opposition around each core leg in order that the magnetic fluxes created by the
zero sequence currents will oppose, and therefore cancel out, providing an alternative low impedance
path when connecting in parallel on a four-wire system. Note that the positive and negative sequence
fluxes (e.g., due to 5
th
, 7
th
, 11
th
, 13
th
harmonics, etc.) remain 120 degrees out of phase and are not
cancelled out.

FIGURE 4
Operation of a Zero Sequence Transformer
A B C N
C
0
A
0
A
0
B
0
C
0
A
0
Zero Sequence
Currents


Section 10, Figure 5 shows the connection of a zero sequence transformer to the four-wire systems
depicted in Section 10, Figure 2. In practical terms, the zero sequence transformer removes the
majority of the triplen harmonics from the neutral current and returns them to the three-phases, and in
doing so, also balances the phase currents.

FIGURE 5
Zero Sequence Transformer on Four-wire System




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4.1.1 Combined Zero Sequence Mitigation and Phase Shifting for Neutral Current
Reduction and Harmonic Mitigation
“Zero sequence transformers” (ZST) can also be used in conjunction with phase shift
transformers to provide effective harmonic attenuation from 3
rd
to up to 19
th
harmonics,
depending on the numbers and rating of discrete loads. Section 10, Figure 6, below,
illustrates the use of ZST and a combined phase shift and zero sequence transformer with
30 degrees phase shift to treat the 3
rd
harmonic current and other triplens and to provide
“cancellation” of the 5
th
and 7
th
harmonics within the system.

FIGURE 6
Zero Sequence Transformer and Combined Phase Shift Transformer with
ZST to Cancel Triplen and 5
th
and 7
th
Harmonic Currents


4.2 Active Filters for Four-wire Systems
An alternative method to reduce the triplen harmonics is an active filter. The theory of operation of
active filters in covered in Subsection 10/7. With reference to Section 10, Figure 7, below, the active
filter monitors the current in the three phases (and also the neutral, depending on manufacturer) via
the current transformers (CTs) installed on the load side of the connection (note that source side
monitoring is also used on occasion).
The voltage signal is fed into, for example, a “notch filter”, which removes the fundamental
component (i.e., 50 Hz or 60 Hz component). The remainder of the signal is termed a voltage signal
which is an “image” of the harmonic distortion current. That voltage signal is then converted into a
current signal, amplified and injected into the load as “harmonic cancellation current” which matches
the needs of the nonlinear load. In theory, therefore, the active filter, if rated correctly in terms of
“harmonic cancellation current”, provides the load with the harmonic current it needs to function and
the source is only supplies the fundamental current which is sinusoidal.
Note: The active filter should be dimensioned in terms of “harmonic cancellation current” based on the actual currents
drawn with the filter in circuit.



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FIGURE 7
Block Diagram of Active Filter on Four-wire Application


5 Standard Reactors for Three-phase AC and DC Drives
Reactors, also known as “inductors”, are coils of wire wound around a laminated steel core, similar in
construction to power transformers. The laminated steel core is usually impregnated to reduce audible
noise due to eddy currents. Reactors are a simple but effective method to reduce the harmonics
produced by nonlinear loads and are usually applied to individual loads such as variable speed drives.
In order to understand the benefit of a reactor, one must consider the impact it has on the power
circuit. When the current through a reactor changes, the result is an induced voltage (in opposition to
the applied voltage) across its terminals according to the formula:
dt
di
L E = ............................................................................................................................ (10.1)
where
E = induced voltage
L = inductance, in Henrys
dt
di
= rate of rise of voltage
It can therefore be seen that if the voltage available is limited, consequently, the rate of rise of voltage
will also be limited. Similarly, if the circuit current or supply conditions are such that they create a
voltage step change, then the reactor tends to limit the rate of raise of voltage, thus slowing the rate of
rise of current. It is the latter characteristic which is useful in limiting the harmonic currents produced
by electrical variable speed drives and other nonlinear loads.
In addition, the AC line reactor does reduce the total harmonic voltage distortion (V
thd
)

at the input to
the reactor compared to that at the terminals of the drive or other nonlinear load.



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In electrical variable speed drives, reactors are used in both AC and DC types. They are often used in
addition to other harmonic mitigation methods. On AC drives, reactors are used on the AC line side
(called AC line reactors), in the DC bus (called DC bus reactors) or both, depending on the type of
drive design and/or necessary performance of the supply.
5.1 Reactors for AC PWM Drives
A simple block diagram illustrating a standard 6-pulse AC PWM variable frequency drive is shown in
Section 10, Figure 8, below. Depending on the drive rating, most manufacturers offer reactors either
standard or as options.

FIGURE 8
Circuit Diagram of Standard 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive


In Section 10, Figure 8, above, the following are represented:
• R1 represents the resistance of the DC bus reactor L1 (if fitted).
• R1 and R2 have negligible effects on the harmonic currents, so will not be considered further.
• L1 represents the inductance of a DC bus reactor of various values (where fitted).
• L2 represents the AC line inductance of various values plus that of the supply.
Please note that in a perfectly-balanced system, the harmonic currents drawn by a 6-pulse AC PWM
drive will consist of the fundamental and the characteristic harmonics as represented by:
h = n ⋅ p ± 1
where
h = harmonic number
p = pulse number
n = integer
For 6-pulse drives: h = 6n ± 1. The harmonics are therefore 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19….
In order to simplify comparisons regarding the performance of the various inductances of AC line and
DC bus reactors, the DC bus reactor is divided into two discrete elements, as shown in Section 10.
Figure 8 (i.e., the total DC bus reactance is 2 × the value of L1).



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To maintain the results independent of current rating, all the values of reactors will be referred to as
“percentage reactances” referred to the current flowing in the AC supply. This means that the voltage
at the fundamental frequency across the AC line reactor will be “x” percent of input voltage of the
drive [i.e., the voltage will be “x%” of the L-L voltage/1.732 (i.e., the phase voltage)].
Percentage reactance can be defined as follows:
3
100 2
%
AC
AC
V
I L f
X
⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅
=
π
............................................................................................. (10.2)
where
f = AC line frequency
I
AC
= AC line current
V
AC
= AC line voltage
L = inductance, in Henrys
X = reactance, in %
The formula can be transformed to calculate the necessary reactance in Henrys for any given
percentage impedance as follows:
100 2
3
%
⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅

=
AC
AC
I f
V
X
L
π
...................................................................................................... (10.3)
Example 1
Calculate the value of reactance in henrys necessary for a 3% reactor for a 630 kW (845 HP),
AC PWM drive having a full load input current of 670 A. The supply to the drive is
three-phase, 690 V, 60 Hz.
Necessary reactance L =
100 2
3
%
⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅

AC
AC
I f
V
X
π

=
100 670 60 2
3
690
3
⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅

π

=
25258405
2 . 1195

= 47.3 × 10
-6

= 47.3 µH (micro-Henrys)



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Example 2
Calculate the percentage reactance of three-phase line reactor having of value of 77 µH for
use with a 315 kW (400 HP) PWM drive on a 480 V, 60 Hz supply. Drive rated input current
is 395 A.
%X =
3
100 2
%
AC
AC
V
I L f
X
⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅
=
π

=
3
480
100 395 10 77 60 2
6
⋅ ⋅ × ⋅ ⋅ ⋅

π

=
277
1147

= 4.14%
It should be noted that the attenuation of the drive harmonic currents is dependent on the value of
percentage reactance inserted into the drive, whether in the AC line, DC bus or both. The effects of
varying percentage reactance for both AC line and DC bus reactors and their resultant effect on both
the magnitude and harmonic number can be observed by reference to the following illustrations:-
5.1.1 AC Line Reactors Only
The use of AC line reactors are more common than DC bus reactors, and in addition to
reducing harmonic currents, also provide a measure of surge suppression for the drive input
rectifier. The disadvantage, as mentioned in 10/4.1, is that there is a voltage drop at the
terminals of the drive, approximately in proportion to the percentage reactance at the
terminals of the drive.

FIGURE 9
Variation of Harmonic Currents with AC Line Reactance Only





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As illustrated above (Section 10, Figure 9), the input harmonics produced by PWM drives with no
reactance is relatively high when the AC line reactor is less than 1%. As the percentage AC line
reactance increases, however, the harmonic currents decrease, although the rate of decrease
diminishes somewhat as percentage reactance increases. AC line reactors of values 2-3% are
common which 5% being the usual maximum.
Example 3
Using the information in Section 10, Figure 9, the harmonic currents for a 3% AC line reactor
can be estimated:
• 5
th
harmonic – 40%
• 7
th
harmonic – 15%
• 11
th
harmonic – 5%
• 13
th
harmonic – 4%
• 17
th
harmonic – 4%
• 19
th
harmonic – 3%
Based on the above estimation, the total harmonic current distortion (I
thd
) as a percentage of
the fundamental current based on harmonics 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19 would be:
I
thd
=
2 2 2 2 2 2
3 4 5 5 15 40 + + + + +
I
thd
= 43.49%
Example 4
Using similar information from Section 10, Figure 9, we can also estimate the harmonic
currents and I
thd
for a 5 % AC line reactor.
• 5
th
harmonic – 32%
• 7
th
harmonic – 9%
• 11
th
harmonic – 4%
• 13
th
harmonic – 3%
• 17
th
harmonic – 3%
• 19
th
harmonic – 2%
The total harmonic current distortion (I
thd
) as a percentage of the fundamental current based
on harmonics 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19 would again be as follows:
I
thd
=
2 2 2 2 2 2
2 3 3 4 9 32 + + + + +
I
thd
= 33.8%
5.1.2 DC Bus Reactors
A relatively small number of AC PWM drive manufacturers do insert reactance in the DC
bus, thus avoiding any voltage drops associated with AC line reactors. These drives normally
need discrete surge suppression to protect the input bridge rectifier devices and to limit any
surges which could affect the DC bus voltage levels. A similar exercise can be carried out to
estimate the respective harmonic currents when a DC bus reactance is installed (Section 10,
Figure 10).



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Note that below rated load, the DC bus reactor percentage reactance is lower than at rated
load. Therefore, at less than rated load, the percentage harmonic currents will be higher than
anticipated. This is due to the reactors being designed (usually for economic reasons) to
partially saturate at rated load. Therefore, at reduced load, the inductance increases.

FIGURE 10
DC Bus Reactance Only in AC PWM Drive


Example 5
Using the information in Section 10, Figure 10, the harmonic currents for a 3% DC bus
reactor can be estimated:
• 5
th
harmonic – 30%
• 7
th
harmonic – 20%
• 11
th
harmonic – 8%
• 13
th
harmonic – 7.5%
• 17
th
harmonic – 5%
• 19
th
harmonic – 5%
Based on the above estimation, the total harmonic current distortion (I
thd
) as a percentage of
the fundamental current based on harmonics 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19 would be:
I
thd
=
2 2 2 2 2 2
5 5 5 . 7 8 20 30 + + + + +
I
thd
= 38.35%
5.1.3 Reactance on Both Sides of the Input Rectifier
On larger drives, both AC line and DC bus reactors may be used. Both are used when the
short circuit capacity of a dedicated supply is relatively low compared to the drive kVA or if
the supply susceptible to disturbances.



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Section 10, Figure 11, below, illustrates the effect on the 5
th
harmonic of varying values of
AC line and DC bus reactance.

FIGURE 11
Variation in 5
th
Harmonic Current for Differing Values
of AC Line Reactance and DC Bus Reactance


Note that when the percentage reactance in the DC bus is low, increasing the AC line
reactance does result in a significant reduction in the 5
th
harmonic, as depicted above. A
similar effect is apparent for higher order harmonics. However, when the percentage
reactance in the DC bus is high (4% or more), increasing the percentage reactance in the AC
line results in a smaller reduction in the harmonic currents, the reduction diminishing as the
harmonic number diminishes.
It should be stated that harmonic current magnitudes are also dependent to a lesser extent on
the value of the DC bus capacitance per amp of load current. More importantly, it is the short
circuit capacity of the source which largely determines the harmonic current magnitudes. As
described previously, a “stiff” source (e.g., 5% transformer) will permit more harmonic
current to be drawn by the nonlinear load without unduly distorting the voltage, whereas a
“soft” source (e.g., X
d
″ of 17%) will restrict the magnitude of harmonic current due to its
leakage reactance, but this harmonic current may significantly distort the supply voltage.
6 AC Line Reactors for DC SCR Drives and AC Drives with
SCR Input Rectifiers
AC line reactors for use with AC and DC drives having full controlled SCR input bridges reduce
harmonic currents in a similar manner to that illustrated in 10/4.1.1 on a pro rata basis (i.e., similar
percentage attenuation, but perhaps based on differing individual harmonic current magnitudes
depending on the type of drive and inductance on the DC side of the bridge rectifier). They also
improve the true power factor and provide surge suppression.



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However, another important function of the AC line reactors in these applications is the reduction of
line notching (see Subsection 2/6, “Line Notching”). In DC drives, AC line reactors are therefore
often termed “commutation reactors”.
With reference to Section 10, Figure 12, below; it should be re-emphasized that the line notching
occurs 6 times per cycle on a 6-pulse bridge and is the result of the commutation of the load current
from one pair of SCRs to another. During this process, the line voltage is short circuited, producing
two primary notches per cycle. In addition, there are four secondary notches of lower amplitude
which are “notch reflections” due to the commutation of the other two legs of the three-phase bridge
rectifier. The short circuit current duration, or “notch width”, is a function of the DC output current of
the rectifier and the total inductance in the power system.

FIGURE 12
Primary and Secondary Notching


The notch depth is a function of where the notch is viewed on the power system. The further away it
is seen from the terminals of the bridge rectifier, the less significant it will seem. This can be
explained with reference to Section 10, Figure 13, below.

FIGURE 13
Line Impedance Distribution and the Effect of Notching




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At Point “A” (the rectifier terminals), the notching will be at its most severe, similar to that illustrated
in Section 10, Figure 13, if it is assumed that all the inductances L
1
, L
2

and L
3
are all equal. Due to the
voltage divider type circuit over the three identical inductances, the notch depth at Point “B” (the
input to the AC line reactor), will be 66% of the maximum depth seen at Point “A”. At Point “C”, it
will be 33% of the depth seen at Point “A”. Therefore, it can be seen that the more the inductance
between the source of the notch the less the depth. However, as explained in Section 2, the insertion
of additional inductance will reduce the notch depth but will increase the notch width.
Note: It is the notch depth which is usually the more important due to interference with equipment which relies of zero
crossing for operation.
The notch size can be calculated using the line side inductance and the bridge rectifier load current
during the commutation period.
Notch Depth =
3 2 1
2 1
L L L
L L
+ +
+
............................................................................................ (10.4)
If all inductance are equal, as per the example (Note: Actual L values of inductances will have to be inserted for
practical calculations):
Notch Depth =
1
1
3
2
L
L
= 66%
Notch Area = L ⋅ I ⋅ (Volts – µSecs)................................................................................... (10.5)
where
L = inductance of distribution transformer and supply inductance (cables, etc.) in
micro-Henrys.
I = DC load current at time of commutation, Amps.
Note that the inductance, L, is frequency-dependent and is expressed in Henrys. For generators, the
substransient reactance, X
d
″, is the impedance of the fundamental harmonic frequency and is
expressed in Ohms. In order to compare transformers with generators, one needs to compare the
inductance L and reactance X for both. X
d
″ mainly comprises reactance X and can be expressed in
Ohms [this value, divided by 2πf (frequency)] will result in inductance L.
Notch Depth =
Voltage n Commutatio
Area Notch
.............................................................................. (10.6)
where the commutation voltage = α sin 2 rms E
LL
and
α = delay angle of SCR in degrees
E = line to line voltage at time of commutation.
It should also be noted that only additional reactance at the rectifier terminals will have a desired
effect in attenuating the notching. Placing additional reactance elsewhere usually results in little
improvement.
Note that standard AC line reactances are usually available on a per drive size basis and that
calculations as illustrated above are not normally necessary. The industry standard is a 3% AC line
reactor. This can reduce the notch depth by up to 50% of the depth seen at the rectifier terminals.
Larger reactors, up to 5%, are not common, as the larger reduction in notch depth is accompanied by a
large increase in the notch width, which may interfere with the rectifier operation.



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The effectiveness of any additional inductance is dependent on the impedance of the system. The
lower the impedance, the less effective any additional inductance will be in reducing the notch depth.
Notch limits are specified in North American Harmonic Recommendation IEEE 519 (1992) and are
currently as follows:

Special Applications
(2)
General Systems Dedicated Systems
(3)

Notch Depth 10% 20% 50%
V
thd
3% 5% 10%
Notch Area (AN)
(1)
16,400 22,800 36.500
Notes
The value of AN for other than 480 V systems should be multiplied by V/480.
1 In volt-microseconds at rated voltage and current.
2 Special applications include airports and hospitals.
3 A dedicated system is exclusively dedicated to a converter load.

7 Special Reactors for Three-phase AC and DC Drives
As can be seen above, “standard” reactors provide only a limited measure of harmonic attenuation
which is normally not sufficient to maintain compliance with harmonic standards, harmonic
recommendations or to allow problem-free installations. For higher performance, more sophisticated
reactor designs (for example, wide spectrum filter and the “Duplex” reactor) may be considered.
7.1 Wide Spectrum Filters
Wide spectrum filters are multi-limbed reactors fitted with a small capacitor bank, as shown in
Section 10, Figure 14, below. The three reactor windings are wound on a common core. L1 on the
source side is the “high impedance winding”, whose design is such that it is “tuned” to prevent the
importation of upstream harmonics. On the load side, the “compensating winding”, L2, decreases the
through impedance, reducing the voltage drop. The output of L2 is tuned to remove a wide spectrum
of load-side harmonics. A unique design of reactor, L3, permits a smaller capacitor bank to be used to
reduce voltage boost and reactive power at no load.
Note: The capacitor bank KVAr is around 30% of installed filter KVA and should operate with any generator.
The wide spectrum filter tend to be largely unaffected by voltage unbalance and background voltage
distortion (e.g., there is a documented case of a marine wide spectrum filter successfully operating
with 22.1% background distortion on a cableship with full electric propulsion) and can be used on
both 6-pulse single drive and multiple drive applications. As it is a serial device (see Section 10,
Figure 14), it effectively isolates the loads from the effects of any upstream (i.e., background)
harmonics.




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FIGURE 14
Wide Spectrum Filter Schematic
L3
A3 B3 C3
L1 L2
C1
B1
A1
C2
B2
A2
C


Section 10, Figure 15 illustrates the current and voltage waveform from a standard 6-pulse 200
HP/150 kW AC PWM drive with 3% DC link inductance. The I
thd
is 39.9%.

FIGURE 15
200 HP/150 kW AC PWM Drive with 3% DC Bus Reactor – I
thd
= 39.9%


The wide spectrum filter is connected to the drive(s) as per a standard AC line reactor (i.e., between
the mains supply and the drive, as shown in Section 10, Figure 16). The output voltage of the wide
spectrum filter is trapezoidal (Section 10, Figure 17), which forces the drive input bridge rectifier
devices (e.g., diodes or SCRs) to conduct over a longer time period at a lower peak value, thus
reducing the harmonics produced at the input. The performance on 6-pulse AC PWM drives reduces
the I
thd
to around 5-8%, irrespective of whether the drive has AC line or DC bus reactors.




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FIGURE 16
Typical Wide Spectrum Filter Connection Diagram – AC PWM Drive



FIGURE 17
Trapezoidal Output Voltage from Wide Spectrum Filter
Filter output voltage


The effect of the wide spectrum filter on the 200 HP/150 kW AC PWM drive (Section 10, Figure 15)
is to reduce the I
thd
from 39.9% to 4.6%, as illustrated below in Section 10, Figure 18.
The wide spectrum filter can be applied to AC drives, DC drives with fully controlled SCR input
bridges and UPS systems.




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FIGURE 18
Mains Waveform with Wide Spectrum Filter – I
thd
= 4.6%


A typical example of a the performance of a wide spectrum filter and a 350 HP, 480 V, 60 Hz AC
PWM drive is shown in Section 10, Figure 19, below. The drive has a standard 3% AC line reactor
and has an I
thd
of 33.81%. With a wide spectrum filter connected in series, the I
thd
reduces to 3.48%.

FIGURE 19
Typical Wide Spectrum Filter Performance
350 HP AC PWM Drive with 3% AC Line Reactance
Without Filter I
thd
is 33.28%. With Filter I
thd
is 3.48%.
350HP VFD without/with Lineator filter
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
5
1
1
1
7
2
3
2
9
3
5
4
1
4
7
Harmonic
Ithd (%)
Without Lineator
With Lineator
350HP VFD without/with filter
Without filter
With filter





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Wide spectrum filters are available in a range up to around 3000 HP/2250 kW and can be applied to
multiple drives on the basis that the rating (in HP/kW) is a sum of all the connected drives. However,
no fixed speed induction motors or other non-drive load should be connected to a wide spectrum
filter, due to trapezoidal nature of output voltage. Typical applications in the marine and offshore
sectors are drives with power ratings of less than 2.5 MW, for main propulsion, thrusters, cableship
winches, compressors, fan and pump drives, etc.
Wide spectrum filters can be retrofitted to existing drives without the need for drive modifications,
whether for single drive or for multiple drive applications.
Wide spectrum filters may be developed for systems with voltages above 1 KV and with higher power
ratings (above 2.5 MW) for those applications with 6-pulse AC drives in systems with voltages above
1 KV.
Note: For 12-pulse drives and other loads, a variant of the wide spectrum filter is available. As can be seen from Section
10, Figure 20, below, a wide spectrum filter is inserted in the primary of the phase shift transformer and results in
an I
thd
of around 3-4%, similar to that expected from a 24-pulse drive, but without the susceptibility to performance
degradation due to voltage unbalance and background voltage distortion normally associated with phase shift
drives. The unit is around 30-35% the physical size of a standard 6-pulse wide spectrum filter.

FIGURE 20
Wide Spectrum Filter with 12-Pulse AC Drive
FILTER


The 12-pulse variants may be useful, perhaps as retrofits, in applications where the use of single or
multiple 12-pulse drives and/or other equipment are insufficient to guarantee compliance with
harmonic recommendations, rules or standards or where levels of voltage distortion are proving
troublesome.
7.2 Duplex Reactors
Duplex reactors originated in Europe in the 1930s and have been used on a number of vessels since
the mid 1980s, mainly for mitigation of the harmonics produced by main propulsion drives and also
with shaft generators to minimize the distortion of the voltage supplied to the ship’s busbar system.
Duplex reactors have two galvanically separated but tightly magnetically coupled coils (Section 10,
Figure 21). The primary coil is connected similarly to that when using standard reactors (i.e., in series
with the load). The secondary coil is connected to the primary coil using an anti-parallel connection
so that a corrective voltage is induced which, when “added” to the primary distorted voltage, produces
a clean compensated voltage, as illustrated in Section 10, Figures 22a, 22b and 22c.



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FIGURE 21
Duplex Reactor Schematic


The generator X
G

should be determined from short circuit calculations. The inductance of the duplex
reactor is designed to be equal to the subtransient reactance (X
d
″) of the generator(s). The addition of
the duplex reactor into the system results in the short circuit capacity in “Subsystem 1”, as shown in
Section 10, Figure 21, being 50% of that if it were connected directly to the generator(s). This results
in the system impedance being doubled in value, and therefore, the voltage distortion on this side of
reactor will increase accordingly (if X
G
″ = X
D1
= X
D2
).

FIGURE 22a
System Voltage Waveform





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FIGURE 22b
Duplex Reactor Correction Voltage


FIGURE 22c
“Corrected” System Voltage


Section 10, Figure 23 illustrates a typical application of duplex reactors, applied instead of standard
AC line or “commutating” reactors for the mitigation of inrush voltage during the commutation of
SCR based drive current (in this instance, on a research vessel with two DC SCR main propulsion
drives). The accuracy and quality of the correction voltage is dependent on a number of factors. The
optimum ratio of the winding turns on the duplex reactor results from the ratio of the subtransient
reactance (X
d
″) of the generator(s) to the primary reactance of duplex reactor.
As the reactance at the generators is dependent on the rating and number of generators on line, it is
necessary to either have some means of switching the ratio of turns on the duplex reactor or to base
optimization on one operational condition with a given number of generators on line. For the system
illustrated in Section 10 Figure 23, the optimum condition was with two generators running, as can be
seen from Section 10, Figure 24.



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In Section 10, Figure 23, note the differentiation of the “distorted bus”, fed via the primary windings
of the reactors which are connected to the DC converters, and the “clean bus” (which may contain
“distortion” due to the reduced fault rating), fed via the secondary windings of the duplex reactors.

FIGURE 23
Application of Duplex Reactors on Main Propulsion Drives


FIGURE 24
Variation of System V
thd

with Number of Generators on Line (Figure 23)




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The performance of duplex reactors depends upon the system subtransient reactance, and hence the
number of generators on line at any one time. However, for the duplex reactor performance to be as
independent as possible from the number of generators in service, a configuration is needed such that
the reactors are closely coupled to the generators, as illustrated in Section 10, Figure 25. Some recent
passenger ships with full electric propulsion based on cycloconverter drives have this configuration of
duplex reactors. With reference to Section 10, Figure 25, as the branch for supply of the propulsion
bus carries higher load current than the general service bus, the number of turns on the propulsion
branch of the duplex reactor is 50% of that on the general service branch. As a consequence, there is
a small variation in the voltages on the two systems. However, the generator voltage regulators both
maintain general service bus voltages constant and the variation in voltage between both the
propulsion and general service buses within tolerable limits.

FIGURE 25
Duplex Reactors on Passenger Ships with 2 × 20 MW Cycloconverters


The important points of the configuration in Section 10, Figure 25 are:
i) According to actual measurements performed on one of these passenger vessels (with 2 × 20
MVA cycloconverter drives) on differing numbers of generators operating, the voltage
distortion (V
thd
) in the general service bus will not unduly affected by the propulsion load.
(The 2.7% V
thd
measured on the general service bus was largely attributed to the nonlinear
loads connected to the service bus, not a reflection the propulsion load voltage distortion.)
ii) The prospective short circuit current in the general service bus will be reduced to 33% of that
without the duplex reactors in the circuit. Therefore, any voltage distortion due to the
nonlinear load connected to the general service bus will be slightly higher than without the
diplex reactors.



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iii) The prospective short current in the propulsion bus will be reduced to 66% of that apparent
without duplex reactors. The voltage distortion, V
thd
on the propulsion bus will therefore be
around 33% higher than without duplex reactors installed.
iv) The general bus and propulsion bus are effectively isolated. Therefore any disturbances,
transient or continuous, including any short circuit effects emanating from the propulsion bus,
will not be reflected on the general service bus.
As mentioned previously, duplex reactors are now applied to shaft generators where they can reduce
the V
thd
of the voltage supplied to the ship’s busbars to <8% (Section 10, Figure 26).

FIGURE 26
Application of Duplex Reactors on Shaft Generators
SG
Syn
Comp
Shaft Generator
Diode Input Rectifier
GTO Short Circuit
Protection
SCR Inverter
Bridge
Fuse
Protection
Duplex Reactor
Synchronous
Compensator
Ship's Busbars


Power systems with multiple converter loads can utilize duplex reactors as illustrated in Section 10,
Figure 27, below. This example needed two duplex reactors and optimization would have to be
designed for the parallel operation of two generators. However, it has to be stated that for other than
two-generator operation, only partial performance would be achieved. The application of duplex
reactors is often a compromise between economics, as mentioned above, and performance. It should
be noted that the generators supplying systems with duplex reactors are subjected to higher levels of
distortion due to reduction in fault rating. This will have to be taken into account in generator
design(s). In addition, on power systems with duplex reactors, large fixed speed AC squirrel cage
motors may have an increased voltage dip and reduced torque at start-up. Special design and/or
precautions will be necessary to minimize these effects.
The development and application of duplex reactors may not yet have reached their full potential, and
therefore, their use may not be as straightforward or as well-understood as other technologies. Duplex
reactors have to be encompassed in the design of the vessel at an early stage and retrofitting may be
difficult.




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FIGURE 27
Application of Duplex Reactors Vessel
with Multiple AC SCR Based Drives


8 Passive L-C Filters
Passive L-C filters, comprising inductors, capacitors and occasionally resistors have been utilized for
harmonic mitigation for many years. Their operation relies on the “resonance phenomenon” which
occurs due to variations in frequency in inductors and capacitors; (see Section 9 for further information)
which is:
Z = 2πfL for an inductor................................................................................................... (10.8)
where
Z = impedance
f = supply frequency
L = inductance
Therefore the impedance of an inductor increases with frequency.
fC
Z
π 2
1
= for a capacitor ................................................................................................ (10.9)
where
C = capacitance
The impedance of a capacitor decreases with frequency.
At series resonance, the impedance of an inductor (X
L
) and capacitive reactance (X
C
) of the capacitor
are equal, and therefore, the resistance, which is generally low, is the only impedance in the circuit.
The circuit “Q” (i.e., quality factor), which determines the “sharpness” of the “tuning” of the passive
filter, is calculated thus:
R
X
Q
r
= ........................................................................................................................... (10.10)
where
Q = quality factor (usually in the range of 20 to 100)
X
r
= reactance at resonance
R = resistance in circuit



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The resonant frequency for a series resonant circuit, and in theory, for a parallel resonant circuit, can
be given as:
( ) C L
f

=
π 2
1
0
.............................................................................................................. (10.11)
where
f
0
= resonant frequency, Hz
L = filter inductance, Henrys,
C = filter capacitance, Farads
The series passive filters, usually connected in parallel with nonlinear load(s), are “tuned” to offer
very low impedance to the harmonic frequency to be mitigated (Section 10, Figure 28 shows the tuned
characteristics of 7
th
harmonic filter). However, the inductance of the source has to be taken into
account due to the production of parallel resonance at a frequency lower than that for series resonance
(perhaps causing power system positive feedback and also resulting in the misfire of power devices,
such as SCRs, for example). Section 10, Figure 28, below, illustrates absolute impedance for a 7
th

harmonic tuned filter over a range of frequencies.
Therefore, the formula above can be modified as follows for parallel resonance:
( ) ( )
F Source F
C L L
f
⋅ +
=
π 2
1
0
....................................................................................... (10.12)
where
L
F
= filter inductance
L
Source
= inductance on busbars
C
F
= filter capacitance

FIGURE 28
Absolute Impedance Characteristics for Tuned 7
th
Harmonic Series Filter





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There are a number of common passive filter configurations which are depicted in Section 10, Figure
29, below, with the “single tuned” filter being one of the most common. In practical use, 5
th
tuned
filters, often with additional 7
th
tuned filters, are the most common configuration. Other multi-limbed
filters; including possible 11
th
and 13
th
can also be applied. However, above the 13
th
harmonic,
passive filter performance is poor, and they are rarely applied on higher-order harmonics.

FIGURE 29
Common Configuration of Passive Filters


Section 10, Figure 30, shows the impedance characteristic for a multi-limbed filter with four discrete
limbs tuned to the 5
th
(300 Hz), 7
th
(420 Hz), 11
th
(660 Hz) and 13
th
(780 Hz) harmonics depicted in
Section 10, Figure 31). Note the respective parallel resonance for each filter below the series resonant
points (these have been highlighted for the 11
th
harmonic in the example given).

FIGURE 30
Simplified Connection of Multi-limbed Passive Filter






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FIGURE 31
Impedance Characteristics of Multi-limbed Passive Filter


In the example (Section 10, Figure 30, above), the filter-tuned limbs would normally be tuned below
the respective characteristic frequencies to prevent possible overloading and to compensate for the
variation in capacitance over time due to the degradation of the capacitor dielectric (i.e., as the
capacitor ages and/or if subject to higher temperatures, the capacitance decreases, increasing the
reactance and thereby increasing the tuned filter’s resonant frequency). Typical values for each limb
would be 4.7
th
(for 5
th
harmonic), 6.6
th
(for 7
th
harmonic), 10.5
th
(for 11
th
harmonic) and 12.4
th
(for 13
th

harmonic).
The passive resonance shown in Section 10, Figure 31 could be problematic, as the high impedances
could result in additional voltage distortion of the respective harmonic currents at those frequencies.
The parallel resonance frequencies can, however, be modified (i.e., shifted) by careful design of the Q
factor (via the sharpness of the tuning) or by connecting resistance in parallel with the filter reactors,
such as not to coincide with a major characteristic harmonic frequency. This practice is called
“dampening”. A reduction in the Q factor has only a minor effect, and therefore, the addition of
resistance in parallel with the reactor is often preferred, as it can achieve the necessary damping with
relatively low fundamental losses compared to Q factor control. Dampening reduces the “sharpness”
at the tuned frequency and increases the bandwidth of the filter, but at increased cost and reduced
filter harmonic reduction performance.
Passive filters are susceptible to changes in source and load impedances. They do attract harmonics
from other sources (i.e., from downstream of the PCC), and this must be taken into account in their
design. Harmonic and power system studies are usually undertaken to calculate their effectiveness
and to explore possibility of resonance in a power system due to their proposed use.
In order to address the problems above for specific applications, “drive applied” (or “trap”) filters are
available, as illustrated in Section 10, Figure 32, below.




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FIGURE 32
Simplified “Drive Applied” or “Trap” Filter for Variable Speed Drives


As can be seen above, a reactor (typically 5% reactance) is connected between the tuned passive filter
and the source (reducing the supply voltage accordingly). The 5% reactor serves two functions:
i) It effectively isolates the passive filter from the source (and any pre-existing voltage distortion)
and reduces the possibility of overloading due to downstream harmonics.
ii) It further reduces the harmonic current spectrum on the source side.
It may be possible for “trap filters” to be applied to drive applications irrespective of source impedance
and possibility of system resonance.
On marine power systems, frequency variations of ±5% are common and would have an adverse
impact on the performance of tuned passive filters. Similarly, if the source impedance were to
change, filter performance would suffer. An example may be a passive filter for a bank of winch
drives on a cableship. The design of the filter is based on that one vessel – if the drives and filter
(often containerized) were moved to another vessel, the source impedances will most probably differ.
Tuned passive filters perform best a rated load with around 14-18% I
thd
, usually achievable from a
well-engineered 5
th
and 7
th
limbed filter. At lesser loads, and especially at light load, the passive filter
“leading” kVAr is impressed on the source. On industrial applications and utility supplies, this may
not be problematic, but if connected to marine generators, this can be a significant issue, as most
generators cannot support any more than around 20% leading kVAr due to the potential of “armature
reaction” and resultant over-excitation and AVR (automatic voltage regulator) instability. Also, as
alluded to above, design of passive filters is more complicated on generators due to increased
frequency variations.
In marine and offshore applications, passive filters normally need in-depth studies to assess their
suitability. They are often more suited to “dedicated systems” where the usually large, nonlinear
loads, such as main electric propulsion drives and their associated power generation, are discrete from
other loads.






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9 Transformer Phase Shifting (Multi-pulsing)
For drives supplying 400 HP/300 kW motors (or larger) and other large nonlinear equipment, “phase
shifting” techniques have been commonly employed to reduce the input harmonic currents.
Therefore, multiple input converter bridges are necessary, connected such that the harmonics
produced by one bridge(s) cancels certain harmonics produced by other(s). In theory, certain
harmonics, as determined by the number of converter bridges in the system, are eliminated at the
input (i.e., primary side) of the phase shift transformer.
The technique of “phase shifting” the harmonic currents produced by one converter against those
produced by another is also termed “multi-pulsing”, hence the term “multi-pulse drives”. The number
of discrete converters in a system determines the “pulse number”. For example, a standard
three-phase drive with one input converter is known as a “6-pulse” drive (the number of pulses relates
to the number of pulses on the DC side of the rectifier):
No. of Pulses = 6 × No. of 6-pulse input rectifiers in converter ...................................... (10.13)
If a drive, for example has two input rectifiers, it is known as a “12-pulse drive”, as depicted in
Section 10, Figure 33, below. Similarly, with three input rectifiers it becomes an “18-pulse drive”.
Pulse configurations up to 48-pulse are possible for very large systems. In addition to reducing the
line side harmonics, phase shifting also reduces the voltage ripple on the DC side of the rectifier(s).
The theoretical cancellation of certain harmonic current is dependent on the “pulse number” based on
the format, as known:
Pulse Number ± 1
Therefore, in a 12-pulse system, the characteristic harmonic currents will be 11, 13, 23, 25, 35, 37,
etc. It will be noted that the 5
th
, 7
th
, 17
th
and 19
th
harmonic are not listed. These are theoretically
cancelled in a 12-pulse system where the lowest harmonic is now the 11
th
. Similarly, in an 18-pulse
system, the characteristic harmonics will be 17, 19, 35, 37, 47, 49, etc. As can therefore be seen, the
higher the pulse number, the more the lower order harmonics will be theoretically cancelled.
The amount of phase shift, in degrees, necessary is also a function of the number of converters
employed:
Phase Shift° =
converters of Number
60
............................................................................ (10.14)
For example, in the 12-pulse drive system illustrated in Section 10, Figure 31 (which has two 6-pulse
converters) the necessary phase shift is:
Phase Shift =
2
60
= 30°
Similarly, an 18-pulse system having three converters would need a 20 degrees phase shift.
Historically, 12-pulse systems were the most common configuration, but in recent years, 18-pulse
systems have become common in North America due to the requirements of IEEE 519 (1992). 12-
pulse systems are still used in other parts of the world, but they are becoming less common due to the
introduction of harmonic recommendations in an increasing number of countries. In the marine and
offshore environment, however, 12-pulse systems were still relatively common, but it is now
recognized that they have increasing difficulty complying with current harmonic recommendations,
especially on larger or multiple loads.
In general terms, there are two main types of phase shift transformer used for drive harmonic mitigation:
i) Double-wound isolating transformer
ii) Polygonal non-isolating autotransformer



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9.1 Double-wound Isolating Transformer Phase Shift Systems
The drive system depicted below (Section 10, Figure 33) comprises a double-wound isolating
transformer with 30 degrees phase shift between the star and delta secondary windings, two 6-pulse
input bridges, an “interbridge reactor”, a DC bus and an inverter bridge. This configuration provides
for optimum cancellation of the 5
th
and 7
th
harmonic, providing, however, that the circuit is carefully
balanced and 120-degree conduction is forced in each of the rectifier bridges through the use of the
DC interbridge reactor. AC interbridge reactors can also be used, but due to the voltage drop across
them, DC reactors tend to be more common.

FIGURE 33
12-Pulse AC PWM Drive with Double-wound Phase Shift Transformer


All phase shift systems, irrespective of pulse number, are susceptible to degradation in performance
due to unbalance, whether in the voltage supply or through inaccuracies or tolerances during
manufacturing of the transformer and/or the rectifiers. Section 10, Figure 34 illustrates the effect of
minor unbalance (<1.5%) on performance of the double-wound-based 12-pulse system shown in
Section 10, Figure 33, and is based on the following conditions:
• Transformer leakage impedance of ~ 5%
• Supply impedance is 1.4%
• Completely balanced phase group impedances
• Rectified voltage drops are completely balanced
• The interbridge reactor was dimensioned to limit the p-p current between bridges to 15% rated
DC current
Note: There will always be some impedance unbalance, which will lead to an increase in the theoretical level of
harmonics.
As can be seen from Section 10, Figure 34, below, a small increase in unbalance can result in
significant increases in the 5
th
and 7
th
harmonics at the primary side of the phase shift transformer. In
order to reduce the effects of unbalance in the secondary windings and rectifiers, the transformer
leakage impedance should be relatively high, with 5% being typical. In order to provide as near to
specified performance, the transformer should be designed with a relatively low value for secondary
voltage unbalance (for example, around 0.3%) to allow for other practical unbalances (e.g., from
rectifiers).




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FIGURE 34
Double-wound 12-Pulse Phase Shift Transformer
Unbalance Between Secondary Voltages


Double-wound transformers need an accurately design system and increased leakage reactance. Note
that on carefully designed systems, the interbridge reactor may not be necessary. However, if balance
is not achieved, the results are higher than expected harmonic levels, poor bridge rectifier and
transformer utilization and possible problems in rating the bridge electronic devices (i.e., diodes or
SCRs).
A well-designed 12-pulse drive system, based on a double-wound phase shift transformer can give a
practical performance of around 10-12% I
thd
based on ideal supply conditions in terms of background
voltage distortion and voltage unbalance
.

Double-wound transformers tend to be common on marine applications, as they can provide common
mode noise attenuation (i.e., between conductors and ground) via the use of copper shielding between
windings. This can serve the purpose of a crude, but effective, EMI filter for the drive. On vessels
with IT power systems (i.e., insulated neutrals), standard drive EMC or EMI filters cannot be used, as
one side of the filter capacitors needs a connection to ground. The capacitors would be damaged,
therefore, if a ground fault appeared on the system. In these applications, the double-wound isolating
transformer provides galvanic isolation between input and output, thus attenuating the common mode
and other conducted emissions.
9.2 Polygonal Non-isolating Autotransformer Phase Shift Systems
For some marine and offshore applications an alternative to the double-wound transformer-based
phase shift system is that based on the polygonal, non-isolating autotransformer. The performance
may not be as effective, with around 15-17% I
thd
being typical for a 12-pulse system.
A polygonal autotransformer is essentially a delta winding structure which permits the unbalancing 3
rd

harmonics to circulate. A typical 12-pulse drive system based on a polygonal autotransformer is
shown in Section 10, Figure 35, below.




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FIGURE 35
12-Pulse AC PWM Drive with Polygonal Autotransformer


The 12-pulse polygonal autotransformer above provides ±15° phase shift relative to the input and
thereby 30° between the two bridge rectifiers. Two large interbridge reactors are necessary in this
configuration in order to:
i) Attenuate the significant amounts of 3
rd
harmonics, which would otherwise flow between
bridge rectifiers
ii) Force the bridge rectifiers to appear as balanced loads to each of the two three-phase groups
of the polygonal autotransformer
iii) Maintain a relatively-balanced utilization of the rectifier
The performance of a typical polygonal autotransformer-based 12-pulse drive system is shown in
Section 10, Figure 36 and is based on the following conditions:
• Transformer impedance of ~ 1%.
• Both interbridge reactors are approximately six (6) times the value for a similar rating of drive
with double-wound transformer.
• Additional AC line reactance of up to 2% is present.
• The impedances per phase group are completely balanced.
• The rectifier voltage drops are completely balanced.
• The drive is operating at rated load.




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FIGURE 36
Variation on Harmonic Currents vs. AC Reactance for a
12-Pulse AC PWM Drive with Polygonal Autotransformer


As can be seen from above, the performance of polygonal autotransformers is not as effective as that
offered by double-wound transformers, but may be sufficient for many applications.
9.3 The Effect of Voltage Unbalance on Phase Shift Performance
As mentioned earlier, unbalance does have a detrimental effect of the performance of phase shift
transformers. This unbalance may be due to manufacturing tolerances in the transformers and/or the
rectifiers. However, no supply is completely balanced. In North America, unbalanced voltages
between 1-3% readily exist in many power systems, impacting on the performance of the phase
shifting scheme, irrespective of pulse number.
Section 10, Figure 38 illustrates the effect on the performance of a typical 18-pulse (20-degree phase
shift) system, as shown in Section 10, Figure 37. As can be seen with the example, on a balanced
system, the I
thd
at rated load is around 5.6%. This level of performance is maintained down to below
15% load. However, when 2% unbalance is introduced, the performance at 100% load is reduced to
around 21% I
thd
. At reduced load, the performance is markedly poorer, with distortion significantly
increased.




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FIGURE 37
Typical 18-Pulse Drive System



FIGURE 38
Effect of 2% Unbalance on 18-Pulse Drive





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9.4 The Effect of Background Voltage Distortion on Phase Shift Performance
The presence of “pre-existing” or “background” voltage distortion also significantly affects the
performance of phase shifting systems. Section 10, Figure 39 shows the degradation of performance
of a similar 18-pulse to that described above, using background voltage distortion values up to 5%.

FIGURE 39
Effect of Background Voltage Distortion on an 18-Pulse Drive


As illustrated above, the performance is largely unaffected on background distortion up to 2% V
thd
at
rated load and up to 1% V
thd
at 50% load. However, beyond these levels, the performance diminishes
to around 15% I
thd

at rated load and 23% I
thd
at 50% load, respectively, with 5% background
distortion.
It should be noted that background voltage distortion on some classes of existing ships and offshore
installations may be excess on 10%, with a number of instances recorded where the background V
thd

was in excess of 20%. This may be the case where full electric propulsion has been installed on a
common bus system or where the majority of the electrical load is nonlinear (e.g., on drilling rigs,
dynamically positioned drillships, etc.).
The performance of phase shift-based drive systems, therefore, has to be carefully considered, if the
necessary level of mitigation is to be achieved under high levels of background distortion. In such
applications, separate mitigation may have to be considered for retrofitting to other nonlinear
equipment in order to reduce the overall voltage distortion such that any installed phase shift systems
can operate more effectively.



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10 Transformer Phase Staggering (Quasi Multi-pulse) Systems
A derivation of “phase shifting” is “phase staggering”. This technique can be used when there are
multiple loads, ideally of similar or identical ratings, which can be fed from different phase shift
transformers. The degree of phase shift per transformer is dependent on the number of discrete loads
and the desired overall pulse number (e.g., a “quasi-18- or 24-pulse system”) necessary.
Section 10, Figure 40, below, depicts a system comprising 4 × 132 kW AC PWM drives fed from an
1800 kVA transformer with 6% impedance. To facilitate the “quasi-24-pulse system”, a minimum of
four drives are necessary. For optimum performance, all the loads should be of identical ratings. In
this case, as in many practical applications, there may not be an ideal load profile. However, it can
still be feasible to construct a quasi-24-pulse system (or any other pulse number based on a phase
staggering based scheme), albeit with slightly less performance than it would have had if all the loads
were balanced, as illustrated in this example.

FIGURE 40
Quasi-24-Pulse System Using Phase Staggering Techniques





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As can be seen from Section 10, Figure 40, one 132 kW drive (No. 1) has a 1:1 (i.e., no voltage
transformation) transformer connected with 30 degrees phase shift between primary and secondary
windings. Drive No. 2 is fed directly from the busbars of the switchboard. Drive No. 3 has a
15-degree phase shift transformer connected, as has Drive No. 4. This combination of phase shifting
results in the I
thd
reducing to 8.5% when all four drives are operating at rated load, as shown in
Section 10, Table 1.

TABLE 1
Estimated Harmonic Current Distortion Using
Quasi-24-Pulse Phase Staggering System
Harmonic 6-pulse 1 drive 2 drives 3 drives 4 drives
5
7
11
13
17
19
23
25
36.6%
13%
8%
3%
4%
1.8%
2.5%
1.7%
36.6%
13%
8%
3%
4%
1.8%
2.5%
1.7%
25.9%
9.2%
1.6%
0.6%
2.8%
1.3%
2.5%
1.7%
12.2%
4.3%
2.7%
1%
1.3%
0.63%
2.5%
1.7%
7.3%
2.6%
1.6%
0.6%
0.8%
0.4%
2.5%
1.7%
I
thd
40.1% 40.1% 27.9% 13.5% 8.5%
Note: Polygonal, non-isolating autotransformers were used in this example, hence the slightly lower
performance than may have been expected with regard to the use of double-wound transformers. Also,
please note that in the table above, the calculations were based on ALL drives having similar loading,
and therefore balanced, and 20% residual for phase angle diversity.

Phase staggering can offer good harmonic mitigation performance. It is, however, prone to
performance degradation due to voltage unbalance and background voltage distortion as are
conventional drive dedicated phase shift transformers.
Phase staggering is not as effective in reducing harmonic currents as individual drives with
multi-pulse, phase shifted inputs of similar pulse number. Nevertheless, phase staggering is an
effective method of reducing the harmonic currents from a number of drives and other nonlinear loads
to within the necessary limits.
Both double-wound and polygonal autotransformers can be used to construct phase staggering
schemes. Double-wound tend to be larger, but offer better mitigation performance, and also
importantly, galvanic isolation (normally a stipulation when EMI/EMC attenuation is necessary for
the drives or other loads in a marine or offshore environment). Polygonal autotransformers are
smaller, but offer lower levels of performance with no galvanic isolation, and therefore will not be as
common on marine and offshore installations.
11 Electronic Filters
11.1 Active Filters
Active filters have been available since the late 1990s and are now relatively common in industrial
applications for both harmonic mitigation and reactive power compensation (i.e., electronic power
factor correction). Unlike passive L-C filters, active filters do not present potential resonance to the
network and are unaffected to changes in source impedance.



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Shunt-connected active filters (i.e., parallel with the nonlinear load, as shown in Section 10, Figure 41,
below) are the common configuration of active filter. Less common series-connected types are available.
As can be seen in Section 10, Figure 41, there are three currents in the circuit:
I
S
= I
L
– L
F
....................................................................................................................... (10.15)
where
I
S
= source current (fundamental)
I
L
= nonlinear load current
I
F
= active filter current (harmonic)

FIGURE 41
Block Diagram of Shunt Connection Active Filter
with Associated Current Waveforms


With reference to Section 10, Figure 41, the active filter measures the wave shape of the nonlinear
load current waveform via current transformers (CTs) in the line, the actual number of which varies
according to the manufacturer. The reference voltage derived from the CTs is fed into a notch filter or
similar circuit, where the fundamental component is removed. The remaining signal is a measure of
the “distortion current” (i.e., the load current less the fundamental current). This signal is then fed
into the control system which generates the respective IGBT firing patterns necessary in order to
replicate and amplify the “distortion current” (now termed the “compensation current”), which is
injected into the load in anti-phase (i.e., 180° displayed) to compensate for the harmonic current.
Note: The active filter should be dimensioned in terms of “harmonic cancellation current” based on the actual nonlinear
currents drawn with the filter in circuit [i.e., due to the filter’s low impedance (<1% Z), the nonlinear loads will
draw more harmonic current than without the filter in the circuit. 10-15% higher current is typical for three-phase
loads].



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When rated correctly in terms of “harmonic compensation current”, the active filter provides the
nonlinear load with the harmonic current it needs to function while the source provides only the
fundamental current (i.e., 50 Hz or 60 Hz component).
Section 10, Figure 42, below, illustrates a typical power circuit schematic of a shunt-connected active
filter. The electromagnetic interference (EMI) and carrier filters are passive L-C networks. The EMI
filter provides common mode filtering [i.e., between all phases and ground (earth) and a measure of
differential mode filtering (i.e., between phases)]. On European Union (EU) applications, an uprated
EMI filter or additional electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) filter is usually necessary in order to
comply with the EU EMC Directive regarding limits of EMI emissions in the range 150 kHz to
30 MHz.

FIGURE 42
Simplified Power Circuit of Active Filter


The “carrier filter” attenuates the IGBT bridge carrier frequency (i.e., ~5 kHz to 20 MHz depending
on the rating of the active filter – on higher ratings (>300 A) the switching frequency is usually
reduced to minimize device power losses). However, after carrier frequency filtering, some leakage
may be apparent which can adversely affect snubber components on SCR front end based drives and
other equipment. In these applications, a 3% AC line reactor between the point of connection of the
active filter and the nonlinear load is normally sufficient to prevent any adverse interaction and to
reduce the harmonic current magnitude. The pre-charge resistors and associated contactor attenuate
the DC bus inrush current during initial power-up, thereby maximizing the life of the capacitors.
[This is a technique also used in AC variable frequency drives via either pre-charge (or ‘soft start’)
resistors, mainly used in smaller HP/kW drives, or via 6-pulse, half controlled diode/SCR pre-charge
input bridges (i.e., this is to provide voltage control from power-up to full conduction when DC bus is
charged). The input bridge rectifier acts as diode bridge rectifier during normal operation].
The IGBT bridge and DC bus architecture are similar to that seen in AC PWM drives. The DC bus is
used as an energy storage unit. The pre-charge contactor and pre-charge resistor are used to “soft
start” the DC bus (i.e., reduce the inrush current to the DC bus capacitors during initial power-up).
The DC bus is continually recharged via the IGBT package diodes, as shown in Section 10, Figure 42.
The IGBT bridge generates a current wave shape for the harmonic compensation based on the
“distortion current” signal derived from the CTs and notch filter or similar circuit.
Section 10, Figure 43 illustrates a typical current waveform for a 6-pulse AC PWM drive:



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FIGURE 43
Typical AC PWM Drive Input Current Waveform (L
L
) as per Figure 41


The active filter “compensation current” is illustrated in Section 10, Figure 44, below:

FIGURE 44
Active Filter “Compensation Current” Waveform (L
f
) as per Figure 41


The corrected source current is shown below in Section 10, Figure 45:

FIGURE 45
Source Current Waveform (L
S
) as per Figure 41




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Section 10, Figure 46, below, illustrates typical performance of a correctly rated active filter. The
nonlinear load is an AC PWM drive with 3% AC line reactor. Without the active filter in the circuit,
the I
thd
is 35.28%. With the active filter operating, the I
thd
is reduced to 3.67%.
The active filters should be rated in terms of “harmonic cancellation current”, based on the currents
actual drawn with the filter in circuit. To assist in the reduction of the magnitude of the harmonic
current, AC line reactors of least 3% should be connected between the filter and load(s). The AC line
reactor also serves to provide protection to SCR front end-based drives from the active filter carrier
frequency.
Most active filters cannot operate on high levels of voltage background distortion (>8-10%), due to
damage to capacitive elements in the filter input.
The rating of an active filter should be based on the load current drawn with the active filter connected,
as detailed above. Failing to do so may result in the active filter being “saturated” prematurely (i.e.,
current limited at its maximum rating), with any additional harmonic current spilling over into the
mains as “distortion current” and raising the source side voltage distortion. However, many active
filters regularly operate intermittently at maximum output current levels without any known problems.

FIGURE 46
Typical Active Filter Performance
with 150 HP AC PWM with 3% AC Line Reactor
Without Active Filter, I
thd
is 35.28%. With Active Filter, I
thd
is 3.87%.
Active Filter Performance
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
3 7
1
1
1
5
1
9
2
3
2
7
3
1
3
5
3
9
4
3
4
7
Harmonic
Ithd
AF OFF
AF ON


Active filters compensate for harmonic currents and provide reactive power compensation (i.e.,
electronic power factor correction). On digitally controlled filters, the amount of each can be selected
via the user interface keypad. However, on older analog control system designs, it is not usually
possible to control the reactive current. This may be problematic. For example, on power systems
where the nonlinear load has been switched off or the load is at low levels, it is possible that
uncontrolled reactive current up to almost the maximum capacity of the active filter can be imposed
on the source. This may not be of concern on “stiff” shore-side utility supplies, but may well be
problematic on “soft” marine and offshore generator-derived voltage supplies.



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The control of the amount of harmonic compensation current to reactive current on digital active
filters is based on its rated capacity and is based on the following formula:
I
AF
= ) (
2 2
r h
I I + ............................................................................................................. (10.16)
where
I
AF
= total output current of the active filter
I
h
= injected harmonic current of the filter
I
r
= injected reactive current
Example
An active filter is rated at 300 A. Calculate the available reactive current if the injected
harmonic current is 220 A.
I
AF
= ) (
2 2
r h
I I +
Thus, I
r
= ) (
2 2
h AF
I I −
I
r
= ) 220 300 (
2 2

I
r

= 204 A
Active filters have the ability to compensate for any load-side current unbalances, but have been
known to be susceptible to voltage unbalance on the source side of the connection. Please note that
little research has been undertaken with regards to the performance of active filter under unbalance
conditions, but published research work suggests the unbalanced voltages can generate a 2
nd
harmonic
voltage in the DC bus, and thereby a 2
nd
harmonic current, whose amplitude is dependent on the DC
bus capacitance. This 2
nd
harmonic can be reflected on the AC side of the filter as a 3
rd
harmonic,
reducing its harmonic compensation effectiveness.
Excessive background voltage distortion (i.e., >8-10% V
thd
) may, in addition to damaging the
capacitive elements in the active filter input, also interfere with the generation of reference and other
signals. Therefore, in the presence of high levels of background voltage distortion, the “supply
voltage signals” (i.e., those necessary for control and protection purposed) should be filtered.
For operation above 1 KV, LV active filters can inject into the supply via interposing transformers
with a small loss in performance at higher frequencies. These transformers have to be specifically
designed based on the injection of harmonic currents at frequencies up to 2.5 kHz or 3 kHz (50
th

harmonic based on 50 Hz and 60 Hz fundamentals).
Active filters are relatively simple to apply. They can be connected to any nonlinear load or point of
common coupling (PCC). Their effectiveness in reducing “line notching” due to fully controlled SCR
drives and other similar equipment is dependent on the operating speed of the filter, which varies
according to the manufacturer and/or the amount of commutating reactance in the line. Active filters
can usually reduce the notching, but cannot eliminate it completely.
Note: Some active filters treat only up to the 25
th
harmonic. Some impose limits on the maximum number treated up to
the 50
th
(e.g., up to ten). Unlike the filter described in this Section, the majority of active filters do not treat
interharmonics. Performance depends on the control strategy adopted [“FFT” (selected characteristic harmonics)-
based or “broadband” (all nonlinear current)-based].



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Active filters are complex products, and it may not be possible for them to be repaired by any party
other than the manufacturer’s service engineers. Also, full commissioning by manufacturers is
necessary to obtain optimum performance, although “self tuning” models are now becoming available.
Active filters do offer good performance in the reduction of harmonics and the control of power
factor. Their use should be examined on a project-by-project basis, depending on the application
criteria.
11.2 Hybrid Active-Passive Filters
The application of hybrid passive-active filters may be considered as an alternative to the use of shunt
active filters. For example: on installations needing large amounts of harmonic cancellation. The use
of passive filter elements is often seen as a means to reduce the current rating of the active filter while
still retaining the benefits. In return, the connection of an active filter to a passive filter can eliminate
the disadvantages of conventional passive filters (i.e., the possibility of resonance in a power system
and the effects on the performance of a passive filter should the load characteristic or source
impedance change).
The schematic diagram for a shunt-connected hybrid passive-active filter is depicted in Section 10,
Figure 47, below, and comprises an active filter and a passive L-C filter with 5
th
and 7
th
tuned
harmonic limbs.

FIGURE 47
Theoretical Shunt Passive-Active Hybrid Filter


There is a misconception regarding the operation of hybrid shunt passive-active filters using “standard”
industrial active filters as depicted in the example shown in Section 10, Figure 47, above. It is assumed
that the passive filter, tuned to the 5
th
and 7
th
harmonic, removes the majority of those harmonics and,
therefore, the active filter only has to be rated, based on the filter’s rated current, to provide harmonic
cancellation for the 11
th
harmonic and above. However, it is usually not possible using “standard”
shunt active filters due to thermal considerations. Section 10, Figure 48, below, illustrates the
maximum output currents per harmonic available from a typical “standard” shunt active filter.




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FIGURE 48
Thermal Limits of Shunt Active per Harmonic Current
Active Filter Thermal Limits
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
3 7
1
1
1
5
1
9
2
3
2
7
3
1
3
5
3
9
4
3
4
7
5
1
Harmonic
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
a
g
e

m
a
x

o
u
t
p
u
t

c
u
r
r
e
n
t
Thermal limits per
harmonic


Operation above the limits illustrated (Section 10, Figure 48) per harmonic is “prohibited”, as the
active filter thermal protection circuitry would initiate “saturation” (i.e., the active filter would current
limit) to protect the IGBTs from damage due to over-temperature.
Note: Most active filters are designed to mitigate typical harmonic spectrums, most notably that associated with 6-pulse
drives and other nonlinear equipment, which consists mainly of low order harmonics (e.g., 5
th
, 7
th
, 11
th
, 13
th
, 17
th

and 19
th
etc.). At higher order characteristic harmonic frequencies, there are lower values of currents to mitigate.
For similar rms current levels, the losses in the output devices, usually IGBTs, increase significantly, and
sometimes exponentially, with increases in frequency. Therefore, the power that devices have to be derated
thermally as per Section 10, Figure 48. This is accomplished automatically with the active filter.
The majority of standard active filters, whether they are based on ‘broadband’ performance (i.e. inject all the non
linear current components into the load) and/or ‘selective FFT’ (i.e. they have the option of individual harmonic
attenuation selection’), are affected by these thermal constraints.
Based on the graph in Section 10, Figure 48 and the circuit in Section 10, Figure 47, only 45% of the
active filter current rating would be available to compensate from the 11
th
harmonic upwards without
temperature limits being exceeded (which would be prevented by saturation). Similarly, from the
same graph, if the passive filter contained 5
th
, 7
th
, 11
th
and 13
th
tuned limbs, the available active filter
current to mitigate from 15
th
harmonic upwards would be 33% rated capacity.
Therefore, as illustrated above, it is not always possible to reduce the rating of a standard shunt active
filter when operated with a passive filter. For example, a 400 A active filter will have 400 A
maximum current available for all harmonic currents from 2
nd
to the 50
th
harmonic. Based on the 5
th

and 7
th
harmonic currents being attenuated by the passive filter, as depicted in Section 10, Figure 47,
only 180 A will be available from the active filter for remainder of the harmonic currents from the 11
th

upward. The active filter will of course also mitigate any residual 5
th
and 7
th
harmonics not attenuated
by the passive filter. If the total harmonic current above the 11
th
is above 180 A, a larger rating of
active filter may be necessary. The larger rating of active filter will also have the same thermal
constraints per harmonic current compensation.



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Similarly, for example, if a nonlinear load needed 280 A of mitigation after the 5
th
and 7
th
harmonics
were attenuated by a passive filter, then the necessary rating of active filter would be, according to
Section 10, Figure 48:
I
AF
=
45 . 0
A 280
= 623 A
Therefore an active filter of rated current of at least 623 A would be necessary. Likely ratings may be
650 A, 750 A or 800 A. It could be argued, therefore, that the rating of the “standard” active filter
cannot be reduced when used in conjunction with passive filter and that the larger active filter rating
necessary for operation with the passive filter could in fact mitigate all the harmonics of the nonlinear
load without the need for passive filtration. Therefore, it is important that manufacturers be consulted
closely when considering the use of “standard” shunt active filters with a hybrid passive-active
configuration.
Hybrid passive-active filters for installations with large nonlinear loads are often custom designed,
some shunt-connected (an example of which is illustrated in Section 10, Figure 49, below) and some
series-connected, depending on the application.

FIGURE 49
Practical Example of Hybrid Shunt Passive-Active Filter


As can be seen in Section 10, Figure 49, above, the configuration of the example of custom designed,
hybrid passive-active filter comprises an active filter connected in series with a passive filter having
two tuned limbs for the 5
th
and 7
th
harmonic, respectively.
The active filter and passive filter are connected via coupling transformers. The operation of the
hybrid scheme is such that the active filter, connected in series to the passive filter via the coupling
transformer imposes a voltage at the terminals at connection with the nonlinear load, which forces the
harmonic currents to circulate through the passive filter, attenuating the 5
th
and 7
th
harmonic. The
residual 5
th
and 7
th
harmonic and the harmonic currents above the 7
th
would be compensated for by the
active filter.



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The active filter may improve, depending on the configuration, the passive filter compensation
characteristics while also maintaining that the passive filter operates independently of any variations
in natural resonant frequencies or filter characteristics (e.g., due to aging of components which would
normally adversely affect operation). However, the passive filter kVAr at harmonic light load may be
problematic on generator-derived supplies injecting leading reactive current into the source.
By their nature hybrid passive-active filters are not as simple to apply as standard active filters.
12 “Active Front Ends” for AC PWM Drives
“Active front ends”, also known as “sinusoidal input rectifiers”, are offered by a number of AC drive
and UPS system companies in order to offer a low input harmonic footprint. An example of the
application of an “active front end” (AFE) to an AC PWM drive is shown in Section 10, Figure 50,
below.
As can be seen below, the normal 6-pulse diode input bridge has been replaced by a fully controlled
IGBT bridge, an identical configuration to the output inverter bridge. The DC bus and the IGBT
output bridge architecture are similar to that in standard 6-pulse AC PWM drives with diode input
bridges.

FIGURE 50
Application of an IGBT “Active Front End” to an AC PWM Drive


Employing PWM (pulse width modulation) waveform control techniques, similar to that utilized in
the construction of the output voltage waveform, the input IGBT bridge synthesizes a sinusoidal input
current waveform as shown in Section 10, Figure 51.




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FIGURE 51
”Active Front End” Input Current and Voltage Waveforms


As can be seen in Section 10, Figure 52, below, the operation of the input IGBT input bridge rectifier
does significantly reduce low order harmonics compared to conventional AC PWM drives with
6-pulse diode bridges with a typical I
thd
of 2-3% (<50
th
harmonic). However, they can also introduce
significant high order harmonics, above the 50
th
, as also illustrated below. The I
thd
of the harmonics
above the 50
th
, according to the information below, are well in excess of the I
thd
for those harmonics
below the 50
th
. (It should be noted that only harmonics up to 50
th
are usually considered in harmonics
calculations, standard harmonic measurements and harmonic rules and recommendations. Harmonics
above the 50
th
may have an adverse effect on plant and equipment unless suitably mitigated).
In addition, the action of IGBT switching introduces a pronounced “ripple” at carrier frequencies
(~2-3 kHz) into the voltage waveform which must be attenuated by a combination of AC line reactors
(which also serve as an energy store that allows the input IGBT rectifier to act as a boost regulator for
the DC bus) and capacitors to form a passive inductance-capacitance-inductance filter (L-C-L filter),
as illustrated in the schematic (Section 10, Figure 50). Although a significant amount of the AC
voltage ripple is attenuated, some residual may still appear on the system network, possibly exciting
parallel resonance. Therefore, depending of the magnitude and nature of this residual ripple, further
filtering may be necessary.
In order to minimize the effect of the residual voltage ripple, the ratio of short circuit power to drive
power should be as high as possible, for example, above 20:1, although this may not always be
practicable in many marine installations.
Compared to similarly-rated conventional 6-pulse AC PWM drives, AFE drive have significantly
higher conducted and radiated EMI emissions, and therefore, special precautions and installation
techniques may be necessary when applying them.




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FIGURE 52
Typical Harmonic Current Input Spectrum for AC PWM Drive with an
“Active Front End”. Note the Harmonic Currents Above the 50
th



AFE drives are inherently “four quadrant” (i.e., they can drive and brake in both directions of rotation
with any excess kinetic energy during braking regenerated to the supply), and unlike SCR based
drives, will not result in fuse rupture, in the event of a power failure during regenerative braking
commutation. AFE AC drives offer high dynamic response and are relatively immune to voltage dips.
However, the effect of severe regenerative braking on the generators, for example, on main propulsion
drives during emergency reversal, may have to be investigated.
The true power factor of AFE drive is high (approximately 0.98-1.0). The reactive current is usually
controllable via the drive interface keypad.



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S E C T I O N 11 Harmonic Limit Recommendations
1 General Systems
In general systems, the total harmonic voltage distortion (V
thd
) should not exceed 5%, as measured at
any point of common coupling (PCC), with any individual harmonic voltage distortion not exceeding
3% of the fundamental voltage value.
The range of harmonics to be taken into account should be up to the 50
th
harmonic.
2 Dedicated Systems
On dedicated systems, such as a dedicated propulsion switchboard, where other ships service loads
are supplied by a separate switchboard, higher levels of total harmonic voltage distortion (V
thd
) may
be permissible, provided the equipment is designed to operate at the higher limits.
For example: when all of the equipment and consumers connected to the dedicated system are
designed and rated for a total harmonic voltage distortion of 10%, then the system should be operated
within this 10% limit, in lieu of the general 5% limit. Further when the system is operated at the 10%
limit, the voltage distortions from each of the individual harmonics are to be within the ratings of all
of the equipment and consumers connected to the dedicated system.
This method is generally not practical on power systems where propulsion loads, ship service loads
and/or industrial loads are all supplied from a common power system. Generally, there are too many
different manufacturers and too many different branch circuits, for all of the equipment connected to
the system to be designed for an increased level of harmonic voltage distortion.
For example: Most of the large drives on a main 4160V switchboard may be rated for 12%, but the
equipment supplied by one branch circuit off the 4160V switchboard may be rated for only 5%.
Further, the transformers to the 480V system may only be rated for 8% and the equipment supplied
from the branch circuits off the 480V system may only be rated for 5%.
This increased limit of harmonic voltage distortion should be based on formal guarantees or formal
declarations from equipment manufacturers, such that the faultless operation, safety and long term
reliability of all connected equipment can be demonstrated.
The range of harmonics to be taken into account should be up to the 50
th
harmonic.
3 Operating Modes
All operating modes of the vessel and associated electrical power demands should be considered. The
harmonic limit recommendations would be applicable during all operating modes. However, if the
harmonic limit recommendations are exceeded during those operating modes that do not occur
frequently or those operating modes that will not last for an extended period, then it may not be
necessary to provide any further harmonic mitigation provided that immediate adverse effects of
harmonics (e.g. instrumentation errors) will not result.




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S E C T I O N 12 Calculation of Harmonic Voltage
Distortion

The operation of both large individual and/or large cumulative nonlinear loads needs to be considered
with regard to their impact on the power system voltage distortion and subsequent effect on other
loads. These calculations are usually undertaken using dedicated harmonic estimation software which
often have models of various types of nonlinear loads (e.g., 6-pulse drives with varying values of AC
line and/or DC bus reactance, 12-pulse drives, 18-pulse drives, etc.) and include the effects of phase
angle diversity, the connection of linear loads and the effects of cables and other system inductances
on the resultant harmonics at a point of common connection (PCC).
However, in order to appreciate the methodology of harmonic estimation software, examples of
“simple” manual harmonic calculations are given.
Note: For simplicity, these examples do not consider any harmonics above the 25
th
(the exact procedure can be used up
to the 50
th
) nor the effects of phase angle diversification, connected linear loads, the effect of cables or other
system inductance on the resultant harmonic currents and subsequent voltage distortion.
1 Manual Calculation of Voltage Distortion
Simple voltage distortion calculations can be undertaken based on specific information being
available regarding the nonlinear load(s) percentage harmonic currents and source data [e.g., course
kVA, impedance (or X
d
″) or short circuit capacity].
Example 1
An 850 HP/630 kW 6-pulse AC PWM drive with full load input current of 962 A is to be
supplied from a 2000 kVA 6000 V/480 V transformer with 6% impedance. The drive
manufacturer has advised the characteristic harmonic currents to the 25
th
based on a 2% DC
bus reactor on this transformer source to be as below.
Note: The harmonics up to the 50
th
should be used in all practical applications. In this instance, only up to the
25
th
harmonic is used for simplicity in order to demonstrate the principles. For higher order harmonics,
the calculations are exactly the same).
Harmonic spectrum to 25
th
is:
5
th
– 32.27%
7
th
– 11.21%
11
th
– 7.37%
13
th
– 3.91%
17
th
– 3.45%
19
th
– 2.35%
23
rd
– 1.82%
25
th
– 1.51%




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Calculate the source short circuit capacity and supply reactance on secondary of transformer:
i) Transformer full load current (A) =
3 × V Secondary
kVA r Transforme
................................... (12.1)
=
732 . 1 480
10 2000
3
×
×

Transformer full load current (A) = 2406 A
ii) Short circuit current =
impedance r Transforme
current load full r Transforme
........................................ (12.2)
=
06 . 0
2406

Short circuit current = 40,100 A (40.1 kA)
iii) Short circuit MVA = Current Circuit Short V × × 3 ......................................... (12.3)
= 1.732 × 480 × 40100
Short circuit MVA = 33.34 MVA
iv) Supply reactance =
MVA Circuit Short
V
2
............................................................. (12.4)
=
6
2
10 34 . 33
480
×

Supply reactance = 0.00692 Ω
Once the above information has been established, the individual voltage per harmonic order
can be calculated using the following method:
Harmonic current per order = I
rms
× I
h
%
............................................................... (12.5)
where
I
rms
= total rms input current
I
h
%
= percentage harmonic current at harmonic order (e.g., 32.27% at 5
th
)
Voltage (L-L) per harmonic order = 3 × h × X
supply
× I
h
................................... (12.6)
where
h = harmonic order (i.e., 5
th
= 5, 11
th
= 11…)
X
supply
= supply reactance, in ohms
I
h
= harmonic current (A) at harmonic order, h
Harmonic voltage as a percentage of L-L rms voltage =
rms
h
V
V % 100 ×
.................. (12.7)
where
V
h
= harmonic voltage at order, h
V
rms
= system L-L rms voltage



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For 5
th
harmonic:
5
th
harmonic current = I
rms
× I
h
%

= 962 × 0.3227
= 310.44 A
5
th
harmonic voltage (L-L) = 3 × h × X
supply
× I
h

= 1.732 × 5 × 0.00692 × 310.44
= 18.6 V
5
th
harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage =
rms
h
V
V % 100 ×

=
480
% 100 6 . 108 ×

5
th
harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage = 3.88%
Similarly for 7
th
harmonic:
7
th
harmonic current = I
rms
× I
h
%

= 962 × 0.1121
= 107.84 A
7
th
harmonic voltage (L-L) = 3 × h × X
supply
× I
h

= 1.732 × 7 × 0.00692 × 107.84
= 9.04 V
7
th
harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage =
rms
h
V
V % 100 ×

=
480
% 100 04 . 9 ×

7
th
harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage = 1.88%
Using the above method for all harmonics up to 25
th
, the following summary table can be
constructed:

TABLE 1
Summary of Harmonics to 25
th
Harmonic I
h
%
I
h
(A) V
h
(V) V
h
%

5 32.27 310.44 18.60 3.88
7 11.21 107.84 9.04 1.88
11 7.37 70.9 9.35 1.95
13 3.91 37.61 5.85 1.22
17 3.45 33.2 6.76 1.41
19 2.35 22.61 5.14 1.71
23 1.82 17.51 4.83 1.01
25 1.51 14.52 4.35 0.91



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Once the above table has been constructed, the total harmonic voltage distortion (V
thd
) can be
calculated (based on Equation 2.6 in Section 2):
V
thd
=

=
25
5
2 %
h
h
V =
2 %
25
2 %
11
2 %
7
2 %
5
..... V V V V + + + ........................................ (12.8)
V
thd
=
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
91 . 0 10 . 1 71 . 1 41 . 1 22 . 1 95 . 1 88 . 1 88 . 3 + + + + + + +
V
thd
= 5.55%
Alternatively, the sum of individual harmonic voltages can be used to also obtain the V
thd
:
V
thd
=
rms
h
h
V
v

=
×
25
5
% 100
=
rms
V
v v v v
2
25
2
11
2
7
2
5
....... + +
............................................... (12.9)
V
thd
=
480
% 100 64 . 26 ×

V
thd
= 5.55%
Example 2
The same 850 HP/630 kW, 480 V, 962 A, 6-pulse AC PWM is to be supplied by a generator
of rating 2000 kVA and subtransient reactance (X
d
″) of 16%. Calculate the voltage distortion
on the generator attributed to drive.
The percentage harmonic current spectrum based on the generator connection is given below.
Note that compared to Example 1, the values are lower. This is normal, as the harmonic
currents drawn from this “soft source” are limited by the leakage reactance of the source.
However, this reduced harmonic current can result in significantly higher voltage distortion,
as can be seen below.
Harmonic spectrum to 25
th
is:
5
th
– 25.63%
7
th
– 7.8%
11
th
– 5.27%
13
th
– 3.43%
17
th
– 1.73%
19
th
– 1.55%
23
rd
– 0.93%
25
th
– 0.78%
Calculate the source short circuit capacity and reactance of the generator:
i) Generator full load current (A) =
3 × V
kVA Generator
............................................ (12.10)
=
732 . 1 480
10 2000
3
×
×

Generator full load current (A) = 2406 A



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ii) Short circuit current (A) =
d
X Generator
current load full Generator
′ ′
................................. (12.11)
=
16 . 0
2406

Short circuit current (A) = 15,038 A (15.038 kA)
iii) Short circuit MVA = 3 × V × Generator Short Circuit Current ..................... (12.12)
= 1.732 × 480 × 15038
Short circuit MVA = 12.5 MVA
iv) Generator reactance =
MVA Circuit Short
V
2
...................................................... (12.13)
=
6
2
10 5 . 12
480
×

Generator reactance = 0.0184 Ω
Once the above information has been established, the individual voltage per harmonic order
can be calculated using exactly the same method as per Example 1:
For 5
th
harmonic:
5
th
harmonic current = I
rms
× I
h
%

= 962 × 0.2563
= 246.6 A
5
th
harmonic voltage (L-L) = 3 × h × X
supply
× I
h

= 1.732 × 5 × 0.0184 × 246.6
= 39.29 V
5
th
harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage =
rms
h
V
V % 100 ×

=
480
% 100 29 . 39 ×

5
th
harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage = 8.18%
Again, similarly for 7
th
harmonic:
7
th
harmonic current = I
rms
× I
h
%

= 962 × 0.078
= 75.0 A
7
th
harmonic voltage (L-L) = 3 × h × X
supply
× I
h

= 1.732 × 7 × 0.0184 × 75.0
= 16.73 V



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7
th
harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage =
rms
h
V
V % 100 ×

=
480
% 100 73 . 16 ×

7
th
harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage = 3.49%
As per Example 1, data regarding all the harmonics to 25
th
can be calculated. A summary
table can be constructed as follows:

TABLE 2
Summary of Harmonics to 25
th

Harmonic I
h
%
I
h
(A) V
h
(V) V
h
%

5 25.63 246.6 39.29 8.19
7 7.8 75.0 16.73 3.49
11 5.27 50.7 17.77 3.70
13 3.43 33.0 13.68 2.85
17 1.73 16.65 9.02 1.88
19 1.55 14.91 9.04 1.88
23 0.93 8.95 6.56 1.37
25 0.78 7.5 5.98 1.25

Also, as per Example 1, once the above values have been established, the total harmonic
voltage distortion (V
thd
) can be calculated (based on Equation 2.6 in Section 2):
V
thd
=

=
25
5
2 %
h
h
V =
2 %
25
2 %
11
2 %
7
2 %
5
..... V V V V + + +
V
thd
=
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
25 . 1 37 . 1 88 . 1 88 . 1 85 . 2 70 . 3 49 . 3 19 . 8 + + + + + + +
V
thd
= 10.57%
Alternatively, the sum of individual harmonic voltages can be used to also obtain the V
thd
:
V
thd
=
rms
h
h
V
v

=
×
25
5
% 100
=
rms
V
v v v v
2
25
2
11
2
7
2
5
....... + +
............................................... (12.9)
V
thd
=
480
% 100 73 . 50 ×

V
thd
= 10.57%
Note: From the above examples, the source impedance has a significant effect on the harmonic currents drawn and their
resultant impact on the subsequent voltage distortion.
For information on the calculation of source short circuit MVA for harmonic distortion estimation
purposes on parallel power sources (generators or transformers), please refer to Subsection 7/3).



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2 Software Estimation of Harmonic Distortion
As indicated in Subsection 12/1, the manual calculation for a simple system with one nonlinear load
can be rather repetitive and tiresome. There is also a significant chance of human error being
introduced. However, on a very simple system, it may prove valuable to undertake manual
calculations to provide an indication of harmonic voltage distortion.
In some cases, there may be multiple harmonic current sources, and therefore, some cancellation via
phase angle diversification. The effect of any connected linear load, especially induction motors, may
attenuate higher order harmonics. In addition, the effect of cable and other system inductances will
have an impact on the harmonic currents and subsequent voltage distortion.
There are a number of harmonic estimation software packages available which are relatively easy to
use. Often, they form part of a comprehensive electrical design and analysis suite where a harmonics
estimation program is only a small part of the overall package.
A number of drive and harmonic mitigation equipment manufacturers do have their own harmonic
estimation software available, either for customers to use via CD or download or indirectly via
company application engineers. However, these simulations should be seen as “estimates” only.
Written guarantees of drive(s) and/or any harmonic mitigation performance should be requested from
the vendor.
Comprehensive power system analysis software packages are also available from dedicated
engineering software engineering companies. These software packages are not provided by the
equipment manufacturers and are therefore should give impartial results.
Many of the harmonics modeling and dedicated electrical design and simulation software packages
can be tailored to individual customer needs.
A comprehensive harmonics software package should have the following capabilities:
i) Have a large number of nodes available for full power system simulations.
ii) Be able to simultaneously model individual harmonic current data and subsequent voltage
distortion based on a range of multiple nonlinear loads types.
iii) Be able to introduce varying values of voltage unbalance and background voltage distortion
into the model.
iv) Be capable of handling all harmonic sequences: positive, negative and zero.
v) Be able to perform frequency scans based on small increments of frequency and to develop
frequency response curves and other data to establish possible resonance points within the
power system.
vi) Have in a library, a full range of nonlinear load models [including AC PWM 6-pulse drives
with varying values of AC and/or DC reactance, DC drives (including notching simulations)
with values of AC side commutation reactance together with 12-pulse, 18-pulse, 24-pulse
versions of AC PWM and DC drives, AC cycloconverters, load commutated inverters,
four-wire distribution systems, etc.].
The package should be able to model the more common types of harmonic mitigation,
including passive L-C filter, phase staggering, wide spectrum filters, active filters, AFE
drives, etc. In addition, the effect of any connected linear loads should be able to be modeled.



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vii) Calculate and display a full range of time domain voltage and current waveforms, full FFT
harmonic voltage and current spectra to at least 50
th
harmonic at each node.
viii) Be able to adjust automatically for harmonic phase angles based on variations in the fundamental
frequency phase angles.
ix) Be able to model any range or number of transformer and/or generator data (including
equivalent data for paralleled units).
x) Should be easy to understand and have report facilities such as comprehensive report writing.


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S E C T I O N 13 Provision of Information on
Harmonics
1 Information to be requested from Vendors
The following should be the minimum information provided to shipbuilders, consultants, designers,
ship-owners and ship-operators et al (as applicable) in order to calculate harmonic voltage distortion:
i) Description of equipment, including type, voltage supply specifications, pulse number and
kW rating.
ii) Details of the total number of units proposed to be installed on vessel or offshore installation.
iii) Total harmonic current distortion (I
thd
), harmonic current spectrum up to 50
th
harmonic (or up
to 100
th
for equipment with “active front ends”) and total magnitude of total harmonic current
per unit, per circuit and per installation at rated load, as applicable.
[The actual source impedance (if transformer) or subtransient reactance (X
d
″) (if generator)
used shall be stated for each calculation.]
[If four-wire systems (three-phase and neutral, either grounded or insulated) are utilized for
domestic or lighting supplies, calculations of the estimated neutral currents shall be provided
on a per distribution panel at rated load basis].
iv) Full details of any proposed harmonic mitigation per unit, including estimated attenuation in
total harmonic current distortion (I
thd
) and total harmonic current per unit, per circuit or per
installation up to 50
th
harmonic (or up to 100
th
for equipment with “active front ends”), as
applicable.
2 Information to be included with a Harmonic Analysis
The following information should be included with a harmonic analysis:
i) Single line electrical diagram of vessel showing connection of any significant (singular or
cumulative) nonlinear load(s) on the system.
ii) Description of significant nonlinear load(s), including duty, pulse number, voltage supply
specifications and kW rating.
iii) Total number, type and kW rating of nonlinear loads proposed to be installed in vessel or
offshore installation.
iv) If four-wire systems (three-phase and neutral, either grounded or insulated) are utilized for
domestic or lighting supplies, calculations of the estimated neutral currents should be
provided on a per distribution panel at rated load basis.
v) Full details of any proposed mitigation, including estimated attenuation in total harmonic
current distortion (I
thd
) and total harmonic current per unit, per circuit or per installation up to
50
th
harmonic (or up to 100
th
for equipment with “active front ends”), as applicable.



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vi) Calculations of total harmonic voltage distortion (V
thd
) on the system based on all significant
nonlinear loads operating as designed and on a worse case scenario with regards to the
number and rating of generators running. The calculations should be on a per-switchboard
basis, including any emergency switchboards, and at the terminals of the generators.
The total harmonic voltage distortion (V
thd
) should be measured in additional to all individual
voltage harmonics up to 50
th
(or up to 100
th
if equipment with “active front ends”) that are
being proposed.
The source impedance or subtransient reactance (X
d
″) used in the calculations should be
stated for each case.
vii) Full details of any proposed mitigation, including estimated attenuation in total harmonic
voltage distortion (V
thd
) and total harmonic voltage up to 50
th
harmonic (or up to 100
th

harmonics for equipment with “active front ends”), as applicable on each switchboard,
including any emergency switchboards and on the generator terminals, based on the worst
case scenario basis as per vi) above.



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S E C T I O N 14 Harmonic Surveys and
Measurement Equipment

This Section outlines the safety precautions, planning, methodology and typical harmonic
measurement/power quality meters and analyzers available to vessel, rig, platform staff or shipyard
electrical engineers should they wish to carry out their own measurements.
There are also a number of specialist independent companies available to carry out harmonic and
power quality surveys in most countries should this be needed. It is standard procedure for a
comprehensive report to be written following the survey.
1 Safety Precautions during Harmonic Surveys
As with all electrical tasks, safety is the main concern. Some of the following recommendations are
common sense, but are necessary for the safety of the vessel, rig or platform and of the individuals
concerned:
i) Measurements should not be undertaken in heavy or rolling seas due to the possible exposure
of live equipment and the risk of injury or death due to individuals coming in contact with
live busbars, terminals, etc., due to the vessel’s movement.
ii) The harmonic measurements should be undertaken by two individuals; one a qualified
electrical engineer conversant with the measurement equipment and a second individual to
assist, who is also fully trained in CPR and other first aid. The latter is necessary when
connecting and disconnecting the harmonic analyzer voltage leads and current probes on to
live equipment.
iii) Proper protective clothing and other safety equipment should be worn when undertaking
measurements.
This should include:
• Fire resistant clothing
• Safety glasses or full face shields
• Safety helmets
• Rubber electrical gloves with full length sleeves
In addition, rubber mats should be placed on the deck where the harmonic analyzer is being
used. They should be moved to each site as necessary.
iv) For safety reasons, it is not recommended that directly connected harmonic measurements
above 690 V/750 V AC (e.g., on high voltage, up to or over 11 kV on some vessels) are
undertaken unless by experienced staff with suitable equipment or by a dedicated, specialist
company with appropriate equipment to safely undertake measurements above these levels.
A number of harmonic analyzers (and accompanying test leads and current probes) are only
suitable for use up to 600 V AC. Others are rated up to 830 or 1000 V AC. Therefore, the
maximum voltage rating of the harmonic analyzer has to be checked against the power system
voltage before undertaking the survey.



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v) All electrical equipment should be de-energized and locked off before connecting the
harmonic measuring equipment. There are a number of safety and operational issues. If the
equipment is provided with door locking mechanism when the equipment is operating, it may
be necessary to stop the equipment in order to gain the necessary access.
Similarly, removing covers from equipment while the equipment is operating is not
recommended. However, if this has to be undertaken, great care must be taken in order that
the metal covers do not touch parts. Rubber gloves, rubber mats and other protective clothing
are therefore recommended as mentioned above.
vi) Before connecting any harmonic measurement equipment, a true rms voltage meter should be
used to confirm the voltage levels OR that the voltage is zero (i.e., the equipment has been
disconnected).
vii) Care should be taken when connecting the harmonic analyzer voltage leads (these can be of
the crocodile type and if not fixed to a suitable point may spring off. Prior to connection, the
most appropriate voltage test points should be established.
Current probes of the “clamp on” type (available to around 1200 A), which usually have
round or rectangular jaws, are simply for use on cables. However, for some types of busbars,
this type of current probe may be problematic, and therefore, AmpFlex type probes are
necessary. (These are flexible current probes, available up to at least 6500 A, which have to
be passed around the busbar and clipped into place. This process entails the individual
placing his/her hands adjacent to and often behind the busbars. Without thick rubber gloves
with full rubber sleeves this can be extremely dangerous and should not be undertaken unless
these are worn with other appropriate protective equipment and a CPR-trained assistant is
available.)
Note: The type of current probe necessary should be established prior to surveys or a range of suitable probes
should be available.
viii) Before undertaking the harmonic measurements, it is advised that the individuals become
fully conversant with the harmonic/power quality analyzer. It is often worthwhile to
undertake some simple measurements, even in a workshop environment, in order to gain this
initial experience.
2 Planning the Harmonic Survey or Measurements
In order to minimize the time necessary to undertake the harmonic survey and/or measurements, some
simple planning is necessary.
A single line diagram is often the most significant source of information. From this, the main sources
of harmonics (i.e., larger nonlinear loads) can be identified (e.g., large variable speed drives).
However, on some power systems (for example, four-wire systems on cruise liners), the large
numbers of nonlinear single-phase loads and their impact may not be apparent from a single line
diagram.
Once the nonlinear loads have been identified, a list or schedule should be compiled of every major
nonlinear load to be measured and recorded.
In addition to measurements at the terminals of every major nonlinear load, recordings should also be
taken on all switchboards, including emergency switchboards, and if possible, on the generators in
operation.
All measurements should be undertaken based on a “worst-case scenario” (i.e., maximum nonlinear
loading, therefore. maximum harmonic distortion, with minimum generators on line based on real
operational conditions). Failing that, measurements must be recorded at full operational loads. It is
important that the information gathered reflects the expected operational conditions.



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With the electrical loading constant, the nonlinear loads furthest away physically from the main
switchboard should be measured first. Then measurements should be recorded for other nonlinear
equipment, progressively towards the main switchboard(s) and generator(s).
Finally, although most harmonic analyzers have sufficient onboard memory and/or can download to a
laptop computer, a paper list of nonlinear equipment to be measured is recommended. Information
such as total harmonic voltage distortion (V
thd
), total harmonic current distortion (I
thd
), current and
kW of each nonlinear load is useful in the event of misnaming a given load on the harmonic analyzer
or laptop computer (i.e., it often helps in identifying the correct load based on that data).
3 Information to be recorded from Harmonic Measurements
Prior to measurements being undertaken, the equipment should be confirmed to be within calibration
time limits and that the necessary voltage and current probes and full protective equipment are to
hand. Only then should the actual harmonic survey and/or harmonic measurements proceed.
As stated earlier, it is essential that the measurements are taken based on a worst-case scenario, or
failing that, at maximum operational loading and maximum harmonic distortion with regard to the
various nonlinear loads. It should be remembered that the higher the magnitude of harmonic current
in the system, the higher the voltage distortion.
Note: Always connect the ground lead (if applicable), followed by the voltage leads and finally the current probes with
the correct polarity. Removal of the equipment leads and probes should be in the reverse order.
For each nonlinear load selected, the following data should be measured and recorded on all three
phases, (and neutral, if appropriate, on four-wire distribution systems), starting with those further
away from the generators. In addition, similar data should be recorded on the main switchboard(s)
and generators.
Information to be recorded:
i) rms voltage and rms current
ii) Total harmonic voltage distortion (V
thd
)
iii) Total harmonic current distortion (I
thd
)
iv) Full harmonic spectrum up to 50
th
harmonic (up to 100
th
harmonic for active front end drives).
v) Harmonic text (i.e., FFT data of harmonic spectrum in text) for voltage and current harmonics
giving magnitudes and phase angles.
vi) Time domain waveforms of both voltage and current
vii) Voltage unbalance between phases
viii) Background total voltage distortion (V
thd
) without the specific nonlinear load currently under
test operating would be desirable but may not be practical due to operational reasons.
The majority of harmonic analyzers can capture the data detailed in i) to vi) simultaneously, either
internally and/or via download to a laptop computer. Some can also capture voltage unbalance [vii)].
In addition to the information downloadable to a laptop or stored in the harmonic analyzer, the data in
i) to iii) should also be recorded on paper, as recommended in the previous Subsection. This may
help to identify any misnamed loads.
Once a complete set of measurements have been taken, a full report, complete with waveforms,
harmonic spectra and other data as above, should be compiled. In addition, a simple diagram
detailing the total harmonic voltage distortion (V
thd
) at the various points in the power system is
recommended. (This may be via an enlarged single line diagram). The gathered harmonics data can
then be compared against the appropriate harmonic limit recommendations and/or used to aid the
consideration of harmonic mitigation for specific items of equipment of nonlinear (e.g., electric
variable speed drives) and/or for other specific items of equipment such as switchboards.



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4 Examples of Harmonic Analyzers
There are a number of high quality harmonic and power quality analyzers currently on the market,
some of which are illustrated in the following Paragraphs, together with some sample screen displays.
When selecting a suitable harmonic/power quality analyzer, check that it can read up to at least the
50
th
harmonic, so that the voltage range is suitable for use on all envisaged applications and that a
suitable range of current probes are available for that particular analyzer. [Some equipment is rated to
only measure safely up to 600 V rms. If above that (e.g., 690 V or 750 V), another type of analyzer
may be necessary.]
Most “harmonic analyzers” are “power quality analyzers”, and perform a range of other measurements
and record, in addition to harmonic data, for example, voltage sags and swells, transients, power
usage and power factor measurements. However, most are not normally suitable for measuring the
output data from AC PWM variable speed drives. (For this, special digital multi-meters with shielding
and low pass filters are necessary.)
Typical harmonic/power quality analyzers include:
4.1 The Fluke 43B
The Fluke 43B is a harmonic/power quality analyzer, rated up to 600 V rms. It is not a full three-
phase unit (i.e., it does not measure all three phases simultaneously) – it measures one phase at a time
(assuming all phases are balanced and data from each is similar, this may be sufficient). It is compact,
lightweight and can store a number of readings (up to 20 screen or data readings based on a maximum
of two selectable parameters) onboard without the need for downloading to computer.
The Fluke 43B measures up to the 50
th
harmonic and is supplied with appropriate software for
downloading and to assist in report compilation. Using suitable proprietary current probes, measurements
up to 2000 A (up to 600 V rms) are possible.

FIGURE 1
Fluke 43B Harmonic/Power Quality Analyzer





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A few samples of screen/computer download data from the Fluke 43B include:

FIGURE 2
Fluke 43B Harmonics Screen Data Available (In This Case Current)
[Voltage and power harmonic data are also available.]


FIGURE 3
Fluke 43B Can Measure Sags and Swells
up to 16 Days on a Per Cycle Basis





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FIGURE 4
Up to 40 Transients (Voltage or Current)
Can Be Captured with the Fluke 41B


FIGURE 5
True rms Voltage and Current Waveform Display(s) from Fluke 43B





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The Fluke 43B is a good example of a relatively low cost harmonic/power quality analyzer for
applications needing measurements to 600 V rms and up to 2000 A. This meter may be more suited
to fault finding and/or “snapshot sampling”.
A full three-phase analyzer may be used for full harmonic surveys and/or for other power quality
tasks, whereby all three phases are measured and/or monitored simultaneously, to prevent data being
“missed” (which may occur with the type of analyzer above if the event occurred on the phase not
being monitored).
Fluke, recognizing the limitation of the 43B for “real” three-phase applications has recently launched
the Fluke 433/434 series of three-phase harmonic/power quality analyzers which have an excellent
range of features, including voltage to 1000 V rms and current to 2000 A.
4.2 AEMC 3945
This is a good example of a three-phase harmonic/power quality analyzer which can measure and
record harmonics to the 50
th
on voltages up to 830 V rms and current per phase up to 6500 A.

FIGURE 6
AEMC 3945 Three-phase Harmonic/Power Quality
Analyzer with Real Time Color Display





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FIGURE 7
AEMC 3945 Connected On-site Illustrating “Wrap-around”
Rogowski-type, AmpFlex 6500 A Current Probes
A range of clamp-on current probes (to 1200 A) and a scalable adaptor box for use with up to three
existing CTs are also available.

In addition to the full range of harmonic measurements, the AEMC 3945 can measure and record
short-term flicker, capture up to 50 transients or other disturbances to 1/256
th
of a cycle, record
voltage and current unbalance, trend recordings and monitoring of a number of parameters based on
min/max limits and “photograph” up to twelve data displays. Comprehensive software is provided to
assist in report compilation.
Samples of analyzer real time displays on the instrument include:




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FIGURE 8
Sample Displays of Voltage and Current Waveforms



FIGURE 9
Three-phase Voltage Waveforms





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2006
FIGURE 10
Transient Current Waveforms



FIGURE 11
Three-phase Voltage Harmonics





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FIGURE 12
Harmonic Direction



FIGURE 13
Harmonic Sequences





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FIGURE 14
Phasor Diagram


Examples of real-time data via a computer from the AEMC 3945 include:

FIGURE 15
AEMC 3945 Configuration via Computer






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FIGURE 16
Real Time Current Waveforms via Computer


FIGURE 17
Real Time Computer Display of Harmonic Currents





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2006
FIGURE 18
Unbalance in Real Time via Computer


Up to 830 V rms voltage measurement and 6500 A, capability of the AEMC 3945 should favor its use
on a wide range of marine power quality applications.
4.3 Hioki 3196
This harmonic/power quality analyzers can offer some advantages, for example in the area of longer
term monitoring plus data recorded and displayed.
The Hioki 3196 can measure currents up to 5000 A and voltages up to 600 V rms, which means, as
per the Fluke 43B, it is unsuitable for 690 V or 750 V systems (the new Fluke 433/434 series can,
however, operate at these higher voltage levels).




Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment

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FIGURE 19
Hioki 3196 Power Analyzer with Voltage and Current Probes


Examples of actual survey measurements from a Hioki 3196 follow:

FIGURE 20
AC VFD Three-phase Voltage and Current Measurements from Hioki 3196





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FIGURE 21
Harmonic FFT Measurements from Hioki 3196 with 5
th
Harmonic Selected


FIGURE 22
Power System V
thd
Trend Recording via Hioki 3196
as a Number of AC VFDs Are Switched On





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FIGURE 23
V
thd
of all Three Phases Recorded by Hioki 3196 when Active Filter
Switched in on Oil Production Platform


FIGURE 24
Summary of Data Sampled from Hioki 3196





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FIGURE 25
Recorded Harmonic Currents by Hioki 3196 on 12-Pulse AC Drive


The Hioki 3196 is a good harmonic/power quality analyzer, limited by the maximum voltage rating of
600 V rms.
5 Measurements on Voltages above 690/750 V AC
Some harmonic analyzers do have the capability to measure harmonics on power systems with
voltages up to 690/750/1000 V AC. Above these levels, it is not recommended due to safety reasons,
that shore, vessel, rig or platform staff undertake directly-connected harmonic measurements/surveys.
In these instances, a specialist company should be subcontracted, who with fully experienced
personnel, specialist safety and measurement equipment rated for higher voltage, can safely carry out
such measurements.
Note: Some vessels and offshore installations have main power systems based on voltages up to or over 11 kV. At these
voltage levels, due to danger of death, special techniques and equipment have to be used in order to directly
measure the harmonic currents and voltages. However, these high voltage systems may have on the main
switchboards, potential transformers (i.e., voltage transformers) and current transformers (e.g., for the Rogowski
type) already installed. Depending on bandwidth (i.e., frequency response) of the transformers (may relatively
accurately measure up to the 50
th
harmonic), the secondaries of the PTs and CTs may be suitable for direct
connection to standard harmonic measurement equipment, subject to suitable scaling being taken into account on
the measurements (i.e., the actual harmonic voltages and currents will have to be scaled up to match ratios of the
transformers) and voltage limits. In these instances, standard harmonic analyzers, including those illustrated,
should be able to be used with reasonable accuracy, subject to the above limitations re PT and CT bandwidth and
scaling accuracy, etc. To this end, scaleable CT adaptor boxes are available as options with some harmonic
analyzers, such as the AEMC 3945.



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A P P E N D I X 1 Recommended Reading

Power System Harmonics, 2
nd
Edition. (2003). Jos Arrillaga and Neville Watson.
ISBN 0-470-85129-5.
Assessment of Electric Power Quality in Ships fitted with Converter Sub-systems. (2004). Janusz
Mindykowski.
ISBN 83-88621-07-6
Electrical Power Systems Quality, 2
nd
Edition. (2002). Roget Dugan, Mark Mc Granaghan et al.
ISBN 0-07-1386220-X.
Power Electronic Converter Harmonics. (1996). Derek Paice.
ISBN 0-7803-5394-3.
Voltage Quality in Electrical Power Systems. (2001). J Schlabbach, D Blume et al.
ISBN 0-85296-975-9.
Variable Frequency AC Motor Drive Systems. (1988). David Finney.
ISBN 0-86341-1142.
IEEE Recommended Practices and Requirements for Harmonic Control in Power Systems. (1992).
IEEE.
ISBN 1-55937-239-7.
Hazardous Areas – A User’s Guide to AC Drive Systems. (1989). Ian C Evans & Des Horne,
Elekotrotek Drives Ltd.
Maritime Electrical Installation and Diesel Electric Propulsion. (2004). Alf-Kare Adnanes. ABB
AS, Norway.
AC Drives : Mitigation – A look at the options. Ian C Evans, Harmonic Solutions Co.Uk. Electricity
+ Control (November 2004).
Handbook of Electrical Calculations, 3
rd
Edition. (2001). H Wayne Beatty.
ISBN 0-07-136298-3.
Harmonic Mitigation for Offshore AC Variable Frequency Drives. Ian C Evans, Harmonic Solutions
Co.Uk. Offshore Visie (October 2002).
The Future is Electric – The Progress of Electric Propulsion. Ian C Evans. Motor Ship (September
2003).
From Oars to Reactors – Electric Drive: The Future of Naval Propulsion. Ian C Evans. Motor Ship
(October 2003).
Electrical Power Quality and Ships Safety. (2004). Janusz Mindykowski, Edward Szmit and Tomasz
Tarasiuk. Polish Academy of Sciences.
Harmonic Mitigation for AC Thruster and Small Propulsion Drives. Ian C Evans, Harmonic
Solutions Co.Uk. Marine Propulsion International (October 2002).



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Foreword
Harmonics (or distortion in wave form) has always existed in electrical power systems. It is harmless as long as its level is not substantial. However, with the recent rapid advancement of power electronics technology, so-called nonlinear loads, such as variable frequency drives for motor power/speed control, are increasingly finding their way to shipboard or offshore applications. Harmonics induced by these nonlinear loads are a potential risk if they are not predicted and controlled. The ABS Guidance Notes for Control of Harmonics in Electrical Power Systems has been developed in order to raise awareness among electrical system designers of the potential risks associated with the harmonics in electrical power systems onboard ships or offshore installations. These Guidance Notes encompass topics from the fundamental physics of harmonics to available means of mitigation to practical testing methods. These Guidance Notes are intended to aid designers to plan an appropriate means of harmonics mitigation early in the design stage of the electrical power distribution systems to make the system robust and predictable.

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..............................22 Interharmonics ....25 Subharmonics ...............2 Line-to-line Voltage (440 V) at Input to a 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive .......9 Input Waveforms (440 V) to 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive...............................1 1 2 3 4 Background.....................................3 Typical Power System Single Line Diagram for DP Class 3 Drilling Rig........................................................................................................................................GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS CONTENTS SECTION 1 Introduction .........7 The Future? ................................................................................................................11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Production of Harmonics ....................................2 415 V Line-to-line Volts on Ship with Four 1100 kW/ 1500 HP AC SCR Converter-fed Thruster Motors....................... 2006 v ........15 Effect of Harmonic Currents on Impedance(s) .........................................................8 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 SECTION 2 The Production of Harmonics.......................22 TABLE 1 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ......................................................5 Main Propulsion Drives .........................................................11 Characteristic Harmonic Currents............................................3 Primary Voltage (11 kV) of Transformer Supplying a 2 MW (2680 HP) Variable Frequency Drive ............................................................................................19 Calculation of Voltage Distortion...............................................22 Line Notching ...........................5 Electrically-driven Podded Propulsor...................................................................................................................................27 Harmonic Sequence Components for 6-Pulse Rectifier ............................................1 The Use of Electric Drives in Marine Applications......................................8 Dynamically-positioned Shuttle Tanker Equipped with AC Electric Variable Speed Main Propulsion and Thrusters ........20 Harmonic Sequence Components..................................................................

24 SCR Line Notching and Associated “Ringing” ...FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2a FIGURE 2b FIGURE 3a FIGURE 3b FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 Voltage and Current Waveforms for Linear Load ...................................................29 1...............................................24 Cycloconverter Current Spectrum – Includes Interharmonics ........................................................................................................30 Voltage Distortion .13 Single-phase Switched Mode Power Supply ................................................12 How Voltage Distortion is Produced (Simplified) ...........23 Exaggerated Example of “Line Notching” .......................11 Simple Single Line Diagram.23 Voltage Notching due to SCR Bridge Commutation...19 How Individual Harmonic Voltage Drops Develop Across System Impedances ............................................................................................................. 29 1 Generators ....................................................13 Harmonic Spectrum of Currents Drawn by Computer Switched Mode Power Supply .................12 Load Current and Volt Drop Waveforms..............17 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current Waveforms for One Phase .14 Computer Power Supply with Single-phase Full Wave Bridge Rectifier .........................................................................3 1...................................32 Shaft Generators .......................33 vi ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006 ....30 Line Notching and Generators..................................25 Waveform Containing both Harmonics and Interharmonics ...............................................................................11 Load and AC Supply Currents ............................19 Simple Three-phase SCR Bridge for Phase Control.............17 Typical 6-Pulse PWM AC Drive .............12 Typical Computer Nonlinear Load .............5 Thermal Losses........................................................................................................1 1...........................................16 Computer SMPS Input Current Waveform ......................................................................27 SECTION 3 Effects of Harmonics ................26 Peak Voltage Deviations due to Interharmonics Voltage ..........................................18 Distorted Currents Induce Voltage Distortion ...............................................................................................................................................4 1....................................................................14 Construction of Complex Wave ........29 Effect of Sequence Components.18 Typical Harmonic Spectrum for 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive............11 Single Phase Full Wave Rectifier................16 Typical Waveform from Computer Switched Power Supply ........2 1.......

......................39 Lighting ........53 Equivalent Circuit for a Generator .........................2 2......... Audio and Video Equipment ................................. 2006 vii ..................................................................................... 48 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Measuring Equipment ..............................................................1 2.................4 Thermal Losses...............38 AC PWM Drive Current Distortion on Weak Source.....................................................................................................1 3............................. 42 Potential for Resonance... 42 6 7 8 Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS).................................35 Proposed NEMA Derating Curve for Harmonic Voltages ........3 4 5 Variable Speed Drives ...................................................1 5...................................................................................................2 8.... 34 Thermal Losses..........47 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ...................44 Cable AC/DC Resistance..................................36 3.....................................................41 Voltage “Flat Topping” due to Pulse Currents .........................40 PWM Drive “Flat Topping” due to Weak Source................. 41 Effects of Line Notching on Lighting................. 45 Neutral Conductors in Four-wire Systems...........................................2 5....43 Flat Topping Reducing Supply Ride-through......... 37 Explosion-proof Motors and Voltage Distortion .................41 5..................................42 Computers and Computer Based Equipment....................................................................................................................52 Radio......... Distribution Transformers and Neutral Currents .....................................................1 8...........................................48 Telephones ......................52 Relays ................51 Circuit Breakers .......43 Cables...2 3..................................................................................................................................................................... Television....53 Capacitors.............3 8............................... 45 Skin and Proximity Effects .....................................................46 4/0 AWG Cable – Proximity and Skin Effect due to Harmonics .............................................................................................51 Fuses ......3 Thermal Losses.................................3 Flicker ................. 47 Additional Effects Associated with Harmonics ..................43 Effect of DC Bus Voltage with Flat Topping..33 Typical Transformer Derating Curve for Nonlinear Load ......................................... 38 3 Induction Motors ........................ 33 Unbalance................................................................................................................... 34 Transformer Derating or K-factor Transformer ........................2 Transformers............31 Low Pass Filter for Generator AVR Sensing on Nonlinear Loads............... kc as a Function of Harmonic Numbers ........................33 2.... 36 Effect of Harmonic Sequence Components .......45 8..........................................................

...........49 SECTION 4 Sources of Harmonics............3 3..Ithd is 128%...............................................................................66 AC PWM drives ................................1 3.60 Televisions ..................................................................................................................57 Harmonic Spectrum Associated with Neutral Current Waveform Shown in Figure 3 ................................................................................................................90 4...............57 Typical Switched Mode Power Supply for Computer Based Equipment..92 2 Single-phase Nonlinear Loads.........59 Harmonic Current Spectrum of Typical Switched Mode Power Supply ..........................................76 AC Load Commutated Inverter (LCI) .......55 Computer-based Equipment............................3 4...............2 3...............................60 Waveforms for Lighting Panel Comprising Fluorescent Lighting with Magnetic Ballasts and T-12 Lamps ...............................58 Typical Voltage and Current Waveforms Associated with a Switched Mode Power Supply .....................84 Rotating Machines........................................1 2....................2 4..............55 1.... 2006 .47 Peak and rms Values of Sinusoidal Waveform.............58 Fluorescent Lighting .........59 Typical Neutral Current due to Triplen Harmonics in Connected Loads on a Four-wire System.............4 4 Additional Three-phase Sources of Harmonics .......FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 12 AWG Cable – Proximity and Skin Effect due to Harmonics ........49 Difficulties Conventional Meters Have Reading Distorted Waveforms .......65 3.................................................64 DC SCR drives ..............................................91 Shaft Generators ..........1 4........................................................................................................................................64 Single-phase AC PWM Drives..........................56 Neutral Current due to Triplen Harmonics (150 Hz for 50 Hz Supply) on Four-wire System..............58 2.61 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 viii ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .....56 Triplen Harmonics Add Up Cumulatively in Neutral Conductors with Single-phase Nonlinear Loads in Four-wire System ............................................90 Transformers ............................4 3 Three-phase Nonlinear Loads .....................................................2 2...............4 FIGURE 1 Four-wire System Linear Phase Currents Return via Neutral Conductor where Balanced Phase Current Cancel Out ............................................3 2................................................2 Three-wire Distribution Systems............................55 Four-wire Distribution Systems................................................................................................................................70 AC Cycloconverter Drives .............................................1 1......... 55 1 Distribution Systems with Single-phase Nonlinear Loads ....................90 UPS Systems ........................................

....................67 Typical Dual Converter for DC Shunt-wound Motor .................73 FIGURE 29b AC Motor/PWM Drives Standard Speed/Power Characteristics ..................70 Pulsed Nature of AC PWM Drive Input Current....................................................................76 Waveforms for Single-phase-to-Single-phase Conversion .........................................................................................................................FIGURE 10 Neutral Current Waveform on Distribution Panel with Fluorescent Lighting with Magnetic Ballasts and T-12 Lamps on a Four-wire System ............65 Single-phase AC PWM Drive Current Spectrum ....................................3%...........63 Television – Typical Current Waveform...71 Typical AC PWM Drive Output (Inverter) Bridge Configuration.....63 Comparison of Neutral Current Harmonic Spectrum for Magnetic and Electronic Ballasts for Typical Fluorescent Lighting Distribution Panel Ithd was 171..........64 Television – Typical Harmonic Current Spectrum ..........................66 Concept of “Constant Torque” and “Constant Power” with DC Shunt-wound Motors ................................. Respectively ..............72 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29a AC Motor/PWM Drives Standard Speed/Torque Characteristics .......65 Typical 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive with Shunt-wound DC Motor...72 Basic Principle of Pulse Width Modulation .................................. Respectively ..........62 Comparison of Phase Current Harmonic Spectrum for Magnetic and Electronic Ballasts for Typical Fluorescent Lighting Distribution Panel Ithd was 12..................61 Same Lighting Panel as per Figure 9..................................... 2006 ix ..............28% and 44%....................69 Harmonic Current Spectrum of Typical 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive at Rated Load ......... but with Electronic Ballasts and T-8 Lamps on Four-wire System......................................75 Harmonic Current Spectrum of 150 HP AC PWM Drive with 3% DC Bus Reactor – Ithd = 39..................75 Single-phase-to-Single-phase Cycloconverter ........................................................................23%...64 Single-phase AC PWM Drive – Typical Ithd is 135% ..8% and 16.....74 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 Input Current – 150 HP AC PWM Drive with 3% DC Bus Reactor – Ithd = 39................................................................................77 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ...... but with Electronic Ballasts (Instead of Magnetic Types) and T-8 Lamps.....62 Neutral Current Waveform on Same Fluorescent Lighting Panel as Figure 10.....68 Concept of “Four Quadrant Control” for DC Motors and Dual Converters ......69 Typical AC PWM Drive Block Diagram.................................................................23% .............................................................68 Typical 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive Current Waveform at 100% Load .........

............ 12-Pulse Cycloconverter...92 Inverter Output Voltage Waveform ...............................87 Six Step Square Wave Current – LCI with Synchronous Motor...................................5 kVA..................80 Waveforms for Blocking Mode Cycloconverters ............... 60 Hz UPS ..87 Output Voltage of LCI with Synchronous Motor or Squirrel Cage Motor with Output Filter ...........................97 Power Factor Components in System with Linear Load ................79 Simplified Connection of Intergroup Reactor on One Phase of Circulating Current Cycloconverters.........................85 12-Pulse Load Commutated Inverter with Synchronous Motor............................................................. 480 V..............81 FIGURE 38a Input Current Associated with a 20 MW........86 12-Pulse Load Commutated Inverter with Squirrel Cage Motor and Output Filter .................................................91 Traditional Shaft Generator System...............................FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37 Three-phase 6-Pulse Cycloconverter ................80 Waveforms for Circulating Current Mode Cycloconverters ............................93 SECTION 5 Harmonics and System Power Factor .......82 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 47 FIGURE 48 FIGURE 49 FIGURE 50 FIGURE 51 FIGURE 52 2-Pulse Cycloconverter with Three-phase Synchronous Motor...................88 Input Waveform of 6-Pulse Load Commutated Inverter ...................................89 Input Voltage and Current Waveforms of 6-Pulse 37..............95 Power Factor in Power System with Harmonics........... 12-Pulse Cycloconverter ........................................................................ 2006 ............................................... 460 V...............96 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 x ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ....................................85 Output Voltage Commutation Spikes – CSI with Squirrel Cage Induction Motor ....................................................................82 FIGURE 38b Harmonic Current Frequency Spectrum Associated with a 20 MW..89 Harmonic Spectrum Associated with a 6-Pulse Load Commutated Inverter ................. 95 1 2 3 Power Factor in Systems with Linear Loads Only ...................91 Harmonic Input Current Spectrum for 6-Pulse 37...............................................................................95 Power Factor Components in System with Harmonics ... 60 Hz UPS .............................................................................83 Harmonic Spectrum of 12-Pulse Cycloconverters Including Interharmonic Sidebands................84 Typical 6-Pulse ASCI CSI Inverter with a Squirrel Cage Induction Motor..........95 How the Mitigation of Harmonics Improves True Power Factor ..........................................................................5 kVA...............................

............ Vthd = 4...................107 Illustrations of the Effect of kVA and Source Impedance Harmonics................109 2000 kVA and 14% Subtransient Reactance ISC /IL = 29......... 103 Cycloconverters ................................................................ Vthd = 9................8% .....SECTION 6 The Effect of Loading on Harmonic Current Distortion....... 102 Load Commutated Inverters................................... ............ Ithd = 24................................................................................... 103 Conclusion: Harmonic Current Magnitude and its Effect on Voltage Distortion...............5%......104 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 SECTION 7 Influence of Source Impedance and kVA on Harmonics...... 99 DC SCR Drives ............................99 1 2 Total Harmonic Voltage Distortion (Vthd) ...............99 2..........................................7%.......................99 Total Harmonic Current Distortion (Ithd) and Reduced Loading ............116 Variation of Ithd and Vthd with Variation of kVA and Impedance (or Xd″)..101 Typical Harmonic Spectrum of AC PWM Drive (with 3% AC Line Reactor) at 30% Load – Ithd Measured at 65.7%........2% Impedance – ISC /IL = 33................108 Parallel Generator Operation and Calculation of Equivalent Short Circuit Ratings ..........4 2...................2%.....................................................................104 Multiple 6-Pulse Cycloconverters Input Current and Voltage Harmonic Spectrums at High Output Frequency/High Load...............................101 6-Pulse DC Drive at 70% Loading – Ithd is 35...........100 Typical Harmonic Spectrum of AC PWM Drive (with 3% AC Line Reactor) at 100% Load – Ithd Measured at 37..................................................... Ithd = 19................................................................. 105 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 Typical 6-Pulse PWM Drive (with 3% AC Line Reactor) at 100% Load – Ithd Measured at 37...........1% ..........110 TABLE 1 FIGURE 1a FIGURE 1b FIGURE 2a ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ..............................................................................................115 2000 kVA and 5..3:1.1:1.........2% Impedance Source with 950 HP AC PWM Drive Load and 180 kW Linear Load ..............1%..2 2.........1 2.....103 Multiple 6-Pulse Cycloconverters Input Current and Voltage Harmonic Spectrums at Low Output Frequency/Low Load ...............102 Harmonic Current Spectrum of 6-Pulse DC Drive at 70% Loading – Ithd is 35............................................100 Typical AC PWM Drive (with 3% AC Line Reactor) at 30% Load – Ithd Measured at 65.................... 2006 xi ....3 2.......107 1 2 3 “Stiff” and “Soft” Sources ..........7% .......1% .......5 AC PWM Drives .........................................5%........108 Current and Voltage Waveforms for 2000 kVA/ 5......

.................112 Current and Voltage Waveforms for 4000 kVA/ 5.114 Current and Voltage Waveforms for 4000 kVA/ 14% Subtransient Reactance Source with 950 HP AC PWM Drive Load and 180 kW Linear Load ..................................120 Reduction of Insulation Life with Temperature ...... Vthd = 2.................... 119 1 2 Balanced Systems .7% .....121 Effect of Unbalanced Loading on Harmonics ......................................................................119 Symmetrical Components of an Unbalanced System .2% Impedance – ISC/IL = 67......1%............134 Balanced System .....................................................120 Effect of Unbalanced Loading on Rotating Machines .................. 2006 .............115 Paralleling of Generators ..............................5 2...............6 2........................119 Unbalanced System..................8% .............124 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 xii ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ......... Vthd = 5..3 2..............................................................................................................................................6:1.............................127 The Effect of Voltage Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion Using Software Modeling ...........................117 FIGURE 3a FIGURE 3b FIGURE 4a FIGURE 4b FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 SECTION 8 The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion ..................2 2..2% Impedance Source with 950 HP AC PWM Drive Load and 180 kW Linear Load .... Ithd = 22................4 2...............................128 Drive Mitigation – Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion .................7 Definition of Voltage Unbalance .1:1..............................................1 2...............113 4000 kVA and 14% Subtransient Reactance ISC/IL = 26.............................................125 Background Voltage Distortion and Multi-pulse Drives and Systems.....122 Derating on Induction Motors of Unbalanced Supplies .........................119 Unbalanced Systems ..........119 2.........123 Voltage Unbalance and Multi-pulse Drives and Systems.124 Typical 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current Waveform on 5% Voltage Unbalance..FIGURE 2b Current and Voltage Waveforms for 2000 kVA/ 14% Subtransient Reactance Source with 950 HP AC PWM Drive Load and 180 kW Linear Load .........................................................123 Typical 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current Waveform on Balanced Voltages............116 Example of Paralleled Generators ...........................................................111 4000 kVA and 5................9%....................................................................................................................... Ithd = 27..........134 TABLE 1 Variation in Ithd and Vthd with Voltage Unbalance and Pre-existing Voltage Distortion .................................................................

......129 FIGURE 13b Voltage and Current Waveforms No Voltage Unbalance......................... 5% Pre-existing Vthd – Ithd = 18............... No Pre-existing Vthd – Ithd = 14....................................................................1 Possibilities of Resonance on Vessels and Offshore Installations .......................0% ........................................................137 Typical Industrial Drive Application where Resonance is Possible......... 136 The Effect of Adding a Detuning Reactor.....................................................9%................127 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13a No Voltage Unbalance.........2%...................... 5% Pre-existing Vthd – Ithd = 10..................................132 FIGURE 16b Voltage and Current Waveforms 2% Voltage Unbalance..9% ...........5%.............2% ....................... No Pre-existing Vthd .....................................126 Effect of Background Voltage Distortion on 18-Pulse AC PWM Drive.........135 The Conditions under which Resonance Occurs .... 5% Pre-existing Vthd ...................................... 5% Pre-existing Vthd .132 FIGURE 16a 2% Voltage Unbalance...125 Unbalance and the Effect on 12-Pulse Drives ....131 FIGURE 15a No Voltage Unbalance.......................................................130 FIGURE 14c Three-phase Current Waveforms 2% Voltage Unbalance....................... No Pre-existing Vthd ................FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 Typical 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current Waveform on 15% Voltage Unbalance.........133 SECTION 9 Resonance .......................................124 Harmonic Spectrum of 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive on Unbalanced Voltages (Fundamental Component Removed)................... Vthd = 5.............................................................138 Simplified Connection of Detuning Reactor to Capacitor Bank .........135 2..................135 1 2 What is Resonance?.......................... 139 3 4 Prevention of Resonance ............135 Parallel Resonance................130 FIGURE 14b Voltage and Current Waveforms 2% Voltage Unbalance...... No Pre-existing Vthd – Ithd = 5....................129 FIGURE 14a 2% Voltage Unbalance.......... 5% Pre-existing Vthd ...............................126 Unbalance and the Effect on 18-Pulse Drives ..... Vthd = 4................... 2006 xiii ............... Vthd = 6...........................2% ............................133 FIGURE 16c Three-phase Current Waveforms 2% Voltage Unbalance................................................135 Series Resonance Frequency Response .............140 Series Resonance. 135 Parallel Resonance ...2 Series Resonance................................131 FIGURE 15b Voltage and Current Waveforms No Voltage Unbalance...............................1 2........137 3.........5%................................ No Pre-existing Vthd .................... Vthd = 6..139 FIGURE 1a FIGURE 1b FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ......

............................................................................................................................1 7....173 The Effect of Voltage Unbalance on Phase Shift Performance...............4 Double-wound Isolating Transformer Phase Shift Systems........................................................142 Mitigation of Harmonics on Three-wire Single-phase Systems ............................................................................................142 Phase Shifting of Three-wire Nonlinear Loads ..........................1 11...............................2 Phase Shifting ...................... 141 1 2 3 Effect of Phase Diversity on Harmonic Currents .........................2 Zero Sequence Mitigation of Triplens on Four-wire Single-phase Systems.........................160 8 9 Passive L-C Filters......................156 7...................................1 9..................2 9...................................................................................179 11......148 6 7 AC Line Reactors for DC SCR Drives and AC Drives with SCR Input Rectifiers ................145 Zero Sequence Transformer on Four-wire System ..3 9.......................143 Active Filtering..........................143 Four-wire System with Nonlinear Loads ....................188 Estimated Harmonic Current Distortion Using Quasi-24-Pulse Phase Staggering System ........................141 Effect of Linear Load on Harmonic Currents .............................................145 TABLE 1 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 xiv ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ........................144 4 Mitigation of Harmonics on Four-wire Single-phase Systems ..................144 Active Filters for Four-wire Systems ...2 Active Filters.................................................144 Operation of a Zero Sequence Transformer...................147 5................................................146 5 Standard Reactors for Three-phase AC and DC Drives ...........................................171 9..........1 Reactors for AC PWM Drives ....166 Transformer Phase Shifting (Multi-pulsing) .............................177 10 11 Transformer Phase Staggering (Quasi Multi-pulse) Systems ....185 12 “Active Front Ends” for AC PWM Drives.156 Duplex Reactors................................................................................ 2006 .....................................................................................172 Polygonal Non-isolating Autotransformer Phase Shift Systems...........................................................................................2 Wide Spectrum Filters .............1 3.........144 4............175 The Effect of Background Voltage Distortion on Phase Shift Performance..179 Hybrid Active-Passive Filters...SECTION 10 Mitigation of Harmonics .........1 4................................................................179 Harmonic Voltage Data to 50th Harmonic with Respective Phase Angle Information...............................143 3..................................153 Special Reactors for Three-phase AC and DC Drives .178 Electronic Filters .........................................................................................

...............................................158 Trapezoidal Output Voltage from Wide Spectrum Filter ...............................................152 Variation in 5th Harmonic Current for Differing Values of AC Line Reactance and DC Bus Reactance ...................159 Wide Spectrum Filter with 12-Pulse AC Drive...............................................................................................164 Application of Duplex Reactors on Shaft Generators ......154 Line Impedance Distribution and the Effect of Notching .......................147 Circuit Diagram of Standard 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive.....................148 Variation of Harmonic Currents with AC Line Reactance Only .....................................FIGURE 6 Zero Sequence Transformer and Combined Phase Shift Transformer with ZST to Cancel Triplen and 5th and 7th Harmonic Currents...............160 Duplex Reactor Schematic ......................................................................................................................................168 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .................................166 Absolute Impedance Characteristics for Tuned 7th Harmonic Series Filter ............................................157 Typical Wide Spectrum Filter Connection Diagram – AC PWM Drive ......................................................165 Application of Duplex Reactors Vessel with Multiple AC SCR Based Drives...154 Wide Spectrum Filter Schematic...161 FIGURE 22b Duplex Reactor Correction Voltage ..........162 FIGURE 22c “Corrected” System Voltage.....150 DC Bus Reactance Only in AC PWM Drive...............................162 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 Application of Duplex Reactors on Main Propulsion Drives.............................................................................................6%...159 Typical Wide Spectrum Filter Performance – 350 HP AC PWM Drive with 3% AC Line Reactance ................161 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22a System Voltage Waveform ..............................163 Variation of System Vthd with Number of Generators on Line (Figure 23) ........... 2006 xv ..............157 200 HP/150 kW AC PWM Drive with 3% DC Bus Reactor – Ithd = 39...................................................158 Mains Waveform with Wide Spectrum Filter – Ithd = 4..............146 Block Diagram of Active Filter on Four-wire Application................................................................................153 Primary and Secondary Notching ...........163 Duplex Reactors on Passenger Ships with 2 × 20 MW Cycloconverters..................................168 Simplified Connection of Multi-limbed Passive Filter ....167 Common Configuration of Passive Filters ..9% .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

...................................191 xvi ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ...................181 Typical AC PWM Drive Input Current Waveform (LL) as per Figure 41 ............................................................................................176 Effect of 2% Unbalance on 18-Pulse Drive.......................................................191 Dedicated Systems .......182 Active Filter “Compensation Current” Waveform (Lf) as per Figure 41...................185 Thermal Limits of Shunt Active per Harmonic Current ........................................................................................176 Effect of Background Voltage Distortion on an 18-Pulse Drive......................................173 12-Pulse AC PWM Drive with Polygonal Autotransformer .................177 Quasi-24-Pulse System Using Phase Staggering Techniques...........................182 Source Current Waveform (LS) as per Figure 41 ..................175 Typical 18-Pulse Drive System .. 2006 .186 Practical Example of Hybrid Shunt Passive-Active Filter ....................174 Variation on Harmonic Currents vs.............170 12-Pulse AC PWM Drive with Double-wound Phase Shift Transformer ..........................................................................................169 Simplified “Drive Applied” or “Trap” Filter for Variable Speed Drives ........................................................................................................................................... Note the Harmonic Currents Above the 50th..................................180 Simplified Power Circuit of Active Filter ......................... AC Reactance for a 12-Pulse AC PWM Drive with Polygonal Autotransformer ....188 ”Active Front End” Input Current and Voltage Waveforms ........ 191 1 2 General Systems ..................172 Double-wound 12-Pulse Phase Shift Transformer Unbalance Between Secondary Voltages .......................FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 Impedance Characteristics of Multi-limbed Passive Filter ..................................189 Typical Harmonic Current Input Spectrum for AC PWM Drive with an “Active Front End”........................................182 Typical Active Filter Performance with 150 HP AC PWM with 3% AC Line Reactor ...........................................................................................................................................187 Application of an IGBT “Active Front End” to an AC PWM Drive ...........190 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 47 FIGURE 48 FIGURE 49 FIGURE 50 FIGURE 51 FIGURE 52 SECTION 11 Harmonic Limit Recommendations...................................183 Theoretical Shunt Passive-Active Hybrid Filter...........178 Block Diagram of Shunt Connection Active Filter with Associated Current Waveforms........................

....................................208 AEMC 3945 Three-phase Harmonic/Power Quality Analyzer with Real Time Color Display....220 Fluke 43B Harmonic/Power Quality Analyzer...........................................] ...............................................................................199 Summary of Harmonics to 25th ...........................................206 4................ 216 5 Measurements on Voltages above 690/750 V AC.... 206 AEMC 3945...............................................2 4........193 Software Estimation of Harmonic Distortion .....................................................................206 Fluke 43B Harmonics Screen Data Available (In This Case Current) [Voltage and power harmonic data are also available.211 Three-phase Voltage Waveforms .......................................................195 Summary of Harmonics to 25th ...214 AEMC 3945 Configuration via Computer................209 AEMC 3945 Connected On-site Illustrating “Wrap-around” Rogowski-type....193 1 2 Manual Calculation of Voltage Distortion.................205 Examples of Harmonic Analyzers............207 Up to 40 Transients (Voltage or Current) Can Be Captured with the Fluke 41B.................................... 2006 xvii ......212 Three-phase Voltage Harmonics ...............................211 Transient Current Waveforms..................................... 209 Hioki 3196 ..........................214 FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .........................1 4...... AmpFlex 6500 A Current Probes .....................201 Information to be included with a Harmonic Analysis .............................................................................................210 Sample Displays of Voltage and Current Waveforms .......................................................................201 SECTION 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment ...............................SECTION 12 Calculation of Harmonic Voltage Distortion .208 True rms Voltage and Current Waveform Display(s) from Fluke 43B..............213 Harmonic Sequences....203 Planning the Harmonic Survey or Measurements ...............................213 Phasor Diagram ...........................................201 1 2 Information to be requested from Vendors ...204 Information to be recorded from Harmonic Measurements .........................................198 TABLE 1 TABLE 2 SECTION 13 Provision of Information on Harmonics........................207 Fluke 43B Can Measure Sags and Swells up to 16 Days on a Per Cycle Basis ..............................................3 The Fluke 43B..............................203 1 2 3 4 Safety Precautions during Harmonic Surveys .212 Harmonic Direction .............

.................................217 AC VFD Three-phase Voltage and Current Measurements from Hioki 3196 .......................................218 Power System Vthd Trend Recording via Hioki 3196 as a Number of AC VFDs Are Switched On ..219 Summary of Data Sampled from Hioki 3196 .......... 221 xviii ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ..215 Unbalance in Real Time via Computer ...................................215 Real Time Computer Display of Harmonic Currents ................................216 Hioki 3196 Power Analyzer with Voltage and Current Probes............218 Vthd of all Three Phases Recorded by Hioki 3196 when Active Filter Switched in on Oil Production Platform............... 2006 ...............................219 Recorded Harmonic Currents by Hioki 3196 on 12-Pulse AC Drive .................................................................................................................220 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 APPENDIX 1 Recommended Reading .......................................................FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 Real Time Current Waveforms via Computer...........217 Harmonic FFT Measurements from Hioki 3196 with 5th Harmonic Selected .............................

ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . The quality and security of voltage supplies are important to the safety of any vessel and its crew and to the protection of the marine environment.. Any failure or malfunction of equipment such as propulsion or navigation systems can result in an accident at sea or close inshore with serious consequences. 3 and 4. as the title suggests. As harmonic distortion is “steady state” and continuous. the issue of electrical power quality associated with harmonics is an important concern to the marine safety aspects and in addition. the specific power quality issue to be addressed in these Guidance Notes is that of the harmonic distortion of voltage supplies caused by the operation of electronic devices which draw nonlinear (i. 2006 1 . Many power quality issues are transient. there has been a significant increase in the installation and use of power electronic equipment onboard ships and on offshore installations. These same items of “nonlinear” equipment can also be affected by harmonic currents and the subsequent voltage distortion they produce. AC motors and transformers).e. the starting of a large electric thruster motor resulting in a momentary dip before the generator regulators correct the situation and reinstate the correct level of voltage and frequency. non-sinusoidal in nature) currents from the voltage supplies. to any adverse effects harmonic distortion has on the performance and reliability of the majority of marine and offshore systems and equipment. in these instances. However.SECTION 1 Introduction 1 Background Over recent years. Examples of the serious impact of harmonics and associated power quality effects on marine and offshore supply voltage waveforms. due to electrical variable speed drives (the main producer of harmonic currents on marine and offshore installations) are illustrated in Section 1. for example. The operation of this equipment has in many cases significantly degraded the ship or offshore installation electrical power quality to such an extent that measures have to be implemented in order to minimize the resultant adverse effects on the electrical plant and equipment. Figures 1. 2. as can the majority of “linear” equipment (particularly generators.

2006 .Section 1 Introduction FIGURE 1 Input Waveforms (440 V) to 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive FIGURE 2 Line-to-line Voltage (440 V) at Input to a 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive 2 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

Section 1 Introduction FIGURE 3 415 V Line-to-line Volts on Ship with Four 1100 kW/1500 HP AC SCR Converter-fed Thruster Motors FIGURE 4 Primary Voltage (11 kV) of Transformer Supplying a 2 MW (2680 HP) Variable Frequency Drive ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006 3 .

Therefore. ABS has imposed limitations on the magnitude of harmonic voltage distortion permitted on classed vessels. As indicated in the title. in the context of the marine and offshore installations. such as generators. The aim of these Guidance Notes. such AC and DC variable speed drives. It is aimed at the “non-expert”. what effects they have on the different types of equipment. the electric variable speed drives and harmonic mitigation of this type of equipment will be a primary focus of these Guidance Notes. including fluorescent lighting. which. below. illustrates the popularity and the reliance some classes of vessel now have with regard to electrical variable speed drives (in this instance a self-propelled drilling rig). thrusters and other duties. up to almost twice the phase current values. albeit in limited qualities compared to large “nonlinear loads”. not a reference book on harmonics. 4 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006 .Section 1 Introduction The American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) is concerned with the effects of harmonic voltage distortion and the possible resultant consequences should some critical item of equipment malfunction or fail. On large passenger vessels. is also known to produce harmonics. variable speed drives and computer-based equipment all produce harmonic currents and therefore will distort the voltage supplies. is to provide information as to what harmonics are and how they interact with the supply impedances. resulting in potentially high levels of neutral currents due to arithmetic addition of triplen harmonics in that conductor. which solely address the harmonics issue. Therefore. The Appendix recommends some of these books should the reader wish further information. Therefore. used for main propulsion. Section 1. These Guidance Notes will indicate that there are a number of sources of harmonic currents. due to its increased popularity in a host of applications. “Linear” equipment. it is the electric variable speed drive (a combination of an electric motor and electronic power converter) whether AC or DC based. lower voltage single-phase equipment down to 110 V is also of significant importance in many vessels in terms of harmonics and associated effects. although very few dealing with harmonics and power quality issues specifically from the marine viewpoint. hence the use of a minimum of complex math. However. However. Figure 5. single-phase electrical and electronic equipment. AC motors and transformers. these Guidance Notes are designed to be practical “guidance notes”. is the main source of harmonic currents and subsequent voltage distortion. This concern is largely a result of the increasing demand for high power nonlinear equipment. what items of equipment typically produce harmonic currents and how harmonic currents can be attenuated or mitigated such that any adverse effects are significantly reduced. 4-wire systems [three-phase and neutral (grounded or insulated)] are now being installed. There are a number of high-quality harmonics and power quality reference books available.

of the DC drive motor was controlled by the excitation of the Ward Leonard DC generator driven by a fixed-speed AC motor and the “field controller” should speeds above base speed be needed. and hence speed and torque. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . special systems including the “Ward-Leonard” AC motorDC generator system were developed.Section 1 Introduction FIGURE 5 Typical Power System Single Line Diagram for DPS-3 Drilling Rig 2 The Use of Electric Drives in Marine Applications For the first half of the 20th century. From the early 1960s. pumps. For duties where speed control was considered necessary (for example. ships utilized DC motors to power a host of applications. The voltage. DC generators were common and therefore.. windlass or mooring winch applications). AC to DC) no harmonic currents were produced by this type of equipment. 2006 5 . the ease in which electric motor speed control was previously achieved was significantly diminished for all but some specialized applications. As no “voltage conversion” was taking place (e. Therefore. fans and other auxiliary driven equipment. The Ward-Leonard set supplied a DC motor which powered the driven load. the majority of vessels were steam turbine or diesel engine driven. harmonic distortion was not an issue that had to be considered. With the introduction of AC power. Speed control was easily achieved using resistance-based control systems for both armature voltage control (for speed variation up to base speed) and field control (above base speed). in this case) was necessary. AC generators were installed in new vessels as the benefits of AC voltage supplies became common.g. windlasses. including cargo winches. however. No “voltage conversion” (AC to DC.

compressors and other equipment were driven by fixed-speed AC motors with bypass systems. AC PWM drives have completely replaced DC drives in the majority of drilling rig applications. cost. has led to a significant increase in harmonic voltage distortion levels on a large number of vessels. but until relatively recently. However. on applications where robust. From the mid 1960s. In the late 1970s and early 1980s. DC SCR drives went largely unchallenged until the early-to-mid 1990s. offer similar levels of performance at less cost. where “load commutated inverters” and “cyclo-converters” are still more common. Although in many cases harmonic mitigation has been used. it was only in the late 1980s that AC drive technology (most notably in the form of “pulse width modulation” (“PWM”) drives) started to appear on ships in any numbers. increased levels of electro-magnetic interference (EMI). reduced complexity. their use in marine applications is increasing. With the exception of large main propulsion drives (above 5-8 MW/6700-10700 HP). AC variable frequency drives (“VFDs” or “inverters”) were developed in various forms. higher efficiency. performance. Offshore. cargo pumps and other LV and HV applications). where the initial benefit was as “soft-starters” for the pumps. In a relatively large number of cases. “interharmonics” and harmonic currents interacting with the generator(s). anchor windlasses and other duties. There are a number of significant commercial and technological issues still to be completely resolved. It has to be noted that the theory of harmonics with respect to electrical networks has been known since the start of the 20th Century. less EMI and higher reliability. reduction in maintenance of AC motors compared to DC motors. there was no effective or accurate monitoring equipment available to measure it. their popularity increased making AC drives comparable to DC SCR drives. despite these issues. the harmonic voltage distortion has reached surprising levels. However. well in excess of the classification societies’ limitations. Figure 5. variable speed control was needed. DC SCR drives have now largely been replaced by AC drives. As can be seen in Section 1. draw-works. Figure 5. input bridge carrier frequency suppression which needs large passive reactor-capacitor-reactor (L-C-L) filters. physical size.Section 1 Introduction Around the mid-to-late 1960s. There are a number of harmonic mitigation solutions which. which offer relatively low harmonic current levels compared to present “standard” AC converter drives. Common applications for DC SCR drives on AC vessels from the mid-to-late 1960s included windlasses. mooring winches and some cargo winches. 2006 . as the physical size. resulting in harmonic voltage distortion as the harmonic currents produced interact with supply impedances. pumps. from that time on. the speed control feature was utilized as oil reservoirs became depleted and flow rate had to be controlled. AC PWM drives with “active front ends” (sinusoidal input rectifiers). valve throttling or damper control used to vary flow. have been available for a number of years. 6 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . However. whether based on AC or DC converters. “quasi square wave drives” and “current source drives”. The power conversion process from AC voltage to DC voltage draws “nonlinear” (non-sinusoidal) currents from the supply. these may not be sufficient to attain the levels of attenuation necessary to guarantee compliance with the harmonic limits imposed by classification societies. As can be seen from Section 1. including cost. the production of high order harmonics (usually above the 40th or 50th) and compatibility with generator-derived supplies regarding suitably low values of source impedance. DC SCR drives were most common. especially including down-hole pumps. and reliability of AC drives continued to improve. being two common examples. mud pumps. AC PWM drives are popular (for example. although they were installed on offshore oil production installations from the mid 1980s for a few duties. when used with “standard” 6-pulse AC drives. the first generation of solid state SCR (“silicon controlled rectifier” or “thyristor”) based variable speed drive systems were introduced for the control of DC motors. DC SCR drives were used extensively on drilling rigs for main propulsion. cabling and other supply impedances when cargo was being worked. thrusters. fans. while the majority of engine room auxiliaries. The increased installed drive capacity on vessels. for small main propulsion systems. caused by a combination of “line notching”. Shortly thereafter. It was common on these vessels fitted with DC SCR cargo handling systems to experience light “flicker”.

are largely limited to a few MWs due to restrictions on the brush-gear and mass of the DC motor armature. offshore supply vessels. for example. specialist survey vessels. in this instance a dynamically-positioned shuttle tanker using AC drives. In the mid 1980s. over 2% of vessels over 500 gross tons were fitted with electrically-driven propulsion. DC propulsion motors were used extensively on US-built T2 tankers.Section 1 Introduction DC SCR drives are still operating in older vessels and in new. including Canberra. Normandie. It is estimated that ratings up to 50 MW for AC PWM drives may be available within a few years based on new types of power devices. less maintenance. Virginia and California. small inland vessels with DC electric motors for propulsion operated in the United Kingdom and Russia as early as 1893. 12 MW cycloconverters for main propulsion and PWM drives for thrusters. The decision as to whether to install electric propulsion in a vessel is complex and is usually dependent on the type of vessel and the operating profile envisaged. including increased cargo carrying capabilities. 2006 7 . Queen Elizabeth II was converted from steam turbine to electric propulsion by installing two 40 MW synchronous motors and converters. fixed and podded. lower running costs. which will accrue significant strategic additional benefits from new generations of electric weapon platforms that will utilize the increased onboard power generating capacity necessary for the main electric propulsion systems. During the Second World War. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . either via conventional shaft arrangements or via podded propulsors. Section 1.000 HP) synchronous propulsion motors. The percentage of new vessels being built with electric propulsion continues to increase annually. shuttle tankers. As of the year 2000. four synchronous motors with a total of 116MW (155. Figure 7. shows a typical application of an electrically-propelled vessel. lower emissions and improved maneuverability (with podded or azimuth type propulsors – see Section 1. cable-ships and cruise liners. however. The power ratings of DC drives systems. Cruise liners in the 1960s. It should be noted that the present power restrictions with AC PWM converters is due to lack of suitable power semiconductors in terms of current and voltage ratings. is currently also being significantly changed with the adoption of fully-integrated electric propulsion systems. in addition to main cargo pumps. reduced manpower. albeit in very small numbers. however. “floating production storage and offloading” vessels (FPSOs).500HP) propelled the French passenger liner. greater redundancy. survey ships. were fitted with 30 MW (40. where low noise and vibration levels are important. The application of electric propulsion has increased in the last five years. In Europe around the same time. A large proportion of modern cruise liners also utilize full electric propulsion. largely due to the introduction of new classes of vessels and the expansion of new builds. Naval warship design. where electric propulsion provides significant benefits. including Ropax ferries. each powered by two synchronous motors each rated at 6750 HP. 3 Main Propulsion Drives Electric drives for propulsion have been used onboard ship for the majority of the 20th Century. Figure 6. Large seagoing vessels first appeared with full electric propulsion in the 1920s with the introduction of the Panama Pacific Line ships. Indeed.).

2006 .Section 1 Introduction FIGURE 6 Electrically-driven Podded Propulsor FIGURE 7 Dynamically-positioned Shuttle Tanker Equipped with AC Electric Variable Speed Main Propulsion and Thrusters 8 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

and where appropriate. the protection of the crew. However. the issue of harmonic distortion and the effects on plant and equipment has to be addressed to ensure the safety of the ship or offshore installation. In the meantime. it may be some years before these emerging AC drive converter developments permeate through from mainly military (naval) development programs and are available to commercial organizations. 2006 9 . particularly AC converters. for main propulsion and a host of other applications within the marine and offshore sectors will continue to increase. control systems. the passengers and the marine environment.Section 1 Introduction 4 The Future? The use of electric variable speed drives. electromagnetics. The continual advances in power semiconductors. including “matrix converters”. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . software engineering and other related technologies will lead to the development of higher performance. “resonant converters” and “pulse frequency modulated” (PFM) converters will all have low harmonic profiles compared to the majority of generic drive technologies available at present. The majority of the emerging AC drive converter types. more compact. more cost effective and more efficient types of electric drives and motors. Their financial viability for any applications other than specialized naval warship duties may also have to be carefully assessed.

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Examples include discharge lighting. any item of equipment which draws current from the supply which is proportional to the applied voltage is termed a “linear” load. 2006 11 . Figure 2a illustrates a simple single-phase full wave rectifier supplying a load containing both inductance and resistance. The current and voltage waveforms associated with linear loads are shown in Section 2. computers and variable speed drives. Figure 1. Section 2. FIGURE 1 Voltage and Current Waveforms for Linear Load Voltage Linear Load Current The term “nonlinear” is used to describe loads which draw current from the supply that is dissimilar in shape to the applied voltage. Figures 2 and 3. Section 2. Figure 2b illustrates the DC load current (Idc) and AC input current (Iac). Examples of linear loads include resistance heaters and incandescent lamps. The impedance of the AC supply is represented by the inductance Lac. In order to explain pictorially how nonlinear current distorts the voltage supply waveform it is necessary to refer Section 2. FIGURE 2a Single Phase Full Wave Rectifier FIGURE 2b Load and AC Supply Currents ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . respectively.SECTION 2 The Production of Harmonics 1 Production of Harmonics In a power system.

......... FIGURE 3a Simple Single Line Diagram FIGURE 3b Load Current and Volt Drop Waveforms The voltage drop across the source impedance (UL) is subtracted from the induced voltage (u).......... Figure 3a shows a simple single line diagram comprising source voltage (u) and source impedance (LN)............. FIGURE 4 How Voltage Distortion is Produced (Simplified) 12 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .. The harmonic current (iN) passing through the source impedance produces a voltage drop (UL) according the following formula: U L = LN .................. Figure 3b illustrates the nonlinear current (iN) and voltage drop (UL) waveforms.... as illustrated in Section 2....... (2....... Figure 4.. Note: The example below has been exaggerated in order to illustrate the principle graphically of how nonlinear current distorts the supply voltage........ di N .............. 2006 ..............1) dt Section 2....... resulting in the distortion of the supply voltage waveform.Section 2 Production of Harmonics Section 2.............

2006 13 . as illustrated in Section 2. rectifiers).. an example of which is illustrated in Section 2. Figure 7. 7…). FIGURE 5 Typical Computer Nonlinear Load Voltage Nonlinear Load Current In order to appreciate why the current waveform shown in Section 2. 3. This is due to the “full wave rectification” used in the SMPS. If the SMPS were to use “half wave” rectification “even” order (2. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . the harmonic spectrum contains only “odd” harmonics (1. This non-sinusoidal current contains “harmonic currents” in addition to the sinusoidal fundamental (50 Hz or 60 Hz) current. When the input voltage (Vi) is higher in value than the capacitor voltage (Vc). 4. it is beneficial to consider the design of switched mode power supplies.g. the appropriate diode will conduct and non-sinusoidal. they conduct in one direction only)..Section 2 Production of Harmonics The majority of nonlinear loads is equipment that utilizes power semiconductor devices for power conversion (e. 5. Note: As can be seen below. The additional function of the capacitor is to store energy which is drawn by the load as necessary. for example. 8…) harmonics would also be present. Section 2. The semiconductor diode rectifiers are unidirectional devices (i. 6. “pulsed” current will be drawn from the supply. Figure 5 is of a “pulsed” nature. They include. computer switched mode power systems (SMPS) for converting AC to DC. Figure 6. Figure 5 illustrates a typical current waveform of a computer switched mode power supplier unit.e. FIGURE 6 Single-phase Switched Mode Power Supply This type of power supply uses capacitors to smooth the rectified DC voltage and current prior to it being supplied to other internal subsystems and components.

An example of complex wave consisting of the fundamental (1st harmonic) and 3rd harmonic is illustrated in Section 2. and so forth. whereas asymmetrical waveforms (where both positive and negative portions are different) contain even and odd harmonics and possibly DC components. 14 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .Section 2 Production of Harmonics FIGURE 7 Harmonic Spectrum of Currents Drawn by Computer Switched Mode Power Supply Harmonic voltages and currents are integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. When all harmonic voltages and currents are added to the fundamental. the 7th harmonic is 420 Hz. It should be noted that symmetrical waveforms only contain odd harmonics. 2006 . FIGURE 8 Construction of Complex Wave 60 Hz Fundamental 180 Hz (3rd Harmonic) Complex Wave Section 2. Figure 8 is an example of a symmetrical waveform in which the positive portion of the wave is identical to the negative portion. On 60 Hz supplies. the 5th harmonic is 300 Hz. for instance. Figure 8. An example of an asymmetrical waveform would be that produced by a half wave rectifier. a waveform known as a “complex wave” is formed.

.3) h Therefore..............2) where h n p = = = order of harmonics an integer 1...... this is never transferred into practical reality as the magnitudes of the various harmonic currents are determined by the per-phase inductance of the AC supply connected..... Any divergence from any of the above hypotheses will introduce “non-characteristic” harmonics.... An AC line or commutating reactor is not used in front of the rectifier.. free from harmonics.. Section 2............ it has to be noted that supply networks or connected equipment are never “idealized” (i... Note: In addition............. for example......................... AC line reactors) it is not uncommon to measure 5th harmonic current up to ~80% on single-phase rectifiers and 65% on three-phase rectifiers... In rectifiers without added inductance (e......... balanced)..... the magnitude of the harmonic current is stated as the reciprocal of the harmonic number: I= 1 ........ should represent 20% and 14% of the total rms current.....e...... ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ............ The AC supply network is symmetrical (i... again......... 2006 15 .g............ therefore....... The DC component of the rectifier configuration is uniform...... However........ Figure 9 illustrates a typical single-phase computer switched mode power supply with full wave bridge rectifier. the rectifier and the impedance of the rectifier as “seen” by the AC supply..................... 2.. in theory................... in idealized harmonic theory.....e. 3… number of current pulses per cycle It should be noted that in the “ideal” harmonic theory........... the 5th harmonic current and 7th harmonic current......... (2. any actual harmonic currents measured will not be exactly as calculated using the above simplified formula........ In practical terms....... The AC supply is sinusoidal... into the harmonic series.......... (2...... based on the above hypotheses) and.....Section 2 Production of Harmonics 2 Characteristic Harmonic Currents Power conversion using full wave rectifiers generates idealized characteristic harmonic currents given by the formula: h = np ± 1 . There are no “overlap” or delay angles for the devices.... including possibly DC. respectively. the following hypotheses are assumed for all rectifiers: • • • • • • The impedance of the AC supply network is zero....

one per half cycle per phase). Figure 10. 3… pulses. 9. as shown in Section 2. 2006 . 2.Section 2 Production of Harmonics FIGURE 9 Computer Power Supply with Single-phase Full Wave Bridge Rectifier Rectifier Bridge iac vac Is Smoothing Capacitor Load Cf Switch Mode DC-to-DC For the single full wave diode bridge rectifier above. (2) FIGURE 10 Computer Switch Mode Power Supply Input Current Waveform 16 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 7. 1. converted into DC load will be: h = np ± 1 h=n⋅2±1 h = 3.. 11. 5. 13.e. the characteristic harmonic currents based on two rectified current pulses per cycle (i. 15… where h n p = = = harmonic number integer.

under balanced loading conditions. 9th…) harmonics in the phase currents do not cancel out but add cumulatively in the neutral conductor. the currents in the three phases return via the neutral conductor. the 120-degree phase shift between respective phase currents causes the currents to cancel out in the neutral. Figure 11. FIGURE 12 Typical 6-Pulse PWM AC Drive ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . any “triplen” (3rd. when nonlinear loads are present. 2006 17 . where the rectifier bridge supplies the DC link section of the drive. which can carry up to 173% of phase current at a frequency of predominately 180 Hz (3rd harmonic). Section 2. This issue will be discussed in more detail in Section 4. “Sources of Harmonics”. However.Section 2 Production of Harmonics The harmonic series calculated for a single-phase full wave rectifier is shown in Section 2. FIGURE 11 Typical Waveform from Computer Switched Power Supply 100 80 60 40 20 0 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 Note: It should be noted that in four-wire distribution systems (three-phase and neutral). Figure 12 shows a typical 6-pulse PWM AC drive.

37… Section 2. 7. respectively. 35. 3… pulses. 60 40 20 0 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 harmonic 18 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . FIGURE 13 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current Waveforms for One Phase FIGURE 14 Typical Harmonic Spectrum for 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive 100 80 . show the input phase current waveforms and harmonic current spectrum measured on a typical 6-pulse AC PWM drive. 24. 1. % Fund. the characteristic harmonic currents will therefore be: h = np ± 1 h=n⋅6±1 h = 5. (6) Similarly. 2006 . 19… where h n p = = = harmonic number integer. the characteristic harmonic currents for a 12-pulse rectifier will be: h = n ⋅ 12 ± 1 h = 11. 17.Section 2 Production of Harmonics For a three-phase full wave diode rectifier bridge [also known as a “6-pulse bridge”. as it rectifies six current pulses (one per half cycle per phase) into the load side of the bridge]. 23. 13. 2. 13. Figures 13 and 14. 11.

2006 19 . @ Load ~ ∧ ∧ Nonlinear Load Harmonic Current Source ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . The vector sum of all the individual voltage drops results in total voltage distortion. is reduced as more impedance is introduced between the nonlinear load and the source. the magnitude of which depends on the system impedance and the levels of harmonic currents at each harmonic frequency. Figure 15 shows in a simplified form that when a nonlinear load draws distorted (non-sinusoidal) current from the supply. The associated harmonic currents passing through the system impedance cause voltage drops for each harmonic frequency based on Ohm’s Law (Vh = Ih × Zh). Figure 16 shows in detail the effect individual harmonic currents have on the impedances within the power system and the associated voltages drops for each. Note that the “total harmonic voltage distortion”. Vthd (based on the vector sum of all individual harmonics).Section 2 Production of Harmonics 3 Effect of Harmonic Currents on Impedance(s) Section 2. FIGURE 15 Distorted Currents Induce Voltage Distortion Impedance No Voltage Distortion Distorted Current Distorted Voltage Source Nonlinear Load Section 2. ZTh Cable ZCh Sinusoidal Voltage Source ZSh Vh Vh Vh ZTh ZCh Ih Nonlinear Load ∧ ∧ @ Source @ Transf. that distorted current passes through all of the impedance between the load and power source. FIGURE 16 How Individual Harmonic Voltage Drops Develop Across System Impedances Source ZSh Transf.

Vnsin(nωt + φn) .. a 19th century French physicist introduced a theory that any periodic function in a interval of time could be expressed by the sum of the fundamental and a series of higher order harmonic frequencies which are integral multipliers of the fundamental component. however... (2. 20 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ..g. The instantaneous value of voltage for non-sinusoidal waveform or complex wave can be expressed as: v = V0 + V1sin(ωt + φ1) + V2sin(2ωt + φ2) + V3sin(3ωt + φ3) +....Section 2 Production of Harmonics V = Ih × Zh (Ohm’s Law) At the load: At the trans. 5th) harmonic current at h-th harmonic (e.....g. 2006 ..: Vh = Ih × (ZCh + ZTh + ZSh) Vh = Ih × (ZTh + ZSh) At the source: Vh = Ih × (ZSh) where Z Vh Ih = = = impedance at frequency of harmonic (e.. 250 Hz) harmonic voltage at h-th harmonic (e... to interpret a complex wave by means of “Fourier Series” and associated analysis methods. 5th) total harmonic voltage distortion Vthd = 4 Calculation of Voltage Distortion Any periodic (repetitive) complex waveform is composed of a sinusoidal component at the fundamental frequency and a number of harmonic components which are integral multipliers of the fundamental frequency. Joseph Fourier...4) where v V0 V1 V2 V3 Vn = = = = = = = = = instantaneous value at any time t direct (or mean) value (DC component) rms value of the fundamental component rms value of the second harmonic component rms value of the third harmonic component rms value of the nth harmonic component relative angular frequency 2πf frequency of fundamental component (1/f defining the time over which the complex wave repeats itself) φ ω f It is usually more convenient.g..

. per unit of load current........ a 30% total current distortion measured against a 50% load would result in a TDD of 15%).......................... Note: In the above Equations 2.13)   ∑I Total Demand Distortion (TDD) = where Iload = TDD = h =2 ∞ 2 h I load = I TDD = 2 2 2 2 I 2 + I 3 + I 4 ..... 2006 21 ..................................... respectively......... + Vn2 .................5) h =1 The rms value of voltage can be expressed as: Vrms 1 2 = v (t )dt = T ∫ 0 ∑ Vh2 h =1 ∞ = V12 + V22 + V32 ................ (2...... For example................................7) The rms voltage or current “total harmonic distortion”.....Section 2 Production of Harmonics Ignoring any DC components in the above formula.................... Vthd and Ithd.11)  100  .........10 to 2.........6) I rms = 1 2 i (t )dt = T T ∫ 0 ∑ I h2 h =1 ∞ = 2 2 2 2 I 1 + I 2 + I 3 .......... + Vnn V1 × 100% .......... + I n ..... the instantaneous rms voltage..... (2.............. (2..10) fund I rms = I fund I fund = I  1 +  thd  .................................................... (2... + I n I1 × 100% ............ (2.13.............. can be represented as a Fourier Series: v(t ) = ∑ vh (t ) = ∑ h =1 T ∞ ∞ 2Vh sin (hω 0 t + φ h ) ................. (2.... + I n ............... (2......12) 2 2 I rms 2 1 + I thd Total fundamental current distortion: I thd ( fund )  I =  rms  I fund    − 1 ......9) Other simple but practical harmonic formulae include: Total rms current: or Fundamental current: 2 I rms = I 2 + I harm ......... (2......................... the voltage (V) can be substituted for the current (I).................................................................. respectively can be expressed as: Vthd = h=2 ∑ Vh2 V1 × 100% = ∞ ∞ V22 + V32 + V42 ........ (2... ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ...................8) I thd = h=2 ∑ I h2 I1 × 100% = 2 2 2 I 2 + I 32 + I 4 ..... (2...... where V1 and I1 represent the fundamental voltage and current.............14) I load maximum demand load current (fundamental) at the PCC ‘total demand distortion’ of current (expressed as measured total harmonic current distortion.. Vh..........

23rd. Triplen harmonics (3rd. The voltage notches occur when the continuous line current commutates (i. reduces to almost zero as the current increases.. transfers) from one phase to another. and so on.e. connected together) for very short durations through the converter bridge and the AC source impedance.. 2006 . in the same sequence as fundamental) are termed “positive sequence harmonics” whereas the 5th . Table 1 details the harmonic sequence components for an idealized 6-pulse rectifier. which rotate in the opposite direction to the fundamental are termed “negative sequence harmonics”. “line notching” is a phenomenon normally associated with the SCR (thyristor) based “phase-controlled” rectifiers such as those utilized in AC and DC variable speed drives and UPS systems. limited only by the circuit impedance. “Effects of Harmonics”. the two phases are short-circuited (i. Section 2. also sources of harmonics. 6 Line Notching Although not strictly “harmonics”. The effects of “line notching” can have a serious impact on the supply system and other equipment. Section 2. and so on. but to a lesser extent than those associated with SCR bridges.e. TABLE 1 Harmonic Sequence Components for 6-Pulse Rectifier Harmonic Sequence Rotation 1 + F 5 B 7 + F 11 B 13 + F 17 B 19 + F 23 B 25…. During the “commutation period”. 9th…). which rotate in a forward direction (i. 13th. as produced in single-phase full wave rectifiers. + F Harmonics such as the 7th. a frequency which is an integer multiple of the fundamental frequency and a “sequence”.. The result is that the voltage.e. for example. 11th.Section 2 Production of Harmonics 5 Harmonic Sequence Components Each harmonic has an order (number). The sequence refers in vector rotation with respect to the fundamental. They are in phase with each other and are therefore termed “zero sequence harmonics”. as illustrated. 22 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . do not rotate. Section 2. Figure 17 depicts a simple three-phase full wave SCR bridge network supplying a DC load. Figure 18 illustrates theoretical notching at the terminals of the SCR input bridge and therefore assumes no additional inductance in the circuit. 19th and 25th. 17th. The impact of sequence harmonics on rotating machines will be discussed in Section 3. Diode bridges can also exhibit “commutation notches”.

the notches can be present anywhere in the respective half cycles. It should be noted that the only real practical way to reduce the notch area is to provide part of the necessary commutation energy from a capacitor bank. but regardless of how much inductance is added at the bridge terminals. 2006 23 . ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . an impedance of relatively low value with relatively high short circuit capacity) due to the additional impedances downstream in the circuit. The disturbances associated with line notching tend to progressively reduce nearer to a “stiff” source impedance (i. as the phase angle of SCRs varies according to the needed output voltage (or current for current source AC drives).e. the area of the notch (depth and width) is dependent on the volt-milliseconds absorbed in the circuits in the line from the source generator or transformer to the SCR bridge input terminals. Figure 19.. the notch area tends to remain constant as the addition of AC line inductance will reduce the notch depth but will increase the notch width.Section 2 Production of Harmonics FIGURE 17 Simple Three-phase SCR Bridge for Phase Control + 3φAC DC − FIGURE 18 Exaggerated Example of “Line Notching” In practical terms. including that associated with cabling. With reference to Section 2. It is common practice to add “commutation reactors” or isolation transformers in the AC line of the SCR bridge to minimize the notch.

especially where no additional AC line reactance is present. 24 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . usually above the highest measured (i. Figures 2 and 3 illustrates the significant effects of line notching.. Figure 4. FIGURE 20 SCR Line Notching and Associated “Ringing” It should be noted that line notching and associated ringing do not usually influence the Vthd. as shown in Section 1. as the harmonics associated with them are of high frequency.. The oscillograph in Section 1. an important phenomenon associated with SCR phase control is “ringing”. as illustrated in Section 2. The effects of line notching on generators and other equipment will be discussed in Section 3. Figure 20. line notching and ringing can have significant effects on voltage quality. “Ringing” is the term given high frequency oscillations due to the rapid switching of the SCRs. It is the result of high frequency “resonance” occurring in the rectifier circuit due to inherent inductance and capacitance in the equipment circuitry.Section 2 Production of Harmonics FIGURE 19 Voltage Notching due to SCR Bridge Commutation In severe cases. However. 2006 . Although secondary to line notching. Figure 3 refers to a vessel where up to four AC SCR input bridge drives were operating.e. 50th). the voltage can be reduced to zero creating additional “zero crossovers” (i.e. the points where the voltage would normally change polarity). Section 1.

1.4 and 10/11. The effect of interharmonics on equipment will be discussed in later Sections. 4/3. including large AC frequency converters drives (especially under unbalanced conditions and/or levels of pre-exiting voltage distortion). where f1 is the fundamental frequency Waveforms which contain both harmonics and interharmonics of constant amplitude but differing frequencies are rarely periodic (i. They appear as discrete frequencies or as a wide-band spectrum”. Figure 22 illustrates.Section 2 Production of Harmonics 7 Interharmonics Interharmonics are defined in IEC Standard 1000-2-1 as: “Between the harmonics of the power frequency voltage and current. where h is an integer >0 f > 0 and f < f1. FIGURE 21 Cycloconverter Current Spectrum – Includes Interharmonics Both harmonics and interharmonics can be defined in a quasi-steady state in terms of their spectral components over a range of frequencies as detailed below: Harmonics: DC: Interharmonics: Subharmonics: f = h ⋅ f1 where h is an integer > 0 f = 0 Hz (f = h ⋅ f1. These can be observed increasingly with nonlinear loads. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 3/6.e. Interharmonics can therefore be considered as the “inter-modulation” of the fundamental and harmonic components of the system with any other frequency components.1. cycloconverters (see Section 2. See 3/5. repetitive). as Section 2.3. where h = 0) f is not equal to h ⋅ f1. Figure 21) and static slip recovery drives. 2006 25 . further frequencies can be observed which are not an integer of the fundamental. 6/2..

..............16) 2 where the period of integration T = 1/f1. similar to the use of percentage values............... and as such.......... it is the AC peak voltage which normally recharges the capacitor(s)... interharmonics are not synchronized with the fundamental and therefore affect the peak amplitude of the AC supply voltage (see Section 2........ (2. The maximum percentage rms voltage deviation over several periods of the fundamental due to interharmonics can be calculated by combining Equations 2.Section 2 Production of Harmonics FIGURE 22 Waveform Containing both Harmonics and Interharmonics Due to the modulation of steady state harmonic voltages............... 26 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .. However...... quantities are expressed as ratios...........15 and 2........(2......... Using this method............. 2006 ... Figure 23) causing deviations of peak voltage which can adversely effect the connected equipment...... both those utilizing capacitors and also several types of lighting.... while the change in the voltage rms value is dependent on both the amplitude and the interharmonics frequency.. current is only drawn from the supply when the AC voltage is greater than the DC side capacitor voltage.................................0 per unit *) interharmonics frequency The per unit system is based on the formula below....15) where f1 a fi * = = = fundamental frequency amplitude (per unit) of the interharmonics voltage (amplitude of the fundamental voltage = 1.... AC PWM drives)...................16.............. In equipment which utilize capacitors on the DC side (for example..... The rms voltage value can be given by: V= 1 T ∫0 T v(t ) dt .. the supply voltage will vary in amplitude and rms value according to: v(t) = sin(2πf1t) + a sin(2πfit).. The resultant integer harmonics in the voltage supply do not effect the AC peak voltage as these integer harmonics are synchronized with the fundamental frequency......... per unit = Note: actual quantity base quatitiy Maximum voltage change in the voltage amplitude is equal to the amplitude of the interharmonics voltage......

... Therefore: ∆V = Vmax – Vmin ............................. Methods of analysis used in the communication industries have been adapted for use in the measurement and analysis of interharmonics components.......... is also used to define subharmonics...... (2.. f > 0 Hz and f < f1).. which uses phase-locked loops and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) techniques......... 2006 27 .............. However. The more technically correct term...............Section 2 Production of Harmonics FIGURE 23 Peak Voltage Deviations due to Interharmonics Voltage The distorted voltage waveform depicted in Section 2................ it should be noted that the calculations provided above associated with interharmonics are valid for “subharmonics” also.....e......... 8 Subharmonics “Subharmonics” is an unofficial but common definition given to interharmonics whose frequency is less than that of the fundamental (i.....18) Note: The measurement of interharmonics............17) where V1 t f1 Vn n = = = = = amplitude of fundamental voltage time fundamental voltage amplitude of interharmonics n fractional real number of interharmonics order The variation of the supply voltage amplitude is calculated from the difference between the maximum and minimum peak values (Vmax and Vmin) recorded over several cycles of the function V(t)... poses considerable problems for traditional harmonic measuring equipment................ This is due to the interharmonic frequency components being non-related to the fundamental frequency and non-periodic... compared to that of integer harmonics.............................. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ...... “sub-synchronous frequency component”. Therefore.(2....... for the measurement and identification of interharmonics it may not be necessary to perform an analysis which depends on the supply fundamental frequency....... Figure 23 can be calculated as: V(t) = V1 sin(2πf1t) + Vn sin(2πfnt).........

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.....1 Thermal Losses The iron losses comprise two separate losses............ Eddy currents produce losses which increase in proportion to the square of the frequency... 1......... windings and other component parts of the generator induced by the stray magnetic fields around the turns in the generator windings...e......... The major impact of voltage and current harmonics is the increase in machine heating caused by increased iron losses........ and copper losses. both on localized heating and torque pulsations. [On shore installations. it is relatively common practice to “derate” (reduce the output of) generators when supplying nonlinear loads to minimize the effects of harmonic heating....] In addition. The relationship of eddy current losses and harmonics is given by: PEC = PEF where PEC = PEF = Ih h = = total eddy current losses eddy current losses at full load at fundamental frequency rms current (per unit) harmonic h harmonic number hmax h =1 ∑ I h2 h 2 ... Eddy currents circulate in the iron core....... Hysteresis losses are proportional to frequency and the square of the magnetic flux.... 120 times a second for 60 Hz supplies).... there is the influence of harmonic sequence components. (3...... both frequency dependent... The hysteresis loss is the power consumed due to nonlinearity of the generator’s flux density/magnetizing force curve and the subsequent reversal in the generator’s core magnetic field each time the current changes polarity (i..... ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ...1) On linear loads.... the eddy current losses are fairly minor but become more significant as the harmonic loading increases......................... 2006 29 .. “hysteresis losses” and “eddy current losses”. Higher hysteresis losses occur at harmonic frequencies due to the more rapid reversals compared to those at fundamental frequency...SECTION 3 Effects of Harmonics 1 Generators In comparison to shore-based utility power supplies... the effects of harmonic voltages and harmonic currents are significantly more pronounced on generators due to their source impedance being typically three to four times that of utility transformers...

. thereby increasing the losses according to: 2 PCU = I rms R .. 1. and overheating is unlikely provided the rotor pole faces are laminated.. For a given load.. but when nonlinear current is drawn.. The higher the resistance..... in addition to causing additional heating..... causing additional. Dd and Dq.... For 5th and 7th harmonic frequency.... The 5th harmonic is negative sequence and induces in the rotor a negatively-rotating 6th harmonic.. Similarly.. for example.. similar in shape to the fundamental but rotating at harmonic frequencies. Note that the resistances are ignored as they are relatively small compared to the reactance. Figure 1.....2) where PCU = Irms R = = total copper losses total rms current resistance of winding The copper losses are also influenced by a phenomenon termed “skin effect”. 2006 ......(3.. localized losses and subsequent heating................ inducing currents in the rotor iron and windings.. the higher the I2R losses.... Within the rotor. when harmonic currents are present...Section 3 Effects of Harmonics Copper losses are dissipated in the generator windings when current is passed through the winding resistance... the harmonic currents interact with the system impedances to produce voltage drops at each individual harmonic frequency. 30 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .... The iron and damper windings..... the total rms value of the current passing through the windings will be increased....... prevent any rapid flux changes in the rotor... adding to rotor losses and the associated temperature rise... A simplified equivalent circuit for one phase of a three-phase generator is shown in Section 3. the 7th harmonic is positive and similarly induces a positively-rotating 6th harmonic in the rotor... this effect is similar to that caused by single-phase or unbalanced-phase operation.... The harmonic stator current drawn by the nonlinear load will result in air gap fluxes. At fundamental frequency.. the torque pulsations will be at six times for fundamental (360 Hz based on 60 Hz fundamental.. the 11th and 13th harmonics will induce both negatively and positively rotating 12th harmonics in the rotor... respectively. The two contra-rotating 6th harmonic systems in the rotor result in “amortisseur” or “damper” winding currents which are stationary with respect to the rotor.... at harmonic frequencies..... However........... thereby causing voltage distortion..... the skin effect is negligible and the distribution of current across the cable is uniform..... relative to the stator). Skin effect refers to the tendency of current flow to be confined in a conductor to a layer close to its outer surface.2 Effect of Sequence Components Harmonic currents occur in pairs each having a negative or a positive sequence rotation..3 Voltage Distortion A generator is designed to produce sinusoidal voltage at its terminals. 1. can create mechanical oscillations on the generator shaft.. significantly reducing the effective cross sectional area of the conductor and increasing its resistance..... These result from the interaction between harmonic and fundamental frequencies exciting a specific mechanical resonant frequency...... Shafts can be severely stressed due to these oscillations.... Harmonic pairs. skin effect is substantially more pronounced.

........ (3......0346 ohms when the 5th harmonic current is 135 A........................................45 V ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ....Section 3 Effects of Harmonics FIGURE 1 Equivalent Circuit for a Generator To calculate the rms harmonic voltage due to the respective harmonic current..... Vh = 3 × Ih × h × Xgen = 1........ Also..............................4) Vrms where Vh = L-L rms voltage of the harmonic h L-L fundamental rms voltage Vrms = Example 1 Calculate the L-L rms 5th harmonic voltage for a 480 V generator with reactance X of 0............... (3..................................... the following method can be used: Vh = where 3 × Ih × h × Xgen ...............0346 = 40......... in ohms harmonic number Vh Ih h Xgen = = To calculate the L-L rms harmonic voltage as a percentage of rms fundamental voltage: Vh × 100% ...................3) = = L-L rms voltage of the harmonic h harmonic current at order h generator reactance..732 × 135 × 5 × 0................... express the harmonic voltage as a percentage of the fundamental rms voltage...... 2006 31 ...............

can be calculated using: Vrms 1 2 = v (t )dt = T T ∫ 0 ∑V h =1 ∞ 2 h = V12 + V22 + V32 . Many electronic regulator units utilize measurement and control circuits which depend on “zero crossovers” (the point on a sine wave when the sinusoidal voltage or current cuts through the zero axis). and hence frequency.) Only equipment utilizing “true rms” techniques indicate correct readings for supplies containing harmonics. 1. for example with large SCR phase control loads. false readings can occur when measurements based on average values are used. however. using low pass filters at the input of the appropriate sensing circuits.. On waveforms containing harmonics. The effect of harmonics on instrumentation will be discussed in Subsection 3/9.Section 3 Effects of Harmonics 5th harmonic voltage as a percentage of the fundamental rms voltage: = = Vh × 100% Vrms 40.11 times the average value. additional zero crossovers may appear. a low pass filter as detailed in Section 3.43% Note: Other percentage harmonic voltage components can be estimated by performing similar calculations for each harmonic current.45 × 100 480 = 8.. In addition. Figure 2.. as shown in Section 3.. to control the speed. Vrms. + Vn2 Similarly. is recommended. below. + Vnn V1 × 100% See Subsection 12/1 for practical examples of manual voltage distortion calculations. The rms value of current.6. of the prime mover and to proportionally distribute the kW load of parallel connected generators. This will result in the majority of the distortion from the voltage control signal being attenuated.. the Vthd “voltage total harmonic distortion” can be expressed using Equation 2. Figure 2.. Note: For generator AVRs subject to voltage distortion. this assumption is no longer valid. When harmonic currents are present. The combination of harmonic distortion and line notching can cause hunting and instability in voltage and frequency regulation control loops. Where “line notching” or “ringing” occurs.. Many of these problems can be resolved. 2006 . the total rms voltage including harmonic voltages.. line notching often makes it difficult to correctly load share when parallel generators are operating. Modern generators use electronic governors to regulate the output voltage.. Load sharing depends on the measurement of the kW load on each generator. This is also valid for switchboard instrumentation. which assumes fundamental only is normally used in the computation of the kW loading.. (Based on sinusoidal waveforms.4 Line Notching and Generators Harmonic currents can cause significant problems in generators in addition to those attributable to additional losses and torsional pulsations. 32 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . the rms value is 1.. As detailed in Equation 2.8: Vthd = Note: h=2 ∑ Vh2 V1 × 100% = ∞ V22 + V32 + V42 .

1 Transformers Thermal Losses Transformer losses comprise “no load losses”.. which are dependent on the peak flux levels necessary to magnetize the transformer core and are negligible with respect to harmonic current levels. Potential small laminated core vibrations can appear as additional audible noise. The increased rms current due to harmonics will increase the I2R copper losses. rate of rise of voltage) are present. In addition. copper losses and stray flux losses which can result in additional heating. winding insulation stress.2. The copper losses can be calculated using Equation 3. 2006 33 . Temperature cycling and possible resonance between transformer winding inductance and supply capacitance can also cause additional losses. eddy currents and hysteresis). The effect of harmonic currents at harmonic frequencies in transformers causes increases in core losses through increased iron losses (i.Section 3 Effects of Harmonics FIGURE 2 Low Pass Filter for Generator AVR Sensing on Nonlinear Loads 1. as shown below: 2 PCU = I rms R where PCU = Irms R = = total copper losses total rms current resistance of winding ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . rotary condenser and line reactors.e.. especially if high levels of dv/dt (i. which significantly increase at harmonic frequencies when transformers supply nonlinear current.5 Shaft Generators Shaft generators are generally unaffected by the import of external power system harmonics due to the filtering effects of the generator converter. 2 2.e. and “load losses”.

Higher hysteresis losses occur at harmonic frequencies due to the more rapid reversals compared to that at fundamental frequency..... 2. Triplen (i.......... In order to minimize the risk of premature failure......... K-rated transformers are specifically designed for nonlinear loads and operate with lower losses at harmonic frequencies.... the three-phase currents will cancel out in the neutral conductor....... as they are designed to run at rated kVA loads in the presence of harmonic currents and also they normally comply with Underwriters Laboratory (UL) and NEC requirements for transformers supplying nonlinear loads.5) h =1 hmax where PEC = PEF = Ih h = = total eddy current losses eddy current losses at full load at fundamental frequency rms current (per unit) harmonic h harmonic number The hysteresis loss is the power consumed due to nonlinearity of the transformers flux density/magnetizing force curve and the subsequent reversal in the transformer core magnetic field each time the current changes polarity (i.. those used in some cruise liners) have a delta-wye (delta-star) configuration... when nonlinear loads are being supplied. which can carry up to 173% of phase current at a frequency of predominately 180 Hz (3rd harmonic). using smaller insulated secondary conductors wired in parallel and transposed to reduce heating due to skin effect and AC resistance and enlarging the primary winding to withstand triplen harmonics present on single-phase nonlinear loads. (3.. the triplen harmonics in the phase currents do not cancel out..3 Transformer Derating or K-factor Transformer Transformers are of prime importance in any power system.. When supplying nonlinear loads... 34 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .Section 3 Effects of Harmonics The eddy current losses can be calculated using Equation 3..... However.. two methods are used by designers:- • • “Derate” the transformer (i....... K-rated transformers are usually preferred to derated transformers. 2. 3rd.... 9th......... 120 times a second for 60 Hz supplies)... K-rated transformer modifications can include additional cooling ducts... Distribution Transformers and Neutral Currents Distribution transformers used in four-wire (i... three-phase and neutral) distribution systems (for example. a redesign of the magnetic core based on lower normal flux density by using higher grades of iron.. overheating transformers and on occasion......e...........2 Unbalance... 15th…) harmonic currents cannot propagate downstream but circulate in the primary delta winding of the transformer causing localized overheating. Use “K-factor” or “K-rated” transformers. Hysteresis losses are proportional to frequency and the square of the magnetic flux.. overheating and burning out neutral conductors... Figure 3 illustrates a typical relationship with transformer derating and K-factor for nonlinear loads..5: 2 PEC = PEF ∑ I h h 2 . oversize it such that it operates at less than the rated load capacity) or if existing....... With linear loading... consider reducing the loading on it..e.... Section 3. 2006 .. but instead add cumulatively in the neutral conductor...e....e... they are particularly vulnerable to overheating and early-life failure.....

.. the greater the heating effect on a given transformer...0 indicates a linear load (i..Section 3 Effects of Harmonics FIGURE 3 Typical Transformer Derating Curve for Nonlinear Load UL developed the K-factor system to indicate the capability of transformers to handle harmonic loads.. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .. (3.. However.......6) h =1 K P1 Pf h Ih = = = = = K-factor eddy current losses on linear load eddy current losses on nonlinear load harmonic number harmonic current (per unit) One acknowledged problem associated with calculating K-factors is selecting the most appropriate range of harmonic frequencies. The equation for calculating K-factor is the ratio of eddy current losses when supplying nonlinear and linear loads: P K= 1 = Pf where h = hmax ∑ 2 I h h 2 ..... of 15th....... the calculations can yield significantly different K-factors for the same load........110. The subsequent ratings are described in UL1561.... for example.........e.. IEEE 519 (1992) considers harmonics up the 50th............. Based on the upper limit. in many calculations harmonic orders up to 25th are commonly used.. 25th or 50th harmonics.......... the K-factor is a weighting of the harmonic current loads according to their effects on transformer heating as derived from ANSI/IEEE C57.. 2006 35 .... A K-factor of 1.......... Essentially................... The higher the K-factor... no harmonic loading)......

......... The magnitude of the iron losses is dependent on the iron loss characteristic of the laminations and the angle of skew.....8) In I1 q = = = magnitude of n-th harmonic magnitude of fundamental current an exponential constant which is dependent on the type of winding and frequency..5 for those with foil low voltage windings....... The formulae used to calculate copper losses and eddy current losses used for transformers are also applicable for induction motors: 2 PCU = I rms R where PCU = Irms R = = total copper losses total rms current resistance of winding 36 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ..5  n= N   ( I n )2     n =1  ∑ 0...7 for transformers with round or rectangular cross sections in both windings and 1................ Leakage magnetic fields caused by harmonic currents in the stator and rotor end windings produce additional stray frequency eddy current dependent losses...... especially at frequencies above 300 Hz. Typical values are 1........... Substantial iron losses can also be produced in induction motors with skewed rotors due to high-frequency-induced currents and rapid flux changes (i.......... 3 3......... (3.5 ..e......... due to hysteresis) in the stator and rotor............ both a reference temperature harmonic number rms value of the sinusoidal current including all harmonics given by: 0. rotor circuit and rotor laminations.... due to additional copper losses and iron losses (eddy current and hysteresis losses) in the stator winding............7) where e n I = = = = eddy current loss at fundamental frequency divided by the loss due to DC current equal to the rms value of the sinusoidal current..Section 3 Effects of Harmonics In Europe.......... These losses are further compounded by skin effect.. the K-factor is termed “Factor K”........1 Induction Motors Thermal Losses Harmonics distortion raises the losses in AC induction motors in a way very similar to that apparent in transformers with increased heating....... 2006 . with significantly more complicated calculations according to BS 7821 Part 4: 2 n= N    nq  In 1 + e  I1   K=    1 + e  I  n+ 2   I 1    ∑     2     0.. (3........5 n = N  I = I1   n  n =1  I 1   ∑     2    .......

. 7th...... 19th…) will assist torque production. are also susceptible to damage due high levels of dv/dt (i. 3..e... rate of rise of voltage) such as those attributed to line notching and associated ringing.Section 3 Effects of Harmonics The eddy current losses can be calculated using Equation 3.... the torque will have a varying component at 300 Hz with an amplitude of torque fluctuation of 0.. The magnitude of torque pulsations due to sequence components can be estimated as follows to assess possible shaft torsional vibration problems based on a nominal voltage: 2 2 T3k = I n+ + I n− − 2 I n + I n − cos(φ n + − φ n − ) [ ] 1/ 2 per unit.....5: PEC = PEF where hmax h =1 ∑ I h2h2 total eddy current losses eddy current losses at full load at fundamental frequency rms current (per unit) harmonic h harmonic number PEC = PEF = Ih H = = Motors with deep bar or double cage rotors are susceptible to additional losses.. if we consider a 50 Hz supply with 4% voltage distortion based on motor harmonic currents of 0.02 per unit for the 5th and 7th harmonics. Assuming no phase displacement between harmonics and full value of voltage. 2006 37 .... The motor’s windings..... 13th. particularly on highly polluted supplies containing high order harmonics..... 17th…) will act against the direction of rotation resulting in torque pulsations which are significant. respectively..01 per unit.... whereas the negative sequence components (5th. (3. 13th....... In– = n+ n– = = per unit values represents the 1 + 3k harmonic orders represents the 1 – 3k harmonic orders For example. any harmonic energy associated with them is dissipated as heat. Zero sequence harmonics (i..e. can degrade the bearing lubrication and result in bearing collapse.9) where In+. due to conduction along the shaft.. For every 10°C rise in temperature (continuous) above rated temperature.03 and 0..05 per unit ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ..e...... triplens) do not rotate (i.. Overheating imposes significant limits on the effective life of an induction motor.. especially if insulation is class B or below. lead to “hot rotors” which. Harmonic currents also can result in bearing currents. Positive sequence components (i.2 Effect of Harmonic Sequence Components Harmonic sequence components also adversely affect induction motors... a practice common in AC variable frequency drive-fed AC motors... If the harmonics have the worst case phase relationship. they are stationary).. the life of motor insulation may be reduced by as much as 50%.e.. Squirrel cage rotors can normally withstand higher temperature levels compared to wound rotors. This can be prevented through the use of an insulated bearing.. This can in extreme cases.. then the amplitude of the torque fluctuation will be 0.

As detailed above. Dependent on the magnitude of the voltage distortion. an internal explosion) it cannot transmit to the surrounding hazardous area. subject to special tests and certification. NEMA standard MG-1 “Application Considerations for Constant Speed motors used on Sinusoidal Bus with Harmonic Content and General Purpose Motors used with Variable Voltage or Variable Frequency Controls or both” proposes the amount of motor derating necessary for both fixed-speed motors on distorted supplies or those fed by variable frequency supplies. on distorted supplies. It should also be noted that “explosion-proof motors” are designed and certified based on “clean” sinusoidal supplies.11. Figure 4. EExe (increased safety) and EExp (pressurised) are permitted only 2% voltage distortion before they are classed “as operating outside the conditions envisaged when they were certified”. Where a certified explosion-proof motor is driven by the variable frequency drive. FIGURE 4 Proposed NEMA Derating Curve for Harmonic Voltages 38 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . temperature class (for example. it may not be so on supplies distorted by harmonics.g. the safety certificate of the motor is no longer valid unless the safety certification has been based on the tests using that particular variable frequency drive. While that may be perfectly valid on pure sinusoidal supplies. However... the rotor may overheat and degrade the flameproof seals. 200°C for T3)]. it may not be successfully contained but transmit to the external “hazardous area” with significant consequences. hot rotors can also result in bearing degradation. for use in hazardous areas to NEMA 30. MG-1 refers to explosion-proof motors. According to EN60034-1. flameproof motors). and if there is an internal explosion (more likely due to excessive rotor temperatures).02. in the presence of harmonics and deep bar or double cage rotors.3 Explosion-proof Motors and Voltage Distortion A practical application of AC induction motors worth noting is that of “explosion-proof motors” (i. the rotor temperature may exceed the motor “T class” [i. An explosion-proof motor relies on the flameproof enclosure and shaft-mounted flameproof seals to contain any internal explosion in the event of an escape of gas or vapor. In North America. 2006 .e. Higher levels of voltage distortion can be accommodated for all protection concepts.. explosion-proof protection concepts EExd (flameproof motors).Section 3 Effects of Harmonics 3.2. This type of motor relies on the principle that no matter what happens inside the flameproof enclosure (e. For EExN motors (non-sparking motor) 3% voltage distortion is permitted under EN60034-12.e. as illustrated by Section 3.

...09 2 0.. Small....10) n n =5 odd harmonic.e.. causing overheating on the smoothing capacitors. single-phase) and small 6-pulse SCR DC drives which do not have commutating reactors or isolation transformers can misfire in the presence of line notching and/or high levels of harmonic current... harmonics can be beneficial for drives as they cause flattening of the peak voltage (i... However.. large numbers of 2-pulse drives (or other single-phase nonlinear loads) can increase the peak-to-peak voltage magnitudes. 0.. Both harmonics and line notching effect variable speed drives........0505 (or 5.. (3. 0.042 2 0.. 7th.... Line commutated inverters (LCIs.e.. respectively.065.......... However...068 2 0...........038 for the 5th.. termed “flat topping” – see Subsection 3/7.........” for more details) which reduces the stress on rectifiers...........e. Generally..e. often up to 130-140% including a large 3rd harmonic which adds cumulatively in the neutral conductor. associated with line notching is also problematic. Conversely..09... significantly increasing the neutral current up to 173% of phase current and increasing neutral-toground voltages...05% voltage distortion) 4 Variable Speed Drives Electrical variable speed drives of all types (i..042...038 2 + + ..Section 3 Effects of Harmonics The “Harmonic Voltage Factor” (HVF) can be defined as: HVF = where n =∞ ∑ Vn2 .... ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .... 2006 39 ..... The effect of line notching is more pronounced when the drive(s) is at low speed and high load.. also known as “current source inverters” when used on smaller induction motor applications) and cycloconverters are more commonly used in higher ratings (i.. These are assumed to be relatively immune to the normal level of harmonics....+ 5 7 11 13 HVF = 0. increasing stress the on rectifiers... single-phase (2-pulse) PWM drives with no reactors have high levels of Ithd. 11th and 13th harmonics..... The resultant excessive localized harmonic current can be reflected into the DC bus...... “Computers and Computer Based Equipment... above 2000 HP). these can be also susceptible to disruption and component damage due to input line harmonics. not including triplens per unit magnitude of the voltage at the n-th harmonic n Vn = = Example 2 Calculate the HVF based on the per unit harmonic voltages of 0.... Ringing associated with line notching increases DC bus levels at no or light loading with consequential over-voltage tripping. the more it is immune to the effects of harmonics and line notching... 0. the larger rating a drive is. Ringing.. AC or DC) use power semiconductors to rectify the AC input voltage and current and thereby create harmonics... 2-pulse (i.. n =∞ HVF = ∑ Vn2 n n =5 HVF = 0.

“soft starting” of DC bus voltage) or for variable voltage DC bus control may experience misfiring of SCRs due to incorrect or irregular conduction and excessive heating of DC bus capacitors and smoothing reactors if the supply voltage is significantly contaminated by line notching or high levels of harmonics.Section 3 Effects of Harmonics Small 6-pulse PWM (“pulse width modulation”) drives (i.0 20.e. On supplies with line notching.0 -80.5 kW) usually have no AC line or DC bus reactors. SCR misfiring can result. However. voltage “flat topping” (see Section 3.e. Figures 5 and 6) can occur. up to 10 HP/7. this also applies to drives with “active front ends” which synthesize an input sinusoidal current wave shape. reducing the DC bus voltage levels. Standard 6-pulse AC PWM drives.0 40. AC PWM drives with SCRs for pre-charge (i. These need special filtering to attenuate the input bridge carrier frequency affecting the supply system and to reduce the overall EMI which is significantly more than emitted from standard diode or SCR pre-charge input stages).e.5 kW usually have AC commutating reactors or isolation transformers installed between the drive and the line to attenuate the line notches on the supply side. it can reduce the drive ride-through in the event of line disturbances and increase the output current to the motor. if the line notching or levels of harmonic current are significant. thereby raising its temperature due to additional I2R losses.0 40 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .e.0 Units -20. Line notching can also result in excessive heating of SCR snubber components.. and in some cases.e... On weak supplies (i. are relatively robust and can usually withstand line disturbances due to harmonics below 5% Vthd. most drives “filter” the harmonics to varying degrees using AC line reactors.0 0. the most common type used. 18-. supplies with high source impedance). possibly blowing fuses or tripping circuit breakers downstream.0 -40.5-11 kW). any overshoot may increase the DC bus voltage on no-load or light load. 2006 .. for 12-. resulting in drive “over-voltage trip”. FIGURE 5 AC PWM Drive Current Distortion on Weak Source 60. 6-pulse SCR DC drives above 10 HP/7. These also reduce the effects of line notching and harmonics impressed on the drive. In addition. passive filters (i. Above 10-15 HP (7. Larger PWM drives with a simple input diode bridge with either AC line or DC bus reactors are usually relatively robust and can operate in a harmonics environment without significant problems.0 -60. which prevents the drive from achieving the nominal power output for drive and the motor. 24-pulse…) for AC or DC drives reduce the effects of downstream harmonics and line notching at the drive terminals.. Phase displacement transformers (i.

repeated fluctuations in light intensity). resulting in spurious command and feedback signals into the drive.0 20. albeit at different levels of intensity.Section 3 Effects of Harmonics FIGURE 6 PWM Drive “Flat Topping” due to Weak Source 80.0 V×10 -20.0 Unwanted “electrical noise” (i. % relative change in light level divided by % relative fluctuation in rms voltage) The amount of ambient light in lighted area Superimposed interharmonic voltages in the supply voltage are a significant cause of light flicker in both incandescent and fluorescent lamps. Note: Filtering of the drive high frequency currents is not normally possible in IT power systems (insulated neutrals). EMI) can be induced into drive signal and control cables. where rerouting cabling is not feasible.e.0 60.. Lighting is highly sensitive to rms voltage changes. if power cabling is not sufficiently segregated from the control cables or if shielding or grounding is not adequate.e. The voltage across any input EMC filter capacitors would be 1..1 Lighting Flicker One noticeable effect on lighting is the phenomenon of “flicker” (i. fluorescent or high intensity discharge) The magnitude of the voltage fluctuations The “frequency” of the voltage fluctuations The “gain factor” of the lamp (i.. 5 5. 2006 41 .25% is perceptible to the human eye in some types of lamps. The severity of the flicker is dependent on a number of factors including: • • • • • The type of light (incandescent. In severe cases. damaging or destroying the filter capacitors. even a deviation of 0.0 -40.73 times higher in the event of a ground fault. the retrofitting of low pass filters to drive input may be necessary.0 40.0 -60.0 0. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Control relays may fail to operate correctly and measuring equipment may be adversely effected.0 -80.e.

... If the notches are severe or where ringing occurs................... Any voltage fluctuations also impact on the life of lamps...... (3.............................2 Effects of Line Notching on Lighting Line notching will also effects lighting to varying degrees................ which may have safety implications for the vessel. transient suppression may be necessary at lighting distribution board level to protect the individual light fittings.. 2006 42 ....... The older................13) where durability at rated voltage. the effects of harmonics on components within UPS systems will be almost identical with additional heating on power devices.... ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .. smoothing capacitors and inductors... usually equates to 1000 hrs...e....... 6 Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS) Due to the phenomenal increase in “power quality”-sensitive loads such as computers and navigation or radio communications equipment......... the type of ballast used impacts on the amount of flicker.......... individual power factor correction should be avoided and group power factor correction with detuning reactors should be installed at lighting distribution panel level........... the reduction in working life with changes in voltage can be expressed as: V TV =  V  n     −14 .3 Potential for Resonance The interaction between harmonic current and power factor correction capacitors inside individual fluorescent lighting units can result in parallel resonances being excited between the capacitors and power system inductances resulting in damage of the lighting units.....6 for incandescent lamps.... The consequential reduction in rms voltage will cause a reduction in the intensity of illumination................ In fluorescent lamps... 5.... especially in incandescent lamps. Ideally. Batteries may overheat due to excessive harmonics and interharmonics on the DC side of the rectifier......... Vn...... where installed....... high frequency types... Fluorescent fittings used with occupancy sensors which are based on zero crossover detection may experience difficulties if the notching is severe and multiple crossovers result... light intensity in “lumens”) of lamps under voltage fluctuations can be expressed by: V ΦV = Φ n  V  n     3.. 5.... magnetic type ballasts are more susceptible to flicker than the more modern........................... In the case of incandescent lamps. (3... UPS are very similar in architecture to variable speed drives.. uninterruptible power supplies (UPSs) are now commonly provided and can range from a 100 VA to several MVA.... Therefore.....11) and V ΦV = Φ n  V  n     1.. Vn.Section 3 Effects of Harmonics Incandescent lamps at higher voltages are usually more susceptible to voltage changes due to smaller filaments and shorter time constants than lamps of similar power rating but lower voltage.......8 for fluorescent lamps .. (3.... The luminous flux (i.......12) where ΦV is luminous flux at rated voltage......

perhaps due to the UPS input filter. As can be seen in Section 3. 2006 43 . FIGURE 7 Voltage “Flat Topping” due to Pulse Currents Voltage flat topping reduces the operating DC bus voltage (Section 3. Section 2. inhibiting the alarm system advising of problems in the bypass system. This will be discussed in Section 4. It should be noted that UPS systems do also produce harmonic currents. FIGURE 8 Effect of DC Bus Voltage with Flat Topping Higher voltage trace = Normal DC bus level Lower voltage trace = DC bus volts due to flat topping ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .. bypass sensing circuits may disable the bypass circuit. On high levels of distortion. displaying a “loss of AC supply” alarm and bypass to inverter mode. If resonance occurs. Figure 7. In the presence of harmonics. the pulsed nature of the current causes a voltage drop at the peak of the voltage wave. which can manifest itself in early life failure of components due to high operating temperatures. Figure 8).e. UPS may shut down. attract harmonic currents from upstream) damaging the harmonic filter. the UPS line side filter (to reduce the harmonics from the rectifier input stage) may act as a sink (i. 7 Computers and Computer Based Equipment The majority of computer based equipment derives the internal voltage supplies from switched mode or similar power supply units and it is often here where harmonic problems are noticed. Figure 7 shows the current drawn from the supply by SMPS with two pulses per cycle while the SMPS capacitors are charging. below. resulting in increased current being drawn and increased I2R losses in the equipment and associated cabling.Section 3 Effects of Harmonics Excessive voltage distortion or notching/ringing can cause misfiring of input rectifier SCRs possibly resulting in fuse rupture.

.....9 per unit......... If passive components predominate in the circuit.11 per unit V 0. 2006 .. In the case of AC PWM drives (single....... P=V⋅I where P V I = = = power (per unit) voltage (per unit) current (per unit) P 1 .............0 = = 1......... the impedance will remain mostly unchanged and current will decrease in proportion with the voltage.....11)2 ⋅ (1) = 1... Figure 9 shows how the reduction in DC bus voltage on the capacitors reduces the stored energy within the power supply thus reducing its ride-through capability....... Section 3..........9 If V is 0.....or three-phase input).Section 3 Effects of Harmonics Example 3 Determine the per unit increase in I2R losses based on a 10% decrease in DC bus voltage due to flat topping.......... FIGURE 9 Flat Topping Reducing Supply Ride-through Higher voltage trace = Normal DC bus level Lower voltage trace = DC bus volts due to flat topping The energy available from the DC capacitors during ride-through can be expressed as: WR = 1 C V12 − V22 ......23 per unit Power losses increase by 23% Note: The above is only valid for circuits where the current is not limited and power control is dominant... I = Ploss = I2R = (1.. (3........ Similarly..14) C ( ) where V1 V2 C = = = normal voltage (per unit) reduced voltage (per unit) value of capacitor 44 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . the current is not permitted to rise above a predetermined value by the current control system...

+ I n therefore: I rms = I FUND 1 +   I thd    100  Example 5 Calculate the rms current carried by a power cable based on a current total harmonic distortion (Ithd) of 42% and fundamental current of 600 A. Assume a system drop-out voltage of 70%. the I2R losses in the cable due to harmonic currents would increase by:  651    ×100% = 17. An analogous phenomenon. As stated in Equation 2.1 Cables Thermal Losses Cable losses.51 − 0. is due to the mutual inductance of conductors arranged closely parallel to one another. R. V2 = 0.73% compared to heating effect at fundamental frequency.92 – 0.32 per unit Therefore.. are substantially increased when carrying harmonic currents due to elevated I2R losses.2 Skin and Proximity Effects The resistance of a conductor is dependent on the frequency of the current being carried.42 2 Irms = 651 A Ignoring the effects of skin and proximity effects. the cable resistance.51 The above effects are similar to those experiences by single-phase and three-phase AC PWM drives which a diode rectifier and capacitive DC bus.7 per unit At normal voltage.7.72) = 0. 8 8. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Irms = 600 1 + 0.. frequency.32 × 100% = 37% 0. proximity effect. V1 = 1 per unit.51 per unit At 10% reduction (0.  600  2 8.72) = 0. 2006 45 . the rms current Irms in a distorted current waveform can be calculates thus: I rms 1 2 = i (t )dt = T T ∫ 0 ∑ I h2 h =1 2 ∞ = 2 2 I12 + I 2 + I 32 . Skin effect is a phenomenon whereby current tends to flow near the surface of a conductor where the impedance is least..Section 3 Effects of Harmonics Example 4 Determine the reduction in ride-through capability in SMPS due to flat topping and 10% decrease in peak voltage. V1 ⋅ WR = (12 – 0.9 per unit) = (0.. determined by its DC value plus skin and proximity effect. resistivity and the permeability of the conductor material. dissipated as heat. reduction in ride-through = Note: 0. Both of these effects are dependent upon conductor size.

...... can increase significantly with frequency.... the skin effect and proximity effects are usually negligible.................... x............... in Hz magnetic permeability of the conductor DC resistance in ohms/304..............u ............... kc. Figure 10 plots the AC/DC resistance ratio. however.....18 2 k PE = k SE σ 2   k + 0....................... which can be defined as: kc = where R AC = 1 + k SE + k PE ..........Section 3 Effects of Harmonics At fundamental frequencies. 500 kcmil. The harmonic frequencies produce a ratio of AC to DC resistance....................... Section 3. kc as a Function of Harmonic Numbers 46 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .... at least for smaller conductors.........................16) R DC f u = = frequency......................... (3. 1/0 AWG and 12 AWG........... but can also be expressed as: x = 0. The spacing used to obtain the σ values for the four cable types is based on National Electric Code (NEC) insulation type THHN.. 4/0 AWG.. at different harmonic numbers of four sizes of power cable with conductors...... The associated losses due to changes in resistance.. adding to the overall I2R losses..................... (3...312σ  . 2006 ... kc...27 + 0........15) R DC = = resistance gain due to skin effect resistance gain due to proximity effect kSE kPE Skin effect parameter............17)   SE  where σ is the ratio of the conductor diameter and the axial spacing between conductors...... (3....8 m (1000 ft) RDC = The resistance gain due to proximity effect can be expressed by:  1.................. as a function of frequency and DC resistance can be found in cable handbooks... FIGURE 10 Cable AC/DC Resistance.......027678 where f ....

whereas with the large cable. ballast lighting. computers.. a large component of triplen harmonics are often present. The phase currents do not cancel in the neutral conductors as with linear loading but sum in the neutral conductor.Section 3 Effects of Harmonics Section 3.). Figures 11 and 12 illustrate the difference of varying harmonic numbers on both proximity effect and skin effect for 12 AWG and 4/0 AWG cable. Therefore. etc. which may have a large percentage of nonlinear loads (e. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .g. 2006 47 . the proximity effect may be more significant at lower frequencies but not at higher frequencies. it can be noted that proximity effects due to harmonics tends to be the more significant in power cables. FIGURE 11 4/0 AWG Cable – Proximity and Skin Effect due to Harmonics FIGURE 12 12 AWG Cable – Proximity and Skin Effect due to Harmonics 8. the proximity effect is more significant in the smaller cable. respectively. such as now installed on large passenger vessels.3 Neutral Conductors in Four-wire Systems On four-wire distribution systems. As can be noted.

therefore.. the heat produced is proportional to the mean of the square...... If the magnitude of the sine wave is “averaged” (i...... Harmonic voltages increase the dielectric stress on cables. Figure 13..e..... Conventional meters are calibrated to respond to rms values.....636 × peak) and multiplying the result by the form factor (1...... the neutral current should be dimensioned accordingly or mitigation equipment installed to attenuate the level of triplen harmonics. rms calibrated”..............11 for a sine wave). control systems and other types of equipment...... 2006 .. triplen currents are problematic on generators due to the associated additional temperature rise on the machines... thereby decreasing the reliability and the working life of cables in proportion to the crest voltages. Refer to Section 3............414 times the rms value)... Refer to 4/1....... However. Power cables carrying harmonic loads act to introduce EMI (electromagnetic interference) in adjacent signal or control cables via conducted and radiated emissions. This has been documented on offshore installations when platforms with no onboard generating capacity are supplied from other platforms a considerable distance away by long subsea cables.... these two important ratios relevant to current and voltage measurement can be derived: Peak factor = Form factor = Peak value . In addition. assuming delta-wye configuration).. Nonlinear voltages and currents impressed on these types of meters introduce errors into the measurement circuits which result in false readings. Root mean square (rms) can be defined as the magnitude of sinusoidal current which is the value of an equivalent direct current which would produce the same amount of heat in a fixed resistive load which is proportional to the square of the current averaged over one full cycle of the waveform (i........ (3. 8... only “true rms” instruments are capable of accurately measure distorted values.....707 times the peak value and the peak value is 1.. especially when very long cable lengths are used.. The result is 0............ 48 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ... (3. This “EMI noise” has a detrimental effect on telephones...................e. For a sine wave... Correct procedures with regard to grounding and segregation within enclosures and in external wiring systems must be adopted to minimize EMI. computers.........Section 3 Effects of Harmonics The overloading on the conductors (and the distribution transformer primary. 9 Measuring Equipment Conventional meters are normally designed to read sinusoidal-based quantities..... the rms value is 0.. televisions..................18) rms value rms value ......9 times the rms value..19) Mean value Most analogue meters and a large number of digital multi-meters are designed to read voltage and current quantities based on a technique termed “average reading.. therefore the current is proportional to the “root mean square”)...... the negative half cycle is inverted) the mean value will be 0..4 Additional Effects Associated with Harmonics Harmonic currents can on occasion excite parallel resonance between cable capacitance and system inductances.. This assumption is valid only for pure sinusoidal waveforms.7071 times the peak value..2 for further information..........636 times the peak value or 0.. For a pure sine wave... radios......... This technique entails taking a measurement of the average (or mean) value (0..... can be significant (up to 173% of phase current).. which is displayed as “rms”....

the real current is 1. almost 40% lower than the real current value. the peak value of 2. 2006 49 .55 A.6 A with an average of 0. Using a conventional “average reading.61 A. Figure 14). calibrated rms” meter the “rms current” displayed would be 0.0 A.Section 3 Effects of Harmonics FIGURE 13 Peak and rms Values of Sinusoidal Waveform The difficulty in accurately measuring distorted values with conventional meters is illustrated by the current drawn by a switched mode power supply (Section 3. Using a true rms meter. FIGURE 14 Difficulties Conventional Meters Have Reading Distorted Waveforms ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

which is the power factor of the fundamental component only and the “true” or “real” power factor.... the more accurate it will be in the measurement of distorted waveforms...... this type of voltage transformer can measure harmonic voltages under 5 kHz (i........e. It is therefore important that only instruments based on true rms techniques be used on power systems supplying nonlinear loads. Any telemetry................Section 3 Effects of Harmonics The “crest factor” of a waveform can be defined as: Crest factor = Peak value . The response of the transformer is largely dependent on the burden used on the LV side........ this will be significantly higher.......... magnetic voltage transformers designed to operate on fundamental frequencies are commonly used..... The higher the crest factor a true rms instrument has...0/0. which includes both the fundamental and harmonic components..... whereas the bandwidth is limited by the frequency response of the magnetic core..... For pulsed waveforms.... The accurate measurement of power factor does present a problem with nonlinear loads when two different power factors are present (see Section 5): the “displacement power factor”. winding-to-ground and turnto-turn capacitance. but should be calibrated on a regular basis........ The use of meters with crest factors less than three (3) is not recommended.......... 2006 . the power factor is simply a measure of the cosine of phase angle between voltage and current.....707).. the crest factor is 1.. protection or other equipment which relies on conventional measurement techniques or the heating effect of current will not operate correctly in the presence of nonlinear loads.) do accurately measure nonlinear currents..I trms ) Pinst = Vtrms = Itrms = Note: The above method is commonly used in digital power instrumentation................ etc........21) (Vtrms .. this is not valid for nonlinear loads.... power meters..... 83rd harmonic at 60 Hz fundamental) to an accuracy of around 3%... On high voltage networks.g..... 50 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .20) rms value For a pure sine wave.. commonly used with probable instruments (e. In a sine wave... provided no resonance is introduced which causes phase and ratio errors......... Hall Effect currents transducers........ (3.. The way to accurately measure nonlinear power factor is to measure the average instantaneous power and divide it by the product of the true rms voltage and true rms current: True cos φ = where cos φ = nonlinear load true power factor average instantaneous power (kW) true rms voltage true rms current Pinst ............ The consequences of under measure can be significant.... with linear response and a very wide bandwidth in order to accurately read frequencies up to 50th harmonic (3 kHz based on 60 Hz fundamental)...... Busbars and cables may prematurely age.. Standard toroidal-type current transformers used for measuring distorted currents must be of high quality. plus other stray capacitance... Fuses and circuit breakers will not offer the expected level of protection... (3...... For use up to 11 kV.414 (1.......... harmonic analyzers......... the winding-to-winding........ overloaded cables may go undetected with the risk of catching fire.

may still trip on relatively low values of peak harmonic current and trip levels therefore may have to be readjusted accordingly. There is also the possibility of both conducted and radiated interference above normal harmonic frequencies with telephone systems and other equipment due to variable speed drives and other nonlinear loads. New designs of electronic breakers include both methods of protection. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . this type of breaker may not operate correctly due to the peak value of nonlinear currents being higher than for respective linear loads. The frequency range. and in such instances. this is often difficult when the vessel or offshore installation is based on an IT power systems (insulated neutrals). However. electronic-type circuit breaker responds to the peak value of fundamental current. however. On highly distorted supplies which may contain line notching and/or ringing. the magnitude of the harmonic current will be very minor in comparison to the fault current. large amounts of fluorescent lighting or large numbers of lighting dimmers and/or single-phase AC inverter drives on cruise liners). the rms-sensing measures the heating effect of the rms current (as per the conventional thermal-magnetic type) and may also have to be readjusted to prevent premature tripping on nonlinear loads. other measures have to be adopted. unless the current trip level is adjusted accordingly. On four-wire systems where a large number of single-phase nonlinear loads are present (for example. especially at high carrier frequencies. In these instances. it is likely that voltages will be induced in the telephone cables. which use magnetic blow-out systems. When carrying harmonic current. Note: Guidance may have to be sought from circuit breaker manufacturers regarding trip level adjustments for nonlinear loads. However. as well as correct levels of spacing and segregation should minimize potential problems. EMI filters at the inputs may have to be installed on drives and other equipment to minimize the possibility of inference. triplen harmonics are troublesome as they are present in all three-phase conductors and cumulatively add in the neutral conductor. 11 Circuit Breakers The vast majority of low voltage thermal-magnetic type circuit breakers utilize bi-metallic trip mechanisms which respond to the heating effect of the rms current.Section 3 Effects of Harmonics 10 Telephones On ships and offshore installations where power conductors carrying nonlinear loads and internal telephone signal cable are run in parallel. resulting in failure of the breaker to operate correctly. Circuit breakers are designed to interrupt the current at a zero crossover. peak current detection and rms current sensing. Similarly. 540 Hz to 1200 Hz (9th harmonic to 20th harmonic at 60 Hz fundamental) can be troublesome. Therefore. in the case of a short circuit current. are less susceptible to harmonics. spurious “zero crossovers” may cause premature interruption of circuit breakers before they can operate correctly in the event of an overload or fault. The failure of large air circuit breakers has on occasion been attributed to harmonic distortion which delays the operation of the blow-out coils. The original type peak-sensing. the failure of the blow-out coil prolongs the arcing period and may cause re-ignition of the arc. Vacuum-type circuit breakers. 2006 51 . This type of breaker therefore may trip prematurely at relatively low levels of harmonic current. the breaker may trip prematurely while carrying nonlinear current. the rms value of current will be higher than for linear loads of same power. In the presence of nonlinear loads. especially in cases of high levels of distortion and low current. The use of twisted pair cables and correct shielding/grounding. The peak detection method of protection.

...... within the value at fundamental frequency........ Protection relays usually fall into three types: electro-mechanical.. which can use either rms current or peak values (or both) are more sophisticated and normally utilize digital filters to extract the fundamental component of the signal value.. The higher the rms current... On nonlinear loads..... 2006 .. 52 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .............. The derating factor..... At fundamental frequency. resulting in non-uniform current distribution across the fuse elements................ although the voltage distortion......... the rms current will be higher than for similarly-rated linear loads.................... placing additional thermal stress on the device...... Microprocessor-based relays..22) where IN and RN are the nominal fuse rated current and resistance at the fundamental frequency.............. and hence temperature of the fuse elements..... 24 V) or fed via step-down transformers which attenuate the harmonics.... Electro-mechanical relays are operated via the torque proportional to the square of the flux determined by the input current. In addition. they may tend to operate more slowly and/or with higher pickup values and may experience early life failure due to additional heating within the coil..... Solid state relays normally respond to the peak value of the input signal.... FP can be expressed as: Fp = where IH = IN = = = = RN ........ solid state and microprocessorbased.. the faster the fuse will operate..............g.Section 3 Effects of Harmonics 12 Fuses Fuse rupture under overcurrent or short-circuit conditions is based on the heating effect of the rms current according to the respective I2t characteristic....... (3....... therefore fuse derating may be necessary to prevent premature opening........ RH therefore the nominal fuse current rating needs to be decreased to a value.......... PH. The exact performance will vary depending on the relay specification and the manufacture. Solid state relays may be stressed when subjected to high levels of harmonic distortion and/or line notching thus reducing reliability.. (3.... usually has to reach levels of 1020% before significant operational problems occur.... However... Vthd. This type of relay responds to the rms value of current........... 13 Relays Conventional electro-mechanical control relays are rarely susceptible to harmonic problems as the operating coils are usually low voltage (e... suffer from skin effect and more importantly..... The operation of both types of relay may be affected by harmonics.................... The non-fundamental components can therefore be attenuated. IH to maintain the total power losses...... the power loss in the fuses equals: PN = IN2 ⋅ RN2 .. fuses at harmonic frequencies...........23) RH derated value of current due to harmonics fuse nominal current at fundamental frequency fuse resistance due to harmonic frequencies fuse resistance at fundamental frequency IH IN RH RN Note: The above formula is used for general guidance only. Fuse manufacturers should be contacted for advice on the correct level derating for a particular application... where the voltage supply to conventional control relays does contain harmonic voltages or current. proximity effect. At harmonic frequencies the resistance of the fuse will increase to a value..

.... Fluorescent lighting. Audio and Video Equipment Radios and televisions are susceptible to interference by harmonics both radiated and conducted.. disrupting and/or damaging plant and equipment... Capacitors (and on occasion...24) n =1 where tan δ = R/(1/ωC) is the loss factor 2πfn rms voltage of n-th harmonic ωn V = = For capacitors directly connected to the power system without series reactance..............Section 3 Effects of Harmonics 14 Radio................... 2006 53 ..e... destroying capacitors and blowing fuses where fitted.... however. the effects of harmonics on general capacitors can be summarized as follows: • Capacitors act as a “sink” for harmonic currents (i......... from DC up to 150 kHz........... Audio and video signals can be affected on four-wire systems due to high ground-to-neutral voltages........... the additional thermal stress can be approximately calculated via the assistance of a special capacitor weight THD (total harmonic distortion) factor....... 15 Capacitors Conventional power factor correction equipment is rarely installed on ships or offshore installations........ they attract and absorb harmonics) due to the fact that their capacitive reactance decreases with frequency.. especially on LW and AM bands.. does.... especially voltage harmonics... often localized................. it is not necessary to describe the interaction between harmonics and power factor correction capacitors...... which are generally installed in industrial plants and commercial buildings. The capacitors can become easily overloaded...25) V1 Vn = = fundamental rms voltage rms voltage of the nth harmonic ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . normally have capacitors fitted internally to improve the individual light fitting’s own power factor.................................... (3.. tend to increase the dielectric losses on capacitors increasing the operating temperature and reduces the reliability.. cable capacitance) combine with source and other inductances to form a parallel resonant circuit (see Section 9)............ as installed across the shore-based industries. defined using: ∑ (nVn2 ) N THDC = where n =1 V1 ........ voltages and currents to flow.. (3.. The presence of harmonics............. the harmonics are amplified causing high.... Television................. Therefore... which is above normal harmonic frequencies (50th harmonic at 60 Hz fundamental is 3 kHz) and into RFI frequency ranges (radio frequency interference)..... In the presence of harmonics. In general... ∞ • • The dielectric loss can be expressed by: ∑ C (tan δ )ω nVn2 ...

as conventional capacitor-based power factor correction equipment is rarely used in the marine sector. However. the presence of capacitors in the power system can result in series and parallel resonances leading to over-voltages and high currents. directly connected to the power system).. 2006 . the possibility of resonance may only exist due to fluorescent lighting integral power factor correction capacitors. with subsequent damage to equipment and additional risks to personnel. cable capacitance and due to other equipment using “external” (i.Section 3 Effects of Harmonics As described in Section 9. for example.e. 54 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . starting capacitors on single-phase motors.

which can carry up to 173% of phase current. The frequency of the neutral current is predominately 180 Hz (for 60 Hz supplies) and mainly 3rd harmonic and other triplens. Large or multiple single-phase nonlinear loads can be problematic on four-wire systems due to significant triplen harmonics caused by their cumulative addition in the neutral conductor. in order to minimize inconvenience to passengers in the event of a ground fault.e. unlike the four-wire system detailed below. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . for example.1 Distribution Systems with Single-phase Nonlinear Loads Three-wire Distribution Systems Three-wire. However. However. resulting in: • • • • • Overloaded and overheating neutral conductors Overheated delta winding in distribution transformers High ground-to-neutral voltages Distortion of voltage waveform (flat topping) Poor power factor As can be seen in Section 4. even if all phases are completely balanced. IT power systems with insulated neutrals) are one of the common types of systems used on vessels for distribution due to the ease of locating and rectifying ground faults and for security of supply of essential equipment during ground faults. distribution systems (i. depending on the type and nature of the nonlinear loads(s). 1. 13th… and perhaps some uncharacteristic harmonics. In three-wire systems. the 3rd harmonics usually cancel out. 11th. These harmonics will be very similar to those described for four-wire systems but with no 3rd harmonic present.. due to. 1 1.e. Figure 2). it is now relatively common to use four-wire systems [i. the 120-degree phase shift between linear load currents results in their balanced portions canceling out in the neutral.2 Four-wire Distribution Systems On large passenger liners. three-phase and neutral (grounded or insulated)] for “domestic” supplies. other harmonic currents will be present in the system. the phase current’s return path is via the neutral conductor. Figure 1. therefore. including lighting.SECTION 4 Sources of Harmonics Many types of electrical and electronic equipment which are adversely affected by harmonic voltages and currents also produce them in varying degrees. In a three-wire balanced system. no “zero sequence harmonics” should exist. their phase sequence is determined by the phase angle of the 3rd harmonic current (and other triplens) and its current magnitude in each of the three phases. however. 2006 55 . 7th. in distribution systems with nonlinear or mixed linear and nonlinear loads. If they do exist. In a four-wire distribution system with only linear loads. These current pulses add together in the neutral conductor. semiconductor power conversion or magnetic saturation in the case of transformers. the current on one phase will not have a “pulse” on either of the two other phases with which to cancel with (see Section 4. including DC and even orders. usually in the order 5th..

2006 .Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 1 Four-wire System Linear Phase Currents Return via Neutral Conductor where Balanced Phase Current Cancel Out FIGURE 2 Triplen Harmonics Add Up Cumulatively in Neutral Conductors with Single-phase Nonlinear Loads in Four-wire System 56 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

Section 4 Sources of Harmonics Section 4. UPS systems. Large vessels such as cruise ships have large hotel loads often comprising large number of televisions. Figure 3 illustrates an example of a neutral current waveform on a four-wire installation with a large number of single-phase nonlinear loads. FIGURE 3 Neutral Current due to Triplen Harmonics (150 Hz for 50 Hz Supply) on Four-wire System Sectoin 4. small single-phase cooling fan variable frequency drives and other nonlinear loads. computers. Figure 3. FIGURE 4 Harmonic Spectrum Associated with Neutral Current Waveform Shown in Figure 3 The importance of large numbers of single-phase. nonlinear loads is often underestimated. lighting dimmers. Figure 4 displays the harmonic spectrum associated with the four-wire system neutral current waveform illustrated in Section 4. Note the presence of 3rd and 9th (triplen harmonics) and relatively low level of fundamental current. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . This produces considerable harmonic currents at characteristic frequencies. fluorescent lighting. 2006 57 .

these loads can be significant. on large cruise liners. In small numbers. televisions and video recorders. 2006 . the SMPS unit only draws current from the supply when the rectified voltage is greater than the DC bus voltage. FIGURE 5 Typical Switched Mode Power Supply for Computer Based Equipment As described in Section 2. 58 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . The low voltage supplies are important since the sensitive equipment is connected to it. Other significant nonlinear single-phase loads include single-phase variable speed drives. fed via distribution transformers. However. have switched mode power supply (SMPS) units similar to that depicted in Section 4.1 Computer-based Equipment The majority of computer-based equipment. have relatively high source impedance resulting in significant distortion of the voltage waveform. lighting dimmers. The low voltage supplies.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics On non-passenger vessels. below. these types of loads usually are not problematic. Appropriate harmonic mitigation may be necessary on distribution systems to reduce the voltage distortion to within permissible levels. Figure 7. such as cruise liners. thus maintaining the safety of the vessel and the operational integrity and reliability of connected equipment. UPS systems. Typical resultant current and voltage waveforms are illustrated in Section 4. the amount of four-wire (single-phase) nonlinear load can also be significant. for example navigation and control systems. 2. Figure 5. creating substantial voltage distortion on the four-wire distribution system and with possible additional overloading of the neutral conductors. 2 Single-phase Nonlinear Loads Computer-based equipment and fluorescent lighting represent substantial loading on marine and offshore four-wire distribution systems. especially on larger vessels. Figure 6 with a typical harmonic current spectrum illustrated in Section 4.

Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 6 Typical Voltage and Current Waveforms Associated with a Switched Mode Power Supply FIGURE 7 Harmonic Current Spectrum of Typical Switched Mode Power Supply Ithd is 128% Typical Switched Mode Power Supply Current Spectrum Percentage harmonic current distortion 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 Harmonic No As can be seen from Section 4. which add due to other nonlinear single-phase loads in the neutral conductor in four-wire systems. 9th 15th. Figure 7. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Figure 8. 2006 59 . Note that the frequency of the neutral current depicted in Section 4. significant odd zero sequence triplen harmonics (3rd. as illustrated in Section 4. 21st) harmonics are generated. Figure 8 is 180 Hz (60 Hz fundamental).

and the newer electronic ballast. essentially a transformer combined with a capacitor. below. The total harmonic current distortion (Ithd) and harmonic current spectrum of fluorescent lighting is dependent on the type of ballast employed. using both magnetic and electronic ballasts are illustrated below. the iron cored magnetic ballast. Two types of ballast are in use. A small inductor is also used in the electronic type to limit the current. The total harmonic current distortion (Ithd) for phase currents was 13.9% and for the neutral current.2 Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lighting represents substantial loading on marine and offshore four-wire distribution systems. initiating the high voltage. 141. Figures 9 and 10. the phase voltage. Fluorescent lights are classed as discharge lamps as they need a “ballast” to initiate the high voltage between the two electrodes in order to facilitate current flow. After. Once the arc is initiated and the current increases. The latter utilizes a switched mode power supply to convert the fundamental frequency to a higher frequency. As an example. the voltage reduces. Section 4.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 8 Typical Neutral Current due to Triplen Harmonics in Connected Loads on a Four-wire System 2.3% 60 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . phase current and neutral current waveforms associated with distribution panels supplying wholly fluorescent lighting. 2006 . especially larger vessels such as cruise liners. usually around 25-40 kHz. for comparison purposes. depict an electrical load wholly comprising fluorescent lighting with magnetic ballasts and T-12 lamps. the ballast also provides a measure of current limiting for the light fitting.

85. The total harmonic current distortion (Ithd) for phase currents was 17. Figures 11 and 12. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 9 Waveforms for Lighting Panel Comprising Fluorescent Lighting with Magnetic Ballasts and T-12 Lamps FIGURE 10 Neutral Current Waveform on Distribution Panel with Fluorescent Lighting with Magnetic Ballasts and T-12 Lamps on a Four-wire System Similarly. 2006 61 . depict the same lighting panel with electrical load wholly comprising fluorescent lighting with electronic ballasts and T-8 lamps.3%. Section 4.2% and for the neutral current. below.

electronic ballasts have an increased harmonic spectrum up to around the 33rd harmonic. However. but with Electronic Ballasts (Instead of Magnetic Types) and T-8 Lamps FIGURE 12 Neutral Current Waveform on Same Fluorescent Lighting Panel as Figure 10. 62 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Figures 13 and 14.3%. The use of electronic ballast would. 9th…) than magnetic types. fluorescent lighting with electronic ballast have significantly less triplen harmonics (3rd. as can also be seen. 2006 . the difference in Ithd for magnetic and electronic ballasts was more significant. which suggests that the additive effect in the neutral conductor discussed earlier will be significantly reduced. at 171. but with Electronic Ballasts and T-8 Lamps on Four-wire System As can be seen with reference to Section 4.2% and 44%. The resultant Ithd for the phase currents for magnetic and electronic ballasts were 12. respectively. from this example.8% and 16. significantly reduce the triplen harmonics produced and carried by the neutral conductor although would slightly increase the phase current distortion.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 11 Same Lighting Panel as per Figure 9. In the neutral conductors. respectively.

Respectively Fluorescent Lighting Com parison .Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 13 Comparison of Phase Current Harmonic Spectrum for Magnetic and Electronic Ballasts for Typical Fluorescent Lighting Distribution Panel Ithd was 12. 2006 63 .3%.Phase Current Spectrum Percentage Harmonic Current Distortion 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 Harm onic No Magnetic Electronic FIGURE 14 Comparison of Neutral Current Harmonic Spectrum for Magnetic and Electronic Ballasts for Typical Fluorescent Lighting Distribution Panel Ithd was 171. Respectively Fluorescent Lighting Comparison .28% and 44%.8% and 16.Neutral Current Spectrum Percentage Harmonic Current Distortion 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 18 21 23 25 27 29 31 33 Harm onic No Magnetic Electronic ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

64 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .3 Televisions Section 4. this would result in high neutral currents (as the triplens are additive). usually have no additional reactance fitted.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics 2.4 Single-phase AC PWM Drives Single-phase AC drives. respectively. 2006 . Note that these results are similar to those produced by single-phase UPS. as can be appreciated with reference to Section 4.7 kW for applications such as cabin fan drives. On large installations. Section 4. commonly used up to 5 HP/3. Figures 15 and 16 illustrate the current waveform and harmonic current spectrum. Figures 17 and 18. resulting in an Ithd up to 135%. Figure 18 depicts a large triplen component. from a typical television. FIGURE 15 Television – Typical Current Waveform FIGURE 16 Television – Typical Harmonic Current Spectrum 2.

These items of equipment will be mentioned briefly in Subsections 4/1 and 4/2. produce harmonics. 2006 65 . a common type of three-phase nonlinear load is variable speed drives. “Linear” equipment. UPS systems and shaft generators both also produce harmonic currents. such as rotating machines (generators and motors). ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . transformers also produce harmonics. In addition. either AC or DC. although relatively minor in magnitude compared to nonlinear loads. The harmonics produced by these nonlinear items will be discussed in Subsections 4/3 and 4/4.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 17 Single-phase AC PWM Drive – Typical Ithd is 135% FIGURE 18 Single-phase AC PWM Drive Current Spectrum 3 Three-phase Nonlinear Loads Onboard ship or on offshore installations.

below. the configuration of the SCR drive converter is the same for each type. 2006 . the use of a variable SCR-based field weakening controller is necessary. With the shunt field current at constant maximum value. DC SCR drives were a common choice for low to medium power electrical variable speed duties on ships. and hence speed. DC motors are available in various designs. FIGURE 19 Typical 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive with Shunt-wound DC Motor La Rf T1 a AC Supply b c T4 T6 T2 D2 T3 T5 D1 D3 Separately Excited DC Motor Field D4 Lf Ra + DC Motor Armature − The above illustration (Section 4.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics 3. Operation above base speed is in the constant power region since the power is constant.or two-phase supplies). Therefore. mud pumps. the speed (and torque) of the DC motor can be controlled infinitely by varying the mean output voltage from the DC converters applied to the DC motor armature. hence flux. This is termed the “constant torque region”. the DC converter comprises six SCR drives (thyristors) in a full wave bridge configuration with a separately-excited shunt field fed by a full wave diode bridge (note – this can be single. as the torque is constant while the power rises in direct proportion to speed. Figure 19) depicts a shunt-wound motor with separately-excited field. the application of which specific type is dependent on the necessary speed/torque characteristic of the given duty. including series-wound. below. the motor speed can be controlled up to “base speed” (based on maximum field flux) using “armature voltage control”. (hence maximum field flux). Speed above “base speed” is achievable by maintaining the armature voltage at a maximum value and then reducing the shunt field current. one of the common types of DC motor in general use.2 on AC PWM drives). Lf and Rf are the shunt field inductance and resistance. As can be seen with reference to Section 4. Common applications included windlasses. draw-works motors. illustrates the concepts of constant torque and constant power. This is achieved by modifying the delay angle of the SCRs over a 120-degree angle (the first 30 deg and final 30 deg of the theoretical 180-degree conduction period cannot be utilized for commutation reasons). Figure 19. In this region.1 DC SCR drives Up until some 5-10 years ago. Section 4. respectively. cranes. the power of the motor is directly proportional to the applied voltage (less armature reaction). Figure 20. Note: This concept can also be applied to AC PWM drives and induction motors (see 4/3. However. Thus. etc. but the available flux hence torque is inversely proportional to speed. and similarly. La and Ra are the armature inductance and resistance. shunt-wound and a number of derivatives of compoundwound. propulsion motors. 66 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . drilling rigs and offshore installations. winches.

Figure 21. the DC converter voltage opposes the DC voltage back EMF. 2006 67 .e. Most DC motors have sufficient inherent inductance to facilitate rapid current reversal during braking and reversal. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . “commutating reactors” have been used to reduce both the line notching and attenuate the harmonic currents. for applications where minimizing noise levels is important (e. DC motors fitted with dual converters (Section 4. They cannot brake regeneratively (i. however..e. However.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 20 Concept of “Constant Torque” and “Constant Power” with DC Shunt-wound Motors DC motors with single converters can drive in the forward direction and need either field reversal or armature voltage reversal in order to drive in the reverse direction. Figure 21) are capable of “four quadrant operation” [i. thus maintaining a stable area of the operation without the potential of losing control of the DC motor.. In these circumstances. Figure 22.. However.g. one that feeds converted kinetic energy into the drive) the load current will remain in the same direction but the DC voltage will be reversed. fishery survey vessels). The DC motor voltage is therefore limited to a maximum conduction angle of 90 degrees..e. if the DC motor is supplying an overhauling load (i. dump the excess electrical energy which has been converted from kinetic energy during the braking process into the supply) due to the blocking action of the SCRs. These are recommended for all DC drives. additional DC side inductors are often used. motoring and braking (generating)] in both directions of rotation as illustrated in Section 4. In the four quadrant DC drive system depicted in Section 4.

2006 . 13th…) and the delay angle of the SCRs at a particular operating point as described in Section 6. The harmonic currents will be at a maximum value at full load. 11th. 68 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 7th.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 21 Typical Dual Converter for DC Shunt-wound Motor FIGURE 22 Concept of “Four Quadrant Control” for DC Motors and Dual Converters The harmonic currents produced by DC SCR drives are a function of the pulse number (“pulse number ± 1”. A typical current waveform and harmonic current spectrum at rated load are illustrated in Section 4. Figure 23 and 24. 5th. respectively. so for 6-pulse.

Due to the use of phase-controlled SCRs (thyristors) line notching will also be present. please refer to Section 6. 2006 69 . the input displacement power factor will vary as a function of the delay angle of the SCRs. For further information on line notching. Note that as the drive input rectifier is SCR based.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 23 Typical 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive Current Waveform at 100% Load FIGURE 24 Harmonic Current Spectrum of Typical 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive at Rated Load 6 pulse DC SCR drive 30 Total percentage harmonic current distortion 25 20 15 10 5 0 5th 7th 19th 23th 25th 29th 49th 11th 13th 17th 31th 35th 37th 47th 43rd 41st Harmonic For the relationship between the magnitude of the harmonic currents produced and the drive loading. “The Effect of Loading on Harmonic Distortion”. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . please refer to Section 2).

Often special high temperature grease was necessary. the motor industry took up the challenges in the mid 1990s and currently produces squirrel cage motors more suitable for variable frequency drive operation. motor cooling options (for large motors) include forced cooling and water cooling. 2006 70 . FIGURE 25 Typical AC PWM Drive Block Diagram 3 Phase AC Supply × × × Diode Rectifier ID VD PWM Inverter AC Motor M ~ Control Circuits With reference to Section 4. bearing lubrication was also a problem. one peak for each of the positive and negative half cycles of the rectified three-phase input waveform. With hot rotors. Rotor design was also an important factor. and the effects of the often harmonically-rich output waveforms had to be taken into account with regard to the level of motor thermal derating. the SCRs act as diodes (i. However. Figure 25.. the DC voltage is smoothed by the action of the DC bus capacitors. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . offshore and general industrial applications for low to medium power applications. reducing the need for derating. copper losses and skin effect.e.. Some large motors had to be fitted with copper rotors due to the increased heating. they are no longer controlled). but in larger drives (i. subject of course to the necessary thermal derating (TEFC squirrel cage motors in constant torque applications usually still need to be derated according to the speed range).g. Once the DC bus is fully charged. according to the speed range driven load torque characteristic. squirrel cage induction motors are generally designed for pure sinusoidal supplies. a single-phase AC PWM would be “2-pulse” due to having one rectified peak per positive and negative half cycle.2 AC PWM drives AC voltage-fed pulse width modulated (PWM) drives are a commom type of electrical variable drive used today in marine. NEMA C and D designs) tended to significantly rise in temperature when on variable frequency supplies due to considerably increased iron losses. The resultant voltage output from the input bridge is in the form of DC voltage with six peaks.e. Presently. below. and thereby reducing the necessary motor frame size and rating of the AC PWM drive. However. as double cage and deep bar rotors (e. The benefit of being able to control standard squirrel cage induction motors was significant. Motors on quadratic duties (centrifugal pumps and fans) rarely need to be derated. Similarly. above 40 HP/30 kW). After rectification.. a diode full wave bridge has been used. SCR “pre-charge” front ends are used to “soft start” the DC bus to minimize any inrush current.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics 3. high level of dv/dt on motor winding insulation and torque production at low frequencies and bearing currents (more applicable on large machines). In this instance. thus the term “6-pulse drive”. the incoming three-phase supply is rectified by the input (or “front end”) rectifier. in the early days of PWM drives (mid 1980s). A block diagram configuration of a typical AC PWM drive is shown in Section 4. Figure 25.

which act as a power storage unit.35 × the AC L-L rms voltage level (e.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics An AC PWM drive operates similarly to a switched mode power supply. The “intermediate” (i. As can be seen from Section 4. between the input and output bridges) DC bus serves as a reservoir of energy. A constant voltage/frequency (V/F) is needed to maintain the desired level of torque in the driven induction motor.. The diodes across the IGBT devices are termed “flywheel diodes” and are in the circuit to assist commutation (i. 2006 71 . Figure 26. Figure 25. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . FIGURE 26 Pulsed Nature of AC PWM Drive Input Current While the operation of the “front end” of an AC PWM drive is relatively simple. The inverter bridge. The DC bus voltage is in the order of 1. the input bridge rectifies the three-phase voltage supply which is further smoothed by the DC bus capacitors. Section 4. the transfer of current from one device to another).e. Figure 27.e. for 480 V AC mains the DC bus would be in the order of 648 V DC). usually comprises insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs). the operation of the output (or “inverter”) bridge is more complex.. hence the pulse nature of the input current. especially from the control aspect. Power is only drawn from the mains supply when the DC bus voltages falls below that of rectified AC mains level. only being recharged as necessary. below.g.. depicts a typical IGBT out rectifier. controls both the output voltage and the output frequency. as shown in Section 4. The DC bus voltage is maintained at a constant level.

Figure 28. not the output voltage) which are relatively sinusoidal. The purpose was to reduce the output harmonics. 2006 . the various PWM strategies have been improved significantly such that present series of drives usually have output current waveforms (i. below. Since that time. FIGURE 28 Basic Principle of Pulse Width Modulation 72 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 27 Typical AC PWM Drive Output (Inverter) Bridge Configuration Pulse width modulation control strategies were introduced in the early 1980s to overcome the heating and torque pulsations of the then “square wave drives” (also known as “quasi-square wave” or “six step drives”). especially the low order harmonics.e. to the motor. The basic principle of pulse width modulation can be seen with reference to Section 4. This was achieved due to a combination of PWM techniques and advances in fast power semiconductors such as IGBTs..

FIGURE 29a AC Motor/PWM Drives Standard Speed/Torque Characteristics ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . in Section 4. Figure 28(b). similar to DC drives. The result is a phase-to-phase voltage waveform as depicted by Section 4. This is compared to a sinusoidal reference waveform (shown as “reference wave”) whose frequency and output are proportional to the desired output waveform. 2006 73 . However.. it is usually not possible to increase the output voltage. which is a series of voltage pulses whose width is related to the magnitude of the sinusoidal reference waveform at a particular instance in time. Figure 28(d).1 on DC SCR drives. Above base speed. the V/F ratio would be approximately 240 V/30 Hz).g. In Section 4. a saw-tooth waveform (shown as “triangle wave”) is produced by the control system based on the desired switching frequency. In 4/3. below. the voltage VAN is switched high whenever the sinusoidal reference voltage is larger than the triangular waveform. the torque availability with AC PWM drives reduces with increased output frequency above base speed and limits the maximum frequency achievable. therefore only the frequency is increased.. Figure 28(a). It is the rms value of this voltage which the motor “sees”. Figure 28(d). Figures 29a and b. the sinusoidal reference waveform is shifted by 180 degrees. The effect of high speed on the bearings and lubrication are also often a factor regarding the maximum frequency of operation. the voltage would be seen to be approximately sinusoidal with zero crossovers as per the PWM waveform. It is also possible to operate an AC PWM drive and squirrel cage induction motor similarly. the possibility of operating the DC motor above base speed was described. at 50% output frequency on 480 V supplies. The current which the motor “sees” also approximates a sine wave in nature. Similarly. Figure 28(c). which is the difference between waveforms VAN and VBN. the motor’s natural synchronous speed) the AC drive maintains a constant voltage/frequency ratio (e. but in this instance. as will be shown in Section 4. Up to base speed (i.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics As illustrated in Section 4.e. If this rms voltage was superimposed on the waveform in Section 4. VBN is controlled in a similar manner by the triangular waveform.

5 kW). below. Additional reactance.2 on AC PWM drives. “vector control”) and “direct torque control” (DTC). It is possible.23% (without the DC bus reactor the Ithd would be approximately 67%). Figure 31 depicts the harmonic current spectrum associated with this particular drive.. These types are also used in marine and offshore applications.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 29b AC Motor/PWM Drives Standard Speed/Power Characteristics As can be seen in Section 4. a 6-pole motor operated at 9-90 Hz in order to obtain a 10:1 speed range at constant torque plus 40% higher starting torque) or with non-standard winding configurations (e. Information on how the harmonic current varies with load can be found in Section 6. 74 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . the harmonic currents and input waveforms will be similar to those described in 4/3.g.g. the motor has to be thermally derated for constant torque duty. Section 4. However. as the input bridge and DC bus architecture of these drives are almost identical to that of PWM drives.. however. Figure 29a. Figure 30. illustrates the input current and voltage waveforms from a 150 HP (110 kW) AC PWM drive with 3% DC bus reactance running at rated load. Note: Other AC voltage-fed drive output waveform control technologies exist. Section 4. “Mitigation of Harmonics”). 5-87 Hz on 50 Hz mains for 17:1 speed range at constant torque). to use motors with higher pole numbers (e. 2006 . such as “field vector orientation” (i.. either in the AC line or in the DC bus serves additional purposes other than harmonic attenuation and is commonly fitted to drives above 10 HP (7. The total harmonic current distortion was measured at 39. both of which provide enhanced motor performance.e. akin to flux control in DC motors. The harmonic currents produced by AC PWM drives are dependent on the pulse number (with 6-pulse drives being the most popular) and whether any additional reactance has been installed in the drive (see Section 10.

23% Ithd 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 5th 7th 19th 23th 25th 29th 49th 11th 13th 17th 31th 35th 37th 47th 43rd 41st Total percentage harmonic current distortion Harmonic ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .23% FIGURE 31 Harmonic Current Spectrum of 150 HP AC PWM Drive with 3% DC Bus Reactor – Ithd = 39.39.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 30 Input Current – 150 HP AC PWM Drive with 3% DC Bus Reactor – Ithd = 39.23% 150HP 6 pulse AC PWM drive . 2006 75 .

an output frequency of 25% of the input frequency (e. the cycloconverter is termed a “static Scherbius” drive. as such. both of which have an intermediate stage (i. In power conversion terms.3 AC Cycloconverter Drives Cycloconverters are a common form of electrical variable speed drive in the higher power range and. 76 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . respectively.e. the operation of a cycloconverter is complex with both positive and negative bridges necessary per motor phase. When used to control the rotor of a wound rotor induction motor. it is necessary to consider the operation of a single-phase-to-single-phase device with full wave rectifiers and a resistive load. Unlike other forms of AC drives. for example. Note that αp and αn are termed the firing angles of the positive and negative bridges. Cycloconverters have been in operation since the 1930s (then based on mercury arc rectifiers) on applications such as railway transportation. Figure 32. In order to briefly describe the operation of cycloconverters.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics 3. Refer to Section 4.g. for example AC PWM drives and load commutated inverters (LCI). below: FIGURE 32 Single-phase-to-Single-phase Cycloconverter As illustrated in Section 4. 2006 . Cycloconverters are characterized by having a maximum output frequency of 33% of the input frequency. In this example. Vs is the input voltage at frequency f1. 15 Hz output for an input of 60 Hz) the positive bridge supplies current to the load for the first two cycles of Vs as it rectifies the incoming AC voltage Vs into four positive half cycles as illustrated. In order to achieve. are used for main propulsion drives. steel works and coal mine winders. which often negates the use of gearboxes for final speed reduction with the ability to provide full four-quadrant control with high torque and high dynamic response.. it is assumed that the SCRs are acting as diodes with α = 0 degrees firing angle. DC bus) to facilitate dual conversion [AC to DC and DC to AC]. Figure 32. below.. the cycloconverter is a direct conversion drive which converts one frequency to another without the need for an intermediate stage. as shown in Section 4. Figure 33(b).

.. The output frequency.......... Figure 33 as being wholly resistive....... Vo... α.... (4. the frequency of the output voltage......... fo.... for 0 deg firing angle Output voltage. can be varied by adjusting the number of cycles the positive and negative converters operate... Figure 33(d). Vo... with firing angle π/3 rad..e.. in Section 4. although the latter is considerably more common...... with variable firing angle During the next two cycles of Vs [Section 4...1) input rms voltage DC output voltage The DC output voltage per half cycle is shown dotted in Section 4........Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 33 Waveforms for Single-phase-to-Single-phase Conversion (a) (b) (c) (d) Input voltage Output voltage...e. It will have the same wave-shape as the voltage)...... Output voltage... Note that cycloconverters can be used for “step up” operation as well as “step down” operation...... Vo...... In the configuration above.. The DC output of each bridge would be: Vd = where V Vd Note: 2 2 π = = V cos α .. The single-phase-single-phase cycloconverter can also supply a voltage based on firing angle.. As can be seen above. the negative converter supplies current to the load in the reverse direction.. 2006 77 ....... the output frequency can be varied (i...... (Note that the current waveform is not depicted in Section 4..... As can be seen in the above example.... Figure 33(b) is 25% of the input voltage Vs (i. Figure 33(c)].... fo/f1 = 1/4).. the other is disabled or “blocked”. Vo...... when one bridge is operating. up to a maximum of one-third the input frequency)..... ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ......

.. The above is a simplistic explanation regarding the basic theory of cycloconverters. It must be noted the positive bridge can only supply positive current and the negative bridge can only supply negative current. α. 2006 . Section 4. For α = 0 degrees: V01 = Vdo × 1 = Vdo where v01 = 4 2 2 π π V cos α . This would serve to reduce the output harmonics and supply a better waveshape to the motor.. Figure 34 shows a typical 6-pulse cycloconverter connected to a star-connected induction motor. 78 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ... Section 4..... so during current reversal. Figure 33(d)....... if α is increased to π/3 radians. and that consequently.. Cycloconverters. α........ each phase displaced by 2π/3 radians (120 degrees).. in addition. However... cycloconverters can be used with both synchronous and squirrel cage induction machines.... attenuate a measure of lower order harmonics due to their inherent leakage reactance. the motor needs the magnitude of the fundamental rms voltage to be continuous at all times.e. the cycloconverter can operate in all four quadrants. results in a very crude output waveform with considerable harmonic content.. the respective bridge previously supplying the current is disabled and the other bridge is enabled in order to reverse the current (e.... Both positive and negative bridges can therefore supply voltages of either positive or negative polarity... In addition... For example. whose input displacement power factor is always lagging. There are certain advantages. Figure 34 shows a typical three-phase cycloconverter with three bridges.... however.... as illustrated in Section 4... absorb) the majority of higher order harmonics and.2) Therefore.. as illustrated in Section 4. can supply leading. whereas induction motors can only draw lagging current. depending on the necessary duty at any instance in time. the average rms voltage supplied by both bridges are “forced” to be of the same magnitude in order to prevent voltage jumps and current “spikes” occurring. However.g. then output voltage V01 = Vdo 0... the polarity of the current determines which converter supplies the load at that instance. lagging or unity power factor loads............ The characteristic that a synchronous motor can draw variable levels of power factor from a converter is ideally suited to the cycloconverters.... As mentioned previously... Figure 33(d)..... Please note that operation with a constant firing angle.... it follows that the fundamental output voltage v0 is dependent on firing angle..Section 4 Sources of Harmonics The peak fundamental output voltage will be: v01 (t ) = where V V0 = = input rms voltage peak fundamental voltage 4 2 2 π π V cos α ... the square waves shown in Section 4..... AC synchronous and squirrel cage induction motors normally filter (i.. Figure 33(b) and (c) would be modified to approximate a sine wave by sinusoidally modulating the firing angle α. When the polarity of the load current changes...... from rectification to inversion). when operating with synchronous motors due to the machine’s output power factor characteristics... The output voltages produced by cycloconverters have a high harmonic content which can be reduced by careful systemization of the bridge(s) firing angle algorithms.. In reality..... (4.......5........

as the name implies. a short circuit would occur across the supply. an “intergroup reactor” can be connected between the two bridges (per phase). Blocking mode converters do not need large intergroup reactors and are therefore physically smaller and less expensive that the circulating current type. 2006 79 .Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 34 Three-phase 6-Pulse Cycloconverter Since current reversal is necessary. both bridges are enabled during current reversal. During this delay time period. However. awaiting reversal. Unlike the “blocking mode” converter. below. with both bridges enabled when running. Figure 35. as shown by Section 4. both bridges (per phase) are disabled. standard cycloconverters are usually designed in two formats. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . It is therefore necessary to program complex harmonic elimination patterns into the firing control software to minimize the level of distortion. In the blocking mode type. The current reversal process also introduces added complexity into the firing and protection control systems. in the “circulating current mode” converter. the blocking mode converter is more efficient (as only one bridge operates at any one time). when the current decays to zero. This circulating current is unidirectional due to the blocking action of the other SCR bridge. If both bridges were operating simultaneously. one bridge is disabled or “blocked” while the other is operating. thus allowing a circulating current to flow between the bridges and the load. To avoid this. “blocking mode” or “circulating current mode” converters. In the “blocking mode” cycloconverters. the current distorts the voltage and current waveforms. to form a “circulating current mode” converter. Most circulating current cycloconverters operate in a circulating current mode. There advantages and disadvantages of both types.

2006 . Figure 36.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 35 Simplified Connection of Intergroup Reactor on One Phase of Circulating Current Cycloconverters The waveforms associated with blocking mode cycloconverters are shown below in Section 4. FIGURE 36 Waveforms for Blocking Mode Cycloconverters (a) (b) (c) Positive bridge output voltage Negative bridge output voltage Load (motor) voltage 80 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

Similarly. The main disadvantage of the circulating current type is the additional size. this is not the case. FIGURE 37 Waveforms for Circulating Current Mode Cycloconverters (a) (b) (c) (d) Positive bridge output voltage Negative bridge output voltage Load (motor) voltage Intergroup reactor voltage The circulating current cycloconverters normally have a smoother output voltage waveform. which is the instantaneous potential difference between the two bridges. however. hybrids have been developed which can provide the advantages of both types. Figure 37. However. In reality. weight and cost associated with the intergroup reactor. both bridges operate simultaneously with fundamental rms output voltages of similar magnitudes. when the reversed current increases above the predetermined level. and the intergroup reactor is necessary to facilitate operation. When one bridge is converting (AC-DC). 2006 81 . however. When the motor current reverses and decreases below a predetermined level.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics In the circulating current cycloconverters. both bridges are enabled and a smooth reversal of current occurs. When operating unidirectionally. One example has architecture similar to a circulating current mode converter but with a much reduced intergroup reactor. than the blocking mode type. are depicted in Section 4. only one bridge is enabled. there would be zero circulating current as the instantaneous potential difference between the two bridges would be zero. the other bridge is disabled. The efficiency is still less than the blocking mode type. but it has the advantage of reduced inherent distortion around zero current permitting less complex firing control compared to the standard blocking mode converter. Note that if the output voltage from both bridges were sinusoidal. The waveforms associated with a circulating current cycloconverter and also the voltage waveform across the intergroup reactor. the other is inverting (DC-AC). control is simplified. containing fewer harmonics. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . however. Due to the lack of current reversal complications associated with the blocking mode converter.

Figure 38(a) illustrates the input current waveform and Section 4. Figure 38(b) the harmonic current frequency spectrum associated with a 20 MW (26. 2006 . FIGURE 38a Input Current Associated with a 20 MW. Figure 39 shows a 12-pulse cycloconverter operating with a three-phase synchronous motor with the rotor field current controlled by a separate 6-pulse. 6-pulse drives are not common. Multi-pulse drives. Section 4. are the norm to minimize the input harmonic currents and associated disruption of the power supply system.810 HP) 12-pulse cycloconverter.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics Cycloconverter input current characteristics and associated harmonic content are complex and dependent on a number of factors. including: • • • • • The pulse number of the cycloconverters The relative magnitude of the output fundamental voltage The ratio of the input and output frequencies The displacement power factor of the load The firing control strategy In applications with large drives. 12-Pulse Cycloconverter 82 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . including 12pulse. Section 4. fully-controlled rectifier. 12-Pulse Cycloconverter FIGURE 38b Harmonic Current Frequency Spectrum Associated with a 20 MW.

it should be noted that each characteristic integer harmonic has a so called “side band” of interharmonics associated with it.....4) where both n and k are integer numbers...... the attenuation of these interharmonics is often more difficult than the reduction of the integer harmonic currents...... 3............ Therefore.. a number........................ Section 4........ 0. 2006 83 ...... 2… With reference to Section 4.3) where fo fh m n = = = = output frequency harmonic current frequency a number....................Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 39 2-Pulse Cycloconverter with Three-phase Synchronous Motor In addition to the production of standard “pulse number ± 1” harmonic currents................ 1...... both the fundamental current and the characteristic harmonic currents are accompanied by additional harmonic components of frequencies based on: f = n ⋅ fL ± k ⋅ 6 ⋅ fM ... 1........................... 2.............. Figure 40 (and to an extent........ due to supply unbalance..... (4. Indeed.............................. This is a result of the modulation of the constant input current frequency with the varying output motor frequency... Figure 38)....... ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ............ cycloconverters often produce....... The characteristic harmonics generated by cycloconverters are: fh = (pm ± 1)f ± 6nfo ... (4..... uncharacteristic harmonics (including even order and triplen harmonics) in addition to significant magnitudes of interharmonics........

tend to vary according to the operating point. also known as “current source inverters” (CSIs) were. cycloconverter input harmonic currents. Note: Cycloconverters generate significant amounts of reactive power which often have to be compensated for. due to the presence of the large capacitor bank. It is characterized by a large inductor included in the DC bus. including the interharmonics.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics As mentioned previously. FIGURE 40 Harmonic Spectrum of 12-Pulse Cycloconverters Including Interharmonic Sidebands 3. Figure 40 depicts a typical 12-pulse cycloconverter harmonic (including interharmonics) current spectrum. below. it facilitates transfer of current from one phase to another). 84 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . it has an “inductive DC bus”). for example: centrifugal pumps and fan loads where high starting torque is not needed. so called due to the fact that the motor current commutates the inverter bridge (i. whereas AC PWM drives have a “capacitive DC bus”. Section 4.. These high pass filters act as a low impedance path for higher order harmonic currents in addition to providing compensation for the reactive power at fundamental frequencies. Figure 41. 2006 . their use has diminished due to availability of the less expensive and physically smaller AC PWM drives. often employing high pass harmonic filters instead of conventional power factor correction capacitor banks.4 AC Load Commutated Inverter (LCI) “Load commutated inverters”.e.e. Load commutated inverters are known as “constant current” drives due to the action of the large DC bus inductor (i. However. as depicted in Section 4. common in industrial applications where squirrel cage induction motors (rated 600HP/450 kW and above).. The load commutated inverter (LCI). for many years. so the harmonic spectrum constantly changes with output frequency.

The output or “inverter” bridge controls the output frequency to the motor.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 41 Typical 6-Pulse ASCI CSI Inverter with a Squirrel Cage Induction Motor As can be seen from Section 4. being superimposed on the output voltage waveform. the load current source inverter comprises a fully controlled SCR input bridge which varies the input DC voltage and a large inductor which converts the variable DC voltage into a current source. as illustrated below. used mainly with squirrel cage induction motors. termed “commutation spikes”. Figure 41. FIGURE 42 Output Voltage Commutation Spikes – CSI with Squirrel Cage Induction Motor ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Figure 42. this commutation process results in transient overvoltages. so forced commutation is necessary to transfer current through the motor phases. the use of this configuration has diminished due to the AC PWM drives. was the “auto-sequentially commutated inverter” (ASCI). 2006 85 . In recent years. as shown in Section 4. Another common inverter bridge configuration. The squirrel cage induction motor has a lagging power factor. However.

However. the majority of which are within the withstand capability of modern LV motors. as shown in Section 4. if squirrel cage motors are to be operated at higher voltages. The motor insulation also has to be capable of withstanding the dv/dt (i. Figure 44. The synchronous motor. 12-pulse is needed due to the high power necessary. 86 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . below. has to operate with a leading power factor and also needs a special excitation circuit for the rotor. as shown in Section 4. therefore a special output filter (which supplies a leading power factor to the inverter) is selected which supplies the commutating current up to around 50% of output frequency.e. to assist commutation. compared to motors for AC PWM drives or for sinusoidal supplies. rate of rise of voltage associated with commutation spikes). which provide the commutation current for the converter (hence the term “load commutated inverter”) via the back EMF of the motor. 2006 . FIGURE 43 12-Pulse Load Commutated Inverter with Synchronous Motor As described above. Above 50% output frequency. load commutated inverters with ASCI inverter bridge configurations result in commutation spikes. In this example. therefore. therefore.. Squirrel cage induction motors for use with load commutated inverters need a higher level of magnetizing current. It is the synchronous motors. Load commutated inverters are mainly used with synchronous motors. then special measures are necessary so that commutation is provided by the load.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics Careful design of the squirrel cage motor and the ASCI circuit is necessary to minimize the commutation spikes. Figure 43. the commutation is achieved due to a combination of the output filter and the motor.

FIGURE 45 Output Voltage of LCI with Synchronous Motor or Squirrel Cage Motor with Output Filter ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . the output voltage waveform (for squirrel cage or synchronous motors) does not contain commutation spikes. as associated with ASCI CSIs.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 44 12-Pulse Load Commutated Inverter with Squirrel Cage Motor and Output Filter As can be seen from Section 4. but does contain notches. very similar to that associated with the input of phase-controlled drives. Figure 45. 2006 87 . such as DC SCR and quasi-square wave drives.

Speed range is usually restricted to 10:1 due to commutation issues but is improved if vector control or a similar strategy is applied. reactive power may be necessary due to the very low power factor at low output frequencies and low loading. Four-quadrant control is inherent in the design.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics One drawback of the load commutated inverter is the difficulty in starting the drive system due to the fact that below around 10% speed there is insufficient back EMF to commutate the inverter bridge. as mentioned above.9. six-phase motors with one “star” and one “delta” (30-degree phase displacement) supplied by two inverter bridges reduce torque fluctuations by 50%. reduces to zero at very low loads. In high power applications. Similarly. but due to the input SCR bridge. squirrel cage motors need an output filter with leading power factor. as indicated above. However. the result of which is additional motor heating and torque fluctuations at low speeds due to the 5th and 7th harmonic currents interacting with the fundamental flux to cause 6th harmonic torque oscillations. This entails the reduction of the DC bus current to zero by temporarily operating the inverter bridge in the inversion mode (i. In order to satisfy the needs of SCRs regarding turn-off. For continuous operation below 10%. be operated with a leading power factor. “pulsed mode” operation is necessary. the synchronous motor must. as a method needed for starting. 88 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . is very similar to a DC SCR drive of similar pulse number due to the controlled SCR input bridge and DC bus inductance. A method known as “DC link pulsing” is necessary to initiate commutation. Power factor at 100% load/speed is usually around 0. which contains significant harmonics. thus permitting the SCRs to regain their blocking capability and thereby commutate the motor current and rotate the motor. 2006 . FIGURE 46 Six Step Square Wave Current – LCI with Synchronous Motor The input current wave shape of load commutated inverters. as shown below in Section 4. results in the LCI being unable to be applied to the more demanding four-quadrant applications.. as shown in Section 4. and is also necessary in order to minimize torque pulsations and associated vibration on the motor rotor and driven load. regenerating into the DC bus). in addition to providing sufficient commutation current for the inverter bridge.e.88 – 0. Figure 46. the poor dynamic performance. The output current of a LCI is a “six step” square wave. On larger installations. The starting torque of load commutated inverter-fed squirrel cage motors is poor. Figure 47. unless utilizing vector control or similar control strategies.

For loads with 3-5 MW (4000-7000 HP). 12-pulse via two discrete motor windings. 30-degree phase displaced. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Typically. (Typically. This permits operation on 6-pulse should any converter or a motor winding fail. Alternatively. the 6-pulse operation is 50% of the rated motor loading). inverters of this type are used when the system voltage is above 1kVand would commonly use multi-pulse rectifiers at the input to reduce harmonic distortion (12-pulse or higher depending on power and supply limitations) and possibly multi-pulse on the output to reduce the torque ripple on the machine and the load. FIGURE 48 Harmonic Spectrum Associated with a 6-Pulse Load Commutated Inverter 6 pulse load commutated inverter 25 Total percentage harmonic current distortion 20 15 10 5 0 5th 7th 19th 23th 25th 29th 49th 11th 31th 35th 13th 17th 37th 47th 43rd 41st Harmonic Load commutated inverters are available for large power systems. 2006 89 .Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 47 Input Waveform of 6-Pulse Load Commutated Inverter A typical harmonic spectrum associated with a 6-pulse load commutated inverter is shown in Section 4. two separate converters could supply the motor with either the converters 12-pulse or the motor 12-pulse. Figure 48.

careful design of winding/slot profile) is used to attenuate the 5th and 7th harmonics. Inrush current. However.) although more modern differential protection systems do attempt to compensate and reduce the likelihood of a shutdown. During testing. As a result. distortion will occur which produces harmonics. 7th. 2006 . for example if subject to a large increase in voltage.. However.. Conversely.. are embedded into slots within the stator pack. Transformers when in saturation (i. It should be noted that if the input voltage was perfectly sinusoidal. especially 3rd and other triplens. it may initiate shutdown of differential protection systems and ultimately. In synchronous machines. the output voltage would be nonlinear. 4. are speed dependent and result from the harmonic content of the MMF distribution within the machine air gap. albeit relatively small in comparison with electronic nonlinear loads such as adjustable speed drives. but as the inrush time is only a few seconds.e. “coil spanning” (i. the magneto-motive force (MMF) is not evenly distributed. similar to rotating machines. the magnitude of harmonics are rarely problematic and are almost negligible compared to harmonics from electronic sources. and therefore. Harmonics produced by induction motors. can also be considered a source of harmonics. compared to electronic nonlinear loads. 90 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Triplens are also produced. the current would be nonlinear and would contain harmonics.1 Additional Three-phase Sources of Harmonics Rotating Machines Linear loads. such as generators and motors. squirrel cage and wound rotor) can also result from voltage unbalance. This is especially true if there is a large DC component on the secondary of the transformer. the generator-induced harmonics are usually checked for compliance against the relevant standard. the magnitude of harmonic electro-motive force (induced voltage) is dependent on the following factors: • • • • The magnitude of the harmonic fluxes The effective phase spread of the winding The coil span Method of interphase connection By careful choice of the above four factors the magnitude of the harmonic EMFs and associated harmonics can be minimized. The windings of the rotating machines.. tend to produce odd order harmonics (5th. irrespective of type. Y or star) connection which acts as a block for 3rd and other zero sequence triplen harmonics. In order to maintain relatively sinusoidal output voltages. However.e. the generator(s. 13th …).e. absorbed) due to delta or ungrounded wye configuration. but are restricted (i. does contain relatively large odd order harmonics. This results in the transformer magnetizing current being non-sinusoidal and containing harmonics. especially in larger transformers. if the magnetizing current were sinusoidal. In larger machines.e. the effects are usually not significant with regard to the harmonic distortion.e. three-phase power transformers are designed with a delta winding or an ungrounded wye (i. overly excited). 11th.2 Transformers Harmonics are produced by transformers as a result of the nonlinear relationship between voltage and current and the magnetic materials used in manufacture. Harmonic production within induction motors (i.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics 4 4.. rotating machine harmonics are relatively small in magnitude and rarely troublesome. Unbalance can also produces odd order harmonics.

Dedicated individual computer UPS systems are usually single-phase and have an input current wave-shape and harmonic current spectrum similar to that produced by single-phase switched mode power supplies (SMPS). Three-phase UPS systems are also available. 60 Hz UPS FIGURE 50 Harmonic Input Current Spectrum for 6-Pulse 37. Section 4. 2006 91 . The majority of three-phase UPS systems have a controlled.5 kVA. 60 Hz UPS rated 37.5 kVA.. Figure 49. Active front ends (i. 480 V. sinusoidal input rectifiers) and 12-pulse configurations are also now available which may have better harmonic performance. below.e. 60 Hz UPS ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . shows the voltage and current waveforms from a typical threephase 480 V. 460 V.3 UPS Systems Uninterruptible power supply systems are usually used to provide “secure power” in the event of generator shutdown or other similar power failure. Section 4.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics 4. The Ithd at the input is 19.1%. SCR input bridge rectifier with characteristic harmonics based on the “pulse number ± 1” format.5 kVA. FIGURE 49 Input Voltage and Current Waveforms of 6-Pulse 37. Figure 50 depicts the harmonic current spectrum associated with this UPS.

Section 4 Sources of Harmonics 4. The synchronous compensator’s duties are to start the system by providing the initial starting voltage for the SCR inverter and to provide reactive power and to facilitate commutation of the inverter bridge SCRs. FIGURE 51 Traditional Shaft Generator System In the above example. but the overlap angle of the output current is increased. the commutation notches in the output voltage waveform (Section 4. AC line reactor and “synchronous compensator” (also known as a “rotary condenser”). 92 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . shown in Section 4. a converter with SCR input rectifier. necessary to provide commutation current to the inverter. as they provide the vessel with electric power when underway while reducing fuel and decreasing operational costs. DC bus inductor and SCR inverter bridge. Figure 51. Figure 52) of the inverter bridge are largely due to the subtransient inductance (Ls″) of the synchronous compensator. comprises a synchronous generator.4 Shaft Generators Shaft driven generators are sometimes provided. The provision of the AC line reactor does serve to reduce the harmonic currents in the output waveform. increasing the notch area. A traditional shaft generator system. 2006 . The inverter output voltage waveform consists of both harmonics and line notches and may not be of sufficient quality to supply the load and/or operate in parallel with diesel or other auxiliary generators.

There are a number of other shaft generator systems in operation which utilize other techniques. 13th…. The example used was to advise the reader as to the fact that shaft generators. therefore the output voltage will also be relatively sinusoidal. 11th. The induced voltages in the compensator are essentially sinusoidal. such that the output voltage is as sinusoidal as practicable. 7th. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . In addition to providing reactive power and commutation current.Section 4 Sources of Harmonics FIGURE 52 Inverter Output Voltage Waveform The harmonics produced by the inverter bridge are based on the “pulse number ± 1” format. A 6-pulse system would therefore produce characteristic harmonic currents of 5th. 2006 93 . others IGBT converters (very similar to AC PWM drives with “active front ends”) or “duplex reactors”. The low harmonic reactance of the compensator attracts a relatively large degree of harmonic currents which would otherwise be injected into the load. the synchronous compensator also provides a measure of harmonic filtering. are a source of harmonics. due to their electronic power conversion. the object is identical: to minimize the harmonics and notching and to address other power quality concerns. However. Some use double-wound induction motors.

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.......SECTION 5 Harmonics and System Power Factor 1 Power Factor in Systems with Linear Loads Only In power systems containing only linear loads.. which produces no useful work... cos φ = P kW = ......... S (kVA) = P 2 + Q 2 = kW 2 + kVAr 2 .......... 2006 95 . Figure 1.e.............. there are essentially two power factors.................. (5.. the power factor of the fundamental component) and the “true power factor”...... which is a measure of the power factor of both the fundamental and harmonic components in the power system........ it produces useful work)......1) S kVA The apparent power..... (kVAr) 2 Power Factor in Power System with Harmonics In power systems which contain nonlinear loads......... can be illustrated with reference to Section 5...... the vector relationship between voltage and current........ below: FIGURE 1 Power Factor Components in System with Linear Load Where the power factor. the “displacement power factor” (i. (5.....e.....2) where P S Q = = = active power (i... ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .. in kW apparent power (kVA) reactive power........................ the “power factor” (cos φ)...........

....................................................................... (5.....................4) h=2 ∞ ∞ where φH is the phase of the n-th harmonic......................... (5............................Section 5 Harmonics and System Power Factor FIGURE 2 Power Factor Components in System with Harmonics With reference to Section 5.. the power factor does not equal ≠ )........................... the reactive power......................................... S kVA kVA 2 The apparent power. Figure 2 above: The power factor................8) 2 = S1 1 + THDV 1 + THD I2 .......3) The active power..................e... can also be defined as: Q= where ∞ ∞ ∑ h =1 V H rms I H rms sin ϕ h = Q1 + h=2 ∑ Qh ....7) 2 = V1rms I1rms 1 + THDV 1 + THD I2 ............ Q.......................................... (5........... 2006 .. cos φ = P kW kW (i............................... Similarly............ S(kVA) = P 2 + Q 2 + D 2 = kW 2 + kVAr 2 + kVArH .............5) ϕh P0 = = phase angle between voltage and current of individual harmonics DC component of active power fundamental component of active/reactive power respectively active/reactive component of individual harmonics P1/Q1 = Ph/Qh = The apparent power....................................................6) = 2 2 ∑ VH rms I H rms h =1 ∞ . (5.... P can be calculated using: P= h =0 ∑ Vh I h cos ϕ h = P0 + P1 + ∑ Ph . S.......................................9) where S1 is the apparent power at the fundamental frequency......................................................... can also be expressed using the following formulae: S = Vrms ⋅ Irms ........................ (5..... (5... 96 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ............... (5....................

. to use passive inductor-capacitor (L-C) filters (see Section 10).. DC drives.. passive or active..... On this type of equipment...... Any form of harmonic mitigation..96-0......... Active filters are usually rated based on “harmonic cancellation current” [i.. is reduced by mitigation........... D. tuned to a specific harmonic frequency (usually 5th and 7th harmonics).... depending on the conduction angle of the bridge rectifier.... and assuming the active filter is rated correctly....10) As detailed above. Please note that the majority of utility power factor meters can only read displacement power factor.... ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .12) S1 Displacement power factor: cos φ disp = Distortion power factor: cos φ dist = where cos φdisp = cos φdist = Note: 1 2 1 + THDV 1 + THD I2 = V1rms I 1rms S1 ..... (5. the apparent power.......... in power systems where harmonics are present.g.. subject to a study of the effects on the power system.... the power factor is the ratio of the active power in kW to the apparent power in kVA........... due to changing speed and/or load demands.. UPS systems) the true power factor will also vary...... AC variable voltage drives....... Figure 2.13) Vrms I rms S displacement power factor (fundamental components) distortion power factor (harmonic components) Many AC PWM drive manufacturers cite “high power factor at all loads” as an advantage when selling this type of drive.. not the true power factor... this “high power factor” (typically 0. comprises active power (P).. S.... (5................ For systems containing nonlinear loads. In theory..... 2006 97 .. D.. (5... reactive power (Q) and H (distortion power) where the distortion power........... the power system then supplies only the fundamental current..e.... will increase the true power factor. can be defined as: D2 = S2 – (P2 + Q2) ............ to prevent a leading power factor from occurring.. 3 How the Mitigation of Harmonics Improves True Power Factor As can be seen from Section 5... based on the magnitude of the harmonic currents being produced by the load(s)]. such as switching out stages of the filter.. This is injected into the power system and provides the nonlinear load with the harmonic currents it needs in order to function....... (5.... = ..... load commutated inverters........ However. Active filters (see Section 10) can also provide a measure of inherent power factor correction...11) S S1 1 + THD 2 1 + THD 2 V I P .... These filters can provide harmonic mitigation and a degree of power factor correction via the filter capacitors...... However. On drives or other loads with fully controlled input bridge rectifiers (e............Section 5 Harmonics and System Power Factor As can be seen from Section 5... the true power factor will increase accordingly. measures may have to be taken at light loads...... if the distortion power........ it can be beneficial...... the power factor can therefore be expressed as: Power factor: cos φ = 1 P P = = cos φ disp ⋅ cos φ dist .......98) refers only to the displacement power factor. Figure 2..

but it will be problematic when the supplies are generator derived. producing a leading power factor when the harmonic load is light or the nonlinear equipment is switched off.. On utility supplies. this statement is based on an active filter with digital control system).4 kVAr. For example. for a 300 A. 98 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . this may not cause problems.Section 5 Harmonics and System Power Factor In addition to the harmonic cancellation current. However.e. 480 V active filter. the reader has to be aware of one type of analog-controlled active filter which has a tendency to supply uncontrolled reactive current into the power system. reactive current compensation is also provided which can correct for a leading or lagging power factor at any load (i. 2006 . the available reactive power would be 249.

it may be worthwhile to briefly consider the effect of loading on the more common types of variable speed drives used in the marine sector. therefore. it absorbs harmonic current) in the circuit. Recent designs have increased power ratings and higher voltage levels. the total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd) is dependent on the magnitude of each harmonic current at its specific harmonic frequency acting upon the source impedance and other individual circuit impedances to produce individual harmonic voltage drops.e. Since the majority of large nonlinear loads installed on marine vessels and offshore installations are variable speed drives. At rated load. As described in Section 4. the Vthd. 2 Total Harmonic Current Distortion (Ithd) and Reduced Loading In nonlinear loads. AC load commutated inverters (LCIs). and to a degree. will affect percentage total harmonic current distortion (Ithd). tends to decrease the further it is measured from the harmonic-producing load..1 AC PWM Drives AC PWM drives are the common type used in the marine sector.SECTION 6 The Effect of Loading on Harmonic Current Distortion 1 Total Harmonic Voltage Distortion (Vthd) As illustrated in Section 2. The higher the magnitude of harmonic current. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . transformers and other impedances. the harmonic current levels tend to be at the highest levels. the higher the voltage distortion for a given impedance. in power systems containing nonlinear loads. The effect of loading. unless resonance is present in the system. all of which are summed and compared with the fundamental voltage to obtain. It is usually the highest nearer to the harmonic load and progressively reduces the nearer to the source it is measured. 2006 99 . this type of drive architecture is characterized by the presence of an input bridge rectifier. including AC PWM (variable frequency) drives. which tends to act as a “harmonic sink” (i. DC SCR drives and AC cycloconverters. The resultant voltage distortion. due to the effect of cables. a DC bus with capacitor bank and an inverter output bridge. except under resonant conditions where specific harmonic currents at the resonant frequency can have significantly higher values. the magnitude of the characteristic harmonic currents is normally proportional to the load demand. 2. the amount of linear load (such as induction motors). in percentage terms.

the Ithd and harmonic currents would be significantly higher.Section 6 The Effect of Loading on Harmonic Current Distortion Section 6. of a typical 6-pulse AC PWM drive at rated load.94 lag.5% at 100% loading. The AC PWM drive illustrated has a total harmonic current distortion (Ithd) of 37. respectively.5% 100 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006 . Without the AC line (or DC bus) reactor. True power factor was 0. Note that the drive contains a 3% AC line reactor which reduces the Ithd and improves the true power factor. FIGURE 1 Typical 6-Pulse PWM Drive (with 3% AC Line Reactor) at 100% Load Ithd Measured at 37.5% FIGURE 2 Typical Harmonic Spectrum of AC PWM Drive (with 3% AC Line Reactor) at 100% Load – Ithd Measured at 37. Figures 1 and 2 illustrate the current time domain waveform and harmonic spectrum.

True power factor was 0. As described in Section 4. As the drive load is reduced. Figure 3 illustrates this effect on the AC PWM used in this example. hence the pulsed nature of the current. FIGURE 3 Typical AC PWM Drive (with 3% AC Line Reactor) at 30% Load Ithd Measured at 65. Section 6. Note the increased 5th and 7th harmonic components.Section 6 The Effect of Loading on Harmonic Current Distortion With AC PWM drives. FIGURE 4 Typical Harmonic Spectrum of AC PWM Drive (with 3% AC Line Reactor) at 30% Load – Ithd Measured at 65. illustrates the harmonic current spectrum associated with the AC PWM drive waveform based on 30% loading. below. the Ithd will increase as the loading is reduced due to the more “discontinuous” nature of the pulsed current drawn from the capacitive DC bus.7% ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . current is only drawn from the mains supply when the instantaneous AC line voltage exceeds the DC bus voltage. Section 6.7%. the current pulse will become “sharper”. Figure 4. 83 lag. 2006 101 .

In common with AC PWM and other drive types. DC drives tend to operate in continuous current mode (see Section 6.2 DC SCR Drives Unlike variable frequency drives.1% Section 6.e. However. Figures 5 and 6) down to around 10-15% load after which the Ithd will rise more significantly. However. 2.e. above. illustrates the typical current waveform of a 6-pulse DC drive at 70% loading (35. As DC drives have. the magnitude of the harmonic currents is usually relatively small and non-problematic. the percentage Ithd will rise with reducing load but be less than with comparable AC PWM drives which have capacitive buses. it should be noted that if AC PWM drives are “oversized” for any reason. The input rectifier directly controls the output voltage (i.1% Ithd). Figure 6. motor armature voltage) by variation of the firing angle of the SCRs. due to the presence of the DC armature. Figure 5. depicts the harmonic current spectrum of the DC drive at 70% loading. FIGURE 5 6-Pulse DC Drive at 70% Loading Ithd is 35. Section 6. This may have to be taken into account when calculating harmonic mitigation. 2006 .Section 6 The Effect of Loading on Harmonic Current Distortion Although it has been shown that the total harmonic current distortion will increase with reducing load it is the magnitude of the harmonic currents and the resultant effect on circuit impedances (which produce voltage distortion) which are more important. at low speeds. A comparable 6-pulse AC PWM drive with 3% AC line reactor at similar loading would present an Ithd of around 42-44%. with the worse case at reduced load being at 90 degrees firing angle (i. primarily “inductive buses”. DC drives do not have an intermediate circuit between the input rectifier and the output to the DC motor. The harmonic current distortion (Ithd) is largely determined by the SCR firing angles. the Ithd will be higher than expected at any load as the drive is not “matched” to the load as far as the kW/HP rating is concerned. the magnitude of harmonic current is usually highest at rated load... low voltage and speed) and rated load. below. 102 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

3 Load Commutated Inverters The input harmonic currents and input current waveforms produced by load commutated inverters (also called current source or current-fed inverters) are similar to those produced by DC SCR drives. so as with DC drives.1% 2. As stated previously. the characteristic harmonics are generally less than other drive types of the same pulse number.e. At low speed operation. As per DC drives. the magnitude of the interharmonic side bands can often exceed those of the characteristic harmonics. the interharmonics are generally of low value. 2006 103 .. low motor speed and load). the mode of operation (i. the magnitudes of the characteristic harmonic currents produced are typically similar to DC drives under the same load conditions.4 Cycloconverters As described in Section 4. but above those harmonic frequencies. the motor loading and the motor ripple current. 2.e. For 6-pulse cycloconverters. 5th and 7th harmonics should not be significant. the interharmonics associated with the fundamental.Section 6 The Effect of Loading on Harmonic Current Distortion FIGURE 6 Harmonic Current Spectrum of 6-Pulse DC Drive at 70% Loading Ithd is 35. The variation in Ithd with load for load commutated converters will be similar to that described for DC SCR drives. the harmonic current distortion (Ithd) produced by load commutated inverters is also a function of the input SCR rectifier firing angles.. blocking mode or circulating mode). Any deviation from the ideal can introduce non-characteristic harmonic currents. but the interharmonics are usually significantly higher. As the output frequency. the characteristic harmonic currents tend to decrease while the interharmonic current sidebands increase. the characteristic harmonics are related to the pulse number and system characteristics. the maximum value of Ithd should occur at very low speed (or zero speed) and high loading. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . whereas the input interharmonic currents are related to the output frequency. This is due to the large inductance inserted in the DC bus to provide a constant current source. cycloconverters are very complex drives from both the input and output harmonic perspectives. such as the 2nd and 3rd. At low frequency operation (i. As also mentioned in Section 4. are increased up to rated speed and load. hence motor speed and load.

Therefore. Figures 7 and 8 illustrate the effect of output frequency on both the input current and input voltage harmonic spectrums. all operating at identical output frequency and loading.. power factor correction) and harmonic filtering may be installed to minimize any adverse effects on the power system of such large drives. 2006 . This application involved six.e.Section 6 The Effect of Loading on Harmonic Current Distortion It has to be stated that cycloconverters applied in the marine sector tend to be in the MW range with 12-pulse or higher configurations. FIGURE 7 Multiple 6-Pulse Cycloconverters Input Current and Voltage Harmonic Spectrums at Low Output Frequency/Low Load FIGURE 8 Multiple 6-Pulse Cycloconverters Input Current and Voltage Harmonic Spectrums at High Output Frequency/High Load 104 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . a measure of both reactive power compensation (i. 6-pulse cycloconverters on a common bus. Section 6.

2006 105 . Therefore.5 Conclusion: Harmonic Current Magnitude and its Effect on Voltage Distortion It should be re-emphasized that it is not the percentage of total harmonic current distortion (Ithd) which is of main concern. It is therefore the total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd) which is to be the main concern in order to minimize any adverse effects on the installed system and equipment. It is the magnitude of the harmonic currents associated with the Ithd which is of more importance. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . as it is the magnitudes of these harmonic currents which interact with the system impedances to produce the individual harmonic voltage drops at the harmonic frequencies which result in the total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd).Section 6 The Effect of Loading on Harmonic Current Distortion 2. it should be the purpose of any harmonic mitigation measure employed to reduce the total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd) to within the necessary limits under all operating conditions.

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Xd″. as it is not as limited by the leakage reactance of the source.1 – 0. 2006 107 . “Soft sources”. such as that achieved by “oversizing” the kVA rating. The higher harmonic current does not usually significantly distort the voltage. should be relatively low to maintain the voltage distortion within the necessary limits. The machine subtransient reactance. assuming the source impedance is unchanged.”often in the range of approximately 0. The generator rotor damper cage. whether utility-owned or customer-owned within their system. Ithd. tend to have reduced short circuit capability and limit the magnitude of the harmonic currents drawn by the given nonlinear load(s). the higher the harmonic current distortion. permit a given nonlinear load(s) to draw higher magnitudes of harmonic current for a given kW value of nonlinear load. However. the higher the harmonic current that will be drawn by the nonlinear load(s) and the less the subsequent voltage distortion for a given load. designed for linear loads. Generators.18 per unit. which results in an increase in short circuit current. “Stiff sources” are often associated with transformers. such as generators. is subject to higher levels of current when nonlinear loads are present. Xd″. The damper winding is to be designed such that the sinusoidal voltage waveform is maintained. that lower value of harmonic current will produce significantly higher levels of voltage distortion. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . The solution will depend on the type of nonlinear load.SECTION 7 Influence of Source Impedance and kVA on Harmonics 1 “Stiff” and “Soft” Sources Power sources in relation to harmonics are often characterized by the terms “stiff source” and “soft source”. are considered as “soft sources” whose “source impedance” is actually the “substransient reactance (Xd″). the magnitude of the harmonic currents produced and the subsequent voltage distortion permissible in the power system. Generators for low harmonic distortion would need a low value of subtransient reactance. “Stiff sources”. The kVA rating also has an impact on the magnitude of harmonic currents and subsequent voltage distortion for a given load as the short circuit capability and associated ISC/IL (load current to short circuit current ratio) varies. having higher short circuit capability. and both have a significant effect on both the nonlinear currents drawn by the load and the resultant voltage distortion. and the lower the resultant harmonic voltage distortion. however. Vthd. Their source impedance is often on the order of 5-6% (Z). The higher the kVA (or MVA). The stiffer the source.

.2% Impedance This is based on a transformer rated at 2000 kVA with impedance of 5. a harmonic estimated program (SOLV) has been utilized. The loads are two AC PWM drives. Ithd = 24. one of 600 HP with 3% AC line reactor and one of 350 HP with 3% DC bus reactor.Section 7 Influence of Source Impedance and kVA on Harmonics 2 Illustrations of the Effect of kVA and Source Impedance on Harmonics In order to illustrate the effect of varying kVA and source impedance (or substransient reactance) of the power source. the effects of varying the values of impedance (or Xd″) and kVA are similar for both transformers and generators). Vthd = 4.85 lag power factor.7% 108 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 60 Hz. The voltage and current waveforms at the PCC#1 (point of common coupling are also included).3:1.2%. 5. Note that the illustrations of the power source do not differentiate between transformer and/or generator derived supplies (the illustrations are “transformers”).e.2% and secondary voltage of 480 V. Linear load is 180 kW at 0.2% Impedance – ISC/IL = 33. but the subsequent calculations are unaffected (i. 2006 . FIGURE 1a 2000 kVA and 5. Example 1 – 2000 kVA.

Section 7 Influence of Source Impedance and kVA on Harmonics FIGURE 1b Current and Voltage Waveforms for 2000 kVA/5. 2006 109 .2% Impedance Source with 950 HP AC PWM Drive Load and 180 kW Linear Load ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

8% 110 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 60 Hz.1:1.Section 7 Influence of Source Impedance and kVA on Harmonics Example 2 – 2000 kVA. with substransient reactance (Xd″) of 14% and secondary voltage of 480 V. FIGURE 2a 2000 kVA and14% Subtransient Reactance ISC/IL = 29. Ithd = 19.1%. 14% Subtransient Reactance This is based on a generator similarly rated at 2000 kVA. The loads are as per Example 1.85 lag power factor. one of 600 HP with 3% AC line reactor and one of 350 HP with 3% DC bus reactor. Linear load is 180 kW at 0. 2006 . with two AC PWM drives. Vthd = 9.

Section 7 Influence of Source Impedance and kVA on Harmonics FIGURE 2b Current and Voltage Waveforms for 2000 kVA/14% Subtransient Reactance Source with 950 HP AC PWM Drive Load and 180 kW Linear Load ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006 111 .

2% Impedance The transformer rating is now increased to 4000 kVA.85 lag power factor are identical to that illustrated in Example 1. FIGURE 3a 4000 kVA and 5. Ithd = 27. 60 Hz remain the same. The loads are two AC PWM drives.2% and secondary voltage of 480 V. 5. Vthd = 2.2% Impedance – ISC/IL = 67.1%. 2006 . one of 600 HP with 3% AC line reactor and one of 350 HP with 3% DC bus reactor and linear load is 180 kW at 0.7% 112 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . but the impedance of 5.Section 7 Influence of Source Impedance and kVA on Harmonics Example 3 – 4000 kVA.1:1.

Section 7 Influence of Source Impedance and kVA on Harmonics FIGURE 3b Current and Voltage Waveforms for 4000 kVA/5.2% Impedance Source with 950 HP AC PWM Drive Load and 180 kW Linear Load ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006 113 .

2006 . The loads are as per Example 2. one of 600 HP with 3% AC line reactor and one of 350 HP with 3% DC bus reactor and linear load is 180 kW at 0. Vthd = 5.Section 7 Influence of Source Impedance and kVA on Harmonics Example 4 – 4000 kVA. 60 Hz maintained.85 lag power factor retained. Ithd = 22.6:1. FIGURE 4a 4000 kVA and14% Subtransient Reactance ISC/IL = 26. 14% Subtransient Reactance The generator is also now increased to 4000 kVA with substransient reactance (Xd″) of 14% and secondary voltage of 480 V.9%.8% 114 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . with two AC PWM drives.

The value of Xd″ varies from generator to generator and is inversely proportional to the square of the generator working voltage. the lower the Xd″.e.7% 9.1% 27.9% Vthd 4.).Section 7 Influence of Source Impedance and kVA on Harmonics FIGURE 4b Current and Voltage Waveforms for 4000 kVA/14% Subtransient Reactance Source with 950 HP AC PWM Drive Load and 180 kW Linear Load A summary of all four examples above is given in Section 7.e.8% 2. It can be seen that the resultant voltage distortion for a given nonlinear load varies in proportion to the source impedance (i.1% 22. Table 1 below: TABLE 1 Variation of Ithd and Vthd with Variation of kVA and Impedance (or Xd″) kVA – Z or Xd″ 2000 kVA – 5..2% Z 2000 kVA – 14% Xd″ 4000 kVA – 5.1 67. the less the resultant voltage distortion) and installed kVA..2% Z 4000 kVA – 14% Xd″ ISC/IL 33. 2006 115 . ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .3 12.8% The kVA rating and transformer impedance (Z) or [substransient reactance (Xd″) for generators] have an important effect on the magnitude of the harmonic currents drawn and the resultant voltage distortion. of a larger kVA rating than one based on the kW load. Achieving a low level of Xd″ usually involves a special winding design with a high level of excitation and therefore high magnetic flux or the use of “derated” generators (i.1 24.6 Ithd 24.7% 5.2% 19. for generators.

Modern generators have excitation systems which can cope with voltage and current distortion provided that they are correctly designed for the nonlinear load(s) in terms of thermal rating and have an appropriate level of winding insulation.) The calculation based on one generator running is straightforward with the generator kVA and Xd″ inserted into program (or used for manual calculations). 2006 .Section 7 Influence of Source Impedance and kVA on Harmonics In Example 2 above. 480 V. 3 Parallel Generator Operation and Calculation of Equivalent Short Circuit Ratings When calculating harmonic voltage and current distortion. the 2000 kVA. Z. thus decreasing the voltage distortion for given nonlinear load.14 per unit. the effective subtransient reactance (Xd″) will be: " Xd = 1000 kVA × 14% = 7% 2000 kVA Therefore. at reduced generator loading. Xd″. In this case S1 will be designated “base unit” in terms of kVA and Xd″. instead of Xd″. are running in parallel to share the loading. (Similar data is necessary for transformers with impedance. a method of calculating the parallel system kVA and equivalent Xd″ (illustrated below) is necessary and is similar to that used for short circuit calculations. At 1000 kVA loading. when more than one generator. However. it is significantly more complicated. FIGURE 5 Paralleling of Generators One of the generators must be selected as the “base unit”. the effective Xd″ will be reduced. 116 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . either the short circuit rating or the generator kVA (or MVA) and the subtransient reactance. Therefore. is necessary. 60 Hz generator used in the illustrations and calculations above had an Xd″ of 14% or 0. perhaps of differing values of kVA and Xd″.

.................................................................. below: FIGURE 6 Example of Paralleled Generators ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ...............3base = ................................3...........................4) The total system short circuit capacity therefore can be calculated: S SC = S base ............. 2... (7....... we must determine X d 2base and X d 3base ............. 2base + X d 3base ′′ X d1....base Example 5 Calculate the equivalent subtransient reactance and short circuit capacity of three paralleled generators rated at 2 × 2000 kVA/16% Xd″ and 1 × 1500 kVA/18% Xd″ depicted in Section 7............................................ 2006 117 ......................... 2............... 2base = ′′ ′′ X d 1 ⋅ X d 2base .............................. Figure 6................................... (7........ (7..... as follows: ′ X d′1....................... as follows: ′′ ′′ X d 2base = X d 2 S1 .............Section 7 Influence of Source Impedance and kVA on Harmonics ′′ ′′ ′′ If X d 1 (S1) is the base unit.... 2base ⋅ X d′ 3base ′′ ′′ X d 1................................................................5) ′ X d′1..3) ′′ ′′ X d 1 + X d 2base ′ ′′ X d 1..... (7..................1) S2 ′ ′′ X d′ 3base = X d 3 S1 ................................. (7..............2) S3 Once all generators are on the same base........... the total system equivalent subtransient reactance can be calculated.........

096 + 0.24 ( 24%) 1500 S2 ′ ′′ X d′ 3base = X d 3 ′ X d′1. Note: The short circuit MVA of parallel transformers can also be calculated using a similar method to that above.06 (6%) 0.096 (9. Consequently. 0. = 0. 2.16 . 2. 2006 . = 0.base 0.6%) ′′ ′′ 0.0384 = = = 0.16 + 0. both the magnitude and percentage of total harmonic current and harmonic total voltage will vary also.3base = S SC = ′′ ′ X d 1.06 Xd The results calculated above are based on one set of generator running conditions and will vary according to the number. 2base ⋅ X d′ 3base ′′ ′′ X d 1. 2base + X d 3base = 0. kVA and Xd″ of the generators on line at any one time.18 .16 (16%) 2000 S3 ′ ′′ X d′1 ⋅ X d 2base 0. 2base = S1 2000 = 0. 0.01536 = = 0.24 0. therefore: ′ ′′ X d′ 2base = X d 2 S1 2000 = 0.16 . designated the “base unit” Sbase.Section 7 Influence of Source Impedance and kVA on Harmonics Generator S1 is.333 MVA ′′1.256 S base 2000 = = 33.4 X d 1 + X d 2base ′′ X d1.16 0.24 0.096 .16 0.3. in this example. 118 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

SECTION 8 The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion 1 Balanced Systems In a power system with balanced sinusoidal voltages. 2006 119 . the three line-to-neutral voltages are all of equal magnitude and displaced by 120 electrical degrees from each other. below: FIGURE 2 Unbalanced System Va Vc Vb ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . as depicted in Section 8. Figure 2. below: FIGURE 1 Balanced System Va Vc Vb 2 Unbalanced Systems An unbalanced power system is so called when the magnitudes of the phase voltages are not equal and/or where the phase shift deviates from the normal phase separation value of 120 degrees. Figure 1. as shown in Section 8.

........... “negative sequence” and “zero sequence” systems as depicted in Section 8.......... Zero sequence components cannot produce a rotating magnetic field.. There are generally two definitions using symmetrical components which can be used to determine unbalance: i) ii) where V1 V2 V0 = = = positive sequence voltages negative sequence voltages zero sequence voltages Negative Sequence Voltage Unbalance Factor = Zero Sequence Unbalance Factor = V2 .............. the resultant torque opposes the normal direction of rotation................ For a perfectly balanced system....2) V1 120 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . FIGURE 3 Symmetrical Components of an Unbalanced System Va1 Vb2 Vc1 Vb1 Vc2 Negative Sequence Va2 Va0 Vb0 Vc0 Zero Sequence Positive Sequence As described in Section 3. when negative sequence components are applied to an induction motor..1 Definition of Voltage Unbalance Power system voltage unbalance can be defined using two methods...... Figure 3 below... (8..Section 8 The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion Deviations from a balanced supply system can be attributed to the following: • • • • • • Unequal impedances within the power distribution system Asymmetries in AC and DC drive commutation reactances Large or unequal distribution of single-phase loads Negative sequence fundamental frequency components in commutating voltages Harmonic distortion of positive and negative sequence components Unbalanced three-phase loads 2........ The first method is based on the theory of symmetrical components.................... 2006 ........1) V1 V0 ....... which mathematically defines an unbalanced system into three separate balanced systems termed “positive sequence”.................. both the negative sequence and zero sequence components would be absent............. (8....

.. especially rotating machines.... the currents then drawn from the supply will also be unbalanced.....4)......... the NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association... 2%-2......3/8......... ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . causing torque pulsations and increasing the temperature rise of the motor as it tries to maintain its output torque and speed. line-to-neutral voltages should not be used.. Vca ) Note that in Equations 8.. When a balanced three-phase load is connected to an unbalanced supply........4) However. Vbc . (8..... tends to be the more accurate............5... Therefore it is the negative sequence components which must be used as a measure of unbalance....4 and 8..e.. or the “IEC definition” can be expressed as: Negative sequence voltage unbalance = 1 − 3 − 6β V2 . The negative sequence voltage unbalance factor....... Vbc ... Also note that the IEC definition (Equations 8...........2)..3) = V1 1 + 3 − 6β where β = (V 4 4 4 Vab + Vbc + Vca 2 ab 2 2 + Vbc + Vca ) 2 ..... it is normal to stipulate the amount permissible on a power system in order that equipment.... the life of motor winding insulation reduces by 50% (i........2 Effect of Unbalanced Loading on Rotating Machines A significant effect of unbalance is that associated with induction motors........ which often form a substantial part of the electric load.. Figure 4. Induction motors on unbalanced supplies will also exhibit additional audible noise.3/8. Vca ) ..5) Mean of (Vab .. in the USA) has a much simpler definition: Voltage unbalance = Maximum deviation from mean of (Vab .... as the associated zero sequence components will introduce errors.. being more mathematical. 2006 121 ................. 2....5% is usually the maximum unbalance specified.... As it is impossible to guarantee completely balanced supplies. is not adversely affected (see 8/2. also known as the “Voltage Unbalance Factor” (VUF).......... (8....... on a 20°C rise the motor insulation life is reduced by 75%) as illustrated in Section 8.Section 8 The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion Zero sequence currents cannot flow in three-wire systems. It is worth re-emphasizing that for every 10°C rise above rated temperature.. the negative sequence components in the machine air gap oppose the direction of rotation.. As mentioned above on unbalanced voltages..... (8.........

............. the impedance is small....... 122 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .......................... For positive sequence voltages the motor slip...... can be expressed in terms of slip..... S2..... when a balanced induction motor is connected to an unbalanced supply....... Consequently.... at start-up or locked rotor)................... Si. the motor slip............. 2006 ............... r = 1 − S1 Ns Ns Ns S2 = S1 + 2(1 – S1) = 2 – S1 ...... would be: S1 = where N s− Nr . as follows: S2 = S1 = Ns + Nr Ns − Nr N N = + 2 r = S1 + 2 r Ns Ns Ns Ns Ns − Nr N N = 1 − r .............. the impedance will be large at conditions of low slip....................Section 8 The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion FIGURE 4 Reduction of Insulation Life with Temperature In addition...... therefore............6) Ns = = synchronous speed rotor speed Ns Nr For negative sequence voltages..... S1........ At conditions of high slip (for example......... (8........ such as that associated with normal running conditions..... the resultant line currents can be several times that of percentage voltage unbalance as shown below............. (8......7) The impedance of an induction motor is largely dependent on the motor slip....

...9...... would be large................ almost zero)................ is usually negligible (i......... whereas the negative sequence slip.. it can be determined that the connection of an induction motor with a locked rotor current of 600% full load current would result a 30% unbalance in motor currents if connected to a supply system with 5% unbalance. Therefore..e........ Z1 V2 Z2 It can be seen therefore that I 2 V2 I starting = × ........ the positive sequence slip..... (8............. NEMA has produced graphically the necessary motor derating factor according to the degree of voltage unbalance (Section 8.. Section 8.......Section 8 The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion Similarly....................... the ratio of positive sequence to negative sequence impedance could be expressed by: Z1 I starting ≈ .... whatever the actual motor loading....3 Effect of Unbalanced Loading on Harmonics The wave shape and characteristic harmonics of rectifier bridges are significantly affected by voltage unbalance................... Please note that NEMA also do not advise any motor to be operated if the voltage unbalance is more than 5%....... S2. Figure 5).............. FIGURE 5 Derating on Induction Motors of Unbalanced Supplies 2.... In order to minimize the effect on motors due to unbalanced voltages......9) I 1 V1 I running Using the above Equation 8...8) Z 2 I running If the positive sequence current is expressed as and the negative sequence current by I1 = I2 = V1 .......... S1....... ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ...... Figure 6 shows a typical input current waveform from a three-phase 6-pulse AC PWM drive with additional reactance (AC line reactor or DC bus) on a system with balanced supplies....... 2006 123 . (8..........

below: FIGURE 7 Typical 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current Waveform on 5% Voltage Unbalance FIGURE 8 Typical 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current Waveform on 15% Voltage Unbalance 124 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Figures 7 and 8. 2006 .Section 8 The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion FIGURE 6 Typical 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive Input Current Waveform on Balanced Voltages The effect when 5% and 15% voltage unbalance is introduced is illustrated in Section 8.

including 2nd.. Section 8. However. “Harmonic Mitigation. inter-bridge reactors. 4th and 6th) and DC.4 Voltage Unbalance and Multi-pulse Drives and Systems Voltage unbalance (and voltage distortion) significantly degrades the performance of phase shift and other multi-pulse harmonic mitigation systems (e. respectively. rarely are accounted for in the design of equipment. 9th. and possibly DC in the power system. Figure 9. When 12-pulse.. than attempt to “design-out” their effect with harmonic filters. 15th. etc. 9th.Section 8 The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion The affect of voltage unbalance is to introduce uncharacteristic harmonics. which further increases the production of uncharacteristic harmonics and the total harmonic current distortion..g. the unbalanced currents can lead to increased thermal stress on the drive components. Section 8.. Unbalance also contributes to the misfiring of SCRs and other power devices. it is often assumed that there is total harmonic cancellation of specified harmonics due to the respective phase shift. rectifier bridges.” for full information). a 30-degree shift in theory cancels the 5th and 7th harmonics (see Section 10. The problem with the nature of uncharacteristic harmonics is that they are difficult to predict and. consequently. 21st…) and even order harmonics (e. 2006 125 . illustrates the effect of unbalance on the harmonic spectrum of a 6-pulse AC PWM drive. due to tolerances in the transformer windings. quasi-multi-pulse). such as unbalance. In addition. 18-pulse and other configurations are discussed.g. there will be residual 5th and 7th harmonic currents present after mitigation. For example. Figures 10 and 11 illustrate the effect of 1%. below. The magnitude of the drive DC bus voltage on AC PWM drives would also be reduced. etc. resulting in subsequent tripping on “undervoltage – DC bus”. the effect of supply unbalance can erode the performance of multi-pulse drives and other phase-shifted systems. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 3rd. It is often easier to address the causes of the uncharacteristic harmonics. More significantly. Note the large 3rd harmonic and other triplens (6th. 2% and 3% voltage unbalance on 12-pulse and 18-pulse drive system. FIGURE 9 Harmonic Spectrum of 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive on Unbalanced Voltages (Fundamental Component Removed) 2.

2006 .Section 8 The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion FIGURE 10 Unbalance and the Effect on 12-Pulse Drives FIGURE 11 Unbalance and the Effect on 18-Pulse Drives 126 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

2006 127 .g. Note: To estimate the effect on 12-pulse drives using double-wound phase shift transformers. and so on). and can cause damage to those types utilizing “front end” capacitors [i. Section 8.. it is not known to what degree background voltage distortion will further degrade the performance of drive systems which depend on phase shift for harmonic mitigation.5 Background Voltage Distortion and Multi-pulse Drives and Systems Background voltage distortion adversely affects the performance of most forms of harmonic mitigation.Section 8 The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion 2. at 100% load and 1% background Vthd. With a Vthd of 5% on a marine power systems. EMI and carrier frequency filters within active filters)].. (For example. FIGURE 12 Effect of Background Voltage Distortion on 18-Pulse AC PWM Drive ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . therefore approximately 10% for 12-pulse. the Ithd would be 5% for 18-pulse.e. especially multi-pulse drive systems. add around 5% to the Ithd figures below. directly subject to high levels of distortion (e. Figure 12 illustrates the effect of background distortion on an 18-pulse drive at 50% and 100% loading.

The total harmonic current distortion would be reduced due to being limited by the leakage reactance of the “softer” source. 12-pulse AC PWM drives (e. it is possible to further illustrate the relationship between voltage unbalance and/or pre-existing voltage distortion on multi-pulse drives (and other types of mitigation). the resultant total voltage distortion in each supply condition would have been increased.g. the subsequent production of total harmonic current distortion and the resultant total harmonic voltage distortion. 60 Hz and Xd″ of 14% was loaded with two off 900 HP. thruster drives) and 180 kW of linear load. a generator rated at 5000 kVA.Section 8 The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion 2.. Note: If a smaller generator kVA and/or a higher value of Xd″ been chosen for the given load. In the examples cited below. The 12-pulse drives were chosen as being the most common multi-pulse configuration in the marine sector.6 The Effect of Voltage Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion Using Software Modeling Using harmonic estimation software. 128 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006 . 480 V. Four sets of supply conditions were modeled: • • • • 0% voltage unbalance and 0% pre-existing voltage distortion 2% voltage unbalance and 0% pre-existing voltage distortion 0% voltage unbalance and 5% pre-existing voltage distortion 2% voltage unbalance and 5% pre-existing voltage distortion The examples below illustrate the differing total harmonic current distortion and associated total voltage distortion and voltage and current waveforms at the PCC#1 for each of the above supply conditions.

No Pre-existing Vthd – Ithd = 5. No Pre-existing Vthd ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Vthd = 4.9% FIGURE 13b Voltage and Current Waveforms No Voltage Unbalance.Section 8 The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion FIGURE 13a No Voltage Unbalance.2%. 2006 129 .

Section

8

The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion

FIGURE 14a 2% Voltage Unbalance, No Pre-existing Vthd – Ithd = 14.5%, Vthd = 5.2%

FIGURE 14b Voltage and Current Waveforms 2% Voltage Unbalance, No Pre-existing Vthd

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Section

8

The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion

FIGURE 14c Three-phase Current Waveforms 2% Voltage Unbalance, No Pre-existing Vthd

FIGURE 15a No Voltage Unbalance, 5% Pre-existing Vthd – Ithd = 10.9%, Vthd = 6.2%

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Section

8

The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion

FIGURE 15b Voltage and Current Waveforms No Voltage Unbalance, 5% Pre-existing Vthd

FIGURE 16a 2% Voltage Unbalance, 5% Pre-existing Vthd – Ithd = 18.5%, Vthd = 6.0%

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Section

8

The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion

FIGURE 16b Voltage and Current Waveforms 2% Voltage Unbalance, 5% Pre-existing Vthd

FIGURE 16c Three-phase Current Waveforms 2% Voltage Unbalance, 5% Pre-existing Vthd

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133

e. there is a documented case of one patented design of “broadband filter” which is operating successfully on a cableship in excess of 22% background voltage distortion (Vthd) due to the vessel having full electric propulsion. 2006 . a maximum of <5% Vthd) may be unable to function reliably on higher levels of background Vthd unless specifically designed for the given application.Section 8 The Effect of Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion The summary of results for the resultant total harmonic current distortion (Ithd) and total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd) for the above examples is tabled below: TABLE 1 Variation in Ithd and Vthd with Voltage Unbalance and Pre-existing Voltage Distortion % Unbalance 0% 2% 0% 2% % Vthd 0% 0% 5% 5% Ithd 5. can offer increased performance on both voltage unbalance and background distortion. (For example.9% 5. A complete approach may be therefore necessary in order to maximize the performance of multi-pulse drives.2% 6. well above 2%. available up to significantly higher powers.7 Drive Mitigation – Unbalance and Background Voltage Distortion Voltage unbalance and background voltage distortion both have a significant effect on drive harmonic mitigation. 134 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .2% 6.0% 2.) Active filters. Other designs..5% Vthd 4.9% 18. usually designed based on IEEE 519 (1992) (i. especially those using phase shifting techniques.5% 10. A number of so-called “broadband filters” for smaller drives offer good mitigation performance up to 2% unbalance and up to 2% background voltage distortion.2% 14.

SECTION

9

Resonance

1

What is Resonance?
The presence of capacitance in the power system can have a significant effect on the system impedance as it varies due to harmonic frequencies. In marine and offshore power supplies, conventional capacitor-based power factor correction banks may not be common, however directly connected capacitors are used in fluorescent lighting fittings for power factor correction and in other equipment. In addition, cable capacitance can also be problematic. Resonance results in high voltages and/or currents being present in the power system, causing damage to equipment and endangerment of personnel.

2

The Conditions under which Resonance Occurs
The system inductive reactance (XL) is proportional to the frequency, whereas the capacitive reactance (XC) is inversely proportional to frequency. “Resonance” is said to be achieved when the values of XL and XC are of the same value. There are two forms of resonance which need to be considered: “series resonance” and “parallel resonance”, as shown below in Section 9, Figure 1.

FIGURE 1a Series Resonance

FIGURE 1b Parallel Resonance

2.1

Series Resonance
For the series resistance-inductance-capacitance (RLC) circuit (see Section 9, Figure 1a), the total impedance at the resonant frequency reduces to the resistance component only. Where this value is low, high values of current at the resonant frequency will flow in the circuit at relatively low levels of exciting voltage. Under these conditions, series resonant will exist when:

 St S2  fs = f  − l2  ...................................................................................................... (9.1)  SC Z t S  C  

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Section

9

Resonance

where

fs f S Z SC St

= = = = = =

series resonant frequency fundamental frequency transformer (or generator) rating transformer per unit impedance (or generator Xd″) capacitor rating load resistive rating

The main area of concern applicable to series resonance is that high capacitor currents can flow at relatively low levels of harmonic voltages. The actual current magnitudes are determined by the “quality factor”, Q, of the resonant circuit:

Q=
where

Xr ............................................................................................................................... (9.2) R
= = = quality factor reactance at resonance resistance

Q Xr R

2.2

Parallel Resonance
In a parallel resonant circuit (Section 9, Figure 1b), the parallel impedance is significantly different. At the resonant frequency, the impedance is significantly high, resulting in high voltages being present in the circuit for relatively low source current values, although significantly larger magnitudes of circulating current also flow in the inductive-capacitance loop. If the power system impedance is assumed to be entirely inductive, the resonant frequency, fp, can be calculated as:

S  f p = f  s  ..................................................................................................................... (9.3) S   c
where

fp f Ss Sc

= = = =

resonant frequency fundamental frequency short circuit rating load resistive rating

The above formula can also be written as:

 MVAsc fp = f   kVArcap 
Note:

  ............................................................................................................ (9.4)  

Due to circuit topography, in the majority of systems with series resonance, parallel resonance will also occur, albeit at a lower frequency, as shown in Section 9, Figure 2, due to the contribution of the source inductance.

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Section

9

Resonance

FIGURE 2 Series Resonance Frequency Response

Parallel resonance is, however, generally more common than series resonance as the majority of equipment is connected in parallel with switchboards. The example illustrated in Section 9, Figure 3 will therefore be based on parallel resonance. Common problems associated with resonance include capacitor fuse failure and damaged capacitors (industrial power systems), spurious protective relay tripping, overheating on equipment and telephone interference.

3

Prevention of Resonance
In order to illustrate a common potential parallel resonance condition and how it can be prevented, it is necessary to use, as an application (see Section 9, Figure 3), a typical industrial system where AC variable speed drives are to be connected to a switchboard which also has capacitor-based power factor correction equipment attached. The above application has two areas of concern:

i) ii)

The possibility of parallel resonance due to the presence of the drive harmonic currents and the installed capacitance and The effect of the harmonics produced by the 2 × 110 kW and 2 × 132 kW AC drives on the capacitors.

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Section

9

Resonance

FIGURE 3 Typical Industrial Drive Application where Resonance is Possible

The resonance frequency based on the short circuit capacity of 30 MVA and capacitor bank rating of 600 kVAr can be calculated using the formula below:

 MVAsc fp = f   kVArcap 

       

 30 MVA f p = 60   600 kVAr  fp = 353 Hz

It will be noted at that the fundamental frequency of 50 Hz, the parallel resonant frequency occurs in the power system illustrated in Section 9, Figure 2 at around the 3rd harmonic (150 Hz). In order to prevent resonance, a “detuning reactor” has to be connected to “adjust” the parallel resonance point such that it does not coincide with any major characteristic harmonics (5th, 7th, 11th, 13th, etc.). The usual practice is to reduce the resonance point to below the 5th harmonic. The detuning reactor can be used to tune the circuit to around 225 Hz-235 Hz (4.5th-4.7th, being typical frequencies). The tuned resonant frequency may be reduced to below the 3rd harmonic if significant triplen harmonics are also present (more common on four-wire systems). On 60 Hz supplies, the tuned frequencies would be 20% higher.
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. This is due to the fact that the inductive reactance subtracts from the capacitive reactance............6) X where VC = capacitor voltage supply voltage resultant reactance capacitive reactance inductive reactance Vsup = X XC XL = = = ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ... However...... in this case) : X = XC – XL .................... as illustrated in Section 9....Section 9 Resonance 3............... thus decreasing the circuit reactance overall and increasing the capacitor bank fundamental current.. the total reactance at fundamental frequency (50 Hz........................................ 2006 139 ... The detuning reactor only prevents resonance with major characteristic harmonics occurring........ That problem will still exist............... The higher value of fundamental current significantly increases the capacitor voltage.......... FIGURE 4 Simplified Connection of Detuning Reactor to Capacitor Bank With reference to Section 9........ Figure 4................... Figure 4 above.. (9............5) VC = V sup ⋅ XC ....................... the connection of the reactor to the capacitor bank does increase the voltage at fundamental frequency...........1 The Effect of Adding a Detuning Reactor The addition of the detuning reactor does not protect the capacitors from the effect of harmonic currents................. (9........................

..... Until then......... damping is usually provided by supply and load resistances.... Loads such as induction motors are mainly inductive and provide limited damping. especially directly connected capacitors... However.. ignoring any supply variations and tolerances... or where unusually high....... resonance can be seen where there are abnormally high voltages or current harmonics at particular frequencies which are not characteristic of the type of equipment connected to the power system (i. therefore: X = 1 – 0. do tend to suppress resonance. However... However... Long cable lengths. which significantly reduces the peak impedances (10% resistive loading has a significant impact on peak impedances). The harmonic frequency at which the high levels of voltage or current occur is the resonant frequency.. using the above formula. localized voltage or current readings are measured.. There have been other instances.....9 As capacitor banks are usually rated for a maximum of 10% overvoltage.. When using a harmonic analyzer... There have been instances of resonance on offshore production installationss with large variable drive installed load. 140 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Fluorescent lights have burned out due to internal capacitor resonance.. a number of reactor manufacturers do produce designs of detuning reactors which do not increase the capacitor voltage levels significantly... Resonance is observable when the high voltages and/or currents cause damage to equipment.. the capacitors may have to be replaced...... 1 = 423 V (11% voltage increase) 0 . a value of reactor 10% the value of the capacitive reactance is connected to the capacitor bank.... 600 kVAr capacitor bank nominally used on 380 V would have to be derated based on a 10% detuning reactor being connected: kVAractual  432  = 600 kVAr  = 530 kVAr  460  2 4 Possibilities of Resonance on Vessels and Offshore Installations The most likely potential for resonance lies with fluorescent lighting fitting power factor correction capacitors and/or cable capacitance.. a 460 V rated.. 2006 .. however....9 so VC = 380...e... (9. no resonance was apparent on the larger platform.. which had both a power generation plant and a high level of power system harmonics..e... the magnitude of harmonic voltage or current should decrease in inverse proportion to the harmonic number)... if the supply voltage is less than the capacitor rated voltage (capacitor voltage ratings are usually in steps).. significant parallel resonance problems were encountered due to the capacitance of the connecting cable between both platforms...7)   2 For example..Section 9 Resonance For example..1 = 0. up to 85% of total loading.... having its kVAr capability reduced) from nameplate value using the following formula: kVAractual  VC = kVArnameplate   Vnameplate    ... when another platform with no onboard power generation has been supplied from a “mother” platform.. then it may be possible to retain the original capacitor bank subject to it being derated (i.

While a minor amount of “natural mitigation” may occur as described below in Subsections 10/1 and 10/2. which often share similar input rectifier architecture. mitigation measures may have also to be considered in order that voltage distortion. the second column is the percentage harmonic current distortion and the third column is the respective phase angle (note that the “–” denotes a negative phase angle. are:- • • • • • • • • • Neutral current eliminators and phase shift systems (for four-wire systems) Standard AC line and DC bus reactors Wide spectrum (reactor/capacitor) filters Duplex reactors Passive L-C (inductance/capacitance) filters Multi-pulse (phase shifting) Quasi-multi-pulse (phase staggering) Active filters Active front ends (sinusoidal input rectifiers) 1 Effect of Phase Diversity on Harmonic Currents On power systems with multiple nonlinear loads. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Mitigation for both individual applications (e. three-phase and three-phase + neutral) systems only “global mitigation” has been addressed. UPS systems.. an AC line reactor for AC PWM drive) or as a discrete item of mitigation equipment (e. each harmonic voltage (or current) has a phase angle associated with it. normally associated with larger powers will often cause the need for the addition of mitigation equipment in order to attenuate the harmonic currents and associated voltage distortion to within the necessary limits. per drive basis) and for “global mitigation” (i.g. particularly electronic converters for AC and DC motors.. is maintained within permissible limits. Depending on the type of solution desired. a common harmonic mitigation solution for a group of nonlinear equipment) are described. an active filter connected to a switchboard). Note that the first column is the harmonic (H00 is the DC component). As can be seen in the example given in Section 10. the mitigation may be supplied as an integral part of nonlinear equipment (e. The result of multiple harmonic sources is a degree of harmonic cancellation which is determined by the respective individual harmonic voltages (or currents) and the associated phase angles..e. some harmonic cancellation may occur due to “phase angle diversification” between the multiple harmonic sources. Figure 1.g. The majority of this Section relates to the mitigation options available for three-phase nonlinear equipment. depending on the application and desired level of attenuation. 2006 141 .SECTION 10 Mitigation of Harmonics The majority of electrical nonlinear equipment... For single-phase three-wire and four-wire (i. The options available. battery chargers.g. as a result of the nonlinear load(s).e. especially three-phase types.

Therefore it could be argued that the distortion would be higher on systems without linear loads compared to those with linear loads.e. Note that the TDD is not the same as the Ithd. will be lower the greater the proportion of linear load to nonlinear load.) On systems with mixed load (i. (The TDD is expressed as the measure of total harmonic current distortion. For example. linear and nonlinear).) Induction motors are naturally inductive and are often citied as increasing the level of distortion by shifting the natural power system resonant frequency nearer to a significant characteristic harmonic.. linear loads such as induction motors and transformers are adversely affected by harmonic currents and voltages. based on the same magnitude of harmonic currents. (This “opinion” appears to be confirmed by recent industrial research which suggested that harmonic currents travel to ground through directly connected induction motors in parallel with the path through the utility supply transformer. While these linear loads do not “absorb” harmonics as such. the “total demand distortion of current” (“TDD”). whereas purely resistive loads generally dampen possible resonance. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . the supply cabling and the nonlinear loads. 2006 142 . the harmonic voltages and currents are dissipated as heat losses within the equipment.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics FIGURE 1 Harmonic Voltage Data to 50th Harmonic with Respective Phase Angle Information 2 Effect of Linear Load on Harmonic Currents As detailed in Section 3. a 30% total current distortion measured against a 50% load would result in a TDD of 15%.06 per unit on a system with induction motors compared to without induction motors. as defined in IEEE 519 (1992). per unit of load current. Calculations suggested a reduction in the resultant harmonics voltage of some 0.

e. 3 Mitigation of Harmonics on Three-wire Single-phase Systems If large single-phase nonlinear loads (or large numbers of small single-phase nonlinear loads) are present in the three-wire single-phase distribution system.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics Induction motors do have higher impedances at higher frequencies and.e.e. for example. Figure 2 shows a typical lighting (or distribution) transformer supplying two fluorescent lighting distribution panels. (Note: Subsection 10/7.. Since the 5th and 7th are the largest two characteristic harmonics. this does not usually have a significant effect on the overall harmonic currents and subsequent voltage distortion within the power system.1 Phase Shifting Section 10. therefore.) Essentially. “Phase shifting” describes the theory behind this technique. unbalance).. 2006 143 . squirrel cage or wound type) and the air gap has an influence on the absorption of the higher frequency harmonic currents. primary side) of the phase shift transformer causes the 5th and 7th harmonic currents to be in “anti-phase” (i. two common methods of local mitigation can usually be applied: i) ii) Phase shifting Active filters 3. Depending on the nature and magnitude of the necessary mitigation and power system configuration.. FIGURE 2 Phase Shifting of Three-wire Nonlinear Loads ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .. The result is that the majority of the 5th and 7th harmonic currents on the busduct are “cancelled” in theory (some residual will remain due to. One panel has no phase shift and the other has 30 degrees displacement (i.e. However. local harmonic mitigation may be necessary to minimize the contribution of the single-phase nonlinear load(s) to the overall voltage distortion in the power system. the resultant Ithd and the subsequent Vthd will normally be significantly reduced. phase shift). The type of rotor (i. can be seen to “absorb” a portion of the high frequency harmonic currents. the 30-degree phase shift at the input (i. 180 degrees out of phase) with the 5th and 7th harmonic currents produced by the other lighting panel (and any other connected nonlinear loads).

. the latter specifically configured to inject into all three phases and the neutral conductor. this load can be in the range of 5-8 MW. 9th. As described in Section 4. odd multiples of three. have four-wire systems for “hotel loads”. particularly 3rd harmonic) which add cumulatively in the neutral. 4 Mitigation of Harmonics on Four-wire Single-phase Systems Some vessels. can be mitigated. often with a large number of nonlinear single-phase loads. Figure 3 re-emphasizes why that on four-wire systems with nonlinear load the neutral current can often exceed the phase currents. with either grounded or insulated neutrals.1 Zero Sequence Mitigation of Triplens on Four-wire Single-phase Systems As discussed in Section 4. 4. resulting in neutral currents being well in excess of phase currents. It is necessary to consider how the harmonic currents in these four-wire systems.e.2 and 10/11. even when perfectly balanced.e.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics The above scheme is similar to a “quasi-12-pulse system” for three-phase drives and other large nonlinear loads (see Subsection 10/8. “Phase Staggering”). Section 10. Two common methods of addressing the problem of excessive neutral currents due to triplens are available.1 for further information regarding the theory and operation of this type of equipment). 3. FIGURE 3 Four-wire System with Nonlinear Loads 144 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . such as passenger ships. These are specially designed “zero sequence” transformers and active filters. depending on the number and ratings of nonlinear loads. Similar schemes are configurable using larger pulse numbers (and therefore great harmonic cancellation). in a four-wire single-phase power system (i.. three-phase + N) the three individual phase currents contain triplens (i. triplen currents (3rd. 15th…) add cumulatively in the neutral conductor.2 Active Filtering Active filters can be used on three-wire lighting and other “domestic” distribution (see 10/4. 2006 . It is therefore important that any excessive neutral currents (and the associated problems thereof due to nonlinear loads) are attenuated as far as practicable. often overloading the neutral conductors and distribution transformers and causing other problems. On some passenger vessels.

etc. the zero sequence transformer removes the majority of the triplen harmonics from the neutral current and returns them to the three-phases. also balances the phase currents. FIGURE 4 Operation of a Zero Sequence Transformer A B C N Zero Sequence Currents A0 A0 B0 C0 C0 Section 10. 2006 145 . Note that the positive and negative sequence fluxes (e. Figure 2. providing an alternative low impedance path when connecting in parallel on a four-wire system. due to 5th. 7th. a zero sequence transformer comprises multiple windings on a common core. and in doing so. Figure 5 shows the connection of a zero sequence transformer to the four-wire systems depicted in Section 10.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics An effective method of reducing the neutral currents in a four-wire system is to use “zero sequence transformers”. In practical terms.g. below. and therefore cancel out. also called “zig-zag transformers”. 11th. 13th harmonics. Figure 4. As illustrated in Section 10.) remain 120 degrees out of phase and are not cancelled out. The windings of at least two phases are wound in opposition around each core leg in order that the magnetic fluxes created by the zero sequence currents will oppose. FIGURE 5 Zero Sequence Transformer on Four-wire System ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ..

1. below. amplified and injected into the load as “harmonic cancellation current” which matches the needs of the nonlinear load. depending on manufacturer) via the current transformers (CTs) installed on the load side of the connection (note that source side monitoring is also used on occasion). depending on the numbers and rating of discrete loads. Figure 6. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . the active filter. which removes the fundamental component (i. 50 Hz or 60 Hz component).1 Combined Zero Sequence Mitigation and Phase Shifting for Neutral Current Reduction and Harmonic Mitigation “Zero sequence transformers” (ZST) can also be used in conjunction with phase shift transformers to provide effective harmonic attenuation from 3rd to up to 19th harmonics.2 Active Filters for Four-wire Systems An alternative method to reduce the triplen harmonics is an active filter. The theory of operation of active filters in covered in Subsection 10/7. if rated correctly in terms of “harmonic cancellation current”. therefore. FIGURE 6 Zero Sequence Transformer and Combined Phase Shift Transformer with ZST to Cancel Triplen and 5th and 7th Harmonic Currents 4. 2006 146 .e. below. illustrates the use of ZST and a combined phase shift and zero sequence transformer with 30 degrees phase shift to treat the 3rd harmonic current and other triplens and to provide “cancellation” of the 5th and 7th harmonics within the system. the active filter monitors the current in the three phases (and also the neutral. That voltage signal is then converted into a current signal. The voltage signal is fed into. a “notch filter”. The remainder of the signal is termed a voltage signal which is an “image” of the harmonic distortion current. With reference to Section 10. Note: The active filter should be dimensioned in terms of “harmonic cancellation current” based on the actual currents drawn with the filter in circuit.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics 4. Figure 7. provides the load with the harmonic current it needs to function and the source is only supplies the fundamental current which is sinusoidal. In theory.. Section 10. for example.

........ one must consider the impact it has on the power circuit..... (10. are coils of wire wound around a laminated steel core...... thus slowing the rate of rise of current..Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics FIGURE 7 Block Diagram of Active Filter on Four-wire Application 5 Standard Reactors for Three-phase AC and DC Drives Reactors...............1) dt where E L di dt = = = induced voltage inductance........ It is the latter characteristic which is useful in limiting the harmonic currents produced by electrical variable speed drives and other nonlinear loads... the AC line reactor does reduce the total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd) at the input to the reactor compared to that at the terminals of the drive or other nonlinear load... the rate of rise of voltage will also be limited. Similarly.... Reactors are a simple but effective method to reduce the harmonics produced by nonlinear loads and are usually applied to individual loads such as variable speed drives........................... similar in construction to power transformers..... In addition. in Henrys rate of rise of voltage It can therefore be seen that if the voltage available is limited......... ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ..... In order to understand the benefit of a reactor. When the current through a reactor changes... also known as “inductors”....... The laminated steel core is usually impregnated to reduce audible noise due to eddy currents............. then the reactor tends to limit the rate of raise of voltage..... 2006 147 ...... the result is an induced voltage (in opposition to the applied voltage) across its terminals according to the formula: E=L di . consequently.. if the circuit current or supply conditions are such that they create a voltage step change......

L2 represents the AC line inductance of various values plus that of the supply. 7. below.e. Depending on the drive rating. above. The harmonics are therefore 5. the harmonic currents drawn by a 6-pulse AC PWM drive will consist of the fundamental and the characteristic harmonics as represented by: h=n⋅p±1 where h p n = = = harmonic number pulse number integer For 6-pulse drives: h = 6n ± 1. as shown in Section 10. 17. They are often used in addition to other harmonic mitigation methods. On AC drives. Please note that in a perfectly-balanced system. the DC bus reactor is divided into two discrete elements. 148 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . FIGURE 8 Circuit Diagram of Standard 6-Pulse AC PWM Drive In Section 10.1 Reactors for AC PWM Drives A simple block diagram illustrating a standard 6-pulse AC PWM variable frequency drive is shown in Section 10. 5. in the DC bus (called DC bus reactors) or both. L1 represents the inductance of a DC bus reactor of various values (where fitted). the following are represented: • • • • R1 represents the resistance of the DC bus reactor L1 (if fitted). so will not be considered further. Figure 8 (i. Figure 8. 2006 .Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics In electrical variable speed drives.. most manufacturers offer reactors either standard or as options. the total DC bus reactance is 2 × the value of L1). Figure 8. 13. R1 and R2 have negligible effects on the harmonic currents. 19…. reactors are used in both AC and DC types. In order to simplify comparisons regarding the performance of the various inductances of AC line and DC bus reactors. 11. depending on the type of drive design and/or necessary performance of the supply. reactors are used on the AC line side (called AC line reactors).

2 25258405 = 47...........Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics To maintain the results independent of current rating.. 2006 149 .......3) 2 ⋅ π ⋅ f ⋅ I AC ⋅ 100 Example 1 Calculate the value of reactance in henrys necessary for a 3% reactor for a 630 kW (845 HP).. (10.....e. 60 Hz. AC PWM drive having a full load input current of 670 A.................... the phase voltage)].. The supply to the drive is three-phase.......... %X ⋅ Necessary reactance L = V AC 3 2 ⋅ π ⋅ f ⋅ I AC ⋅ 100 3⋅ 690 = = 3 2 ⋅ π ⋅ 60 ⋅ 670 ⋅ 100 1195.... 690 V........... in % VAC = = = The formula can be transformed to calculate the necessary reactance in Henrys for any given percentage impedance as follows: %X ⋅ L= V AC 3 ..732 (i................e...........3 µH (micro-Henrys) ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ..3 × 10-6 = 47. the voltage will be “x%” of the L-L voltage/1............ all the values of reactors will be referred to as “percentage reactances” referred to the current flowing in the AC supply........................................................ in Henrys reactance....... This means that the voltage at the fundamental frequency across the AC line reactor will be “x” percent of input voltage of the drive [i........2) V AC 3 where f IAC L X = = AC line frequency AC line current AC line voltage inductance... Percentage reactance can be defined as follows: %X = 2 ⋅ π ⋅ f ⋅ L ⋅ I AC ⋅ 100 ....... (10..................

1. 2006 . The effects of varying percentage reactance for both AC line and DC bus reactors and their resultant effect on both the magnitude and harmonic number can be observed by reference to the following illustrations:- 5. FIGURE 9 Variation of Harmonic Currents with AC Line Reactance Only 150 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . and in addition to reducing harmonic currents. whether in the AC line.1. as mentioned in 10/4. The disadvantage. %X = % X = 2 ⋅ π ⋅ f ⋅ L ⋅ I AC ⋅ 100 V AC 3 2 ⋅ π ⋅ 60 ⋅ 77 × 10 −6 ⋅ 395 ⋅ 100 = 480 3 = 1147 277 = 4.1 AC Line Reactors Only The use of AC line reactors are more common than DC bus reactors.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics Example 2 Calculate the percentage reactance of three-phase line reactor having of value of 77 µH for use with a 315 kW (400 HP) PWM drive on a 480 V. is that there is a voltage drop at the terminals of the drive. also provide a measure of surge suppression for the drive input rectifier. 60 Hz supply. approximately in proportion to the percentage reactance at the terminals of the drive. Drive rated input current is 395 A.14% It should be noted that the attenuation of the drive harmonic currents is dependent on the value of percentage reactance inserted into the drive. DC bus or both.

17.49% Example 4 Using similar information from Section 10. 2006 151 . the total harmonic current distortion (Ithd) as a percentage of the fundamental current based on harmonics 5. 19 would be: Ithd = 40 2 + 15 2 + 5 2 + 5 2 + 4 2 + 3 2 Ithd = 43. Figure 9). AC line reactors of values 2-3% are common which 5% being the usual maximum. the input harmonics produced by PWM drives with no reactance is relatively high when the AC line reactor is less than 1%. Example 3 Using the information in Section 10.1. • • • • • • 5th harmonic – 32% 7th harmonic – 9% 11th harmonic – 4% 13th harmonic – 3% 17th harmonic – 3% 19th harmonic – 2% The total harmonic current distortion (Ithd) as a percentage of the fundamental current based on harmonics 5. although the rate of decrease diminishes somewhat as percentage reactance increases. 13. As the percentage AC line reactance increases. 19 would again be as follows: Ithd = 32 2 + 9 2 + 4 2 + 3 2 + 3 2 + 2 2 Ithd = 33. 11. the harmonic currents decrease. we can also estimate the harmonic currents and Ithd for a 5 % AC line reactor. A similar exercise can be carried out to estimate the respective harmonic currents when a DC bus reactance is installed (Section 10. 17.2 DC Bus Reactors A relatively small number of AC PWM drive manufacturers do insert reactance in the DC bus. 13. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . however.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics As illustrated above (Section 10. Figure 9. thus avoiding any voltage drops associated with AC line reactors. Figure 9. Figure 10). 7.8% 5. the harmonic currents for a 3% AC line reactor can be estimated: • • • • • • 5th harmonic – 40% 7th harmonic – 15% 11th harmonic – 5% 13th harmonic – 4% 17th harmonic – 4% 19th harmonic – 3% Based on the above estimation. 11. 7. These drives normally need discrete surge suppression to protect the input bridge rectifier devices and to limit any surges which could affect the DC bus voltage levels.

2006 152 . 11. the harmonic currents for a 3% DC bus reactor can be estimated: • • • • • • 5th harmonic – 30% 7th harmonic – 20% 11th harmonic – 8% 13th harmonic – 7. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 13. Both are used when the short circuit capacity of a dedicated supply is relatively low compared to the drive kVA or if the supply susceptible to disturbances. 7. at less than rated load. both AC line and DC bus reactors may be used. Therefore. This is due to the reactors being designed (usually for economic reasons) to partially saturate at rated load. the total harmonic current distortion (Ithd) as a percentage of the fundamental current based on harmonics 5.3 Reactance on Both Sides of the Input Rectifier On larger drives. 19 would be: Ithd = 30 2 + 20 2 + 8 2 + 7. the inductance increases. FIGURE 10 DC Bus Reactance Only in AC PWM Drive Example 5 Using the information in Section 10. 17.1. the DC bus reactor percentage reactance is lower than at rated load. at reduced load. Therefore. Figure 10.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics Note that below rated load.5% 17th harmonic – 5% 19th harmonic – 5% Based on the above estimation.35% 5.5 2 + 5 2 + 5 2 Ithd = 38. the percentage harmonic currents will be higher than anticipated.

a “stiff” source (e. it is the short circuit capacity of the source which largely determines the harmonic current magnitudes. below. but perhaps based on differing individual harmonic current magnitudes depending on the type of drive and inductance on the DC side of the bridge rectifier). whereas a “soft” source (e. FIGURE 11 Variation in 5 Harmonic Current for Differing Values of AC Line Reactance and DC Bus Reactance th Note that when the percentage reactance in the DC bus is low. As described previously.e. 2006 153 . increasing the AC line reactance does result in a significant reduction in the 5th harmonic.g. 6 AC Line Reactors for DC SCR Drives and AC Drives with SCR Input Rectifiers AC line reactors for use with AC and DC drives having full controlled SCR input bridges reduce harmonic currents in a similar manner to that illustrated in 10/4. A similar effect is apparent for higher order harmonics.1.1 on a pro rata basis (i.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics Section 10. increasing the percentage reactance in the AC line results in a smaller reduction in the harmonic currents. Xd″ of 17%) will restrict the magnitude of harmonic current due to its leakage reactance. when the percentage reactance in the DC bus is high (4% or more). More importantly. They also improve the true power factor and provide surge suppression. similar percentage attenuation. It should be stated that harmonic current magnitudes are also dependent to a lesser extent on the value of the DC bus capacitance per amp of load current. 5% transformer) will permit more harmonic current to be drawn by the nonlinear load without unduly distorting the voltage.. as depicted above. However.g. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . but this harmonic current may significantly distort the supply voltage... illustrates the effect on the 5th harmonic of varying values of AC line and DC bus reactance. Figure 11. the reduction diminishing as the harmonic number diminishes.

Section

10

Mitigation of Harmonics

However, another important function of the AC line reactors in these applications is the reduction of line notching (see Subsection 2/6, “Line Notching”). In DC drives, AC line reactors are therefore often termed “commutation reactors”. With reference to Section 10, Figure 12, below; it should be re-emphasized that the line notching occurs 6 times per cycle on a 6-pulse bridge and is the result of the commutation of the load current from one pair of SCRs to another. During this process, the line voltage is short circuited, producing two primary notches per cycle. In addition, there are four secondary notches of lower amplitude which are “notch reflections” due to the commutation of the other two legs of the three-phase bridge rectifier. The short circuit current duration, or “notch width”, is a function of the DC output current of the rectifier and the total inductance in the power system.

FIGURE 12 Primary and Secondary Notching

The notch depth is a function of where the notch is viewed on the power system. The further away it is seen from the terminals of the bridge rectifier, the less significant it will seem. This can be explained with reference to Section 10, Figure 13, below.

FIGURE 13 Line Impedance Distribution and the Effect of Notching

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Section

10

Mitigation of Harmonics

At Point “A” (the rectifier terminals), the notching will be at its most severe, similar to that illustrated in Section 10, Figure 13, if it is assumed that all the inductances L1, L2 and L3 are all equal. Due to the voltage divider type circuit over the three identical inductances, the notch depth at Point “B” (the input to the AC line reactor), will be 66% of the maximum depth seen at Point “A”. At Point “C”, it will be 33% of the depth seen at Point “A”. Therefore, it can be seen that the more the inductance between the source of the notch the less the depth. However, as explained in Section 2, the insertion of additional inductance will reduce the notch depth but will increase the notch width.
Note: It is the notch depth which is usually the more important due to interference with equipment which relies of zero crossing for operation.

The notch size can be calculated using the line side inductance and the bridge rectifier load current during the commutation period.

Notch Depth =

L1 + L2 ............................................................................................ (10.4) L1 + L2 + L3

If all inductance are equal, as per the example (Note: Actual L values of inductances will have to be inserted for practical calculations):

Notch Depth =

2 L1 = 66% 3L1

Notch Area = L ⋅ I ⋅ (Volts – µSecs)................................................................................... (10.5)
where

L I

= =

inductance of distribution transformer and supply inductance (cables, etc.) in micro-Henrys. DC load current at time of commutation, Amps.

Note that the inductance, L, is frequency-dependent and is expressed in Henrys. For generators, the substransient reactance, Xd″, is the impedance of the fundamental harmonic frequency and is expressed in Ohms. In order to compare transformers with generators, one needs to compare the inductance L and reactance X for both. Xd″ mainly comprises reactance X and can be expressed in Ohms [this value, divided by 2πf (frequency)] will result in inductance L.

Notch Depth =

Notch Area .............................................................................. (10.6) Commutation Voltage

where the commutation voltage =

2 E LL rms sin α and

α
E

= =

delay angle of SCR in degrees line to line voltage at time of commutation.

It should also be noted that only additional reactance at the rectifier terminals will have a desired effect in attenuating the notching. Placing additional reactance elsewhere usually results in little improvement. Note that standard AC line reactances are usually available on a per drive size basis and that calculations as illustrated above are not normally necessary. The industry standard is a 3% AC line reactor. This can reduce the notch depth by up to 50% of the depth seen at the rectifier terminals. Larger reactors, up to 5%, are not common, as the larger reduction in notch depth is accompanied by a large increase in the notch width, which may interfere with the rectifier operation.

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Section

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Mitigation of Harmonics

The effectiveness of any additional inductance is dependent on the impedance of the system. The lower the impedance, the less effective any additional inductance will be in reducing the notch depth. Notch limits are specified in North American Harmonic Recommendation IEEE 519 (1992) and are currently as follows:
Special Applications (2) Notch Depth Vthd Notch Area (AN) Notes The value of AN for other than 480 V systems should be multiplied by V/480. 1 2 3 In volt-microseconds at rated voltage and current. Special applications include airports and hospitals. A dedicated system is exclusively dedicated to a converter load.
(1)

General Systems 20% 5% 22,800

Dedicated Systems (3) 50% 10% 36.500

10% 3% 16,400

7

Special Reactors for Three-phase AC and DC Drives
As can be seen above, “standard” reactors provide only a limited measure of harmonic attenuation which is normally not sufficient to maintain compliance with harmonic standards, harmonic recommendations or to allow problem-free installations. For higher performance, more sophisticated reactor designs (for example, wide spectrum filter and the “Duplex” reactor) may be considered.

7.1

Wide Spectrum Filters
Wide spectrum filters are multi-limbed reactors fitted with a small capacitor bank, as shown in Section 10, Figure 14, below. The three reactor windings are wound on a common core. L1 on the source side is the “high impedance winding”, whose design is such that it is “tuned” to prevent the importation of upstream harmonics. On the load side, the “compensating winding”, L2, decreases the through impedance, reducing the voltage drop. The output of L2 is tuned to remove a wide spectrum of load-side harmonics. A unique design of reactor, L3, permits a smaller capacitor bank to be used to reduce voltage boost and reactive power at no load.
Note: The capacitor bank KVAr is around 30% of installed filter KVA and should operate with any generator.

The wide spectrum filter tend to be largely unaffected by voltage unbalance and background voltage distortion (e.g., there is a documented case of a marine wide spectrum filter successfully operating with 22.1% background distortion on a cableship with full electric propulsion) and can be used on both 6-pulse single drive and multiple drive applications. As it is a serial device (see Section 10, Figure 14), it effectively isolates the loads from the effects of any upstream (i.e., background) harmonics.

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Section

10

Mitigation of Harmonics

FIGURE 14 Wide Spectrum Filter Schematic
A1 B1 C1

L1

L2

A2 B2 C2

L3
A3 B3 C3

C

Section 10, Figure 15 illustrates the current and voltage waveform from a standard 6-pulse 200 HP/150 kW AC PWM drive with 3% DC link inductance. The Ithd is 39.9%.

FIGURE 15 200 HP/150 kW AC PWM Drive with 3% DC Bus Reactor – Ithd = 39.9%

The wide spectrum filter is connected to the drive(s) as per a standard AC line reactor (i.e., between the mains supply and the drive, as shown in Section 10, Figure 16). The output voltage of the wide spectrum filter is trapezoidal (Section 10, Figure 17), which forces the drive input bridge rectifier devices (e.g., diodes or SCRs) to conduct over a longer time period at a lower peak value, thus reducing the harmonics produced at the input. The performance on 6-pulse AC PWM drives reduces the Ithd to around 5-8%, irrespective of whether the drive has AC line or DC bus reactors.

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Section

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Mitigation of Harmonics

FIGURE 16 Typical Wide Spectrum Filter Connection Diagram – AC PWM Drive

FIGURE 17 Trapezoidal Output Voltage from Wide Spectrum Filter

Filter output voltage

The effect of the wide spectrum filter on the 200 HP/150 kW AC PWM drive (Section 10, Figure 15) is to reduce the Ithd from 39.9% to 4.6%, as illustrated below in Section 10, Figure 18. The wide spectrum filter can be applied to AC drives, DC drives with fully controlled SCR input bridges and UPS systems.

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Section

10

Mitigation of Harmonics

FIGURE 18 Mains Waveform with Wide Spectrum Filter – Ithd = 4.6%

A typical example of a the performance of a wide spectrum filter and a 350 HP, 480 V, 60 Hz AC PWM drive is shown in Section 10, Figure 19, below. The drive has a standard 3% AC line reactor and has an Ithd of 33.81%. With a wide spectrum filter connected in series, the Ithd reduces to 3.48%.

FIGURE 19 Typical Wide Spectrum Filter Performance 350 HP AC PWM Drive with 3% AC Line Reactance
Without Filter Ithd is 33.28%. With Filter Ithd is 3.48%. 350HP VFDVFD without/with filterfilter 350HP without/with Lineator
35 30 25 20 Ithd (%) 15 10 5 0

Lineator Without filter Lineator With filter

5

11

41

17

29

23

35

Harmonic

ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006

47

159

Section

10

Mitigation of Harmonics

Wide spectrum filters are available in a range up to around 3000 HP/2250 kW and can be applied to multiple drives on the basis that the rating (in HP/kW) is a sum of all the connected drives. However, no fixed speed induction motors or other non-drive load should be connected to a wide spectrum filter, due to trapezoidal nature of output voltage. Typical applications in the marine and offshore sectors are drives with power ratings of less than 2.5 MW, for main propulsion, thrusters, cableship winches, compressors, fan and pump drives, etc. Wide spectrum filters can be retrofitted to existing drives without the need for drive modifications, whether for single drive or for multiple drive applications. Wide spectrum filters may be developed for systems with voltages above 1 KV and with higher power ratings (above 2.5 MW) for those applications with 6-pulse AC drives in systems with voltages above 1 KV.
Note: For 12-pulse drives and other loads, a variant of the wide spectrum filter is available. As can be seen from Section 10, Figure 20, below, a wide spectrum filter is inserted in the primary of the phase shift transformer and results in an Ithd of around 3-4%, similar to that expected from a 24-pulse drive, but without the susceptibility to performance degradation due to voltage unbalance and background voltage distortion normally associated with phase shift drives. The unit is around 30-35% the physical size of a standard 6-pulse wide spectrum filter.

FIGURE 20 Wide Spectrum Filter with 12-Pulse AC Drive

FILTER

The 12-pulse variants may be useful, perhaps as retrofits, in applications where the use of single or multiple 12-pulse drives and/or other equipment are insufficient to guarantee compliance with harmonic recommendations, rules or standards or where levels of voltage distortion are proving troublesome.

7.2

Duplex Reactors
Duplex reactors originated in Europe in the 1930s and have been used on a number of vessels since the mid 1980s, mainly for mitigation of the harmonics produced by main propulsion drives and also with shaft generators to minimize the distortion of the voltage supplied to the ship’s busbar system. Duplex reactors have two galvanically separated but tightly magnetically coupled coils (Section 10, Figure 21). The primary coil is connected similarly to that when using standard reactors (i.e., in series with the load). The secondary coil is connected to the primary coil using an anti-parallel connection so that a corrective voltage is induced which, when “added” to the primary distorted voltage, produces a clean compensated voltage, as illustrated in Section 10, Figures 22a, 22b and 22c.

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ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006

2006 161 . FIGURE 22a System Voltage Waveform ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . and therefore. the voltage distortion on this side of reactor will increase accordingly (if XG″ = XD1 = XD2). as shown in Section 10.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics FIGURE 21 Duplex Reactor Schematic The generator XG should be determined from short circuit calculations. being 50% of that if it were connected directly to the generator(s). Figure 21. This results in the system impedance being doubled in value. The addition of the duplex reactor into the system results in the short circuit capacity in “Subsystem 1”. The inductance of the duplex reactor is designed to be equal to the subtransient reactance (Xd″) of the generator(s).

Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics FIGURE 22b Duplex Reactor Correction Voltage FIGURE 22c “Corrected” System Voltage Section 10. applied instead of standard AC line or “commutating” reactors for the mitigation of inrush voltage during the commutation of SCR based drive current (in this instance. The accuracy and quality of the correction voltage is dependent on a number of factors. as can be seen from Section 10. the optimum condition was with two generators running. Figure 23 illustrates a typical application of duplex reactors. As the reactance at the generators is dependent on the rating and number of generators on line. it is necessary to either have some means of switching the ratio of turns on the duplex reactor or to base optimization on one operational condition with a given number of generators on line. For the system illustrated in Section 10 Figure 23. The optimum ratio of the winding turns on the duplex reactor results from the ratio of the subtransient reactance (Xd″) of the generator(s) to the primary reactance of duplex reactor. on a research vessel with two DC SCR main propulsion drives). 2006 . Figure 24. 162 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

note the differentiation of the “distorted bus”. fed via the secondary windings of the duplex reactors.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics In Section 10. fed via the primary windings of the reactors which are connected to the DC converters. FIGURE 23 Application of Duplex Reactors on Main Propulsion Drives FIGURE 24 Variation of System Vthd with Number of Generators on Line (Figure 23) ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Figure 23. 2006 163 . and the “clean bus” (which may contain “distortion” due to the reduced fault rating).

Therefore. a configuration is needed such that the reactors are closely coupled to the generators. any voltage distortion due to the nonlinear load connected to the general service bus will be slightly higher than without the diplex reactors. the voltage distortion (Vthd) in the general service bus will not unduly affected by the propulsion load.) The prospective short circuit current in the general service bus will be reduced to 33% of that without the duplex reactors in the circuit. as illustrated in Section 10. FIGURE 25 Duplex Reactors on Passenger Ships with 2 × 20 MW Cycloconverters The important points of the configuration in Section 10. for the duplex reactor performance to be as independent as possible from the number of generators in service. (The 2. As a consequence. the generator voltage regulators both maintain general service bus voltages constant and the variation in voltage between both the propulsion and general service buses within tolerable limits. However. 2006 . ii) 164 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . as the branch for supply of the propulsion bus carries higher load current than the general service bus. Some recent passenger ships with full electric propulsion based on cycloconverter drives have this configuration of duplex reactors. and hence the number of generators on line at any one time. Figure 25. However. With reference to Section 10. not a reflection the propulsion load voltage distortion. the number of turns on the propulsion branch of the duplex reactor is 50% of that on the general service branch. Figure 25. there is a small variation in the voltages on the two systems.7% Vthd measured on the general service bus was largely attributed to the nonlinear loads connected to the service bus. Figure 25 are: i) According to actual measurements performed on one of these passenger vessels (with 2 × 20 MVA cycloconverter drives) on differing numbers of generators operating.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics The performance of duplex reactors depends upon the system subtransient reactance.

duplex reactors are now applied to shaft generators where they can reduce the Vthd of the voltage supplied to the ship’s busbars to <8% (Section 10. large fixed speed AC squirrel cage motors may have an increased voltage dip and reduced torque at start-up. This will have to be taken into account in generator design(s). The voltage distortion. on power systems with duplex reactors. This example needed two duplex reactors and optimization would have to be designed for the parallel operation of two generators. as mentioned above. below. Therefore any disturbances. and therefore.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics iii) The prospective short current in the propulsion bus will be reduced to 66% of that apparent without duplex reactors. FIGURE 26 Application of Duplex Reactors on Shaft Generators Diode Input Rectifier GTO Short Circuit Protection SCR Inverter Bridge Fuse Duplex Reactor Protection Synchronous Compensator Syn Comp Shaft Generator SG Ship's Busbars Power systems with multiple converter loads can utilize duplex reactors as illustrated in Section 10. It should be noted that the generators supplying systems with duplex reactors are subjected to higher levels of distortion due to reduction in fault rating. The general bus and propulsion bus are effectively isolated. Figure 27. will not be reflected on the general service bus. iv) As mentioned previously. In addition. The development and application of duplex reactors may not yet have reached their full potential. Figure 26). transient or continuous. and performance. only partial performance would be achieved. Vthd on the propulsion bus will therefore be around 33% higher than without duplex reactors installed. their use may not be as straightforward or as well-understood as other technologies. Special design and/or precautions will be necessary to minimize these effects. it has to be stated that for other than two-generator operation. Duplex reactors have to be encompassed in the design of the vessel at an early stage and retrofitting may be difficult. However. 2006 165 . ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . including any short circuit effects emanating from the propulsion bus. The application of duplex reactors is often a compromise between economics.

... and therefore............... At series resonance......................................... the resistance...................... which is generally low..... is calculated thus: Q= where Q Xr R 166 Xr .... which determines the “sharpness” of the “tuning” of the passive filter.......................... Their operation relies on the “resonance phenomenon” which occurs due to variations in frequency in inductors and capacitors..... comprising inductors..... capacitors and occasionally resistors have been utilized for harmonic mitigation for many years...................e..................... (10.....................8) where Z f L = = = impedance supply frequency inductance Therefore the impedance of an inductor increases with frequency.............. (10............ quality factor)...............Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics FIGURE 27 Application of Duplex Reactors Vessel with Multiple AC SCR Based Drives 8 Passive L-C Filters Passive L-C filters............... The circuit “Q” (i............10) R = = = quality factor (usually in the range of 20 to 100) reactance at resonance resistance in circuit ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ....... 2006 .......... Z= where C 1 2πfC = for a capacitor ......................... the impedance of an inductor (XL) and capacitive reactance (XC) of the capacitor are equal.... is the only impedance in the circuit........................ (10..9) capacitance The impedance of a capacitor decreases with frequency. (see Section 9 for further information) which is: Z = 2πfL for an inductor............

.......................................... Therefore.. for a parallel resonant circuit........... Henrys.................Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics The resonant frequency for a series resonant circuit. Section 10.. are “tuned” to offer very low impedance to the harmonic frequency to be mitigated (Section 10................ Figure 28 shows the tuned characteristics of 7th harmonic filter).................... the formula above can be modified as follows for parallel resonance: f0 = where LF CF = filter inductance inductance on busbars filter capacitance LSource = = 1 (2π (L F + LSource ) ⋅ C F ) ...... Figure 28............ can be given as: f0 = where f0 L C = = = resonant frequency.... illustrates absolute impedance for a 7th harmonic tuned filter over a range of frequencies....... Farads (2π 1 L⋅C ) .. usually connected in parallel with nonlinear load(s).. (10.. However........ and in theory. Hz filter inductance. below........ the inductance of the source has to be taken into account due to the production of parallel resonance at a frequency lower than that for series resonance (perhaps causing power system positive feedback and also resulting in the misfire of power devices............. for example)...................... filter capacitance...11) The series passive filters.. such as SCRs.... (10.... 2006 167 ......12) FIGURE 28 Absolute Impedance Characteristics for Tuned 7th Harmonic Series Filter ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ...

passive filter performance is poor. Figure 30. In practical use. above the 13th harmonic. often with additional 7th tuned filters. including possible 11th and 13th can also be applied. FIGURE 30 Simplified Connection of Multi-limbed Passive Filter 168 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Figure 31). 2006 . Other multi-limbed filters. shows the impedance characteristic for a multi-limbed filter with four discrete limbs tuned to the 5th (300 Hz). 11th (660 Hz) and 13th (780 Hz) harmonics depicted in Section 10. However. with the “single tuned” filter being one of the most common. 7th (420 Hz). below. FIGURE 29 Common Configuration of Passive Filters Section 10. Note the respective parallel resonance for each filter below the series resonant points (these have been highlighted for the 11th harmonic in the example given). and they are rarely applied on higher-order harmonics. 5th tuned filters. Figure 29.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics There are a number of common passive filter configurations which are depicted in Section 10. are the most common configuration.

. The parallel resonance frequencies can.5th (for 11th harmonic) and 12. The passive resonance shown in Section 10.7th (for 5th harmonic). 2006 169 . as the capacitor ages and/or if subject to higher temperatures. This practice is called “dampening”. such as not to coincide with a major characteristic harmonic frequency.6th (for 7th harmonic). They do attract harmonics from other sources (i. and this must be taken into account in their design. shifted) by careful design of the Q factor (via the sharpness of the tuning) or by connecting resistance in parallel with the filter reactors.e..4th (for 13th harmonic). however.. as illustrated in Section 10. A reduction in the Q factor has only a minor effect. 6.e. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Figure 30. above). from downstream of the PCC). Typical values for each limb would be 4. Figure 31 could be problematic. as the high impedances could result in additional voltage distortion of the respective harmonic currents at those frequencies. Harmonic and power system studies are usually undertaken to calculate their effectiveness and to explore possibility of resonance in a power system due to their proposed use. Dampening reduces the “sharpness” at the tuned frequency and increases the bandwidth of the filter. be modified (i. “drive applied” (or “trap”) filters are available. the capacitance decreases. the addition of resistance in parallel with the reactor is often preferred. 10. and therefore. increasing the reactance and thereby increasing the tuned filter’s resonant frequency). as it can achieve the necessary damping with relatively low fundamental losses compared to Q factor control. Passive filters are susceptible to changes in source and load impedances. but at increased cost and reduced filter harmonic reduction performance.e. In order to address the problems above for specific applications. Figure 32.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics FIGURE 31 Impedance Characteristics of Multi-limbed Passive Filter In the example (Section 10. the filter-tuned limbs would normally be tuned below the respective characteristic frequencies to prevent possible overloading and to compensate for the variation in capacitance over time due to the degradation of the capacitor dielectric (i. below.

The 5% reactor serves two functions: i) ii) It effectively isolates the passive filter from the source (and any pre-existing voltage distortion) and reduces the possibility of overloading due to downstream harmonics. They are often more suited to “dedicated systems” where the usually large. 170 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . as most generators cannot support any more than around 20% leading kVAr due to the potential of “armature reaction” and resultant over-excitation and AVR (automatic voltage regulator) instability. and especially at light load. the passive filter “leading” kVAr is impressed on the source. the source impedances will most probably differ. Tuned passive filters perform best a rated load with around 14-18% Ithd. frequency variations of ±5% are common and would have an adverse impact on the performance of tuned passive filters. a reactor (typically 5% reactance) is connected between the tuned passive filter and the source (reducing the supply voltage accordingly). this can be a significant issue. An example may be a passive filter for a bank of winch drives on a cableship. Also. this may not be problematic. filter performance would suffer. The design of the filter is based on that one vessel – if the drives and filter (often containerized) were moved to another vessel. passive filters normally need in-depth studies to assess their suitability. usually achievable from a well-engineered 5th and 7th limbed filter. In marine and offshore applications. such as main electric propulsion drives and their associated power generation.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics FIGURE 32 Simplified “Drive Applied” or “Trap” Filter for Variable Speed Drives As can be seen above. if the source impedance were to change. On marine power systems. as alluded to above. nonlinear loads. At lesser loads. 2006 . Similarly. It further reduces the harmonic current spectrum on the source side. On industrial applications and utility supplies. It may be possible for “trap filters” to be applied to drive applications irrespective of source impedance and possibility of system resonance. are discrete from other loads. but if connected to marine generators. design of passive filters is more complicated on generators due to increased frequency variations.

.... Similarly. Figure 31 (which has two 6-pulse converters) the necessary phase shift is: Phase Shift = 60 = 30° 2 Similarly... in degrees... Pulse configurations up to 48-pulse are possible for very large systems.. 47.. 17th and 19th harmonic are not listed. primary side) of the phase shift transformer. (10. hence the term “multi-pulse drives”.. In general terms.. In the marine and offshore environment... as depicted in Section 10... etc.. 12-pulse systems were still relatively common.. 37. of Pulses = 6 × No.... (10.... the characteristic harmonics will be 17... especially on larger or multiple loads. In theory. 25. an 18-pulse system having three converters would need a 20 degrees phase shift. The technique of “phase shifting” the harmonic currents produced by one converter against those produced by another is also termed “multi-pulsing”. a standard three-phase drive with one input converter is known as a “6-pulse” drive (the number of pulses relates to the number of pulses on the DC side of the rectifier): No.. below. 7th..... in the 12-pulse drive system illustrated in Section 10. for example has two input rectifiers...... as determined by the number of converter bridges in the system. Figure 33.13) If a drive.... For example. 35.. Therefore...... there are two main types of phase shift transformer used for drive harmonic mitigation: i) ii) Double-wound isolating transformer Polygonal non-isolating autotransformer ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . the higher the pulse number. 12-pulse systems were the most common configuration.. certain harmonics..... are eliminated at the input (i.... Historically........ 12pulse systems are still used in other parts of the world. 13.. the characteristic harmonic currents will be 11..... of 6-pulse input rectifiers in converter .. 19. These are theoretically cancelled in a 12-pulse system where the lowest harmonic is now the 11th.. but they are becoming less common due to the introduction of harmonic recommendations in an increasing number of countries....Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics 9 Transformer Phase Shifting (Multi-pulsing) For drives supplying 400 HP/300 kW motors (or larger) and other large nonlinear equipment.... the more the lower order harmonics will be theoretically cancelled.... 49... It will be noted that the 5th.. 37.. 35. but it is now recognized that they have increasing difficulty complying with current harmonic recommendations. 2006 171 ... In addition to reducing the line side harmonics... in an 18-pulse system.14) Number of converters For example.. connected such that the harmonics produced by one bridge(s) cancels certain harmonics produced by other(s)..... it is known as a “12-pulse drive”..... etc.. The theoretical cancellation of certain harmonic current is dependent on the “pulse number” based on the format.. multiple input converter bridges are necessary.. The number of discrete converters in a system determines the “pulse number”.. 18-pulse systems have become common in North America due to the requirements of IEEE 519 (1992)....... in a 12-pulse system. necessary is also a function of the number of converters employed: Phase Shift° = 60 .... Similarly.... “phase shifting” techniques have been commonly employed to reduce the input harmonic currents. phase shifting also reduces the voltage ripple on the DC side of the rectifier(s). As can therefore be seen...e. however. The amount of phase shift. as known: Pulse Number ± 1 Therefore... but in recent years. with three input rectifiers it becomes an “18-pulse drive”. 23.

the transformer should be designed with a relatively low value for secondary voltage unbalance (for example. Section 10. AC interbridge reactors can also be used. the transformer leakage impedance should be relatively high. a small increase in unbalance can result in significant increases in the 5th and 7th harmonics at the primary side of the phase shift transformer.4% Completely balanced phase group impedances Rectified voltage drops are completely balanced The interbridge reactor was dimensioned to limit the p-p current between bridges to 15% rated DC current There will always be some impedance unbalance. whether in the voltage supply or through inaccuracies or tolerances during manufacturing of the transformer and/or the rectifiers. In order to reduce the effects of unbalance in the secondary windings and rectifiers. an “interbridge reactor”. a DC bus and an inverter bridge. FIGURE 33 12-Pulse AC PWM Drive with Double-wound Phase Shift Transformer All phase shift systems. and is based on the following conditions: • • • • • Transformer leakage impedance of ~ 5% Supply impedance is 1.1 Double-wound Isolating Transformer Phase Shift Systems The drive system depicted below (Section 10. irrespective of pulse number.3%) to allow for other practical unbalances (e. In order to provide as near to specified performance. which will lead to an increase in the theoretical level of harmonics. around 0. with 5% being typical. that the circuit is carefully balanced and 120-degree conduction is forced in each of the rectifier bridges through the use of the DC interbridge reactor. 172 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Figure 34 illustrates the effect of minor unbalance (<1. Figure 33) comprises a double-wound isolating transformer with 30 degrees phase shift between the star and delta secondary windings.. from rectifiers). This configuration provides for optimum cancellation of the 5th and 7th harmonic. Note: As can be seen from Section 10. however. below. Figure 33.5%) on performance of the double-wound-based 12-pulse system shown in Section 10. two 6-pulse input bridges. Figure 34. providing. but due to the voltage drop across them.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics 9. 2006 . are susceptible to degradation in performance due to unbalance. DC reactors tend to be more common.g.

2006 173 .e. This can serve the purpose of a crude. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . A polygonal autotransformer is essentially a delta winding structure which permits the unbalancing 3rd harmonics to circulate.. The performance may not be as effective. but effective. thus attenuating the common mode and other conducted emissions. the double-wound isolating transformer provides galvanic isolation between input and output. as they can provide common mode noise attenuation (i. On vessels with IT power systems (i. In these applications. the results are higher than expected harmonic levels. diodes or SCRs). A well-designed 12-pulse drive system.e. as one side of the filter capacitors needs a connection to ground. Double-wound transformers tend to be common on marine applications. 9. with around 15-17% Ithd being typical for a 12-pulse system.e. therefore. based on a double-wound phase shift transformer can give a practical performance of around 10-12% Ithd based on ideal supply conditions in terms of background voltage distortion and voltage unbalance... between conductors and ground) via the use of copper shielding between windings. Note that on carefully designed systems. standard drive EMC or EMI filters cannot be used.2 Polygonal Non-isolating Autotransformer Phase Shift Systems For some marine and offshore applications an alternative to the double-wound transformer-based phase shift system is that based on the polygonal. the interbridge reactor may not be necessary. if balance is not achieved. insulated neutrals). poor bridge rectifier and transformer utilization and possible problems in rating the bridge electronic devices (i. if a ground fault appeared on the system. EMI filter for the drive.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics FIGURE 34 Double-wound 12-Pulse Phase Shift Transformer Unbalance Between Secondary Voltages Double-wound transformers need an accurately design system and increased leakage reactance. Figure 35. The capacitors would be damaged. non-isolating autotransformer. A typical 12-pulse drive system based on a polygonal autotransformer is shown in Section 10. below. However.

Figure 36 and is based on the following conditions: • • • • • • Transformer impedance of ~ 1%. The rectifier voltage drops are completely balanced. The drive is operating at rated load. Both interbridge reactors are approximately six (6) times the value for a similar rating of drive with double-wound transformer.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics FIGURE 35 12-Pulse AC PWM Drive with Polygonal Autotransformer The 12-pulse polygonal autotransformer above provides ±15° phase shift relative to the input and thereby 30° between the two bridge rectifiers. 174 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Two large interbridge reactors are necessary in this configuration in order to: i) ii) iii) Attenuate the significant amounts of 3rd harmonics. Additional AC line reactance of up to 2% is present. The impedances per phase group are completely balanced. 2006 . which would otherwise flow between bridge rectifiers Force the bridge rectifiers to appear as balanced loads to each of the two three-phase groups of the polygonal autotransformer Maintain a relatively-balanced utilization of the rectifier The performance of a typical polygonal autotransformer-based 12-pulse drive system is shown in Section 10.

As can be seen with the example. the performance at 100% load is reduced to around 21% Ithd. However. This level of performance is maintained down to below 15% load. no supply is completely balanced. with distortion significantly increased. Figure 37. However. AC Reactance for a 12-Pulse AC PWM Drive with Polygonal Autotransformer As can be seen from above. the Ithd at rated load is around 5. Figure 38 illustrates the effect on the performance of a typical 18-pulse (20-degree phase shift) system. when 2% unbalance is introduced. This unbalance may be due to manufacturing tolerances in the transformers and/or the rectifiers. At reduced load. unbalance does have a detrimental effect of the performance of phase shift transformers. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . on a balanced system. as shown in Section 10. the performance is markedly poorer. the performance of polygonal autotransformers is not as effective as that offered by double-wound transformers. In North America.6%. unbalanced voltages between 1-3% readily exist in many power systems. 2006 175 . 9. irrespective of pulse number. but may be sufficient for many applications.3 The Effect of Voltage Unbalance on Phase Shift Performance As mentioned earlier. Section 10. impacting on the performance of the phase shifting scheme.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics FIGURE 36 Variation on Harmonic Currents vs.

Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics FIGURE 37 Typical 18-Pulse Drive System FIGURE 38 Effect of 2% Unbalance on 18-Pulse Drive 176 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006 .

dynamically positioned drillships.g. with 5% background distortion. with a number of instances recorded where the background Vthd was in excess of 20%. on drilling rigs.4 The Effect of Background Voltage Distortion on Phase Shift Performance The presence of “pre-existing” or “background” voltage distortion also significantly affects the performance of phase shifting systems. separate mitigation may have to be considered for retrofitting to other nonlinear equipment in order to reduce the overall voltage distortion such that any installed phase shift systems can operate more effectively. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . the performance diminishes to around 15% Ithd at rated load and 23% Ithd at 50% load. The performance of phase shift-based drive systems.. etc. therefore. has to be carefully considered. It should be noted that background voltage distortion on some classes of existing ships and offshore installations may be excess on 10%. However. Section 10.). In such applications. FIGURE 39 Effect of Background Voltage Distortion on an 18-Pulse Drive As illustrated above. This may be the case where full electric propulsion has been installed on a common bus system or where the majority of the electrical load is nonlinear (e. using background voltage distortion values up to 5%. the performance is largely unaffected on background distortion up to 2% Vthd at rated load and up to 1% Vthd at 50% load. 2006 177 . Figure 39 shows the degradation of performance of a similar 18-pulse to that described above. if the necessary level of mitigation is to be achieved under high levels of background distortion.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics 9. beyond these levels. respectively.

. 2006 . below. However. ideally of similar or identical ratings.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics 10 Transformer Phase Staggering (Quasi Multi-pulse) Systems A derivation of “phase shifting” is “phase staggering”. as illustrated in this example. which can be fed from different phase shift transformers. albeit with slightly less performance than it would have had if all the loads were balanced. a minimum of four drives are necessary. FIGURE 40 Quasi-24-Pulse System Using Phase Staggering Techniques 178 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . This technique can be used when there are multiple loads. The degree of phase shift per transformer is dependent on the number of discrete loads and the desired overall pulse number (e. a “quasi-18. there may not be an ideal load profile.g. depicts a system comprising 4 × 132 kW AC PWM drives fed from an 1800 kVA transformer with 6% impedance. Figure 40. as in many practical applications. Section 10. To facilitate the “quasi-24-pulse system”.or 24-pulse system”) necessary. all the loads should be of identical ratings. In this case. it can still be feasible to construct a quasi-24-pulse system (or any other pulse number based on a phase staggering based scheme). For optimum performance.

Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics As can be seen from Section 10.6% 0.7% 40. non-isolating autotransformers were used in this example. prone to performance degradation due to voltage unbalance and background voltage distortion as are conventional drive dedicated phase shift transformers. galvanic isolation (normally a stipulation when EMI/EMC attenuation is necessary for the drives or other loads in a marine or offshore environment). TABLE 1 Estimated Harmonic Current Distortion Using Quasi-24-Pulse Phase Staggering System Harmonic 5 7 11 13 17 19 23 25 Ithd Note: 6-pulse 36.7% 27. Both double-wound and polygonal autotransformers can be used to construct phase staggering schemes.6% 13% 8% 3% 4% 1.63% 2.3% 2. as shown in Section 10.e. 3 has a 15-degree phase shift transformer connected.6% 1. Drive No. It is.6% 0. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 1) has a 1:1 (i.6% 13% 8% 3% 4% 1.3% 2.9% 9.2% 4.6% 2.6% 0.7% 8. electronic power factor correction)..5% 1.9% 3 drives 12. phase shifted inputs of similar pulse number. the calculations were based on ALL drives having similar loading.8% 2..5% when all four drives are operating at rated load.3% 2.1% 2 drives 25.2% 1. This combination of phase shifting results in the Ithd reducing to 8. and 20% residual for phase angle diversity.7% 40. as has Drive No. but offer lower levels of performance with no galvanic isolation. Figure 40. Double-wound tend to be larger.8% 1. 2006 179 . hence the slightly lower performance than may have been expected with regard to the use of double-wound transformers. Table 1. but offer better mitigation performance.5% 1.7% 1% 1.5% 1. 4. 11 11. and therefore balanced.5% Polygonal.5% 4 drives 7. active filters do not present potential resonance to the network and are unaffected to changes in source impedance. and also importantly.5% 1.8% 2. phase staggering is an effective method of reducing the harmonic currents from a number of drives and other nonlinear loads to within the necessary limits.1 Electronic Filters Active Filters Active filters have been available since the late 1990s and are now relatively common in industrial applications for both harmonic mitigation and reactive power compensation (i. Nevertheless.e. Also. Polygonal autotransformers are smaller. Unlike passive L-C filters. however.7% 13. please note that in the table above. and therefore will not be as common on marine and offshore installations.3% 0.1% 1 drive 36. Drive No.4% 2. no voltage transformation) transformer connected with 30 degrees phase shift between primary and secondary windings. Phase staggering can offer good harmonic mitigation performance. one 132 kW drive (No.8% 0.5% 1. 2 is fed directly from the busbars of the switchboard. Phase staggering is not as effective in reducing harmonic currents as individual drives with multi-pulse.

...... ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ... Figure 41.... The remaining signal is a measure of the “distortion current” (i... due to the filter’s low impedance (<1% Z)...... below) are the common configuration of active filter.15) where IS IL IF = = = source current (fundamental) nonlinear load current active filter current (harmonic) FIGURE 41 Block Diagram of Shunt Connection Active Filter with Associated Current Waveforms With reference to Section 10.... Figure 41..... Note: The active filter should be dimensioned in terms of “harmonic cancellation current” based on the actual nonlinear currents drawn with the filter in circuit [i.. where the fundamental component is removed..... there are three currents in the circuit: IS = IL – LF .... 10-15% higher current is typical for three-phase loads]..e.................Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics Shunt-connected active filters (i.. 2006 180 . This signal is then fed into the control system which generates the respective IGBT firing patterns necessary in order to replicate and amplify the “distortion current” (now termed the “compensation current”).... Less common series-connected types are available..............e.... The reference voltage derived from the CTs is fed into a notch filter or similar circuit...... 180° displayed) to compensate for the harmonic current........... the active filter measures the wave shape of the nonlinear load current waveform via current transformers (CTs) in the line.. the nonlinear loads will draw more harmonic current than without the filter in the circuit... parallel with the nonlinear load.... the actual number of which varies according to the manufacturer.. Figure 41.. As can be seen in Section 10............ (10. the load current less the fundamental current)... as shown in Section 10......e.. which is injected into the load in anti-phase (i....e........

a 3% AC line reactor between the point of connection of the active filter and the nonlinear load is normally sufficient to prevent any adverse interaction and to reduce the harmonic current magnitude. The DC bus is used as an energy storage unit.. The pre-charge resistors and associated contactor attenuate the DC bus inrush current during initial power-up. between phases)]. as shown in Section 10. In these applications.. The electromagnetic interference (EMI) and carrier filters are passive L-C networks.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics When rated correctly in terms of “harmonic compensation current”. The DC bus is continually recharged via the IGBT package diodes. reduce the inrush current to the DC bus capacitors during initial power-up).e. ~5 kHz to 20 MHz depending on the rating of the active filter – on higher ratings (>300 A) the switching frequency is usually reduced to minimize device power losses). [This is a technique also used in AC variable frequency drives via either pre-charge (or ‘soft start’) resistors. mainly used in smaller HP/kW drives. illustrates a typical power circuit schematic of a shunt-connected active filter. The IGBT bridge generates a current wave shape for the harmonic compensation based on the “distortion current” signal derived from the CTs and notch filter or similar circuit.e. Figure 42.. 50 Hz or 60 Hz component). thereby maximizing the life of the capacitors. The EMI filter provides common mode filtering [i. The pre-charge contactor and pre-charge resistor are used to “soft start” the DC bus (i. an uprated EMI filter or additional electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) filter is usually necessary in order to comply with the EU EMC Directive regarding limits of EMI emissions in the range 150 kHz to 30 MHz. below. Figure 42.e.. FIGURE 42 Simplified Power Circuit of Active Filter The “carrier filter” attenuates the IGBT bridge carrier frequency (i. However. Section 10. The IGBT bridge and DC bus architecture are similar to that seen in AC PWM drives. the active filter provides the nonlinear load with the harmonic current it needs to function while the source provides only the fundamental current (i. On European Union (EU) applications. 2006 181 .. half controlled diode/SCR pre-charge input bridges (i.e. Section 10.e. or via 6-pulse. The input bridge rectifier acts as diode bridge rectifier during normal operation]. some leakage may be apparent which can adversely affect snubber components on SCR front end based drives and other equipment. after carrier frequency filtering.e. between all phases and ground (earth) and a measure of differential mode filtering (i.. Figure 43 illustrates a typical current waveform for a 6-pulse AC PWM drive: ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . this is to provide voltage control from power-up to full conduction when DC bus is charged).

below: FIGURE 44 Active Filter “Compensation Current” Waveform (Lf) as per Figure 41 The corrected source current is shown below in Section 10.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics FIGURE 43 Typical AC PWM Drive Input Current Waveform (LL) as per Figure 41 The active filter “compensation current” is illustrated in Section 10. 2006 . Figure 44. Figure 45: FIGURE 45 Source Current Waveform (LS) as per Figure 41 182 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

e. To assist in the reduction of the magnitude of the harmonic current. This may not be of concern on “stiff” shore-side utility supplies. Ithd is 35. the Ithd is reduced to 3.28%. Most active filters cannot operate on high levels of voltage background distortion (>8-10%). The nonlinear load is an AC PWM drive with 3% AC line reactor. due to damage to capacitive elements in the filter input. However. For example. With the active filter operating.87%.. it is not usually possible to control the reactive current. Active Filter Performance 35% 30% 25% Ithd 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 11 35 3 7 15 19 23 27 31 39 43 Harmonic 47 AF OFF AF ON Active filters compensate for harmonic currents and provide reactive power compensation (i. many active filters regularly operate intermittently at maximum output current levels without any known problems. Failing to do so may result in the active filter being “saturated” prematurely (i. Without the active filter in the circuit. 2006 183 . based on the currents actual drawn with the filter in circuit. Ithd is 3. However. below. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . the Ithd is 35.28%. electronic power factor correction). Figure 46. on older analog control system designs.. it is possible that uncontrolled reactive current up to almost the maximum capacity of the active filter can be imposed on the source. The AC line reactor also serves to provide protection to SCR front end-based drives from the active filter carrier frequency.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics Section 10. AC line reactors of least 3% should be connected between the filter and load(s). With Active Filter. illustrates typical performance of a correctly rated active filter. This may be problematic. FIGURE 46 Typical Active Filter Performance with 150 HP AC PWM with 3% AC Line Reactor Without Active Filter. but may well be problematic on “soft” marine and offshore generator-derived voltage supplies. on power systems where the nonlinear load has been switched off or the load is at low levels.67%. The rating of an active filter should be based on the load current drawn with the active filter connected. with any additional harmonic current spilling over into the mains as “distortion current” and raising the source side voltage distortion. On digitally controlled filters. as detailed above. the amount of each can be selected via the user interface keypad. current limited at its maximum rating). The active filters should be rated in terms of “harmonic cancellation current”.e.

and thereby a 2nd harmonic current......... LV active filters can inject into the supply via interposing transformers with a small loss in performance at higher frequencies.... whose amplitude is dependent on the DC bus capacitance....... They can be connected to any nonlinear load or point of common coupling (PCC).. 184 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .e.. Calculate the available reactive current if the injected harmonic current is 220 A. but have been known to be susceptible to voltage unbalance on the source side of the connection.... Unlike the filter described in this Section.... but published research work suggests the unbalanced voltages can generate a 2nd harmonic voltage in the DC bus..... 2006 . the “supply voltage signals” (i.. but cannot eliminate it completely. Therefore. those necessary for control and protection purposed) should be filtered.. Please note that little research has been undertaken with regards to the performance of active filter under unbalance conditions. in the presence of high levels of background voltage distortion. in addition to damaging the capacitive elements in the active filter input...g.. also interfere with the generation of reference and other signals. Note: Some active filters treat only up to the 25th harmonic... reducing its harmonic compensation effectiveness.. These transformers have to be specifically designed based on the injection of harmonic currents at frequencies up to 2..........Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics The control of the amount of harmonic compensation current to reactive current on digital active filters is based on its rated capacity and is based on the following formula: IAF = where IAF Ih Ir = = = total output current of the active filter injected harmonic current of the filter injected reactive current 2 ( I h + I r2 ) ....... Ir = Ir = 2 ( I h + I r2 ) 2 2 ( I AF − I h ) (300 2 − 220 2 ) Ir = 204 A Active filters have the ability to compensate for any load-side current unbalances........ up to ten)......... Some impose limits on the maximum number treated up to the 50th (e. This 2nd harmonic can be reflected on the AC side of the filter as a 3rd harmonic.......16) Example An active filter is rated at 300 A.. Active filters are relatively simple to apply.... Performance depends on the control strategy adopted [“FFT” (selected characteristic harmonics)based or “broadband” (all nonlinear current)-based].....e...... Their effectiveness in reducing “line notching” due to fully controlled SCR drives and other similar equipment is dependent on the operating speed of the filter. which varies according to the manufacturer and/or the amount of commutating reactance in the line... For operation above 1 KV. >8-10% Vthd) may. the majority of active filters do not treat interharmonics... Excessive background voltage distortion (i....... (10.5 kHz or 3 kHz (50th harmonic based on 50 Hz and 60 Hz fundamentals)...... Active filters can usually reduce the notching........ IAF = Thus....

In return. tuned to the 5th and 7th harmonic. above. to provide harmonic cancellation for the 11th harmonic and above. 2006 185 . It is assumed that the passive filter. illustrates the maximum output currents per harmonic available from a typical “standard” shunt active filter.2 Hybrid Active-Passive Filters The application of hybrid passive-active filters may be considered as an alternative to the use of shunt active filters. although “self tuning” models are now becoming available.e.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics Active filters are complex products. For example: on installations needing large amounts of harmonic cancellation. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . the active filter only has to be rated. below.. the possibility of resonance in a power system and the effects on the performance of a passive filter should the load characteristic or source impedance change). 11. it is usually not possible using “standard” shunt active filters due to thermal considerations. removes the majority of those harmonics and. Figure 48. Figure 47. Also. and it may not be possible for them to be repaired by any party other than the manufacturer’s service engineers. depending on the application criteria. Active filters do offer good performance in the reduction of harmonics and the control of power factor. full commissioning by manufacturers is necessary to obtain optimum performance. Their use should be examined on a project-by-project basis. The use of passive filter elements is often seen as a means to reduce the current rating of the active filter while still retaining the benefits. FIGURE 47 Theoretical Shunt Passive-Active Hybrid Filter There is a misconception regarding the operation of hybrid shunt passive-active filters using “standard” industrial active filters as depicted in the example shown in Section 10. the connection of an active filter to a passive filter can eliminate the disadvantages of conventional passive filters (i. Figure 47. based on the filter’s rated current. Section 10. The schematic diagram for a shunt-connected hybrid passive-active filter is depicted in Section 10. and comprises an active filter and a passive L-C filter with 5th and 7th tuned harmonic limbs. below. However. therefore.

For similar rms current levels. it is not always possible to reduce the rating of a standard shunt active filter when operated with a passive filter. a 400 A active filter will have 400 A maximum current available for all harmonic currents from 2nd to the 50th harmonic. Figure 48) per harmonic is “prohibited”. Figure 48. the losses in the output devices. The larger rating of active filter will also have the same thermal constraints per harmonic current compensation. only 45% of the active filter current rating would be available to compensate from the 11th harmonic upwards without temperature limits being exceeded (which would be prevented by saturation). and sometimes exponentially. whether they are based on ‘broadband’ performance (i. which consists mainly of low order harmonics (e.). At higher order characteristic harmonic frequencies. with increases in frequency. The active filter will of course also mitigate any residual 5th and 7th harmonics not attenuated by the passive filter. usually IGBTs. For example. Based on the 5th and 7th harmonic currents being attenuated by the passive filter. inject all the non linear current components into the load) and/or ‘selective FFT’ (i. most notably that associated with 6-pulse drives and other nonlinear equipment. 7th. 17th and 19th etc. Based on the graph in Section 10. there are lower values of currents to mitigate. Figure 47. the active filter would current limit) to protect the IGBTs from damage due to over-temperature. as illustrated above. This is accomplished automatically with the active filter.g.. If the total harmonic current above the 11th is above 180 A. the power that devices have to be derated thermally as per Section 10. The majority of standard active filters. Figure 47. as depicted in Section 10. 11th and 13th tuned limbs. 186 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . increase significantly. 2006 51 15 19 23 27 35 39 43 47 . Similarly. are affected by these thermal constraints. only 180 A will be available from the active filter for remainder of the harmonic currents from the 11th upward.e. the available active filter current to mitigate from 15th harmonic upwards would be 33% rated capacity. 11th. if the passive filter contained 5th.e. Figure 48 and the circuit in Section 10.e. Therefore. 13th. Note: Most active filters are designed to mitigate typical harmonic spectrums.. as the active filter thermal protection circuitry would initiate “saturation” (i. 5th. a larger rating of active filter may be necessary. 7th. Therefore. they have the option of individual harmonic attenuation selection’).Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics FIGURE 48 Thermal Limits of Shunt Active per Harmonic Current Active Filter Thermal Limits 120 Percentage max output current 100 80 60 40 20 0 Thermal limits per harmonic 3 7 11 31 Harmonic Operation above the limits illustrated (Section 10. from the same graph.

therefore. 2006 187 . for example. above. depending on the application.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics Similarly. Therefore. attenuating the 5th and 7th harmonic. according to Section 10. Likely ratings may be 650 A. hybrid passive-active filter comprises an active filter connected in series with a passive filter having two tuned limbs for the 5th and 7th harmonic. then the necessary rating of active filter would be. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . the configuration of the example of custom designed. It could be argued. below) and some series-connected.45 Therefore an active filter of rated current of at least 623 A would be necessary. that the rating of the “standard” active filter cannot be reduced when used in conjunction with passive filter and that the larger active filter rating necessary for operation with the passive filter could in fact mitigate all the harmonics of the nonlinear load without the need for passive filtration. respectively. if a nonlinear load needed 280 A of mitigation after the 5th and 7th harmonics were attenuated by a passive filter. The residual 5th and 7th harmonic and the harmonic currents above the 7th would be compensated for by the active filter. connected in series to the passive filter via the coupling transformer imposes a voltage at the terminals at connection with the nonlinear load. The active filter and passive filter are connected via coupling transformers. 750 A or 800 A. which forces the harmonic currents to circulate through the passive filter. some shunt-connected (an example of which is illustrated in Section 10. Figure 48: IAF = 280 A = 623 A 0. it is important that manufacturers be consulted closely when considering the use of “standard” shunt active filters with a hybrid passive-active configuration. Figure 49. Figure 49. FIGURE 49 Practical Example of Hybrid Shunt Passive-Active Filter As can be seen in Section 10. The operation of the hybrid scheme is such that the active filter. Hybrid passive-active filters for installations with large nonlinear loads are often custom designed.

due to aging of components which would normally adversely affect operation). depending on the configuration. similar to that utilized in the construction of the output voltage waveform. are offered by a number of AC drive and UPS system companies in order to offer a low input harmonic footprint. 188 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . below. the input IGBT bridge synthesizes a sinusoidal input current waveform as shown in Section 10. Figure 50. Figure 51. an identical configuration to the output inverter bridge. also known as “sinusoidal input rectifiers”. As can be seen below. the passive filter kVAr at harmonic light load may be problematic on generator-derived supplies injecting leading reactive current into the source. the normal 6-pulse diode input bridge has been replaced by a fully controlled IGBT bridge. The DC bus and the IGBT output bridge architecture are similar to that in standard 6-pulse AC PWM drives with diode input bridges.. However. FIGURE 50 Application of an IGBT “Active Front End” to an AC PWM Drive Employing PWM (pulse width modulation) waveform control techniques. 2006 . By their nature hybrid passive-active filters are not as simple to apply as standard active filters. An example of the application of an “active front end” (AFE) to an AC PWM drive is shown in Section 10. the passive filter compensation characteristics while also maintaining that the passive filter operates independently of any variations in natural resonant frequencies or filter characteristics (e.g. 12 “Active Front Ends” for AC PWM Drives “Active front ends”.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics The active filter may improve.

possibly exciting parallel resonance. the operation of the input IGBT input bridge rectifier does significantly reduce low order harmonics compared to conventional AC PWM drives with 6-pulse diode bridges with a typical Ithd of 2-3% (<50th harmonic). although this may not always be practicable in many marine installations. according to the information below. depending of the magnitude and nature of this residual ripple. as illustrated in the schematic (Section 10. Compared to similarly-rated conventional 6-pulse AC PWM drives. Harmonics above the 50th may have an adverse effect on plant and equipment unless suitably mitigated). further filtering may be necessary. are well in excess of the Ithd for those harmonics below the 50th. and therefore. Therefore. Although a significant amount of the AC voltage ripple is attenuated. above the 50th. (It should be noted that only harmonics up to 50th are usually considered in harmonics calculations. 2006 189 . ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . below. Figure 50). they can also introduce significant high order harmonics. special precautions and installation techniques may be necessary when applying them. AFE drive have significantly higher conducted and radiated EMI emissions. above 20:1. However. In addition. In order to minimize the effect of the residual voltage ripple. as also illustrated below. for example. Figure 52. the action of IGBT switching introduces a pronounced “ripple” at carrier frequencies (~2-3 kHz) into the voltage waveform which must be attenuated by a combination of AC line reactors (which also serve as an energy store that allows the input IGBT rectifier to act as a boost regulator for the DC bus) and capacitors to form a passive inductance-capacitance-inductance filter (L-C-L filter).Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics FIGURE 51 ”Active Front End” Input Current and Voltage Waveforms As can be seen in Section 10. some residual may still appear on the system network. standard harmonic measurements and harmonic rules and recommendations. The Ithd of the harmonics above the 50th. the ratio of short circuit power to drive power should be as high as possible.

may have to be investigated.e. for example. Note the Harmonic Currents Above the 50th AFE drives are inherently “four quadrant” (i. The true power factor of AFE drive is high (approximately 0. and unlike SCR based drives. in the event of a power failure during regenerative braking commutation.98-1. will not result in fuse rupture.Section 10 Mitigation of Harmonics FIGURE 52 Typical Harmonic Current Input Spectrum for AC PWM Drive with an “Active Front End”.. 190 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006 . However. The reactive current is usually controllable via the drive interface keypad. the effect of severe regenerative braking on the generators. on main propulsion drives during emergency reversal. AFE AC drives offer high dynamic response and are relatively immune to voltage dips. they can drive and brake in both directions of rotation with any excess kinetic energy during braking regenerated to the supply).0).

the total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd) should not exceed 5%. such that the faultless operation. provided the equipment is designed to operate at the higher limits. higher levels of total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd) may be permissible. This method is generally not practical on power systems where propulsion loads. However.SECTION 11 Harmonic Limit Recommendations 1 General Systems In general systems. for all of the equipment connected to the system to be designed for an increased level of harmonic voltage distortion. where other ships service loads are supplied by a separate switchboard. 2 Dedicated Systems On dedicated systems. instrumentation errors) will not result. The range of harmonics to be taken into account should be up to the 50th harmonic. For example: Most of the large drives on a main 4160V switchboard may be rated for 12%. The range of harmonics to be taken into account should be up to the 50th harmonic. with any individual harmonic voltage distortion not exceeding 3% of the fundamental voltage value. then the system should be operated within this 10% limit. but the equipment supplied by one branch circuit off the 4160V switchboard may be rated for only 5%. 2006 191 . This increased limit of harmonic voltage distortion should be based on formal guarantees or formal declarations from equipment manufacturers. For example: when all of the equipment and consumers connected to the dedicated system are designed and rated for a total harmonic voltage distortion of 10%. there are too many different manufacturers and too many different branch circuits. then it may not be necessary to provide any further harmonic mitigation provided that immediate adverse effects of harmonics (e. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . if the harmonic limit recommendations are exceeded during those operating modes that do not occur frequently or those operating modes that will not last for an extended period. such as a dedicated propulsion switchboard. Further when the system is operated at the 10% limit. The harmonic limit recommendations would be applicable during all operating modes. in lieu of the general 5% limit. ship service loads and/or industrial loads are all supplied from a common power system. as measured at any point of common coupling (PCC). safety and long term reliability of all connected equipment can be demonstrated. Further. 3 Operating Modes All operating modes of the vessel and associated electrical power demands should be considered. Generally. the transformers to the 480V system may only be rated for 8% and the equipment supplied from the branch circuits off the 480V system may only be rated for 5%. the voltage distortions from each of the individual harmonics are to be within the ratings of all of the equipment and consumers connected to the dedicated system.g.

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2006 193 . 18-pulse drives.35% 23rd – 1.SECTION 12 Calculation of Harmonic Voltage Distortion The operation of both large individual and/or large cumulative nonlinear loads needs to be considered with regard to their impact on the power system voltage distortion and subsequent effect on other loads. However. examples of “simple” manual harmonic calculations are given. Harmonic spectrum to 25th is: 5th – 32. the effect of cables or other system inductance on the resultant harmonic currents and subsequent voltage distortion.g. only up to the 25th harmonic is used for simplicity in order to demonstrate the principles.21% 11th – 7. impedance (or Xd″) or short circuit capacity].) and include the effects of phase angle diversity.82% 25th – 1.27% 7th – 11. etc. These calculations are usually undertaken using dedicated harmonic estimation software which often have models of various types of nonlinear loads (e. The drive manufacturer has advised the characteristic harmonic currents to the 25th based on a 2% DC bus reactor on this transformer source to be as below..g. in order to appreciate the methodology of harmonic estimation software. 6-pulse drives with varying values of AC line and/or DC bus reactance. the calculations are exactly the same). the connection of linear loads and the effects of cables and other system inductances on the resultant harmonics at a point of common connection (PCC).51% ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 1 Manual Calculation of Voltage Distortion Simple voltage distortion calculations can be undertaken based on specific information being available regarding the nonlinear load(s) percentage harmonic currents and source data [e. Note: The harmonics up to the 50th should be used in all practical applications. Example 1 An 850 HP/630 kW 6-pulse AC PWM drive with full load input current of 962 A is to be supplied from a 2000 kVA 6000 V/480 V transformer with 6% impedance. In this instance.. these examples do not consider any harmonics above the 25th (the exact procedure can be used up to the 50th) nor the effects of phase angle diversification.91% 17th – 3. course kVA. For higher order harmonics. 12-pulse drives.45% 19th – 2. connected linear loads. Note: For simplicity.37% 13th – 3.

.... 32....e.g.......1 kA) iii) Short circuit MVA = = 1.......100 A (40...00692 Ω Once the above information has been established..................6) Voltage (L-L) per harmonic order = where h Ih = = harmonic order (i.. (12.............. (12....3) Short circuit current = 40..7) Vrms Xsupply = Harmonic voltage as a percentage of L-L rms voltage = where Vh = harmonic voltage at order........... in ohms harmonic current (A) at harmonic order........... 11th = 11…) supply reactance.....34 MVA iv) Supply reactance = V2 ...4) Short Circuit MVA 480 2 33.....5) where Irms Ih% = = total rms input current percentage harmonic current at harmonic order (e.. (12................ (12..... 2006 .................................................... (12.............................732 .............27% at 5th) 3 × h × Xsupply × Ih.1) = Transformer full load current (A) = 2406 A ii) Short circuit current = = Transformer full load current ...................... (12..34 × 10 6 = Supply reactance = 0............. h Vh × 100% .... 5th = 5.Section 12 Direct Calculation of Harmonic Voltage Distortion Calculate the source short circuit capacity and supply reactance on secondary of transformer: i) Transformer full load current (A) = Transformer kVA Secondary V × 3 2000 ×10 3 480 × 1................ the individual voltage per harmonic order can be calculated using the following method: Harmonic current per order = Irms × Ih% .......06 3 × V × Short Circuit Current ..............2) Transformer impedance 2406 0.... (12... h system L-L rms voltage Vrms = 194 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS ....732 × 480 × 40100 Short circuit MVA = 33.............

the following summary table can be constructed: TABLE 1 Summary of Harmonics to 25th Harmonic 5 7 11 13 17 19 23 25 Ih% 32.83 4.95 1.84 A 7th harmonic voltage (L-L) = 3 × h × Xsupply × Ih = 1.6 V 5th harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage = = Vh × 100% Vrms 108.41 1.88% Similarly for 7th harmonic: 7th harmonic current = Irms × Ih% = 962 × 0.2 22.61 17.71 1.60 9.84 70.732 × 7 × 0.1121 = 107.04 × 100% 480 7th harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage = 1.61 33.35 5.44 A 5th harmonic voltage (L-L) = 3 × h × Xsupply × Ih = 1.85 6.21 7.88 1.22 1.37 3.45 2.00692 × 107.91 3.6 × 100% 480 5th harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage = 3.51 14.04 9.91 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .3227 = 310.9 37.732 × 5 × 0.52 Vh (V) 18.88% Using the above method for all harmonics up to 25th.88 1.27 11.35 Vh% 3.35 1.00692 × 310.14 4.84 = 9.82 1.44 107.Section 12 Direct Calculation of Harmonic Voltage Distortion For 5th harmonic: 5th harmonic current = Irms × Ih% = 962 × 0.04 V 7th harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage = = Vh × 100% Vrms 9.01 0.76 5.44 = 18.51 Ih (A) 310. 2006 195 .

....27% 13th – 3.....88 2 + 1.... the total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd) can be calculated (based on Equation 2........732 Generator full load current (A) = 2406 A 196 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .88 2 + 1......93% 25th – 0. This is normal.. 6-pulse AC PWM is to be supplied by a generator of rating 2000 kVA and subtransient reactance (Xd″) of 16%.712 + 1.10) = 2000 ×10 3 480 × 1....8) 3.. as can be seen below.78% Calculate the source short circuit capacity and reactance of the generator: i) Generator full load current (A) = Generator kVA V× 3 ... Calculate the voltage distortion on the generator attributed to drive......6 in Section 2): Vthd = Vthd = ∑ Vh% 2 h =5 25 = % % V5% 2 + V7% 2 + V11 2 .. (12. + V25 2 ..912 Vthd = 5. The percentage harmonic current spectrum based on the generator connection is given below......................64 × 100% 480 = 2 2 2 2 v5 + v 7 + v11 . However........10 2 + 0...95 2 + 1.....55% 23rd – 0.....43% 17th – 1. as the harmonic currents drawn from this “soft source” are limited by the leakage reactance of the source.......... 962 A.9) Vthd = 5...Section 12 Direct Calculation of Harmonic Voltage Distortion Once the above table has been constructed..... (12.v 25 Vrms ... Note that compared to Example 1..... 2006 .73% 19th – 1........8% 11th – 5.......... Harmonic spectrum to 25th is: 5th – 25..412 + 1.63% 7th – 7.... the sum of individual harmonic voltages can be used to also obtain the Vthd: ∑ vh × 100% Vthd = Vthd = h =5 25 Vrms 26.....22 2 + 1....... (12..55% Alternatively...... the values are lower.55% Example 2 The same 850 HP/630 kW. this reduced harmonic current can result in significantly higher voltage distortion..... 480 V...

.... (12..078 = 75... (12........13) Short Circuit MVA 480 2 12.0184 Ω Once the above information has been established....12) = 1..6 A 5th harmonic voltage (L-L) = 3 × h × Xsupply × Ih = 1..0 = 16........73 V ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .732 × 5 × 0........038 kA) iii) Short circuit MVA = 3 × V × Generator Short Circuit Current .. 2006 197 ...0184 × 75............0184 × 246.Section 12 Direct Calculation of Harmonic Voltage Distortion ii) Short circuit current (A) = = Generator full load current ...18% Again........2563 = 246......5 × 10 6 = Generator reactance = 0...29 × 100% 480 5th harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage = 8..............6 = 39........0 A 7th harmonic voltage (L-L) = 3 × h × Xsupply × Ih = 1..732 × 7 × 0. (12...11) ′′ Generator X d 2406 0...29 V 5th harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage = = Vh × 100% Vrms 39...038 A (15. similarly for 7th harmonic: 7th harmonic current = Irms × Ih% = 962 × 0..5 MVA iv) Generator reactance = V2 ..732 × 480 × 15038 Short circuit MVA = 12........ the individual voltage per harmonic order can be calculated using exactly the same method as per Example 1: For 5th harmonic: 5th harmonic current = Irms × Ih% = 962 × 0.......16 Short circuit current (A) = 15.

04 6.. the source impedance has a significant effect on the harmonic currents drawn and their resultant impact on the subsequent voltage distortion. as per Example 1..95 7.88 1.6 in Section 2): Vthd = Vthd = ∑ Vh% 2 h =5 25 = % % V5% 2 + V7% 2 + V11 2 . the total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd) can be calculated (based on Equation 2.37 2 + 1. A summary table can be constructed as follows: TABLE 2 Summary of Harmonics to 25th Harmonic 5 7 11 13 17 19 23 25 Ih% 25.55 0.. the sum of individual harmonic voltages can be used to also obtain the Vthd: ∑ vh × 100% Vthd = Vthd = h =5 25 Vrms 50.... data regarding all the harmonics to 25th can be calculated...73 17....77 13.v 25 Vrms .63 7.9) Vthd = 10..65 14.85 2 + 1.49 3. please refer to Subsection 7/3).57% Note: From the above examples.91 8.49 2 + 3...98 Vh% 8...56 5...5 Vh (V) 39..27 3....19 2 + 3.85 1..... 2006 .... + V25 2 8..49% As per Example 1.70 2 + 2..88 2 + 1..0 16.88 1.25 2 Vthd = 10.. (12....88 2 + 1.68 9...... once the above values have been established..19 3.Section 12 Direct Calculation of Harmonic Voltage Distortion 7th harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage = = Vh × 100% Vrms 16.0 50....37 1...43 1...25 Also.70 2. For information on the calculation of source short circuit MVA for harmonic distortion estimation purposes on parallel power sources (generators or transformers).29 16..6 75.73 × 100% 480 7th harmonic voltage (L-L) as percentage of rms voltage = 3.7 33..93 0.02 9...73 1.8 5... 198 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .73 × 100% 480 = 2 2 2 2 v5 + v 7 + v11 ..57% Alternatively.78 Ih (A) 246.

either for customers to use via CD or download or indirectly via company application engineers. the manual calculation for a simple system with one nonlinear load can be rather repetitive and tiresome. In some cases. Often. phase staggering. These software packages are not provided by the equipment manufacturers and are therefore should give impartial results. A comprehensive harmonics software package should have the following capabilities: i) ii) iii) iv) v) Have a large number of nodes available for full power system simulations. they form part of a comprehensive electrical design and analysis suite where a harmonics estimation program is only a small part of the overall package. Be able to perform frequency scans based on small increments of frequency and to develop frequency response curves and other data to establish possible resonance points within the power system. negative and zero.]. In addition. The package should be able to model the more common types of harmonic mitigation. active filters. the effect of any connected linear loads should be able to be modeled. There is also a significant chance of human error being introduced. Have in a library. There are a number of harmonic estimation software packages available which are relatively easy to use. these simulations should be seen as “estimates” only. a full range of nonlinear load models [including AC PWM 6-pulse drives with varying values of AC and/or DC reactance. In addition. Comprehensive power system analysis software packages are also available from dedicated engineering software engineering companies. etc. it may prove valuable to undertake manual calculations to provide an indication of harmonic voltage distortion. Be able to simultaneously model individual harmonic current data and subsequent voltage distortion based on a range of multiple nonlinear loads types.Section 12 Direct Calculation of Harmonic Voltage Distortion 2 Software Estimation of Harmonic Distortion As indicated in Subsection 12/1. AFE drives. some cancellation via phase angle diversification. load commutated inverters. may attenuate higher order harmonics. Written guarantees of drive(s) and/or any harmonic mitigation performance should be requested from the vendor. vi) ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . However. the effect of cable and other system inductances will have an impact on the harmonic currents and subsequent voltage distortion. Be capable of handling all harmonic sequences: positive. DC drives (including notching simulations) with values of AC side commutation reactance together with 12-pulse. The effect of any connected linear load. Be able to introduce varying values of voltage unbalance and background voltage distortion into the model. including passive L-C filter. and therefore. etc. Many of the harmonics modeling and dedicated electrical design and simulation software packages can be tailored to individual customer needs. A number of drive and harmonic mitigation equipment manufacturers do have their own harmonic estimation software available. AC cycloconverters. However. 2006 199 . especially induction motors. four-wire distribution systems. there may be multiple harmonic current sources. 24-pulse versions of AC PWM and DC drives. on a very simple system. 18-pulse. wide spectrum filters.

Section 12 Direct Calculation of Harmonic Voltage Distortion vii) viii) ix) x) Calculate and display a full range of time domain voltage and current waveforms. Should be easy to understand and have report facilities such as comprehensive report writing. Be able to adjust automatically for harmonic phase angles based on variations in the fundamental frequency phase angles. 200 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . full FFT harmonic voltage and current spectra to at least 50th harmonic at each node. 2006 . Be able to model any range or number of transformer and/or generator data (including equivalent data for paralleled units).

as applicable. If four-wire systems (three-phase and neutral. Total number. including type.] [If four-wire systems (three-phase and neutral. 2006 . pulse number and kW rating. 201 v) ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Full details of any proposed mitigation. per circuit and per installation at rated load. including duty. voltage supply specifications and kW rating. calculations of the estimated neutral currents shall be provided on a per distribution panel at rated load basis]. calculations of the estimated neutral currents should be provided on a per distribution panel at rated load basis. voltage supply specifications. harmonic current spectrum up to 50th harmonic (or up to 100th for equipment with “active front ends”) and total magnitude of total harmonic current per unit. designers. either grounded or insulated) are utilized for domestic or lighting supplies. as applicable. [The actual source impedance (if transformer) or subtransient reactance (Xd″) (if generator) used shall be stated for each calculation.SECTION 13 Provision of Information on Harmonics 1 Information to be requested from Vendors The following should be the minimum information provided to shipbuilders. per circuit or per installation up to 50th harmonic (or up to 100th for equipment with “active front ends”). including estimated attenuation in total harmonic current distortion (Ithd) and total harmonic current per unit. pulse number. Details of the total number of units proposed to be installed on vessel or offshore installation. either grounded or insulated) are utilized for domestic or lighting supplies. per circuit or per installation up to 50th harmonic (or up to 100th for equipment with “active front ends”). Total harmonic current distortion (Ithd). type and kW rating of nonlinear loads proposed to be installed in vessel or offshore installation. Description of significant nonlinear load(s). consultants. 2 Information to be included with a Harmonic Analysis The following information should be included with a harmonic analysis: i) ii) iii) iv) Single line electrical diagram of vessel showing connection of any significant (singular or cumulative) nonlinear load(s) on the system. as applicable. ship-owners and ship-operators et al (as applicable) in order to calculate harmonic voltage distortion: i) ii) iii) Description of equipment. including estimated attenuation in total harmonic current distortion (Ithd) and total harmonic current per unit. iv) Full details of any proposed harmonic mitigation per unit.

including any emergency switchboards and on the generator terminals. The source impedance or subtransient reactance (Xd″) used in the calculations should be stated for each case. including any emergency switchboards. and at the terminals of the generators. The calculations should be on a per-switchboard basis.Section 13 Provision of Information on Harmonics vi) Calculations of total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd) on the system based on all significant nonlinear loads operating as designed and on a worse case scenario with regards to the number and rating of generators running. based on the worst case scenario basis as per vi) above. 202 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . The total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd) should be measured in additional to all individual voltage harmonics up to 50th (or up to 100th if equipment with “active front ends”) that are being proposed. including estimated attenuation in total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd) and total harmonic voltage up to 50th harmonic (or up to 100th harmonics for equipment with “active front ends”). as applicable on each switchboard. 2006 . vii) Full details of any proposed mitigation.

. specialist company with appropriate equipment to safely undertake measurements above these levels. planning. The harmonic measurements should be undertaken by two individuals. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . up to or over 11 kV on some vessels) are undertaken unless by experienced staff with suitable equipment or by a dedicated. who is also fully trained in CPR and other first aid. 1 Safety Precautions during Harmonic Surveys As with all electrical tasks..g. one a qualified electrical engineer conversant with the measurement equipment and a second individual to assist. This should include: • • • • Fire resistant clothing Safety glasses or full face shields Safety helmets Rubber electrical gloves with full length sleeves ii) iii) In addition. etc. but are necessary for the safety of the vessel.SECTION 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment This Section outlines the safety precautions. Others are rated up to 830 or 1000 V AC. terminals. It is standard procedure for a comprehensive report to be written following the survey. it is not recommended that directly connected harmonic measurements above 690 V/750 V AC (e. A number of harmonic analyzers (and accompanying test leads and current probes) are only suitable for use up to 600 V AC. rubber mats should be placed on the deck where the harmonic analyzer is being used. rig. 2006 203 . on high voltage. rig or platform and of the individuals concerned: i) Measurements should not be undertaken in heavy or rolling seas due to the possible exposure of live equipment and the risk of injury or death due to individuals coming in contact with live busbars. platform staff or shipyard electrical engineers should they wish to carry out their own measurements. Proper protective clothing and other safety equipment should be worn when undertaking measurements. They should be moved to each site as necessary. The latter is necessary when connecting and disconnecting the harmonic analyzer voltage leads and current probes on to live equipment. safety is the main concern. There are also a number of specialist independent companies available to carry out harmonic and power quality surveys in most countries should this be needed. Therefore. methodology and typical harmonic measurement/power quality meters and analyzers available to vessel. iv) For safety reasons. the maximum voltage rating of the harmonic analyzer has to be checked against the power system voltage before undertaking the survey. Some of the following recommendations are common sense. due to the vessel’s movement.

g. on the generators in operation.e. available up to at least 6500 A.. this type of current probe may be problematic. Prior to connection. even in a workshop environment. the equipment has been disconnected). if this has to be undertaken. it is advised that the individuals become fully conversant with the harmonic/power quality analyzer. Rubber gloves. If the equipment is provided with door locking mechanism when the equipment is operating. rubber mats and other protective clothing are therefore recommended as mentioned above.. the large numbers of nonlinear single-phase loads and their impact may not be apparent from a single line diagram. which have to be passed around the busbar and clipped into place. maximum harmonic distortion. Once the nonlinear loads have been identified. However. including emergency switchboards. removing covers from equipment while the equipment is operating is not recommended. a true rms voltage meter should be used to confirm the voltage levels OR that the voltage is zero (i. are simply for use on cables. it may be necessary to stop the equipment in order to gain the necessary access. Failing that. There are a number of safety and operational issues. in order to gain this initial experience. However. AmpFlex type probes are necessary.e. However.Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment v) All electrical equipment should be de-energized and locked off before connecting the harmonic measuring equipment..e. From this. Similarly. therefore. with minimum generators on line based on real operational conditions). the most appropriate voltage test points should be established. on some power systems (for example. maximum nonlinear loading. some simple planning is necessary. and if possible. which usually have round or rectangular jaws. 2 Planning the Harmonic Survey or Measurements In order to minimize the time necessary to undertake the harmonic survey and/or measurements. (These are flexible current probes. Care should be taken when connecting the harmonic analyzer voltage leads (these can be of the crocodile type and if not fixed to a suitable point may spring off. for some types of busbars. larger nonlinear loads) can be identified (e. 2006 204 . recordings should also be taken on all switchboards. A single line diagram is often the most significant source of information. vii) viii) Before undertaking the harmonic measurements. It is often worthwhile to undertake some simple measurements. All measurements should be undertaken based on a “worst-case scenario” (i.) Note: The type of current probe necessary should be established prior to surveys or a range of suitable probes should be available. In addition to measurements at the terminals of every major nonlinear load. measurements must be recorded at full operational loads. Current probes of the “clamp on” type (available to around 1200 A). It is important that the information gathered reflects the expected operational conditions. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . four-wire systems on cruise liners).. This process entails the individual placing his/her hands adjacent to and often behind the busbars. and therefore. large variable speed drives). a list or schedule should be compiled of every major nonlinear load to be measured and recorded. the main sources of harmonics (i. great care must be taken in order that the metal covers do not touch parts. vi) Before connecting any harmonic measurement equipment. Without thick rubber gloves with full rubber sleeves this can be extremely dangerous and should not be undertaken unless these are worn with other appropriate protective equipment and a CPR-trained assistant is available.

3 Information to be recorded from Harmonic Measurements Prior to measurements being undertaken. This may help to identify any misnamed loads. current and kW of each nonlinear load is useful in the event of misnaming a given load on the harmonic analyzer or laptop computer (i.g. a full report. starting with those further away from the generators. 2006 205 . it often helps in identifying the correct load based on that data). the equipment should be confirmed to be within calibration time limits and that the necessary voltage and current probes and full protective equipment are to hand. complete with waveforms. As stated earlier. a simple diagram detailing the total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd) at the various points in the power system is recommended. In addition. Removal of the equipment leads and probes should be in the reverse order. the data in i) to iii) should also be recorded on paper. it is essential that the measurements are taken based on a worst-case scenario. Information to be recorded: i) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) vii) viii) rms voltage and rms current Total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd) Total harmonic current distortion (Ithd) Full harmonic spectrum up to 50th harmonic (up to 100th harmonic for active front end drives). Some can also capture voltage unbalance [vii)]. Then measurements should be recorded for other nonlinear equipment. at maximum operational loading and maximum harmonic distortion with regard to the various nonlinear loads. although most harmonic analyzers have sufficient onboard memory and/or can download to a laptop computer..e. on four-wire distribution systems)..Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment With the electrical loading constant. harmonic spectra and other data as above. the higher the voltage distortion. The majority of harmonic analyzers can capture the data detailed in i) to vi) simultaneously. It should be remembered that the higher the magnitude of harmonic current in the system. Only then should the actual harmonic survey and/or harmonic measurements proceed. Note: Always connect the ground lead (if applicable). Finally. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . For each nonlinear load selected. (This may be via an enlarged single line diagram). total harmonic current distortion (Ithd). the following data should be measured and recorded on all three phases..e. if appropriate. FFT data of harmonic spectrum in text) for voltage and current harmonics giving magnitudes and phase angles. should be compiled. or failing that. either internally and/or via download to a laptop computer. as recommended in the previous Subsection. Time domain waveforms of both voltage and current Voltage unbalance between phases Background total voltage distortion (Vthd) without the specific nonlinear load currently under test operating would be desirable but may not be practical due to operational reasons. The gathered harmonics data can then be compared against the appropriate harmonic limit recommendations and/or used to aid the consideration of harmonic mitigation for specific items of equipment of nonlinear (e. electric variable speed drives) and/or for other specific items of equipment such as switchboards. (and neutral. progressively towards the main switchboard(s) and generator(s). Once a complete set of measurements have been taken. In addition. In addition to the information downloadable to a laptop or stored in the harmonic analyzer. the nonlinear loads furthest away physically from the main switchboard should be measured first. followed by the voltage leads and finally the current probes with the correct polarity. a paper list of nonlinear equipment to be measured is recommended. Harmonic text (i. similar data should be recorded on the main switchboard(s) and generators. Information such as total harmonic voltage distortion (Vthd).

. The Fluke 43B measures up to the 50th harmonic and is supplied with appropriate software for downloading and to assist in report compilation. transients.Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment 4 Examples of Harmonic Analyzers There are a number of high quality harmonic and power quality analyzers currently on the market. some of which are illustrated in the following Paragraphs. so that the voltage range is suitable for use on all envisaged applications and that a suitable range of current probes are available for that particular analyzer. special digital multi-meters with shielding and low pass filters are necessary. (For this. check that it can read up to at least the 50th harmonic. and perform a range of other measurements and record. power usage and power factor measurements.] Most “harmonic analyzers” are “power quality analyzers”.g. measurements up to 2000 A (up to 600 V rms) are possible. together with some sample screen displays.e.. FIGURE 1 Fluke 43B Harmonic/Power Quality Analyzer 206 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .) Typical harmonic/power quality analyzers include: 4. most are not normally suitable for measuring the output data from AC PWM variable speed drives. another type of analyzer may be necessary. in addition to harmonic data. voltage sags and swells. lightweight and can store a number of readings (up to 20 screen or data readings based on a maximum of two selectable parameters) onboard without the need for downloading to computer. for example. [Some equipment is rated to only measure safely up to 600 V rms. rated up to 600 V rms. When selecting a suitable harmonic/power quality analyzer. it does not measure all three phases simultaneously) – it measures one phase at a time (assuming all phases are balanced and data from each is similar. 2006 . 690 V or 750 V). Using suitable proprietary current probes. this may be sufficient). However. If above that (e.1 The Fluke 43B The Fluke 43B is a harmonic/power quality analyzer. It is not a full threephase unit (i. It is compact.

2006 207 .] FIGURE 3 Fluke 43B Can Measure Sags and Swells up to 16 Days on a Per Cycle Basis ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment A few samples of screen/computer download data from the Fluke 43B include: FIGURE 2 Fluke 43B Harmonics Screen Data Available (In This Case Current) [Voltage and power harmonic data are also available.

Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment FIGURE 4 Up to 40 Transients (Voltage or Current) Can Be Captured with the Fluke 41B FIGURE 5 True rms Voltage and Current Waveform Display(s) from Fluke 43B 208 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006 .

including voltage to 1000 V rms and current to 2000 A. FIGURE 6 AEMC 3945 Three-phase Harmonic/Power Quality Analyzer with Real Time Color Display ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Fluke. 2006 209 . This meter may be more suited to fault finding and/or “snapshot sampling”.2 AEMC 3945 This is a good example of a three-phase harmonic/power quality analyzer which can measure and record harmonics to the 50th on voltages up to 830 V rms and current per phase up to 6500 A. recognizing the limitation of the 43B for “real” three-phase applications has recently launched the Fluke 433/434 series of three-phase harmonic/power quality analyzers which have an excellent range of features. A full three-phase analyzer may be used for full harmonic surveys and/or for other power quality tasks.Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment The Fluke 43B is a good example of a relatively low cost harmonic/power quality analyzer for applications needing measurements to 600 V rms and up to 2000 A. to prevent data being “missed” (which may occur with the type of analyzer above if the event occurred on the phase not being monitored). 4. whereby all three phases are measured and/or monitored simultaneously.

AmpFlex 6500 A Current Probes A range of clamp-on current probes (to 1200 A) and a scalable adaptor box for use with up to three existing CTs are also available. capture up to 50 transients or other disturbances to 1/256th of a cycle. In addition to the full range of harmonic measurements. the AEMC 3945 can measure and record short-term flicker.Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment FIGURE 7 AEMC 3945 Connected On-site Illustrating “Wrap-around” Rogowski-type. record voltage and current unbalance. 2006 . trend recordings and monitoring of a number of parameters based on min/max limits and “photograph” up to twelve data displays. Samples of analyzer real time displays on the instrument include: 210 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . Comprehensive software is provided to assist in report compilation.

2006 211 .Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment FIGURE 8 Sample Displays of Voltage and Current Waveforms FIGURE 9 Three-phase Voltage Waveforms ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

2006 .Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment FIGURE 10 Transient Current Waveforms FIGURE 11 Three-phase Voltage Harmonics 212 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

2006 213 .Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment FIGURE 12 Harmonic Direction FIGURE 13 Harmonic Sequences ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment FIGURE 14 Phasor Diagram Examples of real-time data via a computer from the AEMC 3945 include: FIGURE 15 AEMC 3945 Configuration via Computer 214 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006 .

Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment FIGURE 16 Real Time Current Waveforms via Computer FIGURE 17 Real Time Computer Display of Harmonic Currents ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006 215 .

3 Hioki 3196 This harmonic/power quality analyzers can offer some advantages. however. 216 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . for example in the area of longer term monitoring plus data recorded and displayed. capability of the AEMC 3945 should favor its use on a wide range of marine power quality applications. which means. operate at these higher voltage levels). 4. 2006 . as per the Fluke 43B. The Hioki 3196 can measure currents up to 5000 A and voltages up to 600 V rms.Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment FIGURE 18 Unbalance in Real Time via Computer Up to 830 V rms voltage measurement and 6500 A. it is unsuitable for 690 V or 750 V systems (the new Fluke 433/434 series can.

Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment FIGURE 19 Hioki 3196 Power Analyzer with Voltage and Current Probes Examples of actual survey measurements from a Hioki 3196 follow: FIGURE 20 AC VFD Three-phase Voltage and Current Measurements from Hioki 3196 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006 217 .

2006 .Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment FIGURE 21 Harmonic FFT Measurements from Hioki 3196 with 5th Harmonic Selected FIGURE 22 Power System Vthd Trend Recording via Hioki 3196 as a Number of AC VFDs Are Switched On 218 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS .

Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment FIGURE 23 Vthd of all Three Phases Recorded by Hioki 3196 when Active Filter Switched in on Oil Production Platform FIGURE 24 Summary of Data Sampled from Hioki 3196 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 2006 219 .

rig or platform staff undertake directly-connected harmonic measurements/surveys. In these instances.. vessel. should be able to be used with reasonable accuracy. etc.e.. the secondaries of the PTs and CTs may be suitable for direct connection to standard harmonic measurement equipment. To this end. standard harmonic analyzers. frequency response) of the transformers (may relatively accurately measure up to the 50th harmonic). due to danger of death. who with fully experienced personnel. 5 Measurements on Voltages above 690/750 V AC Some harmonic analyzers do have the capability to measure harmonics on power systems with voltages up to 690/750/1000 V AC. At these voltage levels. subject to the above limitations re PT and CT bandwidth and scaling accuracy. In these instances.g. a specialist company should be subcontracted.. However. scaleable CT adaptor boxes are available as options with some harmonic analyzers. for the Rogowski type) already installed. Depending on bandwidth (i. voltage transformers) and current transformers (e. subject to suitable scaling being taken into account on the measurements (i.e.. such as the AEMC 3945. the actual harmonic voltages and currents will have to be scaled up to match ratios of the transformers) and voltage limits. 2006 . potential transformers (i. that shore. special techniques and equipment have to be used in order to directly measure the harmonic currents and voltages. these high voltage systems may have on the main switchboards. can safely carry out such measurements.e. 220 ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . limited by the maximum voltage rating of 600 V rms. it is not recommended due to safety reasons. specialist safety and measurement equipment rated for higher voltage. including those illustrated. Above these levels.Section 14 Harmonic Surveys and Measurement Equipment FIGURE 25 Recorded Harmonic Currents by Hioki 3196 on 12-Pulse AC Drive The Hioki 3196 is a good harmonic/power quality analyzer. Note: Some vessels and offshore installations have main power systems based on voltages up to or over 11 kV.

Mark Mc Granaghan et al. ISBN 0-7803-5394-3. Ian C Evans. H Wayne Beatty. (1989). Janusz Mindykowski. Edward Szmit and Tomasz Tarasiuk. Ian C Evans & Des Horne. (2001). Harmonic Mitigation for AC Thruster and Small Propulsion Drives. Janusz Mindykowski. Harmonic Solutions Co. Motor Ship (September 2003). Ian C Evans. Handbook of Electrical Calculations. Harmonic Solutions Co. AC Drives : Mitigation – A look at the options. Hazardous Areas – A User’s Guide to AC Drive Systems. Solutions Co. The Future is Electric – The Progress of Electric Propulsion. (1996). 2nd Edition.APPENDIX 1 Recommended Reading Power System Harmonics. Maritime Electrical Installation and Diesel Electric Propulsion. Variable Frequency AC Motor Drive Systems. (2002). (2004). Polish Academy of Sciences. (2004). Harmonic 221 . (2001). 2nd Edition. Offshore Visie (October 2002). Motor Ship (October 2003). Jos Arrillaga and Neville Watson. 2006 Ian C Evans. ISBN 83-88621-07-6 Electrical Power Systems Quality. Ian C Evans. From Oars to Reactors – Electric Drive: The Future of Naval Propulsion.Uk. Electrical Power Quality and Ships Safety. (2004). Marine Propulsion International (October 2002). ISBN 0-07-136298-3. ISBN 0-07-1386220-X. Electricity + Control (November 2004). Voltage Quality in Electrical Power Systems. Assessment of Electric Power Quality in Ships fitted with Converter Sub-systems. (1992). IEEE. Norway. ISBN 1-55937-239-7. ISBN 0-85296-975-9. ABB AS. ISBN 0-86341-1142.Uk. (2003). Harmonic Mitigation for Offshore AC Variable Frequency Drives. (1988). Roget Dugan. Elekotrotek Drives Ltd. David Finney.Uk. Alf-Kare Adnanes. ABS GUIDANCE NOTES ON CONTROL OF HARMONICS IN ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS . 3rd Edition. ISBN 0-470-85129-5. Ian C Evans. D Blume et al. Power Electronic Converter Harmonics. J Schlabbach. Derek Paice. IEEE Recommended Practices and Requirements for Harmonic Control in Power Systems.

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