Computers and Structures, Inc.

Berkeley, California, USA
Version 8
January 2002
ETABS
®
Integrated Building Design Software
Concrete Frame Design Manual
 Copyright Computers and Structures, Inc., 1978-2002.
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DISCLAIMER
CONSIDERABLE TIME, EFFORT AND EXPENSE HAVE GONE INTO THE
DEVELOPMENT AND DOCUMENTATION OF ETABS. THE PROGRAM HAS
BEEN THOROUGHLY TESTED AND USED. IN USING THE PROGRAM,
HOWEVER, THE USER ACCEPTS AND UNDERSTANDS THAT NO WARRANTY
IS EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED BY THE DEVELOPERS OR THE DISTRIBUTORS
ON THE ACCURACY OR THE RELIABILITY OF THE PROGRAM.
THIS PROGRAM IS A VERY PRACTICAL TOOL FOR THE DESIGN/CHECK OF
CONCRETE STRUCTURES. HOWEVER, THE USER MUST THOROUGHLY READ
THE MANUAL AND CLEARLY RECOGNIZE THE ASPECTS OF CONCRETE
DESIGN THAT THE PROGRAM ALGORITHMS DO NOT ADDRESS.
THE USER MUST EXPLICITLY UNDERSTAND THE ASSUMPTIONS OF THE
PROGRAM AND MUST INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE RESULTS.
i
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN
Contents
General Concrete Frame Design Information
1 General Design Information
Design Codes 1-1
Units 1-1
Overwriting the Frame Design Procedure for a Con-
crete Frame
1-1
Design Load Combinations 1-2
Design of Beams 1-2
Design of Columns 1-3
Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios 1-4
Second Order P-Delta Effects 1-4
Element Unsupported Lengths 1-6
Analysis Sections and Design Sections 1-7
2 Concrete Frame Design Process
Concrete Frame Design Procedure 2-1
3 Interactive Concrete Frame Design
General 3-1
Concrete Design Information Form 3-1
4 Output Data Plotted Directly on the Model
Overview 4-1
Using the Print Design Tables Form 4-1
Design Input 4-2
Design Output 4-2
Concrete Frame Design Manual
ii
Concrete Frame Design Specific to UBC97
5 General and Notation
Introduction to the UBC 97 Series of Technical Notes 5-1
Notation 5-2
6 Preferences
General 6-1
Using the Preferences Form 6-1
Preferences 6-2
7 Overwrites
General 7-1
Overwrites 7-1
Making Changes in the Overwrites Form 7-3
Resetting Concrete Frame Overwrites to Default
Values
7-4
8 Design Load Combinations
9 Strength Reduction Factors
10 Column Design
Overview 10-1
Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces 10-2
Calculate Column Capacity Ratio 10-5
Determine Factored Moments and Forces 10-6
Determine Moment Magnification Factors 10-6
Determine Capacity Ratio 10-8
Required Reinforcing Area 10-10
Design Column Shear Reinforcement 10-10
Determine Required Shear Reinforcement 10-14
Reference 10-15
11 Beam Design
Overview 11-1
Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement 11-1
Determine Factored Moments 11-2
Determine Required Flexural Reinforcement 11-2
Contents
iii
Design Beam Shear Reinforcement 11-10
12 Joint Design
Overview 12-1
Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force 12-1
Determine the Effective Area of Joint 12-5
Check Panel Zone Shear Stress 12-5
Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios 12-6
13 Input Data
Input data 13-1
Using the Print Design Tables Form 13-3
14 Output Details
Using the Print Design Tables Form 14-3
Concrete Frame Design Specific to ACI-318-99
15 General and Notation
Introduction to the ACI318-99 Series of Technical
Notes
15-1
Notation 15-2
16 Preferences
General 16-1
Using the Preferences Form 16-1
Preferences 16-2
17 Overwrites
General 17-1
Overwrites 17-1
Making Changes in the Overwrites Form 17-3
Resetting Concrete Frame Overwrites to Default
Values
17-4
18 Design Load Combinations
19 Strength Reduction Factors
Concrete Frame Design Manual
iv
20 Column Design
Overview 20-1
Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces 20-2
Calculate Column Capacity Ratio 20-5
Determine Factored Moments and Forces 20-6
Determine Moment Magnification Factors 20-6
Determine Capacity Ratio 20-9
Required Reinforcing Area 20-10
Design Column Shear Reinforcement 20-10
Determine Section Forces 20-11
Determine Concrete Shear Capacity 20-12
Determine Required Shear Reinforcement 20-13
References 20-15
21 Beam Design
Overview 21-1
Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement 21-1
Determine Factored Moments 21-2
Determine Required Flexural Reinforcement 21-2
Design for T-Beam 21-5
Minimum Tensile Reinforcement 21-8
Special Consideration for Seismic Design 21-8
Design Beam Shear Reinforcement 21-9
Determine Shear Force and Moment 21-11
Determine Concrete Shear Capacity 21-12
Determine Required Shear Reinforcement 21-13
22 Joint Design
Overview 22-1
Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force 22-1
Determine the Effective Area of Joint 22-4
Check Panel Zone Shear Stress 22-4
Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios 22-6
23 Input Data
Input Data 23-1
Using the Print Design Tables Form 23-3
Contents
v
24 Output Details
Using the Print Design Tables Form 24-3
Design Codes Technical Note 1 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA JANUARY 2002
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN
Technical Note 1
General Design Information
This Technical Note presents some basic information and concepts helpful
when performing concrete frame design using this program.
Design Codes
The design code is set using the Options menu > Preferences > Concrete
Frame Design command. You can choose to design for any one design code
in any one design run. You cannot design some elements for one code and
others for a different code in the same design run. You can, however, perform
different design runs using different design codes without rerunning the
analysis.
Units
For concrete frame design in this program, any set of consistent units can be
used for input. You can change the system of units at any time. Typically, de-
sign codes are based on one specific set of units.
Overwriting the Frame Design Procedure for a Concrete
Frame
The two design procedures possible for concrete beam design are:
ƒ Concrete frame design
ƒ No design
If a line object is assigned a frame section property that has a concrete ma-
terial property, its default design procedure is Concrete Frame Design. A con-
crete frame element can be switched between the Concrete Frame Design and
the "None" design procedure. Assign a concrete frame element the "None"
design procedure if you do not want it designed by the Concrete Frame De-
sign postprocessor.
General Design Information Concrete Frame Design
Technical Note 1 - 2 Design Load Combinations
Change the default design procedure used for concrete frame elements by
selecting the element(s) and clicking Design menu > Overwrite Frame
Design Procedure. This change is only successful if the design procedure
assigned to an element is valid for that element. For example, if you select a
concrete element and attempt to change the design procedure to Steel Frame
Design, the program will not allow the change because a concrete element
cannot be changed to a steel frame element.
Design Load Combinations
The program creates a number of default design load combinations for con-
crete frame design. You can add in your own design load combinations. You
can also modify or delete the program default load combinations. An unlim-
ited number of design load combinations can be specified.
To define a design load combination, simply specify one or more load cases,
each with its own scale factor. For more information see Concrete Frame De-
sign UBC97 Technical Note 8 Design Load Combination and Concrete Frame
Design ACI 318-99 Technical Note 18 Design Load Combination.
Design of Beams
The program designs all concrete frame elements designated as beam sec-
tions in their Frame Section Properties as beams (see Define menu >Frame
Sections command and click the Reinforcement button). In the design of
concrete beams, in general, the program calculates and reports the required
areas of steel for flexure and shear based on the beam moments, shears, load
combination factors, and other criteria, which are described in detail in Con-
crete Frame UBC97 Technical Note Beam Design 11 and Concrete Frame ACI
318-99 Technical Note 21 Beam Design. The reinforcement requirements are
calculated at each output station along the beam span.
All the beams are designed for major direction flexure and shear only.
Effects resulting from any axial forces, minor direction bending, and
torsion that may exist in the beams must be investigated independ-
ently by the user.
In designing the flexural reinforcement for the major moment at a particular
section of a particular beam, the steps involve the determination of the
maximum factored moments and the determination of the reinforcing steel.
Concrete Frame Design General Design Information
Design of Beams Technical Note 1 - 3
The beam section is designed for the maximum positive and maximum nega-
tive factored moment envelopes obtained from all of the load combinations.
Negative beam moments produce top steel. In such cases, the beam is al-
ways designed as a rectangular section. Positive beam moments produce
bottom steel. In such cases, the beam may be designed as a rectangular- or
T-beam. For the design of flexural reinforcement, the beam is first designed
as a singly reinforced beam. If the beam section is not adequate, the required
compression reinforcement is calculated.
In designing the shear reinforcement for a particular beam for a particular set
of loading combinations at a particular station resulting from the beam major
shear, the steps involve the determination of the factored shear force, the
determination of the shear force that can be resisted by concrete, and the
determination of the reinforcement steel required to carry the balance.
Design of Columns
The program designs all concrete frame elements designated as column sec-
tions in their Frame Section Properties as columns (see Define menu
>Frame Sections command and click the Reinforcement button). In the
design of the columns, the program calculates the required longitudinal steel,
or if the longitudinal steel is specified, the column stress condition is reported
in terms of a column capacity ratio. The capacity ratio is a factor that gives an
indication of the stress condition of the column with respect to the capacity of
the column. The design procedure for reinforced concrete columns involves
the following steps:
ƒ Generate axial force-biaxial moment interaction surfaces for all of the dif-
ferent concrete section types of the model.
ƒ Check the capacity of each column for the factored axial force and bending
moments obtained from each load combination at each end of the column.
This step is also used to calculate the required reinforcement (if none was
specified) that will produce a capacity ratio of 1.0.
ƒ Design the column shear reinforcement.
The shear reinforcement design procedure for columns is very similar to that
for beams, except that the effect of the axial force on the concrete shear ca-
pacity needs to be considered. See Concrete Frame UBC97 Technical Note 10
General Design Information Concrete Frame Design
Technical Note 1 - 4 Second Order P-Delta Effects
Column Design and Concrete Frame ACI 318-99 Technical Note 20 Column
Design for more information.
Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios
When the ACI 318-99 or UBC97 code is selected, the program calculates the
ratio of the sum of the beam moment capacities to the sum of the column
moment capacities at a particular joint for a particular column direction, ma-
jor or minor. The capacities are calculated with no reinforcing overstrength
factor, α, and including ϕ factors. The beam capacities are calculated for re-
versed situations and the maximum summation obtained is used.
The moment capacities of beams that frame into the joint in a direction that is
not parallel to the major or minor direction of the column are resolved along
the direction that is being investigated and the resolved components are
added to the summation.
The column capacity summation includes the column above and the column
below the joint. For each load combination, the axial force, P
u
, in each of the
columns is calculated from the program analysis load combinations. For each
load combination, the moment capacity of each column under the influence of
the corresponding axial load P
u
is then determined separately for the major
and minor directions of the column, using the uniaxial column interaction dia-
gram. The moment capacities of the two columns are added to give the ca-
pacity summation for the corresponding load combination. The maximum ca-
pacity summations obtained from all of the load combinations is used for the
beam/column capacity ratio.
The beam/column flexural capacity ratios are only reported for Special Mo-
ment-Resisting Frames involving seismic design load combinations.
See Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios in Concrete Frame UBC97 Techni-
cal Note 12 Joint Design or in Concrete Frame ACI 318-99 Technical Note 22
Joint Design for more information.
Second Order P-Delta Effects
Typically, design codes require that second order P-Delta effects be consid-
ered when designing concrete frames. The P-Delta effects come from two
sources. They are the global lateral translation of the frame and the local de-
formation of elements within the frame.
Concrete Frame Design General Design Information
Second Order P-Delta Effects Technical Note 1 - 5
Consider the frame element shown in Figure 1, which is extracted from a
story level of a larger structure. The overall global translation of this frame
element is indicated by ∆. The local deformation of the element is shown as δ.
The total second order P-Delta effects on this frame element are those caused
by both ∆ and δ.
The program has an option to consider P-Delta effects in the analysis. Con-
trols for considering this effect are found using the Analyze menu > Set
Analysis Options command and then clicking the Set P-Delta Parameters
button. When you consider P-Delta effects in the analysis, the program does a
good job of capturing the effect due to the ∆ deformation shown in Figure 1,
but it does not typically capture the effect of the δ deformation (unless, in the
model, the frame element is broken into multiple pieces over its length).
In design codes, consideration of the second order P-Delta effects is generally
achieved by computing the flexural design capacity using a formula similar to
that shown in Equation. 1.
M
CAP
= aM
nt
+ bM
lt
Eqn. 1
where,
M
CAP
= Flexural design capacity

δ
Original position of frame
element shown by vertical
line
Position of frame element
as a result of global lateral
translation, ∆, shown by
dashed line
Final deflected position of
frame element that
includes the global lateral
translation, ∆, and the
local deformation of the
element, δ
Figure 1: The Total Second Order P-Delta Effects on a Frame Element
Caused by Both ∆ ∆∆ ∆ and δ δδ δ
General Design Information Concrete Frame Design
Technical Note 1 - 6 Element Unsupported Lengths
M
nt
= Required flexural capacity of the member assuming there is
no translation of the frame (i.e., associated with the δ defor-
mation in Figure 1)
M
lt
= Required flexural capacity of the member as a result of lateral
translation of the frame only (i.e., associated with the ∆ de-
formation in Figure 1)
a = Unitless factor multiplying M
nt
b = Unitless factor multiplying M
lt
(assumed equal to 1 by the
program; see below)
When the program performs concrete frame design, it assumes that the factor
b is equal to 1 and it uses code-specific formulas to calculate the factor a.
That b = 1 assumes that you have considered P-Delta effects in the analysis,
as previously described. Thus, in general, if you are performing concrete
frame design in this program, you should consider P-Delta effects in the
analysis before running the design.
Element Unsupported Lengths
The column unsupported lengths are required to account for column slender-
ness effects. The program automatically determines these unsupported
lengths. They can also be overwritten by the user on an element-by-element
basis, if desired, using the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design >
View/Revise Overwrites command.
There are two unsupported lengths to consider. They are L
33
and L
22,
as
shown in Figure 2. These are the lengths between support points of the ele-
ment in the corresponding directions. The length L
33
corresponds to instability
about the 3-3 axis (major axis), and L
22
corresponds to instability about the
2-2 axis (minor axis). The length L
22
is also used for lateral-torsional buckling
caused by major direction bending (i.e., about the 3-3 axis).
In determining the values for L
22
and L
33
of the elements, the program recog-
nizes various aspects of the structure that have an effect on these lengths,
such as member connectivity, diaphragm constraints and support points. The
program automatically locates the element support points and evaluates the
corresponding unsupported length.
Concrete Frame Design General Design Information
Analysis Sections and Design Sections Technical Note 1 - 7
Figure 2: Major and Minor Axes of Bending
It is possible for the unsupported length of a frame element to be evaluated
by the program as greater than the corresponding element length. For exam-
ple, assume a column has a beam framing into it in one direction, but not the
other, at a floor level. In this case, the column is assumed to be supported in
one direction only at that story level, and its unsupported length in the other
direction will exceed the story height.
Analysis Sections and Design Sections
Analysis sections are those section properties used to analyze the model
when you click the Analyze menu > Run Analysis command. The design
section is whatever section has most currently been designed and thus desig-
nated the current design section.
Tip:
It is important to understand the difference between analysis sections and design sec-
tions.
General Design Information Concrete Frame Design
Technical Note 1 - 8 Analysis Sections and Design Sections
It is possible for the last used analysis section and the current design section
to be different. For example, you may have run your analysis using a W18X35
beam and then found in the design that a W16X31 beam worked. In that
case, the last used analysis section is the W18X35 and the current design
section is the W16X31. Before you complete the design process, verify that
the last used analysis section and the current design section are the same.
The Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Verify Analysis vs De-
sign Section command is useful for this task.
The program keeps track of the analysis section and the design section
separately. Note the following about analysis and design sections:
ƒ Assigning a beam a frame section property using the Assign menu >
Frame/Line > Frame Section command assigns the section as both the
analysis section and the design section.
ƒ Running an analysis using the Analyze menu > Run Analysis command
(or its associated toolbar button) always sets the analysis section to be the
same as the current design section.
ƒ Assigning an auto select list to a frame section using the Assign menu >
Frame/Line > Frame Section command initially sets the design section
to be the beam with the median weight in the auto select list.
ƒ Unlocking a model deletes the design results, but it does not delete or
change the design section.
ƒ Using the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Select Design
Combo command to change a design load combination deletes the design
results, but it does not delete or change the design section.
ƒ Using the Define menu > Load Combinations command to change a de-
sign load combination deletes the design results, but it does not delete or
change the design section.
ƒ Using the Options menu > Preferences > Concrete Frame Design
command to change any of the composite beam design preferences deletes
the design results, but it does not delete or change the design section.
ƒ Deleting the static nonlinear analysis results also deletes the design results
for any load combination that includes static nonlinear forces. Typically,
Concrete Frame Design General Design Information
Analysis Sections and Design Sections Technical Note 1 - 9
static nonlinear analysis and design results are deleted when one of the
following actions is taken:
9 Use the Define menu > Frame Nonlinear Hinge Properties com-
mand to redefine existing or define new hinges.
9 Use the Define menu > Static Nonlinear/Pushover Cases com-
mand to redefine existing or define new static nonlinear load cases.
9 Use the Assign menu > Frame/Line > Frame Nonlinear Hinges
command to add or delete hinges.
Again, note that these actions delete only results for load combinations that
include static nonlinear forces.
Concrete Frame Design Procedure Technical Note 2 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN
Technical Note 2
Concrete Frame Design Process
This Technical Note describes a basic concrete frame design process using
this program. Although the exact steps you follow may vary, the basic design
process should be similar to that described herein. Other Technical Notes in
the Concrete Frame Design series provide additional information, including
the distinction between analysis sections and design sections (see Analysis
Sections and Design Sections in Concrete Frame Design Technical Note 1
General Design Information).
The concrete frame design postprocessor can design or check concrete col-
umns and can design concrete beams.
Important note: A concrete frame element is designed as a beam or a col-
umn, depending on how its frame section property was designated when it
was defined using the Define menu > Frame Sections command. Note that
when using this command, after you have specified that a section has a con-
crete material property, you can click on the Reinforcement button and
specify whether it is a beam or a column.
Concrete Frame Design Procedure
The following sequence describes a typical concrete frame design process for
a new building. Note that although the sequence of steps you follow may
vary, the basic process probably will be essentially the same.
1. Use the Options menu > Preferences > Concrete Frame Design
command to choose the concrete frame design code and to review other
concrete frame design preferences and revise them if necessary. Note
that default values are provided for all concrete frame design prefer-
ences, so it is unnecessary to define any preferences unless you want to
change some of the default values. See Concrete Frame Design ACI
UBC97 Technical Notes 6 Preferences and Concrete Frame Design ACI
318-99 Technical Notes 16 Preferences for more information.
Concrete Frame Design Process Concrete Frame Design
Technical Note 2 - 2 Concrete Frame Design Procedure
2. Create the building model.
3. Run the building analysis using the Analyze menu > Run Analysis
command.
4. Assign concrete frame overwrites, if needed, using the Design menu >
Concrete Frame Design > View/Revise Overwrites command. Note
that you must select frame elements before using this command. Also
note that default values are provided for all concrete frame design over-
writes, so it is unnecessary to define any overwrites unless you want to
change some of the default values. Note that the overwrites can be as-
signed before or after the analysis is run. See Concrete Frame Design
UBC97 Technical Note 7 Overwrites and Concrete Frame Design ACI
318-99 Technical Note 17 Overwrites for more information.
5. To use any design load combinations other than the defaults created by
the program for your concrete frame design, click the Design menu >
Concrete Frame Design > Select Design Combo command. Note
that you must have already created your own design combos by clicking
the Define menu > Load Combinations command. See Concrete
Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 8 Design Load Combinations and
Concrete Frame Design ACI 318-99 Technical Note 18 Design Load
Combinations for more information.
6. Click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Start De-
sign/Check of Structure command to run the concrete frame design.
7. Review the concrete frame design results by doing one of the following:
a. Click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Display De-
sign Info command to display design input and output information on
the model. See Concrete Frame Design Technical Note 4 Output Data
Plotted Directly on the Model for more information.
b. Right click on a frame element while the design results are displayed
on it to enter the interactive design mode and interactively design the
frame element. Note that while you are in this mode, you can revise
overwrites and immediately see the results of the new design. See
Concrete Frame Design Technical Note 3 Interactive Concrete Frame
Design for more information.
Concrete Frame Design Concrete Frame Design Process
Concrete Frame Design Procedure Technical Note 2 - 3
If design results are not currently displayed (and the design has been
run), click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Interac-
tive Concrete Frame Design command and then right click a frame
element to enter the interactive design mode for that element.
8. Use the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design com-
mand to print concrete frame design data. If you select frame elements
before using this command, data is printed only for the selected ele-
ments. See Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 14 Output
Details and Concrete Frame Design ACI 318-99 Technical Note 24 Out-
put Details for more information.
9. Use the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Change Design
Section command to change the design section properties for selected
frame elements.
10. Click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Start De-
sign/Check of Structure command to rerun the concrete frame design
with the new section properties. Review the results using the procedures
described in Item 7.
11. Rerun the building analysis using the Analyze menu > Run Analysis
command. Note that the section properties used for the analysis are the
last specified design section properties.
12. Click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Start De-
sign/Check of Structure command to rerun the concrete frame design
with the new analysis results and new section properties. Review the re-
sults using the procedures described above.
13. Again use the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Change
Design Section command to change the design section properties for
selected frame elements, if necessary.
14. Repeat the processes in steps 10, 11 and 12 as many times as neces-
sary.
15. Rerun the building analysis using the Analyze menu > Run Analysis
command. Note that the section properties used for the analysis are the
last specified design section properties.
Concrete Frame Design Process Concrete Frame Design
Technical Note 2 - 4 Concrete Frame Design Procedure
Note:
Concrete frame design is an iterative process. Typically, the analysis and design will be
rerun multiple times to complete a design.
16. Click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Start De-
sign/Check of Structure command to rerun the concrete frame design
with the new section properties. Review the results using the procedures
described in Item 7.
17. Click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Verify Analysis
vs Design Section command to verify that all of the final design sec-
tions are the same as the last used analysis sections.
18. Use the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design com-
mand to print selected concrete frame design results, if desired.
It is important to note that design is an iterative process. The sections used in
the original analysis are not typically the same as those obtained at the end
of the design process. Always run the building analysis using the final frame
section sizes and then run a design check using the forces obtained from that
analysis. Use the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Verify
Analysis vs Design Section command to verify that the design sections are
the same as the analysis sections.
General Technical Note 3 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN
Technical Note 3
Interactive Concrete Frame Design
This Technical Note describes interactive concrete frame design and review,
which is a powerful mode that allows the user to review the design results for
any concrete frame design and interactively revise the design assumptions
and immediately review the revised results.
General
Note that a design must have been run for the interactive design mode to be
available. To run a design, click the Design menu > Concrete Frame De-
sign > Start Design/Check of Structure command.
Right click on a frame element while the design results are displayed on it to
enter the interactive design mode and interactively design the element in the
Concrete Design Information form. If design results are not currently dis-
played (and a design has been run), click the Design menu > Concrete
Frame Design > Interactive Concrete Frame Design command and then
right click a frame element to enter the interactive design mode for that ele-
ment.
Important note: A concrete frame element is designed as a beam or a col-
umn, depending on how its frame section property was designated when it
was defined using the Define menu > Frame Sections command and the
Reinforcement button, which is only available if it is a concrete section.
Concrete Design Information Form
Table 1 describe the features that are included in the Concrete Design Infor-
mation form.
Interactive Concrete Frame Design Concrete Frame Design
Technical Note 3 - 2 Table 1 Concrete Design Information Form
Table 1 Concrete Design Information Form
Item DESCRIPTION
Story This is the story level ID associated with the frame element.
Beam This is the label associated with a frame element that has been
assigned a concrete frame section property that is designated
as a beam. See the important note previously in this Technical
Note for more information.
Column This is the label associated with a frame element that has been
assigned a concrete frame section property that is designated
as a column. See the important note previously in this Techni-
cal Note for more information.
Section Name This is the label associated with a frame element that has been
assigned a concrete frame section property.
Reinforcement Information
The reinforcement information table on the Concrete Design Information form shows the
output information obtained for each design load combination at each output station
along the frame element. For columns that are designed by this program, the item with
the largest required amount of longitudinal reinforcing is initially highlighted. For columns
that are checked by this program, the item with the largest capacity ratio is initially high-
lighted. For beams, the item with the largest required amount of bottom steel is initially
highlighted. Following are the possible headings in the table:
Combo ID This is the name of the design load combination considered.
Station location This is the location of the station considered, measured from
the i-end of the frame element.
Longitudinal
reinforcement
This item applies to columns only. It also only applies to col-
umns for which the program designs the longitudinal reinforc-
ing. It is the total required area of longitudinal reinforcing steel.
Capacity ratio This item applies to columns only. It also only applies to col-
umns for which you have specified the location and size of re-
inforcing bars and thus the program checks the design. This
item is the capacity ratio.
Concrete Frame Design Interactive Concrete Frame Design
Table 1 Concrete Design Information Form Technical Note 3 - 3
Table 1 Concrete Design Information Form
Item DESCRIPTION
The capacity ratio is determined by first extending a line from
the origin of the PMM interaction surface to the point repre-
senting the P, M2 and M3 values for the designated load com-
bination. Assume the length of this first line is designated L1.
Next, a second line is extended from the origin of the PMM in-
teraction surface through the point representing the P, M2 and
M3 values for the designated load combination until it intersects
the interaction surface. Assume the length of this line from the
origin to the interaction surface is designated L2. The capacity
ratio is equal to L1/L2.
Major shear
reinforcement
This item applies to columns only. It is the total required area of
shear reinforcing per unit length for shear acting in the column
major direction.
Minor shear
reinforcement
This item applies to columns only. It is the total required area of
shear reinforcing per unit length for shear acting in the column
minor direction.
Top steel This item applies to beams only. It is the total required area of
longitudinal top steel at the specified station.
Bottom steel This item applies to beams only. It is the total required area of
longitudinal bottom steel at the specified station.
Shear steel This item applies to beams only. It is the total required area of
shear reinforcing per unit length at the specified station for
loads acting in the local 2-axis direction of the beam.
Overwrites Button Click this button to access and make revisions to the concrete
frame overwrites and then immediately see the new design re-
sults. If you modify some overwrites in this mode and you exit
both the Concrete Frame Design Overwrites form and the Con-
crete Design Information form by clicking their respective OK
buttons, the changes to the overwrites are saved permanently.
When you exit the Concrete Frame Design Overwrites form by
clicking the OK button the changes are temporarily saved. If
you then exit the Concrete Design Information form by clicking
the Cancel button the changes you made to the concrete frame
overwrites are considered temporary only and are not perma-
nently saved. Permanent saving of the overwrites does not ac-
tually occur until you click the OK button in the Concrete Design
Information form as well as the Concrete Frame Design Over-
writes form.
Interactive Concrete Frame Design Concrete Frame Design
Technical Note 3 - 4 Table 1 Concrete Design Information Form
Table 1 Concrete Design Information Form
Item DESCRIPTION
Details Button
Clicking this button displays design details for the frame ele-
ment. Print this information by selecting Print from the File
menu that appears at the top of the window displaying the de-
sign details.
Interaction Button Clicking this button displays the biaxial interaction curve for the
concrete section at the location in the element that is high-
lighted in the table.
Overview Technical Note 4 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN
Technical Note 4
Output Data Plotted Directly on the Model
This Technical Note describes the input and output data that can be plotted
directly on the model.
Overview
Use the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Display Design Info
command to display on-screen output plotted directly on the program model.
If desired, the screen graphics can then be printed using the File menu >
Print Graphics command. The on-screen display data presents input and
output data.
Using the Print Design Tables Form
To print the concrete frame input summary directly to a printer, use the File
menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command and click the
check box on the Print Design Tables form. Click the OK button to send the
print to your printer. Click the Cancel button rather than the OK button to
cancel the print. Use the File menu > Print Setup command and the
Setup>> button to change printers, if necessary.
To print the concrete frame input summary to a file, click the Print to File
check box on the Print Design Tables form. Click the Filename>> button to
change the path or filename. Use the appropriate file extension for the de-
sired format (e.g., .txt, .xls, .doc). Click the OK buttons on the Open File for
Printing Tables form and the Print Design Tables form to complete the re-
quest.
Note:
The File menu > Display Input/Output Text Files command is useful for displaying out-
put that is printed to a text file.
The Append check box allows you to add data to an existing file. The path and
filename of the current file is displayed in the box near the bottom of the Print
Design Tables form. Data will be added to this file. Or use the Filename
Output Data Plotted Directly on the Model Concrete Frame Design
Technical Note 4 - 2 Design Input
button to locate another file, and when the Open File for Printing Tables cau-
tion box appears, click Yes to replace the existing file.
If you select a specific concrete frame element(s) before using the File menu
> Print Tables > concrete Frame Design command, the Selection Only
check box will be checked. The print will be for the selected steel frame ele-
ment(s) only.
Design Input
The following types of data can be displayed directly on the model by select-
ing the data type (shown in bold type) from the drop-down list on the Display
Design Results form. Display this form by selecting he Design menu > Con-
crete Frame Design > Display Design Info command.
ƒ Design Sections
ƒ Design Type
ƒ Live Load Red Factors
ƒ Unbraced L_Ratios
ƒ Eff Length K-Factors
ƒ Cm Factors
ƒ DNS Factors
ƒ DS Factors
Each of these items is described in the code-specific Concrete Frame Design
UBC97 Technical Note 13 Input Data and Concrete Frame Design ACI 318-99
Technical Note 23 Input Data.
Design Output
The following types of data can be displayed directly on the model by select-
ing the data type (shown in bold type) from the drop-down list on the Display
Design Results form. Display this form by selecting he Design menu > Con-
crete Frame Design > Display Design Info command.
Concrete Frame Design Output Data Plotted Directly on the Model
Design Output Technical Note 4 - 3
ƒ Longitudinal Reinforcing
ƒ Shear Reinforcing
ƒ Column Capacity Ratios
ƒ Joint Shear Capacity Ratios
ƒ Beam/Column Capacity Ratios
Each of these items is described in the code-specific Concrete Frame Design
ACI 318-99 Technical Note 24 Output Details and Concrete Frame Design
UBC97 Technical Note 14 Output Details.
General and Notation Technical Note 5 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97
Technical Note 5
General and Notation
Introduction to the UBC97 Series of Technical Notes
The Concrete Frame Design UBC97 series of Technical Notes describes in de-
tail the various aspects of the concrete design procedure that is used by this
program when the user selects the UBC97 Design Code (ICBO 1997). The
various notations used in this series are listed herein.
The design is based on user-specified loading combinations. The program
provides a set of default load combinations that should satisfy requirements
for the design of most building type structures. See Concrete Frame Design
UBC97 Technical Note 8 Design Load Combinations for more information.
When using the UBC 97 option, a frame is assigned to one of the following
five Seismic Zones (UBC 2213, 2214):
ƒ Zone 0
ƒ Zone 1
ƒ Zone 2
ƒ Zone 3
ƒ Zone 4
By default the Seismic Zone is taken as Zone 4 in the program. However, the
Seismic Zone can be overwritten in the Preference form to change the de-
fault. See Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 6 Preferences for
more information.
When using the UBC 97 option, the following Framing Systems are recognized
and designed according to the UBC design provisions (UBC 1627, 1921):
ƒ Ordinary Moment-Resisting Frame (OMF)
General and Notation Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 5 - 2 General and Notation
ƒ Intermediate Moment-Resisting Frame (IMRF)
ƒ Special Moment-Resisting Frame (SMRF)
The Ordinary Moment-Resisting Frame (OMF) is appropriate in minimal seis-
mic risk areas, especially in Seismic Zones 0 and 1. The Intermediate Mo-
ment-Resisting Frame (IMRF) is appropriate in moderate seismic risk areas,
specially in Seismic Zone 2. The Special Moment-Resisting Frame (SMRF) is
appropriate in high seismic risk areas, specially in Seismic Zones 3 and 4. The
UBC seismic design provisions are considered in the program. The details of
the design criteria used for the different framing systems are described in
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 9 Strength Reduction Factors,
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 10 Column Design, Concrete
Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 11 Beam Design, and Concrete Frame
Design UBC97 Technical Note 12 Joint Design.
By default the frame type is taken in the program as OMRF in Seismic Zone 0
and 1, as IMRF in Seismic Zone 2, and as SMRF in Seismic Zone 3 and 4.
However, the frame type can be overwritten in the Overwrites form on a
member-by-member basis. See Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note
7 Overwrites for more information. If any member is assigned with a frame
type, the change of the Seismic Zone in the Preferences will not modify the
frame type of an individual member that has been assigned a frame type.
The program also provides input and output data summaries, which are de-
scribed in Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 13 Input Data and
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 14 Output Details.
English as well as SI and MKS metric units can be used for input. The code is
based on Inch-Pound-Second units. For simplicity, all equations and descrip-
tions presented in this Technical Note correspond to Inch-Pound-Second
units unless otherwise noted.
Notation
A
cv
Area of concrete used to determine shear stress, sq-in
A
g
Gross area of concrete, sq-in
A
s
Area of tension reinforcement, sq-in
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 General and Notation
General and Notation Technical Note 5 - 3
'
s
A
Area of compression reinforcement, sq-in
A
s(required)
Area of steel required for tension reinforcement, sq-in
A
st
Total area of column longitudinal reinforcement, sq-in
A
v
Area of shear reinforcement, sq-in
C
m
Coefficient, dependent upon column curvature, used to calculate
moment magnification factor
D' Diameter of hoop, in
E
c
Modulus of elasticity of concrete, psi
E
s
Modulus of elasticity of reinforcement, assumed as 29,000,000 psi
(UBC 1980.5.2)
I
g
Moment of inertia of gross concrete section about centroidal axis,
neglecting reinforcement, in
4
I
se
Moment of inertia of reinforcement about centroidal axis of mem-
ber cross section, in
4
L Clear unsupported length, in
M
1
Smaller factored end moment in a column, lb-in
M
2
Larger factored end moment in a column, lb-in
M
c
Factored moment to be used in design, lb-in
M
ns
Nonsway component of factored end moment, lb-in
M
s
Sway component of factored end moment, lb-in
M
u
Factored moment at section, lb-in
M
ux
Factored moment at section about X-axis, lb-in
M
uy
Factored moment at section about Y-axis, lb-in
P
b
Axial load capacity at balanced strain conditions, lb
General and Notation Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 5 - 4 General and Notation
P
c
Critical buckling strength of column, lb
P
max
Maximum axial load strength allowed, lb
P
0
Acial load capacity at zero eccentricity, lb
P
u
Factored axial load at section, lb
V
c
Shear resisted by concrete, lb
V
E
Shear force caused by earthquake loads, lb
V
D+L
Shear force from span loading, lb
V
u
Factored shear force at a section, lb
V
p
Shear force computed from probable moment capacity, lb
a Depth of compression block, in
a
b
Depth of compression block at balanced condition, in
b Width of member, in
b
f
Effective width of flange (T-Beam section), in
b
w
Width of web (T-Beam section), in
c Depth to neutral axis, in
c
b
Depth to neutral axis at balanced conditions, in
d Distance from compression face to tension reinforcement, in
d' Concrete cover to center of reinforcing, in
d
s
Thickness of slab (T-Beam section), in
'
c
f
Specified compressive strength of concrete, psi
f
y
Specified yield strength of flexural reinforcement, psi
f
y
≤ 80,000 psi (UBC 1909.4)
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 General and Notation
General and Notation Technical Note 5 - 5
f
ys
Specified yield strength of flexural reinforcement, psi
h Dimension of column, in
k Effective length factor
r Radius of gyration of column section, in
α Reinforcing steel overstrength factor
β
1
Factor for obtaining depth of compression block in concrete
β
d
Absolute value of ratio of maximum factored axial dead load to
maximum factored axial total load
δ
s
Moment magnification factor for sway moments
δ
ns
Moment magnification factor for nonsway moments
ε
c
Strain in concrete
ε
s
Strain in reinforcing steel
ϕ Strength reduction factor
General Technical Note 6 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97
Technical Note 6
Preferences
This Technical Note describes the items in the Preferences form.
General
The concrete frame design preferences in this program are basic assignments
that apply to all concrete frame elements. Use the Options menu > Prefer-
ences > Concrete Frame Design command to access the Preferences form
where you can view and revise the concrete frame design preferences.
Default values are provided for all concrete frame design preference items.
Thus, it is not required that you specify or change any of the preferences. You
should, however, at least review the default values for the preference items
to make sure they are acceptable to you.
Using the Preferences Form
To view preferences, select the Options menu > Preferences > Concrete
Frame Design. The Preferences form will display. The preference options
are displayed in a two-column spreadsheet. The left column of the spread-
sheet displays the preference item name. The right column of the spreadsheet
displays the preference item value.
To change a preference item, left click the desired preference item in either
the left or right column of the spreadsheet. This activates a drop-down box or
highlights the current preference value. If the drop-down box appears, select
a new value. If the cell is highlighted, type in the desired value. The prefer-
ence value will update accordingly. You cannot overwrite values in the drop-
down boxes.
When you have finished making changes to the concrete frame preferences,
click the OK button to close the form. You must click the OK button for the
changes to be accepted by the program. If you click the Cancel button to exit
Preferences Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 6 - 2 Preferences
the form, any changes made to the preferences are ignored and the form is
closed.
Preferences
For purposes of explanation in this Technical Note, the preference items are
presented in Table 1. The column headings in the table are described as fol-
lows:
ƒ Item: The name of the preference item as it appears in the cells at the
left side of the Preferences form.
ƒ Possible Values: The possible values that the associated preference item
can have.
ƒ Default Value: The built-in default value that the program assumes for
the associated preference item.
ƒ Description: A description of the associated preference item.
Table 1: Concrete Frame Preferences
Item
Possible
Values
Default
Value Description
Design Code Any code in
the program
UBC97 Design code used for design of
concrete frame elements.
Phi Bending
Tension
>0 0.9 Unitless strength reduction factor per
UBC 1909.
Phi Compres-
sion Tied
>0 0.7 Unitless strength reduction factor per
UBC 1909.
Phi Compres-
sion Spiral
>0 0.75 Unitless strength reduction factor per
UBC 1909.
Phi Shear >0 0.85 Unitless strength reduction factor per
UBC 1909.
Number Inter-
action Curves
≥4.0 24 Number of equally spaced interaction
curves used to create a full 360-degree
interaction surface (this item should be
a multiple of four). We recommend that
you use 24 for this item.
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Preferences
Preferences Technical Note 6 - 3
Table 1: Concrete Frame Preferences
Item
Possible
Values
Default
Value Description
Number Inter-
action Points
Any odd value
≥1.0
11 Number of points used for defining a
single curve in a concrete frame
interaction surface (this item should be
odd).
Time History
Design
Envelopes or
Step-by-Step
Envelopes Toggle for design load combinations
that include a time history designed for
the envelope of the time history, or
designed step-by-step for the entire
time history. If a single design load
combination has more than one time
history case in it, that design load
combination is designed for the
envelopes of the time histories,
regardless of what is specified here.
Overwrites Technical Note 7 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97
Technical Note 7
Overwrites
General
The concrete frame design overwrites are basic assignments that apply only
to those elements to which they are assigned. This Technical Note describes
concrete frame design overwrites for UBC97. To access the overwrites, select
an element and click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design >
View/Revise Overwrites command.
Default values are provided for all overwrite items. Thus, you do not need to
specify or change any of the overwrites. However, at least review the default
values for the overwrite items to make sure they are acceptable. When
changes are made to overwrite items, the program applies the changes only
to the elements to which they are specifically assigned; that is, to the ele-
ments that are selected when the overwrites are changed.
Overwrites
For explanation purposes in this Technical Note, the overwrites are presented
in Table 1. The column headings in the table are described as follows.
ƒ Item: The name of the overwrite item as it appears in the program. To
save space in the formes, these names are generally short.
ƒ Possible Values: The possible values that the associated overwrite item
can have.
ƒ Default Value: The default value that the program assumes for the asso-
ciated overwrite item.
ƒ Description: A description of the associated overwrite item.
An explanation of how to change an overwrite is provided at the end of this
Technical Note.
Overwrites Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 7 - 2 Overwrites
Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Overwrites
Item
Possible
Values
Default
Value Description
Element
Section
Element
Type
Sway Special,
Sway Interme-
diate,
Sway
Ordinary
NonSway
Sway Special Frame type; see UBC 1910.11 to
1910.13.
Live Load
Reduction
Factor
>0
≤1.0
1. Used to reduce the live load contribu-
tion to the factored loading.
Horizontal
Earthquake
Factor
>0
≤1.0
1.
Unbraced
Length Ratio
(Major)
>0
≤1.0
1.0
Unbraced
Length Ratio
(Minor)
>0
≤1.0
1.0
Effective
Length Factor
(K Major)
>0
≤1.0
1 See UBC 1910.12.1.
Effective
Length Factor
(K Minor)
>0
≤1.0
1 See UBC 1910.12.1.
Moment
Coefficient
(Cm Major)
>0
≤1.0
1 See UBC 1910.12.3.1 relates actual
moment diagram to an equivalent uni-
form moment diagram.
Moment
Coefficient
(Cm Minor)
>0
≤1.0
1 See UBC 1910.12.3.1 relates actual
moment diagram to an equivalent uni-
form moment diagram.
NonSway
Moment Factor
(Dns Major)
>0
≤1.0
1 See UBC 1910.12.
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Overwrites
Overwrites Technical Note 7 - 3
Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Overwrites
Item
Possible
Values
Default
Value Description
NonSway
Moment Factor
(Dns Minor)
1 See UBC 1910.12.
Sway Moment
Factor
(Ds Major)
1 See UBC 1910.12.
Sway Moment
Factor
(Ds Minor)
1 See UBC 1910.12.
Making Changes in the Overwrites Form
To access the concrete frame overwrites, select an element and click the De-
sign menu > Concrete Frame Design > View/Revise Overwrites com-
mand.
The overwrites are displayed in the form with a column of check boxes and a
two-column spreadsheet. The left column of the spreadsheet contains the
name of the overwrite item. The right column of the spreadsheet contains the
overwrites values.
Initially, the check boxes in the Concrete Frame Design Overwrites form are
all unchecked and all of the cells in the spreadsheet have a gray background
to indicate that they are inactive and the items in the cells cannot be
changed. The names of the overwrite items are displayed in the first column
of the spreadsheet. The values of the overwrite items are visible in the second
column of the spreadsheet if only one element was selected before the over-
writes form was accessed. If multiple elements were selected, no values show
for the overwrite items in the second column of the spreadsheet.
After selecting one or multiple elements, check the box to the left of an over-
write item to change it. Then left click in either column of the spreadsheet to
activate a drop-down box or highlight the contents in the cell in the right col-
umn of the spreadsheet. If the drop-down box appears, select a value from
Overwrites Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 7 - 4 Overwrites
the box. If the cell contents is highlighted, type in the desired value. The
overwrite will reflect the change. You cannot change the values of the drop-
down boxes.
When changes to the overwrites have been completed, click the OK button to
close the form. The program then changes all of the overwrite items whose
associated check boxes are checked for the selected members. You must click
the OK button for the changes to be accepted by the program. If you click the
Cancel button to exit the form, any changes made to the overwrites are ig-
nored and the form is closed.
Resetting Concrete Frame Overwrites to Default Values
Use the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Reset All Overwrites
command to reset all of the steel frame overwrites. All current design results
will be deleted when this command is executed.
Important note about resetting overwrites: The program defaults for the
overwrite items are built into the program. The concrete frame overwrite val-
ues that were in a .edb file that you used to initialize your model may be dif-
ferent from the built-in program default values. When you reset overwrites,
the program resets the overwrite values to its built-in values, not to the val-
ues that were in the .edb file used to initialize the model.
Design Load Combinations Technical Note 8 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97
Technical Note 8
Design Load Combinations
The design load combinations are the various combinations of the prescribed
load cases for which the structure needs to be checked. For the UBC 97 code,
if a structure is subjected to dead load (DL) and live load (LL) only, the stress
check may need only one load combination, namely 1.4 DL + 1.7 LL (UBC
1909.2.1). However, in addition to the dead and live loads, if the structure is
subjected to wind (WL) and earthquake (EL) loads, and considering that wind
and earthquake forces are reversible, the following load combinations may
need to be considered (UBC 1909.2).
1.4 DL (UBC 1909.2.1)
1.4 DL + 1.7 LL (UBC 1909.2.1)
0.9 DL ± 1.3 WL (UBC 1909.2.2)
0.75 (1.4 DL + 1.7 LL ± 1.7 WL) (UBC 1909.2.2)
0.9 DL ± 1.0 EL (UBC 1909.2.3, 1612.2.1)
1.2 DL + 0.5 LL ± 1.0 EL) (UBC 1909.2.3, 1612.2.1)
These are also the default design load combinations in the program whenever
the UBC97 code is used.
Live load reduction factors can be applied to the member forces of the live
load condition on an element-by-element basis to reduce the contribution of
the live load to the factored loading. See Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 7 Overwrites for more information.
Strength Reduction Factors Technical Note 9 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97
Technical Note 9
Strength Reduction Factors
The strength reduction factors, ϕ, are applied on the nominal strength to ob-
tain the design strength provided by a member. The ϕ factors for flexure, ax-
ial force, shear, and torsion are as follows:
ϕ = 0.90 for flexure (UBC 1909.3.2.1)
ϕ = 0.90 for axial tension (UBC 1909.3.2.2)
ϕ = 0.90 for axial tension and flexure (UBC 1909.3.2.2)
ϕ = 0.75 for axial compression, and axial compression
and flexure (spirally reinforced column) (UBC 1909.3.2.2)
ϕ = 0.70 for axial compression, and axial compression
and flexure (tied column) (UBC 1909.3.2.2)
ϕ = 0.85 for shear and torsion (non-seismic design) (UBC 1909.3.2.3)
ϕ = 0.60 for shear and torsion (UBC 1909.3.2.3)
Overview Technical Note 10 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97
Technical Note 10
Column Design
This Technical Note describes how the program checks column capacity or de-
signs reinforced concrete columns when the UBC97 code is selected.
Overview
The program can be used to check column capacity or to design columns. If
you define the geometry of the reinforcing bar configuration of each concrete
column section, the program will check the column capacity. Alternatively, the
program can calculate the amount of reinforcing required to design the col-
umn. The design procedure for the reinforced concrete columns of the struc-
ture involves the following steps:
ƒ Generate axial force/biaxial moment interaction surfaces for all of the dif-
ferent concrete section types of the model. A typical biaxial interaction
surface is shown in Figure 1. When the steel is undefined, the program
generates the interaction surfaces for the range of allowable reinforce-
ment1 to 8 percent for Ordinary and Intermediate moment resisting
frames (UBC 1910.9.1) and 1 to 6 percent for Special moment resisting
frames (UBC 1921.4.3.1).
ƒ Calculate the capacity ratio or the required reinforcing area for the fac-
tored axial force and biaxial (or uniaxial) bending moments obtained from
each loading combination at each station of the column. The target capac-
ity ratio is taken as 1 when calculating the required reinforcing area.
ƒ Design the column shear reinforcement.
The following four subsections describe in detail the algorithms associated
with this process.
Column Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 10 - 2 Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces
Figure 1 A Typical Column Interaction Surface
Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces
The column capacity interaction volume is numerically described by a series
of discrete points that are generated on the three-dimensional interaction
failure surface. In addition to axial compression and biaxial bending, the for-
mulation allows for axial tension and biaxial bending considerations. A typical
interaction diagram is shown in Figure 1.
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Column Design
Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces Technical Note 10 - 3
The coordinates of these points are determined by rotating a plane of linear
strain in three dimensions on the section of the column. See Figure 2. The
linear strain diagram limits the maximum concrete strain, ε
c
, at the extremity
of the section, to 0.003 (UBC 1910.2.3).
The formulation is based consistently upon the general principles of ultimate
strength design (UBC 1910.3), and allows for any doubly symmetric rectan-
gular, square, or circular column section.
The stress in the steel is given by the product of the steel strain and the steel
modulus of elasticity, ε
s
E
s
, and is limited to the yield stress of the steel, f
y
(UBC 1910.2.4). The area associated with each reinforcing bar is assumed to
be placed at the actual location of the center of the bar and the algorithm
does not assume any further simplifications with respect to distributing the
area of steel over the cross section of the column, such as an equivalent steel
tube or cylinder. See Figure 3.
The concrete compression stress block is assumed to be rectangular, with a
stress value of 0.85
'
c
f (UBC 1910.2.7.1). See Figure 3. The interaction algo-
rithm provides correction to account for the concrete area that is displaced by
the reinforcement in the compression zone.
The effects of the strength reduction factor, ϕ, are included in the generation
of the interaction surfaces. The maximum compressive axial load is limited to
ϕP
n(max)
, where
ϕP
n(max)
= 0.85ϕ[0.85
'
c
f (A
g
-A
st
)+f
y
A
st
] (spiral) (UBC 1910.3.5.1)
ϕP
n(max)
= 0.85ϕ[0.85
'
c
f (A
g
-A
st
)+f
y
A
st
] (tied) (UBC 1910.3.5.2)
ϕ = 0.70 for tied columns (UBC 1909.3.2.2)
ϕ = 0.75 for spirally reinforced columns (UBC 1909.3.2.2)
The value of ϕ used in the interaction diagram varies from ϕ
min
to 0.9 based
on the axial load. For low values of axial load, ϕ is increased linearly from ϕ
min
to 0.9 as the nominal capacity ϕP
n
decreases from the smaller of ϕP
b
or
0.1
'
c
f A
g
to zero, where P
b
is the axial force at the balanced condition. In
cases involving axial tension, ϕ is always 0.9 (UBC 1909.3.2.2).
Column Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 10 - 4 Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces
Figure 2 Idealized Strain Distribution for Generation of Interaction Surfaces
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Column Design
Calculate Column Capacity Ratio Technical Note 10 - 5
Figure 3 Idealization of Stress and Strain Distribution in a Column Section
Calculate Column Capacity Ratio
The column capacity ratio is calculated for each loading combination at each
output station of each column. The following steps are involved in calculating
the capacity ratio of a particular column for a particular loading combination
at a particular location:
ƒ Determine the factored moments and forces from the analysis load cases
and the specified load combination factors to give P
u
, M
ux
, and M
uy
.
ƒ Determine the moment magnification factors for the column moments.
ƒ Apply the moment magnification factors to the factored moments. Deter-
mine whether the point, defined by the resulting axial load and biaxial
moment set, lies within the interaction volume.
The factored moments and corresponding magnification factors depend on the
identification of the individual column as either “sway” or “non-sway.”
Column Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 10 - 6 Calculate Column Capacity Ratio
The following three sections describe in detail the algorithms associated with
this process.
Determine Factored Moments and Forces
The factored loads for a particular load combination are obtained by applying
the corresponding load factors to all the load cases, giving P
u
, M
ux
, and M
uy
.
The factored moments are further increased for non-sway columns, if re-
quired, to obtain minimum eccentricities of (0.6 + 0.03h) inches, where h is
the dimension of the column in the corresponding direction (UBC
1910.12.3.2).
Determine Moment Magnification Factors
The moment magnification factors are calculated separately for sway (overall
stability effect), δ
s
, and for non-sway (individual column stability effect), δ
ns
.
Also the moment magnification factors in the major and minor directions are
in general different.
The program assumes that it performs a P-delta analysis and, therefore, mo-
ment magnification factors for moments causing sidesway are taken as unity
(UBC 1910.10.2). For the P-delta analysis, the load should correspond to a
load combination of 0.75 (1.4 dead load + 1.7 live load)/ϕ if wind load gov-
erns, or (1.2 dead load + 0.50 live load)/ϕ if seismic load governs, where ϕ is
the understrength factor for stability, which is taken as 0.75 (UBC
1910.12.3). See also White and Hajjar (1991).
The moment obtained from analysis is separated into two components: the
sway (M
s
) and the non-sway (M
s
) components. The non-sway components
which are identified by “ns” subscripts are predominantly caused by gravity
load. The sway components are identified by the “s” subscripts. The sway
moments are predominantly caused by lateral loads, and are related to the
cause of side-sway.
For individual columns or column-members in a floor, the magnified moments
about two axes at any station of a column can be obtained as
M = M
ns
+ δ
s
M
s
. (UBC 1910.13.3)
The factor δ
s
is the moment magnification factor for moments causing side
sway. The moment magnification factors for sway moments, δ
s
, is taken as 1
because the component moments M
s
and M
ns
are obtained from a “second or-
der elastic (P-delta) analysis.”
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Column Design
Calculate Column Capacity Ratio Technical Note 10 - 7
The computed moments are further amplified for individual column stability
effect (UBC 1910.12.3, 1910.13.5) by the nonsway moment magnification
factor, δ
ns
, as follows:
M
c
= δ
ns
M
2
, where (UBC 1910.12.3)
M
c
is the factored moment to be used in design, and
M
2
is the larger factored and amplified end moment.
The non-sway moment magnification factor, δ
ns
, associated with the major or
minor direction of the column is given by (UBC 1910.12.3)
δ
ns
=
c
u
m
P
P
C
75 . 0
1 −
≥ 1.0, where (UBC 1910.12.3)
P
c
=
2
2
) (
u
kl
EI π
, (UBC 1910.12.3)
k is conservatively taken as 1; however, the program allows the user to
override this value.
EI is associated with a particular column direction given by:
EI =
d
g c
I E
β + 1
4 . 0
, (UBC 1910.12.3)
maximum factored axial dead load
β
d
= maximum factored axial total load and (UBC 1910.12.3)
C
m
= 0.6 + 0.4
b
a
M
M
≥ 0.4. (UBC 1910.12.3.1)
M
a
and M
b
are the moments at the ends of the column, and M
b
is numerically
larger than M
a
. M
a
/ M
b
is positive for single curvature bending and negative
for double curvature bending. The above expression of C
m
is valid if there is
no transverse load applied between the supports. If transverse load is present
on the span, or the length is overwritten, C
m
= 1. C
m
can be overwritten by
the user on an element-by-element basis.
Column Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 10 - 8 Calculate Column Capacity Ratio
The magnification factor, δ
ns
, must be a positive number and greater than 1.
Therefore, P
u
must be less than 0.75P
c
. If P
u
is found to be greater than or
equal to 0.75P
c
, a failure condition is declared.
The above calculations use the unsupported length of the column. The two
unsupported lengths are l
22
and l
33
, corresponding to instability in the minor
and major directions of the element, respectively. See Figure 4. These are the
lengths between the support points of the element in the corresponding di-
rections.
Figure 4 Axes of Bending and Unsupported Length
If the program assumptions are not satisfactory for a particular member, the
user can explicitly specify values of δ
s
and δ
ns
.
Determine Capacity Ratio
The program calculates a capacity ratio as a measure of the stress condition
of the column. The capacity ratio is basically a factor that gives an indication
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Column Design
Calculate Column Capacity Ratio Technical Note 10 - 9
of the stress condition of the column with respect to the capacity of the col-
umn.
Before entering the interaction diagram to check the column capacity, the
moment magnification factors are applied to the factored loads to obtain P
u
,
M
ux
, and M
uy
. The point (P
u
, M
ux
, M
uy
.) is then placed in the interaction space
shown as point L in Figure 5. If the point lies within the interaction volume,
the column capacity is adequate; however, if the point lies outside the inter-
action volume, the column is overstressed.
Figure 5 Geometric Representation of Column Capacity Ratios
This capacity ratio is achieved by plotting the point L and determining the lo-
cation of point C. The point C is defined as the point where the line OL (if
extended outwards) will intersect the failure surface. This point is determined
by three-dimensional linear interpolation between the points that define the
Column Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 10 - 10 Required Reinforcing Area
failure surface. See Figure 5. The capacity ratio, CR, is given by the ratio
OC
OL
.
ƒ If OL = OC (or CR=1), the point lies on the interaction surface and the
column is stressed to capacity.
ƒ If OL < OC (or CR<1), the point lies within the interaction volume and the
column capacity is adequate.
ƒ If OL > OC (or CR>1), the point lies outside the interaction volume and the
column is overstressed.
The maximum of all the values of CR calculated from each load combination is
reported for each check station of the column, along with the controlling P
u
,
M
ux
, and M
uy
set and associated load combination number.
Required Reinforcing Area
If the reinforcing area is not defined, the program computes the reinforce-
ment that will give a column capacity ratio of one, calculated as described in
the previous section entitled "Calculate Column Capacity Ratio."
Design Column Shear Reinforcement
The shear reinforcement is designed for each loading combination in the ma-
jor and minor directions of the column. The following steps are involved in
designing the shear reinforcing for a particular column for a particular load
combination caused by shear forces in a particular direction:
ƒ Determine the factored forces acting on the section, P
u
and V
u
. Note that
P
u
is needed for the calculation of V
c
.
ƒ Determine the shear force, V
c
, that can be resisted by concrete alone.
ƒ Calculate the reinforcement steel required to carry the balance.
For Special and Intermediate moment resisting frames (Ductile frames), the
shear design of the columns is also based on the probable and nominal mo-
ment capacities of the members, respectively, in addition to the factored
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Column Design
Design Column Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 10 - 11
moments. Effects of the axial forces on the column moment capacities are
included in the formulation.
The following three sections describe in detail the algorithms associated with
this process.
Determine Section Forces
ƒ In the design of the column shear reinforcement of an Ordinary moment
resisting concrete frame, the forces for a particular load combination,
namely, the column axial force, P
u
, and the column shear force, V
u
, in a
particular direction are obtained by factoring the program analysis load
cases with the corresponding load combination factors.
ƒ In the shear design of Special moment resisting frames (i.e., seismic
design) the column is checked for capacity-shear in addition to the re-
quirement for the Ordinary moment resisting frames. The capacity-shear
force in a column, V
p
, in a particular direction is calculated from the prob-
able moment capacities of the column associated with the factored axial
force acting on the column.
For each load combination, the factored axial load, P
u
, is calculated. Then,
the positive and negative moment capacities,
+
u
M and

u
M , of the column
in a particular direction under the influence of the axial force P
u
is calcu-
lated using the uniaxial interaction diagram in the corresponding direction.
The design shear force, V
u
, is then given by (UBC 1921.4.5.1)
V
u
= V
p
+ V
D+L
(UBC 1921.4.5.1)
where, V
p
is the capacity-shear force obtained by applying the calculated
probable ultimate moment capacities at the two ends of the column acting
in two opposite directions. Therefore, V
p
is the maximum of
1
P
V and
2
P
V ,
where
1
P
V =
L
M M
J I
+ −
+
, and
2
P
V =
L
M M
J I
− +
+
, where
Column Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 10 - 12 Design Column Shear Reinforcement
− +
I I
M M , , = Positive and negative moment capacities at end I of the
column using a steel yield stress value of αf
y
and no ϕ
factors (ϕ = 1.0),
− +
J J
M M , , = Positive and negative moment capacities at end J of the
column using a steel yield stress value of αf
y
and no ϕ
factors (ϕ = 1.0), and
L = Clear span of column.
For Special moment resisting frames, α is taken as 1.25 (UBC 1921.0).
V
D+L
is the contribution of shear force from the in-span distribution of
gravity loads. For most of the columns, it is zero.
ƒ For Intermediate moment resisting frames, the shear capacity of the
column is also checked for the capacity-shear based on the nominal mo-
ment capacities at the ends and the factored gravity loads, in addition to
the check required for Ordinary moment resisting frames. The design
shear force is taken to be the minimum of that based on the nominal (ϕ =
1.0) moment capacity and factored shear force. The procedure for calcu-
lating nominal moment capacity is the same as that for computing the
probable moment capacity for special moment resisting frames, except
that α is taken equal to 1 rather than 1.25 (UBC 1921.0, 1921.8.3). The
factored shear forces are based on the specified load factors, except the
earthquake load factors are doubled (UBC 1921.8.3).
Determine Concrete Shear Capacity
Given the design force set P
u
and V
u
, the shear force carried by the concrete,
V
c
, is calculated as follows:
ƒ If the column is subjected to axial compression, i.e., P
u
is positive,
V
c
= 2
cv
g
u
c
A
A
P
f








+
000 , 2
1
'
, (UBC 1911.3.1.2)
where,
'
c
f ≤ 100 psi, and (UBC 1911.1.2)
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Column Design
Design Column Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 10 - 13
V
c
≤ 3.5
'
c
f
cv
g
u
A
A
P








+
500
1 . (UBC 1911.3.2.2)
The term
g
u
A
P
must have psi units. A
cv
is the effective shear area which is
shown shaded in Figure 6. For circular columns, A
cv
is not taken to be
greater than 0.8 times the gross area (UBC 1911.5.6.2).
Figure 6 Shear Stress Area, A
cv
Column Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 10 - 14 Design Column Shear Reinforcement
ƒ If the column is subjected to axial tension, P
u
is negative, (UBC
1911.3.2.3)
V
c
= 2
'
c
f








+
g
u
A
P
500
1 A
cv
≥ 0 (UBC 1911.3.2.3)
ƒ For Special moment resisting concrete frame design, V
c
is set to zero
if the factored axial compressive force, P
u
, including the earthquake effect
is small (Pu <
'
c
f A
g
/ 20) and if the shear force contribution from earth-
quake, V
E
, is more than half of the total factored maximum shear force
over the length of the member V
u
(V
E
≥ 0.5V
u
) (UBC 1921.4.5.2).
Determine Required Shear Reinforcement
Given V
u
and V
c
, the required shear reinforcement in the form of stirrups or
ties within a spacing, s, is given for rectangular and circular columns by the
following:
A
v
=
d f
s V V
ys
c u
) / ( − ϕ
, for rectangular columns (UBC 1911.5.6.1, 1911.5.6.2)
A
v
=
'
) / ( 2
D f
s V V
ys
c u
− ϕ
π
, for circular columns (UBC 1911.5.6.1, 1911.5.6.2)
V
u
is limited by the following relationship.
(V
u
/ ϕ-V
c
) ≤ 8
'
c
f A
cv
(UBC 1911.5.6.8)
Otherwise redimensioning of the concrete section is required. Here ϕ, the
strength reduction factor, is 0.85 for nonseismic design or for seismic design
in Seismic Zones 0, 1, and 2 (UBC 1909.3.2.3) and is 0.60 for seismic design
in Seismic Zones 3 and 4 (UBC 1909.3.4.1). The maximum of all the calcu-
lated values obtained from each load combination are reported for the major
and minor directions of the column, along with the controlling shear force and
associated load combination label.
The column shear reinforcement requirements reported by the program are
based purely on shear strength consideration. Any minimum stirrup require-
ments to satisfy spacing considerations or transverse reinforcement volumet-
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Column Design
Reference Technical Note 10 - 15
ric considerations must be investigated independently of the program by the
user.
Reference
White. D. W., and J.F., Hajjar. 1991. Application of Second-Order Elastic
Analysis in LRFD: Research in Practice. Engineering Journal. American
Institute of Steel Construction, Inc. Vol. 28, No. 4.
Overview Technical Note 11 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97
Technical Note 11
Beam Design
This Technical Note describes how this program completes beam design when
the UBC97 code is selected. The program calculates and reports the required
areas of steel for flexure and shear based on the beam moments, shears, load
combination factors and other criteria described herein.
Overview
In the design of concrete beams, the program calculates and reports the re-
quired areas of steel for flexure and shear based upon the beam moments,
shears, load combination factors, and other criteria described below. The re-
inforcement requirements are calculated at a user-defined number of
check/design stations along the beam span.
All beams are designed for major direction flexure and shear only.
Effects caused by axial forces, minor direction bending, and torsion
that may exist in the beams must be investigated independently by
the user.
The beam design procedure involves the following steps:
ƒ Design beam flexural reinforcement
ƒ Design beam shear reinforcement
Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement
The beam top and bottom flexural steel is designed at check/design stations
along the beam span. The following steps are involved in designing the flex-
ural reinforcement for the major moment for a particular beam for a particu-
lar section:
ƒ Determine the maximum factored moments
ƒ Determine the reinforcing steel
Beam Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 11 - 2 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement
Determine Factored Moments
In the design of flexural reinforcement of Special, Intermediate, or Ordinary
moment resisting concrete frame beams, the factored moments for each load
combination at a particular beam section are obtained by factoring the corre-
sponding moments for different load cases with the corresponding load fac-
tors.
The beam section is then designed for the maximum positive
+
u
M and maxi-
mum negative

u
M factored moments obtained from all of the load combina-
tions
.
Negative beam moments produce top steel. In such cases, the beam is al-
ways designed as a rectangular section. Positive beam moments produce
bottom steel. In such cases, the beam may be designed as a Rectangular- or
a T-beam.
Determine Required Flexural Reinforcement
In the flexural reinforcement design process, the program calculates both the
tension and compression reinforcement. Compression reinforcement is added
when the applied design moment exceeds the maximum moment capacity of
a singly reinforced section. The user has the option of avoiding the compres-
sion reinforcement by increasing the effective depth, the width, or the grade
of concrete.
The design procedure is based on the simplified rectangular stress block as
shown in Figure 1 (UBC 1910.2). It is assumed that the compression carried
by concrete is less than 0.75 times that which can be carried at the balanced
condition (UBC 1910.3.3). When the applied moment exceeds the moment
capacity at this designed balanced condition, the area of compression rein-
forcement is calculated assuming that the additional moment will be carried
by compression and additional tension reinforcement.
The design procedure used by the program for both rectangular and flanged
sections (L- and T-beams) is summarized below. It is assumed that the de-
sign ultimate axial force does not exceed 0.1
'
c
f A
g
(UBC 1910.3.3); hence, all
the beams are designed for major direction flexure and shear only.
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Beam Design
Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Technical Note 11 - 3
Figure 1 Design of a Rectangular Beam Section
Design for Rectangular Beam
In designing for a factored negative or positive moment, M
u
(i.e., designing
top or bottom steel), the depth of the compression block is given by a (see
Figure 1), where,
a = d -
b f
M
d
c
u
ϕ

'
2
85 . 0
2
,
where the value of ϕ is 0.90 (UBC 1909.3.2.1) in the above and the following
equations. Also β
1
and c
b
are calculated as follows:
β
1
= 0.85 - 0.05
(
(
,
\
,
,
(
j

000 , 1
000 , 4
'
c
f
, 0.65 ≤ β
1
≤ 0.85, (UBC 1910.2.7.3)
c
b
= d
f E
E
y s c
s c
+ ε
ε
=
y
f + 000 , 87
000 , 87
d. (UBC 1910.2.3, 1910.2.4)
Beam Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 11 - 4 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement
The maximum allowed depth of the compression block is given by
a
max
= 0.75β
1
c
b
. (UBC 1910.2.7.1, 1910.3.3)
ƒ If a ≤ a
max
, the area of tensile steel reinforcement is given by
A
s
=
(
,
\
,
(
j
− ϕ
2
a
d f
M
y
u
.
This steel is to be placed at the bottom if M
u
is positive, or at the top if M
u
is negative.
ƒ If a > a
max
, compression reinforcement is required (UBC 1910.3.3) and is
calculated as follows:
− The compressive force developed in concrete alone is given by
C = 0.85
'
c
f ba
max
, and (UBC 1910.2.7.1)
the moment resisted by concrete compression and tensile steel is
M
uc
= C
(
(
,
\
,
,
(
j

2
max
a
d ϕ.
− Therefore the moment resisted by compression steel and tensile steel is
M
us
= M
u
- M
uc
.
− So the required compression steel is given by
'
s
A =
ϕ − ) ' (
'
d d f
M
s
us
, where
'
s
f = 0.003E
s
]
]
]
,
¸
, −
c
d c '
. (UBC 1910.2.4)
− The required tensile steel for balancing the compression in concrete is
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Beam Design
Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Technical Note 11 - 5
A
s1
=
ϕ
]
]
]
,
¸
,

2
max
a
d f
M
y
uc
, and
the tensile steel for balancing the compression in steel is given by
A
s2
=
ϕ − ) ' ( d d f
M
y
us
.
− Therefore, the total tensile reinforcement, A
s
= A
s1
+ A
s2
, and total com-
pression reinforcement is
'
s
A . A
s
is to be placed at bottom and
'
s
A is to
be placed at top if M
u
is positive, and vice versa if M
u
is negative.
Design for T-Beam
In designing for a factored negative moment, M
u
(i.e., designing top steel),
the calculation of the steel area is exactly the same as above, i.e., no T-Beam
data is to be used. See Figure 2. If M
u
> 0, the depth of the compression
block is given by
a = d -
f c
u
b f
M
d
ϕ

'
2
85 . 0
2
.
The maximum allowed depth of the compression block is given by
a
max
= 0.75β
1
c
b
. (UBC 1910.2.7.1)
If a ≤ d
s
, the subsequent calculations for A
s
are exactly the same as previously
defined for the rectangular section design. However, in this case, the width of
the compression flange is taken as the width of the beam for analysis. Com-
pression reinforcement is required if a > a
max
.
If a > d
s
, calculation for A
s
is performed in two parts. The first part is for bal-
ancing the compressive force from the flange, C
f
, and the second part is for
balancing the compressive force from the web, C
w
, as shown in Figure 2. C
f
is
given by
C
f
= 0.85
'
c
f (bf - b
w
) d
s
.
Beam Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 11 - 6 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement
Figure 2 Design of a T-Beam Section
Therefore, A
s1
=
y
f
f
C
and the portion of M
u
that is resisted by the flange is
given by
M
uf
= C
f

(
(
,
\
,
,
(
j

2
s
d
d ϕ .
Again, the value for ϕ is 0.90. Therefore, the balance of the moment, M
u
to be
carried by the web is given by
M
uw
= M
u
- M
uf
.
The web is a rectangular section of dimensions b
w
and d, for which the design
depth of the compression block is recalculated as
a
1
= d -
w c
uw
b f
M
d
ϕ

'
2
85 . 0
2
.
ƒ If a
1
≤ a
max
, the area of tensile steel reinforcement is then given by
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Beam Design
Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Technical Note 11 - 7
A
s2
=
(
(
,
\
,
,
(
j
− ϕ
2
1
a
d f
M
y
uw
, and
A
s
= A
s1
+ A
s2
.
This steel is to be placed at the bottom of the T-beam.
ƒ If a
1
> a
max
, compression reinforcement is required (UBC 1910.3.3) and is
calculated as follows:
− The compressive force in web concrete alone is given by
C = 0.85
'
c
f ba
max
. (UBC 1910.2.7.1)
− Therefore the moment resisted by concrete web and tensile steel is
M
uc
= C
(
(
,
\
,
,
(
j

2
max
a
d ϕ, and
the moment resisted by compression steel and tensile steel is
M
us
= M
uw
- M
uc
.
− Therefore, the compression steel is computed as
'
s
A =
ϕ − ) ' (
'
d d f
M
s
us
, where
'
s
f = 0.003E
s
]
]
]
,
¸
, −
c
d c '
. (UBC 1910.2.4)
− The tensile steel for balancing compression in web concrete is
A
s2
=
ϕ
(
(
,
\
,
,
(
j

2
max
a
d f
M
y
uc
, and
the tensile steel for balancing compression in steel is
Beam Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 11 - 8 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement
A
s3
=
( )ϕ − ' d d f
M
y
us
.
− The total tensile reinforcement, A
s
= A
s1
+ A
s2
+ A
s3
, and total compres-
sion reinforcement is
'
s
A . A
s
is to be placed at bottom and
'
s
A is to be
placed at top.
Minimum Tensile Reinforcement
The minimum flexural tensile steel provided in a rectangular section in an Or-
dinary moment resisting frame is given by the minimum of the two following
limits:
A
s
≥ max
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
d b
f
d b
f
f
w
y
w
y
c
200
and
3
'
or (UBC 1910.5.1)
A
s

3
4
A
s(required)
(UBC 1910.5.3)
Special Consideration for Seismic Design
For Special moment resisting concrete frames (seismic design), the beam de-
sign satisfies the following additional conditions (see also Table 1 for compre-
hensive listing):
ƒ The minimum longitudinal reinforcement shall be provided at both the top
and bottom. Any of the top and bottom reinforcement shall not be less
than A
s(min)
(UBC 1921.3.2.1).
A
s(min)
≥ max
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
d b
f
d b
f
f
w
y
w
y
c
200
and
3
'
or (UBC 1910.5.1, 1921.3.2.1)
A
s(min)

3
4
A
s(required)
. (UBC 1910.5.3, 1921.3.2.1)
ƒ The beam flexural steel is limited to a maximum given by
A
s
≤ 0.25 b
w
d. (UBC 1921.3.2.1)
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Beam Design
Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Technical Note 11 - 9
Table 1 Design Criteria Table
Type of
Check/
Design
Ordinary Moment
Resisting Frames
(Seismic Zones 0&1)
Intermediate Moment
Resisting Frames
(Seismic Zone 2)
Special Moment
Resisting Frames
(Seismic Zones 3 & 4)
Column
Check
(interaction)
NLD
a
Combinations NLD
a
Combinations NLD
a
Combinations
Column
Design
(interaction)
NLD
a
Combinations
1% < ρ < 8%
NLD
a
Combinations
1% < ρ < 8%
NLD
a
Combinations
α = 1.0
1% < ρ < 6%
Column
Shears
NLD
a
Combinations
Modified NLD
a
Combinations
(earthquake loads doubled)
Column Capacity
ϕ = 1.0 and α = 1.0
NLD
a
Combinations and
Column shear capacity
ϕ = 1.0 and α = 1.25
Beam
Design
Flexure
NLD
a
Combinations NLD
a
Combinations
NLD
a
Combinations
ρ ≤ 0.025
ρ ≥
y y
c
f f
f
200
,
3
'
≥ ρ
Beam Min.
Moment
Override
Check
No Requirement
− +

uEND uEND
M M
3
1
¦ ¦
END u u uSPAN
M M M
− + +
≥ , max
5
1
¦ ¦
END u u uSPAN
M M M
− + −
≥ , max
5
1
− +

uEND uEND
M M
2
1
¦ ¦
END u u uSPAN
M M M
− + +
≥ , max
4
1
¦ ¦
END u u uSPAN
M M M
− − −
≥ , max
4
1
Beam
Design
Shear
NLD
a
Combinations
Modified NLD
a
Combinations
(earthquake loads doubled)
Beam Capacity Shear (Vp)
with α = 1.0 and ϕ = 1.0
plus VD+L
NLD
a
Combinations
Beam Capacity Shear (Vp)
with α = 1.25 and ϕ = 1.0
plus VD+L
Vc = 0
Joint
Design
No Requirement No Requirement Checked for shear
Beam/
Column
Capacity
Ratio
No Requirement No Requirement Reported in output file
NLD
a
= Number of specified loading
Beam Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 11 - 10 Design Beam Shear Reinforcement
ƒ At any end (support) of the beam, the beam positive moment capacity
(i.e., associated with the bottom steel) would not be less than 1/2 of the
beam negative moment capacity (i.e., associated with the top steel) at
that end (UBC 1921.3.2.2).
ƒ Neither the negative moment capacity nor the positive moment capacity
at any of the sections within the beam would be less than 1/4 of the
maximum of positive or negative moment capacities of any of the beam
end (support) stations (UBC 1921.3.2.2).
For Intermediate moment resisting concrete frames (i.e., seismic design), the
beam design would satisfy the following conditions:
ƒ At any support of the beam, the beam positive moment capacity would
not be less than 1/3 of the beam negative moment capacity at that end
(UBC 1921.8.4.1).
ƒ Neither the negative moment capacity nor the positive moment capacity
at any of the sections within the beam would be less than 1/5 of the
maximum of positive or negative moment capacities of any of the beam
end (support) stations (UBC 1921.8.4.1).
Design Beam Shear Reinforcement
The shear reinforcement is designed for each load combination at a user-
defined number of stations along the beam span. The following steps are in-
volved in designing the shear reinforcement for a particular beam for a par-
ticular load combination at a particular station resulting from the beam major
shear:
ƒ Determine the factored shear force, V
u
.
ƒ Determine the shear force, V
c
, that can be resisted by the concrete.
ƒ Determine the reinforcement steel required to carry the balance.
For Special and Intermediate moment resisting frames (Ductile frames), the
shear design of the beams is also based on the probable and nominal moment
capacities of the members, respectively, in addition to the factored load de-
sign.
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Beam Design
Design Beam Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 11 - 11
The following three sections describe in detail the algorithms associated with
this process.
Determine Shear Force and Moment
ƒ In the design of the beam shear reinforcement of an Ordinary moment
resisting concrete frame, the shear forces and moments for a particular
load combination at a particular beam section are obtained by factoring
the associated shear forces and moments with the corresponding load
combination factors.
ƒ In the design of Special moment resisting concrete frames (i.e.,
seismic design), the shear capacity of the beam is also checked for the
capacity-shear associated with the probable moment capacities at the
ends and the factored gravity load. This check is performed in addition to
the design check required for Ordinary moment resisting frames. The ca-
pacity-shear force, V
p
, is calculated from the probable moment capacities
of each end of the beam and the gravity shear forces. The procedure for
calculating the design shear force in a beam from probable moment ca-
pacity is the same as that described for a column in section “Design Col-
umn Shear Reinforcement” in Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical
Note 10 Column Design. See also Table 1 for details.
The design shear force V
u
is then given by (UBC 1921.3.4.1)
V
u
= V
p
+ V
D+L
(UBC 1921.3.4.1)
where V
p
is the capacity shear force obtained by applying the calculated
probable ultimate moment capacities at the two ends of the beams acting
in opposite directions. Therefore, V
p
is the maximum of
1
P
V and
2
P
V ,
where
1
P
V =
L
M M
J I
+ −
+
, and
2
P
V =
L
M M
J I
− +
+
, where

I
M = Moment capacity at end I, with top steel in tension, using a
steel yield stress value of αf
y
and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1.0),
Beam Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 11 - 12 Design Beam Shear Reinforcement
+
J
M = Moment capacity at end J, with bottom steel in tension, using a
steel yield stress value of αf
y
and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1.0),
+
I
M = Moment capacity at end I, with bottom steel in tension, using a
steel yield stress value of αf
y
and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1.0),

J
M = Moment capacity at end J, with top steel in tension, using a
steel yield stress value of αf
y
and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1.0), and
L = Clear span of beam.
For Special moment resisting frames, α is taken as 1.25 (UBC 1921.0).
V
D+L
is the contribution of shear force from the in-span distribution of
gravity loads.
ƒ For Intermediate moment resisting frames, the shear capacity of the
beam is also checked for the capacity shear based on the nominal moment
capacities at the ends and the factored gravity loads, in addition to the
check required for Ordinary moment resisting frames. The design shear
force in beams is taken to be the minimum of that based on the nominal
moment capacity and factored shear force. The procedure for calculating
nominal (ϕ = 1.0) moment capacity is the same as that for computing the
probable moment capacity for Special moment resisting frames, except
that α is taken equal to 1 rather than 1.25 (UBC 1921.0, 1921.8.3). The
factored shear forces are based on the specified load factors, except the
earthquake load factors are doubled (UBC 1921.8.3). The computation of
the design shear force in a beam of an Intermediate moment resisting
frame is also the same as that for columns, which is described in Con-
crete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 10 Column Design. Also see
Table 1 for details.
Determine Concrete Shear Capacity
The allowable concrete shear capacity is given by
V
c
= 2
'
c
f b
w
d. (UBC 1911.3.1.1)
For Special moment resisting frame concrete design, V
c
is set to zero if both
the factored axial compressive force, including the earthquake effect P
u
, is
less than
'
c
f A
g
/20 and the shear force contribution from earthquake V
E
is
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Beam Design
Design Beam Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 11 - 13
more than half of the total maximum shear force over the length of the mem-
ber V
u
(i.e., V
E
≥ 0.5V
u
) (UBC 1921.3.4.2).
Determine Required Shear Reinforcement
Given V
u
and V
c
, the required shear reinforcement in area/unit length is cal-
culated as
A
v
=
d f
s V V
ys
c u
) / ( − ϕ
. (UBC 1911.5.6.1, 1911.5.6.2)
The shear force resisted by steel is limited by
(V
u
/ϕ - V
c
) ≤ 8
'
c
f bd. (UBC 1911.5.6.8)
Otherwise, redimensioning of the concrete section is required. Here ϕ, the
strength reduction factor, is 0.85 for nonseismic design or for seismic design
in Seismic Zones 0, 1, and 2 (UBC 1909.3.2.3) and is 0.60 for seismic design
in Seismic Zones 3 and 4 (UBC 1909.3.4.1). The maximum of all the calcu-
lated A
v
values, obtained from each load combination, is reported along with
the controlling shear force and associated load combination number.
The beam shear reinforcement requirements displayed by the program are
based purely on shear strength considerations. Any minimum stirrup require-
ments to satisfy spacing and volumetric considerations must be investigated
independently of the program by the user.
Overview Technical Note 12 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97
Technical Note 12
Joint Design
This Technical Note explains how the program performs a rational analysis of
the beam-column panel zone to determine the shear forces that are gener-
ated in a joint. The program then checks this against design shear strength.
Overview
To ensure that the beam-column joint of special moment resisting frames
possesses adequate shear strength, the program performs a rational analysis
of the beam-column panel zone to determine the shear forces that are gener-
ated in the joint. The program then checks this against design shear strength.
Only joints having a column below the joint are designed. The mate-
rial properties of the joint are assumed to be the same as those of the
column below the joint.
The joint analysis is completed in the major and the minor directions of the
column. The joint design procedure involves the following steps:
• Determine the panel zone design shear force,V
u
h
• Determine the effective area of the joint
• Check panel zone shear stress
The algorithms associated with these three steps are described in detail in the
following three sections.
Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force
Figure 1 illustrates the free body stress condition of a typical beam-column
intersection for a column direction, major or minor.
Joint Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 12 - 2 Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force
Figure1 Beam-Column Joint Analysis
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Joint Design
Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force Technical Note 12 - 3
The force V
u
h
is the horizontal panel zone shear force that is to be calculated.
The forces that act on the joint are P
u
, V
u
, M
u
L
and M
u
R
. The forces P
u
and V
u
are axial force and shear force, respectively, from the column framing into the
top of the joint. The moments M
u
L
and M
u
R
are obtained from the beams
framing into the joint. The program calculates the joint shear force V
u
h
by re-
solving the moments into C and T forces. Noting that T
L
= C
L
and T
R
= C
R
,
V
u
h
= T
L
+ T
R
- V
u
The location of C or T forces is determined by the direction of the moment.
The magnitude of C or T forces is conservatively determined using basic prin-
ciples of ultimate strength theory, ignoring compression reinforcement as fol-
lows. The program first calculates the maximum compression, C
max
, and the
maximum moment, M
max
, that can be carried by the beam.
bd f C
c
'
max
85 . 0
2
max max
d
C M
Then the program conservatively determines C and T forces as follows:
(
(
,
\
,
,
(
j
− −
max
max
) (
1 1
M
M abs
C T C
The program resolves the moments and the C and T forces from beams that
frame into the joint in a direction that is not parallel to the major or minor
directions of the column along the direction that is being investigated, thereby
contributing force components to the analysis. Also, the program calculates
the C and T for the positive and negative moments, considering the fact that
the concrete cover may be different for the direction of moment.
In the design of special moment resisting concrete frames, the evaluation of
the design shear force is based on the moment capacities (with reinforcing
steel overstrength factor, α, and no ϕ factors) of the beams framing into the
joint (UBC 1921.5.1.1). The C and T forces are based on these moment ca-
pacities. The program calculates the column shear force V
u
from the beam
moment capacities, as follows:
Joint Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 12 - 4 Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force
H
M M
V
R
u
L
u
u
+

See Figure 2. It should be noted that the points of inflection shown on Figure
2 are taken as midway between actual lateral support points for the columns.
If there is no column at the top of the joint, the shear force from the top of
the column is taken as zero.
Figure 2 Column Shear Force V
u
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Joint Design
Determine the Effective Area of Joint Technical Note 12 - 5
The effects of load reversals, as illustrated in Case 1 and Case 2 of Figure 1,
are investigated and the design is based on the maximum of the joint shears
obtained from the two cases.
Determine the Effective Area of Joint
The joint area that resists the shear forces is assumed always to be rectan-
gular in plan view. The dimensions of the rectangle correspond to the major
and minor dimensions of the column below the joint, except if the beam
framing into the joint is very narrow. The effective width of the joint area to
be used in the calculation is limited to the width of the beam plus the depth of
the column. The area of the joint is assumed not to exceed the area of the
column below. The joint area for joint shear along the major and minor direc-
tions is calculated separately (ACI R21.5.3).
It should be noted that if the beam frames into the joint eccentrically, the
above assumptions may be unconservative and the user should investigate
the acceptability of the particular joint.
Check Panel Zone Shear Stress
The panel zone shear stress is evaluated by dividing the shear force V
u
h
by
the effective area of the joint and comparing it with the following design shear
strengths (UBC 1921.5.3):
20ϕ
c
f '
for joints confined on all four sides
v = 15ϕ
c
f '
for joints confined on three faces or on two
opposite faces
¦
12ϕ
c
f '
for all other joints
where ϕ = 0.85 (by default). (UBC 1909.3.2.3,1909.3.4.1)
A beam that frames into a face of a column at the joint is considered in this
program to provide confinement to the joint if at least three-quarters of the
face of the joint is covered by the framing member (UBC 1921.5.3.1).
Joint Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 12 - 6 Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios
For light-weight aggregate concrete, the design shear strength of the joint is
reduced in the program to at least three-quarters of that of the normal weight
concrete by replacing the
'
c
f with
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦ '
,
4 / 3 , ' min
c c factor cs
f f f (UBC 1921.5.3.2)
For joint design, the program reports the joint shear, the joint shear stress,
the allowable joint shear stress and a capacity ratio.
Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios
At a particular joint for a particular column direction, major or minor, the pro-
gram will calculate the ratio of the sum of the beam moment capacities to the
sum of the column moment capacities. For Special Moment-Resisting Frames,
the following UBC provision needs to be satisfied (UBC 1921.4.2.2).
∑M
e

5
6
∑M
g
(UBC 1921.4.2.2)
The capacities are calculated with no reinforcing overstrength factor, α, and
including ϕ factors. The beam capacities are calculated for reversed situations
(Cases 1 and 2) as illustrated in Figure 1 and the maximum summation ob-
tained is used.
The moment capacities of beams that frame into the joint in a direction that is
not parallel to the major or minor direction of the column are resolved along
the direction that is being investigated and the resolved components are
added to the summation.
The column capacity summation includes the column above and the column
below the joint. For each load combination, the axial force, P
u
, in each of the
columns is calculated from the program analysis load combinations. For each
load combination, the moment capacity of each column under the influence of
the corresponding axial load P
u
is then determined separately for the major
and minor directions of the column, using the uniaxial column interaction dia-
gram, see Figure 3. The moment capacities of the two columns are added to
give the capacity summation for the corresponding load combination. The
maximum capacity summations obtained from all of the load combinations is
used for the beam/column capacity ratio.
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Joint Design
Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios Technical Note 12 - 7
The beam/column flexural capacity ratios are only reported for Special Mo-
ment-Resisting Frames involving seismic design load combinations. If this ra-
tio is greater than 5/6, a warning message is printed in the output file.
Figure 3 Moment Capacity M
u
at a Given Axial Load P
u
Input Data Technical Note 13 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97
Technical Note 13
Input Data
This Technical Note describes the concrete frame design input data for
UBC97. The input can be printed to a printer or to a text file when you click
the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command. A
printout of the input data provides the user with the opportunity to carefully
review the parameters that have been input into the program and upon which
program design is based. Further information about using the Print Design
Tables form is presented at the end of this Technical Note.
Input Data
The program provides the printout of the input data in a series of tables. The
column headings for input data and a description of what is included in the
columns of the tables are provided in Table 1 of this Technical Note.
Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data
COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION
Load Combination Multipliers
Combo Design load combination. See Technical Note 8.
Type
Load type: dead, live, superimposed dead, earthquake, wind,
snow, reduced live load, other.
Case Name of load case.
Factor Load combination scale factor.
Code Preferences
Phi_bending Bending strength reduction factor.
Phi_tension Tensile strength reduction factor.
Phi_compression
(Tied)
Compressive strength reduction factor for tied columns.
Phi_compression (Spi-
ral)
Compressive strength reduction factor for reinforced columns.
Phi_shear Shear strength reduction factor.
Input Data Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 13 - 2 Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data
Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data
COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION
Material Property Data
Material Name Concrete, steel, other.
Material Type Isotropic or orthotropic.
Design Type
Modulus of Elasticity
Poisson's Ratio
Thermal Coeff Coefficient of thermal expansion.
Shear Modulus
Material Property Mass and Weight
Material Name Concrete, steel, other.
Mass Per Unit Vol Used to calculate self-mass of structure.
Weight Per Unit Vol Used to calculate self-weight of structure.
Material Design Data for Concrete Materials
Material Name Concrete, steel, other.
Lightweight Concrete
Concrete FC Concrete compressive strength.
Rebar FY Bending reinforcing steel yield strength.
Rebar FYS Shear reinforcing steel yield strength.
Lightwt Reduc Fact Shear strength reduction factor for light weight concrete; default
= 1.0.
Concrete Column Property Data
Section Label Label applied to section.
Mat Label Material label.
Column Depth
Column Width
Rebar Pattern Layout of main flexural reinforcing steel.
Concrete Cover Minimum clear concrete cover.
Bar Area Area of individual reinforcing bar to be used.
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Input Data
Using the Print Design Tables Form Technical Note 13 - 3
Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data
COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION
Concrete Column Design Element Information
Story ID Column assigned to story level at top of column.
Column Line Grid line.
Section ID Name of section assigned to column.
Framing Type Lateral or gravity.
RLLF Factor
L_Ratio Major Unbraced length about major axis.
L_Ratio Minor Unbraced length about minor axis.
K Major Effective length factor; default = 1.0.
K Minor Effective length factor; default = 1.0.
Concrete Beam Design Element Information
Story ID Story level at which beam occurs.
Bay ID Grid lines locating beam.
Section ID Section number assigned to beam.
Framing type Lateral or gravity.
RLLF Factor
L_Ratio Major Unbraced length about major axis.
L_Ratio Minor Unbraced length about minor axis.
Using the Print Design Tables Form
To print steel frame design input data directly to a printer, use the File menu
> Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command and click the check
box on the Print Design Tables form. Click the OK button to send the print to
your printer. Click the Cancel button rather than the OK button to cancel the
print. Use the File menu > Print Setup command and the Setup>> button
to change printers, if necessary.
To print steel frame design input data to a file, click the Print to File check box
on the Print Design Tables form. Click the Filename>> button to change the
Input Data Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 13 - 4 Using the Print Design Tables Form
path or filename. Use the appropriate file extension for the desired format
(e.g., .txt, .xls, .doc). Click the OK buttons on the Open File for Printing Ta-
bles form and the Print Design Tables form to complete the request.
Note:
The File menu > Display Input/Output Text Files command is useful for displaying out-
put that is printed to a text file.
The Append check box allows you to add data to an existing file. The path and
filename of the current file is displayed in the box near the bottom of the Print
Design Tables form. Data will be added to this file. Or use the Filename>>
button to locate another file, and when the Open File for Printing Tables cau-
tion box appears, click Yes to replace the existing file.
If you select a specific frame element(s) before using the File menu > Print
Tables > Concrete Frame Design command, the Selection Only check box
will be checked. The print will be for the selected beam(s) only.
Table 1 Concrete Column Design Output Technical Note 14 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97
Technical Note 14
Output Details
This Technical Note describes the concrete frame design output for UBC97
that can be printed to a printer or to a text file. The design output is printed
when you click the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design
command and select Output Summary of the Print Design Tables dialog box.
Further information about using the Print Design Tables dialog box is pre-
sented at the end of this Technical Note.
The program provides the output data in a series of tables. The column
headings for output data and a description of what is included in the columns
of the tables are provided in Table 1 of this Technical Note.
Table 1 Concrete Column Design Output
COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION
Biaxial P-M Interaction and Shear Design of Column-Type Elements
Story ID Column assigned to story level at top of column.
Column Line Grid lines.
Section ID Name of section assigned to column.
Station ID
Required Reinforcing
Longitudinal Area of longitudinal reinforcing required.
Combo Load combination for which the reinforcing is designed.
Shear22 Shear reinforcing required.
Combo Load combination for which the reinforcing is designed.
Shear33 Shear reinforcing required.
Output Details Concrete Frame Design UBC97
Technical Note 14 - 2 Table 2 Concrete Column Joint Output
Table 1 Concrete Column Design Output
COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION
Combo Load combination for which the reinforcing is designed.
Table 2 Concrete Column Joint Output
COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION
Beam to Column Capacity Ratios and Joint Shear Capacity Check
Story ID Story level at which joint occurs.
Column Line Grid line.
Section ID Assigned section name.
Beam-Column Capacity Ratios
Major Ratio of beam moment capacity to column capacity.
Combo Load combination upon which the ratio of beam moment ca-
pacity to column capacity is based.
Minor Ratio of beam moment capacity to column capacity.
Combo Load combination upon which the ratio of beam moment ca-
pacity to column capacity is based.
Joint Shear Capacity Ratios
Major Ratio of factored load versus allowed capacity.
Combo Load combination upon which the ratio of factored load versus
allowed capacity is based.
Minor Ratio of factored load versus allowed capacity.
Combo Load combination upon which the ratio of factored load versus
allowed capacity is based.
Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Output Details
Using the Print Design Tables Form Technical Note 14 - 3
Using the Print Design Tables Form
To print concrete frame design input data directly to a printer, use the File
menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command and click the
check box on the Print Design Tables dialog box. Click the OK button to send
the print to your printer. Click the Cancel button rather than the OK button
to cancel the print. Use the File menu > Print Setup command and the
Setup>> button to change printers, if necessary.
To print concrete frame design input data to a file, click the Print to File check
box on the Print Design Tables dialog box. Click the Filename>> button to
change the path or filename. Use the appropriate file extension for the de-
sired format (e.g., .txt, .xls, .doc). Click the OK buttons on the Open File for
Printing Tables dialog box and the Print Design Tables dialog box to complete
the request.
Note:
The File menu > Display Input/Output Text Files command is useful for displaying out-
put that is printed to a text file.
The Append check box allows you to add data to an existing file. The path and
filename of the current file is displayed in the box near the bottom of the Print
Design Tables dialog box. Data will be added to this file. Or use the File-
name>> button to locate another file, and when the Open File for Printing
Tables caution box appears, click Yes to replace the existing file.
If you select a specific frame element(s) before using the File menu > Print
Tables > Concrete Frame Design command, the Selection Only check box
will be checked. The print will be for the selected beam(s) only.
Introduction to the ACI318-99 Series of Technical Notes Technical Note 15 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI-318-99
Technical Note 15
General and Notation
Introduction to the ACI318-99 Series of Technical Notes
The ACI-318-99 Concrete Frame Design series of Technical Notes describes in
detail the various aspects of the concrete design procedure that is used by
this program when the user selects the ACI-318-99 Design Code (ACI 1999).
The various notations used in this series are listed herein.
The design is based on user-specified loading combinations. The program
provides a set of default load combinations that should satisfy requirements
for the design of most building type structures. See Concrete Frame Design
ACI-318-99 Technical Note 18 Design Load Combination for more information.
The program provides options to design or check Earthquake resisting
frames; Ordinary, Earthquake resisting frames; Intermediate (moderate
seismic risk areas), and Earthquake resisting frames; Special (high seismic
risk areas) moment resisting frames as required for seismic design provisions.
The details of the design criteria used for the different framing systems are
described in Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Technical Note 19 Strength
Reduction Factors, Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Technical Note 20 Col-
umn Design, Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Technical Note 21 Beam De-
sign, and Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Technical Note 22 Joint Design.
The program uses preferences and overwrites, which are described in Con-
crete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Technical Note 16 Preferences and Concrete
Frame Design ACI-318-99 Technical Note 17 Overwrites. It also provides in-
put and output data summaries, which are described in Concrete Frame De-
sign ACI-318-99 Technical Note 23 Input Data and Concrete Frame Design
ACI-318-99 Technical Note 24 Output Details.
English as well as SI and MKS metric units can be used for input. But the code
is based on Inch-Pound-Second units. For simplicity, all equations and de-
scriptions presented in this chapter correspond to Inch-Pound-Second units
unless otherwise noted.
General and Notation Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99
Technical Note 15 - 2 Notation
Notation
A
cv
Area of concrete used to determine shear stress, sq-in
A
g
Gross area of concrete, sq-in
A
s
Area of tension reinforcement, sq-in
'
s
A
Area of compression reinforcement, sq-in
A
s(required)
Area of steel required for tension reinforcement, sq-in
A
st
Total area of column longitudinal reinforcement, sq-in
A
v
Area of shear reinforcement, sq-in
C
m
Coefficient, dependent upon column curvature, used to calculate
moment magnification factor
E
c
Modulus of elasticity of concrete, psi
E
s
Modulus of elasticity of reinforcement, assumed as 29,000,000
psi (ACI 8.5.2)
I
g
Moment of inertia of gross concrete section about centroidal axis,
neglecting reinforcement, in
4
I
se
Moment of inertia of reinforcement about centroidal axis of
member cross section, in
4
L Clear unsupported length, in
M
1
Smaller factored end moment in a column, lb-in
M
2
Larger factored end moment in a column, lb-in
M
c
Factored moment to be used in design, lb-in
M
ns
Nonsway component of factored end moment, lb-in
M
s
Sway component of factored end moment, lb-in
Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 General and Notation
Notation Technical Note 15 - 3
M
u
Factored moment at section, lb-in
M
ux
Factored moment at section about X-axis, lb-in
M
uy
Factored moment at section about Y-axis, lb-in
P
b
Axial load capacity at balanced strain conditions, lb
P
c
Critical buckling strength of column, lb
P
max
Maximum axial load strength allowed, lb
P
0
Axial load capacity at zero eccentricity, lb
P
u
Factored axial load at section, lb
V
c
Shear resisted by concrete, lb
V
E
Shear force caused by earthquake loads, lb
V
D+L
Shear force from span loading, lb
V
u
Factored shear force at a section, lb
V
p
Shear force computed from probable moment capacity, lb
a Depth of compression block, in
a
b
Depth of compression block at balanced condition, in
b Width of member, in
b
f
Effective width of flange (T-Beam section), in
b
w
Width of web (T-Beam section), in
c Depth to neutral axis, in
c
b
Depth to neutral axis at balanced conditions, in
d Distance from compression face to tension reinforcement, in
d' Concrete cover to center of reinforcing, in
General and Notation Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99
Technical Note 15 - 4 Notation
d
s
Thickness of slab (T-Beam section), in
'
c
f
Specified compressive strength of concrete, psi
f
y
Specified yield strength of flexural reinforcement, psi
f
y
≤ 80,000 psi (ACI 9.4)
f
ys
Specified yield strength of shear reinforcement, psi
h Dimension of column, in
k Effective length factor
r Radius of gyration of column section, in
α Reinforcing steel overstrength factor
β
1
Absolute value of ratio of maximum factored axial dead load to
maximum factored axial total load
β
d
Absolute value of ratio or maximum factored axial dead load to
maximum factored axial total load
δ
s
Moment magnification factor for sway moments
δ
ns
Moment magnification factor for nonsway moments
ε
c
Strain in concrete
ε
s
Strain in reinforcing steel
ϕ Strength reduction factor
General Technical Note 16 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI318-99
Technical Note 16
Preferences
This Technical Note describes the items in the Preferences form.
General
The concrete frame design preferences in this program are basic assignments
that apply to all concrete frame elements. Use the Options menu > Prefer-
ences > Concrete Frame Design command to access the Preferences form
where you can view and revise the concrete frame design preferences.
Default values are provided for all concrete frame design preference items.
Thus, it is not required that you specify or change any of the preferences. You
should, however, at least review the default values for the preference items
to make sure they are acceptable to you.
Using the Preferences Form
To view preferences, select the Options menu > Preferences > Concrete
Frame Design. The Preferences form will display. The preference options
are displayed in a two-column spreadsheet. The left column of the spread-
sheet displays the preference item name. The right column of the spreadsheet
displays the preference item value.
To change a preference item, left click the desired preference item in either
the left or right column of the spreadsheet. This activates a drop-down box or
highlights the current preference value. If the drop-down box appears, select
a new value. If the cell is highlighted, type in the desired value. The prefer-
ence value will update accordingly. You cannot overwrite values in the drop-
down boxes.
When you have finished making changes to the composite beam preferences,
click the OK button to close the form. You must click the OK button for the
changes to be accepted by the program. If you click the Cancel button to exit
Preferences Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99
Technical Note 16 - 2 Preferences
the form, any changes made to the preferences are ignored and the form is
closed.
Preferences
For purposes of explanation in this Technical Note, the preference items are
presented in Table. The column headings in the table are described as fol-
lows:
ƒ Item: The name of the preference item as it appears in the cells at the
left side of the Preferences form.
ƒ Possible Values: The possible values that the associated preference item
can have.
ƒ Default Value: The built-in default value that the program assumes for
the associated preference item.
ƒ Description: A description of the associated preference item.
Table 1: Concrete Frame Preferences
Item
Possible
Values
Default
Value Description
Design Code Any code in
the program
ACI 318-99 Design code used for design of
concrete frame elements.
Phi Bending
Tension
>0 0.9 Unitless strength reduction factor per
ACI 9.3.
Phi Compres-
sion Tied
>0 0.7 Unitless strength reduction factor per
ACI 9.3.
Phi Compres-
sion Spiral
>0 0.75 Unitless strength reduction factor per
ACI 9.3.
Phi Shear >0 0.85 Unitless strength reduction factor per
ACI 9.3.
Number Inter-
action Curves
≥4.0 24 Number of equally spaced interaction
curves used to create a full 360-degree
interaction surface (this item should be
a multiple of four). We recommend that
you use 24 for this item.
Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Preferences
Preferences Technical Note 16 - 3
Table 1: Concrete Frame Preferences
Item
Possible
Values
Default
Value Description
Number Inter-
action Points
Any odd value
≥4.0
11 Number of points used for defining a
single curve in a concrete frame
interaction surface (this item should be
odd).
Time History
Design
Envelopes or
Step-by-Step
Envelopes Toggle for design load combinations
that include a time history designed for
the envelope of the time history, or
designed step-by-step for the entire
time history. If a single design load
combination has more than one time
history case in it, that design load
combination is designed for the
envelopes of the time histories,
regardless of what is specified here.
Overwrites Technical Note 17 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI318-99
Technical Note 17
Overwrites
General
The concrete frame design overwrites are basic assignments that apply only
to those elements to which they are assigned. This Technical Note describes
concrete frame design overwrites for ACI318-99. To access the overwrites,
select an element and click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design >
View/Revise Overwrites command.
Default values are provided for all overwrite items. Thus, you do not need to
specify or change any of the overwrites. However, at least review the default
values for the overwrite items to make sure they are acceptable. When
changes are made to overwrite items, the program applies the changes only
to the elements to which they are specifically assigned; that is, to the ele-
ments that are selected when the overwrites are changed.
Overwrites
For explanation purposes in this Technical Note, the overwrites are presented
in Table 1. The column headings in the table are described as follows.
ƒ Item: The name of the overwrite item as it appears in the program. To
save space in the formes, these names are generally short.
ƒ Possible Values: The possible values that the associated overwrite item
can have.
ƒ Default Value: The default value that the program assumes for the asso-
ciated overwrite item.
ƒ Description: A description of the associated overwrite item.
An explanation of how to change an overwrite is provided at the end of this
Technical Note.
Overwrites Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99
Technical Note 17 - 2 Overwrites
Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Overwrites
Item
Possible
Values
Default
Value Description
Element
Section
Element
Type
Sway Special,
Sway Interme-
diate,
Sway
Ordinary
NonSway
Sway Special Frame type per moment frame defini-
tion given in ACI 21.1.
Live Load
Reduction
Factor
>0
≤1.0
1. Used to reduce the live load contribu-
tion to the factored loading.
Horizontal
Earthquake
Factor
>0
≤1.0
1
Unbraced
Length Ratio
(Major)
>0
≤1.0
1.0
Unbraced
Length Ratio
(Minor)
>0
≤1.0
1.0
Effective
Length Factor
(K Major)
>0
≤1.0
1 See ACI 10.12, 10.13 and Figure
R10.12.1.
Effective
Length Factor
(K Minor)
>0
≤1.0
1 See ACI 10.12, 10.13 and Figure
R10.12.1.
Moment
Coefficient
(Cm Major)
>0
≤1.0
1 Factor relating actual moment diagram
to an equivalent uniform moment dia-
gram. See ACI 10.12.3.
Moment
Coefficient
(Cm Minor)
>0
≤1.0
1 Factor relating actual moment diagram
to an equivalent uniform moment dia-
gram. See ACI 10.12.3.
NonSway
Moment Factor
(Dns Major)
>0
≤1.0
1 See ACI 10.12.
Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Overwrites
Overwrites Technical Note 17 - 3
Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Overwrites
Item
Possible
Values
Default
Value Description
NonSway
Moment Factor
(Dns Minor)
1 See ACI 10.13.
Sway Moment
Factor
(Ds Major)
1 See ACI 10.13.
Sway Moment
Factor
(Ds Minor)
1 See ACI 10.13.
Making Changes in the Overwrites Form
To access the concrete frame overwrites, select an element and click the De-
sign menu > Concrete Frame Design > View/Revise Overwrites com-
mand.
The overwrites are displayed in the form with a column of check boxes and a
two-column spreadsheet. The left column of the spreadsheet contains the
name of the overwrite item. The right column of the spreadsheet contains the
overwrites values.
Initially, the check boxes in the Concrete Frame Design Overwrites form are
all unchecked and all of the cells in the spreadsheet have a gray background
to indicate that they are inactive and the items in the cells cannot be
changed. The names of the overwrite items are displayed in the first column
of the spreadsheet. The values of the overwrite items are visible in the second
column of the spreadsheet if only one element was selected before the over-
writes form was accessed. If multiple elements were selected, no values show
for the overwrite items in the second column of the spreadsheet.
After selecting one or multiple elements, check the box to the left of an over-
write item to change it. Then left click in either column of the spreadsheet to
activate a drop-down box or highlight the contents in the cell in the right col-
umn of the spreadsheet. If the drop-down box appears, select a value from
Overwrites Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99
Technical Note 17 - 4 Overwrites
the box. If the cell contents is highlighted, type in the desired value. The
overwrite will reflect the change. You cannot change the values of the drop-
down boxes.
When changes to the overwrites have been completed, click the OK button to
close the form. The program then changes all of the overwrite items whose
associated check boxes are checked for the selected members. You must click
the OK button for the changes to be accepted by the program. If you click the
Cancel button to exit the form, any changes made to the overwrites are ig-
nored and the form is closed.
Resetting Concrete Frame Overwrites to Default Values
Use the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Reset All Overwrites
command to reset all of the steel frame overwrites. All current design results
will be deleted when this command is executed.
Important note about resetting overwrites: The program defaults for the
overwrite items are built into the program. The concrete frame overwrite val-
ues that were in a .edb file that you used to initialize your model may be dif-
ferent from the built-in program default values. When you reset overwrites,
the program resets the overwrite values to its built-in values, not to the val-
ues that were in the .edb file used to initialize the model.
Design Load Combinations Technical Note 18 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI-318-99
Technical Note 18
Design Load Combinations
The design load combinations are the various combinations of the prescribed
load cases for which the structure needs to be checked. For the ACI 318-99
code, if a structure is subjected to dead load (DL) and live load (LL) only, the
stress check may need only one load combination, namely 1.4 DL + 1.7 LL
(ACI 9.2.1). However, in addition to the dead and live loads, if the structure is
subjected to wind (WL) and earthquake (EL) loads and considering that wind
and earthquake forces are reversible, the following load combinations should
be considered (ACI 9.2).
1.4 DL
1.4 DL + 1.7 LL (ACI 9.2.1)
0.9 DL ± 1.3 WL
0.75 (1.4 DL + 1.7 LL ± 1.7 WL) (ACI 9.2.2)
0.9 DL ± 1.3 * 1.1 EL
0.75 (1.4 DL + 1.7 LL ± 1.7 * 1.1 EL) (ACI 9.2.3)
These are also the default design load combinations in the program whenever
the ACI 318-99 code is used. The user is warned that the above load combi-
nations involving seismic loads consider service-level seismic forces. Different
load factors may apply with strength-level seismic forces (ACI R9.2.3).
Live load reduction factors can be applied to the member forces of the live
load condition on an element-by-element basis to reduce the contribution of
the live load to the factored loading. See Concrete Frame Design ACI 318-99
Technical Note 17 Overwrites for more information.
Strength Reduction Factors Technical Note 19 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI-318-99
Technical Note 19
Strength Reduction Factors
The strength reduction factors, ϕ, are applied on the nominal strength to ob-
tain the design strength provided by a member. The ϕ factors for flexure, ax-
ial force, shear, and torsion are as follows:
ϕ = 0.90 for flexure (ACI 9.3.2.1)
ϕ = 0.90 for axial tension (ACI 9.3.2.2)
ϕ = 0.90 for axial tension and flexure (ACI 9.3.2.2)
ϕ = 0.75 for axial compression, and axial compression
and flexure (spirally reinforced column) (ACI 9.3.2.2)
ϕ = 0.70 for axial compression, and axial compression
and flexure (tied column) (ACI 9.3.2.2)
ϕ = 0.85 for shear and torsion (ACI 9.3.2.3)
Overview Technical Note 20 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI-318-99
Technical Note 20
Column Design
This Technical Note describes how the program checks column capacity or de-
signs reinforced concrete columns when the ACI-318-99 code is selected.
Overview
The program can be used to check column capacity or to design columns. If
you define the geometry of the reinforcing bar configuration of each concrete
column section, the program will check the column capacity. Alternatively, the
program can calculate the amount of reinforcing required to design the col-
umn. The design procedure for the reinforced concrete columns of the struc-
ture involves the following steps:
ƒ Generate axial force/biaxial moment interaction surfaces for all of the dif-
ferent concrete section types of the model. A typical biaxial interaction
surface is shown in Figure 1. When the steel is undefined, the program
generates the interaction surfaces for the range of allowable reinforce-
ment  1 to 8 percent for Ordinary and Intermediate moment resisting
frames (ACI 10.9.1) and 1 to 6 percent for Special moment resisting
frames (ACI 21.4.3.1).
ƒ Calculate the capacity ratio or the required reinforcing area for the fac-
tored axial force and biaxial (or uniaxial) bending moments obtained from
each loading combination at each station of the column. The target capac-
ity ratio is taken as one when calculating the required reinforcing area.
ƒ Design the column shear reinforcement.
The following four sections describe in detail the algorithms associated with
this process.
Column Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99
Technical Note 20 - 2 Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces
Figure 1 A Typical Column Interaction Surface
Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces
The column capacity interaction volume is numerically described by a series
of discrete points that are generated on the three-dimensional interaction
failure surface. In addition to axial compression and biaxial bending, the for-
mulation allows for axial tension and biaxial bending considerations. A typical
interaction diagram is shown in Figure 1.
The coordinates of these points are determined by rotating a plane of linear
strain in three dimensions on the section of the column. See Figure 2. The
Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Column Design
Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces Technical Note 20 - 3
linear strain diagram limits the maximum concrete strain, ε
c
, at the extremity
of the section, to 0.003 (ACI 10.2.3).
The formulation is based consistently upon the general principles of ultimate
strength design (ACI 10.3), and allows for any doubly symmetric rectangular,
square, or circular column section.
The stress in the steel is given by the product of the steel strain and the steel
modulus of elasticity, ε
s
E
s
, and is limited to the yield stress of the steel, f
y
(ACI 10.2.4). The area associated with each reinforcing bar is assumed to be
placed at the actual location of the center of the bar and the algorithm does
not assume any further simplifications with respect to distributing the area of
steel over the cross section of the column, such as an equivalent steel tube or
cylinder. See Figure 3.
The concrete compression stress block is assumed to be rectangular, with a
stress value of 0.85
'
c
f (ACI 10.2.7.1). See Figure 3. The interaction algorithm
provides correction to account for the concrete area that is displaced by the
reinforcement in the compression zone.
The effects of the strength reduction factor, ϕ, are included in the generation
of the interaction surfaces. The maximum compressive axial load is limited to
ϕP
n(max)
, where
ϕP
n(max)
= 0.85ϕ[0.85
'
c
f (A
g
-A
st
)+f
y
A
st
] spiral column, (ACI 10.3.5.1)
ϕP
n(max)
= 0.80ϕ[0.85
'
c
f (A
g
-A
st
)+f
y
A
st
] tied column, (ACI 10.3.5.2)
ϕ = 0.70 for tied columns, and (ACI 9.3.2.2)
ϕ = 0.75 for spirally reinforced columns. (ACI 9.3.2.2)
The value of ϕ used in the interaction diagram varies from ϕ(compression) to
ϕ(flexure) based on the axial load. For low values of axial load, ϕ is increased
linearly from ϕ(compression) to ϕ(flexure) as the ϕP
n
decreases from the
smaller of ϕP
b
or 0.1
'
c
f A
g
to zero, where ϕP
b
is the axial force at the balanced
condition. The ϕ factor used in calculating ϕP
n
and ϕP
b
is the ϕ(compression).
In cases involving axial tension, ϕ is always ϕ(flexure), which is 0.9 by default
(ACI 9.3.2.2).
Column Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99
Technical Note 20 - 4 Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces
Figure 2 Idealized Strain Distribution for Generation of Interaction Source
Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Column Design
Calculate Column Capacity Ratio Technical Note 20 - 5
Figure 3 Idealization of Stress and Strain Distribution in a Column Section
Calculate Column Capacity Ratio
The column capacity ratio is calculated for each load combination at each out-
put station of each column. The following steps are involved in calculating the
capacity ratio of a particular column for a particular load combination at a
particular location:
ƒ Determine the factored moments and forces from the analysis load cases
and the specified load combination factors to give P
u
, M
ux
, and M
uy
.
ƒ Determine the moment magnification factors for the column moments.
ƒ Apply the moment magnification factors to the factored moments. Deter-
mine whether the point, defined by the resulting axial load and biaxial
moment set, lies within the interaction volume.
The factored moments and corresponding magnification factors depend on the
identification of the individual column as either “sway” or “non-sway.”
The following three sections describe in detail the algorithms associated with
this process.
Column Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99
Technical Note 20 - 6 Calculate Column Capacity Ratio
Determine Factored Moments and Forces
The factored loads for a particular load combination are obtained by applying
the corresponding load factors to all the load cases, giving P
u
, M
ux
, and M
uy
.
The factored moments are further increased for non-sway columns, if re-
quired, to obtain minimum eccentricities of (0.6+0.03h) inches, where h is
the dimension of the column in the corresponding direction (ACI 10.12.3.2).
Determine Moment Magnification Factors
The moment magnification factors are calculated separately for sway (overall
stability effect), δ
s
and for non-sway (individual column stability effect), δ
ns
.
Also, the moment magnification factors in the major and minor directions are
in general different (ACI 10.0, R10.13).
The moment obtained from analysis is separated into two components: the
sway (M
s
) and the non-sway (M
ns
) components. The non-sway components,
which are identified by “ns” subscripts, are predominantly caused by gravity
load. The sway components are identified by the “s” subscripts. The sway
moments are predominantly caused by lateral loads, and are related to the
cause of side sway.
For individual columns or column-members in a floor, the magnified moments
about two axes at any station of a column can be obtained as
M = M
ns
+ δ
s
M
s
. (ACI 10.13.3)
The factor δ
s
is the moment magnification factor for moments causing side
sway. The moment magnification factors for sway moments, δ
s
, is taken as 1
because the component moments M
s
and M
ns
are obtained from a “second or-
der elastic (P-delta) analysis” (ACI R10.10, 10.10.1, R10.13, 10.13.4.1).
The program assumes that it performs a P-delta analysis and, therefore, mo-
ment magnification factor δ
s
for moments causing side-sway is taken as unity
(ACI 10.10.2). For the P-delta analysis, the load should correspond to a load
combination of 1.4 dead load + 1.7 live load (ACI 10.13.6). See also White
and Hajjar (1991). The user should use reduction factors for the moment of
inertias in the program as specified in ACI 10.11. The moment of inertia re-
duction for sustained lateral load involves a factor β
d
(ACI 10.11). This β
d
for
sway frame in second-order analysis is different from the one that is defined
later for non-sway moment magnification (ACI 10.0, R10.12.3, R10.13.4.1).
The default moment of inertia factor in this program is 1.
Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Column Design
Calculate Column Capacity Ratio Technical Note 20 - 7
The computed moments are further amplified for individual column stability
effect (ACI 10.12.3, 10.13.5) by the nonsway moment magnification factor,
δ
ns
, as follows:
M
c
= δ
ns
M, where (ACI 10.12.3)
M
c
is the factored moment to be used in design.
The non-sway moment magnification factor, δ
ns
, associated with the major or
minor direction of the column is given by (ACI 10.12.3)
δ
ns
=
c
u
m
P
P
C
75 . 0
1 −
≤ 1.0, where (ACI 10.12.3)
C
m
= 0.6 +0.4
b
a
M
M
≥ 0.4, (ACI 10.12.3.1)
M
a
and M
b
are the moments at the ends of the column, and M
b
is
numerically larger than M
a
. M
a
/ M
b
is positive for single curvature
bending and negative for double curvature bending. The above ex-
pression of C
m
is valid if there is no transverse load applied between
the supports. If transverse load is present on the span, or the length
is overwritten, C
m
=1. The user can overwrite C
m
on an element-by-
element basis.
P
c
=
2
2
) (
u
kl
EI π
, where (ACI 10.12.3)
k is conservatively taken as 1; however, the program allows the
user to override this value (ACI 10.12.1).
l
u
is the unsupported length of the column for the direction of
bending considered. The two unsupported lengths are l
22
and l
33
,
corresponding to instability in the minor and major directions of
the element, respectively. See Figure 4. These are the lengths
Column Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99
Technical Note 20 - 8 Calculate Column Capacity Ratio
Figure 4 Axes of Bending and Unsupported Length
between the support points of the element in the corresponding
directions.
EI is associated with a particular column direction:
EI =
d
g c
I E
β + 1
4 . 0
, where (ACI 10.12.3)
maximum factored axial sustained (dead) load
β
d
=
maximum factored axial total load
(ACI 10.0,R10.12.3)
The magnification factor, δ
ns
, must be a positive number and greater than
one. Therefore, P
u
must be less than 0.75P
c
. If P
u
is found to be greater than
or equal to 0.75P
c
, a failure condition is declared.
Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Column Design
Calculate Column Capacity Ratio Technical Note 20 - 9
The above calculations are performed for major and minor directions sepa-
rately. That means that δ
s
, δ
ns
, C
m
, k, l
u
, EI, and P
c
assume different values for
major and minor directions of bending.
If the program assumptions are not satisfactory for a particular member, the
user can explicitly specify values of δ
s
and δ
ns
.
Determine Capacity Ratio
As a measure of the stress condition of the column, a capacity ratio is calcu-
lated. The capacity ratio is basically a factor that gives an indication of the
stress condition of the column with respect to the capacity of the column.
Before entering the interaction diagram to check the column capacity, the
moment magnification factors are applied to the factored loads to obtain P
u
,
M
ux
, and M
uy
. The point (P
u
, M
ux
, M
uy
) is then placed in the interaction space
shown as point L in Figure 5. If the point lies within the interaction volume,
the column capacity is adequate; however, if the point lies outside the inter-
action volume, the column is overstressed.
This capacity ratio is achieved by plotting the point L and determining the lo-
cation of point C. The point C is defined as the point where the line OL (if ex-
tended outwards) will intersect the failure surface. This point is determined by
three-dimensional linear interpolation between the points that define the fail-
ure surface. See Figure 5. The capacity ratio, CR, is given by the ratio
OC
OL
.
ƒ If OL = OC (or CR=1), the point lies on the interaction surface and the
column is stressed to capacity.
ƒ If OL < OC (or CR<1), the point lies within the interaction volume and the
column capacity is adequate.
ƒ If OL > OC (or CR>1), the point lies outside the interaction volume and
the column is overstressed.
The maximum of all the values of CR calculated from each load combination is
reported for each check station of the column along with the controlling P
u
,
M
ux
, and M
uy
set and associated load combination number.
Column Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99
Technical Note 20 - 10 Required Reinforcing Area
Figure 5 Geometric Representation of Column Capacity Ratio
Required Reinforcing Area
If the reinforcing area is not defined, the program computes the reinforce-
ment that will give a column capacity ratio of one, calculated as described in
the previous section entitled "Calculate Column Capacity Ratio."
Design Column Shear Reinforcement
The shear reinforcement is designed for each load combination in the major
and minor directions of the column. The following steps are involved in de-
signing the shear reinforcing for a particular column for a particular load com-
bination resulting from shear forces in a particular direction:
Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Column Design
Design Column Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 20 - 11
ƒ Determine the factored forces acting on the section, P
u
and V
u
. Note that
P
u
is needed for the calculation of V
c
.
ƒ Determine the shear force, V
c
, that can be resisted by concrete alone.
ƒ Calculate the reinforcement steel required to carry the balance.
For Special and Intermediate moment resisting frames (Ductile frames), the
shear design of the columns is also based on the Probable moment and nomi-
nal moment capacities of the members, respectively, in addition to the fac-
tored moments. Effects of the axial forces on the column moment capacities
are included in the formulation.
The following three sections describe in detail the algorithms associated with
this process.
Determine Section Forces
ƒ In the design of the column shear reinforcement of an Ordinary moment
resisting concrete frame, the forces for a particular load combination,
namely, the column axial force, P
u
, and the column shear force, V
u
, in a
particular direction are obtained by factoring the program analysis load
cases with the corresponding load combination factors.
ƒ In the shear design of Special moment resisting frames (i.e., seismic
design), the column is checked for capacity shear in addition to the re-
quirement for the Ordinary moment resisting frames. The capacity shear
force in a column, V
p
, in a particular direction is calculated from the prob-
able moment capacities of the column associated with the factored axial
force acting on the column.
For each load combination, the factored axial load, P
u
, is calculated. Then,
the positive and negative moment capacities,
+
u
M and

u
M , of the column
in a particular direction under the influence of the axial force P
u
is calcu-
lated using the uniaxial interaction diagram in the corresponding direction.
The design shear force, V
u
, is then given by (ACI 21.4.5.1)
V
u
= V
p
+ V
D+L
(ACI 21.4.5.1)
where, V
p
is the capacity shear force obtained by applying the calculated
probable ultimate moment capacities at the two ends of the column acting
Column Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99
Technical Note 20 - 12 Design Column Shear Reinforcement
in two opposite directions. Therefore, V
p
is the maximum of
1
P
V and
2
P
V ,
where
1
P
V =
L
M M
J I
+ −
+
, and
2
P
V =
L
M M
J I
− +
+
, where
− +
I I
M M , , = Positive and negative moment capacities at end I of the
column using a steel yield stress value of αf
y
and no ϕ
factors (ϕ = 1.0),
− +
J J
M M , , = Positive and negative moment capacities at end J of the
column using a steel yield stress value of αf
y
and no ϕ
factors (ϕ = 1.0), and
L = Clear span of column.
For Special moment resisting frames α is taken as 1.25 (ACI 10.0,
R21.4.5.1). V
D+L
is the contribution of shear force from the in-span distri-
bution of gravity loads. For most of the columns, it is zero.
ƒ For Intermediate moment resisting frames, the shear capacity of the
column is also checked for the capacity shear based on the nominal mo-
ment capacities at the ends and the factored gravity loads, in addition to
the check required for Ordinary moment resisting frames. The design
shear force is taken to be the minimum of that based on the nominal (ϕ =
1.0) moment capacity and modified factored shear force. The procedure
for calculating nominal moment capacity is the same as that for comput-
ing the probable moment capacity for special moment resisting frames,
except that α is taken equal to 1 rather than 1.25 (ACI 21.10.3.a,
R21.10). The modified factored shear forces are based on the specified
load factors, except the earthquake load factors are doubled (ACI
21.10.3.b).
Determine Concrete Shear Capacity
Given the design force set P
u
and V
u
, the shear force carried by the concrete,
V
c
, is calculated as follows:
Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Column Design
Design Column Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 20 - 13
ƒ If the column is subjected to axial compression, i.e., P
u
is positive,
V
c
= 2








+
g
u
c
A
P
f
000 , 2
1
'
A
cv
, where (ACI 11.3.1.2)
'
c
f ≤ 100 psi, and (ACI 11.1.2)
V
c
≤ 3.5
'
c
f








+
g
u
A
P
500
1 A
cv
. (ACI 11.3.2.2)
The term P
u
/ A
g
must have psi units. A
cv
is the effective shear area, which
is shown shaded in Figure 6. For circular columns, A
cv
is taken to be equal
to the gross area of the section (ACI 11.3.3, R11.3.3).
ƒ If the column is subjected to axial tension, P
u
is negative
V
c
= 2
'
c
f








+
g
u
A
P
500
1 A
cv
≥ 0 (ACI 11.3.2.3)
ƒ For Special moment resisting concrete frame design, V
c
is set to zero
if the factored axial compressive force, P
u
, including the earthquake effect,
is small (P
u
<
'
c
f A
g
/ 20) and if the shear force contribution from earth-
quake, V
E
, is more than half of the total factored maximum shear force
over the length of the member V
u
(V
E
≥ 0.5V
u
) (ACI 21.4.5.2).
Determine Required Shear Reinforcement
Given V
u
and V
c
, the required shear reinforcement in the form of stirrups or
ties within a spacing, s, is given for rectangular and circular columns by
A
v
=
d f
s V V
ys
c u
) / ( − ϕ
, for rectangular columns and (ACI 11.5.6.1, 11.5.6.2)
A
v
=
) 8 . 0 (
) / (
D f
s V V
ys
c u
− ϕ
, for circular columns. (ACI 11.5.6.3, 11.3.3)
V
u
is limited by the following relationship.
(V
u
/ ϕ-V
c
) ≤ 8
'
c
f A
cv
(ACI 11.5.6.9)
Column Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99
Technical Note 20 - 14 Design Column Shear Reinforcement
Figure 6 Shear Stress Area, A
cv
Otherwise, redimensioning of the concrete section is required. Here ϕ, the
strength reduction factor, is 0.85 (ACI 9.3.2.3). The maximum of all the cal-
culated A
v
values obtained from each load combination are reported for the
major and minor directions of the column, along with the controlling shear
force and associated load combination label.
The column shear reinforcement requirements reported by the program are
based purely on shear strength consideration. Any minimum stirrup require-
ments to satisfy spacing considerations or transverse reinforcement volumet-
ric considerations must be investigated independently of the program by the
user.
Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Column Design
Reference Technical Note 20 - 15
Reference
White, D.W. and J.F. Hajjar. 1991. Application of Second-Order Elastic Analy-
sis in LRFD: Research to Practice. Engineering Journal. American In-
stitute of Steel Construction, Inc. Vol. 28. No. 4.
Overview Technical Note 21 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI-318-99
Technical Note 21
Beam Design
This Technical Note describes how this program completes beam design when
the ACI 318-99 code is selected. The program calculates and reports the re-
quired areas of steel for flexure and shear based on the beam moments,
shears, load combination factors and other criteria described herein.
Overview
In the design of concrete beams, the program calculates and reports the re-
quired areas of steel for flexure and shear based on the beam moments,
shears, load combination factors, and other criteria described below. The re-
inforcement requirements are calculated at a user-defined number of
check/design stations along the beam span.
All beams are designed for major direction flexure and shear only.
Effects resulting from any axial forces, minor direction bending, and
torsion that may exist in the beams must be investigated independ-
ently by the user.
The beam design procedure involves the following steps:
ƒ Design beam flexural reinforcement
ƒ Design beam shear reinforcement
Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement
The beam top and bottom flexural steel is designed at check/design stations
along the beam span. The following steps are involved in designing the flex-
ural reinforcement for the major moment for a particular beam for a particu-
lar section:
ƒ Determine the maximum factored moments
ƒ Determine the reinforcing steel
Beam Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99
Technical Note 21 - 2 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement
Determine Factored Moments
In the design of flexural reinforcement of Special, Intermediate, or Ordinary
moment resisting concrete frame beams, the factored moments for each load
combination at a particular beam section are obtained by factoring the corre-
sponding moments for different load cases with the corresponding load fac-
tors.
The beam section is then designed for the maximum positive
+
u
M and maxi-
mum negative

u
M factored moments obtained from all of the load combina-
tions
.
Negative beam moments produce top steel. In such cases, the beam is al-
ways designed as a rectangular section. Positive beam moments produce
bottom steel. In such cases, the beam may be designed as a Rectangular- or
a T-beam.
Determine Required Flexural Reinforcement
In the flexural reinforcement design process, the program calculates both the
tension and compression reinforcement. Compression reinforcement is added
when the applied design moment exceeds the maximum moment capacity of
a singly reinforced section. The user has the option of avoiding the compres-
sion reinforcement by increasing the effective depth, the width, or the grade
of concrete.
The design procedure is based on the simplified rectangular stress block as
shown in Figure 1 (ACI 10.2). It is assumed that the compression carried by
concrete is less than 0.75 times that which can be carried at the balanced
condition (ACI 10.3.3). When the applied moment exceeds the moment ca-
pacity at this designed balanced condition, the area of compression rein-
forcement is calculated assuming that the additional moment will be carried
by compression and additional tension reinforcement.
The design procedure used by this program for both rectangular and flanged
sections (L- and T-beams) is summarized below. It is assumed that the de-
sign ultimate axial force does not exceed 0.1
'
c
f A
g
(ACI 10.3.3); hence, all the
beams are designed for major direction flexure and shear only.
Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Beam Design
Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Technical Note 21 - 3
Figure 1 Design of Rectangular Beam Section
Design for Rectangular Beam
In designing for a factored negative or positive moment, M
u
(i.e., designing
top or bottom steel), the depth of the compression block is given by a (see
Figure 1), where,
a = d -
b f
M
d
c
u
ϕ

1
2
85 . 0
2
, (ACI 10.2.7.1)
where, the value of ϕ is 0.90 (ACI 9.3.2.1) in the above and the following
equations. Also β
1
and c
b
are calculated as follows:
β
1
= 0.85-0.05
(
(
,
\
,
,
(
j

000 , 1
000 , 4
'
c
f
, 0.65 ≤ β
1
≤ 0.85, (ACI 10.2.7.3)
c
b
= d
f E
E
y s c
s c
+ ε
ε
=
y
f + 000 , 87
000 , 87
d. (ACI 10.2.3, 10.2.4)
Beam Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99
Technical Note 21 - 4 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement
The maximum allowed depth of the compression block is given by
a
max
= 0.75β
1
c
b
. (ACI 10.2.7.1, 10.3.3)
ƒ If a ≤ a
max
, the area of tensile steel reinforcement is then given by
A
s
=
(
,
\
,
(
j
− ϕ
2
a
d f
M
y
u
.
This steel is to be placed at the bottom if M
u
is positive, or at the top if M
u
is negative.
ƒ If a > a
max
, compression reinforcement is required (ACI 10.3.3) and is cal-
culated as follows:
− The compressive force developed in concrete alone is given by
C = 0.85
'
c
f ba
max
, and (ACI 10.2.7.1)
the moment resisted by concrete compression and tensile steel is
M
uc
= C
(
(
,
\
,
,
(
j

2
max
a
d ϕ.
− Therefore the moment resisted by compression steel and tensile steel
is
M
us
= M
u
- M
uc
.
− So the required compression steel is given by
'
s
A =
ϕ − ) ' (
'
d d f
M
s
us
, where
'
s
f = 0.003E
s
]
]
]
,
¸
, −
c
d c '
. (ACI 10.2.4)
− The required tensile steel for balancing the compression in concrete is
Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Beam Design
Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Technical Note 21 - 5
A
s1
=
ϕ
]
]
]
,
¸
,

2
max
a
d f
M
y
uc
, and
the tensile steel for balancing the compression in steel is given by
A
s2
=
ϕ − ) ' ( d d f
M
y
us
.
− Therefore, the total tensile reinforcement, A
s
= A
s1
+ A
s2
, and total
compression reinforcement is
'
s
A . A
s
is to be placed at bottom and
'
s
A
is to be placed at top if M
u
is positive, and vice versa if M
u
is negative.
Design for T-Beam
In designing for a factored negative moment, M
u
(i.e., designing top steel),
the calculation of the steel area is exactly the same as above, i.e., no T-Beam
data is to be used. See Figure 2. If M
u
> 0, the depth of the compression
block is given by
a = d -
f c
u
b f
M
d
ϕ

'
2
85 . 0
2
.
The maximum allowed depth of compression block is given by
a
max
= 0.75β
1
c
b
. (ACI 10.2.7.1, 10.3.3)
• If a ≤ d
s
, the subsequent calculations for A
s
are exactly the same as previ-
ously defined for the rectangular section design. However, in this case the
width of the compression flange is taken as the width of the beam for
analysis. Compression reinforcement is required if a > a
max
.
• If a > d
s
, calculation for A
s
is performed in two parts. The first part is for
balancing the compressive force from the flange, C
f
, and the second part
is for balancing the compressive force from the web, C
w
, as shown in Fig-
ure 2. C
f
is given by
C
f
= 0.85
'
c
f (b
f
- b
w
)d
s
.
Beam Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99
Technical Note 21 - 6 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement
Figure 2 Design of a T-Beam Section
Therefore, A
s1
=
y
f
f
C
and the portion of M
u
that is resisted by the flange is
given by
M
uf
= C
f

(
(
,
\
,
,
(
j

2
s
d
d ϕ.
Again, the value for ϕ is ϕ(flexure), which is 0.90 by default. Therefore,
the balance of the moment, M
u
to be carried by the web is given by
M
uw
= M
u
- M
uf
.
The web is a rectangular section of dimensions b
w
and d, for which the de-
sign depth of the compression block is recalculated as
a
1
= d -
w
i
c
uw
b f
M
d
ϕ

85 . 0
2
2
.
ƒ If a
1
≤ a
max
, the area of tensile steel reinforcement is then given by
A
s2
=
(
(
,
\
,
,
(
j
− ϕ
2
1
a
d f
M
y
uw
, and
Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Beam Design
Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Technical Note 21 - 7
A
s
= A
s1
+ A
s2
.
This steel is to be placed at the bottom of the T-beam.
ƒ If a
1
> a
max
, compression reinforcement is required (ACI 10.3.3) and is
calculated as follows:
− The compressive force in web concrete alone is given by
C = 0.85
'
c
f ba
max
. (ACI 10.2.7.1)
− Therefore, the moment resisted by concrete web and tensile steel
is
M
uc
= C ϕ
(
(
,
\
,
,
(
j

2
max
a
d , and
the moment resisted by compression steel and tensile steel is
M
us
= M
uw
- M
uc
.
− Therefore, the compression steel is computed as
'
s
A =
ϕ − ) ' (
'
d d f
M
s
us
, where
'
s
f = 0.003E
s
]
]
]
,
¸
, −
c
d c '
. (ACI 10.2.4)
− The tensile steel for balancing compression in web concrete is
A
s2
=
ϕ − )
2
(
max
a
d f
M
y
uc
, and
the tensile steel for balancing compression in steel is
A
s3
=
ϕ − ) ' ( d d f
M
y
us
.
Beam Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99
Technical Note 21 - 8 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement
− The total tensile reinforcement, A
s
= A
s1
+ A
s2
+ A
s3
, and total
compression reinforcement is
'
s
A . A
s
is to be placed at bottom and
'
s
A is to be placed at top.
Minimum Tensile Reinforcement
The minimum flexural tensile steel provided in a rectangular section in an Or-
dinary moment resisting frame is given by the minimum of the two following
limits:
A
s
≥ max
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
d b
f
d b
f
f
w
y
w
y
c
200
and
3
'
or (ACI 10.5.1)
A
s
≥ (4/3)A
s(required)
. (ACI 10.5.3)
Special Consideration for Seismic Design
For Special moment resisting concrete frames (seismic design), the beam de-
sign satisfies the following additional conditions (see also Table 1):
ƒ The minimum longitudinal reinforcement shall be provided at both the top
and bottom. Any of the top and bottom reinforcement shall not be less
than A
s(min)
(ACI 21.3.2.1).
A
s(min)
≥ max
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
d b
f
d b
f
f
w
y
w
y
c
200
and
3
'
or (ACI 10.5.1)
A
s(min)

3
4
A
s(required)
. (ACI 10.5.3)
ƒ The beam flexural steel is limited to a maximum given by
A
s
≤ 0.025 b
w
d. (ACI 21.3.2.1)
ƒ At any end (support) of the beam, the beam positive moment capacity
(i.e., associated with the bottom steel) would not be less than 1/2 of the
beam negative moment capacity (i.e., associated with the top steel) at
that end (ACI 21.3.2.2).
ƒ Neither the negative moment capacity nor the positive moment capacity
at any of the sections within the beam would be less than 1/4 of the
Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Beam Design
Design Beam Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 21 - 9
maximum of positive or negative moment capacities of any of the beam
end (support) stations (ACI 21.3.2.2).
For Intermediate moment resisting concrete frames (i.e., seismic design), the
beam design would satisfy the following conditions:
ƒ At any support of the beam, the beam positive moment capacity would
not be less than 1/3 of the beam negative moment capacity at that end
(ACI 21.10.4.1).
ƒ Neither the negative moment capacity nor the positive moment capacity
at any of the sections within the beam would be less than 1/5 of the
maximum of positive or negative moment capacities of any of the beam
end (support) stations (ACI 21.10.4.1).
Design Beam Shear Reinforcement
The shear reinforcement is designed for each load combination at a user de-
fined number of stations along the beam span. The following steps are in-
volved in designing the shear reinforcement for a particular beam for a par-
ticular load combination at a particular station due to the beam major shear:
• Determine the factored shear force, V
u
.
• Determine the shear force, V
c
, that can be resisted by the concrete.
• Determine the reinforcement steel required to carry the balance.
For Special and Intermediate moment resisting frames (ductile frames), the
shear design of the beams is also based upon the probable and nominal mo-
ment capacities of the members, respectively, in addition to the factored load
design.
The following three sections describe in detail the algorithms associated with
this process.
Beam Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99
Technical Note 21 - 10 Design Beam Shear Reinforcement
Table 1 Design Criteria Table
Type of
Check/
Design
Ordinary Moment
Resisting Frames
(non-Seismic)
Intermediate Moment
Resisting Frames
(Seismic)
Special Moment
Resisting Frames
(Seismic)
Column
Check
(interaction)
NLD
a
Combinations NLD
a
Combinations NLD
a
Combinations
Column
Design
(interaction)
NLD
a
Combinations
1% < ρ < 8%
NLD
a
Combinations
1% < ρ < 8%
NLD
a
Combinations
α = 1.0
1% < ρ < 6%
Column
Shears
NLD
a
Combinations
Modified NLD
a
Combinations
(earthquake loads doubled)
Column capacity
ϕ = 1.0 and α = 1.0
NLD
a
Combinations
Column shear capacity
ϕ = 1.0 and α = 1.25
Beam
Design
Flexure
NLD
a
Combinations NLD
a
Combinations
NLD
a
Combinations
ρ ≤ 0.025
ρ ≥
y
c
f
f
'
3
, ρ ≥
y
f
200
Beam Min.
Moment
Override
Check
No Requirement
END u uEND
M M
− +

3
1
¦ ¦
END u u uSPAN
M M M
− + +
≥ , max
5
1
¦ ¦
END u u uSPAN
M M M
− + −
≥ , max
5
1
END
u uEND
M M
− +

2
1
¦ ¦
END u u uSPAN
M M M
− + +
≥ , max
4
1
¦ ¦
END u u uSPAN
M M M
− − −
≥ , max
4
1
Beam
Design
Shear
NLD
a
Combinations
Modified NLD
a
Combinations
(earthquake loads doubled)
Beam Capacity Shear (Vp)
with α = 1.0 and ϕ = 1.0
plus VD+L
NLD
a
Combinations
Beam Capacity Shear (Vp)
with α = 1.25 and ϕ = 1.0
plus VD+L
Vc = 0
Joint Design No Requirement No Requirement Checked for shear
Beam/Column
Capacity
Ratio
No Requirement No Requirement Reported in output file
NLD
a
= Number of specified loading
Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Beam Design
Design Beam Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 21 - 11
Determine Shear Force and Moment
• In the design of the beam shear reinforcement of an Ordinary moment
resisting concrete frame, the shear forces and moments for a particular
load combination at a particular beam section are obtained by factoring
the associated shear forces and moments with the corresponding load
combination factors.
• In the design of Special moment resisting concrete frames (i.e.,
seismic design), the shear capacity of the beam is also checked for the
capacity shear resulting from the probable moment capacities at the ends
and the factored gravity load. This check is performed in addition to the
design check required for Ordinary moment resisting frames. The capacity
shear force, V
p
, is calculated from the probable moment capacities of each
end of the beam and the gravity shear forces. The procedure for calculat-
ing the design shear force in a beam from probable moment capacity is
the same as that described for a column in section “Design Column Shear
Reinforcement” of Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Technical Note 20
Column Design. See also Table 1 for details.
The design shear force V
u
is then given by (ACI 21.3.4.1)
V
u
= V
p
+ V
D+L
(ACI 21.3.4.1)
where V
p
is the capacity shear force obtained by applying the calculated
probable ultimate moment capacities at the two ends of the beams acting
in two opposite directions. Therefore, V
p
is the maximum of
1
P
V and
2
P
V ,
where
1
P
V =
L
M M
J I
+ −
+
, and
2
P
V =
L
M M
J I
− +
+
, where

I
M = Moment capacity at end I, with top steel in tension, using a
steel yield stress value of αf
y
and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1.0),
+
J
M = Moment capacity at end J, with bottom steel in tension, using
a steel yield stress value of αf
y
and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1.0),
Beam Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99
Technical Note 21 - 12 Design Beam Shear Reinforcement
+
I
M = Moment capacity at end I, with bottom steel in tension, using
a steel yield stress value of αf
y
and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1.0),

J
M = Moment capacity at end J, with top steel in tension, using a
steel yield stress value of αf
y
and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1.0), and
L = Clear span of beam.
For Special moment resisting frames α is taken as 1.25 (ACI 21.0,
R21.3.4.1). V
D+L
is the contribution of shear force from the in-span distri-
bution of gravity loads.
• For Intermediate moment resisting frames, the shear capacity of the
beam is also checked for the capacity shear based on the nominal moment
capacities at the ends and the factored gravity loads, in addition to the
check required for Ordinary moment resisting frames. The design shear
force in beams is taken to be the minimum of that based on the nominal
moment capacity and modified factored shear force. The procedure for
calculating nominal (ϕ = 1.0) moment capacity is the same as that for
computing the probable moment capacity for Special moment resisting
frames, except that α is taken equal to 1 rather than 1.25 (ACI 21.10.3.a,
R21.10). The modified factored shear forces are based on the specified
load factors, except the earthquake load factors are doubled (ACI
21.10.3.b). The computation of the design shear force in a beam of an
Intermediate moment resisting frame is the same as described for col-
umns in section “Determine Section Forces” of Concrete Frame Design
ACI318-99 Technical Note 20 Column Design. See also Table 1 for details.
Determine Concrete Shear Capacity
The allowable concrete shear capacity is given by
V
c
= 2
'
c
f b
w
d. (ACI 11.3.1.1)
For Special moment resisting frame concrete design, V
c
is set to zero if both
the factored axial compressive force, including the earthquake effect P
u
, is
less than
'
c
f A
g
/20 and the shear force contribution from earthquake V
E
is
more than half of the total maximum shear force over the length of the mem-
ber V
u
(i.e., V
E
≥ 0.5V
u
) (ACI 21.3.4.2).
Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Beam Design
Design Beam Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 21 - 13
Determine Required Shear Reinforcement
Given V
u
and V
c
, the required shear reinforcement in area/unit length is cal-
culated as
A
v
=
d f
s V V
ys
c u
) / ( − ϕ
. (ACI 11.5.6.1, 11.5.6.2)
The shear force resisted by steel is limited by
(V
u
/ ϕ - V
c
) ≤ 8
'
c
f bd. (ACI 11.5.6.9)
Otherwise, redimensioning of the concrete section is required. Here, ϕ, the
strength reduction factor for shear, is 0.85 by default (ACI 9.3.2.3). The
maximum of all the calculated A
v
values, obtained from each load combina-
tion, is reported along with the controlling shear force and associated load
combination number.
The beam shear reinforcement requirements displayed by the program are
based purely on shear strength considerations. Any minimum stirrup require-
ments to satisfy spacing and volumetric considerations must be investigated
independently of the program by the user.
Overview Technical Note 22 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI318-99
Technical Note 22
Joint Design
This Technical Note explains how the program performs a rational analysis of
the beam-column panel zone to determine the shear forces that are gener-
ated in a joint. The program then checks this against design shear strength.
Overview
To ensure that the beam-column joint of special moment resisting frames
possesses adequate shear strength, the program performs a rational analysis
of the beam-column panel zone to determine the shear forces that are gener-
ated in the joint. The program then checks this against design shear strength.
Only joints having a column below the joint are designed. The material prop-
erties of the joint are assumed to be the same as those of the column below
the joint.
The joint analysis is completed in the major and the minor directions of the
column. The joint design procedure involves the following steps:
ƒ Determine the panel zone design shear force, V
u
h
ƒ Determine the effective area of the joint
ƒ Check panel zone shear stress
The algorithms associated with these three steps are described in detail in the
following three sections.
Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force
Figure 1 illustrates the free body stress condition of a typical beam-column
intersection for a column direction, major or minor.
Joint Design Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99
Technical Note 22 - 2 Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force
Figure 1 Beam-Column Joint Analysis
Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Joint Design
Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force Technical Note 22 - 3
The force V
u
h
is the horizontal panel zone shear force that is to be calculated.
The forces that act on the joint are P
u
, V
u
, M
u
L
and M
u
R
. The forces P
u
and V
u
are axial force and shear force, respectively, from the column framing into the
top of the joint. The moments M
u
L
and M
u
R
are obtained from the beams
framing into the joint. The program calculates the joint shear force V
u
h
by re-
solving the moments into C and T forces. Noting that T
L
= C
L
and T
R
= C
R
,
V
u
h
= T
L
+ T
R
- V
u
The location of C or T forces is determined by the direction of the moment.
The magnitude of C or T forces is conservatively determined using basic prin-
ciples of ultimate strength theory, ignoring compression reinforcement as fol-
lows. The program first calculates the maximum compression, C
max
, and the
maximum moment, M
max
, that can be carried by the beam.
bd f C c
'
max
85 . 0
2
max max
d
C M
Then the program conservatively determines C and T forces as follows:
(
(
,
\
,
,
(
j
− −
max
max
) (
1 1
M
M abs
C T C
The program resolves the moments and the C and T forces from beams that
frame into the joint in a direction that is not parallel to the major or minor
directions of the column along the direction that is being investigated, thereby
contributing force components to the analysis. Also, the program calculates
the C and T for the positive and negative moments, considering the fact that
the concrete cover may be different for the direction of moment.
In the design of special moment resisting concrete frames, the evaluation of
the design shear force is based on the moment capacities (with reinforcing
steel overstrength factor, α, and no ϕ factors) of the beams framing into the
joint (ACI 21.5.1.1, UBC 1921.5.1.1). The C and T force are based on these
moment capacities. The program calculates the column shear force V
u
from
the beam moment capacities, as follows:
Joint Design Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99
Technical Note 22 - 4 Determine the Effective Area of Joint
H
M M
V
R
u
L
u
u
+

See Figure 2. It should be noted that the points of inflection shown on Figure
2 are taken as midway between actual lateral support points for the columns.
If there is no column at the top of the joint, the shear force from the top of
the column is taken as zero.
The effects of load reversals, as illustrated in Case 1 and Case 2 of Figure 1,
are investigated and the design is based on the maximum of the joint shears
obtained from the two cases.
Determine the Effective Area of Joint
The joint area that resists the shear forces is assumed always to be rectan-
gular in plan view. The dimensions of the rectangle correspond to the major
and minor dimensions of the column below the joint, except if the beam
framing into the joint is very narrow. The effective width of the joint area to
be used in the calculation is limited to the width of the beam plus the depth of
the column. The area of the joint is assumed not to exceed the area of the
column below. The joint area for joint shear along the major and minor direc-
tions is calculated separately (ACI R21.5.3).
It should be noted that if the beam frames into the joint eccentrically, the
above assumptions may be unconservative and the user should investigate
the acceptability of the particular joint.
Check Panel Zone Shear Stress
The panel zone shear stress is evaluated by dividing the shear force V
u
h
by
the effective area of the joint and comparing it with the following design shear
strengths (ACI 21.5.3, UBC 1921.5.3):
20ϕ
c
f '
for joints confirmed on all four sides
v = 15ϕ
c
f '
for joints confirmed on three faces or on two
opposite faces
¦
12ϕ
c
f '
for all other joints
Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Joint Design
Determine the Effective Area of Joint Technical Note 22 - 5
where ϕ = 0.85 (by default). (ACI 9.3.2.3, UBC 1909.3.2.3,1909.3.4.1)
A beam that frames into a face of a column at the joint is considered in this
program to provide confinement to the joint if at least three-quarters of the
face of the joint is covered by the framing member (ACI 21.5.3.1, UBC
1921.5.3.1).
Figure 2 Column Shear Force V
u
Joint Design Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99
Technical Note 22 - 6 Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios
For light-weight aggregate concrete, the design shear strength of the joint is
reduced in the program to at least three-quarters of that of the normal weight
concrete by replacing the
'
c
f

with
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦
¦ ' '
,
4 / 3 , min
c c factor cs
f f f (ACI 21.5.3.2, UBC 1921.5.3.2)
For joint design, the program reports the joint shear, the joint shear stress,
the allowable joint shear stress and a capacity ratio.
Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios
At a particular joint for a particular column direction, major or minor, the pro-
gram will calculate the ratio of the sum of the beam moment capacities to the
sum of the column moment capacities (ACI 21.4.2.2).
∑M
e

5
6
∑M
g
(ACI 21.4.2.2)
The capacities are calculated with no reinforcing overstrength factor, α , and
including ϕ factors. The beam capacities are calculated for reversed situations
(Cases 1 and 2) as illustrated in Figure 1 and the maximum summation ob-
tained is used.
The moment capacities of beams that frame into the joint in a direction that is
not parallel to the major or minor direction of the column are resolved along
the direction that is being investigated and the resolved components are
added to the summation.
The column capacity summation includes the column above and the column
below the joint. For each load combination, the axial force, P
u
, in each of the
columns is calculated from the program analysis load combinations. For each
load combination, the moment capacity of each column under the influence of
the corresponding axial load P
u
is then determined separately for the major
and minor directions of the column, using the uniaxial column interaction dia-
gram; see Figure 3. The moment capacities of the two columns are added to
give the capacity summation for the corresponding load combination. The
maximum capacity summations obtained from all of the load combinations is
used for the beam/column capacity ratio.
Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Joint Design
Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios Technical Note 22 - 7
The beam/column flexural capacity ratios are only reported for Special Mo-
ment-Resisting Frames involving seismic design load combinations. If this ra-
tio is greater than 5/6, a warning message is printed in the output file.
Figure 3 Moment Capacity M
u
at a Given Axial Load P
u
Input Data Technical Note 23 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI318-99
Technical Note 23
Input Data
This Technical Note describes the concrete frame design input data for
ACI318-99. The input can be printed to a printer or to a text file when you
click the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command. A
printout of the input data provides the user with the opportunity to carefully
review the parameters that have been input into the program and upon which
program design is based. Further information about using the Print Design
Tables form is presented at the end of this Technical Note.
Input Data
The program provides the printout of the input data in a series of tables. The
column headings for input data and a description of what is included in the
columns of the tables are provided in Table 1 of this Technical Note.
Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data
COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION
Load Combination Multipliers
Combo Design load combination. See Technical Note 8.
Type
Load type: dead, live, superimposed dead, earthquake, wind,
snow, reduced live load, other.
Case Name of load case.
Factor Load combination scale factor.
Code Preferences
Phi_bending Bending strength reduction factor.
Phi_tension Tensile strength reduction factor.
Phi_compression
(Tied)
Compressive strength reduction factor for tied columns.
Phi_compression (Spi-
ral)
Compressive strength reduction factor for reinforced columns.
Phi_shear Shear strength reduction factor.
Input Data Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99
Technical Note 23 - 2 Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data
Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data
COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION
Material Property Data
Material Name Concrete, steel, other.
Material Type Isotropic or orthotropic.
Design Type
Modulus of Elasticity
Poisson's Ratio
Thermal Coeff Coefficient of thermal expansion.
Shear Modulus
Material Property Mass and Weight
Material Name Concrete, steel, other.
Mass Per Unit Vol Used to calculate self-mass of structure.
Weight Per Unit Vol Used to calculate self-weight of structure.
Material Design Data for Concrete Materials
Material Name Concrete, steel, other.
Lightweight Concrete
Concrete FC Concrete compressive strength.
Rebar FY Bending reinforcing steel yield strength.
Rebar FYS Shear reinforcing steel yield strength.
Lightwt Reduc Fact Shear strength reduction factor for light weight concrete; default
= 1.0.
Concrete Column Property Data
Section Label Label applied to section.
Mat Label Material label.
Column Depth
Column Width
Rebar Pattern Layout of main flexural reinforcing steel.
Concrete Cover Minimum clear concrete cover.
Bar Area Area of individual reinforcing bar to be used.
Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Input Data
Using the Print Design Tables Form Technical Note 23 - 3
Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data
COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION
Concrete Column Design Element Information
Story ID Column assigned to story level at top of column.
Column Line Grid line.
Section ID Name of section assigned to column.
Framing Type Lateral or gravity.
RLLF Factor
L_Ratio Major Unbraced length about major axis.
L_Ratio Minor Unbraced length about minor axis.
K Major Effective length factor; default = 1.0.
K Minor Effective length factor; default = 1.0.
Concrete Beam Design Element Information
Story ID Story level at which beam occurs.
Bay ID Grid lines locating beam.
Section ID Section number assigned to beam.
Framing type Lateral or gravity.
RLLF Factor
L_Ratio Major Unbraced length about major axis.
L_Ratio Minor Unbraced length about minor axis.
Using the Print Design Tables Form
To print concrete frame design input data directly to a printer, use the File
menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command and click the
check box on the Print Design Tables form. Click the OK button to send the
print to your printer. Click the Cancel button rather than the OK button to
cancel the print. Use the File menu > Print Setup command and the
Setup>> button to change printers, if necessary.
To print concrete frame design input data to a file, click the Print to File check
box on the Print Design Tables form. Click the Filename>> button to change
Input Data Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99
Technical Note 23 - 4 Using the Print Design Tables Form
the path or filename. Use the appropriate file extension for the desired format
(e.g., .txt, .xls, .doc). Click the OK buttons on the Open File for Printing Ta-
bles form and the Print Design Tables form to complete the request.
Note:
The File menu > Display Input/Output Text Files command is useful for displaying out-
put that is printed to a text file.
The Append check box allows you to add data to an existing file. The path and
filename of the current file is displayed in the box near the bottom of the Print
Design Tables form. Data will be added to this file. Or use the Filename>>
button to locate another file, and when the Open File for Printing Tables cau-
tion box appears, click Yes to replace the existing file.
If you select a specific frame element(s) before using the File menu > Print
Tables > Concrete Frame Design command, the Selection Only check box
will be checked. The print will be for the selected beam(s) only.
Table 1 Concrete Column Design Output Technical Note 24 - 1
©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001
CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI318-99
Technical Note 24
Output Details
This Technical Note describes the concrete frame design output for ACI318-99
that can be printed to a printer or to a text file. The design output is printed
when you click the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design
command and select Output Summary on the Print Design Tables form. Fur-
ther information about using the Print Design Tables form is presented at the
end of this Technical Note.
The program provides the output data in a series of tables. The column
headings for output data and a description of what is included in the columns
of the tables are provided in Table 1 of this Technical Note.
Table 1 Concrete Column Design Output
COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION
Biaxial P-M Interaction and Shear Design of Column-Type Elements
Story ID Column assigned to story level at top of column.
Column Line Grid lines.
Section ID Name of section assigned to column.
Station ID
Required Reinforcing
Longitudinal Area of longitudinal reinforcing required.
Combo Load combination for which the reinforcing is designed.
Shear22 Shear reinforcing required.
Combo Load combination for which the reinforcing is designed.
Shear33 Shear reinforcing required.
Output Details Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99
Technical Note 24 - 2 Table 2 Concrete Column Joint Output
Table 1 Concrete Column Design Output
COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION
Combo Load combination for which the reinforcing is designed.
Table 2 Concrete Column Joint Output
COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION
Beam to Column Capacity Ratios and Joint Shear Capacity Check
Story ID Story level at which joint occurs.
Column Line Grid line.
Section ID Assigned section name.
Beam-Column Capacity Ratios
Major Ratio of beam moment capacity to column capacity.
Combo Load combination upon which the ratio of beam moment ca-
pacity to column capacity is based.
Minor Ratio of beam moment capacity to column capacity.
Combo Load combination upon which the ratio of beam moment ca-
pacity to column capacity is based.
Joint Shear Capacity Ratios
Major Ratio of factored load versus allowed capacity.
Combo Load combination upon which the ratio of factored load versus
allowed capacity is based.
Minor Ratio of factored load versus allowed capacity.
Combo Load combination upon which the ratio of factored load versus
allowed capacity is based.
Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Output Details
Using the Print Design Tables Form Technical Note 24 - 3
Using the Print Design Tables Form
To print concrete frame design input data directly to a printer, use the File
menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command and click the
check box on the Print Design Tables form. Click the OK button to send the
print to your printer. Click the Cancel button rather than the OK button to
cancel the print. Use the File menu > Print Setup command and the
Setup>> button to change printers, if necessary.
To print concrete frame design input data to a file, click the Print to File check
box on the Print Design Tables form. Click the Filename>> button to change
the path or filename. Use the appropriate file extension for the desired format
(e.g., .txt, .xls, .doc). Click the OK buttons on the Open File for Printing Ta-
bles form and the Print Design Tables form to complete the request.
Note:
The File menu > Display Input/Output Text Files command is useful for displaying out-
put that is printed to a text file.
The Append check box allows you to add data to an existing file. The path and
filename of the current file is displayed in the box near the bottom of the Print
Design Tables form. Data will be added to this file. Or use the Filename>>
button to locate another file, and when the Open File for Printing Tables cau-
tion box appears, click Yes to replace the existing file.
If you select a specific frame element(s) before using the File menu > Print
Tables > Concrete Frame Design command, the Selection Only check box
will be checked. The print will be for the selected beam(s) only.

ETABS

®

Integrated Building Design Software

Concrete Frame Design Manual

Computers and Structures, Inc. Berkeley, California, USA

Version 8 January 2002

1995 University Avenue Berkeley. 1978-2002.. Inc. Further information and copies of this documentation may be obtained from: Computers and Structures.com  Copyright Computers and Structures.Copyright The computer program ETABS and all associated documentation are proprietary and copyrighted products. Inc. California 94704 USA Phone: (510) 845-2177 FAX: (510) 845-4096 e-mail: info@csiberkeley. Unlicensed use of the program or reproduction of the documentation in any form. Adobe and Acrobat are registered trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated . Inc. ETABS is a trademark of Computers and Structures.com (for general questions) e-mail: support@csiberkeley. The CSI Logo is a trademark of Computers and Structures. Inc.. Inc. Inc.csiberkeley. Worldwide rights of ownership rest with Computers and Structures.com (for technical support questions) web: www. is explicitly prohibited. without prior written authorization from Computers and Structures. Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

.

THE USER MUST EXPLICITLY UNDERSTAND THE ASSUMPTIONS OF THE PROGRAM AND MUST INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE RESULTS. THE USER MUST THOROUGHLY READ THE MANUAL AND CLEARLY RECOGNIZE THE ASPECTS OF CONCRETE DESIGN THAT THE PROGRAM ALGORITHMS DO NOT ADDRESS. THE PROGRAM HAS BEEN THOROUGHLY TESTED AND USED. HOWEVER. IN USING THE PROGRAM. THIS PROGRAM IS A VERY PRACTICAL TOOL FOR THE DESIGN/CHECK OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES.DISCLAIMER CONSIDERABLE TIME. THE USER ACCEPTS AND UNDERSTANDS THAT NO WARRANTY IS EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED BY THE DEVELOPERS OR THE DISTRIBUTORS ON THE ACCURACY OR THE RELIABILITY OF THE PROGRAM. . HOWEVER. EFFORT AND EXPENSE HAVE GONE INTO THE DEVELOPMENT AND DOCUMENTATION OF ETABS.

.

©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN Contents General Concrete Frame Design Information 1 General Design Information Design Codes Units Overwriting the Frame Design Procedure for a Concrete Frame Design Load Combinations Design of Beams Design of Columns Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios Second Order P-Delta Effects Element Unsupported Lengths Analysis Sections and Design Sections Concrete Frame Design Process Concrete Frame Design Procedure Interactive Concrete Frame Design General Concrete Design Information Form Output Data Plotted Directly on the Model Overview Using the Print Design Tables Form Design Input Design Output 1-1 1-1 1-1 1-2 1-2 1-3 1-4 1-4 1-6 1-7 2 2-1 3 3-1 3-1 4 4-1 4-1 4-2 4-2 i .. BERKELEY. INC.

Concrete Frame Design Manual Concrete Frame Design Specific to UBC97 5 General and Notation Introduction to the UBC 97 Series of Technical Notes Notation Preferences General Using the Preferences Form Preferences Overwrites General Overwrites Making Changes in the Overwrites Form Resetting Concrete Frame Overwrites to Default Values Design Load Combinations Strength Reduction Factors Column Design Overview Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces Calculate Column Capacity Ratio Determine Factored Moments and Forces Determine Moment Magnification Factors Determine Capacity Ratio Required Reinforcing Area Design Column Shear Reinforcement Determine Required Shear Reinforcement Reference Beam Design Overview Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Determine Factored Moments Determine Required Flexural Reinforcement 5-1 5-2 6 6-1 6-1 6-2 7 7-1 7-1 7-3 7-4 8 9 10 10-1 10-2 10-5 10-6 10-6 10-8 10-10 10-10 10-14 10-15 11 11-1 11-1 11-2 11-2 ii .

Contents Design Beam Shear Reinforcement 12 Joint Design Overview Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force Determine the Effective Area of Joint Check Panel Zone Shear Stress Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios Input Data Input data Using the Print Design Tables Form Output Details Using the Print Design Tables Form 11-10 12-1 12-1 12-5 12-5 12-6 13 13-1 13-3 14 14-3 Concrete Frame Design Specific to ACI-318-99 15 General and Notation Introduction to the ACI318-99 Series of Technical Notes Notation Preferences General Using the Preferences Form Preferences Overwrites General Overwrites Making Changes in the Overwrites Form Resetting Concrete Frame Overwrites to Default Values Design Load Combinations Strength Reduction Factors 15-1 15-2 16 16-1 16-1 16-2 17 17-1 17-1 17-3 17-4 18 19 iii .

Concrete Frame Design Manual 20 Column Design Overview Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces Calculate Column Capacity Ratio Determine Factored Moments and Forces Determine Moment Magnification Factors Determine Capacity Ratio Required Reinforcing Area Design Column Shear Reinforcement Determine Section Forces Determine Concrete Shear Capacity Determine Required Shear Reinforcement References Beam Design Overview Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Determine Factored Moments Determine Required Flexural Reinforcement Design for T-Beam Minimum Tensile Reinforcement Special Consideration for Seismic Design Design Beam Shear Reinforcement Determine Shear Force and Moment Determine Concrete Shear Capacity Determine Required Shear Reinforcement Joint Design Overview Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force Determine the Effective Area of Joint Check Panel Zone Shear Stress Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios Input Data Input Data Using the Print Design Tables Form 20-1 20-2 20-5 20-6 20-6 20-9 20-10 20-10 20-11 20-12 20-13 20-15 21 21-1 21-1 21-2 21-2 21-5 21-8 21-8 21-9 21-11 21-12 21-13 22 22-1 22-1 22-4 22-4 22-6 23 23-1 23-3 iv .

Contents 24 Output Details Using the Print Design Tables Form 24-3 v .

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its default design procedure is Concrete Frame Design. perform different design runs using different design codes without rerunning the analysis. design codes are based on one specific set of units. Design Codes The design code is set using the Options menu > Preferences > Concrete Frame Design command. You can choose to design for any one design code in any one design run. BERKELEY. A concrete frame element can be switched between the Concrete Frame Design and the "None" design procedure. You can. any set of consistent units can be used for input.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. INC. however. You cannot design some elements for one code and others for a different code in the same design run. Overwriting the Frame Design Procedure for a Concrete Frame The two design procedures possible for concrete beam design are: Concrete frame design No design If a line object is assigned a frame section property that has a concrete material property. CALIFORNIA JANUARY 2002 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN Technical Note 1 General Design Information This Technical Note presents some basic information and concepts helpful when performing concrete frame design using this program. Assign a concrete frame element the "None" design procedure if you do not want it designed by the Concrete Frame Design postprocessor.1 . You can change the system of units at any time.. Design Codes Technical Note 1 . Typically. Units For concrete frame design in this program.

Design Load Combinations The program creates a number of default design load combinations for concrete frame design. Effects resulting from any axial forces. shears. You can add in your own design load combinations.General Design Information Concrete Frame Design Change the default design procedure used for concrete frame elements by selecting the element(s) and clicking Design menu > Overwrite Frame Design Procedure. Technical Note 1 . the program calculates and reports the required areas of steel for flexure and shear based on the beam moments. and other criteria. Design of Beams The program designs all concrete frame elements designated as beam sections in their Frame Section Properties as beams (see Define menu >Frame Sections command and click the Reinforcement button). In designing the flexural reinforcement for the major moment at a particular section of a particular beam. All the beams are designed for major direction flexure and shear only. To define a design load combination. For more information see Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 8 Design Load Combination and Concrete Frame Design ACI 318-99 Technical Note 18 Design Load Combination. which are described in detail in Concrete Frame UBC97 Technical Note Beam Design 11 and Concrete Frame ACI 318-99 Technical Note 21 Beam Design. In the design of concrete beams. The reinforcement requirements are calculated at each output station along the beam span. This change is only successful if the design procedure assigned to an element is valid for that element. You can also modify or delete the program default load combinations. load combination factors. An unlimited number of design load combinations can be specified. in general. if you select a concrete element and attempt to change the design procedure to Steel Frame Design. simply specify one or more load cases. minor direction bending. the program will not allow the change because a concrete element cannot be changed to a steel frame element.2 Design Load Combinations . the steps involve the determination of the maximum factored moments and the determination of the reinforcing steel. For example. each with its own scale factor. and torsion that may exist in the beams must be investigated independently by the user.

For the design of flexural reinforcement. Design of Columns The program designs all concrete frame elements designated as column sections in their Frame Section Properties as columns (see Define menu >Frame Sections command and click the Reinforcement button). the program calculates the required longitudinal steel. In such cases. the beam is first designed as a singly reinforced beam. the steps involve the determination of the factored shear force. the required compression reinforcement is calculated. Negative beam moments produce top steel. The design procedure for reinforced concrete columns involves the following steps: Generate axial force-biaxial moment interaction surfaces for all of the different concrete section types of the model. In designing the shear reinforcement for a particular beam for a particular set of loading combinations at a particular station resulting from the beam major shear. Design the column shear reinforcement. the determination of the shear force that can be resisted by concrete. the beam may be designed as a rectangular. Check the capacity of each column for the factored axial force and bending moments obtained from each load combination at each end of the column. The capacity ratio is a factor that gives an indication of the stress condition of the column with respect to the capacity of the column. The shear reinforcement design procedure for columns is very similar to that for beams. See Concrete Frame UBC97 Technical Note 10 Design of Beams Technical Note 1 . Positive beam moments produce bottom steel. the beam is always designed as a rectangular section. and the determination of the reinforcement steel required to carry the balance. In such cases. In the design of the columns.3 .or T-beam. If the beam section is not adequate. except that the effect of the axial force on the concrete shear capacity needs to be considered. or if the longitudinal steel is specified.0.Concrete Frame Design General Design Information The beam section is designed for the maximum positive and maximum negative factored moment envelopes obtained from all of the load combinations. the column stress condition is reported in terms of a column capacity ratio. This step is also used to calculate the required reinforcement (if none was specified) that will produce a capacity ratio of 1.

major or minor. in each of the columns is calculated from the program analysis load combinations. α. The moment capacities of the two columns are added to give the capacity summation for the corresponding load combination. For each load combination. the axial force. the program calculates the ratio of the sum of the beam moment capacities to the sum of the column moment capacities at a particular joint for a particular column direction. The beam/column flexural capacity ratios are only reported for Special Moment-Resisting Frames involving seismic design load combinations. and including ϕ factors. The maximum capacity summations obtained from all of the load combinations is used for the beam/column capacity ratio. For each load combination.General Design Information Concrete Frame Design Column Design and Concrete Frame ACI 318-99 Technical Note 20 Column Design for more information. The P-Delta effects come from two sources. the moment capacity of each column under the influence of the corresponding axial load Pu is then determined separately for the major and minor directions of the column. The capacities are calculated with no reinforcing overstrength factor. Second Order P-Delta Effects Typically. Pu.4 Second Order P-Delta Effects . Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios When the ACI 318-99 or UBC97 code is selected. See Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios in Concrete Frame UBC97 Technical Note 12 Joint Design or in Concrete Frame ACI 318-99 Technical Note 22 Joint Design for more information. They are the global lateral translation of the frame and the local deformation of elements within the frame. design codes require that second order P-Delta effects be considered when designing concrete frames. The moment capacities of beams that frame into the joint in a direction that is not parallel to the major or minor direction of the column are resolved along the direction that is being investigated and the resolved components are added to the summation. Technical Note 1 . using the uniaxial column interaction diagram. The beam capacities are calculated for reversed situations and the maximum summation obtained is used. The column capacity summation includes the column above and the column below the joint.

but it does not typically capture the effect of the δ deformation (unless. and the local deformation of the element. ∆. MCAP = Flexural design capacity = aMnt + bMlt Eqn. consideration of the second order P-Delta effects is generally achieved by computing the flexural design capacity using a formula similar to that shown in Equation. When you consider P-Delta effects in the analysis.Concrete Frame Design General Design Information ∆ Original position of frame element shown by vertical line Position of frame element as a result of global lateral translation. the frame element is broken into multiple pieces over its length).5 . 1. δ Figure 1: The Total Second Order P-Delta Effects on a Frame Element Caused by Both ∆ and δ Consider the frame element shown in Figure 1. MCAP where. in the model. shown by dashed line δ Final deflected position of frame element that includes the global lateral translation. The program has an option to consider P-Delta effects in the analysis. 1 Second Order P-Delta Effects Technical Note 1 . The overall global translation of this frame element is indicated by ∆. Controls for considering this effect are found using the Analyze menu > Set Analysis Options command and then clicking the Set P-Delta Parameters button. which is extracted from a story level of a larger structure. In design codes. The local deformation of the element is shown as δ. the program does a good job of capturing the effect due to the ∆ deformation shown in Figure 1. The total second order P-Delta effects on this frame element are those caused by both ∆ and δ. ∆.

if you are performing concrete frame design in this program. such as member connectivity. There are two unsupported lengths to consider. The length L22 is also used for lateral-torsional buckling caused by major direction bending (i. diaphragm constraints and support points. and L22 corresponds to instability about the 2-2 axis (minor axis). They are L33 and L22. These are the lengths between support points of the element in the corresponding directions. The program automatically determines these unsupported lengths.. The program automatically locates the element support points and evaluates the corresponding unsupported length. Technical Note 1 .6 Element Unsupported Lengths . In determining the values for L22 and L33 of the elements. if desired.e. using the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > View/Revise Overwrites command. associated with the δ deformation in Figure 1) Required flexural capacity of the member as a result of lateral translation of the frame only (i. about the 3-3 axis). as shown in Figure 2.e. see below) Mlt = a b = = When the program performs concrete frame design. in general. That b = 1 assumes that you have considered P-Delta effects in the analysis. They can also be overwritten by the user on an element-by-element basis.General Design Information Concrete Frame Design Mnt = Required flexural capacity of the member assuming there is no translation of the frame (i.. the program recognizes various aspects of the structure that have an effect on these lengths. it assumes that the factor b is equal to 1 and it uses code-specific formulas to calculate the factor a. as previously described. The length L33 corresponds to instability about the 3-3 axis (major axis).. Element Unsupported Lengths The column unsupported lengths are required to account for column slenderness effects.e. you should consider P-Delta effects in the analysis before running the design. Thus. associated with the ∆ deformation in Figure 1) Unitless factor multiplying Mnt Unitless factor multiplying Mlt (assumed equal to 1 by the program.

Concrete Frame Design General Design Information Figure 2: Major and Minor Axes of Bending It is possible for the unsupported length of a frame element to be evaluated by the program as greater than the corresponding element length. In this case. assume a column has a beam framing into it in one direction. the column is assumed to be supported in one direction only at that story level. The design section is whatever section has most currently been designed and thus designated the current design section. and its unsupported length in the other direction will exceed the story height. For example. Tip: It is important to understand the difference between analysis sections and design sections.7 . Analysis Sections and Design Sections Analysis sections are those section properties used to analyze the model when you click the Analyze menu > Run Analysis command. Analysis Sections and Design Sections Technical Note 1 . at a floor level. but not the other.

but it does not delete or change the design section. Unlocking a model deletes the design results. Using the Options menu > Preferences > Concrete Frame Design command to change any of the composite beam design preferences deletes the design results.8 Analysis Sections and Design Sections . Running an analysis using the Analyze menu > Run Analysis command (or its associated toolbar button) always sets the analysis section to be the same as the current design section.General Design Information Concrete Frame Design It is possible for the last used analysis section and the current design section to be different. The Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Verify Analysis vs Design Section command is useful for this task. The program keeps track of the analysis section and the design section separately. Typically. Using the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Select Design Combo command to change a design load combination deletes the design results. Note the following about analysis and design sections: Assigning a beam a frame section property using the Assign menu > Frame/Line > Frame Section command assigns the section as both the analysis section and the design section. Assigning an auto select list to a frame section using the Assign menu > Frame/Line > Frame Section command initially sets the design section to be the beam with the median weight in the auto select list. In that case. For example. verify that the last used analysis section and the current design section are the same. Before you complete the design process. you may have run your analysis using a W18X35 beam and then found in the design that a W16X31 beam worked. Technical Note 1 . but it does not delete or change the design section. but it does not delete or change the design section. but it does not delete or change the design section. Using the Define menu > Load Combinations command to change a design load combination deletes the design results. the last used analysis section is the W18X35 and the current design section is the W16X31. Deleting the static nonlinear analysis results also deletes the design results for any load combination that includes static nonlinear forces.

Use the Define menu > Static Nonlinear/Pushover Cases command to redefine existing or define new static nonlinear load cases.Concrete Frame Design General Design Information static nonlinear analysis and design results are deleted when one of the following actions is taken: Use the Define menu > Frame Nonlinear Hinge Properties command to redefine existing or define new hinges. Again. note that these actions delete only results for load combinations that include static nonlinear forces.9 . Analysis Sections and Design Sections Technical Note 1 . Use the Assign menu > Frame/Line > Frame Nonlinear Hinges command to add or delete hinges.

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1. so it is unnecessary to define any preferences unless you want to change some of the default values. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN Technical Note 2 Concrete Frame Design Process This Technical Note describes a basic concrete frame design process using this program. See Concrete Frame Design ACI UBC97 Technical Notes 6 Preferences and Concrete Frame Design ACI 318-99 Technical Notes 16 Preferences for more information. Other Technical Notes in the Concrete Frame Design series provide additional information.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. depending on how its frame section property was designated when it was defined using the Define menu > Frame Sections command. The concrete frame design postprocessor can design or check concrete columns and can design concrete beams. you can click on the Reinforcement button and specify whether it is a beam or a column. Note that default values are provided for all concrete frame design preferences. Concrete Frame Design Procedure Technical Note 2 . Note that although the sequence of steps you follow may vary.1 . including the distinction between analysis sections and design sections (see Analysis Sections and Design Sections in Concrete Frame Design Technical Note 1 General Design Information). BERKELEY. Use the Options menu > Preferences > Concrete Frame Design command to choose the concrete frame design code and to review other concrete frame design preferences and revise them if necessary. Although the exact steps you follow may vary. after you have specified that a section has a concrete material property. Concrete Frame Design Procedure The following sequence describes a typical concrete frame design process for a new building. Note that when using this command.. INC. Important note: A concrete frame element is designed as a beam or a column. the basic design process should be similar to that described herein. the basic process probably will be essentially the same.

Click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Display Design Info command to display design input and output information on the model. you can revise overwrites and immediately see the results of the new design. 6. Assign concrete frame overwrites. Review the concrete frame design results by doing one of the following: a.2 Concrete Frame Design Procedure .Concrete Frame Design Process Concrete Frame Design 2. Technical Note 2 . click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Select Design Combo command. Note that you must have already created your own design combos by clicking the Define menu > Load Combinations command. Create the building model. using the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > View/Revise Overwrites command. Run the building analysis using the Analyze menu > Run Analysis command. See Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 8 Design Load Combinations and Concrete Frame Design ACI 318-99 Technical Note 18 Design Load Combinations for more information. Right click on a frame element while the design results are displayed on it to enter the interactive design mode and interactively design the frame element. See Concrete Frame Design Technical Note 3 Interactive Concrete Frame Design for more information. To use any design load combinations other than the defaults created by the program for your concrete frame design. Note that while you are in this mode. Note that you must select frame elements before using this command. 5. Click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Start Design/Check of Structure command to run the concrete frame design. Also note that default values are provided for all concrete frame design overwrites. if needed. 3. so it is unnecessary to define any overwrites unless you want to change some of the default values. See Concrete Frame Design Technical Note 4 Output Data Plotted Directly on the Model for more information. Note that the overwrites can be assigned before or after the analysis is run. See Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 7 Overwrites and Concrete Frame Design ACI 318-99 Technical Note 17 Overwrites for more information. b. 7. 4.

9.3 . if necessary. 14. click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Interactive Concrete Frame Design command and then right click a frame element to enter the interactive design mode for that element. Click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Start Design/Check of Structure command to rerun the concrete frame design with the new analysis results and new section properties. 15. Click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Start Design/Check of Structure command to rerun the concrete frame design with the new section properties. Repeat the processes in steps 10. 12. 13. 11 and 12 as many times as necessary. See Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 14 Output Details and Concrete Frame Design ACI 318-99 Technical Note 24 Output Details for more information. Note that the section properties used for the analysis are the last specified design section properties. Rerun the building analysis using the Analyze menu > Run Analysis command. Rerun the building analysis using the Analyze menu > Run Analysis command. 8. Review the results using the procedures described above. Use the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Change Design Section command to change the design section properties for selected frame elements. 11. 10. Concrete Frame Design Procedure Technical Note 2 . Note that the section properties used for the analysis are the last specified design section properties. Use the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command to print concrete frame design data. data is printed only for the selected elements. Again use the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Change Design Section command to change the design section properties for selected frame elements. Review the results using the procedures described in Item 7.Concrete Frame Design Concrete Frame Design Process If design results are not currently displayed (and the design has been run). If you select frame elements before using this command.

Use the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command to print selected concrete frame design results. Technical Note 2 . It is important to note that design is an iterative process. Click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Verify Analysis vs Design Section command to verify that all of the final design sections are the same as the last used analysis sections.4 Concrete Frame Design Procedure . The sections used in the original analysis are not typically the same as those obtained at the end of the design process. Review the results using the procedures described in Item 7. if desired. Typically. 17. 18. Click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Start Design/Check of Structure command to rerun the concrete frame design with the new section properties. Use the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Verify Analysis vs Design Section command to verify that the design sections are the same as the analysis sections. the analysis and design will be rerun multiple times to complete a design. Always run the building analysis using the final frame section sizes and then run a design check using the forces obtained from that analysis.Concrete Frame Design Process Concrete Frame Design Note: Concrete frame design is an iterative process. 16.

. depending on how its frame section property was designated when it was defined using the Define menu > Frame Sections command and the Reinforcement button. click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Start Design/Check of Structure command. If design results are not currently displayed (and a design has been run). click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Interactive Concrete Frame Design command and then right click a frame element to enter the interactive design mode for that element. To run a design. General Note that a design must have been run for the interactive design mode to be available. INC. Important note: A concrete frame element is designed as a beam or a column. Concrete Design Information Form Table 1 describe the features that are included in the Concrete Design Information form. Right click on a frame element while the design results are displayed on it to enter the interactive design mode and interactively design the element in the Concrete Design Information form. which is a powerful mode that allows the user to review the design results for any concrete frame design and interactively revise the design assumptions and immediately review the revised results. BERKELEY.1 . which is only available if it is a concrete section. General Technical Note 3 . CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN Technical Note 3 Interactive Concrete Frame Design This Technical Note describes interactive concrete frame design and review.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES.

This is the label associated with a frame element that has been assigned a concrete frame section property that is designated as a beam. Column Section Name Reinforcement Information The reinforcement information table on the Concrete Design Information form shows the output information obtained for each design load combination at each output station along the frame element.Interactive Concrete Frame Design Concrete Frame Design Table 1 Concrete Design Information Form Item Story Beam DESCRIPTION This is the story level ID associated with the frame element. This is the label associated with a frame element that has been assigned a concrete frame section property that is designated as a column. Following are the possible headings in the table: Combo ID Station location Longitudinal reinforcement Capacity ratio This is the name of the design load combination considered. the item with the largest required amount of longitudinal reinforcing is initially highlighted. the item with the largest required amount of bottom steel is initially highlighted. It also only applies to columns for which you have specified the location and size of reinforcing bars and thus the program checks the design.2 Table 1 Concrete Design Information Form . This item applies to columns only. It also only applies to columns for which the program designs the longitudinal reinforcing. See the important note previously in this Technical Note for more information. For columns that are designed by this program. For columns that are checked by this program. See the important note previously in this Technical Note for more information. This item is the capacity ratio. For beams. measured from the i-end of the frame element. This item applies to columns only. This is the location of the station considered. the item with the largest capacity ratio is initially highlighted. This is the label associated with a frame element that has been assigned a concrete frame section property. Technical Note 3 . It is the total required area of longitudinal reinforcing steel.

Assume the length of this first line is designated L1. a second line is extended from the origin of the PMM interaction surface through the point representing the P. This item applies to columns only. The capacity ratio is equal to L1/L2. Next. If you modify some overwrites in this mode and you exit both the Concrete Frame Design Overwrites form and the Concrete Design Information form by clicking their respective OK buttons. M2 and M3 values for the designated load combination until it intersects the interaction surface. It is the total required area of longitudinal bottom steel at the specified station. Major shear reinforcement Minor shear reinforcement Top steel Bottom steel Shear steel This item applies to columns only. It is the total required area of shear reinforcing per unit length for shear acting in the column minor direction. Assume the length of this line from the origin to the interaction surface is designated L2. M2 and M3 values for the designated load combination. If you then exit the Concrete Design Information form by clicking the Cancel button the changes you made to the concrete frame overwrites are considered temporary only and are not permanently saved. the changes to the overwrites are saved permanently. Overwrites Button Table 1 Concrete Design Information Form Technical Note 3 . This item applies to beams only. Permanent saving of the overwrites does not actually occur until you click the OK button in the Concrete Design Information form as well as the Concrete Frame Design Overwrites form. It is the total required area of shear reinforcing per unit length for shear acting in the column major direction. This item applies to beams only. This item applies to beams only.Concrete Frame Design Interactive Concrete Frame Design Table 1 Concrete Design Information Form Item DESCRIPTION The capacity ratio is determined by first extending a line from the origin of the PMM interaction surface to the point representing the P. Click this button to access and make revisions to the concrete frame overwrites and then immediately see the new design results. It is the total required area of shear reinforcing per unit length at the specified station for loads acting in the local 2-axis direction of the beam. When you exit the Concrete Frame Design Overwrites form by clicking the OK button the changes are temporarily saved.3 . It is the total required area of longitudinal top steel at the specified station.

Print this information by selecting Print from the File menu that appears at the top of the window displaying the design details. Clicking this button displays the biaxial interaction curve for the concrete section at the location in the element that is highlighted in the table.Interactive Concrete Frame Design Concrete Frame Design Table 1 Concrete Design Information Form Item Details Button DESCRIPTION Clicking this button displays design details for the frame element.4 Table 1 Concrete Design Information Form . Interaction Button Technical Note 3 .

click the Print to File check box on the Print Design Tables form. the screen graphics can then be printed using the File menu > Print Graphics command.doc). . . The path and filename of the current file is displayed in the box near the bottom of the Print Design Tables form. use the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command and click the check box on the Print Design Tables form. To print the concrete frame input summary to a file. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN Technical Note 4 Output Data Plotted Directly on the Model This Technical Note describes the input and output data that can be plotted directly on the model.. if necessary.g. Or use the Filename Overview Technical Note 4 .xls. INC. The on-screen display data presents input and output data. Note: The File menu > Display Input/Output Text Files command is useful for displaying output that is printed to a text file. Use the File menu > Print Setup command and the Setup>> button to change printers. Click the Cancel button rather than the OK button to cancel the print. . Click the OK buttons on the Open File for Printing Tables form and the Print Design Tables form to complete the request. Use the appropriate file extension for the desired format (e. Click the Filename>> button to change the path or filename. The Append check box allows you to add data to an existing file.. BERKELEY. Using the Print Design Tables Form To print the concrete frame input summary directly to a printer. Overview Use the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Display Design Info command to display on-screen output plotted directly on the program model.1 . Click the OK button to send the print to your printer.txt. If desired. Data will be added to this file.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES.

Design Input The following types of data can be displayed directly on the model by selecting the data type (shown in bold type) from the drop-down list on the Display Design Results form. The print will be for the selected steel frame element(s) only. Display this form by selecting he Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Display Design Info command. and when the Open File for Printing Tables caution box appears.2 Design Input . Display this form by selecting he Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Display Design Info command. Design Output The following types of data can be displayed directly on the model by selecting the data type (shown in bold type) from the drop-down list on the Display Design Results form. click Yes to replace the existing file. Design Sections Design Type Live Load Red Factors Unbraced L_Ratios Eff Length K-Factors Cm Factors DNS Factors DS Factors Each of these items is described in the code-specific Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 13 Input Data and Concrete Frame Design ACI 318-99 Technical Note 23 Input Data. Technical Note 4 . If you select a specific concrete frame element(s) before using the File menu > Print Tables > concrete Frame Design command. the Selection Only check box will be checked.Output Data Plotted Directly on the Model Concrete Frame Design button to locate another file.

Concrete Frame Design Output Data Plotted Directly on the Model Longitudinal Reinforcing Shear Reinforcing Column Capacity Ratios Joint Shear Capacity Ratios Beam/Column Capacity Ratios Each of these items is described in the code-specific Concrete Frame Design ACI 318-99 Technical Note 24 Output Details and Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 14 Output Details.3 . Design Output Technical Note 4 .

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The program provides a set of default load combinations that should satisfy requirements for the design of most building type structures. However.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. When using the UBC 97 option. BERKELEY.. a frame is assigned to one of the following five Seismic Zones (UBC 2213. 2214): Zone 0 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 By default the Seismic Zone is taken as Zone 4 in the program. The various notations used in this series are listed herein. The design is based on user-specified loading combinations. INC. the following Framing Systems are recognized and designed according to the UBC design provisions (UBC 1627. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97 Technical Note 5 General and Notation Introduction to the UBC97 Series of Technical Notes The Concrete Frame Design UBC97 series of Technical Notes describes in detail the various aspects of the concrete design procedure that is used by this program when the user selects the UBC97 Design Code (ICBO 1997). See Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 6 Preferences for more information. 1921): Ordinary Moment-Resisting Frame (OMF) General and Notation Technical Note 5 .1 . See Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 8 Design Load Combinations for more information. the Seismic Zone can be overwritten in the Preference form to change the default. When using the UBC 97 option.

If any member is assigned with a frame type. which are described in Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 13 Input Data and Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 14 Output Details. Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 11 Beam Design. Notation Acv Ag As Area of concrete used to determine shear stress. sq-in Area of tension reinforcement. and Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 12 Joint Design.General and Notation Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Intermediate Moment-Resisting Frame (IMRF) Special Moment-Resisting Frame (SMRF) The Ordinary Moment-Resisting Frame (OMF) is appropriate in minimal seismic risk areas. For simplicity. However. the frame type can be overwritten in the Overwrites form on a member-by-member basis. The UBC seismic design provisions are considered in the program. The program also provides input and output data summaries. all equations and descriptions presented in this Technical Note correspond to Inch-Pound-Second units unless otherwise noted. as IMRF in Seismic Zone 2. The details of the design criteria used for the different framing systems are described in Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 9 Strength Reduction Factors. specially in Seismic Zone 2. specially in Seismic Zones 3 and 4. the change of the Seismic Zone in the Preferences will not modify the frame type of an individual member that has been assigned a frame type. sq-in Gross area of concrete. The Special Moment-Resisting Frame (SMRF) is appropriate in high seismic risk areas. especially in Seismic Zones 0 and 1. By default the frame type is taken in the program as OMRF in Seismic Zone 0 and 1. See Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 7 Overwrites for more information.2 General and Notation . English as well as SI and MKS metric units can be used for input. Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 10 Column Design. The code is based on Inch-Pound-Second units. and as SMRF in Seismic Zone 3 and 4. The Intermediate Moment-Resisting Frame (IMRF) is appropriate in moderate seismic risk areas. sq-in Technical Note 5 .

5. lb-in Nonsway component of factored end moment. lb-in Larger factored end moment in a column. neglecting reinforcement. psi Modulus of elasticity of reinforcement.000.2) Moment of inertia of gross concrete section about centroidal axis. in4 Clear unsupported length. lb-in Factored moment at section. in Modulus of elasticity of concrete. in Smaller factored end moment in a column.000 psi (UBC 1980. in4 Moment of inertia of reinforcement about centroidal axis of member cross section. sq-in Area of steel required for tension reinforcement. sq-in Total area of column longitudinal reinforcement. dependent upon column curvature.Concrete Frame Design UBC97 General and Notation ' As Area of compression reinforcement. assumed as 29. sq-in Coefficient. sq-in Area of shear reinforcement. lb-in Axial load capacity at balanced strain conditions. used to calculate moment magnification factor Diameter of hoop. lb-in Factored moment at section about X-axis. lb-in Factored moment to be used in design.3 . lb-in Sway component of factored end moment. lb-in Factored moment at section about Y-axis. lb As(required) Ast Av Cm D' Ec Es Ig Ise L M1 M2 Mc Mns Ms Mu Mux Muy Pb General and Notation Technical Note 5 .

lb Shear force from span loading. in Distance from compression face to tension reinforcement. psi Specified yield strength of flexural reinforcement. lb Acial load capacity at zero eccentricity. lb Shear force caused by earthquake loads. psi fy ≤ 80. in Specified compressive strength of concrete. in Depth to neutral axis at balanced conditions. lb Shear force computed from probable moment capacity. in Concrete cover to center of reinforcing. lb Factored shear force at a section.4 General and Notation . lb Shear resisted by concrete. in Thickness of slab (T-Beam section). in Depth to neutral axis. lb Factored axial load at section.000 psi (UBC 1909. in Width of web (T-Beam section). in Width of member. in Depth of compression block at balanced condition. lb Depth of compression block.General and Notation Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Pc Pmax P0 Pu Vc VE VD+L Vu Vp a ab b bf bw c cb d d' ds f c' fy Critical buckling strength of column. in Effective width of flange (T-Beam section). lb Maximum axial load strength allowed.4) Technical Note 5 .

psi Dimension of column. in Reinforcing steel overstrength factor Factor for obtaining depth of compression block in concrete Absolute value of ratio of maximum factored axial dead load to maximum factored axial total load Moment magnification factor for sway moments Moment magnification factor for nonsway moments Strain in concrete Strain in reinforcing steel Strength reduction factor α β1 βd δs δns εc εs ϕ General and Notation Technical Note 5 .Concrete Frame Design UBC97 General and Notation fys h k r Specified yield strength of flexural reinforcement.5 . in Effective length factor Radius of gyration of column section.

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The preference options are displayed in a two-column spreadsheet. You cannot overwrite values in the dropdown boxes. Thus. You should. click the OK button to close the form. If you click the Cancel button to exit General Technical Note 6 . select a new value.. INC. Using the Preferences Form To view preferences.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. The left column of the spreadsheet displays the preference item name. The right column of the spreadsheet displays the preference item value. it is not required that you specify or change any of the preferences. You must click the OK button for the changes to be accepted by the program. To change a preference item. The Preferences form will display. This activates a drop-down box or highlights the current preference value. The preference value will update accordingly.1 . however. If the cell is highlighted. Use the Options menu > Preferences > Concrete Frame Design command to access the Preferences form where you can view and revise the concrete frame design preferences. If the drop-down box appears. at least review the default values for the preference items to make sure they are acceptable to you. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97 Technical Note 6 Preferences This Technical Note describes the items in the Preferences form. General The concrete frame design preferences in this program are basic assignments that apply to all concrete frame elements. left click the desired preference item in either the left or right column of the spreadsheet. When you have finished making changes to the concrete frame preferences. select the Options menu > Preferences > Concrete Frame Design. Default values are provided for all concrete frame design preference items. BERKELEY. type in the desired value.

Unitless strength reduction factor per UBC 1909. Possible Values: The possible values that the associated preference item can have.9 0.7 0. Default Value: The built-in default value that the program assumes for the associated preference item. Preferences For purposes of explanation in this Technical Note. the preference items are presented in Table 1.0 Default Value UBC97 Description Design code used for design of concrete frame elements. Number of equally spaced interaction curves used to create a full 360-degree interaction surface (this item should be a multiple of four).2 Preferences .75 0. Unitless strength reduction factor per UBC 1909. We recommend that you use 24 for this item.Preferences Concrete Frame Design UBC97 the form.85 24 Technical Note 6 . Unitless strength reduction factor per UBC 1909. Description: A description of the associated preference item. Table 1: Concrete Frame Preferences Item Design Code Possible Values Any code in the program >0 >0 >0 >0 ≥4. Unitless strength reduction factor per UBC 1909. any changes made to the preferences are ignored and the form is closed. Phi Bending Tension Phi Compression Tied Phi Compression Spiral Phi Shear Number Interaction Curves 0. The column headings in the table are described as follows: Item: The name of the preference item as it appears in the cells at the left side of the Preferences form.

or designed step-by-step for the entire time history. regardless of what is specified here.Any odd value action Points ≥1.3 . If a single design load combination has more than one time history case in it. Toggle for design load combinations that include a time history designed for the envelope of the time history.0 Time History Design Envelopes or Step-by-Step Envelopes Preferences Technical Note 6 . Number Inter. that design load combination is designed for the envelopes of the time histories.Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Preferences Table 1: Concrete Frame Preferences Item Possible Values Default Value 11 Description Number of points used for defining a single curve in a concrete frame interaction surface (this item should be odd).

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Default Value: The default value that the program assumes for the associated overwrite item. at least review the default values for the overwrite items to make sure they are acceptable. However. An explanation of how to change an overwrite is provided at the end of this Technical Note. Overwrites For explanation purposes in this Technical Note. these names are generally short. When changes are made to overwrite items. The column headings in the table are described as follows. that is. This Technical Note describes concrete frame design overwrites for UBC97. BERKELEY. the program applies the changes only to the elements to which they are specifically assigned.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. Item: The name of the overwrite item as it appears in the program. Default values are provided for all overwrite items. To save space in the formes. INC. to the elements that are selected when the overwrites are changed. the overwrites are presented in Table 1.1 . Thus. Overwrites Technical Note 7 . you do not need to specify or change any of the overwrites. To access the overwrites. select an element and click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > View/Revise Overwrites command. Description: A description of the associated overwrite item. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97 Technical Note 7 Overwrites General The concrete frame design overwrites are basic assignments that apply only to those elements to which they are assigned.. Possible Values: The possible values that the associated overwrite item can have.

1 relates actual moment diagram to an equivalent uniform moment diagram. See UBC 1910.12. 1. see UBC 1910.0 >0 ≤1. Sway Intermediate.12. 1.11 to 1910.1.0 >0 ≤1.0 1.1 relates actual moment diagram to an equivalent uniform moment diagram. See UBC 1910.3.0 1.0 >0 ≤1. 1 See UBC 1910.2 Overwrites .12.3. Possible Values Default Value Description Element Type Live Load Reduction Factor Horizontal Earthquake Factor Unbraced Length Ratio (Major) Unbraced Length Ratio (Minor) Effective Length Factor (K Major) Effective Length Factor (K Minor) Moment Coefficient (Cm Major) Moment Coefficient (Cm Minor) NonSway Moment Factor (Dns Major) Technical Note 7 . Used to reduce the live load contribution to the factored loading. Sway Ordinary NonSway >0 ≤1.0 >0 ≤1.0 >0 ≤1.0 1 1 1 See UBC 1910.0 >0 ≤1. Sway Special Frame type.0 >0 ≤1.1. 1 See UBC 1910.12.0 >0 ≤1.12.13.Overwrites Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Overwrites Item Element Section Sway Special.

12. check the box to the left of an overwrite item to change it. no values show for the overwrite items in the second column of the spreadsheet. 1 See UBC 1910.12. The left column of the spreadsheet contains the name of the overwrite item. The overwrites are displayed in the form with a column of check boxes and a two-column spreadsheet. If multiple elements were selected. The values of the overwrite items are visible in the second column of the spreadsheet if only one element was selected before the overwrites form was accessed. Then left click in either column of the spreadsheet to activate a drop-down box or highlight the contents in the cell in the right column of the spreadsheet. The names of the overwrite items are displayed in the first column of the spreadsheet. select a value from Overwrites Technical Note 7 . Initially. The right column of the spreadsheet contains the overwrites values.Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Overwrites Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Overwrites Item NonSway Moment Factor (Dns Minor) Sway Moment Factor (Ds Major) Sway Moment Factor (Ds Minor) Possible Values Default Value 1 Description See UBC 1910. After selecting one or multiple elements. select an element and click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > View/Revise Overwrites command. Making Changes in the Overwrites Form To access the concrete frame overwrites. 1 See UBC 1910. the check boxes in the Concrete Frame Design Overwrites form are all unchecked and all of the cells in the spreadsheet have a gray background to indicate that they are inactive and the items in the cells cannot be changed.3 .12. If the drop-down box appears.

You cannot change the values of the dropdown boxes. The concrete frame overwrite values that were in a . The overwrite will reflect the change. any changes made to the overwrites are ignored and the form is closed. If you click the Cancel button to exit the form. type in the desired value. When you reset overwrites. If the cell contents is highlighted.edb file that you used to initialize your model may be different from the built-in program default values. Important note about resetting overwrites: The program defaults for the overwrite items are built into the program. the program resets the overwrite values to its built-in values. All current design results will be deleted when this command is executed. You must click the OK button for the changes to be accepted by the program. click the OK button to close the form.Overwrites Concrete Frame Design UBC97 the box.4 Overwrites . Technical Note 7 . The program then changes all of the overwrite items whose associated check boxes are checked for the selected members. not to the values that were in the . When changes to the overwrites have been completed.edb file used to initialize the model. Resetting Concrete Frame Overwrites to Default Values Use the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Reset All Overwrites command to reset all of the steel frame overwrites.

2) (UBC 1909.1) (UBC 1909.1) (UBC 1909.2) (UBC 1909. See Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 7 Overwrites for more information.1) These are also the default design load combinations in the program whenever the UBC97 code is used.2. BERKELEY. if a structure is subjected to dead load (DL) and live load (LL) only.3 WL 0.1 . INC.0 EL) (UBC 1909. 1.3. 1612. the stress check may need only one load combination. in addition to the dead and live loads.75 (1.2)..2.0 EL 1. the following load combinations may need to be considered (UBC 1909.7 LL 0.4 DL + 1.7 WL) 0.2.4 DL + 1. namely 1.9 DL ± 1.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. and considering that wind and earthquake forces are reversible.2. if the structure is subjected to wind (WL) and earthquake (EL) loads.7 LL (UBC 1909. Design Load Combinations Technical Note 8 . 1612.1) (UBC 1909.1).5 LL ± 1. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97 Technical Note 8 Design Load Combinations The design load combinations are the various combinations of the prescribed load cases for which the structure needs to be checked.2.2.3. For the UBC 97 code.9 DL ± 1. However.4 DL 1. Live load reduction factors can be applied to the member forces of the live load condition on an element-by-element basis to reduce the contribution of the live load to the factored loading.7 LL ± 1.2.2.2 DL + 0.2.4 DL + 1.

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3) (UBC 1909.90 for axial tension and flexure (UBC 1909.75 for axial compression.2) (UBC 1909.3.2) = 0. and axial compression and flexure (tied column) (UBC 1909.3. and torsion are as follows: ϕ ϕ ϕ ϕ = 0.2.3.1 .90 for flexure = 0. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97 Technical Note 9 Strength Reduction Factors The strength reduction factors.3.2.2.3. shear.3.3.60 for shear and torsion (UBC 1909.90 for axial tension = 0. BERKELEY. The ϕ factors for flexure. are applied on the nominal strength to obtain the design strength provided by a member. INC.1) (UBC 1909.70 for axial compression.2.85 for shear and torsion (non-seismic design) = 0.2) = 0. and axial compression and flexure (spirally reinforced column) (UBC 1909.2. axial force.2) = 0.2.2. ϕ.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES..3) ϕ ϕ ϕ Strength Reduction Factors Technical Note 9 .

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the program generates the interaction surfaces for the range of allowable reinforcement1 to 8 percent for Ordinary and Intermediate moment resisting frames (UBC 1910. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97 Technical Note 10 Column Design This Technical Note describes how the program checks column capacity or designs reinforced concrete columns when the UBC97 code is selected.9. A typical biaxial interaction surface is shown in Figure 1. the program can calculate the amount of reinforcing required to design the column. Calculate the capacity ratio or the required reinforcing area for the factored axial force and biaxial (or uniaxial) bending moments obtained from each loading combination at each station of the column. The design procedure for the reinforced concrete columns of the structure involves the following steps: Generate axial force/biaxial moment interaction surfaces for all of the different concrete section types of the model. Alternatively.1 .1) and 1 to 6 percent for Special moment resisting frames (UBC 1921. Overview Technical Note 10 . When the steel is undefined.4. the program will check the column capacity.3. BERKELEY.. If you define the geometry of the reinforcing bar configuration of each concrete column section.1).©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. The following four subsections describe in detail the algorithms associated with this process. Overview The program can be used to check column capacity or to design columns. Design the column shear reinforcement. INC. The target capacity ratio is taken as 1 when calculating the required reinforcing area.

Column Design

Concrete Frame Design UBC97

Figure 1 A Typical Column Interaction Surface

Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces
The column capacity interaction volume is numerically described by a series of discrete points that are generated on the three-dimensional interaction failure surface. In addition to axial compression and biaxial bending, the formulation allows for axial tension and biaxial bending considerations. A typical interaction diagram is shown in Figure 1.

Technical Note 10 - 2

Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces

Concrete Frame Design UBC97

Column Design

The coordinates of these points are determined by rotating a plane of linear strain in three dimensions on the section of the column. See Figure 2. The linear strain diagram limits the maximum concrete strain, εc, at the extremity of the section, to 0.003 (UBC 1910.2.3). The formulation is based consistently upon the general principles of ultimate strength design (UBC 1910.3), and allows for any doubly symmetric rectangular, square, or circular column section. The stress in the steel is given by the product of the steel strain and the steel modulus of elasticity, εsEs, and is limited to the yield stress of the steel, fy (UBC 1910.2.4). The area associated with each reinforcing bar is assumed to be placed at the actual location of the center of the bar and the algorithm does not assume any further simplifications with respect to distributing the area of steel over the cross section of the column, such as an equivalent steel tube or cylinder. See Figure 3. The concrete compression stress block is assumed to be rectangular, with a stress value of 0.85 f c' (UBC 1910.2.7.1). See Figure 3. The interaction algorithm provides correction to account for the concrete area that is displaced by the reinforcement in the compression zone. The effects of the strength reduction factor, ϕ, are included in the generation of the interaction surfaces. The maximum compressive axial load is limited to ϕPn(max), where ϕPn(max) = 0.85ϕ[0.85 f c' (Ag-Ast)+fyAst] (spiral) ϕPn(max) = 0.85ϕ[0.85 f c' (Ag-Ast)+fyAst] (tied) ϕ ϕ = 0.70 for tied columns = 0.75 for spirally reinforced columns (UBC 1910.3.5.1) (UBC 1910.3.5.2) (UBC 1909.3.2.2) (UBC 1909.3.2.2)

The value of ϕ used in the interaction diagram varies from ϕmin to 0.9 based on the axial load. For low values of axial load, ϕ is increased linearly from ϕmin to 0.9 as the nominal capacity ϕPn decreases from the smaller of ϕPb or 0.1 f c' Ag to zero, where Pb is the axial force at the balanced condition. In cases involving axial tension, ϕ is always 0.9 (UBC 1909.3.2.2).

Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces

Technical Note 10 - 3

Column Design

Concrete Frame Design UBC97

Figure 2 Idealized Strain Distribution for Generation of Interaction Surfaces

Technical Note 10 - 4

Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces

The factored moments and corresponding magnification factors depend on the identification of the individual column as either “sway” or “non-sway. lies within the interaction volume. defined by the resulting axial load and biaxial moment set. Mux. and Muy. The following steps are involved in calculating the capacity ratio of a particular column for a particular loading combination at a particular location: Determine the factored moments and forces from the analysis load cases and the specified load combination factors to give Pu.Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Column Design Figure 3 Idealization of Stress and Strain Distribution in a Column Section Calculate Column Capacity Ratio The column capacity ratio is calculated for each loading combination at each output station of each column. Determine the moment magnification factors for the column moments. Apply the moment magnification factors to the factored moments.5 .” Calculate Column Capacity Ratio Technical Note 10 . Determine whether the point.

50 live load)/ϕ if seismic load governs. which is taken as 0.2 dead load + 0. and are related to the cause of side-sway.” Technical Note 10 . and Muy. or (1. Determine Moment Magnification Factors The moment magnification factors are calculated separately for sway (overall stability effect). moment magnification factors for moments causing sidesway are taken as unity (UBC 1910.10. The program assumes that it performs a P-delta analysis and. the magnified moments about two axes at any station of a column can be obtained as M = Mns + δsMs.6 + 0. where ϕ is the understrength factor for stability.12. Also the moment magnification factors in the major and minor directions are in general different. The factored moments are further increased for non-sway columns.13.Column Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97 The following three sections describe in detail the algorithms associated with this process. δs. δs.7 live load)/ϕ if wind load governs. The moment magnification factors for sway moments. (UBC 1910. For the P-delta analysis. The sway components are identified by the “s” subscripts.2).12. Mux. See also White and Hajjar (1991).4 dead load + 1. the load should correspond to a load combination of 0.75 (1.3. The non-sway components which are identified by “ns” subscripts are predominantly caused by gravity load.3).75 (UBC 1910.6 Calculate Column Capacity Ratio . is taken as 1 because the component moments Ms and Mns are obtained from a “second order elastic (P-delta) analysis. to obtain minimum eccentricities of (0. For individual columns or column-members in a floor.3) The factor δs is the moment magnification factor for moments causing side sway. if required. Determine Factored Moments and Forces The factored loads for a particular load combination are obtained by applying the corresponding load factors to all the load cases. where h is the dimension of the column in the corresponding direction (UBC 1910.03h) inches. giving Pu. δns.2). The sway moments are predominantly caused by lateral loads. therefore. and for non-sway (individual column stability effect). The moment obtained from analysis is separated into two components: the sway (Ms) and the non-sway (Ms) components.

4. and M2 is the larger factored and amplified end moment. Ma / Mb is positive for single curvature bending and negative for double curvature bending.3) Pc = (UBC 1910. where (UBC 1910. Pu 1− 0. The above expression of Cm is valid if there is no transverse load applied between the supports. EI is associated with a particular column direction given by: EI = 0.7 . δns.75Pc π 2 EI (kl u )2 .3) (UBC 1910.12. where Mc is the factored moment to be used in design.3.12.0. Mb maximum factored axial dead load and (UBC 1910. as follows: Mc = δnsM2 . (UBC 1910. If transverse load is present on the span.3) δns = Cm ≥ 1. however. the program allows the user to override this value. 1910.6 + 0.3) βd = maximum factored axial total load Cm = 0.1) Ma and Mb are the moments at the ends of the column. and Mb is numerically larger than Ma.4E c I g 1 + βd .3.12.12. Cm can be overwritten by the user on an element-by-element basis. or the length is overwritten.5) by the nonsway moment magnification factor.3) (UBC 1910.4 Ma ≥ 0. Cm = 1.12.12.Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Column Design The computed moments are further amplified for individual column stability effect (UBC 1910.12.13. δns. Calculate Column Capacity Ratio Technical Note 10 .12.3) k is conservatively taken as 1. The non-sway moment magnification factor. associated with the major or minor direction of the column is given by (UBC 1910.

The two unsupported lengths are l22 and l33. See Figure 4. corresponding to instability in the minor and major directions of the element. the user can explicitly specify values of δs and δns. Determine Capacity Ratio The program calculates a capacity ratio as a measure of the stress condition of the column. The capacity ratio is basically a factor that gives an indication Technical Note 10 . These are the lengths between the support points of the element in the corresponding directions. The above calculations use the unsupported length of the column. δns. If Pu is found to be greater than or equal to 0. a failure condition is declared. Therefore. respectively.8 Calculate Column Capacity Ratio .75Pc. must be a positive number and greater than 1. Figure 4 Axes of Bending and Unsupported Length If the program assumptions are not satisfactory for a particular member.75Pc. Pu must be less than 0.Column Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97 The magnification factor.

Before entering the interaction diagram to check the column capacity. Mux. The point (Pu. If the point lies within the interaction volume. Mux.Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Column Design of the stress condition of the column with respect to the capacity of the column. the moment magnification factors are applied to the factored loads to obtain Pu. The point C is defined as the point where the line OL (if extended outwards) will intersect the failure surface. however.) is then placed in the interaction space shown as point L in Figure 5. This point is determined by three-dimensional linear interpolation between the points that define the Calculate Column Capacity Ratio Technical Note 10 . and Muy. Muy. Figure 5 Geometric Representation of Column Capacity Ratios This capacity ratio is achieved by plotting the point L and determining the location of point C. the column capacity is adequate. the column is overstressed.9 . if the point lies outside the interaction volume.

For Special and Intermediate moment resisting frames (Ductile frames). respectively. CR. Pu and Vu. Vc." Design Column Shear Reinforcement The shear reinforcement is designed for each loading combination in the major and minor directions of the column.Column Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97 failure surface. If OL < OC (or CR<1). Required Reinforcing Area If the reinforcing area is not defined. the shear design of the columns is also based on the probable and nominal moment capacities of the members. See Figure 5. Determine the shear force. the point lies within the interaction volume and the column capacity is adequate. The maximum of all the values of CR calculated from each load combination is reported for each check station of the column. the point lies on the interaction surface and the column is stressed to capacity. the point lies outside the interaction volume and the column is overstressed. calculated as described in the previous section entitled "Calculate Column Capacity Ratio.10 Required Reinforcing Area . is given by the ratio OL . OC If OL = OC (or CR=1). The capacity ratio. in addition to the factored Technical Note 10 . The following steps are involved in designing the shear reinforcing for a particular column for a particular load combination caused by shear forces in a particular direction: Determine the factored forces acting on the section. Mux. along with the controlling Pu. that can be resisted by concrete alone. the program computes the reinforcement that will give a column capacity ratio of one. Note that Pu is needed for the calculation of Vc. and Muy set and associated load combination number. Calculate the reinforcement steel required to carry the balance. If OL > OC (or CR>1).

4. Vu. and the column shear force. + − the positive and negative moment capacities. Then. The capacity-shear force in a column. the forces for a particular load combination. is then given by (UBC 1921. Mu and Mu . Vp is the capacity-shear force obtained by applying the calculated probable ultimate moment capacities at the two ends of the column acting in two opposite directions.e. For each load combination. Determine Section Forces In the design of the column shear reinforcement of an Ordinary moment resisting concrete frame.11 . the factored axial load. seismic design) the column is checked for capacity-shear in addition to the requirement for the Ordinary moment resisting frames.4.1) Vu = Vp + VD+L (UBC 1921. Effects of the axial forces on the column moment capacities are included in the formulation. of the column in a particular direction under the influence of the axial force Pu is calculated using the uniaxial interaction diagram in the corresponding direction. Therefore. in a particular direction are obtained by factoring the program analysis load cases with the corresponding load combination factors.Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Column Design moments. Pu.1) where. The following three sections describe in detail the algorithms associated with this process. where L Design Column Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 10 . is calculated. and L + − MI + M J . Pu. The design shear force. Vp. namely. Vu. where VP1 = VP2 = − + MI + M J . Vp is the maximum of VP1 and VP2 . the column axial force. in a particular direction is calculated from the probable moment capacities of the column associated with the factored axial force acting on the column.5..5. In the shear design of Special moment resisting frames (i.

25 (UBC 1921. and (UBC 1911. and L = Clear span of column. except that α is taken equal to 1 rather than 1. except the earthquake load factors are doubled (UBC 1921.0).0) moment capacity and factored shear force.8.2)   Acv . Pu is positive. = Positive and negative moment capacities at end I of the column using a steel yield stress value of αfy and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1.8. f c' ≤ 100 psi.e.. i. Vc. = Positive and negative moment capacities at end J of the column using a steel yield stress value of αfy and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1. The factored shear forces are based on the specified load factors. the shear force carried by the concrete. + − M J . it is zero. α is taken as 1. VD+L is the contribution of shear force from the in-span distribution of gravity loads. For most of the columns. in addition to the check required for Ordinary moment resisting frames.  Pu Vc = 2 f c' 1 +  2.2) Technical Note 10 . The design shear force is taken to be the minimum of that based on the nominal (ϕ = 1. is calculated as follows: If the column is subjected to axial compression. Determine Concrete Shear Capacity Given the design force set Pu and Vu.0.25 (UBC 1921.0). M J .3).0).3. 1921.1.000 Ag  where. For Special moment resisting frames.3).   (UBC 1911.1. For Intermediate moment resisting frames. the shear capacity of the column is also checked for the capacity-shear based on the nominal moment capacities at the ends and the factored gravity loads. The procedure for calculating nominal moment capacity is the same as that for computing the probable moment capacity for special moment resisting frames.Column Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97 + − M I . M I .12 Design Column Shear Reinforcement .

Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Column Design Vc ≤ 3. For circular columns.3.5.8 times the gross area (UBC 1911.2).2. Figure 6 Shear Stress Area. Acv is the effective shear area which is Ag shown shaded in Figure 6. Acv is not taken to be greater than 0. Acv Design Column Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 10 .2) The term Pu must have psi units.6.5 f c'  1 + Pu  500 Ag    Acv .   (UBC 1911.13 .

Pu is negative.8) Otherwise redimensioning of the concrete section is required. Determine Required Shear Reinforcement Given Vu and Vc. for circular columns f ys D' π (UBC 1911.2. along with the controlling shear force and associated load combination label.6.5.60 for seismic design in Seismic Zones 3 and 4 (UBC 1909.14 Design Column Shear Reinforcement . the strength reduction factor.1). is 0.2. Here ϕ. Pu. (Vu / ϕ-Vc) ≤ 8 f c' Acv (UBC 1911.3)  Pu Vc = 2 f c' 1 +  500 Ag    Acv ≥ 0   (UBC 1911.3. 1. (UBC 1911.5.3) and is 0. 1911.3) For Special moment resisting concrete frame design.2) Vu is limited by the following relationship. including the earthquake effect is small (Pu < f c' Ag / 20) and if the shear force contribution from earthquake.5.6. for rectangular columns f ys d 2 (Vu / ϕ − Vc )s .2). Any minimum stirrup requirements to satisfy spacing considerations or transverse reinforcement volumet- Technical Note 10 .3.5.5. 1911.3. The column shear reinforcement requirements reported by the program are based purely on shear strength consideration. s. the required shear reinforcement in the form of stirrups or ties within a spacing.1. Vc is set to zero if the factored axial compressive force.4.1.5.3.6. and 2 (UBC 1909.6. VE.4.85 for nonseismic design or for seismic design in Seismic Zones 0. The maximum of all the calculated values obtained from each load combination are reported for the major and minor directions of the column.5Vu) (UBC 1921. is given for rectangular and circular columns by the following: Av = (Vu / ϕ − Vc )s . is more than half of the total factored maximum shear force over the length of the member Vu(VE ≥ 0.2) Av = (UBC 1911.6.Column Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97 If the column is subjected to axial tension.2.

15 . Hajjar. Reference Technical Note 10 . No. Vol. and J.Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Column Design ric considerations must be investigated independently of the program by the user.. W. D. Reference White. Application of Second-Order Elastic Analysis in LRFD: Research in Practice. 1991.. American Institute of Steel Construction. Inc.F. Engineering Journal. 28. 4.

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1 . and torsion that may exist in the beams must be investigated independently by the user. load combination factors and other criteria described herein. INC. All beams are designed for major direction flexure and shear only. The following steps are involved in designing the flexural reinforcement for the major moment for a particular beam for a particular section: Determine the maximum factored moments Determine the reinforcing steel Overview Technical Note 11 . load combination factors. BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97 Technical Note 11 Beam Design This Technical Note describes how this program completes beam design when the UBC97 code is selected. The program calculates and reports the required areas of steel for flexure and shear based on the beam moments. The reinforcement requirements are calculated at a user-defined number of check/design stations along the beam span. shears. minor direction bending.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. and other criteria described below. Overview In the design of concrete beams. The beam design procedure involves the following steps: Design beam flexural reinforcement Design beam shear reinforcement Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement The beam top and bottom flexural steel is designed at check/design stations along the beam span. Effects caused by axial forces. shears.. the program calculates and reports the required areas of steel for flexure and shear based upon the beam moments.

Negative beam moments produce top steel. the width. the beam is always designed as a rectangular section.3.or a T-beam.Beam Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Determine Factored Moments In the design of flexural reinforcement of Special. + The beam section is then designed for the maximum positive M u and maxi− mum negative M u factored moments obtained from all of the load combina- tions. all the beams are designed for major direction flexure and shear only.2). the program calculates both the tension and compression reinforcement. the beam may be designed as a Rectangular. or Ordinary moment resisting concrete frame beams.75 times that which can be carried at the balanced condition (UBC 1910. Technical Note 11 . It is assumed that the compression carried by concrete is less than 0. In such cases. Determine Required Flexural Reinforcement In the flexural reinforcement design process.3.3). The design procedure is based on the simplified rectangular stress block as shown in Figure 1 (UBC 1910. In such cases.and T-beams) is summarized below. the factored moments for each load combination at a particular beam section are obtained by factoring the corresponding moments for different load cases with the corresponding load factors. Compression reinforcement is added when the applied design moment exceeds the maximum moment capacity of a singly reinforced section. It is assumed that the design ultimate axial force does not exceed 0. the area of compression reinforcement is calculated assuming that the additional moment will be carried by compression and additional tension reinforcement. When the applied moment exceeds the moment capacity at this designed balanced condition.1 f c' Ag (UBC 1910.3).2 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement . hence. The user has the option of avoiding the compression reinforcement by increasing the effective depth. The design procedure used by the program for both rectangular and flanged sections (L. or the grade of concrete. Intermediate. Positive beam moments produce bottom steel.

2. designing top or bottom steel).000  .90 (UBC 1909.2.Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Beam Design Figure 1 Design of a Rectangular Beam Section Design for Rectangular Beam In designing for a factored negative or positive moment. d = ε c E s + fy 87.65 ≤ β1 ≤ 0.3 . where.4) Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Technical Note 11 .2.3) (UBC 1910. Mu (i.7.2.0.85f c' ϕb . the depth of the compression block is given by a (see Figure 1).e. 1910.85.05  c  1. Also β1 and cb are calculated as follows:  f ' − 4..85 .3. a=dd2 − 2 Mu 0.000    cb = εc E s 87.3.000 + f y 0. where the value of ϕ is 0. (UBC 1910. β1 = 0.1) in the above and the following equations.000 d.

  Therefore the moment resisted by compression steel and tensile steel is Mus = Mu . the area of tensile steel reinforcement is given by As = Mu a  ϕf y  d −  2  . − So the required compression steel is given by ' As = M us f s' (d − d' )ϕ .3) and is calculated as follows: − The compressive force developed in concrete alone is given by C = 0.2.7.Muc.3) If a ≤ amax.2.7.1) the moment resisted by concrete compression and tensile steel is a  Muc = C  d − max  2  −   ϕ. or at the top if Mu is negative.2. If a > amax.1.85 f c' bamax.75β1cb.  c  − (UBC 1910. where  c − d'  f s' = 0. 1910. (UBC 1910.003Es   . This steel is to be placed at the bottom if Mu is positive.3.4 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement .Beam Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97 The maximum allowed depth of the compression block is given by amax = 0. compression reinforcement is required (UBC 1910.4) The required tensile steel for balancing the compression in concrete is Technical Note 11 . and (UBC 1910.3.

5 .7.. Mu (i. designing top steel). The first part is for balancing the compressive force from the flange. If a > ds.bw) ds. Cw.2. in this case. no T-Beam data is to be used. calculation for As is performed in two parts. The maximum allowed depth of the compression block is given by amax = 0. Cf. Design for T-Beam In designing for a factored negative moment. the calculation of the steel area is exactly the same as above.85 f c' (bf . the subsequent calculations for As are exactly the same as previously defined for the rectangular section design.85f c' ϕbf . the depth of the compression block is given by a = d . the total tensile reinforcement. Compression reinforcement is required if a > amax..75β1cb.1) If a ≤ ds. the width of the compression flange is taken as the width of the beam for analysis.Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Beam Design As1 = Muc a   f y d − max  ϕ 2   . and total com' ' pression reinforcement is As . If Mu > 0.e. Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Technical Note 11 .e. See Figure 2. i. As = As1 + As2. As is to be placed at bottom and As is to be placed at top if Mu is positive. and the tensile steel for balancing the compression in steel is given by As2 = M us . f y (d − d' )ϕ − Therefore. and vice versa if Mu is negative.d2 − 2M u 0. as shown in Figure 2. Cf is given by Cf = 0. (UBC 1910. However. and the second part is for balancing the compressive force from the web.

Mu to be carried by the web is given by Muw = Mu . for which the design depth of the compression block is recalculated as a1 = d d2 − 2M uw 0. the area of tensile steel reinforcement is then given by Technical Note 11 . the balance of the moment.85f c' ϕbw . the value for ϕ is 0. Therefore. If a1 ≤ amax.Beam Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Figure 2 Design of a T-Beam Section Therefore.Muf.90. The web is a rectangular section of dimensions bw and d.   Cf fy and the portion of Mu that is resisted by the flange is Again.6 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement . As1 = given by d  Muf = Cf  d − s  2   ϕ .

where  c − d'  f s' = 0. (UBC 1910.Muc. and As = As1 + As2.4) The tensile steel for balancing compression in web concrete is As2 = M uc a  f y  d − max  2   ϕ   .2.7.  c  − (UBC 1910. the compression steel is computed as ' As = M us f s' (d − d' )ϕ . − Therefore.85 f c' bamax. compression reinforcement is required (UBC 1910.Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Beam Design As2 = M uw a   ϕf y  d − 1   2    .003Es  .3.7 .3) and is calculated as follows: − The compressive force in web concrete alone is given by C = 0.1) − Therefore the moment resisted by concrete web and tensile steel is a  Muc = C  d − max  2    ϕ. and the tensile steel for balancing compression in steel is Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Technical Note 11 . If a1 > amax. and   the moment resisted by compression steel and tensile steel is Mus = Muw .2. This steel is to be placed at the bottom of the T-beam.

2.2.3) Special Consideration for Seismic Design For Special moment resisting concrete frames (seismic design).1) The beam flexural steel is limited to a maximum given by As ≤ 0.5.5.5.3. Minimum Tensile Reinforcement The minimum flexural tensile steel provided in a rectangular section in an Ordinary moment resisting frame is given by the minimum of the two following limits: 3 f '  200   c As ≥ max  bw d and bw d  or fy  fy    As ≥ 4 As(required) 3 (UBC 1910.3.1.1) (UBC 1910.Beam Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97 As3 = Mus . 3 (UBC 1910.5.1) Technical Note 11 . As is to be placed at bottom and As is to be placed at top. 1921.1).25 bwd. (UBC 1921.3. and total compres' ' sion reinforcement is As . As = As1 + As2 + As3. 1921. the beam design satisfies the following additional conditions (see also Table 1 for comprehensive listing): The minimum longitudinal reinforcement shall be provided at both the top and bottom. f y (d − d')ϕ − The total tensile reinforcement. Any of the top and bottom reinforcement shall not be less than As(min) (UBC 1921.1) (UBC 1910.2.8 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement .3.3.2. 3 f '  200   c As(min) ≥ max  bw d and bw d  or fy  fy    As(min) ≥ 4 As(required).

25 and ϕ = 1.9 .0 and ϕ = 1.ρ ≥ 200 fy NLDa Combinations 1% < ρ < 8% Modified NLDa Combinations (earthquake loads doubled) Column Capacity ϕ = 1.025 ρ≥ 3 f c' fy .0 plus VD+L Vc = 0 Checked for shear No Requirement No Requirement No Requirement Reported in output file NLDa = Number of specified loading Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Technical Note 11 .Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Beam Design Table 1 Design Criteria Table Type of Check/ Design Column Check (interaction) Column Design (interaction) Column Shears Ordinary Moment Resisting Frames (Seismic Zones 0&1) NLDa Combinations NLDa Combinations 1% < ρ < 8% Intermediate Moment Resisting Frames (Seismic Zone 2) NLDa Combinations Special Moment Resisting Frames (Seismic Zones 3 & 4) NLDa Combinations NLDa Combinations α = 1. Moment Override Check + M uEND ≥ No Requirement + M uSPAN − M uSPAN 1 − M uEND 3 1 + − ≥ max M u .0 1% < ρ < 6% NLDa Combinations and Column shear capacity ϕ = 1.0 and α = 1. M u 5 + MuEND ≥ { } 1 − MuEND 2 END + MuSPAN ≥ − MuSPAN ≥ 1 + − max M u .0 and α = 1. Mu 4 { { } } END END Beam Design Shear Joint Design Beam/ Column Capacity Ratio NLDa Combinations Modified NLDa Combinations (earthquake loads doubled) Beam Capacity Shear (Vp) with α = 1.0 plus VD+L No Requirement NLDa Combinations Beam Capacity Shear (Vp) with α = 1. Mu 4 1 − − ≥ max Mu . M u 5 { } END 1 + − max Mu .25 NLDa Combinations ρ ≤ 0.0 NLDa Combinations Beam Design Flexure NLDa Combinations NLDa Combinations Beam Min.

e.1).3. Neither the negative moment capacity nor the positive moment capacity at any of the sections within the beam would be less than 1/5 of the maximum of positive or negative moment capacities of any of the beam end (support) stations (UBC 1921. Neither the negative moment capacity nor the positive moment capacity at any of the sections within the beam would be less than 1/4 of the maximum of positive or negative moment capacities of any of the beam end (support) stations (UBC 1921. respectively.. the beam positive moment capacity would not be less than 1/3 of the beam negative moment capacity at that end (UBC 1921. The following steps are involved in designing the shear reinforcement for a particular beam for a particular load combination at a particular station resulting from the beam major shear: Determine the factored shear force... associated with the bottom steel) would not be less than 1/2 of the beam negative moment capacity (i.8.2).1). Design Beam Shear Reinforcement The shear reinforcement is designed for each load combination at a userdefined number of stations along the beam span.2. seismic design).Beam Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97 At any end (support) of the beam. For Intermediate moment resisting concrete frames (i. the beam positive moment capacity (i. associated with the top steel) at that end (UBC 1921. in addition to the factored load design. For Special and Intermediate moment resisting frames (Ductile frames). the beam design would satisfy the following conditions: At any support of the beam.8. Determine the reinforcement steel required to carry the balance. Technical Note 11 .2).4. Vu. the shear design of the beams is also based on the probable and nominal moment capacities of the members. Vc.10 Design Beam Shear Reinforcement . Determine the shear force.2.3.4.e. that can be resisted by the concrete.e.

where VP1 = VP2 = − MI − + MI + M J . Design Beam Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 11 . Determine Shear Force and Moment In the design of the beam shear reinforcement of an Ordinary moment resisting concrete frame. with top steel in tension.. Therefore.11 .Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Beam Design The following three sections describe in detail the algorithms associated with this process.4. See also Table 1 for details. The procedure for calculating the design shear force in a beam from probable moment capacity is the same as that described for a column in section “Design Column Shear Reinforcement” in Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 10 Column Design. Vp.1) where Vp is the capacity shear force obtained by applying the calculated probable ultimate moment capacities at the two ends of the beams acting in opposite directions. where L = Moment capacity at end I. and L + − MI + M J .3.1) Vu = Vp + VD+L (UBC 1921.0). The capacity-shear force.4.3. is calculated from the probable moment capacities of each end of the beam and the gravity shear forces. The design shear force Vu is then given by (UBC 1921. Vp is the maximum of VP1 and VP2 . the shear forces and moments for a particular load combination at a particular beam section are obtained by factoring the associated shear forces and moments with the corresponding load combination factors. the shear capacity of the beam is also checked for the capacity-shear associated with the probable moment capacities at the ends and the factored gravity load.e. In the design of Special moment resisting concrete frames (i. using a steel yield stress value of αfy and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1. This check is performed in addition to the design check required for Ordinary moment resisting frames. seismic design).

except that α is taken equal to 1 rather than 1. − MJ = Moment capacity at end J. and L = Clear span of beam. except the earthquake load factors are doubled (UBC 1921.3). α is taken as 1. For Special moment resisting frames.Beam Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97 + MJ = Moment capacity at end J.25 (UBC 1921.0).8. The design shear force in beams is taken to be the minimum of that based on the nominal moment capacity and factored shear force.1) For Special moment resisting frame concrete design.0) moment capacity is the same as that for computing the probable moment capacity for Special moment resisting frames. (UBC 1911.25 (UBC 1921.0). which is described in Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Technical Note 10 Column Design. + MI = Moment capacity at end I. with bottom steel in tension. VD+L is the contribution of shear force from the in-span distribution of gravity loads. using a steel yield stress value of αfy and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1. For Intermediate moment resisting frames.0). with bottom steel in tension. with top steel in tension. the shear capacity of the beam is also checked for the capacity shear based on the nominal moment capacities at the ends and the factored gravity loads. including the earthquake effect Pu.0). The procedure for calculating nominal (ϕ = 1. in addition to the check required for Ordinary moment resisting frames. using a steel yield stress value of αfy and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1.3).0.8.12 Design Beam Shear Reinforcement . The computation of the design shear force in a beam of an Intermediate moment resisting frame is also the same as that for columns. Determine Concrete Shear Capacity The allowable concrete shear capacity is given by Vc = 2 f c' bwd.1. Vc is set to zero if both the factored axial compressive force. using a steel yield stress value of αfy and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1.3. Also see Table 1 for details. is less than f c' Ag/20 and the shear force contribution from earthquake VE is Technical Note 11 . 1921. The factored shear forces are based on the specified load factors.

Concrete Frame Design UBC97

Beam Design

more than half of the total maximum shear force over the length of the member Vu (i.e., VE ≥ 0.5Vu) (UBC 1921.3.4.2).

Determine Required Shear Reinforcement
Given Vu and Vc, the required shear reinforcement in area/unit length is calculated as Av = (Vu / ϕ − Vc )s . f ys d (UBC 1911.5.6.1, 1911.5.6.2)

The shear force resisted by steel is limited by (Vu/ϕ - Vc) ≤ 8 f c' bd. (UBC 1911.5.6.8)

Otherwise, redimensioning of the concrete section is required. Here ϕ, the strength reduction factor, is 0.85 for nonseismic design or for seismic design in Seismic Zones 0, 1, and 2 (UBC 1909.3.2.3) and is 0.60 for seismic design in Seismic Zones 3 and 4 (UBC 1909.3.4.1). The maximum of all the calculated Av values, obtained from each load combination, is reported along with the controlling shear force and associated load combination number. The beam shear reinforcement requirements displayed by the program are based purely on shear strength considerations. Any minimum stirrup requirements to satisfy spacing and volumetric considerations must be investigated independently of the program by the user.

Design Beam Shear Reinforcement

Technical Note 11 - 13

©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001

CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97

Technical Note 12 Joint Design
This Technical Note explains how the program performs a rational analysis of the beam-column panel zone to determine the shear forces that are generated in a joint. The program then checks this against design shear strength.

Overview
To ensure that the beam-column joint of special moment resisting frames possesses adequate shear strength, the program performs a rational analysis of the beam-column panel zone to determine the shear forces that are generated in the joint. The program then checks this against design shear strength. Only joints having a column below the joint are designed. The material properties of the joint are assumed to be the same as those of the column below the joint. The joint analysis is completed in the major and the minor directions of the column. The joint design procedure involves the following steps: • • • Determine the panel zone design shear force,Vuh Determine the effective area of the joint Check panel zone shear stress

The algorithms associated with these three steps are described in detail in the following three sections.

Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force
Figure 1 illustrates the free body stress condition of a typical beam-column intersection for a column direction, major or minor.

Overview

Technical Note 12 - 1

Joint Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Figure1 Beam-Column Joint Analysis Technical Note 12 .2 Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force .

considering the fact that the concrete cover may be different for the direction of moment. The forces Pu and Vu are axial force and shear force. The program calculates the joint shear force Vuh by resolving the moments into C and T forces. The forces that act on the joint are Pu. the program calculates the C and T for the positive and negative moments.1). Also. C max = 0. thereby contributing force components to the analysis. from the column framing into the top of the joint.1. Vu. The C and T forces are based on these moment capacities. Cmax. and no ϕ factors) of the beams framing into the joint (UBC 1921.5. as follows: Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force Technical Note 12 . MuL and MuR. Noting that TL = CL and TR = CR. The program calculates the column shear force Vu from the beam moment capacities. The magnitude of C or T forces is conservatively determined using basic principles of ultimate strength theory.3 . α. respectively. Mmax. The program first calculates the maximum compression. The moments MuL and MuR are obtained from the beams framing into the joint.Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Joint Design The force Vuh is the horizontal panel zone shear force that is to be calculated. Vuh = TL + TR .85f c' bd Mmax = C max d 2 Then the program conservatively determines C and T forces as follows:  abs( M )   C = T = C max 1 − 1 −  M max    The program resolves the moments and the C and T forces from beams that frame into the joint in a direction that is not parallel to the major or minor directions of the column along the direction that is being investigated. In the design of special moment resisting concrete frames. and the maximum moment. ignoring compression reinforcement as follows. the evaluation of the design shear force is based on the moment capacities (with reinforcing steel overstrength factor. that can be carried by the beam.Vu The location of C or T forces is determined by the direction of the moment.

the shear force from the top of the column is taken as zero. Figure 2 Column Shear Force Vu Technical Note 12 .4 Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force .Joint Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Vu = Mu + Mu H L R See Figure 2. If there is no column at the top of the joint. It should be noted that the points of inflection shown on Figure 2 are taken as midway between actual lateral support points for the columns.

It should be noted that if the beam frames into the joint eccentrically. Check Panel Zone Shear Stress The panel zone shear stress is evaluated by dividing the shear force Vuh by the effective area of the joint and comparing it with the following design shear strengths (UBC 1921. as illustrated in Case 1 and Case 2 of Figure 1. Determine the Effective Area of Joint Technical Note 12 .3. the above assumptions may be unconservative and the user should investigate the acceptability of the particular joint. are investigated and the design is based on the maximum of the joint shears obtained from the two cases.5.2. Determine the Effective Area of Joint The joint area that resists the shear forces is assumed always to be rectangular in plan view. except if the beam framing into the joint is very narrow.3.5. The joint area for joint shear along the major and minor directions is calculated separately (ACI R21.1) A beam that frames into a face of a column at the joint is considered in this program to provide confinement to the joint if at least three-quarters of the face of the joint is covered by the framing member (UBC 1921.3.4. The area of the joint is assumed not to exceed the area of the column below.3): v = { 20ϕ 15ϕ 12ϕ f 'c f 'c f 'c for joints confined on all four sides for joints confined on three faces or on two opposite faces for all other joints where ϕ = 0.1909.3.5 . (UBC 1909. The dimensions of the rectangle correspond to the major and minor dimensions of the column below the joint.3).Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Joint Design The effects of load reversals.5.1).85 (by default). The effective width of the joint area to be used in the calculation is limited to the width of the beam plus the depth of the column.

For each load combination. α. The maximum capacity summations obtained from all of the load combinations is used for the beam/column capacity ratio.5. The beam capacities are calculated for reversed situations (Cases 1 and 2) as illustrated in Figure 1 and the maximum summation obtained is used.6 Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios . the joint shear stress. Technical Note 12 . the design shear strength of the joint is reduced in the program to at least three-quarters of that of the normal weight concrete by replacing the minf cs. For Special Moment-Resisting Frames. the program will calculate the ratio of the sum of the beam moment capacities to the sum of the column moment capacities. the axial force. major or minor. the following UBC provision needs to be satisfied (UBC 1921.4. in each of the columns is calculated from the program analysis load combinations. the program reports the joint shear. ∑Me ≥ 6 ∑Mg 5 (UBC 1921.4.2.3 / 4 f c'      f c' with (UBC 1921. The moment capacities of the two columns are added to give the capacity summation for the corresponding load combination.2). For each load combination.2. Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios At a particular joint for a particular column direction.Joint Design Concrete Frame Design UBC97 For light-weight aggregate concrete. Pu. factor f ' c . the moment capacity of each column under the influence of the corresponding axial load Pu is then determined separately for the major and minor directions of the column. The column capacity summation includes the column above and the column below the joint. and including ϕ factors.3. see Figure 3.2) For joint design. using the uniaxial column interaction diagram. The moment capacities of beams that frame into the joint in a direction that is not parallel to the major or minor direction of the column are resolved along the direction that is being investigated and the resolved components are added to the summation. the allowable joint shear stress and a capacity ratio.2) The capacities are calculated with no reinforcing overstrength factor.

Figure 3 Moment Capacity Mu at a Given Axial Load Pu Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios Technical Note 12 .Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Joint Design The beam/column flexural capacity ratios are only reported for Special Moment-Resisting Frames involving seismic design load combinations.7 . a warning message is printed in the output file. If this ratio is greater than 5/6.

.

Bending strength reduction factor. reduced live load. Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data COLUMN HEADING Combo Type Case Factor DESCRIPTION Design load combination. snow. BERKELEY. wind. The column headings for input data and a description of what is included in the columns of the tables are provided in Table 1 of this Technical Note. Further information about using the Print Design Tables form is presented at the end of this Technical Note. Compressive strength reduction factor for tied columns. INC. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97 Technical Note 13 Input Data This Technical Note describes the concrete frame design input data for UBC97. earthquake. superimposed dead. other. Load type: dead. Compressive strength reduction factor for reinforced columns. live. Load Combination Multipliers Code Preferences Phi_bending Phi_tension Phi_compression (Tied) Phi_compression (Spiral) Phi_shear Input Data Technical Note 13 .. Tensile strength reduction factor.1 . Load combination scale factor. The input can be printed to a printer or to a text file when you click the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command. See Technical Note 8. Name of load case.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. A printout of the input data provides the user with the opportunity to carefully review the parameters that have been input into the program and upon which program design is based. Shear strength reduction factor. Input Data The program provides the printout of the input data in a series of tables.

steel. Area of individual reinforcing bar to be used. other. Minimum clear concrete cover. Bending reinforcing steel yield strength. Isotropic or orthotropic. Technical Note 13 . Material Design Data for Concrete Materials Concrete Column Property Data Section Label Mat Label Column Depth Column Width Rebar Pattern Concrete Cover Bar Area Layout of main flexural reinforcing steel. Label applied to section. other. Used to calculate self-mass of structure.Input Data Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION Concrete. Concrete. default = 1. Shear strength reduction factor for light weight concrete. Material Property Data Material Name Material Type Design Type Modulus of Elasticity Poisson's Ratio Thermal Coeff Shear Modulus Coefficient of thermal expansion. Material label. Material Property Mass and Weight Material Name Mass Per Unit Vol Weight Per Unit Vol Material Name Lightweight Concrete Concrete FC Rebar FY Rebar FYS Lightwt Reduc Fact Concrete compressive strength. Concrete.2 Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data . steel. steel. other. Used to calculate self-weight of structure.0. Shear reinforcing steel yield strength.

Grid line. To print steel frame design input data to a file. default = 1. Effective length factor. Lateral or gravity. Grid lines locating beam. Concrete Column Design Element Information Concrete Beam Design Element Information Using the Print Design Tables Form To print steel frame design input data directly to a printer. Effective length factor. Section number assigned to beam. if necessary. click the Print to File check box on the Print Design Tables form. Lateral or gravity. Use the File menu > Print Setup command and the Setup>> button to change printers.Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Input Data Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data COLUMN HEADING Story ID Column Line Section ID Framing Type RLLF Factor L_Ratio Major L_Ratio Minor K Major K Minor Story ID Bay ID Section ID Framing type RLLF Factor L_Ratio Major L_Ratio Minor Unbraced length about major axis. default = 1.3 . Name of section assigned to column.0. Click the Cancel button rather than the OK button to cancel the print.0. Unbraced length about minor axis. Click the OK button to send the print to your printer. Unbraced length about major axis. DESCRIPTION Column assigned to story level at top of column. Unbraced length about minor axis. Story level at which beam occurs. Click the Filename>> button to change the Using the Print Design Tables Form Technical Note 13 . use the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command and click the check box on the Print Design Tables form.

The Append check box allows you to add data to an existing file. Technical Note 13 . Click the OK buttons on the Open File for Printing Tables form and the Print Design Tables form to complete the request.xls. .4 Using the Print Design Tables Form . The print will be for the selected beam(s) only. Or use the Filename>> button to locate another file..txt.g. click Yes to replace the existing file. The path and filename of the current file is displayed in the box near the bottom of the Print Design Tables form.doc).Input Data Concrete Frame Design UBC97 path or filename. Use the appropriate file extension for the desired format (e. Note: The File menu > Display Input/Output Text Files command is useful for displaying output that is printed to a text file. . and when the Open File for Printing Tables caution box appears. If you select a specific frame element(s) before using the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command. Data will be added to this file. . the Selection Only check box will be checked.

Load combination for which the reinforcing is designed. Table 1 Concrete Column Design Output COLUMN HEADING Story ID Column Line Section ID Station ID DESCRIPTION Column assigned to story level at top of column. INC. Table 1 Concrete Column Design Output Technical Note 14 . Name of section assigned to column.. Shear reinforcing required. The column headings for output data and a description of what is included in the columns of the tables are provided in Table 1 of this Technical Note.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. The program provides the output data in a series of tables. Grid lines. Load combination for which the reinforcing is designed.1 . BERKELEY. The design output is printed when you click the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command and select Output Summary of the Print Design Tables dialog box. Further information about using the Print Design Tables dialog box is presented at the end of this Technical Note. Biaxial P-M Interaction and Shear Design of Column-Type Elements Required Reinforcing Longitudinal Combo Shear22 Combo Shear33 Area of longitudinal reinforcing required. Shear reinforcing required. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN UBC97 Technical Note 14 Output Details This Technical Note describes the concrete frame design output for UBC97 that can be printed to a printer or to a text file.

Ratio of beam moment capacity to column capacity.2 Table 2 Concrete Column Joint Output . Assigned section name. Table 2 Concrete Column Joint Output COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION Beam to Column Capacity Ratios and Joint Shear Capacity Check Story ID Column Line Section ID Story level at which joint occurs. Load combination upon which the ratio of factored load versus allowed capacity is based. Load combination upon which the ratio of factored load versus allowed capacity is based. Minor Combo Technical Note 14 .Output Details Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Table 1 Concrete Column Design Output COLUMN HEADING Combo DESCRIPTION Load combination for which the reinforcing is designed. Load combination upon which the ratio of beam moment capacity to column capacity is based. Ratio of factored load versus allowed capacity. Beam-Column Capacity Ratios Major Combo Ratio of beam moment capacity to column capacity. Grid line. Load combination upon which the ratio of beam moment capacity to column capacity is based. Minor Combo Joint Shear Capacity Ratios Major Combo Ratio of factored load versus allowed capacity.

The print will be for the selected beam(s) only. . . Use the appropriate file extension for the desired format (e. If you select a specific frame element(s) before using the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command. and when the Open File for Printing Tables caution box appears.3 . To print concrete frame design input data to a file. Click the OK buttons on the Open File for Printing Tables dialog box and the Print Design Tables dialog box to complete the request. Data will be added to this file. use the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command and click the check box on the Print Design Tables dialog box. Click the Filename>> button to change the path or filename.g. Click the OK button to send the print to your printer. Or use the Filename>> button to locate another file. click Yes to replace the existing file. if necessary.doc).xls. Using the Print Design Tables Form Technical Note 14 . The path and filename of the current file is displayed in the box near the bottom of the Print Design Tables dialog box.txt. the Selection Only check box will be checked. The Append check box allows you to add data to an existing file.Concrete Frame Design UBC97 Output Details Using the Print Design Tables Form To print concrete frame design input data directly to a printer. click the Print to File check box on the Print Design Tables dialog box. Use the File menu > Print Setup command and the Setup>> button to change printers.. Note: The File menu > Display Input/Output Text Files command is useful for displaying output that is printed to a text file. Click the Cancel button rather than the OK button to cancel the print. .

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For simplicity. Ordinary. Introduction to the ACI318-99 Series of Technical Notes Technical Note 15 . Special (high seismic risk areas) moment resisting frames as required for seismic design provisions. BERKELEY. and Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Technical Note 22 Joint Design. and Earthquake resisting frames. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI-318-99 Technical Note 15 General and Notation Introduction to the ACI318-99 Series of Technical Notes The ACI-318-99 Concrete Frame Design series of Technical Notes describes in detail the various aspects of the concrete design procedure that is used by this program when the user selects the ACI-318-99 Design Code (ACI 1999).1 .©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. which are described in Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Technical Note 16 Preferences and Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Technical Note 17 Overwrites. It also provides input and output data summaries. INC. Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Technical Note 20 Column Design. all equations and descriptions presented in this chapter correspond to Inch-Pound-Second units unless otherwise noted. Intermediate (moderate seismic risk areas). The program uses preferences and overwrites. The details of the design criteria used for the different framing systems are described in Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Technical Note 19 Strength Reduction Factors. But the code is based on Inch-Pound-Second units. The design is based on user-specified loading combinations. The various notations used in this series are listed herein. The program provides a set of default load combinations that should satisfy requirements for the design of most building type structures. Earthquake resisting frames. The program provides options to design or check Earthquake resisting frames.. Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Technical Note 21 Beam Design. which are described in Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Technical Note 23 Input Data and Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Technical Note 24 Output Details. English as well as SI and MKS metric units can be used for input. See Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Technical Note 18 Design Load Combination for more information.

sq-in Gross area of concrete.000. lb-in Nonsway component of factored end moment. sq-in Area of steel required for tension reinforcement. psi Modulus of elasticity of reinforcement. lb-in Larger factored end moment in a column. sq-in Area of shear reinforcement.000 psi (ACI 8. neglecting reinforcement. in Smaller factored end moment in a column.2) Moment of inertia of gross concrete section about centroidal axis. lb-in Factored moment to be used in design.2 Notation . dependent upon column curvature. in4 Clear unsupported length.General and Notation Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Notation Acv Ag As ' As Area of concrete used to determine shear stress. sq-in Total area of column longitudinal reinforcement. sq-in Coefficient. used to calculate moment magnification factor Modulus of elasticity of concrete. sq-in Area of tension reinforcement. lb-in As(required) Ast Av Cm Ec Es Ig Ise L M1 M2 Mc Mns Ms Technical Note 15 .5. lb-in Sway component of factored end moment. in4 Moment of inertia of reinforcement about centroidal axis of member cross section. assumed as 29. sq-in Area of compression reinforcement.

lb Shear force computed from probable moment capacity. in Concrete cover to center of reinforcing. in Effective width of flange (T-Beam section). in Notation Technical Note 15 . in Depth to neutral axis. lb-in Factored moment at section about Y-axis. in Width of member.3 . in Depth of compression block at balanced condition.Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 General and Notation Mu Mux Muy Pb Pc Pmax P0 Pu Vc VE VD+L Vu Vp a ab b bf bw c cb d d' Factored moment at section. lb Shear resisted by concrete. lb Critical buckling strength of column. lb Axial load capacity at zero eccentricity. lb Factored shear force at a section. lb Depth of compression block. lb Shear force from span loading. lb Factored axial load at section. lb Maximum axial load strength allowed. in Distance from compression face to tension reinforcement. lb Shear force caused by earthquake loads. in Width of web (T-Beam section). lb-in Axial load capacity at balanced strain conditions. in Depth to neutral axis at balanced conditions. lb-in Factored moment at section about X-axis.

psi Dimension of column. psi fy ≤ 80. in Reinforcing steel overstrength factor Absolute value of ratio of maximum factored axial dead load to maximum factored axial total load Absolute value of ratio or maximum factored axial dead load to maximum factored axial total load Moment magnification factor for sway moments Moment magnification factor for nonsway moments Strain in concrete Strain in reinforcing steel Strength reduction factor fys h k r α β1 βd δs δns εc εs ϕ Technical Note 15 . in Specified compressive strength of concrete. in Effective length factor Radius of gyration of column section.General and Notation Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 ds f c' fy Thickness of slab (T-Beam section).4) Specified yield strength of shear reinforcement.000 psi (ACI 9. psi Specified yield strength of flexural reinforcement.4 Notation .

©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES, INC., BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001

CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI318-99

Technical Note 16 Preferences
This Technical Note describes the items in the Preferences form.

General
The concrete frame design preferences in this program are basic assignments that apply to all concrete frame elements. Use the Options menu > Preferences > Concrete Frame Design command to access the Preferences form where you can view and revise the concrete frame design preferences. Default values are provided for all concrete frame design preference items. Thus, it is not required that you specify or change any of the preferences. You should, however, at least review the default values for the preference items to make sure they are acceptable to you.

Using the Preferences Form
To view preferences, select the Options menu > Preferences > Concrete Frame Design. The Preferences form will display. The preference options are displayed in a two-column spreadsheet. The left column of the spreadsheet displays the preference item name. The right column of the spreadsheet displays the preference item value. To change a preference item, left click the desired preference item in either the left or right column of the spreadsheet. This activates a drop-down box or highlights the current preference value. If the drop-down box appears, select a new value. If the cell is highlighted, type in the desired value. The preference value will update accordingly. You cannot overwrite values in the dropdown boxes. When you have finished making changes to the composite beam preferences, click the OK button to close the form. You must click the OK button for the changes to be accepted by the program. If you click the Cancel button to exit

General

Technical Note 16 - 1

Preferences

Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99

the form, any changes made to the preferences are ignored and the form is closed.

Preferences
For purposes of explanation in this Technical Note, the preference items are presented in Table. The column headings in the table are described as follows: Item: The name of the preference item as it appears in the cells at the left side of the Preferences form. Possible Values: The possible values that the associated preference item can have. Default Value: The built-in default value that the program assumes for the associated preference item. Description: A description of the associated preference item.

Table 1: Concrete Frame Preferences
Item Design Code Possible Values Any code in the program >0 >0 >0 >0 ≥4.0 Default Value ACI 318-99 Description Design code used for design of concrete frame elements. Unitless strength reduction factor per ACI 9.3. Unitless strength reduction factor per ACI 9.3. Unitless strength reduction factor per ACI 9.3. Unitless strength reduction factor per ACI 9.3. Number of equally spaced interaction curves used to create a full 360-degree interaction surface (this item should be a multiple of four). We recommend that you use 24 for this item.

Phi Bending Tension Phi Compression Tied Phi Compression Spiral Phi Shear Number Interaction Curves

0.9 0.7 0.75 0.85 24

Technical Note 16 - 2

Preferences

Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99

Preferences

Table 1: Concrete Frame Preferences
Item Possible Values Default Value 11 Description Number of points used for defining a single curve in a concrete frame interaction surface (this item should be odd). Toggle for design load combinations that include a time history designed for the envelope of the time history, or designed step-by-step for the entire time history. If a single design load combination has more than one time history case in it, that design load combination is designed for the envelopes of the time histories, regardless of what is specified here.

Number Inter- Any odd value action Points ≥4.0 Time History Design Envelopes or Step-by-Step

Envelopes

Preferences

Technical Note 16 - 3

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Overwrites Technical Note 17 . An explanation of how to change an overwrite is provided at the end of this Technical Note. BERKELEY. To access the overwrites.1 . Default Value: The default value that the program assumes for the associated overwrite item. the program applies the changes only to the elements to which they are specifically assigned. This Technical Note describes concrete frame design overwrites for ACI318-99. the overwrites are presented in Table 1. Thus. Description: A description of the associated overwrite item.. at least review the default values for the overwrite items to make sure they are acceptable. INC. When changes are made to overwrite items. these names are generally short. that is. select an element and click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > View/Revise Overwrites command. To save space in the formes. Default values are provided for all overwrite items. However. The column headings in the table are described as follows. to the elements that are selected when the overwrites are changed. Possible Values: The possible values that the associated overwrite item can have.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. Item: The name of the overwrite item as it appears in the program. Overwrites For explanation purposes in this Technical Note. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI318-99 Technical Note 17 Overwrites General The concrete frame design overwrites are basic assignments that apply only to those elements to which they are assigned. you do not need to specify or change any of the overwrites.

12. 10.3. See ACI 10. See ACI 10. 1.3.1.13 and Figure R10.12.2 Overwrites . Used to reduce the live load contribution to the factored loading. 10.13 and Figure R10.1. Sway Special Frame type per moment frame definition given in ACI 21. Sway Intermediate. See ACI 10.0 1.0 >0 ≤1.0 >0 ≤1.12.0 >0 ≤1.0 1 1. Factor relating actual moment diagram to an equivalent uniform moment diagram.0 >0 ≤1. See ACI 10.12.0 >0 ≤1.0 >0 ≤1.12. Sway Ordinary NonSway >0 ≤1. Possible Values Default Value Description Element Type Live Load Reduction Factor Horizontal Earthquake Factor Unbraced Length Ratio (Major) Unbraced Length Ratio (Minor) Effective Length Factor (K Major) Effective Length Factor (K Minor) Moment Coefficient (Cm Major) Moment Coefficient (Cm Minor) NonSway Moment Factor (Dns Major) Technical Note 17 .1.0 >0 ≤1.12.0 >0 ≤1.0 1 1 1 1 1 See ACI 10.12. Factor relating actual moment diagram to an equivalent uniform moment diagram.Overwrites Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Overwrites Item Element Section Sway Special.

If multiple elements were selected. check the box to the left of an overwrite item to change it. no values show for the overwrite items in the second column of the spreadsheet. The right column of the spreadsheet contains the overwrites values. After selecting one or multiple elements.13.Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Overwrites Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Overwrites Item NonSway Moment Factor (Dns Minor) Sway Moment Factor (Ds Major) Sway Moment Factor (Ds Minor) Possible Values Default Value 1 Description See ACI 10.3 . select a value from Overwrites Technical Note 17 . 1 See ACI 10. The values of the overwrite items are visible in the second column of the spreadsheet if only one element was selected before the overwrites form was accessed.13. Making Changes in the Overwrites Form To access the concrete frame overwrites. Initially. the check boxes in the Concrete Frame Design Overwrites form are all unchecked and all of the cells in the spreadsheet have a gray background to indicate that they are inactive and the items in the cells cannot be changed. If the drop-down box appears. Then left click in either column of the spreadsheet to activate a drop-down box or highlight the contents in the cell in the right column of the spreadsheet.13. The left column of the spreadsheet contains the name of the overwrite item. 1 See ACI 10. select an element and click the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > View/Revise Overwrites command. The overwrites are displayed in the form with a column of check boxes and a two-column spreadsheet. The names of the overwrite items are displayed in the first column of the spreadsheet.

the program resets the overwrite values to its built-in values. Technical Note 17 . You cannot change the values of the dropdown boxes. Important note about resetting overwrites: The program defaults for the overwrite items are built into the program. The overwrite will reflect the change. Resetting Concrete Frame Overwrites to Default Values Use the Design menu > Concrete Frame Design > Reset All Overwrites command to reset all of the steel frame overwrites. click the OK button to close the form.edb file that you used to initialize your model may be different from the built-in program default values. You must click the OK button for the changes to be accepted by the program. type in the desired value.4 Overwrites . If you click the Cancel button to exit the form. When you reset overwrites. When changes to the overwrites have been completed. any changes made to the overwrites are ignored and the form is closed.Overwrites Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 the box.edb file used to initialize the model. not to the values that were in the . The concrete frame overwrite values that were in a . If the cell contents is highlighted. All current design results will be deleted when this command is executed. The program then changes all of the overwrite items whose associated check boxes are checked for the selected members.

2. namely 1.7 LL ± 1.7 WL) 0. 1.9 DL ± 1.2) (ACI 9. in addition to the dead and live loads.4 DL + 1.3 * 1.1) (ACI 9. See Concrete Frame Design ACI 318-99 Technical Note 17 Overwrites for more information. INC. However. BERKELEY. the following load combinations should be considered (ACI 9.3 WL 0.75 (1.1).1 .©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES.2.4 DL + 1.7 LL 0.4 DL 1. if a structure is subjected to dead load (DL) and live load (LL) only.2.7 LL ± 1.2. Different load factors may apply with strength-level seismic forces (ACI R9.4 DL + 1. The user is warned that the above load combinations involving seismic loads consider service-level seismic forces. if the structure is subjected to wind (WL) and earthquake (EL) loads and considering that wind and earthquake forces are reversible. Live load reduction factors can be applied to the member forces of the live load condition on an element-by-element basis to reduce the contribution of the live load to the factored loading. the stress check may need only one load combination. Design Load Combinations Technical Note 18 .1 EL 0.2.9 DL ± 1.2). For the ACI 318-99 code.3) These are also the default design load combinations in the program whenever the ACI 318-99 code is used.3).7 * 1. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI-318-99 Technical Note 18 Design Load Combinations The design load combinations are the various combinations of the prescribed load cases for which the structure needs to be checked.4 DL + 1.7 LL (ACI 9.75 (1..1 EL) (ACI 9.

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3.70 for axial compression.2) = 0.1 .3.2.90 for axial tension = 0.2) = 0.. and axial compression and flexure (tied column) (ACI 9.3. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI-318-99 Technical Note 19 Strength Reduction Factors The strength reduction factors.3. and axial compression and flexure (spirally reinforced column) (ACI 9.1) (ACI 9.2) = 0. shear. and torsion are as follows: ϕ ϕ ϕ ϕ = 0. BERKELEY.90 for axial tension and flexure (ACI 9.2.2.90 for flexure = 0.2.3. are applied on the nominal strength to obtain the design strength provided by a member.2.2) (ACI 9.3. INC. The ϕ factors for flexure.75 for axial compression. ϕ.3) ϕ ϕ Strength Reduction Factors Technical Note 19 .©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES.85 for shear and torsion (ACI 9. axial force.2.

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The design procedure for the reinforced concrete columns of the structure involves the following steps: Generate axial force/biaxial moment interaction surfaces for all of the different concrete section types of the model.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES.3.4. If you define the geometry of the reinforcing bar configuration of each concrete column section. the program generates the interaction surfaces for the range of allowable reinforcement  1 to 8 percent for Ordinary and Intermediate moment resisting frames (ACI 10. The following four sections describe in detail the algorithms associated with this process. When the steel is undefined.9.1). BERKELEY. Overview The program can be used to check column capacity or to design columns.. Alternatively.1 . the program can calculate the amount of reinforcing required to design the column. INC.1) and 1 to 6 percent for Special moment resisting frames (ACI 21. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI-318-99 Technical Note 20 Column Design This Technical Note describes how the program checks column capacity or designs reinforced concrete columns when the ACI-318-99 code is selected. The target capacity ratio is taken as one when calculating the required reinforcing area. Calculate the capacity ratio or the required reinforcing area for the factored axial force and biaxial (or uniaxial) bending moments obtained from each loading combination at each station of the column. the program will check the column capacity. A typical biaxial interaction surface is shown in Figure 1. Overview Technical Note 20 . Design the column shear reinforcement.

A typical interaction diagram is shown in Figure 1. The Technical Note 20 . In addition to axial compression and biaxial bending.Column Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Figure 1 A Typical Column Interaction Surface Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces The column capacity interaction volume is numerically described by a series of discrete points that are generated on the three-dimensional interaction failure surface.2 Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces . See Figure 2. The coordinates of these points are determined by rotating a plane of linear strain in three dimensions on the section of the column. the formulation allows for axial tension and biaxial bending considerations.

85 f c' (ACI 10. The effects of the strength reduction factor.7.2.75 for spirally reinforced columns.2. The interaction algorithm provides correction to account for the concrete area that is displaced by the reinforcement in the compression zone.2) (ACI 9.70 for tied columns.Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Column Design linear strain diagram limits the maximum concrete strain.3 .2) The value of ϕ used in the interaction diagram varies from ϕ(compression) to ϕ(flexure) based on the axial load. fy (ACI 10.85ϕ[0. ϕ is increased linearly from ϕ(compression) to ϕ(flexure) as the ϕPn decreases from the smaller of ϕPb or 0. ϕ. The area associated with each reinforcing bar is assumed to be placed at the actual location of the center of the bar and the algorithm does not assume any further simplifications with respect to distributing the area of steel over the cross section of the column.1) (ACI 10.1). or circular column section. and is limited to the yield stress of the steel.2). The stress in the steel is given by the product of the steel strain and the steel modulus of elasticity.2.5. (ACI 10. The concrete compression stress block is assumed to be rectangular.9 by default (ACI 9.3. which is 0.3. and allows for any doubly symmetric rectangular. where ϕPb is the axial force at the balanced condition. ϕPn(max) = 0.3.2.85 f c' (Ag-Ast)+fyAst] spiral column. to 0. at the extremity of the section.3).1 f c' Ag to zero. The maximum compressive axial load is limited to ϕPn(max). The formulation is based consistently upon the general principles of ultimate strength design (ACI 10. ϕ ϕ = = 0.2) (ACI 9.3. For low values of axial load. with a stress value of 0. such as an equivalent steel tube or cylinder.80ϕ[0.2. are included in the generation of the interaction surfaces.3.3).2. ϕ is always ϕ(flexure).003 (ACI 10. See Figure 3. εc. where ϕPn(max) = 0. See Figure 3.85 f c' (Ag-Ast)+fyAst] tied column. Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces Technical Note 20 . In cases involving axial tension. The ϕ factor used in calculating ϕPn and ϕPb is the ϕ(compression).5. εsEs. square. and 0.4).

4 Generation of Biaxial Interaction Surfaces .Column Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Figure 2 Idealized Strain Distribution for Generation of Interaction Source Technical Note 20 .

Calculate Column Capacity Ratio Technical Note 20 . Apply the moment magnification factors to the factored moments. The factored moments and corresponding magnification factors depend on the identification of the individual column as either “sway” or “non-sway. lies within the interaction volume. The following steps are involved in calculating the capacity ratio of a particular column for a particular load combination at a particular location: Determine the factored moments and forces from the analysis load cases and the specified load combination factors to give Pu. Mux. Determine whether the point.” The following three sections describe in detail the algorithms associated with this process. Determine the moment magnification factors for the column moments.Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Column Design Figure 3 Idealization of Stress and Strain Distribution in a Column Section Calculate Column Capacity Ratio The column capacity ratio is calculated for each load combination at each output station of each column. and Muy. defined by the resulting axial load and biaxial moment set.5 .

δns.13. therefore. if required. where h is the dimension of the column in the corresponding direction (ACI 10.1.7 live load (ACI 10. The moment obtained from analysis is separated into two components: the sway (Ms) and the non-sway (Mns) components.12.6+0.2). For the P-delta analysis. The non-sway components. the moment magnification factors in the major and minor directions are in general different (ACI 10. the magnified moments about two axes at any station of a column can be obtained as M = Mns + δsMs. 10.3) The factor δs is the moment magnification factor for moments causing side sway. The sway moments are predominantly caused by lateral loads. The moment of inertia reduction for sustained lateral load involves a factor βd (ACI 10. Also. Determine Moment Magnification Factors The moment magnification factors are calculated separately for sway (overall stability effect).13. The user should use reduction factors for the moment of inertias in the program as specified in ACI 10. 10.1). the load should correspond to a load combination of 1.6 Calculate Column Capacity Ratio . The moment magnification factors for sway moments. For individual columns or column-members in a floor. to obtain minimum eccentricities of (0. are predominantly caused by gravity load.0.12. The factored moments are further increased for non-sway columns.10.1).13. moment magnification factor δs for moments causing side-sway is taken as unity (ACI 10. Mux.6). is taken as 1 because the component moments Ms and Mns are obtained from a “second order elastic (P-delta) analysis” (ACI R10.3.0.4. The sway components are identified by the “s” subscripts. δs and for non-sway (individual column stability effect). δs.4 dead load + 1.03h) inches.3. and are related to the cause of side sway. and Muy. giving Pu.11. See also White and Hajjar (1991).4. which are identified by “ns” subscripts. R10. R10. R10.11). (ACI 10. The default moment of inertia factor in this program is 1.10.2).13). Technical Note 20 . The program assumes that it performs a P-delta analysis and.13.13.Column Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Determine Factored Moments and Forces The factored loads for a particular load combination are obtained by applying the corresponding load factors to all the load cases. This βd for sway frame in second-order analysis is different from the one that is defined later for non-sway moment magnification (ACI 10. R10.10.

Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Column Design The computed moments are further amplified for individual column stability effect (ACI 10.12.0. where (ACI 10.1). associated with the major or minor direction of the column is given by (ACI 10. The above expression of Cm is valid if there is no transverse load applied between the supports.13.1) Ma and Mb are the moments at the ends of the column. or the length is overwritten.5) by the nonsway moment magnification factor. The non-sway moment magnification factor. where Pu 1− 0.75Pc Ma ≥ 0. lu is the unsupported length of the column for the direction of bending considered.4 (ACI 10.3. If transverse load is present on the span.3) Mc is the factored moment to be used in design.4.12. corresponding to instability in the minor and major directions of the element. The two unsupported lengths are l22 and l33.12. respectively. Ma / Mb is positive for single curvature bending and negative for double curvature bending. Mb (ACI 10. the program allows the user to override this value (ACI 10. 10. however. These are the lengths Calculate Column Capacity Ratio Technical Note 20 .3) Cm = 0.3) k is conservatively taken as 1.12.12.3. See Figure 4. Cm=1. and Mb is numerically larger than Ma.12. Pc = π 2 EI (kl u )2 .3) δns = Cm ≤ 1. δns.6 +0. where (ACI 10.7 . δns.12. The user can overwrite Cm on an element-byelement basis. as follows: Mc = δnsM.

75Pc. Technical Note 20 . Therefore. must be a positive number and greater than one.75Pc.12. If Pu is found to be greater than or equal to 0. where (ACI 10. δns.R10.3) βd = maximum factored axial sustained (dead) load maximum factored axial total load (ACI 10.8 Calculate Column Capacity Ratio .12. EI is associated with a particular column direction: EI = 0.0.Column Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Figure 4 Axes of Bending and Unsupported Length between the support points of the element in the corresponding directions.4E c I g 1 + βd . a failure condition is declared. Pu must be less than 0.3) The magnification factor.

a capacity ratio is calculated. The maximum of all the values of CR calculated from each load combination is reported for each check station of the column along with the controlling Pu. however. If the program assumptions are not satisfactory for a particular member. the point lies outside the interaction volume and the column is overstressed. the column capacity is adequate. The capacity ratio is basically a factor that gives an indication of the stress condition of the column with respect to the capacity of the column. This point is determined by three-dimensional linear interpolation between the points that define the failOL ure surface. Cm. CR. lu. If OL < OC (or CR<1). The point (Pu. the point lies within the interaction volume and the column capacity is adequate. See Figure 5. That means that δs. Determine Capacity Ratio As a measure of the stress condition of the column. the user can explicitly specify values of δs and δns. Mux. Calculate Column Capacity Ratio Technical Note 20 . and Muy.Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Column Design The above calculations are performed for major and minor directions separately. OC If OL = OC (or CR=1). If OL > OC (or CR>1). if the point lies outside the interaction volume. is given by the ratio . the column is overstressed. the moment magnification factors are applied to the factored loads to obtain Pu. and Pc assume different values for major and minor directions of bending. Mux. If the point lies within the interaction volume. Muy) is then placed in the interaction space shown as point L in Figure 5. The point C is defined as the point where the line OL (if extended outwards) will intersect the failure surface. Before entering the interaction diagram to check the column capacity. δns. k. The capacity ratio. EI. This capacity ratio is achieved by plotting the point L and determining the location of point C. the point lies on the interaction surface and the column is stressed to capacity.9 . Mux. and Muy set and associated load combination number.

" Design Column Shear Reinforcement The shear reinforcement is designed for each load combination in the major and minor directions of the column. calculated as described in the previous section entitled "Calculate Column Capacity Ratio.Column Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Figure 5 Geometric Representation of Column Capacity Ratio Required Reinforcing Area If the reinforcing area is not defined. the program computes the reinforcement that will give a column capacity ratio of one.10 Required Reinforcing Area . The following steps are involved in designing the shear reinforcing for a particular column for a particular load combination resulting from shear forces in a particular direction: Technical Note 20 .

Vu. Vu. the factored axial load.1) where. + − the positive and negative moment capacities. Vc.e. in a particular direction is calculated from the probable moment capacities of the column associated with the factored axial force acting on the column. Effects of the axial forces on the column moment capacities are included in the formulation. Vp is the capacity shear force obtained by applying the calculated probable ultimate moment capacities at the two ends of the column acting Design Column Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 20 . is calculated.1) Vu = Vp + VD+L (ACI 21. of the column in a particular direction under the influence of the axial force Pu is calculated using the uniaxial interaction diagram in the corresponding direction. For each load combination. in addition to the factored moments. is then given by (ACI 21. For Special and Intermediate moment resisting frames (Ductile frames). Then. namely. Pu. In the shear design of Special moment resisting frames (i. Determine Section Forces In the design of the column shear reinforcement of an Ordinary moment resisting concrete frame.4. Mu and Mu .Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Column Design Determine the factored forces acting on the section. seismic design).4. respectively.11 .5. The capacity shear force in a column. in a particular direction are obtained by factoring the program analysis load cases with the corresponding load combination factors. that can be resisted by concrete alone. Determine the shear force. the column is checked for capacity shear in addition to the requirement for the Ordinary moment resisting frames. the forces for a particular load combination. the column axial force. and the column shear force. Calculate the reinforcement steel required to carry the balance. Note that Pu is needed for the calculation of Vc.5. Vp. Pu and Vu. the shear design of the columns is also based on the Probable moment and nominal moment capacities of the members. The following three sections describe in detail the algorithms associated with this process.. The design shear force. Pu.

b). For most of the columns.0). except that α is taken equal to 1 rather than 1.0) moment capacity and modified factored shear force. = Positive and negative moment capacities at end J of the column using a steel yield stress value of αfy and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1. the shear capacity of the column is also checked for the capacity shear based on the nominal moment capacities at the ends and the factored gravity loads. R21. MI .3.3.10).0.Column Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 in two opposite directions. in addition to the check required for Ordinary moment resisting frames.10.12 Design Column Shear Reinforcement .1). where L + − MI . Therefore. MJ . The procedure for calculating nominal moment capacity is the same as that for computing the probable moment capacity for special moment resisting frames. The design shear force is taken to be the minimum of that based on the nominal (ϕ = 1. + − MJ . the shear force carried by the concrete.10.a. and L = Clear span of column. Vp is the maximum of VP1 and VP2 . Vc. R21. and L + − MI + M J . where VP1 = VP2 = − + MI + M J . Determine Concrete Shear Capacity Given the design force set Pu and Vu. = Positive and negative moment capacities at end I of the column using a steel yield stress value of αfy and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1. The modified factored shear forces are based on the specified load factors.25 (ACI 10. For Intermediate moment resisting frames.0).4. except the earthquake load factors are doubled (ACI 21. VD+L is the contribution of shear force from the in-span distribution of gravity loads. it is zero.5. For Special moment resisting frames α is taken as 1.25 (ACI 21. is calculated as follows: Technical Note 20 .

where   (ACI 11.3). which is shown shaded in Figure 6. Pu is positive.Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Column Design If the column is subjected to axial compression. Acv is taken to be equal to the gross area of the section (ACI 11. is small (Pu < f c' Ag / 20) and if the shear force contribution from earthquake. (Vu / ϕ-Vc) ≤ 8 f c' Acv (ACI 11.3) Vu is limited by the following relationship.000 Ag  f c' ≤ 100 psi.2.3.  Pu Vc = 2 f c' 1 +  2.5.5Vu) (ACI 21.3. for rectangular columns and f ys d (Vu / ϕ − Vc )s .2) (ACI 11. Acv is the effective shear area.9) Design Column Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 20 .5. s.8D) (ACI 11.3.3.5.1. 11. For circular columns.3) For Special moment resisting concrete frame design. is more than half of the total factored maximum shear force over the length of the member Vu (VE ≥ 0.1.5.1. Pu is negative Vc = 2 f c'  1 + Pu  500 Ag    Acv ≥ 0   (ACI 11.3.4.e. R11.3. Vc is set to zero if the factored axial compressive force.2) Av = (ACI 11.3. and Vc ≤ 3.2).6.5 f c'  1 + Pu  500 Ag    Acv. the required shear reinforcement in the form of stirrups or ties within a spacing. i. f ys (0.2. VE.2) The term Pu / Ag must have psi units. including the earthquake effect. Determine Required Shear Reinforcement Given Vu and Vc. for circular columns. 11.5.13 .6.. is given for rectangular and circular columns by Av = (Vu / ϕ − Vc )s .     Acv.6.6.2) (ACI 11. If the column is subjected to axial tension. Pu.3.

Any minimum stirrup requirements to satisfy spacing considerations or transverse reinforcement volumetric considerations must be investigated independently of the program by the user.3. The maximum of all the calculated Av values obtained from each load combination are reported for the major and minor directions of the column. Acv Otherwise.3). the strength reduction factor. The column shear reinforcement requirements reported by the program are based purely on shear strength consideration.14 Design Column Shear Reinforcement . Here ϕ. redimensioning of the concrete section is required.Column Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Figure 6 Shear Stress Area. along with the controlling shear force and associated load combination label.2.85 (ACI 9. is 0. Technical Note 20 .

and J. Engineering Journal. Vol. Reference Technical Note 20 .Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Column Design Reference White. 4. D. No.15 .F. Application of Second-Order Elastic Analysis in LRFD: Research to Practice. 1991. Hajjar.W. American Institute of Steel Construction. Inc. 28.

.

load combination factors and other criteria described herein. the program calculates and reports the required areas of steel for flexure and shear based on the beam moments. load combination factors. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI-318-99 Technical Note 21 Beam Design This Technical Note describes how this program completes beam design when the ACI 318-99 code is selected. Overview In the design of concrete beams. The following steps are involved in designing the flexural reinforcement for the major moment for a particular beam for a particular section: Determine the maximum factored moments Determine the reinforcing steel Overview Technical Note 21 . INC. The beam design procedure involves the following steps: Design beam flexural reinforcement Design beam shear reinforcement Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement The beam top and bottom flexural steel is designed at check/design stations along the beam span. minor direction bending. The reinforcement requirements are calculated at a user-defined number of check/design stations along the beam span.. Effects resulting from any axial forces. and other criteria described below. All beams are designed for major direction flexure and shear only.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. shears.1 . BERKELEY. and torsion that may exist in the beams must be investigated independently by the user. shears. The program calculates and reports the required areas of steel for flexure and shear based on the beam moments.

It is assumed that the compression carried by concrete is less than 0. the program calculates both the tension and compression reinforcement.1 f c' Ag (ACI 10. Intermediate. Determine Required Flexural Reinforcement In the flexural reinforcement design process.3.75 times that which can be carried at the balanced condition (ACI 10. or Ordinary moment resisting concrete frame beams. the area of compression reinforcement is calculated assuming that the additional moment will be carried by compression and additional tension reinforcement. the width. In such cases. It is assumed that the design ultimate axial force does not exceed 0. When the applied moment exceeds the moment capacity at this designed balanced condition. The design procedure is based on the simplified rectangular stress block as shown in Figure 1 (ACI 10.or a T-beam. hence.Beam Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Determine Factored Moments In the design of flexural reinforcement of Special. The user has the option of avoiding the compression reinforcement by increasing the effective depth. or the grade of concrete.2 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement . Technical Note 21 . the beam is always designed as a rectangular section.3. In such cases. Positive beam moments produce bottom steel. + The beam section is then designed for the maximum positive M u and maxi− mum negative M u factored moments obtained from all of the load combina- tions. Negative beam moments produce top steel. the beam may be designed as a Rectangular. the factored moments for each load combination at a particular beam section are obtained by factoring the corresponding moments for different load cases with the corresponding load factors.2). Compression reinforcement is added when the applied design moment exceeds the maximum moment capacity of a singly reinforced section.3). all the beams are designed for major direction flexure and shear only. The design procedure used by this program for both rectangular and flanged sections (L.3).and T-beams) is summarized below.

000    cb = εc Es 87. designing top or bottom steel). 0.1) in the above and the following equations.e.Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Beam Design Figure 1 Design of Rectangular Beam Section Design for Rectangular Beam In designing for a factored negative or positive moment.7.65 ≤ β1 ≤ 0.05  c  1. the value of ϕ is 0.000 d = d.85-0.3) (ACI 10.000 + f y ε c E s + fy (ACI 10.3. 10.2. the depth of the compression block is given by a (see Figure 1). β1 = 0.90 (ACI 9.3 .85f c ϕb .000   .1) where.2. where.3.2.85. 87. a=dd2 − 2 Mu 1 0.4) Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Technical Note 21 .. Also β1 and cb are calculated as follows:  f ' − 4.2.2.7. (ACI 10. Mu (i.

or at the top if Mu is negative.4) The required tensile steel for balancing the compression in concrete is Technical Note 21 .2.003Es  .1.   Therefore the moment resisted by compression steel and tensile steel is Mus = Mu . compression reinforcement is required (ACI 10.3) If a ≤ amax. If a > amax.2. − So the required compression steel is given by ' As = M us f s' (d − d' )ϕ .3.1) the moment resisted by concrete compression and tensile steel is a  Muc = C  d − max  2  −   ϕ.  c  − (ACI 10.85 f c' bamax.7.7.2.4 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement . and (ACI 10.3. (ACI 10. 10.75β1cb.Muc. the area of tensile steel reinforcement is then given by As = Mu a  ϕf y  d −  2  . This steel is to be placed at the bottom if Mu is positive.Beam Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 The maximum allowed depth of the compression block is given by amax = 0. where  c − d'  f s' = 0.3) and is calculated as follows: − The compressive force developed in concrete alone is given by C = 0.

See Figure 2. the total tensile reinforcement. in this case the width of the compression flange is taken as the width of the beam for analysis. and total ' ' compression reinforcement is As .. no T-Beam data is to be used.5 . The maximum allowed depth of compression block is given by amax = 0.85f c' ϕbf . Design for T-Beam In designing for a factored negative moment. the calculation of the steel area is exactly the same as above. the subsequent calculations for As are exactly the same as previously defined for the rectangular section design.3) • If a ≤ ds. i. (ACI 10.bw)ds. If Mu > 0. Cf.3. If a > ds.75β1cb.85 f c' (bf .. As = As1 + As2. The first part is for balancing the compressive force from the flange. and vice versa if Mu is negative. designing top steel). and the second part is for balancing the compressive force from the web. as shown in Figure 2. Compression reinforcement is required if a > amax.2. calculation for As is performed in two parts.7. 10. Cf is given by Cf = 0.Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Beam Design As1 = M uc a   f y d − max  ϕ 2   . Mu (i.e. the depth of the compression block is given by a=dd2 − 2Mu 0. f y (d − d' )ϕ − Therefore. Cw. • Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Technical Note 21 .e. As is to be placed at bottom and As is to be placed at top if Mu is positive. and the tensile steel for balancing the compression in steel is given by As2 = M us . However.1.

the value for ϕ is ϕ(flexure).  2    Again. As1 = given by d   Muf = Cf  d − s  ϕ. The web is a rectangular section of dimensions bw and d. and Technical Note 21 .Muf. Mu to be carried by the web is given by Muw = Mu . Cf fy and the portion of Mu that is resisted by the flange is If a1 ≤ amax.90 by default. which is 0. Therefore. for which the design depth of the compression block is recalculated as a1 = d d2 − 2Muw 0. the balance of the moment.Beam Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Figure 2 Design of a T-Beam Section Therefore. the area of tensile steel reinforcement is then given by As2 = Muw a   ϕf y  d − 1   2    .6 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement .85f ci ϕbw .

and amax )ϕ f y (d − 2 the tensile steel for balancing compression in steel is As3 = Mus .3. where  c − d'  f s' = 0.2. − Therefore. compression reinforcement is required (ACI 10. and  2    the moment resisted by compression steel and tensile steel is Mus = Muw .003Es  .85 f c' bamax.  c  − (ACI 10.3) and is calculated as follows: − The compressive force in web concrete alone is given by C = 0. If a1 > amax. This steel is to be placed at the bottom of the T-beam. the compression steel is computed as ' As = Mus f s' (d − d' )ϕ .7. (ACI 10.4) The tensile steel for balancing compression in web concrete is As2 = Muc . f y (d − d' )ϕ Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement Technical Note 21 .1) − Therefore.Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Beam Design As = As1 + As2. the moment resisted by concrete web and tensile steel is a   Muc = C  d − max ϕ .2.Muc.7 .

3) The beam flexural steel is limited to a maximum given by As ≤ 0.. (ACI 10. associated with the top steel) at that end (ACI 21.2. Neither the negative moment capacity nor the positive moment capacity at any of the sections within the beam would be less than 1/4 of the Technical Note 21 . the beam design satisfies the following additional conditions (see also Table 1): The minimum longitudinal reinforcement shall be provided at both the top and bottom.5.3) Special Consideration for Seismic Design For Special moment resisting concrete frames (seismic design). Any of the top and bottom reinforcement shall not be less than As(min) (ACI 21.e. associated with the bottom steel) would not be less than 1/2 of the beam negative moment capacity (i. (ACI 21. As is to be placed at bottom and ' As is to be placed at top.8 Design Beam Flexural Reinforcement .5.1)..1) (ACI 10.2).5.1) (ACI 10. 3 f '  200   c As(min) ≥ max  bw d and bw d  or fy fy     As(min) ≥ 4 As(required). As = As1 + As2 + As3.025 bwd.e.3. 3 (ACI 10.2. and total ' compression reinforcement is As .2.Beam Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 − The total tensile reinforcement. the beam positive moment capacity (i.5.1) At any end (support) of the beam. Minimum Tensile Reinforcement The minimum flexural tensile steel provided in a rectangular section in an Ordinary moment resisting frame is given by the minimum of the two following limits:  3 f ' 200   c As ≥ max  bw d and bw d  or fy fy     As ≥ (4/3)As(required).3.3.

The following steps are involved in designing the shear reinforcement for a particular beam for a particular load combination at a particular station due to the beam major shear: • • • Determine the factored shear force. in addition to the factored load design. Determine the shear force.. seismic design).2).e.3.4. the beam design would satisfy the following conditions: At any support of the beam. that can be resisted by the concrete. Neither the negative moment capacity nor the positive moment capacity at any of the sections within the beam would be less than 1/5 of the maximum of positive or negative moment capacities of any of the beam end (support) stations (ACI 21.4. Design Beam Shear Reinforcement The shear reinforcement is designed for each load combination at a user defined number of stations along the beam span.10. Design Beam Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 21 . the shear design of the beams is also based upon the probable and nominal moment capacities of the members.Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Beam Design maximum of positive or negative moment capacities of any of the beam end (support) stations (ACI 21.1).9 .1). respectively. The following three sections describe in detail the algorithms associated with this process. Vc. For Special and Intermediate moment resisting frames (ductile frames). Vu. Determine the reinforcement steel required to carry the balance. For Intermediate moment resisting concrete frames (i.10. the beam positive moment capacity would not be less than 1/3 of the beam negative moment capacity at that end (ACI 21.2.

0 plus VD+L Vc = 0 Checked for shear Joint Design Beam/Column Capacity Ratio No Requirement No Requirement No Requirement Reported in output file NLDa = Number of specified loading Technical Note 21 . Moment Override Check + M uEND ≥ No Requirement + MuSPAN − M uSPAN { 1 ≥ max{ M 5 1 − M u END 3 1 + − ≥ max M u .0 and ϕ = 1. ρ ≥ 200 fy Beam Min. Mu 4 END − u END Beam Design Shear NLDa Combinations Modified NLDa Combinations (earthquake loads doubled) Beam Capacity Shear (Vp) with α = 1.25 and ϕ = 1.0 plus VD+L No Requirement NLDa Combinations Beam Capacity Shear (Vp) with α = 1.0 NLDa Combinations α = 1.25 NLDa Combinations ρ ≤ 0. M u 5 + M uEND ≥ + − u .Beam Design Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Table 1 Design Criteria Table Type of Check/ Design Column Check (interaction) Column Design (interaction) Ordinary Moment Resisting Frames (non-Seismic) NLDa Combinations Intermediate Moment Resisting Frames (Seismic) NLDa Combinations Special Moment Resisting Frames (Seismic) NLDa Combinations NLDa Combinations 1% < ρ < 8% NLDa Combinations 1% < ρ < 8% Modified NLDa Combinations (earthquake loads doubled) Column capacity ϕ = 1.0 1% < ρ < 6% NLDa Combinations Column shear capacity ϕ = 1.025 ρ≥ 3 f c' fy Column Shears NLDa Combinations Beam Design Flexure NLDa Combinations NLDa Combinations .10 Design Beam Shear Reinforcement . M } M 4 − u 1 − M u END 2 1 + − ≥ max Mu .0 and α = 1.0 and α = 1. M u END } } END + MuSPAN − MuSPAN { } 1 ≥ max{ .

where L = = Moment capacity at end I. The design shear force Vu is then given by (ACI 21. seismic design). with bottom steel in tension. Design Beam Shear Reinforcement Technical Note 21 . See also Table 1 for details.e. + MJ = Moment capacity at end J.11 . Vp. Vp is the maximum of VP1 and VP2 .3.1) • where Vp is the capacity shear force obtained by applying the calculated probable ultimate moment capacities at the two ends of the beams acting in two opposite directions. the shear capacity of the beam is also checked for the capacity shear resulting from the probable moment capacities at the ends and the factored gravity load. This check is performed in addition to the design check required for Ordinary moment resisting frames. Therefore.4.3.0).Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99 Beam Design Determine Shear Force and Moment • In the design of the beam shear reinforcement of an Ordinary moment resisting concrete frame. The procedure for calculating the design shear force in a beam from probable moment capacity is the same as that described for a column in section “Design Column Shear Reinforcement” of Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Technical Note 20 Column Design. is calculated from the probable moment capacities of each end of the beam and the gravity shear forces. the shear forces and moments for a particular load combination at a particular beam section are obtained by factoring the associated shear forces and moments with the corresponding load combination factors. In the design of Special moment resisting concrete frames (i.1) Vu = Vp + VD+L (ACI 21. The capacity shear force.4. using a steel yield stress value of αfy and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1. using a steel yield stress value of αfy and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1.0). with top steel in tension. and L + − MI + MJ .. where VP1 VP2 − MI = − + MI + MJ .

Beam Design

Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99

+ MI

= Moment capacity at end I, with bottom steel in tension, using a steel yield stress value of αfy and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1.0),

− MJ

= Moment capacity at end J, with top steel in tension, using a
steel yield stress value of αfy and no ϕ factors (ϕ = 1.0), and = Clear span of beam.

L

For Special moment resisting frames α is taken as 1.25 (ACI 21.0, R21.3.4.1). VD+L is the contribution of shear force from the in-span distribution of gravity loads.

For Intermediate moment resisting frames, the shear capacity of the beam is also checked for the capacity shear based on the nominal moment capacities at the ends and the factored gravity loads, in addition to the check required for Ordinary moment resisting frames. The design shear force in beams is taken to be the minimum of that based on the nominal moment capacity and modified factored shear force. The procedure for calculating nominal (ϕ = 1.0) moment capacity is the same as that for computing the probable moment capacity for Special moment resisting frames, except that α is taken equal to 1 rather than 1.25 (ACI 21.10.3.a, R21.10). The modified factored shear forces are based on the specified load factors, except the earthquake load factors are doubled (ACI 21.10.3.b). The computation of the design shear force in a beam of an Intermediate moment resisting frame is the same as described for columns in section “Determine Section Forces” of Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Technical Note 20 Column Design. See also Table 1 for details.

Determine Concrete Shear Capacity
The allowable concrete shear capacity is given by Vc = 2 f c' bwd. (ACI 11.3.1.1)

For Special moment resisting frame concrete design, Vc is set to zero if both the factored axial compressive force, including the earthquake effect Pu, is less than f c' Ag/20 and the shear force contribution from earthquake VE is more than half of the total maximum shear force over the length of the member Vu (i.e., VE ≥ 0.5Vu) (ACI 21.3.4.2).

Technical Note 21 - 12

Design Beam Shear Reinforcement

Concrete Frame Design ACI-318-99

Beam Design

Determine Required Shear Reinforcement
Given Vu and Vc, the required shear reinforcement in area/unit length is calculated as Av = (Vu / ϕ − Vc )s . f ys d (ACI 11.5.6.1, 11.5.6.2)

The shear force resisted by steel is limited by (Vu / ϕ - Vc) ≤ 8 f c' bd. (ACI 11.5.6.9)

Otherwise, redimensioning of the concrete section is required. Here, ϕ, the strength reduction factor for shear, is 0.85 by default (ACI 9.3.2.3). The maximum of all the calculated Av values, obtained from each load combination, is reported along with the controlling shear force and associated load combination number. The beam shear reinforcement requirements displayed by the program are based purely on shear strength considerations. Any minimum stirrup requirements to satisfy spacing and volumetric considerations must be investigated independently of the program by the user.

Design Beam Shear Reinforcement

Technical Note 21 - 13

Overview Technical Note 22 .1 . BERKELEY. INC. Only joints having a column below the joint are designed. Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force Figure 1 illustrates the free body stress condition of a typical beam-column intersection for a column direction. Overview To ensure that the beam-column joint of special moment resisting frames possesses adequate shear strength. The material properties of the joint are assumed to be the same as those of the column below the joint. The program then checks this against design shear strength. The joint analysis is completed in the major and the minor directions of the column. major or minor. The program then checks this against design shear strength. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI318-99 Technical Note 22 Joint Design This Technical Note explains how the program performs a rational analysis of the beam-column panel zone to determine the shear forces that are generated in a joint..©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. Vuh Determine the effective area of the joint Check panel zone shear stress The algorithms associated with these three steps are described in detail in the following three sections. the program performs a rational analysis of the beam-column panel zone to determine the shear forces that are generated in the joint. The joint design procedure involves the following steps: Determine the panel zone design shear force.

Joint Design Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Figure 1 Beam-Column Joint Analysis Technical Note 22 .2 Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force .

that can be carried by the beam. MuL and MuR.1. Vu. as follows: Determine the Panel Zone Shear Force Technical Note 22 . The program calculates the joint shear force Vuh by resolving the moments into C and T forces.1.85f ' c bd Mmax = C max d 2 Then the program conservatively determines C and T forces as follows:  abs( M )   C = T = C max 1 − 1 −  M max    The program resolves the moments and the C and T forces from beams that frame into the joint in a direction that is not parallel to the major or minor directions of the column along the direction that is being investigated. UBC 1921. the program calculates the C and T for the positive and negative moments. The C and T force are based on these moment capacities.Vu The location of C or T forces is determined by the direction of the moment. Also. The forces that act on the joint are Pu. considering the fact that the concrete cover may be different for the direction of moment.5. from the column framing into the top of the joint. C max = 0. respectively. The program calculates the column shear force Vu from the beam moment capacities. Mmax. The program first calculates the maximum compression. and no ϕ factors) of the beams framing into the joint (ACI 21.1).3 .1. In the design of special moment resisting concrete frames. ignoring compression reinforcement as follows. The magnitude of C or T forces is conservatively determined using basic principles of ultimate strength theory. Vuh = TL + TR . α. The moments MuL and MuR are obtained from the beams framing into the joint. thereby contributing force components to the analysis. The forces Pu and Vu are axial force and shear force. Cmax.Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Joint Design The force Vuh is the horizontal panel zone shear force that is to be calculated. the evaluation of the design shear force is based on the moment capacities (with reinforcing steel overstrength factor. Noting that TL = CL and TR = CR.5. and the maximum moment.

the above assumptions may be unconservative and the user should investigate the acceptability of the particular joint.5. If there is no column at the top of the joint. Determine the Effective Area of Joint The joint area that resists the shear forces is assumed always to be rectangular in plan view. It should be noted that the points of inflection shown on Figure 2 are taken as midway between actual lateral support points for the columns.3). UBC 1921.Joint Design Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Vu = Mu + Mu H L R See Figure 2.3): v = { 20ϕ 15ϕ 12ϕ f 'c f 'c f 'c for joints confirmed on all four sides for joints confirmed on three faces or on two opposite faces for all other joints Technical Note 22 .5. the shear force from the top of the column is taken as zero. except if the beam framing into the joint is very narrow. The effects of load reversals. The joint area for joint shear along the major and minor directions is calculated separately (ACI R21. are investigated and the design is based on the maximum of the joint shears obtained from the two cases.5. The dimensions of the rectangle correspond to the major and minor dimensions of the column below the joint. The area of the joint is assumed not to exceed the area of the column below. Check Panel Zone Shear Stress The panel zone shear stress is evaluated by dividing the shear force Vuh by the effective area of the joint and comparing it with the following design shear strengths (ACI 21.3. The effective width of the joint area to be used in the calculation is limited to the width of the beam plus the depth of the column. as illustrated in Case 1 and Case 2 of Figure 1.4 Determine the Effective Area of Joint . It should be noted that if the beam frames into the joint eccentrically.

5.1.85 (by default).2.Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Joint Design Figure 2 Column Shear Force Vu where ϕ = 0.4. Determine the Effective Area of Joint Technical Note 22 .1).5 .1909.3. UBC 1909.3. (ACI 9.3.3. UBC 1921.2.1) A beam that frames into a face of a column at the joint is considered in this program to provide confinement to the joint if at least three-quarters of the face of the joint is covered by the framing member (ACI 21.3.3.5.3.

2) The capacities are calculated with no reinforcing overstrength factor. the program will calculate the ratio of the sum of the beam moment capacities to the sum of the column moment capacities (ACI 21.2). The column capacity summation includes the column above and the column below the joint. the program reports the joint shear. see Figure 3. using the uniaxial column interaction diagram. factor f c' . the moment capacity of each column under the influence of the corresponding axial load Pu is then determined separately for the major and minor directions of the column. the axial force.4.Joint Design Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 For light-weight aggregate concrete.5.2) minf cs. the joint shear stress. The beam capacities are calculated for reversed situations (Cases 1 and 2) as illustrated in Figure 1 and the maximum summation obtained is used.4. The moment capacities of beams that frame into the joint in a direction that is not parallel to the major or minor direction of the column are resolved along the direction that is being investigated and the resolved components are added to the summation. The maximum capacity summations obtained from all of the load combinations is used for the beam/column capacity ratio. α .3.3 / 4 f c'      For joint design. Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios At a particular joint for a particular column direction.5. For each load combination. For each load combination.2. in each of the columns is calculated from the program analysis load combinations. and including ϕ factors.2.6 Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios .3. major or minor. Pu. UBC 1921.2. the allowable joint shear stress and a capacity ratio. Technical Note 22 . the design shear strength of the joint is reduced in the program to at least three-quarters of that of the normal weight concrete by replacing the f c' with (ACI 21. ∑Me ≥ 6 ∑Mg 5 (ACI 21. The moment capacities of the two columns are added to give the capacity summation for the corresponding load combination.

Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Joint Design The beam/column flexural capacity ratios are only reported for Special Moment-Resisting Frames involving seismic design load combinations. a warning message is printed in the output file. Figure 3 Moment Capacity Mu at a Given Axial Load Pu Beam/Column Flexural Capacity Ratios Technical Note 22 .7 . If this ratio is greater than 5/6.

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The column headings for input data and a description of what is included in the columns of the tables are provided in Table 1 of this Technical Note. A printout of the input data provides the user with the opportunity to carefully review the parameters that have been input into the program and upon which program design is based. Load combination scale factor. Tensile strength reduction factor. INC. Further information about using the Print Design Tables form is presented at the end of this Technical Note.. The input can be printed to a printer or to a text file when you click the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command. superimposed dead. Name of load case. See Technical Note 8. Load Combination Multipliers Code Preferences Phi_bending Phi_tension Phi_compression (Tied) Phi_compression (Spiral) Phi_shear Input Data Technical Note 23 . Load type: dead. earthquake. snow. Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data COLUMN HEADING Combo Type Case Factor DESCRIPTION Design load combination. reduced live load. BERKELEY. Shear strength reduction factor.1 . CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI318-99 Technical Note 23 Input Data This Technical Note describes the concrete frame design input data for ACI318-99. Compressive strength reduction factor for reinforced columns. other. live. Input Data The program provides the printout of the input data in a series of tables. Bending strength reduction factor. Compressive strength reduction factor for tied columns.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. wind.

Bending reinforcing steel yield strength. steel. Technical Note 23 . default = 1. Material Design Data for Concrete Materials Concrete Column Property Data Section Label Mat Label Column Depth Column Width Rebar Pattern Concrete Cover Bar Area Layout of main flexural reinforcing steel. Minimum clear concrete cover. Label applied to section.2 Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data . other. Concrete. steel. other.Input Data Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION Concrete. Used to calculate self-mass of structure. Concrete. Shear reinforcing steel yield strength. Used to calculate self-weight of structure. other.0. Material label. Area of individual reinforcing bar to be used. Shear strength reduction factor for light weight concrete. Material Property Mass and Weight Material Name Mass Per Unit Vol Weight Per Unit Vol Material Name Lightweight Concrete Concrete FC Rebar FY Rebar FYS Lightwt Reduc Fact Concrete compressive strength. Isotropic or orthotropic. steel. Material Property Data Material Name Material Type Design Type Modulus of Elasticity Poisson's Ratio Thermal Coeff Shear Modulus Coefficient of thermal expansion.

Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Input Data Table 1 Concrete Frame Design Input Data COLUMN HEADING Story ID Column Line Section ID Framing Type RLLF Factor L_Ratio Major L_Ratio Minor K Major K Minor Story ID Bay ID Section ID Framing type RLLF Factor L_Ratio Major L_Ratio Minor Unbraced length about major axis. click the Print to File check box on the Print Design Tables form. default = 1. DESCRIPTION Column assigned to story level at top of column. Click the Cancel button rather than the OK button to cancel the print.0. Story level at which beam occurs. use the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command and click the check box on the Print Design Tables form. Unbraced length about minor axis. Concrete Column Design Element Information Concrete Beam Design Element Information Using the Print Design Tables Form To print concrete frame design input data directly to a printer. Section number assigned to beam. Lateral or gravity. Use the File menu > Print Setup command and the Setup>> button to change printers. default = 1. Lateral or gravity. if necessary. Unbraced length about major axis. Unbraced length about minor axis. Grid lines locating beam. Name of section assigned to column. Click the OK button to send the print to your printer. Effective length factor.0. Effective length factor. Click the Filename>> button to change Using the Print Design Tables Form Technical Note 23 . To print concrete frame design input data to a file.3 . Grid line.

g.4 Using the Print Design Tables Form . Note: The File menu > Display Input/Output Text Files command is useful for displaying output that is printed to a text file.Input Data Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 the path or filename. If you select a specific frame element(s) before using the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command. . Data will be added to this file. Technical Note 23 . .xls. The Append check box allows you to add data to an existing file. Use the appropriate file extension for the desired format (e.txt. and when the Open File for Printing Tables caution box appears. the Selection Only check box will be checked. click Yes to replace the existing file. Or use the Filename>> button to locate another file. The print will be for the selected beam(s) only..doc). Click the OK buttons on the Open File for Printing Tables form and the Print Design Tables form to complete the request. . The path and filename of the current file is displayed in the box near the bottom of the Print Design Tables form.

Table 1 Concrete Column Design Output Technical Note 24 . Table 1 Concrete Column Design Output COLUMN HEADING Story ID Column Line Section ID Station ID DESCRIPTION Column assigned to story level at top of column. Further information about using the Print Design Tables form is presented at the end of this Technical Note. BERKELEY. Load combination for which the reinforcing is designed. Shear reinforcing required. INC. Name of section assigned to column. Grid lines. The column headings for output data and a description of what is included in the columns of the tables are provided in Table 1 of this Technical Note.©COMPUTERS AND STRUCTURES. The program provides the output data in a series of tables. Biaxial P-M Interaction and Shear Design of Column-Type Elements Required Reinforcing Longitudinal Combo Shear22 Combo Shear33 Area of longitudinal reinforcing required..1 . Shear reinforcing required. The design output is printed when you click the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command and select Output Summary on the Print Design Tables form. CALIFORNIA DECEMBER 2001 CONCRETE FRAME DESIGN ACI318-99 Technical Note 24 Output Details This Technical Note describes the concrete frame design output for ACI318-99 that can be printed to a printer or to a text file. Load combination for which the reinforcing is designed.

Load combination upon which the ratio of factored load versus allowed capacity is based. Assigned section name. Load combination upon which the ratio of beam moment capacity to column capacity is based. Beam-Column Capacity Ratios Major Combo Ratio of beam moment capacity to column capacity. Minor Combo Technical Note 24 .2 Table 2 Concrete Column Joint Output . Ratio of beam moment capacity to column capacity.Output Details Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Table 1 Concrete Column Design Output COLUMN HEADING Combo DESCRIPTION Load combination for which the reinforcing is designed. Grid line. Minor Combo Joint Shear Capacity Ratios Major Combo Ratio of factored load versus allowed capacity. Load combination upon which the ratio of beam moment capacity to column capacity is based. Table 2 Concrete Column Joint Output COLUMN HEADING DESCRIPTION Beam to Column Capacity Ratios and Joint Shear Capacity Check Story ID Column Line Section ID Story level at which joint occurs. Load combination upon which the ratio of factored load versus allowed capacity is based. Ratio of factored load versus allowed capacity.

. Click the Filename>> button to change the path or filename.. the Selection Only check box will be checked. if necessary.g. To print concrete frame design input data to a file. Data will be added to this file. click Yes to replace the existing file.xls. The path and filename of the current file is displayed in the box near the bottom of the Print Design Tables form. Or use the Filename>> button to locate another file. Use the appropriate file extension for the desired format (e. Click the OK button to send the print to your printer. Click the OK buttons on the Open File for Printing Tables form and the Print Design Tables form to complete the request. and when the Open File for Printing Tables caution box appears. The print will be for the selected beam(s) only. . The Append check box allows you to add data to an existing file. use the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command and click the check box on the Print Design Tables form.txt. click the Print to File check box on the Print Design Tables form. Use the File menu > Print Setup command and the Setup>> button to change printers. . Using the Print Design Tables Form Technical Note 24 . If you select a specific frame element(s) before using the File menu > Print Tables > Concrete Frame Design command. Click the Cancel button rather than the OK button to cancel the print. Note: The File menu > Display Input/Output Text Files command is useful for displaying output that is printed to a text file.3 .doc).Concrete Frame Design ACI318-99 Output Details Using the Print Design Tables Form To print concrete frame design input data directly to a printer.

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