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The Lighting Handbook

1st edition, July 2004

The Lighting Handbook

Chapter 1

Lighting fundamentals
Chapter 2

Recommended values for indoor and outdoor lighting
NEW: Based on the new European standards Chapter 3

Luminaires
Chapter 4

Lamps and ballasts
Chapter 5

Lighting and room management, Emergency lighting
Chapter 6

Quickplan – Calculating luminaire quantities
Chapter 7

Lighting refurbishment
Chapter 8

Economic efficiency calculation
Chapter 9

Technical information
Chapter 10

The Lighting Handbook

Notes

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Glare – glare limitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Light colour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 1 Lighting fundamentals What is light? . . . . . . . . Colour rendition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Luminance . . . . . . . . . . 3 4–5 4 5 5 5 6–7 6 6–7 7 8–9 10 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Basic parameters used in lighting . . . . . . . . Illuminance – definition of terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Illuminance . . General quality criteria for lighting . . . . . . Luminous intensity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lighting technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Luminous flux . . The right light – traditional and new quality criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

2 350 450 550 650 750 Wavelength [nm] Wavelength [m] Night Day By day we see in colour.8 0.What is light? Light is that part of the electromagnetic spectrum that is perceived by our eyes. The Lighting Handbook Chapter 1 / 3 .6 0. What is light? Wavelength [m] 10-10 Gamma rays X-rays Ultraviolet Visible light 10-5 Infrared Microwaves 100 Television. while at night we can only see in shades of grey.4 0. VSW Medium waves 105 Radio waves What does the human eye see? Relative spectral brightness perception 1.0 0.

It is a measure of a lamp’s economic efficiency. The luminous efficiency is the ratio of the luminous flux to the electrical power consumed (lm/W). Abbreviation: Unit: φ lm phi lumen 4 / Chapter 1 The Lighting Handbook .Basic parameters used in lighting Luminous flux – Luminous intensity – Illuminance – Luminance Luminous flux φ φ I= Ω φ A E= Lumen [lm] Luminous intensity I Illuminance E Candela [lm/sr]=[cd] Luminance L L= I A Lux [lm/m2]=[lx] L= E Ω [lm/(sr*m2 )]=[cd/m2 ] Luminous flux The luminous flux describes the quantity of light emitted by a light source.

The Lighting Handbook Abbreviation: Unit: L cd/m2 Chapter 1 / 5 . Abbreviation: Unit: Ι cd candela Illuminance Illuminance describes the quantity of luminous flux falling on a surface. Relevant standards specify the required illuminance (e.g. EN 12464 “Lighting of indoor workplaces”). It decreases by the square of the distance (inverse square law). It specifies the brightness of a surface and is essentially dependent on its reflectance (finish and colour). It is represented by the luminous intensity distribution curve (LDC). Illuminance: E(lx) = luminous flux (lm) area (m2) Abbreviation: Unit: E lx lux Luminance The luminance is the only basic lighting parameter that is perceived by the eye.Luminous intensity The luminous intensity describes the quantity of light that is radiated in a particular direction. This is a useful measurement for directive lighting elements such as reflectors.

and can be determined on a case-by-case basis. The maintenance factor accounts for the reduction in luminous flux from lamps. Visual task area: Illuminance levels are specified for specific visual tasks and are designed for the area in which these may take place. Area immediately surrounding the visual task area: Here the illuminance may be one level lower than in the visual task area (e. 6 / Chapter 1 The Lighting Handbook . then the whole room or a specific working area is used to define it. Maintenance factor: The initial value multiplied by the maintenance factor gives the illuminance maintenance value.General quality criteria for lighting The right light – traditional and new quality criteria T R A D I T I O N A L Harmonious brightness distribution Sufficient illumination level Glare limitation Avoidance of reflections Good modelling Correct light colour Appropriate colour rendition Quality criteria Changing lighting situations Personal control Energy efficiency Daylight integration Light as an interior design element N E W Illuminance – definition of terminology Each term corresponds to the new European standards (see Chapter 2 / 2). Illuminance maintenance value Em: Value that the illuminance level must not fall below in the visual task area. See also the chapter on “Economic efficiency calculation”. luminaires and room surfaces in the installation. The visual task area may be a horizontal. If the precise location is not known.g. The maintenance schedule (the cleaning and maintenance intervals for the lamps and installation) must be documented. 300 lx to 500 lx). vertical or inclined plane.

relative illuminance (%) 150 125 100 75 50 25 maintenance value initial value operating time Maintenance value = maintenance factor x initial value Glare – glare limitation Direct glare Reflected glare • luminaires without glare control • very bright surfaces • loss of concentration • more frequent mistakes • fatigue The Lighting Handbook • reflective surfaces • incorrect luminaire arrangement • incorrect workstation position • loss of concentration • more frequent mistakes • fatigue • matching luminaire to workstation (layout) • indirect lighting • matt surfaces Chapter 1 / 7 remedy • luminaires with limited luminance levels • blinds effect cause .

meetings. UGR tables derived from this formula are provided by the manufacturers for glare rating. computer-based work Craft and light industries Heavy industry Railway platforms. which is based on a formula for glare. foyers 8 / Chapter 1 The Lighting Handbook . (psychological) glare is assessed by the unified glare rating method (UGR). It produces a UGR index.25 Lb (1) ( L2 P2 (2) ) The UGR method takes account of all the luminaires in the system that contribute to the glare sensation (2) as well as the brightness of walls and ceilings (1). The Quickplan tables in Chapter 6 and the lighting catalogues contain reference values for specific room sizes. UGR = 8 log 0.Lighting technology Under the new European standard for interior workplace lighting EN 12464. UGR limits (UGRL). writing. The two methods – the one set out in DIN 5035 and the one defined in EN 12464 – produce comparable results. training. It takes account of all the luminaires in a system contributing to the sensation of glare. that must not be exceeded: ≤ 16 ≤ 19 ≤ 22 ≤ 25 ≤ 28 Technical drawing Reading.

Chapter 1 / 9 = 85° 45° 8 103 2 3 4 5 6 8 104 2 Luminance L in cd/m2 16 19 3 4 . The new European standard sets UGR = 19 as the maximum permissible value for offices.Quality class for nominal illuminance (lx) A 1000 750 500 <300 1 2000 1500 1000 750 500 <300 2 2000 1000 500 <300 3 2000 1000 500 <300 25 28 22 8 6 4 3 2 a hs 1 55° A 13 UGRL 85° 75° 65° = 45° The Lighting Handbook The previously used luminance limiting curve method defined in DIN 5035 assesses the mean luminance of the luminaires over a beam angle of 45° to 85°. which is equivalent to the luminance limiting curve for 500 lx in Quality class 1.

300 K – 5.300 K Appearance reddish white blue-ish Association warm intermediate cool The light colour sets the underlying mood of the room! Colour rendition Colour rendition index Ra ≥ 90 80–89 70–79 60–69 40–59 20–39 Daylight Incandescent lamp Compact fluorescent lamp Fluorescent lamp Mercury vapour highpressure lamp Metal halide lamp Sodium vapour highpressure lamp Application examples: Ra ≥ 90: colour inspection Ra 80–89: offices Ra 70–79: electronics industry Ra 60–69: assembly work Ra 40–59: fabrication shop Ra 20–39: warehouses Display format on fluorescent lamps Example 840: 8 Ra ≥ 80 Colour temperature 4.000 K (nw) The Lighting Handbook 40 10 / Chapter 1 . Colour temperature ww nw tw up to 3.300 K 3.Light colour The light colour describes the colour appearance of the light.300 K above 5.

. . . gas and heat plants . . Saw mills . . . Places of public assembly . . . . . . Fuel filling service stations . . . . . . Airports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sports facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Petrochemical and other hazardous industries . . . . . . . Industrial activities and crafts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Educational premises . Industrial sites and storage areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportational areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Health care premises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Off-shore gas and oil structures . . . . . . .Chapter 2 Standard values for indoor and outdoor lighting Standard values for lighting of indoor and outdoor workplaces and sports facility lighting . . . . . electricity. Shipyards and docks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Outdoor workplaces General circulation areas . Parking lots . . . . . . . Power. . . . 2 3 3–7 7 7 8 8–9 9 – 10 10 – 11 11 – 12 13 13 13 13 13 13 14 14 14 14 – 15 15 15 15 16 16 . . . . Canals. . . . . . . . . . . . Offices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Water and sewage plants . . . . . . . . Railway areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . locks and harbours . Building sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Retail premises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Indoor workplaces Traffic zones and general areas inside buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

75 m area 1.g.67 in a clean atmosphere. Austrian standard O 1040.00 m The maintenance factors can be determined on a case-by-case basis from the manufacturer’s data (see also Chapter 8). the following values are recommended as reference maintenance factors for modern technology and three-yearly maintenance: 0. The Ra of the selected lamp must be equal to or greater than this value. If the precise location is not known. EN 12464-1 (April 2003) “Lighting of outdoorwork places”. DIN 67526).Standard values for lighting of indoor and outdoor workplaces and sports facility lighting Em gives the illuminance maintenance values specified in the European standards which partially or completely replace national standards (e. use r flo or-a rea The maintenance factors and schedules for Zumtobel Staff luminaires are given in the Quickplan tables (Chapter 6). and 0.50 in very dirty environments. Where no individual maintenance data is available. “Lighting of indoor workplaces”. EN 12464 specifies that the lighting designer must document the maintenance factor and maintenance schedule. The Lighting Handbook . EN 12193 (September 1999) (see also “Definition of terminology”. Example for an office task area: task height = 0. Swiss lighting standard SLG 8912. Ra is the lower limit for the colour rendition index. UGRL is the upper limit for direct glare. Chapter 1 / 6) Illuminance levels must not fall below the Em maintenance values in the visual task area. DIN 5035. pr EN 12464-2 “Sports facility lighting”. The UGR value calculated in the design process must lie below this (the Quickplan tables give the UGR figure for the luminaire used in a medium-size reference room). the limit should be applied to the whole room or a specific working area.

rolling. engraving. switchboard Store rooms. glazing. glazing. handling equipment and machinery • Buildings for livestock • Sick animal pens. decorating Cement. bathrooms. pantries • Rest rooms • Rooms for physical exercise • Cloakrooms. work on kilns and mixers • General machine work • Rough forms Ceramics. cement goods. escalators. general machine work • Enamelling. washrooms. shaping precision parts. dairy. sanitation and first aid rooms • Canteens. glassware • Drying • Preparation. concrete. manufacture of glass instruments 200 50 200 200 300 500 50 200 300 300 50 300 300 750 25 – 25 25 22 22 28 28 25 25 28 25 25 19 80 40 80 80 80 80 20 40 80 80 20 80 80 80 The Lighting Handbook Chapter 2 / 3 . glass blowing • Grinding. glass polishing. task or activity Em UGRL Ra Traffic zones and general areas inside buildings Traffic zones • Circulation areas and corridors • Stairs.Type of interior. pressing. tiles. post room. bricks • Drying • Preparation of materials. travolators • Loading ramps/bays Rest. glass. calving stalls • Feed preparation. switch gear rooms • Telex. utensil washing Bakeries • Preparation and baking • Finishing. toilets • Sick bay • Rooms for medical attention Control rooms • Plant rooms. shaping simple parts. cold stores • Store and stockrooms • Dispatch packing handling areas Storage rack areas • Gangways: unmanned • Gangways: manned • Control stations 100 150 150 200 100 300 200 500 500 200 500 100 300 20 150 150 28 25 25 22 22 22 25 19 16 25 19 25 25 – 22 22 40 40 40 80 80 80 80 80 90 60 80 60 60 40 60 60 Industrial activities and crafts Agriculture • Loading and operating of goods.

kitchen work. milling. sorting.g. trimming. decorative grinding. packing • Work places and critical zones in slaughter houses. laboratories • Pharmaceutical production • Tyre production • Colour inspection • Cutting. malting floor – for washing. mixing. testing. finishing.g. hand grinding and engraving • Precision work e. hand painting • Manufacture of synthetic precious stones Chemical. fermentation cellar • Sorting and washing of products. plastics and rubber industry • Remote-operated processing installations • Processing installations with limited manual intervention • Constantly manned work places in processing installations • Precision measuring rooms. telephones – precision e. cleaning. on filtering floor in sugar refineries • Cutting and sorting of fruit and vegetables • Manufacture of delicatessen foods. large transformers – medium e. adjusting Food stuffs and luxury food industry • Work places and zones in – breweries. switchboards – fine e. task or activity • Grinding of optical glass. crystal. dairies mills.g. decoration Em UGRL Ra 750 1000 1500 50 150 300 500 500 500 1000 750 300 300 500 750 300 300 300 500 750 1000 1500 16 16 16 – 28 25 19 22 22 16 19 25 25 22 19 25 25 25 22 19 16 16 80 90 90 20 40 80 80 80 80 90 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 200 300 500 300 500 500 25 25 25 25 22 22 80 80 80 80 80 80 4 / Chapter 2 The Lighting Handbook . butchers.g. manufacture of cigars and cigarettes • Inspection of glasses and bottles. measuring equipment • Electronic workshops. sieving. product control.g. barrel filling. inspection Electrical industry • Cable and wire manufacture • Winding: – large coils – medium-sized coils – small coils • Coil impregnating • Galvanising • Assembly work: – rough e.Type of interior. peeling – cooking in preserve and chocolate factories – work places and zones in sugar factories – for drying and fermenting raw tobacco.

marking and sorting • Washing and dry cleaning • Ironing. tumbling of skins • Saddlery work.1 mm • Precision machining. rubbing. cutting. shoe manufacture: stitching. etc. punching • Sorting • Leather dyeing (machine) • Quality control • Colour inspection • Shoe making • Glove making Metal working and processing • Open die forging • Drop forging • Welding • Rough and average machining: tolerances ≥ 0. cold forming • Plate machining: thickness ≥ 5 mm Em 500 1000 50 100 200 200 200 200 200 200 300 300 500 500 1500 1000 1500 500 300 300 300 750 200 300 500 500 500 1000 1000 500 500 200 300 300 300 500 750 300 200 UGRL 19 16 – 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 22 19 16 16 16 19 25 25 25 19 25 25 22 22 22 19 16 22 22 25 25 25 22 19 19 25 25 Ra 80 90 20 40 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 90 90 90 80 80 80 80 80 80 40 80 80 90 80 80 90 80 80 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 The Lighting Handbook Chapter 2 / 5 . polishing. sewing. inspection • Wire and pipe drawing shops. • Platforms • Sand preparation • Dressing room • Work places at cupola and mixer • Casting bay • Shake out areas • Machine moulding • Hand and core moulding • Die casting • Model building Hairdressers • Hairdressing Jewellery manufacturing • Working with precious stones • Manufacture of jewellery • Watch making (manual) • Watch making (automatic) Laundries and dry cleaning • Goods in.Type of interior.1 mm • Scribing. shaping. barrels. pits • Fleshing. task or activity • Laboratories • Colour inspection Foundries and metal casting • Man-size underfloor tunnels. cellars. skiving. grinding: tolerances < 0. pressing • Inspection and repairs Leather and leather goods • Work on vats.

cutting equipment manufacture • Assembly: – rough – medium – fine – precision • Galvanising • Surface preparation and painting • Tool. lithography • Colour inspection in multicoloured printing • Steel and copper engraving Rolling mills.g. micromechanics Paper and paper goods • Edge runners. retouching. gilding. embossing. gluing. iron and steel works • Production plants without manual operation • Production plants with occasional manual operation • Production plants with continuous manual operation • Slab Store • Furnaces • Mill train. switchboards (inside buildings) • Control rooms • Outdoor switch gear Printers • Cutting. e. bale opening Em 300 750 200 300 500 750 300 750 1000 200 300 500 50 100 200 200 500 20 UGRL 22 19 25 25 22 19 25 25 19 25 25 22 – 28 25 25 16 – Ra 60 60 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 20 40 80 60 80 20 500 500 1000 1500 2000 50 150 200 50 200 300 300 500 50 200 19 19 19 16 16 – 28 25 – 25 25 22 22 – 25 80 80 80 90 80 20 40 80 20 20 40 80 80 20 60 6 / Chapter 2 The Lighting Handbook . e. template and jig making. Textile manufacture and processing • Work places and zones in baths.Type of interior. paper and corrugating machines. cellars etc. sewing Power stations • Fuel supply plant • Boiler house • Machine halls • Side rooms. pump rooms. precision mechanics. cutting.g. shear line • Control platforms. cardboard manufacture • Standard bookbinding work. task or activity • Sheet metalwork: thickness < 5 mm • Tool making. belt sections.. folding. matrix making • Paper sorting and hand printing • Type setting. pulp mills • Paper manufacture and processing. work on stones and platens. sorting. control panels • Test. block engraving. coiler. printing machines. condenser rooms etc. measurement and inspection • Underfloor man-sized tunnels. embossing.

ironing. grooving. washing. reading. cutting. plywood manufacturing 50 • Steam pits 150 • Saw frame 300 • Work at joiner’s bench. dyeing 500 • Drying room 100 • Automatic fabric printing 500 • Burling. trimming 1000 • Colour inspection. picking. fluting. painting. sizing. reeling. typing. devilling machine work. combing. assembly 300 • Polishing. pre-spinning. inspection 1000 • Upholstery manufacture (manned) 1000 • Final inspection 1000 Wood working and processing • Automatic processing e.g. weaving.Type of interior. sawing. turning. winding 500 • Warping. polishing chamber 750 • Painting: touch-up. inspection 1000 22 22 22 22 22 22 28 25 19 16 19 22 22 22 19 19 19 80 80 80 80 90 80 60 80 80 90 90 80 80 80 90 80 80 28 28 25 25 22 19 22 22 19 40 40 60 80 80 80 90 90 90 Offices Offices • Filing. plying. task or activity Em UGRL Ra • Carding. copying. jute and hemp spinning 300 • Spinning. • Writing. sinking 500 • Selection of veneer woods 750 • Marquetry. etc. inlay work 750 • Quality control. fine knitting. rebating. drawing patterns 750 • Finishing. knitting 500 • Sewing. braiding. data processing • Technical drawing • CAD work stations • Conference and meeting rooms • Reception desk • Archives The Lighting Handbook 300 500 750 500 500 300 200 19 19 16 19 19 22 25 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 Retail premises Retail premises • Sales area • Till area • Wrapper table 300 500 500 22 19 19 80 80 80 Chapter 2 / 7 . spraying chamber. gluing. drying. fabric control 1000 • Invisible mending 1500 • Hat manufacturing 500 Vehicle construction • Body work and assembly 500 • Painting. dressing. fancy joinery 750 • Work on wood working machines e.g. drawing. card cutting. taking up stitches 750 • Manual design.

Type of interior, task or activity

Em

UGRL

Ra

Places of public assembly
General areas • Entrance halls • Cloakrooms • Lounges • Ticket offices Restaurants and hotels • Reception/cashier desk, porters desk • Kitchen • Restaurant, dining room, function room • Self-service restaurant • Buffet • Conference rooms • Corridors Theatres, concert halls, cinemas • Practice rooms, dressing rooms Trade fairs, exhibition halls • General lighting Museums • Exhibits, insensitive to light • Light sensitive exhibits Libraries • Bookshelves • Reading area • Counters Public car parks (indoor) • In/out ramps (during the day) • In/out ramps (at night) • Traffic lanes • Parking areas • Ticket office 100 200 200 300 300 500 – 200 300 500 100 300 300 22 25 22 22 22 22 – 22 22 19 25 22 22 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80

200 500 500 300 75 75 75 300

19 19 19 25 25 25 – 19

80 80 80 20 20 20 20 80

Educational premises
Nursery school, play school • Play room • Nursery • Handicraft room Educational buildings • Classrooms, tutorial rooms • Classroom for evening classes and adults education • Lecture hall • Black board • Demonstration table • Art rooms • Art rooms in art schools • Technical drawing rooms 300 300 300 300 500 500 500 500 500 750 750 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 16 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 90 80

8 / Chapter 2

The Lighting Handbook

Type of interior, task or activity • Practical rooms and laboratories • Handicraft rooms • Teaching workshop • Music practice rooms • Computer practice rooms (menu driven) • Language laboratory • Preparation rooms and workshops • Entrance halls • Circulation areas, corridors • Stairs • Student common rooms and assembly halls • Teachers rooms • Library: bookshelves • Library: reading areas • Stock rooms for teaching materials • Sports halls, gymnasiums, swimming pools (general use) • School canteens • Kitchen

Em 500 500 500 300 300 300 500 200 100 150 200 300 200 500 100 300 200 500

UGRL 19 19 19 19 19 19 22 22 25 25 22 19 19 19 25 22 22 22

Ra 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80

Health care premises
Rooms for general use • Waiting rooms • Corridors: during the day • Corridors: during the night • Day rooms Staff rooms • Staff office • Staff rooms Wards, maternity wards • General lighting • Reading lighting • Simple examinations • Examination and treatment • Night lighting, observation lighting • Bathrooms and toilets for patients Examination rooms (general) • General lighting • Examination and treatment Eye examination rooms • General lighting • Examination of the outer eye • Reading and colour vision tests with vision charts Ear examination rooms • General lighting • Ear examination 200 200 50 200 500 300 100 300 300 1000 5 200 500 1000 300 1000 500 300 1000 22 22 22 22 19 19 19 19 19 19 – 22 19 19 19 – 16 19 – 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 90 80 80 90 90 80 90 90 80 90

The Lighting Handbook

Chapter 2 / 9

Type of interior, task or activity Scanner rooms • General lighting • Scanners with image enhancers and television systems Delivery rooms • General lighting • Examination and treatment Treatment rooms (general) • Dialysis • Dermatology • Endoscopy rooms • Plaster rooms • Medical baths • Massage and radiotherapy Operating areas • Pre-op and recovery rooms • Operating theatre • Operating cavity Intensive care unit • General lighting • Simple examinations • Examination and treatment • Night watch Dentists • General lighting • At the patient • Operating cavity • White teeth matching Laboratories and pharmacies • General lighting • Colour inspection Decontamination rooms • Sterilisation rooms • Disinfection rooms Autopsy rooms and mortuaries • General lighting • Autopsy table and dissecting table

Em

UGRL

Ra

300 50 300 1000 500 500 300 500 300 300 500 1000

19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19

80 80 80 80 80 90 80 80 80 80 90 90

100 300 1000 20 500 1000 5000 5000 500 1000 300 300 500 5000

19 19 19 19 19 – – – 19 19 22 22 19 –

90 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 80 90 80 80 90 90

Transportational areas
Airports • Arrival and departure halls, baggage claim areas • Connecting areas, escalators, travolators • Information desks, check-in desks • Customs and passport control desks • Waiting areas • Luggage store rooms • Security check areas 200 150 500 500 200 200 300 22 22 19 19 22 25 19 80 80 80 80 80 80 80

10 / Chapter 2

The Lighting Handbook

Type of interior, task or activity • Air traffic control tower • Testing and repair hangars • Engine test areas • Measuring areas in hangars Railway installations • Covered platforms and passenger subways (underpasses) • Ticket hall and concourse • Ticket and luggage offices and counters • Waiting rooms

Em 500 500 500 500

UGRL 16 22 22 22

Ra 80 80 80 80

50 200 300 200

28 28 19 22

40 40 80 80

Sport facilities
The following values are based on top level competition and correspond to EN 12193 and EN 12464 Ra value of 80 is preferable For training purposes, a UGRL rating of 19 should bei adhered to • Aerobics 500 • Archery 200 • Athletics (all disciplines) 500 • Badminton 750 • Basketball 750 • Billards 750 • Boccia 300 • Boules 300 • Bowling 200 • Bowls 500 • Boxing (competition/training) 2000/300 • Climbing 500 • Cricket 750 • Cricket nets 1500 • Curling (target/playing area) 300/200 • Cycling 750 • Dancing (fitness) 500 • Darts 200 • Fencing 750 • Football (indoor) 750 • Gymnastics 500 • Handball 750 • Hockey 750 • Ice hockey 750 • Ice skating 750 • Judo 750 • Kendo/Karate 750 • Netball 750 • Petanque 300 • Racketball 750 • Riding 500 • Roller skating 500 • School sports 750

The Lighting Handbook

60 60 60 60 60 80 60 60 60 60 80 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60

Chapter 2 / 11

task or activity • Shooting • Snooker • Speed skating • Squash • Swimming • Swimmung (school level) • Table tennis • Tennis • Volleyball • Weight lifting • Wrestling Em 200 750 500 750 300 500 750 750 750 750 750 Ra 60 80 60 60 80 60 60 60 60 60 60 12 / Chapter 2 The Lighting Handbook .Type of interior.

g. (See also parking areas) Farms • Farm yard • Equipment shed (open) • Animals sorting pen Fuel filling service stations The Lighting Handbook • Vehicle parking and storage areas • Entry and exit driveways: dark environment • Entry and exit driveways: light environment (i. excavation and loading • Drain pipes mounting. auxiliary and storage tasks • Framework element mounting. trucks and excavators • Regular vehicle traffic (max. e. cities) • Air pressure and water checking points and other service areas • Meter reading area Chapter 2 / 13 . vehicle turning. locks and harbours • Waiting quays at canals and locks • Gangways and passages exclusively for pedestrians. loading and unloading points 5 10 20 50 20 30 50 50 50 20 50 20 20 20 20 20 40 40 40 20 20 20 Airports • Hangar apron • Terminal apron • Loading areas • Fuel depot Building sites • General lighting at building sites • Clearance. 40 km/h) • Pedestrian passages. light reinforcement work. wooden mould and framework mounting. waiting areas • Outport embankment ballasting at canals and locks • Lock control area • Cargo handling.e. loading and unloading • Passenger areas in passenger harbours • Coupling of hoses. pipes and ropes • Dangerous part of walkways and driveways. bicycles. transport. demanding electrical.Type of area. (10 km/h). electric piping and cabling • Element jointing. task or activity Em Ra General circulation areas • Walkways exclusively for pedestrians • Traffic areas for slowly moving vehicles max. machine and pipe mountings 100 200 10 10 20 20 50 50 50 50 20 50 50 5 20 50 150 150 40 40 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 Canals.

walkways • Plant areas • Boat landing areas/transport areas • Life boat areas • Sea surface below the rig • Helideck Parking lots • Light traffic. reading of instruments 20 20 The Lighting Handbook 50 20 100 40 14 / Chapter 2 . churches.g. loading and unloading of freight. parking lots of department stores. stairs. office buildings.Type of area.g. covered loading platforms. parking lots of major shopping centres. open loading platforms • Reading of addresses. inspection 20 20 50 20 100 200 300 500 150 100 300 200 200 300 100 100 300 100 200 30 100 20 20 40 40 40 40 40 40 20 40 40 20 40 20 20 20 20 Off-shore gas and oil structures • Drill floor and monkey board • Rotary table • Pipe rack area/deck • Derrick • Mud room.g. plants. sports and multipurpose building complexes • Heavy traffic. shale shaker. schools. utilisation of manually regulated valves. sampling • Test station. task or activity Em Ra Industrial sites and storage areas • Short term handling of large units and raw materials. inspection of leakage. replacements of pump packing. machine and piping installations. parking lots of shops. e. use of tools. lighting of burners • Filling and emptying of container trucks and wagons with risk free substances. ordinary reinforcement and casting tasks in concrete plants • Demanding electrical. e. starting and stopping motors. piping and packing • Filling and emptying of container trucks and wagons with dangerous substances. major sports and multipurpose building complexes 5 20 10 20 20 20 Petrochemical and other hazardous industries • Handling of servicing tools. loading and unloading of solid bulk goods • Continuous handling of large units and raw materials. terraced and apartment houses • Medium traffic. e. general service work. wellhead Process areas: • Pumping areas • Crude oil pumps • Treatment areas • Ladders. lifting and descending location for cranes.

coal • Overall inspection • General servicing work and reading of instruments • Wind tunnels: servicing and maintenance • Repair of electric devices Railway areas Passenger areas: • Open platforms. short duration operations • Covered platform. electricity.Type of area. large stations. mechanical lifting to timber conveyor • Reading of addresses and markings of sawn timber • Grading and packaging • Feeding into stripping and chopping machines 20 50 100 200 300 20 20 40 40 40 The Lighting Handbook Chapter 2 / 15 . continuous operation • Open platforms • Covered platform. sawdust and chip conveyors • Sorting of timber on land or in water. medium-size stations. large stations • Walkways. retarder and classification yards • Hump areas • Wagon inspection pit • Coupling area • Tracks in passenger station areas. medium-size stations. rural and local trains • Open platforms. inter-city services • Stairs. big stations Freight areas: • Freight track. large stations. continuous operation • Railway yards handling areas • Railway yards: flat marshalling. including stabling • Servicing trains and locomotives • Level crossings 15 20 50 50 100 50 100 20 50 10 20 20 50 100 30 10 10 100 50 10 20 20 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 20 20 40 40 40 20 20 20 40 20 20 40 20 Saw mills • Timber handling on land and in water. gas and heat plants • Pedestrian movements within electrically safe areas • Handling of servicing tools. task or activity • Repair of machines and electric devices • Fuel loading and unloading sites Em 200 100 5 20 50 100 100 200 Ra 60 20 20 20 20 40 40 60 Power. suburban and regional trains • Open platforms. small stations. small and medium-size stations • Walkways. inter-city services • Covered platforms. timber unloading points and sawn timber loading points. short duration operations • Freight track. suburban and regional trains • Covered platforms. small and medium-size stations • Stairs.

reading of instruments • Repair of motors and electric devices 50 20 100 200 40 60 Extracts from EN 12464-1 EN 12464-2 (draft) EN 12193 by kind permission of the Austrian Norm Institute. inspection of leakage. utilisation of manually operated valves. changing of pumps. general servicing work.Type of area. starting and stopping of motors.at 16 / Chapter 2 The Lighting Handbook .on-norm. task or activity Em Ra Shipyards and docks • Short term handling of large units • Cleaning of ship hull • Painting and welding of ship hull • Mounting of electrical and mechanical components • General lighting of shipyard area. A-1020 Vienna http://www. piping packing and raking plants • Handling of chemicals. storage areas for prefabricated goods 20 50 100 200 20 20 20 60 60 40 Water and sewage plants • Handling of service tools.

Continuous-row lighting system 3 4–5 6–7 8 – 11 12 – 13 14 15 16 – 17 18 – 19 20 – 21 22 – 23 23 24 – 26 27 28 – 29 30 – 31 32 – 33 34 – 35 . . . . . . . Double array (waveguide luminaire) RTX II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Recessed louvre luminaire MIRAL/MIREL T16 BWS . . . . . . . . . More degrees of vertical freedom PANOS M/MWW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Multitalented downlights PANOS S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LIGHT FIELDS-S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LANOS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louvre luminaire for sports halls AERO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Impressive and powerful LIGHT FIELDS . . . . FLEXOS TECTON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Modular micro-pyramidal lighting system MELLOW LIGHT IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . Surface-mounted louvre luminaire MIREL T16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A piece of sky MIRAL T16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . From semiconductor to lighting innovation FREE-STANDING UPLIGHTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Types of lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x-tra strong lighting accents STARFLEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X as in XENO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Modular fibre-optic system PANOS L and H . . . . . . . . . . . . KAREA. . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 3 Luminaires Zumtobel Staff applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Design-oriented continuous-row lighting system LED luminaires . . . . . . . High-tech light with waveguide OREA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Office and Education • Intensifies sense of well-being • Improves human factors • Increases motivation • Creates sense of identity Industry and Engineering • Provides time reference • Prevents accidents • Reduces stress • Boosts productivity Health & Care • Encourages relaxation • Facilitates convalescence • Encourages rehabilitation • Creates feel-good atmosphere Art and Culture • Conveys information • Sets the stage for art • Structures content • Adapts concepts Presentation and Retail • Makes objects look attractive • Creates branded landscapes • Gets message across • Shopping becomes an experience Hotels and Restaurants • Creates an unmistakeable look • Paints a backdrop for events • Stimulates sense of well-being • Stimulates communication Sport and Leisure • Facilitates identification • Encourages self discovery • Celebrates surfaces • Stimulates performance The Lighting Handbook Chapter 3 / 3 .

Types of lighting Direct lighting: – highly directional – strong glare reduction at certain angles – dark ceiling (cave effect) – limited choice of workstation layout – energy-efficient Indirect lighting: – diffuse lighting conditions – room gains in height – glare-free – workstations can be positioned anywhere – low energy efficiency 4 / Chapter 3 The Lighting Handbook .

Indirect/direct lighting: – pleasant room impression – high user acceptance – good contrast ratios – flexible workstation layout (indirect component > 60 %) Mellow Light: – indirect/direct solution for low ceiling heights – workstations can be positioned anywhere – glare-free – reduced luminance levels at all viewing angles – gives impression of daylight in room The Lighting Handbook Chapter 3 / 5 .

With choice of additional optical systems. 6 / Chapter 3 The Lighting Handbook XENO QR-CBC covers a huge spectrum of applications thanks to its use of low-voltage halogen cool-beam reflector lamps with beam angles from superspot to flood. honeycomb louvres or anti-glare blades. spot 15° and flood 40°. with models ranging from LV halogen lamps to projection spotlights. glass covers. as superspot 8°. the X-joint pivots through 90°. or galleries and museums.X as in XENO – x-tra strong lighting accents XENO is a spotlight generation for professionally setting the lighting stage. Basically. is complemented by a huge choice of accessories such as filters. all spotlights have the following features: they rotate through 365°. lenses. . fitted with the QT 12–100 W low-voltage halogen lamp. XENO QT 12. The new spotlight-system range. exhibitions and trade fairs. accentuation and presentation whether in shops and malls. Low-voltage models are dimmable via rotary potentiometer on the spotlight. providing ideal light for display.

XENO QR 111 is particularly suitable for impressive accent lighting. The Lighting Handbook XENO HIT-CRI has been optimised for HIT-CRI metal halide lamps with single-ended base (70 W to 150 W). PROJECTOR: The XENO projection spotlight is a highperformance compact spotlight system for accentuation or sharply outlined projection of logos. the spotlight (spot 10°/flood 40°) provides good colour rendition. Can be used with QR 111 LV halogen lamps in 50 W. particularly for warmer colour tones. 75 W or 100 W versions. PulseControl starters monitor lamp parameters and guarantee optimum performance. spot 15°. XENO HIT-CRI is available as superspot 10°. Separate motor control of slide and colour magazine allows the use of various patterns and colour filters. Chapter 3 / 7 . gobos or slides. flood 35° and superflood 50°. XENO HST: By using high-pressure sodium vapour lamps.

STARFLEX – Modular fibre optic system System components Light engine Accessories QR-CBC 50 W/100 W Colour-wheel module HIT 35 W/70 W Sparkle-effect wheel module HIT 150 W/250 W HIT 150 W/250 W controllable Static colour filters Colour temperature correction filters 8 / Chapter 3 The Lighting Handbook IP 54 150 W/250 W IP 54 150 W/250 W controllable .

Optical fibres Light outlets (selection) Adjustable light outlet Terminal light emitting glass fibres Crystal light outlet Terminal light emitting PMMA fibres Light outlet for stairway/path lighting Side-radiating PMMA fibres Curved tube light outlet The Lighting Handbook Projection attachment Chapter 3 / 9 .

81 0.5 mm 2.7 mm 307 3.0 mm Outer diameter Maximum number of sheathing of individual fibres per common end spigot 2.57 0.54 0.4 mm 36 8.7 mm 20 Minimum bending radius 7 mm 11 mm 14 mm 21 mm 32 mm 42 mm Applications – glass display cases in museums – saunas and steam baths – hotel and restaurant lighting – applications requiring high levels of illumination – retail shop windows.76 0.93 0.Properties and applications of optical fibres Fibre Properties material Glass – can withstand relatively high temperatures (up to 110 °C) – extremely long service life (in excess of 20 years) – relatively tight bending radius – projects preferring relatively warm light colour PMMA – cheaper than glass – life time in excess of 20 years – projects involving relatively cool light colour – choice of side-radiating or terminal light emitting fibres – side-radiating and terminal light-emitting fibres can be combined in a single fibre bundle – fibre bundle can optionally be assembled on site Assembly of glass fibre bundles Active diameter of fibre cable 1.50 10 / Chapter 3 The Lighting Handbook Length-dependent correction factors (attenuation) for glass fibre cables .0 mm 3.5 mm 6.62 0.0 mm 1.2 mm 615 2.9 mm 79 6.0 mm 4.71 0. display shelving and show cases – starry skies in hotels and wellness areas – outdoor lighting or in areas with high air humidity 1m 2m 3m 4m 5m 6m 7m 8 m 9 m 10 m 0.87 0.9 mm 176 4.66 0.

0 mm 8.5 mm 80 8. factory-assembled) Active diameter of fibre cable Outer diameter Maximum number of sheathing of individual fibres per common end spigot crimped/spliced 2.5 mm 20/10 10.2 mm 575/300 2.5 mm 6.0 mm 11 14.0 mm 8/4 Minimum bending radius 1.87 0.75 0.72 0. factory-assembled) Outer diameter Maximum number of of sheathing individual fibres per common end spigot (crimped) 4.5 mm 2.79 0.5 mm 37/18 8.69 0.5 mm 13/6 12.0 mm 72/35 6.91 0.0 mm 1.62 Assembly of PMMA fibre bundles (side radiation.0 mm 4.0 mm 6 Maximum number of individual fibres per common end spigot (spliced) 40 10 5 3 The Lighting Handbook Chapter 3 / 11 .83 0.Assembly of PMMA fibre bundles (terminal light emission.0 mm 143/70 5.95 0.65 0.0 mm 10.0 mm 3.7 mm 342/165 4.0 mm 19 11.0 mm 8 mm 12 mm 16 mm 24 mm 36 mm 48 mm 60 mm 75 mm Length-dependent correction factors (attenuation) for PMMA cables 1m 2m 3m 4m 5m 6m 7m 8 m 9 m 10 m 0.

PANOS H Satisfies the most stringent glare limitation requirements without the need for accessories. HG/LG Highly specular darklight reflector optic for glare-free working at the highest level. reduced luminance levels and optimum efficiency. 12 / Chapter 3 The Lighting Handbook HWW The special ribbed structure of the reflector produces asymmetrical light distribution. ideal for highlighting vertical surfaces. . Reflectors and their applications HF/LF The precision-shaped facets provide brilliant effects. HL/LL The white reflector optic is a perfect match for the decorative accessories. HM/LM Good looks are guaranteed by this matt reflector optic with reduced dust sensitivity.PANOS L and H – Multi-talented downlights PANOS L Recessed depth of just 100 mm. Also suitable for use with VDT workstations thanks to radial louvre.

clear glass Akamar IP 54 kit. structured glass Alhena PANOS L and H with compact fluorescent lamps (TC) PANOS L Diameter 175 mm 200 mm 250 mm 175 mm 200 mm 250 mm Wattage 13–26 W 18–26 W 26–57 W 13–26 W 18–42 W 26–57 W Mounting depth 100 mm 100 mm 100 mm 120 mm 150 mm 190 mm PANOS H Installation instructions No-tool installation The mounting ring made of diecast aluminium is fitted without tools using spring clips. opal glass Adhara IP 54 kit. The ballast box has a rapid locking device and forms a preassembled luminaire unit with the reflector. Combined reflector/flange unit The reflector/flange unit is installed by means of a “twist and lock mechanism” without any tools.Attachments for interior design (selection) IP 54 kit. The Lighting Handbook Chapter 3 / 13 .

Diameter 100 mm 150 mm 200 mm 14 / Chapter 3 The Lighting Handbook Lamps QT-LP 12 QR-CBC 51 QT-LP 12 HIT QT-LP 12 QR 111 HIT HST Wattage 75 W 50 W 100 W 20–70 W 100 W 100 W 70–150 W 100 W Mounting depth 125 mm 125 mm 145 mm 145 mm 230 mm 230 mm 230/240 mm 230 mm . A convenient grip clip makes positioning easy. with horizontal rotation through 360°. PANOS S works like a spotlight with antiglare blades to prevent seeing directly into the lamp. With completely independent adjustment of lighting head and housing possible.PANOS S – More degrees of vertical freedom The innovative tilting principle allows 45° pivoting into the ceiling and up to 60° pivoting out of the ceiling. rotates through 360° When pivoted at 60°. or light the top surface of a shelf. Pivoting into the ceiling at 45° enables asymmetrical light distribution for an unobtrusive and calm ceiling effect. A choice of flood or spot reflectors are available. it can illuminate the wall from the ceiling down.

The Lighting Handbook Wide range of lamps PANOS M and MWW can accommodate a huge range of lamps. The high-tech Teflon material also results in efficiencies up to 10 % higher than conventional surface finishes. PANOS MTE Dust and dirt stand no chance on the Teflon-coated surface. Chapter 3 / 15 . ensuring a consistent interior design.PANOS M/MWW – Impressive and powerful PANOS M Metal reflector for high thermal stability. this means complete freedom when professionally setting the lighting stage. PANOS MWW The sophisticated wallwasher with asymmetrical light distribution looks just like its rotationally symmetrical counterparts when installed in the ceiling. Ideal for lamps with high heat output. Die-cast aluminium mounting rings and cooling attachment. For the lighting designer.

LIGHT FIELDS – Modular micro-pyramidal lighting system Design by Sottsass Associati Pure innovation for the office Micro-pyramidal optic Even in surface-mounted and recessed luminaires. the sandwich construction of the micro-pyramidal optic ensures both glare control in conformity with standards and reduced luminance for direct illumination – ideal for office lighting according to standard EN 12464. micro-pyramidal layer for directing the light diffuser layer 16 / Chapter 3 The Lighting Handbook base .

with EN 12464 compliance over a range of ceiling heights and floor areas. they are ideal for the more stylish office. Recessed 1198 x 298 2/28 W T16 1498 x 298 2/35 W T16 598 x 598 4/14 W T16 1248 x 310 2/28 W T16 1548 x 310 2/35 W T16 623 x 623 4/14 W T16 Surfacemounted 1248 x 310 2/28 W T16 1548 x 310 2/35 W T16 623 x 623 4/14 W T16 ID pendant 1248 x 310 2/54 W T16 1548 x 310 2/49 W T16 623 x 623 4/24 W T16 Free-standing luminaire 3/55 W TCL 3/80 W TCL LIGHT FIELDS model Recessed L-FIELDS E 4 x 4/14 W T16 L-FIELDS E 4 x 2/28 W T16 L-FIELDS E 4 x 2/28 W T16 L-FIELDS E 6 x 4/14 W T16 Surface-mounted L-FIELDS A 4 x 4/14 W T16 L-FIELDS A 4 x 2/28 W T16 L-FIELDS A 3 x 2/35 W T16 L-FIELDS A 4 x 2/28 W T16 L-FIELDS A 6 x 4/14 W T16 M 625 M 600 1-person office • 2-person office • • • 3-person office • • • • • • • • Chapter 3 / 17 The Lighting Handbook .Available as recessed/surface-mounted/pendant/ free-standing or cluster luminaires.

MELLOW LIGHT IV – A piece of sky T16 lamp Colour filter (optional) Light scattering (diffuse reflection from surface) Reflector Enclosed lighting chamber Light scattering (opal translucent material) Optic (louvre or diffuser) 18 / Chapter 3 The Lighting Handbook Light scattering (diffuse reflection from surface) Reflector Enclosed lighting chamber Light scattering (opal translucent material) Colour filter (optional) T16 lamp Optic (louvre or diffuser) .

no. L W H Cat. L W H 24 W T16 623 623 81 24 W T16 598 598 81 28 W T16 1248 310 76 28 W T16 1198 298 76 35 W T16 1548 310 76 35 W T16 1498 298 76 49 W T16 1548 310 76 49 W T16 1498 298 76 54 W T16 1248 310 76 54 W T16 1198 298 76 55 W TC-L 623 623 81 55 W TC-L 598 598 81 Calculating the size of the sawn cut-out in the ceiling: length/width of ceiling cut-out = length/width of luminaire –16 mm 42 Chapter 3 / 19 . no.6 LxB TC-L 81 B Module 600 Module 625 The Lighting Handbook Cat. MELLOW LIGHT IV recessed luminaire with slotted sheet steel diffuser optic • Recessed sheet steel housing with die-cast structure • Lighting chamber made of high purity PMMA diffuserpearl material • Lighting chamber can be backlit in colour using colour filters T16 MELLOW LIGHT IV dimensions 76 105.Diffuser optic • Optic can be fitted without tools • Optic has “fly-proof” seal • Diffuser optic with slotted sheet steel for all-round glare control • Suitable for glare control on upright and steeply inclined displays • Mounting kit required for concealed ceiling systems and sawn cut-outs • “Dimmable DALI” luminaires contain a DALI-controllable electronic ballast and are suitable for all DALI and Luxmate Professional applications.

and even used to light the construction site. transport and temporary storage. resources and energy that would otherwise be spent on lamp procurement. Thus the connecting cable can be fitted conveniently and in minimum time without needing to open the luminaire housing. MIRAL T16 can therefore be fully installed whilst building work is still in progress. Protective film A special self-adhesive protective film made of recyclable material offers optimum protection against louvre soiling. Electrical connection Quick installation is also guaranteed thanks to the exactly centered 5-pole plug-in terminal (CE-compliant) easily accessible from outside the luminaire. simply pull away the film which leaves no residue. schools. saving the time. Packaging The mounting brackets are located ready for use outside the box so there is no need to open it. Advantage: the luminaire remains protected in its packaging during pre-installation.MIRAL T16 – Surface-mounted louvre luminaire Complete louvre luminaire range: – surface-mounted luminaire – indirect/direct pendant luminaire – wallwasher Application: offices. The installation instructions and drilling template are printed on the outside of the box. Once the building is finished. shops Benefits: – BIVERGENZ® plus lighting technology – quick installation thanks to – mounting bracket – pre-fitted lamp – protective film Lay in Fold up Snap in Light source included MIRAL T16 is pre-fitted with an LF840 lamp (LF830 available on request). 20 / Chapter 3 The Lighting Handbook . This keeps the installation effort to a minimum.

two operations with the electric screwdriver. MIRAL T16 installation for the electrician means getting the same result in half the time! The Lighting Handbook Chapter 3 / 21 .Traditional installation MIRAL T16 installation Traditional installation for the electrician meant four trips up and down the ladder.

has two new features developed specifically with the new European standard EN 12464 in mind: a higherreflection coating in the latest materials. and the innovative freeform surface technology of the UniQue blade. based on 25 years of experience.MIREL T16 – Recessed louvre luminaire Complete louvre luminaire range: – narrow recessed luminaire – recessed luminaire module – wallwasher Application: offices Benefits: – BIVERGENZ® plus lighting technology – ergonomic installation – pre-fitted lamp – Balanced Colour BIVERGENZ® plus The secret of success of Zumtobel Staff’s louvre luminaire is: ONE (BIVERGENZ technology) plus ONE (UniQue blade) = FOUR (benefits) ® The patented BIVERGENZ® technology. This provides FOUR benefits: Divergence Convergence – Optimum uniformity thanks to practically ideal batwing distribution of direct light – Gentle all-round glare control in conformity with the new EN 12464 standard The Lighting Handbook – Standard narrow-width louvre for fitting one or two lamps – Maximum efficiency thanks to louvre material increasing reflection 22 / Chapter 3 .

MIRAL/MIREL T16 BWS – Louvre luminaire for sports halls The Lighting Handbook Louvre luminaire range: – Surface-mounted luminaire BWS T16 – Recessed luminaire BWS T16 – Trunking installation accessories Application: sports halls Benefits: – High luminous efficiency thanks to T16 lamp – Narrow housing thanks to 2-in-1 lamp capability (two lamps in one louvre panel) – Good price/performance ratio Chapter 3 / 23 . and it’s done! Air extraction openings Through special openings in the standard luminaire housing. visually unbroken lines in the narrow louvre design. fast installation: unpack the luminaire. T12 or Wieland connectors. Extensive measurement data is available to assist accurate air-handling calculations. fit. used air from the room flows directly into the ventilated ceiling. Integrated light source Option of complete luminaire with pre-fitted lamp for straightforward. Emergency lighting components Power failure? No problem thanks to optional emergency lighting components! Electrical connection Optionally available with Euro.Solutions MIREL T16 in continuous-row lighting system Straightforward installation of a continuous row system with clean. remove protective film. Lighting control system Requirements for lighting intensity and lighting scene vary: optional LUXMATE lighting control components can be used for easy control of MIREL T16 luminaires and dynamic light changes. built-in or with cable.

AERO – High-tech light with waveguide Principle of operation Directional light emission in batwing distribution Light distribution Operating efficiency η = 70 % (2/54W) I : D = 75 % : 25 % 560 cd/m2 at 60° Reduced luminance levels 2900 cd/m2 at 0° 3800 cd/m2 at 30° 24 / Chapter 3 The Lighting Handbook .

flat-panel displays.50 m or more. flexible workstation layout Rooms with longer maintenance intervals Lamps cannot be seen from any angle Indirect/direct ratio 75:25 Restricted brightness Ceiling pleasantly illuminated.AERO waveguide luminaire Models and designs Geometric 2 x 54 W T5–16 mm Softline 2 x 28 W T5–16 mm Softline semi-transparent Features and typical applications Features Reduced luminance levels Effect No direct or reflected glare Application Offices with modern office equipment (standard screens. good modelling. good contrast rendition Louvre-like directional light distribution. VDTs) Flat-panel displays. e. in doctors’ surgeries Ceiling heights of 2.g. easy to clean The Lighting Handbook Light directed using microprismatic arrays Chapter 3 / 25 .

AERO with SLC® technology Principle of operation (SLC® lateral light coupler) See OREA luminaire – See OREA luminaire for description of lighting technology 26 / Chapter 3 The Lighting Handbook .

including directly above workstations (except where flat-panel displays are used) The Lighting Handbook – direct component approximately 5 % higher than AERO Chapter 3 / 27 .500 cd/m2 at 65° for standard situations – luminaires can be arranged freely in the room.OREA – Double array (waveguide luminaire) OGZ-ID 2/54 Principle of operation (SLC® lateral light coupler) – directional direct-light component with reduced luminance of to L ≤ 2.

RTX II – Design-oriented continuous row lighting system Design by Charles Keller Avant-garde in terms of both material and shape Application: offices and schools Individual luminaires and continuous row systems: – Pure aluminium – Matt bivergent or darklight reflector optic – Wallwasher for illuminating blackboards – Decorative optics Typical applications RTX II-C 1/35W 1/49W 1/54W 1/80W 2/28W 2/35W 2/49W 2/54W Day school Technical college/ evening school Office Office with DSE Open-plan office Technical drawing RTX II-D 1/35W 1/49W 1/54W 1/80W 2/28W 2/35W 2/49W 2/54W 28 / Chapter 3 The Lighting Handbook Day school Technical college/ evening school Office Office with DSE Open-plan office Technical drawing .

00 1.80 1.80 1.40 blackboard – luminaire distance [m] optimum range possible range possible range under certain conditions* * Use strongly depends on architectural parameters and luminaire arrangement.RTX II Wallwasher RTX II 1 x 49 W RTX II 1 x 54 W RTX II 1 x 80 W RTX RTX RTX RTX II II II II 2 x 28 W 2 x 35 W 2 x 49 W 2 x 54 W 300 Lux (Day school) 0.60 0.20 1.60 0.40 0. Chapter 3 / 29 .20 0.40 blackboard – luminaire distance [m] optimum range possible range possible range under certain conditions* The Lighting Handbook * Use strongly depends on architectural parameters and luminaire arrangement.20 0. RTX II 1 x 80 W RTX II 2 x 49 W RTX II 2 x 54 W 500 Lux (Evening school and technical colleges) 0.20 1.40 0.00 1.

LED luminaires – From semiconductor to lighting innovation Static and dynamic light Overview of LED luminaires static dynamic LEDOS RG LEDOS RGB LEDOS M PHAOS LED lighting tile PHAOS Lighting tube LEDOS B KAVA LED Benefits of LED technology PHAOS Spotlight PHAOS Line 30 / Chapter 3 The Lighting Handbook – long service life = low maintenance costs – low power consumption = minimum operating costs – vibration and impact-proof – compact size – high colour stability – efficient control thanks to simple control system – low heat generation .

The Lighting Handbook Technical data (selection) static LEDOS RGB Full spectrum PHAOS Lighting tile Full spectrum PHAOS Lighting tube Full spectrum PHAOS Spotlight Full spectrum PHAOS Line* Full spectrum dynamic Name Colours LEDOS M Blue Yellow Green Red White 65 LEDOS B Blue Yellow Green Red White 85/100/120 KAVA LED Blue Yellow Green Red White 120 LEDOS RG Alternately red/green 120 Diameter of circular luminaires Dimensions of square luminaires IP Voltage 120 x 120 228 x 228 310 900 20 24 V 67 230 V 20 24 V 80 x 80 80 x 115 100 x 100 120 x 120 310 x 100 900 x 100 20 230 V 67 230 V * only available as analog version Chapter 3 / 31 67/68 24 V 85 x 85 100 x 100 120 x 120 54/67 24 V 230 V 20/54 24 V 230 V 67 24 V .

KAREA. … use sensors to provide optimum user convenience and large potential energy savings. making the whole office space useable. … can be adjusted easily and economically to evolving office situations. LIGHT FIELDS-S • Free-standing uplight with indirect/direct light distribution • 3/55 W or 3/80 W TC-L • Direct light component with micro-pyramidal optic (MPO) with defined glare-free light emission L < 1000 cd/m2 at 60°/65° • Luminaire head and stand made of anodised aluminium • SensControl LCD with built-in display for intuitive operation KAREA • Free-standing luminaire with indirect/direct light distribution 4/55 W TC-L • Extremely flat angular luminaire head • Direct light component with perforated metal optic • Angular aluminium stand • Optionally available with SensControl lighting management system • SensControl LCD with built-in display for intuitive operation • Colour: titanium 32 / Chapter 3 The Lighting Handbook . … can be placed in the optimum position. FLEXOS Free-standing uplights … … enable personal adjustment and control to suit viewing conditions and the visual task in hand. … allow individual illumination of the workstation.FREE-STANDING UPLIGHTS – LIGHT FIELDS-S. LANOS.

with 1 to 4 heads • Direct light component with louvre optic or perforated metal optic • 2/55 W TC-L per head • Optimum two-point adjustment of each luminaire head in relation to workstation • Optionally available with SensControl lighting management system • Single. program switch-on times or select the menu language desired at the press of a button. The Lighting Handbook Chapter 3 / 33 . LANOS. SensControl LCD also makes it possible to call up preset profiles. FLEXOS and KAREA uplights. Straightforward menu-driven software allows near-intuitive control of the luminaire and easy programming of individual functions. The main feature is a small LCD display which provides details of the various operating states and settings.and twin-head version dimmable via touch switch • Colour: titanium SensControl LCD SensControl LCD is the highly convenient SensControl lighting management system for LIGHT FIELDS-S. This innovative electronic system combines intelligent technology with optimum operating convenience. Besides individual adjustment of the daylight sensor and presence detector.LANOS • Free-standing luminaire with indirect/direct light distribution 4/55 W TC-L • Luminaire head with lateral perforated metal refractors • Stand made of aluminium extrusion • Two-step switching (50/100 %) • Optionally available with SensControl lighting management system • SensControl LCD with built-in display for intuitive operation • Colour: titanium FLEXOS • Free-standing luminaire with indirect/direct light distribution.

TECTON – continuous-row lighting system TECTON Compact TECTON Retail TECTON-I Industry 34 / Chapter 3 The Lighting Handbook .

reducing TECTON installation costs by up to 60 percent through time savings. The Lighting Handbook Chapter 3 / 35 . emergency lighting and control. TECTON provides safety TECTON provides safety in several ways: – At the design stage. The specially designed power conductor integrated in the trunking revolutionises installation. Not only does this save time. – By the ONLITE emergency luminaire range that can be fully customized to the TECTON system for safety and reliability of the lighting solution in conformity with relevant standards. by the integration of mains lighting. demanding maximum flexibility from any continuous-row lighting system. All components can be combined logically and simply in the modular system. depending on the continuous row configuration chosen. – By the clear separation of emergency and escape-sign luminaires in two emergency-lighting circuits. with 11-pole wiring allowing any modifications in terms of brightness control or emergency lighting supply in conformity with relevant standards. TECTON allows the luminaire modules to be placed anywhere on the trunking.TECTON provides flexibility Layout changes occur at ever shorter intervals in retail. making TECTON both versatile and easy to handle. the better”. but lower qualified and hence cheaper staff can do the work. business and industry. TECTON saves on installation costs “The easier. Technical alterations to the lighting can also be made on site.

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. Comparison of lamp names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Characteristics of metal halide lamps 250 + 400 W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Application notes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Application notes. . . . . Properties of dimmable electronic ballasts . . . . . . . . . . . . . The main lamp types . . . . . . . Application notes. . . . . . . . . . . energy savings. 2 3 4–8 9 – 10 11 12 – 13 14 15 – 16 17 17 18 – 22 23 24 25 . . . . Energy efficiency of luminaires . . . . . . . . . . required power . Lamp characteristics . A comparison of fluorescent lamps – T16/T26 . . . Lamp names . Characteristic values of the major lamps . Power consumption. . . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 4 Lamps and ballasts Lamp selection . . . . . . . . . . T16 fluorescent lamps . . . . . metal halide lamps . . compact fluorescent lamps . . . . . . . . . . . . .

In other situations. Lamp characteristics can essentially be specified by the following key terms: Luminous flux/ efficiency Service life Light colour Colour rendition Lamp power Lamp characteristics Warm-up time Re-start time Dimming capability Burning position The Lighting Handbook . Even though the lamps may generate little light.Choosing the right lamp – An important first decision Choosing the right lamp depends on what is required of the lighting (see Chapter 5 / 2). the poor efficiency is acceptable because they are comparatively cheap to buy and are normally on for short periods. users happily tolerate the higher purchase price of discharge lamps because their high luminous efficiency and long lifetime make them economic. For instance. incandescent lamps are still the most popular lighting option used in domestic areas to help create that cosy atmosphere. Thus it is part of the expertise of the lighting designer to find the most suitable lamp for a lighting task.

6. Burning position Manufacturers specify the permitted burning positions for their lamps. It is affected by the red and blue colour components in the spectrum. Warm-up time Discharge lamps in particular need between 30 seconds and several minutes to warm up and output the full luminous flux. 4. only certain burning positions are allowed so as to avoid unstable operating states. Colour rendition The spectral components of the light determine how well various object colours can be reproduced. The higher the colour rendition index (Ra or CRI). tw = cool). being the time by which statistically half the lamps are still working (mortality). or the lower the colour rendition group number. 8.and mercury-vapour lamps can be varied. Chapter 4 / 3 The Lighting Handbook . temperature curve may vary with position. Metal halide lamps. the better the colour rendition in comparison with the optimum reference light. The system luminous efficiency also includes the power consumption of the ballast. 2. 3. Power The electrical power consumption of the lamp as opposed to the power consumption of a system comprising lamp and ballast. 9. Dimming capability Besides incandescent and halogen incandescent lamps. The rated luminous flux is measured at a standardised measurement temperature of 25 °C in units of lumen [lm]. Compact fluorescent lamps may usually be used in any burning position. Service life The average service life is normally specified. nowadays all fluorescent and compact fluorescent lamps can also be dimmed over almost any range. however. are still not approved by the manufacturers for dimming. 7. The drop in luminous flux also needs to be taken into account. For some metal halide lamps. Light colour The light colour describes the colour impression made by a white light source as relatively warm (ww = warm) or relatively cool (nw = intermediate. 5. because this may have uncontrollable effects on light quality and lamp service life. The ratio of luminous flux to electrical power consumption gives the luminous efficiency [lm/W].Lamp characteristics 1. Luminous flux/luminous efficiency The luminous flux specifies the total amount of light generated by a lamp. Re-start High-pressure discharge lamps need to cool down for several minutes before they can be started again. The power of highpressure sodium. but only in discrete levels. although important properties such as the luminous flux vs.

The main lamp types Halogen lamps Halogen lamps • For mains and low-voltage • Brilliant light • Excellent colour rendition operation • Applications: retail • Longer service life and and domestic areas. higher luminous efficiency restaurants and than incandescent lamps catering • Easy to dim How they work Current flows through a filament and heats it up. The halogen cycle increases the efficiency and extends the service life compared with traditional incandescent lamps. but do require a transformer. These lamps therefore generate a relatively large amount of heat. The Lighting Handbook 4 / Chapter 4 . just as in incandescent lamps. Low-voltage types are very small and are ideal for precise direction of light.

fluorescent lamps Compact Compact fluorescent lamps • Compact designs • High luminous efficiency • Excellent colour rendition • Extensive range of types • Dimmable • Applications: commercial and high-profile interiors. usually combined in an electronic ballast. and operate in a very similar way. The lamps need a starting aid and a current limiting device. restaurants and catering The Lighting Handbook How they work These lamps are compact versions of the linear or circular fluorescent lamps.lamps Fluorescent Fluorescent lamps • High to very high luminous efficiency (in particular T16 HE) • Good to excellent colour rendition • Long service life • Extensive range of types • Dimmable How they work An alternating electric field generates invisible UV radiation between the two electrodes in the discharge tube. The luminous flux is highly dependent on the ambient temperature. This radiation is converted into high-quality visible light in the fluorescent material. The luminous flux depends on the burning position and temperature. Chapter 4 / 5 .

and the current must be limited by a ballast. spotlighting. 6 / Chapter 4 The Lighting Handbook . retail amic discharge-tube lamps areas How they work In metal halide lamps.Metal halide lamps Metal halide lamps • High luminous efficiency • Cannot be dimmed • Good to excellent colour • Applications: industrial rendition bays. A starter is needed to switch on the lamp. The composition of the materials in the tube determines the light quality. • High colour stability for cer.floodlighting. The use of ceramic discharge tubes further improves the lamp properties. Practical electronic ballasts are also available for low-power lamps. a highly compact electric arc is produced in a discharge tube.

and so only need a ballast for current limiting.Colour-improved (Philips SDW): • Excellent colour rendition • Warm light • Long service life • Application: retail areas lamps vapour Sodium Sodium vapour lamps • High luminous efficiency and long service life • Satisfactory to poor colour rendition • Can be dimmed in discrete steps • Applications: industrial bays. The colour-improved SDW lamp by Philips is a popular choice for lighting retail areas. although it provides a far poorer light quality. Mercury vapour lamps • No starter. A starter is usually needed to switch on the lamp. street lighting How they work The discharge in the linearly extended ceramic discharge tube is defined by sodium. just ballast required • Satisfactory to poor colour rendition • Can be dimmed in discrete steps • Applications: industrial bays. The Lighting Handbook Mercury vapour lamps Chapter 4 / 7 . so the light is yellowish and only suitable for special applications. and the current must be limited by a ballast. street lighting How they work The high-pressure mercury vapour lamp is actually the forerunner to the modern metal halide lamp. The lamps can be started at mains voltage.

8 / Chapter 4 The Lighting Handbook . just as in fluorescent lamps. Systems have a very long service life because the only parts subject to wear are in these ballasts. 85 W and 165 W • Rotationally symmetrical light distribution • Applications: areas where it is difficult to replace lamps lamps. The lamps can only be operated with special electronic ballasts. As yet there are no dimmable electronic ballasts available. retail.Induction QL • 55 W. This produces UV radiation which is then converted into visible light by fluorescent material. indoor and outdoor public areas How they work A high-frequency electromagnetic field is coupled into the glass bulb via an antenna protruding into the bulb. The amalgam technology used in these lamps makes their luminous flux only very slightly temperature-dependent. commercial and industrial interiors.

The reason for this is that the cool spot of the T16 lamp does not lie in the centre of the lamp but typically at one end of the tube near the lamp end. with losses increasing at higher and lower temperatures. % 100 80 T26 58 W 60 40 20 T26 36 W T16 -20 0 20 40 60 80 °C Ambient temperature The Lighting Handbook Chapter 4 / 9 . 1. Thus luminaire efficiencies may have levels greater than “1”.Application notes T16 fluorescent lamps T16 lamps differ from T26 versions in several characteristics that the user should be particularly aware of. The T16 basically follows the same curve as the T26. The rated luminous flux is generally specified for an ambient temperature of 25 °C. The maximum value is obtained at an optimum ambient temperature. the lamp’s luminous flux is temperature-dependent. but the maximum occurs not at an ambient temperature of 20 to 25 °C but at about 35 °C. Luminous flux – temperature curve As for all fluorescent lamps. the maximum value therefore lies above this rated value. For the T16.

This is the period immediately after the lamps are switched on for the first time. Unstabilised lamps may differ in brightness and light colour. 10 / Chapter 4 The Lighting Handbook . particularly in dimming installations. Ageing/burning in Brand new lamps stabilise during the ageing phase. To ensure perfect operation. it matters how one or more lamps are fitted in the luminaires. in multi-lamp luminaires they should lie next to each other.2.e. even exhibiting flickering at low dimming levels. For cool environments it may be practical to choose a different orientation. Lamp orientation Owing to the two electrodes (tube ends) not being identical in design. they should preferably also be at the bottom. when the initially encapsulated mercury is vaporised and evenly distributed in the lamp. In general. One should also wait for proper ageing before assessing the illuminance level and the light quality. single-lamp normal ambient temperature multi-lamp cool ambient temperature 3. one should allow a period of 2 to 4 days of operation without dimming or switching. lamp ends should always have the same orientation i. This ageing has no effect on the lamp service life. and where lamps are positioned vertically.

2/36 W electr. ballast Option 2: SPHEROS ind/direct luminaire. height = 3 m Reflection factors: ceiling = 70 %. matt louvre. matt louvre. 2/28 W electr.2 W/m2/100 lx Luminaire efficiency 85 % Utilization factor 66 % Energy saving Option 2 2/28 W 8 104 lm/W 2. floor = 20 % Required maintenance value of illuminance: 500 lx Option 1: SPHEROS ind/direct luminaire.A comparison of fluorescent lamps – T16/T26 Advantages of T16 fluorescent lamps – – – – Reduction in the lamp diameter by about 40 % Higher optical efficiencies possible Improved luminous efficiency Improved luminaire efficiencies from the shift in the luminous-flux peak – Standardised luminance levels for all lamp lengths for high-efficiency lamps – Larger range of types makes it easier to meet lighting requirements more closely Summary type comparison (selection): Length 549 mm 849 mm 1149 mm 1449 mm T16 Power Rated luminous flux (25°) 14 W 1200 lm 24 W 1750 lm 21 W 1900 lm 39 W 3100 lm 28 W 2600 lm 54 W 4450 lm 35 W 3300 lm 49 W 4300 lm 80 W 6150 lm T26 Power Rated luminous flux (25°) 590 mm 18 W 1350 lm Length 895 mm 30 W 2350 lm 1200 mm 36 W 3350 lm 1500 mm 58 W 5200 lm Example of interior lighting using T16 and T26 Room dimensions: length = 8 m.0 W/m2/100 lx 91 % 73 % 10 % Chapter 4 / 11 The Lighting Handbook . lamp luminous efficiency 93 lm/W Power consumption per m2 per 100 lx 2. ballast Option 1 2/36 W Number of luminaires 8 Max. width = 6 m. walls = 50 %.

TC-QELI 13 W 18 W 26 W 32 W 42 W 57 W 60 W 70 W 85 W 120 W Osram 2-pin DULUX T IN Osram 4-pin DULUX T/E IN Philips 2-pin PL-T 2p Philips 4-pin PL-T 4p GE 4-pin BIAX T/E BIAX Q/E Sylvania 4-pin Lynx CF-TE X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X The Lighting Handbook X X X X X X X 12 / Chapter 4 . Above and below this range. This helps to somewhat check the steep drop-off at higher or lower temperatures. TC-TELI. however. TC-TE manufacturers’ 13 W 18 W 26 W 32 W 42 W lamps in the TC-T design (three-fold Osram 2-pin DULUX T X X X double tube) that Osram 4-pin have added X X X X X DULUX T/E amalgam. so that at least 90 % of the maximum luminous flux is achieved over a wide temperature range of about +5 to +70 °C. Amalgam lamps The strong temperature dependence of the luminous flux of traditional fluorescent and compact fluorescent lamps can be compensated by adding amalgam (mercury compound). GE 2-pin BIAX T Sylvania 2-pin Lynx CF-T X X X X X with amalgam TC-TI.Application notes Compact fluorescent lamps 1. The tables provide an overview of those major without amalgam TC-T. the light level still falls off sharply.

In amalgam lamps. Either possible orientation of these lamps is equivalent. The light output ratio can therefore be maximized by inserting the lamps correctly. In compact luminaires with horizontal lamp arrangement (e. so that self-heating and convection may lead to a temperature rise here. The exception to this is the PHILIPS PL-T. Standard types have a cool spot in the exposed lamp bend. the cool spot lies in the lamp base. in which the electrodes are arranged diagonally. that lamp side on which adjacent tubes are not connected should be placed uppermost – these are the two tube ends containing the internal electrodes. downlights). Lamp orientation The luminous flux from compact fluorescent lamps is highly dependent on the burning position. it is therefore recommended to fit the lamps with electrodes uppermost wherever possible.2. The Lighting Handbook Chapter 4 / 13 . Since the lamp end does not allow consistent identification of the electrode position.g.

metal halide lamps require a glass cover to protect people and property in the event of the lamp exploding. COPA I 1/400 HSE). The detailed information from the manufacturer must be observed without fail. integral safety tube. Once again the detailed data from the manufacturer must be taken into account. Suitable safety devices are installed in the lamps for this purpose (e. Glass covers In general.g. They also depend on the switching frequency and the position of use.Application notes Metal halide lamps 1. 14 / Chapter 4 The Lighting Handbook . Service life characteristics The average lamp service life (lamp survival factor) and the reduction in luminous flux (lamp luminous flux maintenance factor) can vary markedly in some of the different lamp types. In both cases suitable starters are required. The maintenance factor tables in Chapter 8 contain some typical values. Some lamps are therefore approved for operation both with ballasts for metal halide lamps (e. 2. outer protective coating). It is the manufacturer’s responsibility to decide whether to permit individual lamp types to be used in uncovered luminaires.g.g. 3. resulting in different electrical operating values. Ballasts The manufacturers of metal halide lamps use a range of operating principles. COPA I 1/400 HIE) and with ballasts for high-pressure sodium vapour lamps (e. The higher operating current then leads to higher luminous flux levels for the same lamps together with a slightly altered light quality.

000 lm 4.The Lighting Handbook OSRAM HPI-PLUS 250 W-BU Ellipsoid E40 vertical ±15° no 20.300 K 90 Chapter 4 / 15 All data subject to change.000 lm Colour temperature 5.000 h 12.000 lm 4.000 h See maintenance factors in Chapter 8 “Calculation of economic efficiency” not permitted Characteristics of metal halide lamps 250 W Operation with metal-halide lamp ballast (HI) Luminous flux not permitted not permitted Colour temperature Colour rendition index Ra Operation with high-pressure sodium-vapour lamp ballast (HS) Luminous flux 19. .000 lm 4.000 K 65 Ellipsoid E40 any no Ellipsoid E40 any yes Tube E40 any no 12.000 h 20.500 lm 3.800 K 69 25.000 h Ellipsoid E40 vertical ±15° yes Tube E40 horizontal ±20° no PHILIPS HPI-PLUS 250 W BU-P HPI-T PLUS 250 W HQI-E 250 W/D HQI-E/P 250 W/D HQI-T 250 W/D Design Base Burning position Approved for operation in uncovered luminaires Average service life Reduction in luminous flux 19.000 lm 4.300 K 69 19.000 h 12.300 K 69 25.000 h 20.000 K Colour rendition index Ra 90 90 20.800 K 69 19.500 lm 3. please refer to the manufacturer’s data.000 lm 5.000 lm 17.500 K 65 23.200 K 6. For reliable information and data on other lamp types.

000 lm 34.000 h 12. . For reliable information and data on other lamp types.100 K 3.000 lm 36.000 h See maintenance factors in Chapter 8 “Calculation of economic efficiency” Operation with metal-halide lamp ballast (HI) Luminous flux 26.000 K 5.000 K Colour rendition index Ra 90 90 70 70 90 65 69 69 69 65 All data subject to change.000 lm 35.000 h 12.000 h 12.000 lm 35.300 K Colour rendition index Ra 90 90 65 65 90 65 69 69 69 65 Operation with high-pressure sodium-vapour lamp ballast (HS) Luminous flux 30.000 lm 35.000 h 20.800 K 4.000 lm 42.800 K 3.200 K 3.700 K 4.400 W 400 W 400 W clear BU BU-P Design Base Burning position Ellipsoid E40 any Ellipsoid E40 any Ellipsoid E40 any Ellipsoid E40 any Tube E40 any Approved for operation in uncovered luminaires Average service life Reduction in luminous flux no yes no no no 12.000 lm 30.600 K 3.000 lm 34.000 lm 38.700 K 3.000 h Ellipsoid E40 vertical ±15° no Ellipsoid E40 vertical ±15° yes Ellipsoid E40 horizontal ±20° no Tube E40 horizontal ±20° no HQI-E HQI-E/P HQI-E HQI-E HQI-BT HQI-T HPI-PLUS HPI-PLUS HPI PLUS HPI-T PLUS 400 W/D 400 W/D 400 W/N 400 W/N 400 W/D 400 W/N 400 W.000 h 20.000 h 20.000 lm 42.800 K 4. please refer to the manufacturer’s data.800 K 5.000 lm 27.500 lm 42.600 K 6.900 K 4.000 lm 23.000 lm 32.800 K 3.000 lm Colour temperature 5.OSRAM PHILIPS Characteristics of metal halide lamps 400 W The Lighting Handbook 16 / Chapter 4 Tube E40 horizontal ±45° no 20.000 h 12.500 lm 35.000 h 12.000 lm Colour temperature 5.300 K 4.000 K 4.000 K 3.000 lm 25.000 lm 43.000 lm 45.500 K 4.300 K 4.

linear doubleended Halogen incandescent lamps for mains voltage with reflector Low-voltage halogen incandescent lamps Ø 9 mm Low-voltage halogen incandescent lamps Ø 12 mm Low-voltage halogen incandescent lamps with reflector Low-voltage halogen incandescent lamps with cool-light specular reflector Low-voltage halogen incandescent lamps with cool-light specular reflector and glass cover Fluorescent lamps Ø 16 mm Fluorescent lamps Ø 26 mm Compact fluorescent lamps (1 tube) up to 11 W/for electr. FQ L HQL HQI-T HCI-T NAV-T Philips A Masterline PAR PL-S PL-T PL-L TL5 HE. KRC/T CMH/T Lucalox T Sylvania Normal Superia Hi-Spot Lynx CF-S Lynx CF-T Lynx CF-L F HSL HSI-T SHP-T. name from LIS (ZVEI) Manufacturer names Osram A DECOSTAR S HALOPAR DULUX S DULUX T DULUX L FH.Lamp names as given by the LIS (ZVEI) – a selection Abbreviation Description A R QT 18 QT 32 QT-DE Q PAR QT9 QT12 QR QR-CB QR-CBC T16 T26 TC-S/SEL TC-D/DEL TC-T/TEL TC-L TC-TELI/ QELI HI HM HS LS General-purpose incandescent lamps Reflector lamps Halogen incandescent lamps for mains voltage Ø 18 mm Halogen incandescent lamps for mains voltage Ø 32 mm Halogen incandescent lamps for mains voltage. ballast Compact fluorescent lamps (2 tubes) up to 26 W/for electr. SHP-TS The Lighting Handbook A 60 QR-CBC QPAR TC-S TC-T TC-L T16 T26 HME HIT HIT-CE HST Chapter 4 / 17 . HO TLD HPL MHN-T CDM-T SON-T. ballast Compact fluorescent lamps (3 tubes) up to 42 W/for electr. SDW-T GE A1 Precise MR PAR BIAX S BIAX T BIAX L F T5 F H ARC/T. ballast Compact fluorescent lamps (1 tube) up to 80 W Compact fluorescent lamps (3–4 tubes) amalgam technology up to 120 W/only for electronic ballast Metal halide lamps: various designs High-pressure mercury vapour lamps: ellipsoid High-pressure sodium vapour lamps: various designs Low-pressure sodium vapour lamps: tubular Comparison of lamp names (examples) Internat.

000 12. nw ww.750 2. nw ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 G5 G5 G5 G5 G5 G5 G5 G5 G5 2 GX 13 2 GX 13 2 GX 13 2 GX 13 G 13 G 13 G 13 1.350 5.000 84 87 74 93 93 76 90 81 82 69 71 67 76 68 89 93 Characteristic values of the major lamps ww. nw ww.000 16–20. nw ww.600 3. nw ww.000 16–20.000 16–20.000 12. nw ww.000 1.200 4. nw ww.000 13.000 12. nw ww. nw ww.150 1. nw ww.000 16–20.900 1.000 16–20. nw ww. nw ww.100 4.450 6.000 16–20. nw ww.200 1.000 13.000 12. nw ww. system luservice life minous efficiency in h in lm/W Lamp name Colour Colour rendition temperature index Ra Base Luminous flux in lm (at 25 °C) Fluorescent lamps T 16 14 W T 16 21 W T 16 24 W T 16 28 W T 16 35 W T 16 39 W T 16 49 W T 16 54 W T 16 80 W T 16-R 22 W T 16-R 40 W T 16-R 55 W T 16-R 60 W T 26 18 W T 26 36 W T 26 58 W 25 42 66 13.300 4.350 3.000 16–20.300 3. 88 26 45–47 60 66 19–20 36 54–57 16–20.000 16–18 24 27 31–33 39–41 46 54 61 ca.000 16–20.000 5.000 16–20. nw ww.800 3.200 .magnetic VVG electronic EVG The Lighting Handbook 18 / Chapter 4 System power in W Lamp service life in h System power in W Lamp max.000 16–20. nw ww.000 16–20.

300 4.000 10. nw TC-T/TC-TEL 13 W ww. nw TC-TELI 70 W ww. nw TC-T/TC-TEL 26 W ww. nw TC-TEL/-TELI 42 W ww. nw 25 30 42 8.500 4. nw TC-D/TC-DEL 18 W ww.000 8.000 8.000 10.000 5.000 10.000 1.000 10.000 10.The Lighting Handbook magnetic VVG electronic EVG Lamp name Colour Colour rendition temperature index Ra 15 17 23 17 23 31 8.000 Base System power in W Lamp service life in h System power in W Lamp max.200 4. nw TC-L 24 W ww.200 6.000 8.000 8.000 50 64 66 64 66 64 68 69 69 62 70 65 70 63 72 85 77 87 71 Chapter 4 / 19 . nw TC-L 36 W ww.000 20.200 1.800 6. nw TC-TEL/-TELI 32 W ww. nw TC-L 80 W ww. nw TC-TELI 60 W ww. nw TC-L 55 W ww.000 10. system luservice life minous efficiency in h in lm/W Luminous flux in lm (at 25 °C) Compact fluorescent lamps TC-D/TC-DEL 10 W ww.000 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 Characteristic values of the major lamps G 24 d-1/q-1 G 24 d-1/q-1 G 24 d-2/q-2 GX 24 d-1/q-1 GX 24 d-2/q-2 GX 24 d-3/q-3 GX 24 q-3 GX 24 q-4 GX 24 q-5 2G8 GX24q-6 2G8 2G8 2 G 11 2 G 11 2 G 11 2 G 11 2 G 11 2 G 11 600 900 1.000 9.800 2.400 3.000 10.000 10. nw TC-TELI 120 W ww.000 10.000 10. nw TC-TELI 85 W ww.000 10. nw TC-L 18 W ww. nw TC-D/TC-DEL 13 W ww. nw TC-TELI 57 W ww.000 8.200 900 1.000 8.000 10.900 3.000 20.000 10.000 20. nw TC-T/TC-TEL 18 W ww.000 8.000 10.000 10.800 2.200 1. nw TC-L 40 W ww.000 12 14 18–20 14 18–20 28 35–36 46–47 62 65 75 92 128 19 25–27 34–39 45 55–61 85 10.

nw LMG-IHf 165 W (QL 165 W) ww.000 1.magnetic VVG electronic EVG The Lighting Handbook 20 / Chapter 4 System power in W 55 85 165 4.800–48.500 1.000 4.000 60.700–30.000 High-voltage halogen lamps QT-DE 12 150 W L 114.000 Characteristic values of the major lamps *Axial luminous intensity in cd.000 2.000 4.000 3.35 GU 5.000 64 71 73 16 18 16 18 10 10 14 16 19 14 16 16 Lamp name Colour Colour rendition temperature index Ra Base Lamp service life in h System power in W Lamp max.400 4. nw ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 Special Special Special 3.000 *950–14.000 3.500 2. nw LMG-IHf 85 W (QL 85 W) ww.000 60.000 Low-voltage halogen lamps QT 12 35 W ww QT 12 50 W ww QR CBC 51 35 W (8–60°) ww QR CBC 51 50 W (8–60°) ww QR 111 75 W (8–45°) ww QR 111 100 W (8–45°) ww ≥90 ≥90 ≥90 ≥90 ≥90 ≥90 GY 6.3 G 53 G 53 600 930 *700–14.000 12.000 2.000 60.000 *1.430 2.000 2.000 2. .3 GU 5.000 *2.35 GY 6.000 9. system luservice life minous efficiency in h in lm/W Luminous flux in lm (at 25 °C) Induction lamps LMG-IHf 55 W (QL 55 W) ww.000 4.500 6.200 5.2 ww QT-DE 12 300 W ww QT-DE 12 500 W ww QT 32 100 W matt ww QT 32 150 W matt ww QT 32 250 W matt ww ≥90 ≥90 ≥90 ≥90 ≥90 ≥90 R7s R7s R7s E 27 E 27 E 27 2.

≥70 E 40 19.000 6.000 400–460 ≥90. ≥70 E 27 7.000 89–95 ≥90. nw ww ww.000 6–12. ≥80 RX 7s 13.500–14.300–8. tw ww. tw nw. ≥80. ≥70 Fc 2 20.000 6.The Lighting Handbook magnetic VVG electronic EVG Lamp name Colour Colour rendition temperature index Ra 80–83 172 6.000 400–460 ≥60 E 40 95.400 44–46 ≥80 G8. nw ww. ≥60. ≥60.000 6.200 168–177 ≥90. nw nw. nw ww.5/G12 6.000 6. tw ww.000 275–285 63 72 74 93 93 90 69 77 80 83 83 76 91 75 66 79 80 72 Chapter 4 / 21 . tw ≥80. ≥60. nw ww. ≥70 E 40 25. ≥70 E 40 20. ≥70 RX 7s 11. nw ww.000 275–285 ≥90. ≥80 RX 7s 5.000 9–12.000 6.600 82–96 ≥80 G 12 14.000 6.000 12–15.000 Characteristic values of the major lamps ww. ≥70 E 27 4. tw nw.000 6.000–21.000 9–12. ≥60.000 6. ≥80 RX 7s 5.100 112–115 ≥80. ≥70 E 40 17.000 Metal halide lamps HIE 70 W HIE 100 W HIE 150 W HIE 250 W HIE 400 W HIE 1000 W HIT 70 W (quartz) HIT 150 W (quartz) HIT/HIT-TC 35 W (ceramic) HIT/HIT-TC 70 W (ceramic) HIT 150 W (ceramic) HIT 250 W HIT 400 W HIT-DE 70 W (quartz) HIT-DE 150 W (quartz) HIT-DE 70 W (ceramic) HIT-DE 150 W (ceramic) HIT-DE 250 W 6. system luservice life minous efficiency in h in lm/W Luminous flux in lm (at 25 °C) 80–83 172 42–45 80–83 172 80–83 172 80–83 172 6.000–42.000 168–177 ≥80 G8.000 7–15.500 82–96 ≥80 G 12 13.000 82–96 ≥80. nw.500–43. ≥70 E 27 10.000 6.5/G12 3. ≥80.200–5.000 7.400–6. nw.700–7.000 Base System power in W Lamp service life in h System power in W Lamp max. nw.000 168–177 ≥90.000 6.500 168–177 ≥90.00–255. nw ww.000 6.000 6.000–6.000 9.000 6.000 12. nw ww.250 168–177 ≥90. nw ww. nw ww.000 6.000 275–285 ≥90.000 82–96 ≥90.500–12.000 6. tw nw ww.900–5.000 6.000 9.000 1050–1065 ≥80 G 12 5.000 6.

000 22.000 48 51 112 120 31 34 42 116 123 Lamp name Colour Colour rendition temperature index Ra Base Lamp service life in h System power in W Lamp max.000 8.000 10.500 .000 1.000 Characteristic values of the major lamps High-pressure sodium vapour lamps HSE 250 W ww HSE 400 W ww HST 35 W (SDW-T) ww HST 50 W (SDW-T/TG) ww HST 100 W (SDW-T/TG) ww HST 250 W ww HST 400 W ww ≥60.300 2.000–56. ≥20 ≥60.300 4. ≥20 E 40 E 40 PG 12-1 PG 12-1/G12 PG 12-1/G12 E 40 E 40 22.magnetic VVG electronic EVG The Lighting Handbook 22 / Chapter 4 System power in W 266–270 425 275–285 440–450 41–42 66 114–116 275 440–450 10.000 10. nw HME 400 W ww.000 10.000–33.800 23.000–54.000 37.000–32.000 10. system luservice life minous efficiency in h in lm/W Luminous flux in lm (at 25 °C) High-pressure mercury vapour lamps HME 250 W ww.000 36. ≥20 ≥60.000 8. ≥20 ≥80 ≥80 ≥80 ≥60.000 10. nw ≥40 ≥40 E 40 E 40 13.000 10.

Example for T26 36 W 840: EEI A1 A2 A3 B1 B2 C D ≤ 19 W (25 % dimming is equivalent to 50 % A3) ≤ 36 ≤ 38 ≤ 41 ≤ 43 ≤ 45 ≤ 45 Chapter 4 / 23 The Lighting Handbook .Energy efficiency of luminaires Most of the electrical power is consumed in the lamp and its control gear. very low loss (low-loss ballast) Magnetic ballasts. the European Union has adopted the energy classification system (Directive 2000/55/EU on energy efficiency requirements for ballasts for fluorescent lamps). The EEI (Energy Efficiency Index) classifies ballasts into seven categories: Class A1 A2 A3 B1 B2 C D Ballasts Dimmable electronic ballasts Reduced-loss electronic ballasts Electronic ballasts Magnetic ballasts. In order to clarify the power consumption of the ballast/lamp system. class C ballasts must be taken off the market by 21 November 2005 at the latest. low loss (low-loss ballast) Magnetic ballasts. moderate loss (conventional ballast) Magnetic ballasts. very high loss (conventional ballast) Sales of class D ballasts have been prohibited since 21 May 2002.

only PCA Excel one4all Luminaire group.Properties 0. all luminaires on one control line Visual comfort Stable and flicker-free lamp operation Dimming curve yes linear yes logarithmic ** Additional emergency lighting function (DC mode) not possible Dimming level can be set by customer 1 or 3–70 % ( PCA Excel one4all ) uniform surface illumination possible in emergency lighting mode.1–100 % (depends on lamp) none Interchangeable polarity yes yes Individual luminaires or luminaire groups yes logarithmic ** Analog (1–10 V) Digital (DSI) Digital (DALI) Properties of dimmable electronic ballasts The Lighting Handbook 24 / Chapter 4 DALI ONLY LDE Functionality Dimming range in AC mode Dimming level tolerance Control line Zero-power switching Status report & logging Addressing 1 or 3–100 % Fluctuations plus/minus no no Luminaire group. dimming-level memory with automatic recall in emergency lighting mode ( PCA Excel one4all) LUXMATE connection LUXMATE Basic* LUXMATE Emotion* LUXMATE Professional* LMB LDE (PCA Excel one4all) * see chapter 5 ** matches visual perception . all luminaires on one control line 1 or 3–100 % none Interchangeable polarity yes yes.

freestanding luminaire using SensControl Power requirement of a freestanding luminaire using SensControl The Lighting Handbook M M M M M M M absent M M M absent cloud cover M M M increasing daylight sufficient daylight decreasing daylight Chapter 4 / 25 M .Power consumption –20 % to –88 % Energy saving at normal operation Set-AC compared with conventional ballasts 20 % to 88 % at 1 % dimming level (off) 55–8 W function of dimmer setting Power consumption as a 55 W 45 W 35 W 25 W 8W A 69 W 8W 8W 1% 100 % 75 % 50 % 25 % Conventional ballast Controlled by LUXMATE Dimmer setting Energy saving using Set-DC 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 further potential energy saving of 27 % 10 0 59 53 48 43 39 35 30 28 22 17 12 AC-mode DC-mode in (%) Additional emergency lighting function with PCA Excel one4all (central power supply) Set-DC potential energy saving of 52 % Saving: up to 70 %.g. at 10 % luminous flux reduced use of group batteries and central installations Power (W) 10 at 230 V DC 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 Power requirement of a traditional freestanding luminaire raditional Potential energy savings using daylight sensors and presence detectors up to 70 % compared with constant light e.

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. . . . 14 – 15 ONLITE emergency lighting system (applicable to U. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 LUXMATE Basic system overviews . .K. . . . . 16 – 25 . . . . . . . . . . . 10 – 13 LUXMATE Professional system overview (selection) . . . . . .Chapter 5 Lighting and room management. . . . . 2 Dimming with LUXMATE Basic . . . . . . . . 4 – 9 Dimming and switching with LUXMATE Emotion LUXMATE EMOTION system overviews + optional integration of ONLITE Local Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . emergency lighting LUXMATE lighting management . . . . . .) . . . . . .

Luxmate lighting management – The intelligent control system for individual rooms and throughout buildings Function Room management systems Applications LUXMATE Professional (based on LUXMATE bus system) – Artificial light/daylight/blinds – Conference rooms – Interfaces to media technology – Office buildings – Integration of ONLITE – Shopping malls emergency lighting system – Museums – Interface to building management – Industry system and central maintenance – Customized operating systems Lighting control systems LUXMATE EMOTION (based on DALI) – Lighting scenes – Shops – Timer – Health & Care – RGB dimming software – Wellness – ACTIVE LIGHT lighting concepts – Control rooms – Flexibility of individual – Offices addressing/grouping – In the home The Lighting Handbook LUXMATE Basic (based on DSI) – Daylight-based – Infrared remote control unit – Standard switch components – No addressing. group dimming – Zero-power switching and dimming – In the home – Small offices & surgeries – Commercial premises .

D/ID Balanced Lighting On/Off. dimming.The Lighting Handbook Dimming with LUXMATE Basic (no addressing required) Output module DSI-T** DSI-TD** DSI-TS DSI-BLC** Momentary-action switch DSI-2IR Momentary-action switch. daylightlight sensor. dimming On/Off. remote control unit STARLFEX optical fibre QT engines 100–0 % DALI TE one4all 105 VA/150 VA 2 x 25/73* DSI-TLC** Momentary-action switch. dimming.000 VA phase dimmer 25/73* 25/73* Low-voltage halogen 100–0 % incandescent lamps DALI TE one4all 105 VA/150 VA 100/148* 2 x 25/73* Dimmable fluorescent lamps T16/T26 100–1 % DSI electronic ballast TC 100–3 % (LMB) 2 x 25/73* LED 100–0 % PWM converter LED K210 one4all 25 W 2 x 25/73* DSI-IRBLC Momentary-action switch. 1 scene Lamps Operation Function Dimming range Control gear/ dimmer Number possible General purpose lamps 100–0 % PAR lamps. daylightdependent dimming Chapter 5 / 3 3 x 100/148* DSI-TLE** Momentary-action switch. D/ID Balanced Lighting On/Off. dimming On/Off. 3 lighting scenes per output On/Off. dimming. presence detector dependent dimming On/Off. On/Off. ** DALI versions available on request . Halogen incandescent lamps PDAX 500 VA PDAS 1. dimming. remote control unit Momentary-action switch Momentary-action switch Momentary-action switch. dimming. dimming. presence detector On/Off. light sensor * number can be increased using DSI-V amplifier.

User control units Control units Lamp control gear Lamps LUXMATE Basic DSI-TD or DALI-TD “Dimming using conventional momentary-action light switches and with dimming-level memory” (DALI-TD available on request) The Lighting Handbook 4 / Chapter 5 up to 25 DSI electr. Programming instructions for preset light level (Dia): • Set brightness level required using momentary-action switch • Press the Preset/Dia switch for at least 5 seconds or up to 25 DSI transformers up to 25 DALI transformers* max.g. ballasts* Fluorescent lamps T26/T16 TC-L/TC-DEL/TC-TEL L N D1 PCA D2 12 11 10 9 L N PE Mains 230 V/50 Hz Conventional double momentary-action light switch On/Off Dimming Control line e. 70/105/150/210 VA • Arguments for your customers • • Absolutely flicker-free dimming • • Simple to operate using conventional momentary-action light switches • throughout • • Hence ensures standardised design of light switches and sockets • • Any number of momentary-action light switches can be connected in parallel • Dimming range 1 or 3–100 % light level Lamps can be started at any dimming level Suitable for all major lamp types Easy to install Insensitive to mains fluctuations and interference Components can be delivered separately or pre-fitted in the luminaire Dimming-level memory . 2 m 2 D1 D2 TEL Incandescent lamps/ HV halogen incandescent lamps max. NYM 2 x 1. ballasts up to 25 DALI electr. length 100 m Conventional momentaryaction light switch Preset/Dia up to 25 DSI phase dimmers up to 25 DALI phase dimmers* D1 D2 APD Momentary-action switch control L module with input for preset light level N D1 T T D2 DSI-TD Preset/Dia or L' N N L DALI-TD Alternative: Connect terminals “T ” and “T ” together with a jumper if a single momentary-action switch is used.5 mm2. 300 VA * available on request LV halogen incandescent lamps max. max.

TEL max. PHD.The Lighting Handbook Lamps Group 2 Fluorescent lamps T26/T16 TC-L/TC-DEL/TC-TEL User control units Control units Lamp control gear Lamp control gear Lamps L N PE N 230 V/50 Hz Up to 5 luminaire groups for each installation LDSI-2IR infrared control module IR1 N IR2 TT D2 D1 T D1 T If more than one DSI module is used. the others as slaves LUXMATE Basic IR up to 5 ceilingmounted IRED IR sensors DSI phase dimmer D1 D2 L' N N L DSI electronic ballast L N D1 D2 DSI electronic ballast 12 L 11 N 10 D1 9 D2 Incandescent lamps/HV halogen incandescent lamps max. TEL IRS IR remote control unit max. D2 12 11 10 9 Group 1 one must be set as master. PHD. range 10 m at 500 lux max. length 50 m Group 1 DSI phase dimmer D1 D2 Group 2 * max. 25 PCA. length 2 m 87 65 43 21 SI transformer up to 7 IRS channels can be used D1 D2 LV halogen incandescent lamps 70/105/150/ 210 VA max. max. 25 PCA. 300 VA * L' N N L max. length 50 m “Dimming of luminaires by infrared remote control unit” Chapter 5 / 5 Arguments for your customers • • • • Convenient operation using infrared remote control unit Remote control unit comes complete with wall bracket Horizontal/vertical transmission characteristics Can run three lighting scenes • • • • Individual dimming of five luminaire groups Easy to install Components can be delivered separately or pre-fitted in the luminaire Up to eight modules per infrared circuit . DSI transformer length 2 m 87 65 D1 43 D2 21 * Single-switch control DSI control lines.

based exactly on the daylight available • Accurate window-light sensor rather than error-prone roomlight sensor • Energy savings of up to 75 % • Brightness level can be changed at any time using momentaryaction dimmer switches • Economically priced – short pay-back period • Long lamp service life • Option to connect presence detector See page 8 for sensor positioning! The Lighting Handbook 6 / Chapter 5 .LUXMATE Basic Daylight DSI-TLC or DALI-TLC Daylight-based control for small rooms (DALI-TLC available on request) Applications • • • • Single and team offices Areas near windows in shopping centres Classrooms Corridors and passageways 0% 50 % 500 lx artificial light daylight Arguments for your customers • Dims the lighting from 100–1 %.

ballasts/Group I “Daylight-based control for small rooms” LSD light sensor Group I Light-sensor line e. NYM 2 x 1.The Lighting Handbook Lamp control gear Fluorescent lamps T26/T16 TC-L/TC-DEL/TC-TEL 12 11 10 9 User control units Control units Lamps L Mains 230 V/50 Hz N PE PCA up to 25 DSI electronic ballasts/Group I up to 25 DALI electr. length 100 m up to 25 DSI electronic ballasts/Group II up to 25 DALI electr. NYM 2 x 1.g. length 100 m L N D1 D2 Conventional double momentary-action light switch G I G II DSI-TLC daylight-based control module installed in luminaire/recessed into ceiling L N Se2 Se1 T1 T2 D2 D1 T3 T4 D4 D3 PD in DSI-TLC On/Off Dimming DALI-TLC Fluorescent lamps T26/T16 TC-L/TC-DEL/TC-TEL LUXMATE Basic Daylight DSI-TLC or DALI-TLC (DALI-TLC available on request) Chapter 5 / 7 Motion sensor/ Presence detector Control line e. max. ballasts/Group II 12 L 11 N D1 10 PCA D2 9 Group II .5 mm 2 max.g.5 mm2.

0% 50 % 80 % Vertical sensor positioning 5m 4m 3 m 2.LUXMATE Basic Daylight DSI-TLE or DALI-TLE Daylight-based control for large rooms (DALI-TLE available on request) Applications • Open-plan offices • Manufacturing bays.5 m 2m 1m 0m ° 1m 2m 4m 5m 6m Window height = 2. warehouses.5 m Horizontal sensor positioning 5m 4m 3m 2.5 m 2m 1m 0m 3m 2m 1m 0m 1m 2m 3m Arguments for your customers: see page 6! 3m Window width = 4. sports halls and gymnasiums • Supermarkets etc.0 m 8 / Chapter 5 The Lighting Handbook .

III 12 L 11 N D1 10 PCA D2 9 Group III Fluorescent lamps T26/T16 TC-L/TC-DEL/TC-TEL Chapter 5 / 9 Dimming using conventional double momentary-action light switch Alternative: Connect the “Up” and “Down” terminals together with a jumper when using a single momentary-action switch. ballasts/Group I. Auto/Man Down installed in L N On/Off Up switch cabinet Insert jumper between Up/Down for single momentaryaction switch up to 100 DSI electr. length 250 m up to 100 DSI electr. II. II. ballasts/Group I. .5 mm 2 max. III Fluorescent lamps T26/T16 TC-L/TC-DEL/TC-TEL up to 64 DALI electr. ballasts/Group I.5 mm 2 max.g. III 12 L 11 N D1 10 PCA D2 9 Group I “Daylight-based control for large rooms” up to 100 DSI electr. NYM 2 x 1. III up to 64 DALI electr.g. ballasts/Group I. II. III 12 L 11 N D1 10 PCA D2 9 Group II Conventional serial switch LUXMATE Basic Daylight DSI-TLE or DALI-TLE On/Off Automatic/Manual DSI-TLE DSI-TLE DALI-TLE Se I II III daylightbased control module for 3 groups. ballasts/Group I. II. NYM 2 x 1.The Lighting Handbook Lamp control gear Lamps User control units Control units L N PE LSD light sensor mounted on ceiling Light-sensor line e. II. II. length 250 m Control line e. ballasts/Group I. III Fluorescent lamps T26/T16 TC-L/TC-DEL/TC-TEL up to 64 DALI electr.

scenes. 1.400 VA cent lamps SDK-AB-05.000 VA Halogen incandesSDK-AN-06. 4A2) 4RUKS. PAR lamps.200 VA Low-voltage halogen 100–0 % DALI TE one4all incandescent lamps 105 VA. 16 x 16 room-based lighting scenes static or Active Light Timed lighting scenes On/Off. 1. shows. 4 x 16A3) Dimming/ Control gear/ switching range dimmer General-purpose 100–0 % EMOTION-APDX lamps. time entries Momentaryaction switch1) Motion sensor1) EMOTION Touch PC software Lamps DALI loads 1 Control unit 1 ANAS 1 10 1 1RUK. 100 % HM 50. 150 VA Discharge lamps HIT 100 % Electronic/ SDW-T 100 % conventional ballast HS 30. 100 % Induction lamps QL 100 % Switchable 100 % fluorescent lamps Dimmable T16/T26 100–1 % DALI electronic ballast fluorescent lamps TC 100–3 % (LDE-DO) 1 . Calling up/changing scenes Download/upload via RS 232 interface Addressing. 1.Dimming and switching with LUXMATE Emotion + optional integration of ONLITE Local Check Operation EMOTION Touch Function (2 x 64 DALI addresses. dimming. dimming. 500 VA. 50. 2 x 99 DALI loads) The Lighting Handbook 10 / Chapter 5 On/Off.

relay contact 24 V. SMS7)) Download/upload via RS 232 interface Configuration data. TC) Emergency luminaires (T. GSM.The Lighting Handbook LED 100–0 % LED K210/K211 25 W 1 STARFLEX QT STARFLEX HIT 100–0 % 100 % ANAS 4RUKS. 4 x 16A ANAS ANAS 70 % 1 1 1 1 1 1 Escape-sign luminaires (T. test log book 6) with ONLITE Local Check power supply and printer 7) with ONLITE Local Check power supply and GSM module Chapter 5 / 11 1) via EMOTION SDED. TC) Depends on wattage4) dimmable transf. ballast (Local Check) DALI electronic ballast + emergency lighting electronic ballast (Local Check NT1-NT3) Local Check Controller3) PC software 3 ONLITE SB 128 Non-maintained/maintained mode can Local Check be set for each luminaire Random test function Controller5) Programmable function test/duration test Test log book function (printable6)) Alarm output (buzzer. 1–10 V electronic ballast 150 W conventional ballast 250 W colour wheel dimming wheel Emergency lighting electr. 5 DALI loads 2) not for Discharge lamps. EMOTION BV bus supply not required . 4 x 16A 4RUKS. otherwise can only be used as contactor relay 3) available on request 4) details in ONLITE product brochure 5) includes bus supply.

5 mm 2 max. SDW-T.LUXMATE EMOTION “Lighting control system” Operation/supply L Mains 230 V/50 Hz N PE EMOTION Touch COM T 1 T 2 COM T 3 L N COM T 4 max. 64 users (addresses) 99 DALI loads ONLITE SB 128 LOCAL CHECK controller.5 s max.f. 64 users (addresses) 99 DALI loads Line 2: DALI control line e. 30A for 0.g.f. 0. corrected) T16/T26/TC with electr. – EMOTION 4RUKS 4 x 2.5 mm 2 max. ballast LV with transformer HIT. HM Safe installed load EMOTION 1 RUK 500 W 250 W 250 W 30A for 0.75 1.g. corrected) TC with low-loss ballast (parallel p.50 0.25 m. NYM 2 x 1.5 s max. length 300 m max. PAR.000 W 4 x 920 W 4 x 800 W 4 x 10 A 4 x 10 A 4 x 800 W 12 / Chapter 5 .50 mm 2 mm 2 mm 2 mm 2 Cable length 116 174 232 300 m m m m Switching lamps using LUXMATE EMOTION Lamp type A. integral bus supply Use EMOTION BV bus supply if ONLITE not included in system Cable lengths of DALI control line Conductor cross-sections DALI control line 2 2 2 2 x x x x 0.00 1. QT T16/T26 with low-loss ballast (parallel p. length 300 m max. NYM 2 x 1. HS. cable included in supply DA DA DA DA COM T 1 T 2 T 3 T 4 LSD* LM-CS(X)* light sensor control point EKXP installation box (please order separately) EMOTIONSDED DA DA (5 DALI loads) DA DA DA DA DA DA DA DA L N Line 1: DALI control line e.

STARFLEX fibre optics (1 DALI load) TECTON trunking PROTON TEC* SPIRIT TEC D1 D2 D1 D2 25 DSI luminaires 25 DSI luminaires L N DA DA Locally supplied emergency luminaire LOCAL CHECK NT1-NT3 (3 DALI loads) DA DA L N Escape-sign luminaire LOCAL CHECK (1 DALI load) * available on request Chapter 5 / 13 .Lighting/emergency lighting Fluorescent lamps T26/T16 12 TC-L/TC-DEL/TC-TEL 11 10 9 L N DA DA DA DA DALI electronic ballast (1 DALI load) K K' EMOTION-1RUK (10 DALI loads) e.g.g. HIT luminaires K1 K 1' L K2 N K 2' DA K3 DA K 3' EMOTION 4RUKS K4 (1 DALI load) K 4' L L' N N DA DA Incandescent lamps/ Emotion APD (1 DALI load) HV halogen incandescent lamps max. 2 m DA DA DALI-TE (1 DALI load) LV halogen incandescent lamps R G B DA DA DALI LED converter (1 DALI load) LN LED luminaires DA DA EMOTION ANAS (1 DALI load) L N DA DA L N DA DA DALI-DSI* 0/1–10 V units e.

L. B2 B1 . N 14 / Chapter 5 . N B 1 . N L. B2 L. N L. B2 LM-2FSE L. N RS-232 link to AV system ASCII plain text protocol B 1. N LM-ZSM L. B2 B1. B2 K1 Blinds Motor 1 B1.or DALI control line Sensor cable Room management/central control/automation Screen B1. N B1 . L. B 2 LM-SI03 L. B 2 . N LM-iZSQ Motor 1 Motor 2 Timer control Sequence automation Window Window LM-BVS35 B1. N L. B2 LM-SDED LM-SWED For dimming and switching individual luminaire groups Bus Mains DSI. N 24VDC 24VAC B 1 . B2 L. B2 B1. B2 Blinds Motor 2 LM-2JSM LM-RV Partition switch LM-2LSE L. N B1. B 2 . L. N 230 VAC B1. B2.LUXMATE Professional (selection) Commissioning/user control units LM-PFC Installation-specific operation LM-CG/LM-EG Multi-room solution LM-MPA/LM-CPA Single-room solution IRED LM-IRB LM-CS(X) control point IRS B1.

N B1 . D2 DALI-PCA LM-DALI L. N Daylight-based dimming (DSI or DALI) D1. D2 D 1 . N Fluorescent lamps DSI dimming up to 10 DSI electronic ballasts up to 10 DALI electronic ballasts LM-2TL LM 2TL DALI L. D2 L. emergency lighting LM DALI-S Local check repeater SB 128 local check CTP locally supplied LOCAL CHECK emergency luminaire LOCAL CHECK escape-sign luminaire ONLITE interface for emergency lighting/local supply Chapter 5 / 15 . D2 up to 64 ballasts in 16 groups DALI-TEL D1. N B1 . D2 D1. N D1. D2 D1. B2 K'.Lighting management LM-2RUK L. N HIT/HST/HME lamps Electronic/conventional ballast for discharge lamps Switching LM-DSI L. D2 LV halogen incandescent lamps DALI LED converter LED luminaires DALI dimming ONLITE interface. N B1 . N B1 . D2 Fluorescent lamps LSD option to connect a daylight sensor to the LM-STL or LM-2TL/DALI up to 10 DSI electronic ballasts up to 10 DALI electronic ballasts D 1 . D2 Fluorescent lamps Incandescent lamps/ HV halogen incandescent lamps DALI-APD D1. D2 L. D2 D1. B 2 up to 10 DSI electronic ballasts D 1 . B 2 D1. K L. B2 L.

function test and duration test are programmable • Test log book listing The Lighting Handbook anti-panic lighting Types of Zumtobel Staff emergency luminaires 16 / Chapter 5 L . not monitored local check: Autotest.) EMERGENCY LIGHTING Emergency lighting L L L Standby lighting L for escape routes and rooms for workplaces with particular risk ONLITE local local solo: • Local battery • Function display • Manual test.K.ONLITE emergency lighting system (applicable to U. not monitored L L L ONLITE central • Group or central battery • Central monitoring • Automatic testing • Test log book listing L central test: • Monitoring of up to 4x64 luminaires by e-DALI.

Annually* • A full system test should be conducted by a competent service engineer including a full rated duration test of the system. • Compliance of the installation and system with the requirements of BS5266/BSEN 1838 should be considered and documented. The following table shows the routine testing of emergency lighting equipment that should take place. • Check that any system fault recorded is given urgent attention and record all corrective actions in the log book provided. The test should not exceed a quarter of the equipment rated duration. upon restoring the mains supply. all supply healthy indicators are again illuminated. undamaged and not blackened.Routine Testing and Maintenance of Emergency Lighting It is important that equipment is properly tested and maintained if it is to function correctly when required in an emergency. The results of all testing and any necessary corrective action should be recorded in a log record held on site which shall be available if required. • Briefly test all emergency lighting equipment by simulating a failure of the normal lighting supply. Daily • Visually check that all maintained lamps are operating and that all system healthy indicators on Central Power Supply Systems (Central Battery Systems) are illuminated. but conduct a test of the equipment for one third of its rated duration. Six • Carry out the inspection and testing as described in monthly the monthly test schedule. All emergency lighting should be regularly checked and maintained by a competent person in accordance with manufacturers’ recommendations. • Check that. * The publication of prEN50172 will change the requirements of BS5266 Part1. Monthly • Check all luminaries and other emergency lighting equipment is in a good condition. for inspection by any authorised person. prEN50172 changes the requirements for the first three years of self-contained luminaires to be annual full duration tests. all lamps and light controllers are clean. Check that all equipment functions correctly. The Lighting Handbook Chapter 5 / 17 .

Risk Assessment Checklist for Emergency Lighting Installations Risk assessment of the following parameters to provide the required level of emergency lighting when the occupants of premises evacuate in an emergency could mean the difference between life and death. 6. is emergency lighting fitted on the escape routes and in open areas? Is emergency lighting and fire safety signage on the existing escape routes adequate to permit occupants to reach a place of safety within 2–3 minutes? Is emergency lighting installed in all open areas of greater than 60m2 If there are special risks e.h) Where artificial lighting is installed. is emergency lighting fitted? 6. flammable materials used in processes.g.d).g). E1 Assessment of Escape Routes Not Applicable ICEL B55266Pt1 1008 Clause Section Ref Ref Does Not Comply The Lighting Handbook 3 6.e). or areas having restricted access. 6.j 6. 7 18 / Chapter 5 Complies .

E2 Assessment of Existing Emergency Lighting – Luminaires and Escape Route Signs ICEL B55266Pt1 1008 Clause Section Ref Ref Does Not Comply 11 9. however in premises where evacuation is not immediate.2 Are the existing luminaires clean.2 The Lighting Handbook Chapter 5 / 19 Complies . Are the fittings sited in their correct operating environment.2 6. following a normal mains failure. Non maintained/ maintained/combined)? 9. for others refer to original equipment manufacturer. 3 hours is required. operational and unblackened? Are luminaire housings on escape routes fire retardant in accordance with BS5266? ICEL Registered products automatically comply.4 6.1 9. undamaged and are all lamps intact. rating? Are the luminaires of the correct system type (e.3 9.1 9.10.g.10. Note: After fully discharging the system allow 24 hours to recharge before re-occupying the building. for temperature and I.g. e.P. Do the luminaires operate for the required emergency duration? The minimum duration is 1 hour.3 9.

E3 Assessment of Fire Safety Signs ICEL B55266Pt1 1008 Clause Section Ref Ref Does Not Comply The Lighting Handbook 8 6g).3 Are there signs that clearly show the emergency escape routes from any position within the premises? 5.6 20 / Chapter 5 Complies .j).8 6..6.4 4 Do the sign legends comply with the Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations 1996? 5.6.9.1 5.9.6 Are all exits marked and directions of travel indicated? 6.3 Are the signs illuminated internally or from an external source when the normal lighting supply fails? Is the size of each sign correct for the viewing distances? 8.

positioned to achieve the required minimum level of illuminance of 0.1 6.9.2 + Are luminaires sited along the BS5266Pt7/ escape routes which may be BSEN1838 utilized by the very young.2 Are luminaires sited along the permanently unobstructed escape routes at the correct spacings.E4 Siting of Luminaires Not Applicable ICEL B55266Pt1 1008 Clause Section Ref Ref Does Not Comply 9.c).1 ICEL 1006 ICEL 1006 ICEL 1006 ICEL 1006 ICEL 1006 ICEL 1006 ICEL 1006 ICEL 1006 6. such that all reads receive direct light? Near changes of level? Near each change of direction? Near each intersection of corridors? To illuminate Exit doors? Near each piece of fire fighting equipment or manual call point? Outside and near to each final exit to a point of safety? Near each first aid point? 5.7 Are the luminaires positioned at all points of emphasis – Near stairs.3 + Are luminaires sited along 9.3. positioned to achieve a level of illuminance of at least 1 Lux (possibly significantly higher. 5. 9.2. positioned to achieve a minimum level of illuminance of 1 Lux? 6.1 5.2 Lux? 6.d). elderly.1 BS5266Pt7/ escape routes which may BSEN1838 become obstructed. disabled or partially sighted.c).5. depending on the degree of impairment? The Lighting Handbook Chapter 5 / 21 Complies .

7 22 / Chapter 5 Complies .5 seconds or less? ICEL 1006 ICEL 1006 ICEL 1006 ICEL 1006 6.j). in an emergency.5 Lux.E4 Siting of Luminaires (continued) Not Applicable ICEL B55266Pt1 1008 Clause Section Ref Ref Does Not Comply The Lighting Handbook 6.5 Lift cars? Toilet facilities and other open tiled areas exceeding 8 m2 floor area and all toilets for the disabled? Escalators? Motor generator.8.8. at BSEN1838 the correct spacing to achieve the illuminance of 0.3.8.4 6.8. control or plant rooms? Covered car parks along pedestrian routes? Near each first aid point? Are high risk areas illuminated at 10 % of normal illuminance or at least 1.e).7 6.3 Are a minimum of 2 luminaires contributing to the emergency illumination in each ‘lighting compartment’ on the escape route.1 5.5 Lux minimum? 6.3 + Are luminaires in the open BS5266Pt7/ areas of greater than 60 m2.8.4 6.9. with a response time of 0.1 9.3 6. to ensure that the area is not plunged into darkness if a luminaire fails? Are additional luminaires provided in the following locations – ICEL 1006 ICEL 1006 6.

4 12.E5 Self-Contained Emergency Luminaires and Sign ICEL B55266Pt1 Section not applicable 1008 Clause Section Ref Ref Does Not Comply Does Not Comply App.1 Are the batteries being charged (indicator lamp on)? Do the luminaires comply with all relevant product standards for escape routes? ICEL marked luminaires automatically comply.4 Do the Central Power Supply Systems (Central Battery Systems) comply with prEN 50171 or does a competent person declare the systems are working correctly? Is the battery charger functioning correctly? The Lighting Handbook Chapter 5 / 23 Complies Complies . 9.2 E6 Central Power Supply Systems (Central Battery Systems) ICEL B55266Pt1 Section not applicable 1008 Clause Section Ref Ref 9.D 9.4 6.6 App. In particular ICEL signifies fire retardant housings and verified photometric data.10.D 12.10.4 6.

E7 Wiring of Luminaires
Not Applicable Complies Has a risk assessment verification certificate been provided? 11.3 3.3 Are the entries made in the log book correct? Are up-to-date drawings available and correct? ICEL B55266Pt1 1008 Clause Section Ref Ref Does Not Comply Does Not Comply
The Lighting Handbook

9 9

8.2.13 6.2

Are luminaires permanently wired? Are the non maintained luminaires fed from the same final sub-circuit as the local lighting? (A qualified electrician can usually check by removing the local lighting fuse and verifying the emergency lighting operation)

9.6

8.3.5.2. + Is the volt drop to Central IEE Regs Battery luminaires within 10% of the nominal voltage and are luminaires connected in fire protected cable as defined in BS5266?

E8 Records and Documentation
ICEL B55266Pt1 1008 Clause Section Ref Ref

App.E 10 10

24 / Chapter 5

Complies

E9 Routine Maintenance
Not Applicable ICEL B55266Pt1 1008 Clause Section Ref Ref Does Not Comply

10 10

Is a procedure in place to rectify test failures and provide spares? 8.3.3, 12.4 Is a regime of regular testing set up? 12.4 Are routine tests completed according to the requirements in BS5266? Central Power Supply Systems (Central Battery Systems). Where applicable, are the battery electrolyte levels and specific gravities satisfactory?

App. D

The Lighting Handbook

Chapter 5 / 25

Complies

Chapter 6

Quickplan – calculating the number of luminaires required
The five steps of lighting design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PANOS HF/HG 175/200/250 2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . PANOS HM 175/200/250 2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PANOS LF/LG 175/200/250 2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PANOS LM 175/200/250 2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . QUARTOS CQF 1-/2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MIRAL/MIREL RAS/RES – BWS 2-/3-/4-lamp . . . . . . . MIREL FEC/FED 1-/4-lamp M625 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RTX II C bzw. D 1-/2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MELLOW LIGHT IV – louvre (surface-mounted/recessed) MELLOW LIGHT IV – grid-mesh controller (surfacemounted/recessed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LIGHT FIELDS recessed M625 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LIGHT FIELDS surface-mounted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LIGHT FIELDS A-ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA TRAVE KC T16 2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LA TRAVE KC T16 3-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CLARIS MSD-ID 1-/2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AERO USN/UGN-ID 2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OREA GZ-ID 2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SPHEROS D-ID/C-ID T16 EVG 1-/2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . TECTON(-I) + RW T16 1-/2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TECTON(-I) + RW T16 1-/2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TECTON-IP louvre T16 1-/2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ZX/XR/XT 1-/2-lamp T26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . COPA I 250 W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . COPA I 400 W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . COPA D 32/42/57/85 W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . COPA D 70/150 W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . COPA D 250 W QT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . COPA A-B HIT/HST 1-/2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . COPA A-B HIT/HST 1-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . COPA A-N HME 1-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . COPA A-B, A-T, A-ASY HST 1-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . COPA A-ASY HIT/HST 1-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FZ/FT/IFP/TOL-TBC 1-lamp, 58 W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FZ/FT/IFP/TOL-TBC 1-lamp, 36 W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FZ/FT/IFP/TOL 2-lamp, 58 W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FZ/FT/IFP/TOL 2-lamp, 36 W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHIARO FTR390/FTR680 1-/2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RAIN 1-/2-lamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41

The following formulae can be used to give an approximate figure for the mean illuminance and the number of luminaires required. Em = n · z · ØL · WF · ηB A n= Em · A z · ØL · WF · ηB n = number of luminaires WF = maintenance factor A = floor area Em = mean illuminance z = number of lamps per luminaire ØL = luminous flux of the lamp ηB = utilization factor (= ηLB · ηR ) ηLB = luminaire efficiency ηR = room utilization factor The Lighting Handbook – Standard UGR values and maintained luminance levels for luminance limit angle (e. costs) (for costs see “Economic efficiency calculation” chapter) Efficiency method The Quickplan graphs have been calculated using the efficiency method. luminaire spacing to achieve a uniformity greater than or equal to 0. of luminaires x factor) – Maintenance factor uses an assumed value (graphs calculated using MF = 0.8) – Uniformity: max.7 .g. 65° or 75°) all around the luminaire – Correction factors for dark rooms and different ceiling heights (no.The five steps of lighting design The lighting design process can be simplified into five steps: Determine lighting REQUIREMENTS (see chapter on “Recommended values for indoor lighting”) SELECT lamps and luminaires (see “Lamps” and “Luminaires” chapters) Calculate NUMBER of luminaires required (using the Quickplan graphs below) POSITION the luminaires (axial spacing values are noted in the Quickplan diagrams) ANALYSE the results (technical lighting features.

000 h 1 year 2 years 2/32 W TC-T (250) 86 80 72 66 60 54 48 42 36 30 24 18 12 6 Uniformity Axial spacing up to 2.8 15.3 PANOS HF/HG 175/200/250 2-lamp X=4H Y=8H / S=0.6 over 50 m2 1. 2/18).The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.2 1.3 < 1000 cd/m2 17.1 • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.1 1. up to 2.2 16.8 < 200 cd/m2 16. 65° 17.78 2.9 m (2/13. 2/32) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 Chapter 6 / 3 Floor area m2 .4 1.2 1.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 2/13 W TC-D (175) 2/18 W TC-D (200) 2/26 W TC-D (250) 2/32 W TC-T (250) UGR_axial UGR_transv.2 < 200 cd/m2 2/13 W TC-D (175) 2/18 W TC-D (200) Maintenance factor (MF) 2/26 W TC-D (250) 140 130 120 110 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.8 m (2/26.3 17.0 < 1000 cd/m2 15.0 17.

6 75°< 1000 cd/m2 16.6 17.2 1.500 lx 300 lx Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.78 2.000 h 1 year 2 years 140 130 120 110 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 86 80 72 66 60 54 48 42 36 30 24 18 12 6 Uniformity Axial spacing up to 3.0 16.6 75°< 200 cd/m2 18.1 m/2.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 2/13 W TC-D (175) 2/18 W TC-D (200) 2/26 W TC-D (250) UGR_axial UGR_transv.6 18.1 • Ceiling Floor area PANOS HM 175/200/250 2-lamp The Lighting Handbook 4 / Chapter 6 height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.4 1.1 1.9 m (2/26 W) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 Floor area m2 .6 over 50 m2 1.3 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.0 65°< 1000 cd/m2 2/13 W TC-DEL (175) 2/18 W TC-DEL (200) 2/26 W TC-DEL (250) Maintenance factor (MF) Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.2 1. 65°/75° 17.

78 2.2 1.7 21. up to 4.2 < 200 cd/m2 20.5 23.000 h 1 year 2 years 2/32 W TC-T (250) 86 80 72 66 60 54 48 42 36 30 24 18 12 6 Uniformity Axial spacing up to 3. 2/26 W).25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 2/13 W TC-D (175) 2/18 W TC-D (200) 2/26 W TC-D (250) 2/32 W TC-T (250) UGR_axial UGR_transv.5 20.7 < 200 cd/m2 24.7 m (2/18 W).2 21.4 m (2/32 W) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 Chapter 6 / 5 Floor area m2 .5 2/13 W TC-D (175) 2/18 W TC-D (200) Maintenance factor (MF) 2/26 W TC-D (250) 140 130 120 110 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0. up to 4 m (2/13 W.1 1.1 • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.6 over 50 m2 1.2 1.4 1.5 < 1000 cd/m2 21.3 PANOS LF/LG 175/200/250 2-lamp X=4H Y=8H / S=0. 75° 21.

1 • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 2/13 W TC-DEL (175) 2/18 W TC-DEL (200) 2/26 W TC-DEL (250) 2/32 W TC-TEL (250) UGR_axial UGR_transv.6 over 50 m2 1.78 2. 2/18 W).7 m (2/26 W.4 1.3 PANOS LM 175/200/250 2-lamp The Lighting Handbook 6 / Chapter 6 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.000 h 1 year 2 years 2/32 W TC-TEL (250) 86 80 72 66 60 54 48 42 36 30 24 18 12 6 Uniformity Axial spacing up to 4 m (2/13 W.7 21.1 1. up to 4.7 20.2/32 W) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 Floor area m2 .1 22.9 2/13 W TC-DEL (175) 2/18 W TC-DEL (200) Maintenance factor (MF) 2/26 W TC-DEL (250) 140 130 120 110 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.2 1.9 20.9 20.1 22.500 lx 300 lx Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.7 < 1000 cd/m2 22. 75° 20.2 1.

2 1.000 h 1 year 2 years Uniformity 180 200 Axial spacing up to 4 m (1/42 W.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 36 30 1/42 W QUARTOS CQF 1-/2-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.1 1. 65° 17.1 < 200 cd/m2 18.4 1. 2/32 W).1 16.1 • Ceiling Floor area 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.3 30 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.6 over 50 m2 1. up to 3.5 < 1000 cd/m2 16.5 17.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 24 2/26 W 2/32 W CQF 1/42 W TC-T CQF 2/26 W TC-D CQF 2/32 W TC-T UGR_axial UGR_transv.78 2.7 m (2/26 W) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Chapter 6 / 7 Floor area m2 .2 1.5 18.5 < 1000 cd/m2 40 18 12 6 height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.

16.3 30 The Lighting Handbook 8 / Chapter 6 9 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.1 1.1 • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.3 16.0 15.2 1.6 18.2 19.4 1.7 20 15 6 3 Maintenance factor (MF) 4/54 W 3/80 W 4/80 W 10 5 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.2 1.4 19.8 19.500 lx 300 lx 18 15 12 2/54 W MIRAL/MIREL RAS/RES .5 14.78 6.8 m 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Floor area m2 .000 h 1 year 2 years Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 3.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 25 RAS/RES 2/54 W T16 RAS/RES 3/80 W T16 RAS/RES 4/54 W T16 RAS/RES 4/80 W T16 UGR_axial UGR_transv.6 over 50 m2 1.BWS 2-/3-/4-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.

17.3 m (1/54 W) or 4.5 65° < 1000 cd/m2 < 1000 cd/m2 < 1000 cd/m2 < 1000 cd/m2 < 1000 cd/m2 30 2/28 W 2/35 W 2/49 W Maintenance factor (MF) 20 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.78 6.3 15.2 1.8 16.1 15.2 1.4 1.1 1.7 14.000 h 1 year 2 years Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 4.1 • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 36 30 24 1/54 W 4/14 W MIREL FEC/FED 1-/4-lamp M625 Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 40 18 12 6 FEC 1/54 W T16 FEC 2/28 W T16 FEC 2/35 W T16 FEC 2/49 W T16 FEC 4/14 W T16 UGR_axial UGR_transv.9 16.6 over 50 m2 1.7 m 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Chapter 6 / 9 Floor area m2 .0 15.7 17.3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.4 14.6 14.

2 1.8 16.000 h 1 year 2 years Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 4.8 18.4 1.500 lx 300 lx 36 30 1/35 W RTX II C or D 1-/2-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.8 17. 15.3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.1 17.4 16.2 65° < 200 cd/m2 < 200 cd/m2 < 200 cd/m2 < 1000 cd/m2 < 1000 cd/m2 30 12 6 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.2 17. up to 4 m 2-lamp 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Floor area m2 .2 1.78 6.1 1.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 The Lighting Handbook 10 / Chapter 6 24 18 1/49 W 1/54 W 2/35 W 2/54 W Ceiling height: 3 m 50 40 RTX2 1/35 W + D RTX2 1/49 W + D RTX2 1/54 W + D RTX2 2/35 W + D RTX2 2/54 W + D UGR_axial UGR_transv.3 15.6 18.1 • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.6 19.6 over 50 m2 1.3 m 1-lamp.

The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 18 15 EC 2/24 W MELLOW LIGHT IV – Louvre (surface-mounted/recessed) 300 lx Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.7 14.0 < 1000 cd/m2 ML IV A AC 2/49 T16 14.4 14.7 m (2/24 W) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Chapter 6 / 11 Floor area m2 . 65° ML IV A AC 2/35 T16 13. axial spacing up to 4.2 1.2 1.4 14.4 1.8 6.6 over 50 m2 1.2 < 1000 cd/m2 height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.7 < 1000 cd/m2 ML IV A EC 2/54 T16 M625 16.4 16.9 < 1000 cd/m2 ML IV B EC 1/55 TC-L M625 16.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 25 12 EC 1/55 W 20 9 UGR_axial UGR_transv.000 h 1 year 1 year Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 4 m.8 < 1000 cd/m2 ML IV B EC 2/24 T16 M625 16.1 • Ceiling Floor area 30 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.3 14.3 15 EC 2/54 W Maintenance factor (MF) 6 3 10 AC 2/35 W AC 2/49 W AC 2/54 W 5 Clean medium-sized room (T16) Lamp operation Cleaning of luminaires Room maintenance MF= 0.7 13.1 < 1000 cd/m2 ML IV A AC 2/54 T16 15.1 1.

9 EB 1/55 W over 50 m2 1.5 20.6 EB 2/24 W 20 ML IV A AB 2/35 W T16 ML IV A AB 2/49 W T16 ML IV A AB 2/54 W T16 ML IV B EB 1/55 W TC-L M625 ML IV B EB 2/24 W T16 M625 ML IV B EB 2/54 W T16 M625 UGR_axial UGR_transv. axial spacing up to 5.1 19.6 19.2 1.7 20.7 m (2/54 W EB) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Floor area m 2 .8 19.4 16.2 1.4 m/4.000 h 1 year 1 year 10 5 Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up.4 19.1 1.8 6.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 The Lighting Handbook 12 / Chapter 6 12 9 6 3 AB 2/54 W AB 2/49 W Ceiling height: 3 m 25 height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.500 lx 300 lx 18 15 AB 2/35 W 30 MELLOW LIGHT IV – Grid-mesh controller (surface-mounted/recessed) Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.1 • Ceiling Floor area X=4H Y=8H / S=0.4 1.3 15 EB 2/54 W Maintenance factor (MF) Clean medium-sized room (T16) Lamp operation Cleaning of luminaires Room maintenance MF= 0. 18.3 17.9 16.1 20.0 18.

77 6.3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0. axial spacing up to 3.4 1.4 65°< 1000 cd/m2 14.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 36 30 2/24 W LIGHT FIELDS Recessed M625 Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.2 1.1 1.000 h 1 year 2 years Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 3.4 15.3 65°< 1000 cd/m2 14.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 24 18 12 6 L-FIELD 2/24 W T16 L-FIELD 2/28 W T16 L-FIELD 2/35 W T16 L-FIELD 4/14 W T16 UGR_axial UGR_transv.4 14.7 m (2/28 W.4 m (2/24 W.5 14.5 14. 2/35 W).3 14.6 over 50 m2 1.2 1. 65° 15. 4/14 W) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Chapter 6 / 13 Floor area m2 .1 • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.2 65°< 1000 cd/m2 40 4/14 W 2/28 W 2/35 W 30 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.

25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 The Lighting Handbook 14 / Chapter 6 18 12 6 2/28 W 2/35 W Ceiling height: 3 m 50 L-FIELDS A 2/28 W L-FIELDS A 2/35 W L-FIELDS A 4/14 W UGR_axial UGR_transv.6 over 50 m2 1.7 m (2/28 W.4 14.1 1.2 65°< 1000 cd/m2 40 30 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.2 1.500 lx 300 lx 36 30 24 4/14 W LIGHT FIELDS Surface-mounted Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1. 2/35 W).77 6.000 h 1 year 2 years Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 3.2 1.5 14.5 14. 65° 14.4 m (4/14 W) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Floor area m2 .4 65°< 1000 cd/m2 14.4 1.1 • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1. axial spacing up to 3.3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.4 65°< 1000 cd/m2 14.

1 1.25 • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.2 1.000 h 1 year 1 year Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 3. axial spacing up to 3.7 m (2/49 W.2 1.4 1.1 m (4/24 W) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Chapter 6 / 15 Floor area m2 .75 4. 2/54 W). 65° <13 <13 < 1000 cd/m2 <13 <13 < 1000 cd/m2 <13 <13 < 1000 cd/m2 40 30 12 6 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 2/49 W 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.6 over 50 m2 1.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 36 30 24 18 4/24 W 2/54 W LIGHT FIELDS A-ID Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 L-FIELDS A-ID 2/49 W L-FIELDS A-ID 2/54 W L-FIELDS A-ID 4/24 W UGR_axial UGR_transv.

75 4.4 1. 55°/65° <13 <13 55°< 1000 cd/m2 <13 <13 65°< 1000 cd/m2 40 30 12 2/54 W Maintenance factor (MF) 20 6 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.2 1.3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.500 lx 300 lx 36 30 24 18 2/35 W LA TRAVE KC T16 2-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.1 1.1 m 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Floor area m2 .25 • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 The Lighting Handbook 16 / Chapter 6 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 2/35 W T16 2/54 W T16 UGR_axial UGR_transv.000 h 1 year 1 year Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 3.6 over 50 m2 1.2 1.

3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.6 over 50 m2 1.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 3/35 W T16 3/54 W T16 UGR_axial UGR_transv. 55°/65° <13 <13 55°< 1000 cd/m2 <13 <13 65°< 1000 cd/m2 40 30 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 6 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.2 1.2 m 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Chapter 6 / 17 Floor area m2 .The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 36 30 24 18 12 3/35 W 3/54 W LA TRAVE KC T16 3-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.75 4.4 1.1 1.2 1.25 • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.000 h 1 year 1 year Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 4.

6 over 50 m2 1.4 m 2-lamp 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Floor area m2 .500 lx 300 lx 36 1/28 W CLARIS MSD-ID 1-/2-lamp 30 24 18 2/28 W 2/35 W 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.77 4.2 1.000 h 1 year 1 year Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 3.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 The Lighting Handbook 18 / Chapter 6 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 1/35 W 1/28 W T16 1/35 W T16 2/28 W T16 2/35 W T16 UGR_axial UGR_transv.3 40 30 12 6 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.25 • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.9 m 1-lamp.1 1. 65° <13 <13 < 1000 cd/m2 <13 <13 < 1000 cd/m2 <13 <13 < 1000 cd/m2 <13 <13 < 1000 cd/m2 Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.2 1. up to 4.4 1.

000 h 1 year 1 year Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 5.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 36 30 2/28 W AERO USN/UGN-ID 2-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.6 over 50 m2 1.75 4.2 1.3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 24 18 2/54 W 2/28 W T16 2/54 W T16 UGR_axial UGR_transv.2 1.6 m 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Chapter 6 / 19 Floor area m2 . 65° <13 <13 < 1000 cd/m2 <13 <13 < 1000 cd/m2 40 30 12 6 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.4 1.1 1.25 • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.

4 1.75 4.2 1. <13 <13 40 30 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 2/54 W 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.2 1.000 h 1 year 1 year Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 5.1 1.25 • Ceiling Floor area over 50 m2 1.500 lx 300 lx 36 30 24 18 12 6 height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.6 OREA GZ-ID 2-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.6 m 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Floor area m2 .25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 The Lighting Handbook 20 / Chapter 6 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 2/54 W T16 UGR_axial UGR_transv.

1 1.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 36 1/35 W SPHEROS D-ID/C-ID T16 Electronic ballast 1-/2-lamp 30 24 1/54 W 2/28 W 2/35 W 2/54 W 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.5 65°/75° 65°< 1000 cd/m2 65°< 1000 cd/m2 65°< 1000 cd/m2 65°< 1000 cd/m2 75°< 1000 cd/m2 Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.2 m 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Chapter 6 / 21 Floor area m2 . <13 <13 <13 <13 <13 <13 <13 <13 14.6 40 18 12 6 1/35 W T16 1/54 W T16 2/28 W T16 2/35 W T16 2/54 W T16 UGR_axial UGR_transv.77 4.25 • Ceiling Floor area over 50 m2 1.2 1.2 1.3 30 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.6 13.000 h 1 year 1 year Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 4.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.4 1.

4 1.3 18 12 6 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 UGR_axial UGR_transv.6 over 50 m2 1.1 22.000 h 1 year 1 year Uniformity 180 200 Axial spacing up to 5.500 lx 300 lx 36 30 24 1/54 W TECTON(-I) + RW T16 1-/2-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.1 1.6 m/4.80 6.1 • Ceiling Floor area 60 The Lighting Handbook 22 / Chapter 6 height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.2 1.0 TECTON-I 2/54 W T16 + R 24. TECTON 1/54 W T16 + RW 25.5 20.5 40 1/54 W+PK 30 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 2/54 W -I 2/54 W 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.8 25.2 1.9 TECTON 2/54 W T16 + RW 25.9 TECTON 1/54 W T16+PK+RW 25.5 24.8 m (-I 2/54 W +R) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Floor area m2 .

25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 UGR_axial UGR_transv.000 h 1 year 1 year Uniformity 180 200 Axial spacing up to 5. TECTON 1/80 W T16 + RW 25.2 TECTON 2/80 W T16 + RW 26.2 1.4 23.3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.3 TECTON-I 2/80 W T16 + R 24.8 21.8 40 30 12 6 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 2/80 W -I 2/80 W 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.4 1.1 • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 36 30 24 18 1/80 W+PK 1/80 W TECTON(-I) + RW T16 1-/2-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.6 m/4.8 m (-I 2/80 W +R) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Chapter 6 / 23 Floor area m2 .2 TECTON 1/80 W T16+PK+RW 25.80 6.6 over 50 m2 1.1 25.1 1.2 1.8 24.

2 1.2 1.5 21.2 21.000 h 2 years 2 years Uniformity 180 200 Axial spacing up to 4.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 The Lighting Handbook 24 / Chapter 6 18 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 TECTON-IP 1/54 W T16 TECTON-IP 1/80 W T16 TECTON-IP 2/54 W T16 TECTON-IP 2/80 W T16 UGR_axial UGR_transv.3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.7 19. 19.1 1.4 1.2 20.5 20.4 m 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Floor area m2 .9 40 30 12 6 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.1 • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.4 18.6 over 50 m2 1.500 lx 300 lx 36 30 24 1/54 W 1/80 W 2/54 W 2/80 W TECTON-IP Louvre T16 1-/2-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.8 19.80 6.

25 for (ZX) • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.3 < 13 20.80 6.5 m (XT) Chapter 6 / 25 Floor area m2 .6 over 50 m2 1.4 30 1/58 W+XT 1/58 W+XR Maintenance factor (MF) 12 20 2/58 W 2/58 W+XT 2/58 W+XR 10 6 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.2 1.8 19.2 1.0 25.000 h 1 year 1 year 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 Uniformity Axial spacing at Rh = 6 m up to 16 m (ZX)/ 14 m (XR)/6.3 25.7 22.XT)/1.4 1.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 36 30 24 1/58 W ZX/XR/XT 1-/2-lamp T26 Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.9 21.6 22.1 1.5 22.3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.2 23.3 18. 26.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 40 18 ZX 1/58 W T26 ZX 2/58 W T26 ZX 1/58 W T26 + XR ZX 2/58 W T26 + XR ZX 1/58 W T26 + XT ZX 2/58 W T26 + XT UGR_axial UGR_transv.1 for (XR.

1 Maintenance factor (MF) 15 12 9 6 3 30 X=4H Y=8H / S=0. 65° 1/250W HIE RAB 19000lm TST 15.83 (HSE) 8.2 < 1000 cd/m2 20 1/250 W HIE 15 1/250 W HSE 10 Uniformity Axial spacing up to 5 m (TST) 5 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 Floor area m2 .2 < 1000 cd/m2 1/250W HSE RAB 25000lm TST 16.2 15.500 lx 300 lx 18 COPA I 250 W Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.2 16.000 h 3 years 3 years Ceiling height: 6 m 25 UGR_axial UGR_transv.79 (HIE) 4000 h 1 year 1 year MF=0.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 The Lighting Handbook 26 / Chapter 6 Clean large room Lamp operation Cleaning of lumi. (IP65) Room maintenance MF=0.

3 m * (Colour rendition class Ra > 60) ** (Colour rendition class Ra > 20) 1/400 W 5 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 Chapter 6 / 27 Floor area m2 .83 (HSE) 8.0 16.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 18 COPA I 400 W Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1. 65°/75° 1/400W HIE RAB 36000 lm 17.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 6 m 25 UGR_axial UGR_transv.1 Maintenance factor (MF) 15 12 9 1/400 W HIE 30 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.70 (HIE) 2000 h 1 year 1 year MF=0.5 17.6 17.4 75°< 1000 cd/m2 1/400W HSE RAB 47000 lm** 16.5 75°< 1000 cd/m2 1/400W HSE RAB 36000 lm* 17.0 65°< 1000 cd/m2 20 15 6 3 Clean large room Lamp operation Cleaning of lumi.000 h 3 years 3 years 10 HSE** 1/400 W HSE* Uniformity Axial spacing up to 8. (IP65) Room maintenance MF=0.

3 23. 15.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 4 m 50 65° / 75° 65°< 200 cd/m2 75°< 200 cd/m2 1/32 W RKF/RKID 40 COPA D 1/32W RKF/RKID COPA D 1/42W RKF/RKID COPA D 1/57W RKF COPA D 1/57W RKID COPA D 1/85W RKF COPA D 1/85W RKID UGR_axial UGR_transv.2 20.6 17.7 m (42 W RKID.1 17. RKID ) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Floor area m2 .5 17.1 • Ceiling Floor area over 50 m2 1. up to 5.2 1.6 17.78 2.5 75°< 1000 cd/m2 65°< 1000 cd/m2 65°< 1000 cd/m2 1/42 W RKF/RKID 30 1/57 W RKF/RKID Maintenance factor (MF) Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Cleaning of luminaires (IP65) Room maintenance MF= 0.000 h 1 year 2 years 1/85 W RKF/RKID 20 10 Uniformity 180 200 Axial spacing up to 5 m.3 17.2 23.1 1.2 60 The Lighting Handbook 28 / Chapter 6 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.1 15. 57 W RKF.4 m (42 W RKF).5 20.5 17.4 COPA D 32/42/57/85 W Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.500 lx 300 lx 36 30 24 18 12 6 height 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1. up to 5.

1 1.9 75° < 1000 cd/m2 20 15 6 3 Maintenance factor (MF) Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Cleaning of luminaires (IP65) Room maintenance MF= 0.4 over 50 m2 1.2 30 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.000 h 1 year 2 years 10 5 Uniformity 180 200 Axial spacing up to 4 m 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Chapter 6 / 29 Floor area m 2 . 55°/65° COPA D 1/70W (6400 lm) 18.2 1.0 65° < 1000 cd/m2 COPA D 1/150W (14000 lm) 20.77 (HCI) 2.9 20.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 18 15 1/70 W HIT COPA D 70/150 W Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 4 m 25 12 9 1/150 W HIT UGR_axial UGR_transv.0 18.1 • Ceiling Floor area height 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.

25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 The Lighting Handbook 30 / Chapter 6 18 12 6 Ceiling height: 4 m 50 COPA D 1/250 W QT UGR_axial UGR_transv.2 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.4 over 50 m2 1.1 • Ceiling Floor area height 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.5 m 180 200 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Floor area m2 .500 lx 300 lx 36 30 24 1/250 W QT COPA D 250 W QT Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.76 1.8 < 1000 cd/m2 40 30 Maintenance factor (MF) Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Cleaning of luminaires (IP65) Room maintenance MF= 0. 65° 17.1 1.8 17.2 1.000 h 1 year 2 years 20 10 Uniformity Axial spacing up to 4.

up to 8.6 25. (IP65) Room maintenance MF=0.5 m HST.3 27.000 h 1 year 2 years 10 Uniformity Axial spacing up to: 7.6 27.6 20 15 2/250 W HST 2/250 W HIT Clean large room Lamp operation Cleaning of lumi. up to 9 m 1/250 W HIT 5 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 Chapter 6 / 31 Floor area m2 .000 h 1 year 2 years MF=0.6 31. 25.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 6 m 25 12 9 6 3 COPA A-B 1/250W HIT (20000 lm) COPA A-B 1/250W HST (23000 lm) COPA A-B 2/250W HIT (40000 lm) COPA A-B 1/250W HST (46000 lm) UGR_axial UGR_transv.1 26.8 25.80 (HIT) 2.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 18 COPA A-B HIT/HST 1-/2-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.3 m 2/250 W HIT.1 Maintenance factor (MF) 15 1/250 W HIT 1/250 W HST 30 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.3 22.81 (HST) 14.

6 25. 25.6 20 15 Clean large room Lamp operation Cleaning of lumi.81 (HST) 14.67 (HIT) 1.1 26.000 h 1 year 2 years MF=0. (IP65) Room maintenance MF=0.8 25.500 lx 300 lx 18 COPA A-B HIT/HST 1-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.1 Maintenance factor (MF) 15 12 1/400 W HIT 30 The Lighting Handbook 32 / Chapter 6 9 6 1/400 W HST X=4H Y=8H / S=0.000 h 1 year 2 years 10 3 Uniformity Axial spacing up to 9 m * (Colour rendition class Ra > 90) ** (Colour rendition class Ra > 20) 5 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 Floor area m2 .25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 6 m 25 COPA A_B 1/400 W HIT (32000 lm) * COPA A_B 1/400 W HST (48000 lm) ** UGR_axial UGR_transv.

80 2.0 25.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 6 m 50 COPA A_B 1/250 W HME (13000 lm) COPA A_B 1/400 W HME (22000 lm) UGR_axial UGR_transv.2 29.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 36 COPA A-N HME 1-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.000 h 1 year 2 years 20 Uniformity Axial spacing up to 9 m 10 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 Chapter 6 / 33 Floor area m2 .7 40 18 1/400 W HME 30 12 6 Clean large room Lamp operation Cleaning of luminaires (IP65) Room maintenance MF= 0.0 27. 27.1 Maintenance factor (MF) 30 24 1/250 W HME 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.

A-ASY HST 1-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1. 32.1 Maintenance factor (MF) 5 4 3 2 1 10 The Lighting Handbook 34 / Chapter 6 Clean large room Lamp operation Cleaning of luminaires (IP65) Room maintenance MF= 0.7 - 6 4 A-T 1/600 W HST A-B 1/600 W HST A-ASY 1/600 W HST Uniformity Axial spacing up to 6.3 m (ASY).25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 6 m 8 COPA A-B 1/600 W HST COPA A-T 1/600 W HST COPA ASY 1/600 W HST UGR_axial UGR_transv.2 22.000 h 2 years 2 years X=4H Y=8H / S=0.5 m (A-B) 2 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 Floor area m2 . A-T.500 lx 300 lx 6 COPA A-B.83 10.7 31.6 27. up to 7.

1 Maintenance factor (MF) 15 12 1/250 W HST 1/400 W HIT 30 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.000 h 2 years 2 years 10 1/400 W HST 5 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 Chapter 6 / 35 Floor area m2 .81 (HST) 14.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 6 m 25 COPA A-ASY 1/250 W HIT (20000 lm) COPA A-ASY 1/250 W HST (27000 lm) COPA A-ASY 1/400 W HIT (32000 lm) COPA A-ASY 1/400 W HST (48000 lm) 20 9 6 3 1/250 W HIT 15 Clean large room Lamp operation Cleaning of luminaires (IP65) Room maintenance MF=0.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 18 COPA A-ASY HIT/HST 1-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.

7. 22.8 m (IFP-PC) or 8.500 lx 300 lx 36 30 24 18 12 6 height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.8 m (TOLTBC).4 19.0 17.2 1.6 FZ/FT/IFP/TOL-TBC 1-lamp.8 19.25 (1.4 1.7 18.78 6.5 40 IFP 1/36 W FZ 1/36 W FT 1/36 W TOL-TBC 1/36 W 30 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Cleaning of luminaires Room maintenance MF= 0.5 m (FZ.2 22.1 for TOL-TBC) • Ceiling Floor area over 50 m2 1.3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 The Lighting Handbook 36 / Chapter 6 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 FZ 1/36W T26 FT 1/36W T26 IFP 1/36W T26 TOL 1/36W T26 TBC UGR_axial UGR_transv.2 1.3 19.000 h 1 year 2 years Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 5.1 1. 36 W Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1. FT) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Floor area m2 .4 15.

78 6.5 m (FZ.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 FZ 1/58W T26 FT 1/58W T26 IFP-PC 1/58W T26 TOL 1/58W T26 TBC UGR_axial UGR_transv.6 40 18 12 TOL-TBC 30 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 6 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Cleaning of luminaires Room maintenance MF= 0.2 1.1 1. 58 W Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.2 1.2 21.2 20.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 36 30 24 FZ · FT IFP-PC FZ/FT/IFP/TOL-TBC 1-lamp.8 m (TOLTBC).1 20.6 over 50 m2 1.8 m (IFP-PC) or 8.3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0. 7.25 (1.8 18.000 h 1 year 2 years Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 5. FT) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Chapter 6 / 37 Floor area m2 .1 for TOL-TBC) • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.2 16.0 23. 22.4 1.5 19.

6 20.9 m (FZ.5 19. 36 W Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.1 for TOL-TBC) • Ceiling Floor area height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.6 over 50 m2 1.000 h 1 year 2 years Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 5.8 19.8 24. 23.8 16.2 1.78 6.2 1.5 40 30 Maintenance factor (MF) 20 FT 2/36 W 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Cleaning of luminaires Room maintenance MF= 0.1 19.25 (1.4 m (IFP-PC) or 7. FT) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Floor area m2 .8 m (TOLTBC).500 lx 300 lx 36 30 TOL 2/36 W FZ/FT/IFP/TOL 2-lamp.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 The Lighting Handbook 38 / Chapter 6 24 18 12 6 FZ 2/36 W IFP 2/36 W Ceiling height: 3 m 50 FZ 2/36W T26 FT 2/36W T26 IFP 2/36W T26 TOL 2/36W T26 TBC UGR_axial UGR_transv.3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.4 1. 7.2 18.1 1.

4 1.3 15 IFP 2/58 W FZ 2/58 W Maintenance factor (MF) 10 TOL 2/58 W 5 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Cleaning of luminaires Room maintenance MF= 0.1 for TOL-TBC) • Ceiling Floor area 30 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.25 (1.4 m (IFP-PC) or 7.2 1.9 20.6 over 50 m2 1.4 21. 24. 58 W Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.78 6.1 1.2 20.6 17.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 18 15 12 9 6 3 FZ/FT/IFP/TOL 2-lamp. FT) 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Chapter 6 / 39 Floor area m2 .9 m (FZ.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 25 FZ 2/58W T26 FT 2/58W T26 IFP 2/58W T26 TOL 2/58W T26 TBC UGR_axial UGR_transv. 7.000 h 1 year 2 years Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 5.8 m (TOLTBC).3 21.0 19.2 1.6 20 FT 2/58 W height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.6 24.

000 h 1 year 2 years Uniformity Axial spacing up to 4.2 1.6 20.7 20.1 1.500 lx 300 lx 54 48 42 36 1/55 W CHIARO FTR390/FTR680 1-/2-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.4 60 50 1/40 W 40 Maintenance factor (MF) 30 2/40 W 20 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Luminaire maintenance Room maintenance MF= 0.5 m. up to 5 m 2/40 W 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Floor area m2 .3 22+40 W 80 RCeiling height: 3 m 70 FTR 1/40W T16-R FTR 1/55W T16-R FTR 1/22W+40W T16-R FTR 2/40W T16-R UGR_axial UGR_transv. 20.6 19.2 1.25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 The Lighting Handbook 40 / Chapter 6 30 24 18 12 6 180 200 height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.25 • Ceiling Floor area 90 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.7 20.6 over 50 m2 1.3 20.76 6.8 19.3 20.4 1.

2 19.3 28.4 21.000 h 1 year 2 years Uniformity 180 200 Continuous row spacing up to 8 m 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Chapter 6 / 41 Floor area m2 .25H / Reflection factors 70/50/20 Ceiling height: 3 m 50 RAIN 1/58 W T 26 RAIN 1/80 W T 16 RAIN 2/36 W T 26 RAIN 2/54 W T 16 UGR_axial UGR_transv.2 1.3 60 X=4H Y=8H / S=0.2 28.7 24.2 1. 26.4 1.2 25.78 6.3 21.1 1.The Lighting Handbook 500 lx 300 lx 36 30 24 18 height 4m 5m 6m up to 50 m2 1.6 RAIN 1-/2-lamp Correction factors • Dark room (50/40/20): 1.8 40 30 1/58 W 1/80 W Maintenance factor (MF) 12 6 20 2/54 W 2/36 W 10 Clean medium-sized room Lamp operation Cleaning of luminaires Room maintenance MF= 0.25 • Ceiling Floor area over 50 m2 1.

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. . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 7 Lighting refurbishment Arguments for refurbishing lighting systems . 3 – 4 Collecting data for lighting refurbishment . 5 Illuminance measurement . . . . . . . . . 6 – 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Data-collection sheet for lighting refurbishment . . . . . . . .

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Savings in lamp replacement costs – The lamp lifetime of fluorescent lamps is extended by more than 50 % when operated with an electronic ballast (to 16. Lamp power 65 W Dissipated power 12 W Total power 77 W Extra power consumption 40 % 26 mm convent.Arguments for refurbishing lighting systems 1. Reduced operating costs 1.000 h) The Lighting Handbook Chapter 7 / 3 .000 – 20. opal diffuser luminaire to louvre luminaire) – Lower power consumption of ballasts Energy audit for 58 W fluorescent lamps Lamp diameter 38 mm Ballast convent. 36 W 9W 45 W 25 % 26 mm 26 mm low-loss electronic 36 W 32 W 6W 4W 42 W 36 W 17 % – Using available daylight: potential energy savings of up to 70 % – Blinds control: prevents buildings getting too hot – Air-conditioned rooms: a reduction in the connected load means a reduction in heat load and hence less air-conditioning power (The heat load generated by a light output of 1 kW requires about 3 kW of cooling power) 1. Lamp power 40 W Dissipated power 9W Total power 49 W Extra power consumption 36 % 26 mm convent.2.g.1. 58 W 12 W 70 W 27 % 26 mm 26 mm low-loss electronic 58 W 50 W 8W 5W 66 W 55 W 20 % Energy audit for 36 W fluorescent lamps Lamp diameter 38 mm Ballast convent. Energy savings – Efficiency of the luminaires improved from about 35 % to more than 80 % (e.

etc.3. lighting level.1. Reliability and safety – Do the luminaires meet the electrotechnical requirements (e.g.g. Improved ergonomics Applying ergonomic principles to lighting brings the following proven benefits: – Growth in output – Fewer mistakes and lower stoppage rates – Reduced number of accidents The lower thermal load of refurbished lighting systems produces a more pleasant room environment. Ex)? – Does the lighting meet photometric requirements (e. so lower maintenance costs (motto: complete refurbishment better than constant repairs) 2. FF/D. glare limitation.)? 4 / Chapter 7 The Lighting Handbook . 3. Savings in maintenance costs – No need to buy a starter when using electronic ballasts – Modular design of luminaires and tool-free installation make it easier and hence cheaper to replace components – No more spare-parts problems. improved working conditions and thus a greater willingness to work. ENEC mark of conformity)? – Do the luminaires comply with stipulated safety measures and requirements in the room (IP XX.

03 m Cylindrical illuminance = 1. 3 % limit of error – A: high accuracy.2 m Measurement grid: coincident rectangles. Meters: designation and accuracy – L: highest accuracy.Collecting data for the lighting refurbishment The data-collection sheets help you to compile all the relevant information for making an inventory of your existing lighting systems. suitably aged lamps (discharge lamps 100 h) Measurement grid and measurement height – – – – – Workplaces = 0. 5 % limit of error – B: moderate accuracy.0 m Thoroughfares. sports facilities = 1. 10 % limit of error (minimum requirement) Measurement conditions – Avoid daylight/light from other sources (measure separately and deduct) – Check mains voltage and ambient temperature – Use new. indoor car parks = 0. Illuminance measurement The average illuminance is the arithmetic mean of the point illuminance levels measured in a defined grid using a luxmeter under precisely defined conditions.75 m. separation about 1 m Measurement grid not coincident with luminaire position grid The Lighting Handbook Chapter 7 / 5 . stairs. They provide a basis for a photometric comparison and system costing.

Data collection sheet for lighting refurbishment Project Address Activities in room Contact Tel Fax Old system Option 1 Luminaire type A Number of luminaires Number of lamps per luminaire Type of ballast System power per luminaire including ballast (W) Illuminance Option 2 Luminaire type B Number of luminaires Number of lamps per luminaire Type of ballast System power per luminaire including ballast (W) Illuminance Total connected load in kW ON period each day (h) Working days per year Annual ON period (h) Power consumption in kWh/a Annual savings in kWh Basic power price kW/year The Lighting Handbook Power costs per kWh Annual power costs in kWh Annual savings 6 / Chapter 7 .

lamp) Old system Option 1 Option 2 Chapter 7 / 7 .Room length Room width Room height Uniformity Emean = Emin = lx lx Reflection: Wall Ceiling Floor u = Emin = Emean % % % Room sketch: The Lighting Handbook Costs Cleaning per luminaire/year Lamp replacement (incl.

Data collection sheet for lighting refurbishment Project Address Activities in room Contact Tel Fax Old system Option 1 Luminaire type A Number of luminaires Number of lamps per luminaire Type of ballast System power per luminaire including ballast (W) Illuminance Option 2 Luminaire type B Number of luminaires Number of lamps per luminaire Type of ballast System power per luminaire including ballast (W) Illuminance Total connected load in kW ON period each day (h) Working days per year Annual ON period (h) Power consumption in kWh/a Annual savings in kWh Basic power price kW/year The Lighting Handbook Power costs per kWh Annual power costs in kWh Annual savings 8 / Chapter 7 .

lamp) Old system Option 1 Option 2 Chapter 7 / 9 .Room length Room width Room height Uniformity Emean = Emin = lx lx Reflection: Wall Ceiling Floor u = Emin = Emean % % % Room sketch: The Lighting Handbook Costs Cleaning per luminaire/year Lamp replacement (incl.

Data collection sheet for lighting refurbishment Project Address Activities in room Contact Tel Fax Old system Option 1 Luminaire type A Number of luminaires Number of lamps per luminaire Type of ballast System power per luminaire including ballast (W) Illuminance Option 2 Luminaire type B Number of luminaires Number of lamps per luminaire Type of ballast System power per luminaire including ballast (W) Illuminance Total connected load in kW ON period each day (h) Working days per year Annual ON period (h) Power consumption in kWh/a Annual savings in kWh Basic power price kW/year The Lighting Handbook Power costs per kWh Annual power costs in kWh Annual savings 10 / Chapter 7 .

Room length Room width Room height Uniformity Emean = Emin = lx lx Reflection: Wall Ceiling Floor u = Emin = Emean % % % Room sketch: The Lighting Handbook Costs Cleaning per luminaire/year Lamp replacement (incl. lamp) Old system Option 1 Option 2 Chapter 7 / 11 .

Data collection sheet for lighting refurbishment Project Address Activities in room Contact Tel Fax Old system Option 1 Luminaire type A Number of luminaires Number of lamps per luminaire Type of ballast System power per luminaire including ballast (W) Illuminance Option 2 Luminaire type B Number of luminaires Number of lamps per luminaire Type of ballast System power per luminaire including ballast (W) Illuminance Total connected load in kW ON period each day (h) Working days per year Annual ON period (h) Power consumption in kWh/a Annual savings in kWh Basic power price kW/year The Lighting Handbook Power costs per kWh Annual power costs in kWh Annual savings 12 / Chapter 7 .

lamp) Old system Option 1 Option 2 Chapter 7 / 13 .Room length Room width Room height Uniformity Emean = Emin = lx lx Reflection: Wall Ceiling Floor u = Emin = Emean % % % Room sketch: The Lighting Handbook Costs Cleaning per luminaire/year Lamp replacement (incl.

Data collection sheet for lighting refurbishment Project Address Activities in room Contact Tel Fax Old system Option 1 Luminaire type A Number of luminaires Number of lamps per luminaire Type of ballast System power per luminaire including ballast (W) Illuminance Option 2 Luminaire type B Number of luminaires Number of lamps per luminaire Type of ballast System power per luminaire including ballast (W) Illuminance Total connected load in kW ON period each day (h) Working days per year Annual ON period (h) Power consumption in kWh/a Annual savings in kWh Basic power price kW/year The Lighting Handbook Power costs per kWh Annual power costs in kWh Annual savings 14 / Chapter 7 .

lamp) Old system Option 1 Option 2 Chapter 7 / 15 .Room length Room width Room height Uniformity Emean = Emin = lx lx Reflection: Wall Ceiling Floor u = Emin = Emean % % % Room sketch: The Lighting Handbook Costs Cleaning per luminaire/year Lamp replacement (incl.

Data collection sheet for lighting refurbishment Project Address Activities in room Contact Tel Fax Old system Option 1 Luminaire type A Number of luminaires Number of lamps per luminaire Type of ballast System power per luminaire including ballast (W) Illuminance Option 2 Luminaire type B Number of luminaires Number of lamps per luminaire Type of ballast System power per luminaire including ballast (W) Illuminance Total connected load in kW ON period each day (h) Working days per year Annual ON period (h) Power consumption in kWh/a Annual savings in kWh Basic power price kW/year The Lighting Handbook Power costs per kWh Annual power costs in kWh Annual savings 16 / Chapter 7 .

Room length Room width Room height Uniformity Emean = Emin = lx lx Reflection: Wall Ceiling Floor u = Emin = Emean % % % Room sketch: The Lighting Handbook Costs Cleaning per luminaire/year Lamp replacement (incl. lamp) Old system Option 1 Option 2 Chapter 7 / 17 .

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. . . . . . . . . 4 Table for luminaire maintenance factor (LMF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Environmental conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Maintenance of lighting systems . . . 8 – 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Table of burning hours . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Economic analysis . . . 3 Table for lamp lumens maintenance factor (LLMF) and lamp survival factor (LSF) . .Chapter 8 Economic efficiency calculation Economic efficiency calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Table for room surface maintenance factor (RSMF) . . . . . . . . . . . .

Economic efficiency calculation
A short pay-back period is usually the most important consideration when designing lighting systems. The pay-back period calculation using the following forms is based on a static calculation method. This is a theoretical approach that delivers a guide value very quickly and is perfectly adequate for an initial estimate. Dynamic calculation models involving depreciation and interest payments are left to the financial experts and fall outside the scope of this handbook. Static calculation model Pay-back time = Extra expenditure Investment costs Annual saving in operating costs

The Lighting Handbook

Definition of terms used in the economic analysis sheets on page 8 onwards (3) System power of luminaire Lamp wattage + power dissipation in control gear. (5) Annual burning hours Total of the daily lamp ON hours over the year. The table of burning hours (page 7) provides help for daylight-dependent systems. (13) Maintenance factor A reference maintenance factor of 0.67 can be assumed (3-year maintenance interval, clean environment). The system-specific maintenance factor must be found in order to calculate the number of luminaires required. It is given by the product of lamp lumens maintenance factor, lamp survival factor, luminaire maintenance factor and room surface maintenance factor. These factors can be found from the tables on pages 3–7. The maintenance factor must be documented in the design process together with the basic conditions. (18) Cost of lamp replacement Cost of complete job of replacing the lamps, including the costs of the lamp and additional costs such as step ladders, weekend overtime payments or loss of production. (19) Cost of luminaire cleaning Cost of the complete job of cleaning the luminaire plus replacing faulty components in the lighting system including parts costs. (20) Cost of room cleaning Labour costs for cleaning room surfaces and restoring the reflection characteristics to their new condition. (21) Energy costs per kWh Estimate a mixed price for high and low tariff. Include energy standing charges in the working price.

Maintenance of lighting systems
160 % 140 % 120 % 100 % 80 % 60 % 40 % 20 % 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 years 2.5 3.0 3.5

Example: Luminaire maintenance: every year Room surface maintenance: every 3 years Lamp replacement: every 3 years Faulty lamp replacement: immediately

Maintenance factor (MF) = LLMF x LSF x LMF x RSMF (see factor tables on the following pages)

Environmental conditions
The following table contains the recommended maximum maintenance interval for the type of environment.
Environment Max. maintenance Work areas type interval Clean (C) 3 years Clean rooms, computer centres, electronic-component assembly areas, hospitals*) Normal (N) 2 years Offices, shops, schools, laboratories, restaurants, warehouses, assembly bays Dirty (D) 1 year Steel works, chemical plants, foundries, welding shops, grinding shops, woodworking *) Sometimes shorter maintenance intervals are required for hygiene reasons.
The Lighting Handbook

From CIE publication 97 “Maintenance of indoor electric lighting systems”, dated 1995, ISBN 3 900 734 34 8

Chapter 8 / 3

Table for lamp lumens maintenance factor (LLMF) and lamp survival factor (LSF)

The Lighting Handbook

4 / Chapter 8 0.83 1.00 0.96 0.99 0.95 0.98 0.88 0.98 0.89 0.91 0.88 0.97 0.70 0.94 0.80 0.98 0.98 1.00 0.89 0.90 0.88 0.80 0.88 0.50 0.88 0.50 0.76 0.80 0.60 0.78 0.73 0.88 0.97 0.98 0.74 0.72 0.58 0.72 0.72 0.83 0.96 0.96 0.95 0.95 0.94 0.97 0.96 0.93 0.91 0.88 0.80 0.99 0.95 0.98 0.94 0.97 0.85 0.98 0.85 0.88 0.83 0.93 0.65 0.90 0.77 0.96 0.98 1.00 0.78 0.95 0.94 0.98 0.93 0.96 0.83 0.94 0.80 0.84 0.80 0.89 0.62 0.85 0.75 0.93 0.97 0.99 0.76 0.85 0.92 0.98 0.92 0.96 0.83 0.50 0.74 0.75 0.92 0.98 0.91 0.95 0.72 0.64 0.91 0.97 0.90 0.94 0.70 0.50 0.90 0.96 0.89 0.90

LLMF burning hours Incandescent lamp CIE 1997 Low-voltage halogen lamp Philips Capsuline Pro Single-phosphor fluorescent lamp CIE 1997 Triphosphor fluorescent lamp T26 Osram LUMILUX Triphosphor fluorescent lamp T16 Osram FH, FQ Compact fluorescent lamp Osram DULUX Metal halide lamp Ceramic Osram HCI-150 W/WDL Metal halide lamp Quartz Osram HQI-E 250 W/D Metal halide lamp Quartz Osram HQI-E 400 W/D Mercury vapour lamp Philips HPL 250/400 W Sodium vapour lamp Philips SON(-T) PIA Plus 100–400 W

LLMF LSF LLMF LSF LLMF LSF LLMF LSF LLMF LSF LLMF LSF LLMF LSF LLMF LSF LLMF LSF LLMF LSF LLMF LSF

100 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

500 0.97 0.98 0.99 0.99 0.97 1.00

0.95 0.50 0.89 1.00 0.97 0.99 0.96 0.99 0.97 0.92 0.99 0.99 0.94 0.96 0.93 0.99 0.78 0.98 0.90 0.99 1.00 1.00 0.99 0.99 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

1,000 0.93 0.50 0.98 0.91 0.94 1.00

1,500 0.89 0.03 0.97 0.84 0.91 1.00

2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 14,000 16,000 18,000 20,000

Manufacturers’ figures from April 2003. Assumes the use of the latest ballast technology. For other manufacturers or lamp types, please contact relevant lamp manufacturer.

The Lighting Handbook

Luminaire cleaning interval in years Environment type Luminaire type Bare batten luminaires D C 2.0 N D C D C D 2.5 N 3.0 N

C

0.5 N

D

C

1.0 N

D

S

1.5 N

0.95 0.92 0.88 0.93 0.89 0.83 0.91 0.87 0.80 0.89 0.84 0.78 0.87 0.82 0.75 0.85 0.79 0.73

Reflector exposed above (self-cleaning effect)

0.95 0.91 0.88 0.90 0.86 0.83 0.87 0.83 0.79 0.84 0.80 0.75 0.82 0.76 0.71 0.79 0.74 0.68

Reflector enclosed above (no self-cleaning effect)

0.93 0.89 0.83 0.89 0.81 0.72 0.84 0.74 0.64 0.80 0.69 0.59 0.77 0.64 0.54 0.74 0.61 0.52

Enclosed IP2X

0.92 0.87 0.83 0.88 0.82 0.77 0.85 0.79 0.73 0.83 0.77 0.71 0.81 0.75 0.68 0.79 0.73 0.65

Dust-proof IP5X

0.96 0.93 0.91 0.94 0.90 0.86 0.92 0.88 0.83 0.91 0.86 0.81 0.90 0.85 0.80 0.90 0.84 0.79

Table for luminaire maintenance factor (LMF)

Indirect luminaires 0.92 0.89 0.85 0.86 0.81 0.74 0.81 0.73 0.65 0.77 0.66 0.57 0.73 0.60 0.51 0.70 0.55 0.45 From CIE publication 97 “Maintenance of indoor electric lighting systems”, dated 1995, ISBN 3 900 734 34 8

Chapter 8 / 5

64 Direct 0.94 0.85 0.90 0.96 0.95 0.77 0.65 From CIE publication 97 “Maintenance of indoor electric lighting systems”.85 0.81 0.94 0.88 0.90 0.59 Medium K = 2.Table for room surface maintenance factor (RSMF) The Lighting Handbook 6 / Chapter 8 Room cleaning interval in years 0.74 0.77 0.0 2.78 Indirect 0.79 0.74 0.86 0.90 0.90 0.86 0.79 0.88 0.72 0.95 0.5 2.83 0.62 0.95 0.94 0.0 Environment type C N D C N D C N D C N D C N D C N D Room size/ Illumination Room index type Small Direct 0.78 0.86 0.92 0.79 0.68 0.94 0.86 0.72 0.73 0.68 0.94 0.75 0.80 0.81 0.88 0.98 0.74 Indirect 0.74 0.88 0.96 0.98 0.94 0.83 0.77 0.83 0.86 0.81 0.84 0.89 0.66 0.95 0.90 0.86 0.87 0.75 0.78 0.99 0.87 0.96 0.97 0.77 0.96 0.80 0.84 0.89 0. ISBN 3 900 734 34 8 Large K = 5.92 0.90 0.83 0.98 0.86 0.96 0.74 0.96 0.92 0.88 0. dated 1995.92 0.96 0.96 0.67 0.87 0.82 0.73 0.95 0.89 0.96 0.95 0.87 0.86 0.94 Direct/Indirect 0.5 1.70 0.93 0.93 0.94 0.5 Direct 0.82 0.78 0.95 0.97 0.85 0.82 0.84 0.70 0.70 0.85 0.96 0.90 0.82 0.94 0.94 Direct/Indirect 0.95 0.85 0.95 0.94 0.69 0.85 0.95 0.88 K = 0.77 0.7 Direct/Indirect 0.81 0.78 Indirect 0.95 0.0 1.75 0.84 0.95 0.96 0.84 0.81 0.86 0.84 0.83 0.96 0.96 0.97 0.5 3.97 0.82 0.89 0.83 0.97 0.0 .82 0.93 0.79 0.84 0.97 0.79 0.94 0.92 0.87 0.78 0.92 0.80 0.96 0.95 0.

000 hours No 8. ISBN 3 900 734 34 8 Chapter 8 / 7 .96 3. dated 1995. 5 days/week 258 258 10 10 No Yes Daylight-dependent control: the lamps switch on automatically when there is too little daylight available. Process monitoring/control 4. From CIE publication 97 “Maintenance of indoor electric lighting systems”.72 3.30 Double shift.76 2.10 1. 6 days/week 310 310 16 16 No Yes Table of burning hours Single shift.58 1.The Lighting Handbook Working mode/shift type 24-h shift working.55 On period Days in use/year 365 365 Hours/day 24 24 Daylight-dependent control Burning hours per lamp and year 1.76 Yes 7. Data is based on the assumption that there is sufficient available daylight for half the year. 6 days/week 310 310 10 10 No Yes Single shift.

Economic analysis Building project Option 1 Luminaire type Luminaire data Number of lamps per luminaire System power of luminaire (W) Operating data Service life of system (y) Annual burning hours see page 7 Lamp replacement interval (y) Luminaire cleaning interval (y) Room cleaning interval (y) Number of luminaires Lamp lumens maintenance factor see page 4 Lamp survival factor see page 4 Luminaire maintenance factor see page 5 Room surface maintenance factor see page 6 Maintenance factor (9) x (10) x (11) x (12) Number of luminaires Itemised investment costs Cost of one luminaire Cost of one lamp Installation costs per luminaire 8 / Chapter 8 (15) (16) (17) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (2) (3) (1) Option 2 The Lighting Handbook .

Option 1 Itemised operating costs Cost of lamp replacement Cost of luminaire cleaning Cost of room cleaning Energy costs per kWh Investment costs Luminaire costs (14) x (15) Lamp costs (14) x (2) x (16) Installation costs (14) x (17) Investment costs (22) + (23) + (24) Operating costs Room cleaning costs (20) x (4) Luminaire cleaning costs (19) x (4) Lamp replacement costs (18) x (4) Energy costs (14) x (3) x (4) x (5) x (21) (8) (26) (7) (27) (6) (28) 1000 (29) (30) (31) (22) (23) (24) (25) (18) (19) (20) (21) Option 2 Operating costs (26) + (27) + (28) + (29) Annual operating costs (30) (4) Pay-back period* = The Lighting Handbook (25) Option 2 – (25) Option 1 (31) Option 1 – (31) Option 2 – – = years Pay-back period* = * excludes depreciation and interest = years Chapter 8 / 9 .

Economic analysis Building project Option 1 Luminaire type Luminaire data Number of lamps per luminaire System power of luminaire (W) Operating data Service life of system (y) Annual burning hours see page 7 Lamp replacement interval (y) Luminaire cleaning interval (y) Room cleaning interval (y) Number of luminaires Lamp lumens maintenance factor see page 4 Lamp survival factor see page 4 Luminaire maintenance factor see page 5 Room surface maintenance factor see page 6 Maintenance factor (9) x (10) x (11) x (12) Number of luminaires Itemised investment costs Cost of one luminaire Cost of one lamp Installation costs per luminaire 10 / Chapter 8 (15) (16) (17) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (2) (3) (1) Option 2 The Lighting Handbook .

Option 1 Itemised operating costs Cost of lamp replacement Cost of luminaire cleaning Cost of room cleaning Energy costs per kWh Investment costs Luminaire costs (14) x (15) Lamp costs (14) x (2) x (16) Installation costs (14) x (17) Investment costs (22) + (23) + (24) Operating costs Room cleaning costs (20) x (4) Luminaire cleaning costs (19) x (4) Lamp replacement costs (18) x (4) Energy costs (14) x (3) x (4) x (5) x (21) (8) (26) (7) (27) (6) (28) 1000 (29) (30) (31) (22) (23) (24) (25) (18) (19) (20) (21) Option 2 Operating costs (26) + (27) + (28) + (29) Annual operating costs (30) (4) Pay-back period* = The Lighting Handbook (25) Option 2 – (25) Option 1 (31) Option 1 – (31) Option 2 – – = years Pay-back period* = * excludes depreciation and interest = years Chapter 8 / 11 .

Economic analysis Building project Option 1 Luminaire type Luminaire data Number of lamps per luminaire System power of luminaire (W) Operating data Service life of system (y) Annual burning hours see page 7 Lamp replacement interval (y) Luminaire cleaning interval (y) Room cleaning interval (y) Number of luminaires Lamp lumens maintenance factor see page 4 Lamp survival factor see page 4 Luminaire maintenance factor see page 5 Room surface maintenance factor see page 6 Maintenance factor (9) x (10) x (11) x (12) Number of luminaires Itemised investment costs Cost of one luminaire Cost of one lamp Installation costs per luminaire 12 / Chapter 8 (15) (16) (17) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (2) (3) (1) Option 2 The Lighting Handbook .

Option 1 Itemised operating costs Cost of lamp replacement Cost of luminaire cleaning Cost of room cleaning Energy costs per kWh Investment costs Luminaire costs (14) x (15) Lamp costs (14) x (2) x (16) Installation costs (14) x (17) Investment costs (22) + (23) + (24) Operating costs Room cleaning costs (20) x (4) Luminaire cleaning costs (19) x (4) Lamp replacement costs (18) x (4) Energy costs (14) x (3) x (4) x (5) x (21) (8) (26) (7) (27) (6) (28) 1000 (29) (30) (31) (22) (23) (24) (25) (18) (19) (20) (21) Option 2 Operating costs (26) + (27) + (28) + (29) Annual operating costs (30) (4) Pay-back period* = The Lighting Handbook (25) Option 2 – (25) Option 1 (31) Option 1 – (31) Option 2 – – = years Pay-back period* = * excludes depreciation and interest = years Chapter 8 / 13 .

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Protection classes . . . . . . . 5 Degrees of protection . . . . . . . . 2 Ceiling Illuminance . . . . . 8 – 9 Chemical effects on materials . . . . . . . . . . . .Chapter 9 Technical information “Ceiling Brightness Impression” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 – 12 Short-circuit protection and loading of circuits . 21 – 23 . . . . . . . . . . . 5 – 7 Fire protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Luminance Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 – 20 Low-voltage installations . . . .

as these are considered to be glaring and not contributing to the overall brightness impression. especially those with Dual Components that emit some light at high angles. As would be known such a luminaire would only achieve about 20 % task illuminance on the ceiling. This is weighted by the solid angle so distance and elevation is accounted for.“Ceiling Brightness Impression” The LG3 criteria have always required that the ceiling is relatively well illuminated.000 cd/m2 are excluded. Zumtobel Staff recognise that many luminaire types. The use of an illuminance ratio in lux on the ceiling is crude but easy to calculate. The LG3 Addendum solved this by banning the Category System and setting a target for illuminating the ceiling to at least 30 % of the task illuminance. In consequence we have developed an application programme that can calculate the CBI – Ceiling Brightness Impression for any luminaire (of any manufacture). Then for a regular array of luminaires it first calculates for varying room reflectance the illuminance on the ceiling. for a Mellow IV Recessed luminaire. however difficult to measure. the market defaulted to luminaire selection with no emphasis on other qualitative criteria. A typical luminaire CBI chart is shown below. The Lighting Handbook . The intention is unequivocal: To maintain the brightness of the ceiling within certain limits to avoid the so called cave effect. easily achieves a CBI or Ceiling Brightness Impression exceeding 30. but under the “Category System” for Downlighters. The CBI application uses the algorithms from the standard Glare Calculation and the output data is presented for each luminaire type for crosswise and endwise viewing. but when you account for the additive effect of luminaires in the space the overall brightness average calculate back to lux equivalency. The basis of the calculation is to take notional room sizes in ratios of “h” value just as the Glare calculation. It converts this to brightness. actually in themselves contribute to the Brightness Impression. Then it takes each luminaire and calculates the brightness subtended at the viewers eye. Any luminaires proximate to the viewer that exceed 2.

Ceiling Illuminance
Surface Dual Component Luminaries – Directly illuminate ceiling and walls – Provide measureable brightness – Provide increased brightness impression

Fully recessed Dual Component Luminaires – Directly illuminate walls – Do not directly illuminate ceiling – Create apparent brightness – Provide increased brightness impression

The Lighting Handbook

Chapter 9 / 3

Luminance Limit Modern computer screens are increasingly tolerant to reflections. BS EN 29241-7 Ergonomic requirements for office work with visual display terminals.

The Lighting Handbook

4 / Chapter 9 Class I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I

Lmax (cd/m2) positive Type 9500 CRT 4900 FDP 4400 FPD 3800 FPD 3700 FPD 3700 CRT 3500 FPD 3500 FPD 3200 FPD 3100 CRT 2700 FPD 2200 CRT 2000 LAPTOP 1 1900 FPD 1800 FPD LG3 Limit 1700 FPD 2 1,500 cd/m 1400 FPD 1400 CRT 1300 CRT 1200 CRT 900 CRT

Make and Model LG Flatron 915FT Plus Nokia 500Xa 15" FDP Compaq TFT 5005 15" FPD LG Flatron LCD 575 MS 15" FPD NEC Multisync LCD1760NX Samsung Syncmaster 700 IFT 17" CRT NEC Multisync 1810X Nocia Pro 800+ 18" FPD Dell Ultrasharp 1504FP Ilyama LS902UT Visionmaster 1451 Ilyama TXA 3813MT 15" FPD Compaq 7500 PE1163T Toshiba Tecra 8000 LAPTOP Samsung Syncmaster 700 TFT 17" FP LG Studioworks 5000 LC 15" FPD Samsung 15" FPD LG Studioworks 880 LC 18" FPD Dell D828L 14" CRT Samsung Syncmaster 753s Samsung Syncmaser 550s 15" CRT AOC 4NLR 14" CRT

Date of mnfr. Dec-02 Jun-99 Oct-00 Nov-00 Apr-03 Nov-99 Oct-99 Oct-99 Nov-02 Feb-02 Feb-02 Feb-02 Jan-99 Feb-99 Feb-99 Dec-99 Dec-99 Dec-97 Oct-01 Oct-01 Jan-95

Increasing tolerance to reflections

Protection classes
Zumtobel Staff luminaires are classified into the following protection classes – a measure intended to afford protection against electric shock. Class I luminaires Class I is not identified by a symbol; the luminaire is intended to be connected to a protective earth conductor which bears the mark. Most Zumtobel Staff luminaires are designed in accordance with protection class I unless otherwise stated. Class II luminaires Class II luminaires have total insulation but no protective earth terminal. The Zumtobel Staff range includes protection class II luminaires, for instance moisture-proof batten luminaires and moisture-proof diffuser luminaires. Class III luminaires Class III identifies luminaires that are intended for operation with a protective extra low voltage (50 V max.). Zumtobel Staff architectural luminaires include class III luminaires, e.g. PRIO low-voltage spotlights. Protection class I Protection class II Protection class III

Degrees of protection
Degrees of protection indicate the following properties of equipment: – The quality of its protection against direct contact – Its sealing against ingress of solid foreign bodies (dust, stones, sand, etc.) – Its sealing against the ingress of water

The Lighting Handbook

Chapter 9 / 5

The type of protection is defined by two degrees of protection in accordance with IEC 529: – Degree of shock-hazard protection and protection against ingress of solid foreign bodies (1st digit) – Degree of protection against the ingress of water (2nd digit) For example IP 23: IP
INGRESS PROTECTION Protection against ingress of solid foreign bodies having a Ø < 12 mm (medium-sized solid bodies), insertion of fingers or objects. Protection against ingress of water falling at any angle up to 60º from vertical. There must be no adverse effect (spray water).

2

3

Degrees of protection for technical luminaires Protection against ingress of solid foreign bodies as per first digit IP 0X IP 1X IP 2X IP 3X IP 4X IP 5X IP 6X Unprotected against ingress of solid foreign bodies Protection against solid bodies > 50 mm Protection against solid bodies > 12 mm Protection against solid bodies > 2.5 mm Protection against solid bodies > 1 mm Dust-protected (limited ingress of dust) Dust-tight (no ingress of dust)

Protection against moisture as per second digit IP X0 IP X1 IP X2 IP X3 IP X4 IP X5 IP X6 IP X7 IP X8 No special protection Drip-proof – protection against water drops Protection against water drops up to 15º from the vertical Rainproof – protection against spray water up to 60º Splash-proof – protection against spray water from all directions Jet-proof – protection against jets of water Protection against heavy seas (conditions on ship decks) Watertight – protection against immersion (pressure and time specified) Protection against immersion under pressure (with instructions from manufacturer)

6 / Chapter 9

The Lighting Handbook

storerooms for hay. maximum mesh size 60 mm Chapter 9 / 7 Badminton courts Squash courts Indoor tennis courts Gymnasia and sports halls . straw.Applications for luminaires with increased protection Damp locations Bakeries Manure sheds Animal-feed preparation facilities Industrial kitchens Boiler rooms Commercial workshops Granaries (Deep-freeze) cold storage Pump houses Sculleries Laundries Wet locations Beer or wine cellars Shower cubicles Meat processing facilities Electroplating facilities Greenhouses Dairies Workshops using wet processes Car wash areas Agricultural facilities IP X1 IP X1 IP X1 IP X1 IP X1 IP 20 IP X1 IP X1 IP X1 IP X1 IP X1 IP X4 IP X4 IP X5 IP X4 IP X4 IP X4 IP X4 IP X4 The following generally applies: IP X5: for cleaning using water jets IP X4: in rinsing areas The following generally applies: IP X5: for cleaning using water jets Beer or wine cellars IP 44 Shower cubicles IP 44 Stores. feedstuff IP 44 Intensive stock farming IP 44 Animal sheds IP 44 Adjoining rooms of animal sheds IP 44 Facilities with increased fire risk Workrooms Woodworking Sawmills Paper processing Textile processing Treatment and fabrication Gymnasia and sports halls The Lighting Handbook The following generally applies: IP X5: for cleaning using water jets IP 54+FF: when increased fire risk IP 50 IP 50 IP 50 IP 50 IP 50 IP 50 IP 20 IP 20 IP 20 IP 20 ballproof luminaires ballproof luminaires with all-round cover.

In order to fulfil the criteria of theUmark. 08. and does not exceed 180 °C in the event of a ballast fault. They are designed so that in normal operation any mounting surface or other adjacent furniture surfaces do not exceed a temperature of 95 °C. They are designed so that in the event of a ballast fault.Fire protection Luminaire identification marking The following criteria must be taken into account: – Position of normal use – Fire behaviour of environment and mounting surfaces – Minimum clearance from combustible substances and materials Luminaires with thecmark Luminaires which carry thecmark must be constructed so that the temperature on the mounting surface does not exceed 130 °C during abnormal operation. External surfaces on which readily flammable substances such as dust or fibrous materials may accumulate when luminaires are installed as prescribed must not exceed specific temperatures. The d luminaire mark was withdrawn in 1999. 2005. /Umark Luminaires with the Both marks regulate the surface temperatures of luminaires. the surface temperature on horizontal surfaces must not exceed 90 °C. veneered or varnished. e. A validity transition period allows the d mark to be used until 01. 8 / Chapter 9 d q The Lighting Handbook . The materials may be painted. The temperature must not exceed 150 °C on vertical surfaces. mark Luminaires with the Luminaires which carry the q mark are intended for mounting in or on furniture made of materials whose flammability is not known. flame-retardant or normally flammable building materials according to DIN 4102. The maximum temperature in the event of a fault is 115 °C. Luminaires with this mark are suitable for direct mounting on parts of buildings made of noncombustible. Temperatures must not exceed 220 °C on vertical surfaces. TheUmark introduced in EN 60598 has applied since 01. The d mark limits the temperature on horizontal surfaces to 95 °C during normal operation and 115 °C in the event of a ballast fault. the same as for the d mark. Luminaires with theQmark Luminaires which carry theQmark are intended for installation in furniture.1998. in corners of wooden furniture. flame-retardant and normally flammable materials as specified in DIN 4102 cannot be ignited.g.08.

Fire protection: Place of use – Mark – Requirements The Lighting Handbook Chapter 9 / 9 .

Ambient temperature Depending on the type and composition of the substances. etc. cover. Chemical composition The chemical composition should be discussed with every operator. What are the key factors? 1. 5. Degree of saturation of chemical substances 10 / Chapter 9 The Lighting Handbook . Applications The following applications are just a few examples of situations in which material damage may occur: – Chemical and petrochemical industry – Foodstuffs industry (cheese production. 4.Chemical effects on materials No material is resistant to all chemical influences. Luminaire materials A luminaire consists of several parts having different functions and which are therefore made from different materials (base plate. chemical reactions will take place over a range of temperatures. meat processing. cable inlets. breweries) – Agriculture – Fishing industry – Kitchens and industrial cooking facilities – Car wash facilities – Production facilities and workshops using a high level of oil and grease 3. The table on the opposite page can therefore only give a brief overview of effects of some frequently occurring chemicals and is subject to the following conditions: – The chemical substance listed in the table is a basic material and not part of a chemical compound. – The ambient temperature is 22 °C. seal. closures. We should be glad to provide further advice if you have any questions or doubts about the resistance of any materials. A great many complaints could be avoided if due consideration were given during the planning stage to the situation in which the luminaire is going to be used.). dairies. 2. The effects of chemicals vary widely and take up entire volumes of resistance tables.

– = not resistant Chapter 9 / 11 ..carbonate The Lighting Handbook Acetic acid up to 5 % Acetic acid up to 30 % Acetone Alcohol up to 30 % Alcohol.Polymeth.Chemical substance in question Stainless Alusteel minium Poly. • = resistant to limited extent. concentrated Aliphatic hydrocarbons Ammonia 25 % Aniline Aromatic hydrocarbons Battery acid Beer Benzene Blood Bromic acid Carbon dioxide Carbon monoxide Carbon tetrachloride Caustic soda solution 2 % Caustic soda solution 10 % Chloroform Chlorophenol Diesel oil. crude oil Dioxan Ether Ethyl acetate (ester) Glycerine Glycol Glysantin Hydrochloric acid up to 20 % above 20 % Hydrogen peroxide up to 40 % over 40 % • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • – – • • • – • • • • • • • • • • • – • • • – – • • • • • • • • • – • • • • • – • • • – – • • • – • – • • • • – – – • • • – • • • • • – – • – – • – • • – – • • – • – • • – • • – – • – – – • • • • • – • • • – • – • – – – • • – • – • • – – – – – • – – – • • • • • • • • = resistant.Polyester acrylate.

– = not resistant 12 / Chapter 9 The Lighting Handbook .Polymeth. • = resistant to limited extent..carbonate Ketones Lime milk Lysol Methylene chloride Methanol Metal salts and their aqueous solutions Naphtha (cleaner’s naphtha) Petrolium ether Pyridine Phenol Nitric acid up to 10 % up to 20 % above 20 % Sea water Soap-suds Soda Sodium chloride solution Sulphuretted hydrogen Sulphuric acid up to 50 % up to 70 % above 70 % Sulphurous acid up to 5 % Synthetic detergents Turpentine Water up to 60 °C Xylene • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • – – – • • • • • • – • • • – • • • • – – • • • – • • – – – • • • • • – • – – – • • • – – • • – • • • • • • • – • • • • – – • – – – • • • – – • • – • • • • • • • – • • • • – – • – – – • • • – – • • – • • • • • • • – – • • • – • = resistant.Chemical substance in question Stainless Alusteel minium Poly.Polyester acrylate.

non-dimming (TRIDONIC PCI series): C10 1. correction twin-lamp Loading of automatic circuit breakers for metal halide lamps – Maximum recommended number of electronic ballasts per automatic circuit breaker Electronic ballasts for HIT/HIT-DE/HIE and HIT-CE/HIT-TC-CE/HIT-DE-CE/HIE-CE metal halide lamps.5 mm2 15 10 10 6 B16 1.5 mm2 12 8 6 4 B13 1.5 mm2 33 22 18 14 C16 1.5 mm2 19 13 13 7 B20 2.f.5 mm2 48 32 30 20 B10 1.Short-circuit protection and loading of circuits Miniature circuit breakers Trip characteristic B C D Range over 3 ln to 5 ln over 5 ln to 10 ln over 10 ln to 20 ln Maximum number of fluorescent lamps per miniature circuit breaker Number of fluorescent lamps with conventional or low-loss ballast for different lamp circuits inductive shunt p.5 mm2 1/20 W HI The Lighting Handbook 1/35 W HI 1/70 W HI 1/150 W HI 24 16 10 7 C13 1.5 mm2 42 28 26 20 C20 2.5 mm2 19 13 13 7 Trip characteristic Rated current A TC 9/11 W TC-D 13 W TC-D 18 W TL + TC-L 18 W TC-L 24 W TC-D + T 26 W TL + TC-L 36 W TL 58 W TC 9/11 W TC-D 13/18 W TC 18 W TC-L 18/24 W TC-D + -T 26 W TL + TC-L 36 W TL 58 W TC-L 24 W TC-D + -T 26 W TL + TC-L 18 W TC + TC-L 36 W TL 58 W B 10 62 47 27 75 43 94 53 30 48 60 75 30 48 60 75 23 14 71 71 37 23 114 114 46 28 144 144 57 36 179 179 23 14 99 99 37 23 159 159 46 28 201 201 57 36 250 250 32 51 64 79 44 71 89 110 32 20 51 32 64 41 79 51 44 27 71 44 89 56 110 71 60 96 54 46 28 86 74 46 16 100 20 125 120 106 92 56 150 132 114 72 60 96 54 46 28 86 74 46 25 156 115 66 C 10 62 47 27 75 43 94 53 16 100 20 125 120 106 92 56 150 132 114 72 25 156 115 66 Chapter 9 / 13 .

Loading of automatic circuit breakers for electronic ballasts for fluorescent and compact fluorescent lamps – Maximum recommended number of electronic ballasts per automatic circuit breaker Electronic ballasts for T16 fluorescent lamps.5 mm2 140 140 64 64 98 100 90 36 140 44 140 64 60 36 80 30 58 36 36 B10 1. non-dimming (TRIDONIC PC E011/PC T8 PRO series): C10 1.5 mm2 80 80 50 50 86 80 80 30 80 30 80 50 50 30 50 24 50 30 30 C20 2.5 mm2 52/70 34/70 33/– 20/– 35/70 20/21 33/33 13/13 B20 2.5 mm2 40 40 25 25 43 40 40 15 40 15 40 25 25 15 25 12 25 15 15 B20 2.5 mm2 55/70 42/70 40/– 22/– 42/70 22/22 40/40 15/15 14 / Chapter 9 The Lighting Handbook 1/18 W 2/18 W 3/18 W 4/18 W 1/36 W 2/36 W 1/58 W 2/58 W T26 T26 T26 T26 T26 T26 T26 T26 .5 mm2 40/40 23/40 23/– 15/– 24/40 15/15 23/23 10/10 B16 1.5 mm2 mm2 104/140 110/140 68/140 84/140 66/– 80/– 40/– 44/– 70/140 84/140 40/42 44/44 66/66 80/80 26/26 30/30 B10 1.5 mm2 80/80 46/80 46/– 30/– 48/80 30/30 46/46 20/20 C16 C20 1.5 mm2 46/46 30/44 32/– 20/– 32/46 20/20 32/32 14/14 C13 1.5 2.5 mm2 80 80 46 46 80 78 78 28 80 30 80 50 40 28 46 20 46 28 28 C16 1.5 mm2 23/23 15/22 16/– 10/– 16/23 10/10 16/16 7/7 B13 1. non-dimming (TRIDONIC PC T5 PRO series): C10 1.5 mm2 70 70 32 32 49 50 45 18 70 22 70 32 30 18 40 15 29 18 18 1/14 W 2/14 W 3/14 W 4/14 W 1/21 W 2/21 W 1/28 W 2/28 W 1/35 W 2/35 W 1/24 W 2/24 W 1/39 W 2/39 W 1/54 W 2/54 W 1/49 W 2/49 W 1/80 W T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 Electronic ballasts for T26 fluorescent lamps.5 mm2 23 23 15 15 23 23 22 9 23 10 23 15 15 9 15 7 15 9 9 B13 1.5 mm2 46 46 30 30 46 46 44 18 46 20 46 30 30 18 30 14 30 18 18 C13 1.5 mm2 40 40 23 23 40 39 39 14 40 15 40 25 20 14 23 10 23 14 14 B16 1.

5 mm2 40 20 12 12 35 15 35 15 20 15 B20 2.5 mm2 15 10 6 6 15 5 15 5 10 5 B13 1.5 mm2 50 30 18 16 50 20 50 20 30 20 C16 1.5 mm2 30 20 12 12 30 10 30 10 20 10 C13 1.5 mm2 35 22 17 17 35 22 36 15 35 15 22 23 22 14 22 14 15 B20 2.5 mm2 50 32 26 24 50 32 50 22 50 22 32 32 32 22 32 22 20 C16 1.5 mm2 40 23 15 14 38 15 38 15 23 15 1/18 W 2/18 W 3/18 W 4/18 W 1/30 W 2/30 W 1/36 W 2/36 W 1/58 W 2/58 W The Lighting Handbook T26 T26 T26 T26 T26 T26 T26 T26 T26 T26 Chapter 9 / 15 . Basic dimming/Dali dimming (TRIDONIC PCA T5 ECO/PCA T5 EXCEL one4all series): C10 1. Basic dimming/Dali dimming (TRIDONIC PCA T8 ECO/PCA T8 EXCEL one4all series): C10 1.5 mm2 25 16 13 12 25 16 25 11 25 11 16 16 16 11 16 11 10 B16 1.5 mm2 70 44 34 34 70 44 72 30 70 30 44 46 44 28 44 28 30 C20 2.5 mm2 80 46 30 28 76 30 76 30 46 30 B10 1.5 mm2 25 15 9 8 25 10 25 10 15 10 B16 1.5 mm2 80 50 42 38 76 50 80 34 80 34 50 52 50 34 50 34 30 B10 1.5 mm2 80 40 24 24 70 30 70 30 40 30 C20 2.5 mm2 40 25 21 19 38 25 40 17 40 17 25 26 25 17 25 17 15 1/14 W 2/14 W 3/14 W 4/14 W 1/21 W 2/21 W 1/28 W 2/28 W 1/35 W 2/35 W 1/24 W 2/24 W 1/39 W 2/39 W 1/54 W 2/54 W 1/80 W T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 T16 Electronic ballasts for T26 fluorescent lamps.Electronic ballasts for T16 fluorescent lamps.5 mm2 15 11 8 8 15 11 16 8 16 8 11 11 11 7 11 7 5 B13 1.5 mm2 30 22 16 16 30 22 32 16 32 16 22 22 22 14 22 14 10 C13 1.

5 mm2 40 40 40 40 40 20 40 13 20 10 15 B20 2.5 mm2 80 80 80 80 80 40 80 26 40 20 30 C20 2.5 mm2 80 80 80 80 100 40 80 30 40 22 36 B10 1.5 mm2 25 25 25 25 40 15 25 10 15 7 14 B16 1.5 mm2 40 40 40 40 50 20 40 15 20 11 18 1/18 W 2/18 W 1/24 W 2/24 W 1/36 W 2/36 W 1/40 W 2/40 W 1/55 W 2/55 W 1/80 W TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L Electronic ballasts for TC-L compact fluorescent lamps.5 mm2 30 30 30 30 80 20 30 14 20 10 18 C13 1.5 mm2 30 30 30 30 80 20 30 14 20 10 18 C13 1.Electronic ballasts for TC-L compact fluorescent lamps.5 mm2 15 15 15 15 40 10 15 7 10 5 9 B13 1.5 mm2 15 15 15 15 40 10 15 7 10 5 9 B13 1.5 mm2 25 25 25 25 40 15 25 10 15 7 14 B16 1.5 mm2 50 50 50 50 80 30 50 20 30 14 28 C16 1. non-dimming (TRIDONIC PC PRO FSD series): C10 1.5 mm2 80 80 80 80 80 40 80 26 40 20 30 C20 2.5 mm2 40 40 40 40 40 20 40 13 20 10 15 B20 2. Basic dimming/Dali dimming (TRIDONIC PCA TCL ECO/ PCA TCL EXCEL one4all series): C10 1.5 mm2 40 40 40 40 50 20 40 15 20 11 18 1/18 W 2/18 W 1/24 W 2/24 W 1/36 W 2/36 W 1/40 W 2/40 W 1/55 W 2/55 W 1/80 W TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L TC-L 16 / Chapter 9 The Lighting Handbook .5 mm2 50 50 50 50 80 30 50 20 30 14 28 C16 1.5 mm2 80 80 80 80 100 40 80 30 40 22 36 B10 1.

5 mm2 60 40 50 32 50 32 38 18 38 18 C16 1.5 mm2 1/13 W TC-DEL/ TC-TEL 2/13 W TC-DEL/ TC-TEL 1/18 W TC-DEL/ TC-TEL 2/18 W TC-DEL/ TC-TEL 1/26 W TC-DEL/ TC-TEL 2/26 W TC-DEL/ TC-TEL 1/32 W TC-TEL 2/32 W TC-TEL 1/42 W TC-TEL 2/42 W TC-TEL 1/57 W TC-TEL 80 80 80 30 30 32 30 16 30 16 20 C13 1.5 mm2 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 30 80 30 30 C20 2.5 mm2 40 40 40 15 15 16 15 8 15 8 10 B13 1.5 mm2 20 14 15 11 15 11 13 5 13 5 B13 1.Electronic ballasts for TC-DEL/TEL compact fluorescent lamps.5 mm2 80 60 70 46 70 46 50 24 50 24 C20 2.5 mm2 30 20 25 16 25 16 19 9 19 9 B16 1.5 mm2 80 64 76 68 76 56 58 28 58 28 B10 1.5 mm2 40 32 38 34 38 28 29 14 29 14 The Lighting Handbook Chapter 9 / 17 .5 mm2 80 80 80 50 50 50 50 22 50 22 30 C16 1.5 mm2 100 100 100 80 80 80 80 44 80 44 44 B10 1.5 mm2 40 40 40 25 25 25 25 11 25 11 15 B16 1.5 mm2 40 30 35 23 35 23 25 12 25 12 B20 2.5 mm2 1/13 W TC-DEL/ TC-TEL 2/13 W TC-DEL/ TC-TEL 1/18 W TC-DEL/ TC-TEL 2/18 W TC-DEL/ TC-TEL 1/26 W TC-DEL/ TC-TEL 2/26 W TC-DEL/ TC-TEL 1/32 W TC-TEL 2/32 W TC-TEL 1/42 W TC-TEL 2/42 W TC-TEL 40 28 30 22 30 22 26 10 26 10 C13 1.5 mm2 50 50 50 40 40 40 40 22 40 22 22 Electronic ballasts for TC-DEL/TEL compact fluorescent lamps.5 mm2 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 15 40 15 15 B20 2. Basic dimming/Dali dimming (TRIDONIC PCA ECO/ PCA EXCEL one4all series): C10 1. non-dimming (TRIDONIC PC PRO series): C10 1.

uncompensated Lamp values Number of ballasts per automatic circuit breaker W V A C10 C16 C20 C25 B10 B16 B20 B25 35 230 0.15 2 3 3 4 2 3 4 400 230 3.2 6 9 11 14 4 6 8 150 230 1.8 6 9 11 14 6 10 12 125 230 1. uncompensated Lamp values Number of ballasts per automatic circuit breaker W V A C10 C16 C20 C25 B10 B16 B20 50 230 0.53 11 18 23 29 9 15 18 23 70 230 0.4 1 1 1 2 – 1 1 B25 20 15 10 5 2 1 18 / Chapter 9 The Lighting Handbook .8 4 6 7 9 2 4 5 250 230 3 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 400 230 4.98 7 11 14 17 5 8 9 12 150 230 1.6 10 15 18 23 8 13 16 80 230 0.8 4 6 7 9 2 4 5 6 250 230 3 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 400 230 3.77 9 14 18 22 6 10 13 70 230 1 7 11 14 17 5 8 10 100 230 1.25 1 2 3 3 1 2 2 700 230 5.15 4 6 7 9 4 7 9 250 230 2.4 1 2 3 4 1 1 2 B25 16 12 10 7 4 2 Conventional ballasts for HME high-pressure mercury vapour lamps.Loading of automatic circuit breakers for high-pressure lamps – Maximum recommended number of ballasts per automatic circuit breaker Conventional ballasts for HIT/HIT-DE/HIE metal halide lamps.5 2 3 4 5 1 2 2 3 Conventional ballasts for HST/HST-DE/HSE high-pressure sodium vapour lamps. uncompensated Lamp values Number of ballasts per automatic circuit breaker W V A C10 C16 C20 C25 B10 B16 B20 50 230 0.

compensated Lamp values W V 50 230 70 230 100 230 150 230 250 230 400 230 ComNumber of ballasts per automatic circuit breaker pensation C10 C16 C20 C25 B10 B16 B20 10 µF 16 24 31 38 11 17 22 12 µF 12 18 23 29 8 13 16 12 µF 10 16 20 25 7 11 14 20 µF 7 11 14 17 5 8 10 36 µF 5 7 9 11 3 5 6 45 µF 3 4 5 7 2 3 4 B25 27 20 17 12 8 5 Conventional ballasts for HME high-pressure mercury vapour lamps. compensated Lamp values W V 35 230 70 230 150 230 250 230 400 230 ComNumber of ballasts per automatic circuit breaker pensation C10 C16 C20 C25 B10 B16 B20 6 µF 22 36 45 50 11 18 23 12 µF 12 18 23 29 8 13 16 20 µF 7 11 14 17 5 8 10 32 µF 5 7 9 11 3 5 6 35 µF 3 5 7 8 2 4 5 B25 27 20 12 8 6 Conventional ballasts for HST/HST-DE/HSE high-pressure sodium vapour lamps.Conventional ballasts for HIT/HIT-DE/HIE metal halide lamps. compensated Lamp values W V 50 230 80 230 125 230 250 230 400 230 700 230 ComNumber of ballasts per automatic circuit breaker pensation C10 C16 C20 C25 B10 B16 B20 B25 7 µF 19 31 39 49 10 15 18 23 8 µF 12 19 24 30 6 9 11 14 10 µF 7 12 15 19 4 6 7 9 18 µF 4 6 7 9 2 3 3 4 25 µF 2 4 5 6 1 2 2 2 40 µF 1 2 2 3 – 1 1 1 The Lighting Handbook Chapter 9 / 19 .

r. n.r.Loading of automatic circuit breakers for low-voltage halogen incandescent lamps – Maximum recommended number of transformers per automatic circuit breaker Magnetic transformers for QT/QR/QR-CB(C) halogen incandescent lamps (TRIDONIC TMBx/OMTx series): Power 20 W 35 W 50 W 70 W 80 W 105 W 150 W 210 W 300 W C10 58 41 21 15 14 8 4 2–3 1–2 C16 93 65 35 24 22 13 6 4–5 2–3 B10 29 20 10 7 7 4 2 1 n. = not recommended 20 / Chapter 9 The Lighting Handbook . B16 2–3 1–2 n.r. B16 46 32 17 12 11 6 3 2 1 n. = not recommended Magnetic transformers for QT/QR/QR-CB(C) halogen incandescent lamps (TRIDONIC TMAx/TMDx series): Power 20 W 35 W 40 W 50 W 60 W 70 W 80 W 105 W C10 42 35 26 23 21 16 13 9 C16 67 56 43 37 33 26 21 14 B10 21 17 13 11 10 8 6 4 B16 33 28 21 18 16 13 10 7 Magnetic transformers for QT/QR/QR-CB(C) halogen incandescent lamps (TRIDONIC OGT series): Power 250 W 300 W 500 W C10 3–4 2 1 C16 5–6 3–4 1–2 B10 1–2 1 n.r.r.

7 6 5 0.1 0. Conductor cross-sections and voltage drop Because the voltages are small.g. The Lighting Handbook Chapter 9 / 21 .3 0. Crosssections must be chosen so that the voltage drop across the conductor between transformer and lamp does not exceed 5 %. this can result in considerable voltage drops.02 Φ Lh 140 % Φ = luminous flux Lh = service life Voltage as % of nominal voltage Operation at rated load Magnetic transformers should be operated at rated load as far as possible so as to avoid any rise in the secondary voltage which can result in a reduction in lamp service life (5 % overvoltage corresponds to 30 % shorter life).2 0. 0. 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.200 hours.5 0. For a 12 V halogen lamp.03 0.000 0. large currents flow on the secondary side.Low-voltage installation Service life and luminous flux The service life and luminous flux of low-voltage halogen lamps are extremely voltage dependent.4 0.8 0.04 0. from 3. If conductors are long and have small crosssections.2 1. this represents an 2 overvoltage of 8 % which re1 = duces the average 100% service life of the 0.6 halogen lamp.3 hours to approx. 3 however. 50 Multiplication factor for relative operating values 30 20 10 8 6 4 2 Lh Φ 1= 100% 0.06 0.15 60 % 80 % 100 % 120 % A 1 V overvoltage is insignificant for a 230 W halogen 4 lamp.4 e. Voltage changes on the line side are transferred to the secondary side in the same ratio.08 0.

5 1.5 4 6 10 up to 10 m up to 12 m 1.5 2. is approx. On the other hand. 22 / Chapter 9 The Lighting Handbook . especially when lighting is adjusted.5 4 4 4 up to 6 m 1. therefore the transformer must be installed out of earshot if possible.5 1.Required conductor cross-sections in mm2 as a function of transformer rating and cable length (one-way line length) for magnetic transformers: Transformer rating Cable length in m 20 VA 50 VA 1OO VA 150 VA 200 VA up to 2 m up to 4 m 1.5 4 6 6 10 10 10 16 Installation The distance between transformer and lamps must be as short as possible (minimum distance. there is often unwanted humming.5 2.5 4 6 6 up to 8 m 1. Transformer Wherever possible.5 2.5 1.5 1. 30 cm) in order to avoid the relatively large conductor cross-sections. cables must be laid in a star configuration and be of equal length to ensure that all lamps receive the same voltage.5 2. however.5 1.5 1.

These are identified by the following symbol and details of the relevant distance in metres: …m The Lighting Handbook Chapter 9 / 23 . Safety measures when operating low-voltage halogen lamps Low-voltage halogen lamps generate a huge amount of heat. . Phase control Halogen lamps are operated with a magnetic transformer. Please note that transformers for use in areas which present fire risks must carry the appropriate conformity mark (e. make sure there is adequate heat removal and that the safety distances from combustible materials are observed. In the case of recessed luminaires. The ambient temperature must not exceed 50 °C max. Reverse phase control Halogen lamps are operated with an electronic transformer in the high-frequency range. The necessary safety distances from the illuminated surface also apply when using spotlights. ).Transformers and light regulation Only approved safety transformers should be used. . .g. Important: do not exceed maximum conductor length.

.

Personal Notes The Lighting Handbook Chapter 10 .

Personal Notes Chapter 10 The Lighting Handbook .

Personal Notes The Lighting Handbook Chapter 10 .

Personal Notes Chapter 10 The Lighting Handbook .

Personal Notes The Lighting Handbook Chapter 10 .

Personal Notes Chapter 10 The Lighting Handbook .

Please contact your local sales office for further information. +1/(0)845/691 62 62 Fax +1/(0)845/691 62 89 www.de www. KG Grevenmarschstr. NSW 2250 Tel.no Sweden Zumtobel Staff AB Norr Mälarstrand 8 11220 Stockholm Tel: +46/(0)8/6511480 Fax: +46/(0)8/265605 E-mail: info@zumtobelstaff. 04 797 525-UK 07/04 © Zumtobel Staff Technical data was correct at time of going to press.zumtobelstaff. Unit 4 . +43/(0)5572/390-0 Fax +43/(0)5572/22 826 Zumtobel Staff GmbH & Co.zumtobelstaff.au Norway Zumtobel Staff Belysning AS Industriveien 11 1481 Hagan Tel: +47/(0)670/62230 Fax: +47/(0)670/62269 Email: firmapost@zumtobelstaff. AUSTRIA Tel. Printed on environmentally-friendly chlorine-free paper.co. +49/(0)5261/2 12-0 Fax +49/(0)5261/2 12-7777 www.au www.com.zumtobelstaff. GERMANY Tel.at www. +44/(0)20 8589 1800 Fax +44/(0)20 8756 4800 Email: enquiries@uk.United Kingdom Zumtobel Staff Lighting Ltd.The Argent Centre.zumtobelstaff. +61/(2)4340 3200 Fax +61/(2)4340 2108 Email: info@zumtobelstaff. 2 Wella Way Somersby.co.zumtobelstaff.com. We reserve the right to make technical changes without notice. New York 1258-2630 Tel. .us Australia and New Zealand Zumtobel Staff (Australia) Pty.zumtobelstaff. 74-78 D-32657 Lemgo.com Art. Pump Lane Hayes/Middlesex UB3 3BL Tel.uk USA and Canada Zumtobel Staff Lighting 3300 Route 9W Highland. Ltd.-No.se Head offices Zumtobel Staff GmbH Schweizer Strasse 30 Postfach 72 A-6851 Dornbirn.

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