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A Friendly Mathematics
Competition
35 Years of Teamwork in Indiana
© 2003 by
The Mathematical Association of America (Incorporated)
Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 2002107971
ISBN 0-88385-808-8
Printed in the United States of America
Current Printing (last digit):
109 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
A Friendly Mathematics
Competition
35 Years of Teamwork in Indiana
Edited by
Rick Gillman
Valparaiso University
Published and Distributed by
The Mathematical Association of America
MAA PROBLEM BOOKS SERIES
Problem Books is a series of the Mathematical Association of America
consisting of collections of problems and solutions from annual mathemat-
ical competitions; compilations of problems (including unsolved problems)
specific to particular branches of mathematics; books on the art and practice
of problem solving, etc.
Committee on Publications
Gerald Alexanderson, Chair
Roger Nelsen Editor
Irl Bivens Clayton Dodge
Richard Gibbs George Gilbert
Art Grainger Gerald Heuer
Elgin Johnston Kiran Kedlaya
Loren Larson Margaret Robinson
A Friendly Mathematics Competition: 35 Years of Teamwork in Indiana,
edited by Rick Gillman
The Inquisitive Problem Solver, Paul Vaderlind, Richard K. Guy, and Loren
L. Larson
Mathematical Olympiads 1998-1999: Problems and Solutions From Around
the World, edited by Titu Andreescu and Zuming Feng
Mathematical Olympiads 1999-2000: Problems and Solutions From Around
the World, edited by Titu Andreescu and Zuming Feng
The William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition 1985-2000: Prob-
lems, Solutions, and Commentary, Kiran S. Kedlaya, Bjorn Poonen,
Ravi Vakil
USA and International Mathematical Olympiads 2000, edited by Titu
Andreescu and Zuming Feng
USA and International Mathematical Olympiads 2001, edited by Titu
Andreescu and Zuming Feng
MAA Service Center
P. O. Box 91112
Washington, DC 20090-1112
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www.maa.org
Preface
A college level mathematics competition has been held in Indiana for
more than 35 years as of the writing of this book. Orginally known as the
Indiana Small College Mathematics Competition, its official title became
the Indiana College Mathematics Competition. However, many people refer
to it by its popular nickname "The Friendly Exam" earned because of the
collegial nature of the competition and the modest level of competitiveness
between the participants and the institutions involved. It is really more
about getting together to do mathematics and to challenge oneself than it
is about winning a competition.
This book shares the efforts of the many students and faculty who have
participated in the Indiana College Mathematics Competition over its first
35 years.
I would like to specifically identify the individual faculty members who
have composed the exams. Unfortunately, this is the one piece of the history
that has been lost over the years. Their attentive work at identifying or
creating good questions has been a major reason why the competition has
been a success for so long.
Over the years, exam authors have borrowed many classic problems from
other sources. These have been included to provide a complete record of
the exam, but have not generally been attributed to an original source.
I'd like to take this opportunity to thank all of the people who have
made this book possible by helping in one way or another. Among all of
these people, the following individuals provided noteworthy help: James
Lee, Ken Luther, Steve Shonefeld, Pat Sullivan, Eric Tkaczyk, and the
Purdue University Math Club.
I would also like to thank Pete Edson for having the idea for the
competition, and extend a very special thank you to Paul Mielke on
vi Preface
behalf of myself and my colleagues in Indiana. Without Paul's efforts
to develop the contest, to support it over the years, and to lead the section
in building the endowment Indiana and the MAA would not have this
wonderful example of a "friendly" competition that does so much to build
the mathematical community in Indiana.
Contents
Preface v
The Indiana College Mathematics Competition: A Short History 1
An Update of the History of the ICMC 5
Exams 7
Exam # 1-1966 7
Exam #2-1967 8
Exam #3-1968 9
Exam #4-1969 10
Exam #5-1970 II
Exam #6-1971 12
Exam #7-1972 14
Exam #8-1973 15
Exam #9-1974 16
Exam #10-1975 . 16
Exam #11-1976 . 17
Exam #12-1977 . 18
Exam #l3-1978 . 19
Exam #14-1979 . 20
Exam #15-1980 . 22
Exam #16-1981 . 23
Exam #17-1982 . 24
Exwn #18-1983 . 25
Exam #19-1984 . 26
Exam #20-1985 . 28
vii
viii Contents
Exam #21-1986 . 29
Exam #22-1987 . 30
Exam #23-1988 . 31
Exam #24--1989 . 32
Exam #25-1990 . 34
Exam #26-1991 . 36
Exam #27-1992 . 37
Exam #28-1993 . 38
Exam #29-1994 . 40
Exam #30-1995 . 40
Exam #31-1996 . 41
Exam #32-1997 . 43
Exam #33-1998 . 44
Exam #34--1999 . 46
Exam #35-2000 . 48
Solutions 51
Exam #1-1966 51
Exam #2-1967 55
Exam #3-1968 61
Exam #4--1969 64
Exam #5-1970 67
Exam #6-1971 69
Exam #7-1972 73
Exam #8-1973 75
Exam #9-1974 78
Exam #10-1975 . 81
Exam #11-1976 . 86
Exam #12-1977 . 88
Exam #13-1978 . 90
Exam #14--1979 . 95
Exam #15-1980 . 98
Exam #16-1981 . 103
Exam #17-1982 . 106
Exam #18-1983 . 109
Exam #19-1984 . 112
Exam #20-1985 . 117
Exam #21-1986 . 120
Exam #22-1987 .. 122
Contents ix
Exam #23-1988 . 126
Exam #24-1989 . 130
Exam #25-1990 . 133
Exam #26-1991 . 136
Exam #27-1992 . 139
Exam #28-1993 . 144
Exam #29-1994 . 148
Exam #30-1995 . 150
Exam #31-1996 . 156
Exam #32-1997 . 160
Exam #33-1998 . 166
Exam #34-1999 . 171
Exam #35-2000 . 176
Index by Problem Type 181
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The Indiana College Mathematics
Competition: A Short History
Paul T. Mielke
On April 27, 1965, Peter Edson, a trustee of Wabash College, sent our
dean a memorandum that included a newspaper clipping about a unique
mathematics competition that was held among high schools in New Jersey.
In this competition, each school entered a team that worked as a team on a
set mathematics examination. Edson wondered if anything of that sort was
done at the college level. I answered that I knew of no such competition
but that I would be willing to suggest the idea to my Indiana colleagues.
Thus, on May 18, 1965, I wrote a letter to heads of departments in the
small colleges of Indiana relaying Edson's suggestion. Response to my
letter was immediate and favorable, so I wrote a second letter, which read
in part:
The Mathematics Department of Wabash College is pleased to invite
its counterparts in the other colleges of Indiana to a friendly mathe-
matics competition to be held on Saturday afternoon, March 12, 1966,
at Wabash College, Crawfordsville. The purpose of this competition
is to stimulate friendship and mathematical interest among members
of the various departments and their undergraduate students. Program
for the day, which we are calling "Pete Edson Day" in honor of the
Wabash College trustee who conceived the idea for the contest, is as
follows:
11 :30 A.M. - 12:30 P.M. Registration, Baxter Hall Lounge,
Wabash College
12:30 P.M. - Luncheon, South Mezzanine, Campus Center.
Participants will be guests of the College.
2:00 P.M. - 4:00 P.M. - The competition, a written examination
for undergraduates
2 The Indiana College Mathematics Competition: A Short History
2:00 P.M. - 4:00 P.M. - Informal seminar for members of the
various departments
4:00 P.M. - Coffee hour at which test papers will be gathered,
Baxter Lounge
The test, prepared by Professor George F. Springer of Indiana
University, will be similar to, though (one hopes) not as difficult as,
the Putnam test. There will be a significant difference, however. Each
school is invited to bring a team of three undergraduates who will
work on the test as a team, consulting with one another as needed.
Tests will be sent to Professor Springer for grading and announcement
of results. A suitable prize will be awarded by Wabash College to
members of the winning team. Ranking of other teams will not be
revealed by Professor Springer.
This first contest was held as scheduled, with eight schools partici-
pating: Anderson College, DePauw University, Earlham College, Franklin
College, Marian College, Rose Polytechnic Institute (now Rose-Hulman),
Valparaiso University, and Wabash College. In the spring of 1967 the
second competition was held at Marian College with 15 participants:
Anderson, Butler, DePauw, Earlham, Evansville, Franklin, Manchester,
Marian, Rose-Hulman, St. Joseph's, St. Mary-of-the-Woods, St. Mary's
(of Notre Dame), Taylor, Valparaiso, and Wabash.
Since its beginning, the contest has been called familiarly, "The Friendly
Math Competition", from the phrase used in the above letter. It has
been held every year, a total of 24 times as of 1989, with a minimum
participation of eight schools in that first year, a maximum participation of
nineteen in 1972, and an average participation of over thirteen schools. The
nineteen participants in the 1972 competition were Butler, DePauw, Earl-
ham, Evansville, Franklin, Huntington, IVPUI Indianapolis, IV Northwest,
IV Southeast, Manchester, Marian, Oakland City, Purdue Calumet, Purdue
Ft. Wayne, Rose-Hulman, St. Mary-of-the-Woods, Taylor, Valparaiso, and
Wabash.
Throughout its history, the essential nature of the contest as a team
competition has remained the same, with a team consisting of at most
three members. The tests have usually been set and graded by a single
person, most often a professor from one of the large state universities.
Duration of the tests has been maintained at two hours. Before each test,
a team member from each school draws a number which is given to an
impartial judge, who attaches the number to the school's name in a memo.
The Indiana College Mathematics Competition: A Short History 3
Teams are instructed to identify their test papers with only their numbers,
so that only these are seen by the person who sets and grades the test.
Upon completing hislher work, the grader announces the results by team
number to the judge who holds the identification key. This person in turn
reports the results to the contestants.
Some other ground rules developed naturally. There was early agitation
for publicly announcing the ranking of the first three teams. This idea was
accepted, but it led to another problem. A school may enter any number
of contestants in the Putnam competition, but it must name its team of
three for the competition beforehand. Rose-Hulman has always been a
worthy adversary in this Indiana competition, and a decision had to be made
with regard to its wish to enter several teams. A consensus was reached
that mUltiple teams of three could be entered, and that a school need not
designate "its team." It was then decided that public announcement of
the top three places in the competition would refer to schools rather than
teams, so that if two teams from a given school scored second and third,
for instance, the school would be awarded second place in the competition,
and third place would be awarded to the next highest school.
Until 1987 the competition was restricted to the small colleges of
Indiana, including branches of IU and Purdue, but in 1987 it was opened
to all colleges, including the large universities.
The contests have always been managed by the host schools, though in its
fall meeting of 1977, the Indiana Section of the Mathematical Association
of America agreed to make them a part of its spring meeting, and this
practice has been followed since 1978. Maintaining the "Edson Trophy"
and awarding of prizes was assumed by Wabash College, which had a
small fund for that purpose, to which Mr. Edson contributed while he was
alive. Since this fund was exhausted, I have had the pleasure of supplying
both trophy and prizes.
Each member of the winning team is awarded a suitably inscribed book
prize, and the winners' names are inscribed on the Edson Trophy. The
books are traditionally selected from those offered by the MAA. The Edson
Trophy is a rectangular walnut plaque measuring 9 x 12 inches. To it is
affixed a permanent identifying plate with this inscription:
THE
PETER EDSON TROPHY
INDIANA COLLEGE
MATHEMATICS COMPETITION
4 An Update of the History of the ICMC
Below this plate is a smaller one containing the year and the name of the
most recent winning college and its team members. Each year, this smaller
plate is moved to the back of the plaque, and a new one replaces it. The
trophy "travels"; it resides each year at the winning college. The back of
the first trophy was filled by 1978, so it resides permanently at Wabash
College, which was the winner in that year. The current trophy is at Purdue
University, the 1989 winner. (Since writing the above, I have succeeded in
making individual trophies for each of the past winners, affixing all the old
winners' plates to them. The new trophies are made of sassafras, one of
Indiana's most beautiful hardwoods. The two old trophies have been retired
to Wabash College, where they record its six wins. Three special walnut
trophies have been made to hold the 12 winning plates for Rose-Hulman.
Henceforth, a non-travelling trophy will be awarded to each winner.)
It should finally be noted that the task here has been to write exami-
nations that will challenge and separate the competitors, yet present some
problems that all can solve, so that there will be enjoyment for everyone
involved. As one might guess, the actual examinations varied in their
success according to these criteria.
An Update of the
History of the .CMC
I was introduced to the Indiana College Mathematics Competition
(ICMC) during the spring of 1987, during my first year on the faculty at
Valparaiso University. This was, as you read in Paul's comments, the first
year that the competition was opened up to the large state universities and
explains why I had not known of the competition while an undergraduate
student at Ball State University.
I have been an enthusiastic supporter of the competition ever since.
While the nickname "friendly" has not been used very much in recent
years, the competition still maintains the same friendly approach that it
had when it began. It is always very exciting and refreshing to be around
the students from the various schools as they wait for the exam to begin,
and to hear their conversations with each other and with their faculty
advisors after the exam. In many years, a lot of friendly banter and good
mathematical conversations occur among my VU students during the drive
back to campus from the meeting.
In 1992, I became the Indiana section's first Student Chapter Coordinator
and one of the responsibilities was to manage the ICMC. The first
competition that I organized was at St. Mary's College in Notre Dame,
Indiana, at a joint meeting of the Indiana, Michigan, and Illinois sections.
Thirty teams from the three states participated in the competition that year.
Subsequent Student Chapter Coordinators have helped implement changes
to the ICMC that have made it the central part of the section's efforts to
reach undergraduate students.
Since 1990, the average number of teams participating in the ICMC
has been 25, generally from twelve or thirteen colleges or universities.
Occasionally, a team from the Indiana Mathematics and Science Academy
also participates. The largest competition was at Ball State University in
5
6
An Update of the History of the ICMC
1998. That year, 29 teams from 22 institutions participated. Somewhat
surprisingly, the large state universities have not dominated the competition
since their inclusion, in either the number of teams participating or the
number of competitions won.
The most significant change in the competition came in the form of a
decision to move the competition from Saturday afternoon (on the second
day of a day and a half meeting) to Friday afternoon as a lead off event for
the meeting. Students can then stay for a banquet and after dinner speaker.
Rather than having a single person grade the exams, a team of faculty
graders do this work overnight. On Saturday, there is a session where
solutions to the exam are discussed and the winners of the competition are
announced late in the day during the section's business meeting.
The institution hosting the ICMC and the section meeting is invited to
have one of its faculty members write the exam and solutions. If they
decline this opportunity, the section finds an external source to do this
work. Each team competing pays a $5.00 registration fee. Originally this
fee was paid to the exam writer for composing and grading the exam. Now
these fees are paid to the writer for writing the exam and for leading the
problem solving session on Saturday.
This format has increased the number of students participating in the
mathematics sessions of the meeting, both as presenters and as members
of the audience. It has also established a new structure for the section
meeting. Sessions on professional and pedagogical issues are now held
on Friday afternoons during the competition itself, so that mathematical
presentations are the central focus when students are part of the audience.
The after-dinner speaker on Friday night is selected with the knowledge
that at least half of the audience of 100-120 individuals are students.
The section has also been able to experiment with late night workshops
for students on Friday evenings, knowing that students will be staying
overnight for the Saturday portion of the meeting.
By 1996, the Indiana section had established a small endowment to
support the ICMC. This endowment will enable the section to continue to
hold the exam each year and present prizes to the winning team members
and the winning institution in the form of books and the Peter Edson
Trophy, respectively. Proceeds from the sale of this volume will go the
Indiana section to support undergraduate student activities in the section.
Rick Gillman
Spring, 2002
Exams
Exam #1-1966
As stated in the introduction, the first "friendly competition" was held at
Wabash College, located in Crawfordsville, a bit northwest of Indianapolis.
Eight schools participated in the competition that year. It was won by the
team from Wabash College consisting of James Clynch, Albert Hart, Jr.,
and Larry Haugh.
P1966-1. Show that the equation x
2
- y2 = a
3
always has integer
solutions for x and y whenever a is a positive integer.
P1966-2. Consider any five points P
l
, P
2
, P
3
, P
4
, Ps in the interior of
a square of side length 1 (one). Denote by d
ij
the distance between points
Pi and Pj . Prove that at least one of the distances d
ij
is less than V2/2.
P1966-3. Let p be a prime number and let al, a2, ... ,a
p
be integers not
necessarily arranged in consecutive order and with possible repetitions.
Establish the existence of integers m and n such that 1 ::::: m ::::: n ::::: p and
n
such that L aj is divisible by p.
j=m
P1966-4. Two functions of x are differentiable and not identically equal
to zero. Find an example of two such functions having the property that
the derivative of their quotient is the quotient of their derivatives.
P1966-S. For two given positive integers n and k, how many different
sequences of positive integers al ::::: a2 ::::: a3 ::::: ... ::::: ak are there in
which ak ::::: n?
P1966-6. A sequence {x
n
} is defined by the following rule: Xn+l =
vi ax; + b with Xl = c. Show that this sequence converges whenever
7
s Exams
o < a < 1 and b > 0 regardless of the value of the real number c, and
determine the limit of the sequence.
P1966-7. By an interval we shall mean a set of points x on the real line
satisfYing a :s: x :s: b for a pair of real numbers a and b with a < b.
Suppose that we are given a collection of intervals h, h, ... , In which
cover an interval I; that is I ~ U ~ = l I
k
. Prove that we can select mutually
disjoint intervals from this collection which cover at least half of I.
P1966-S. Let us assume that a given pair of people either know each
other or are strangers. If six people enter a room, show that there must be
either three people who know each other pairwise or three people who are
pairwise strangers.
Exam #2-1967
This competition was held at Marian College in Indianapolis. The winning
team, consisting of David Hafting, Albert Hart Jr., and Robert Spear, was
again from Wabash College.
P1967-1. A = {aij} is a symmetric (i.e., aij = aji) n x n matrix with n
odd, and each row of the matrix is a permutation of the integers 1,2, ... ,n.
Prove that the main diagonal is also a permutation of 1, 2, ... ,n.
P1967-2. Two parabolas have parallel axes. Prove that their common
chord bisects their common tangent.
P1967-3. Show that for all a ~ 0 and b ~ 1, ab :s: e
a
+ b(ln b - 1).
P1967-4. For each positive integer n the binomial coefficients ( ~ ) , 0 :s:
r :s: n, are integers, some odd, some even. Show that for each n the number
of odd binomial coefficients is a power of 2.
P1967-5. Show that if lanl < 2 for 1 :s: n :s: N, then the equation
1 + alz + a2z2 + ... + aNz
N
= 0 has no root z such that Izl < 1/3.
P1967-6. Prove that if the set S of points in or on the boundary of
the unit square is partitioned into three disjoint sets A, B, and C, i.e.,
S = A U B U C and A n B = A n C = B n C = 0, then the least upper
bound of the diameters of A, B, and C is greater than or equal to V65 /8.
The diameter of a set is the least upper bound of the distances between
two points of the set.
Exam #3-1968 9
P1967-7. Given a > 0 and Xo > 0, show that there exists one and only
one sequence of positive numbers {Xo, Xl, X2, ... } such that
00
Xn= L xj,
j=n+l
for n = 0, 1,2, ....
P1967-8. Let T be a mapping of the Euclidean plane into itself which
preserves all rational distances. Prove that T preserves all distances.
Exam #3-1968
Held at Franklin College, located just south of Indianapolis, this competi-
tion was won by a team from Earlham College. The team members were
William Roha, Thorn Sulanke, and William Wilson. It is unique because
it is the only competition that came with a warning.
WARNING: The statements below should be viewed as conjectures. At
least one cannot be done.
P1968-1. Let f be a real-valued function defined on the closed interval
[a, b]. Show that if the set of Riemann sums for f is bounded, then f is
bounded. By Riemann sum we mean a sum of the form
n
L f(ti)(Xi - xi-d
i=l
where a = Xo < Xl < ... < Xn = band Xi-l :s: ti :s: Xi for 1 :s: i :s: n.
P1968-2. Given four points which are the vertices of a convex quadrilat-
eral in the plane and five points inside the quadrilateral such that no three
of the nine points are collinear, show that five of the nine points are the
vertices of a convex pentagon.
P1968-3. Let f : R
n
H R
n
be a differentiable function such that
f(tx) = tf(x) for X E Rn and t > O. Show that f is linear.
P1968-4. Find all integral solutions of the equation 2
X
- 3
Y
= 1 or of
the equation 3
x
- 2
Y
= 1.
P1968-S. Let Un} be a sequence of real-valued functions defined on R.
Suppose that for each n, {xlfn(x) i= O} is bounded and that the sequence
10
converges unifonnly on R to the zero function. Show that
lim /00 in = O.
n--+oo -(X)
Exams
P196S-6. Find two decreasing sequences {an} and {b
n
} of positive
numbers such that
00 00 00
Lan = 00 and Lbn = 00, but LCn < 00
n=l n=l n=l
where C
n
= min{ an, b
n
}.
P196S-7. Let Zl, Z2, ... , Zn be complex numbers such that
Show that for some iI, i
2
, ... ,ib we have
1
Iz + z· + ... + z· I > -
1.1 t2 tk - 7r.
P196S-S. Let nand k be positive integers. Suppose line segments are
drawn joining each pair of n points and that each segment is painted blue
or green. Are there k points such that all the line segments with end points
among these k points are of the same color? Show that the answer is yes
if n is large enough. Can you guess how large n must be?
Exam #4-1969
This competition was held at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, located
in Terre Haute. The winning team from Valparaiso University consisted of
Gerald Anderson, Charles Frank, and Charles Spear.
P1969-1. Prove that sin x :::: x - (x
2
/ 7f) if 0 ::; x ::; 7f.
P1969-2. Suppose p, q, and r are positive integers no two of which have
a common factor larger than 1. Suppose P, Q, and R are positive integers
such that f + ~ + !f is an integer. Prove that each of f, ~ , and !f is an
integer.
P1969-3. Determine whether {i25 + 5V20 + {i25 - 5V20 is rational
or irrational.
P1969-4. A ball is thrown into the air. The only forces acting are gravity
(constant) and air resistance (proportional to the velocity). Which takes it
longer, to go up, or to come down?
Exam #5-1970 II
P1969-S. An equilateral triangle is circumscribed about an arbitrary
triangle as shown in the figure below. Show without using calculus that
the maximum area it can have is
(b
2
+ c
2
- 2bc cos ( A + i) ) .
I'
I '
I '
I
I ,
I ,
I
I ,
I ,
I ,
tJ!7\
P1969-6. Assume that f has a continuous second derivative, that a < b,
that f(a) = feb) = 0, and that 1f"(x)1 :::; M on a:::; x :::; b. Prove that
lib f(x)dxl:::;
Exam #5-1970
Held at Butler University, in Indianapolis, for the first of many occasions,
this competition was again won by a team from Valparaiso University. The
team consisted of Gerald Anderson, Jonathon Berke, and George Lueker.
A team from Rose-Hulman came in second.
P1970-1. Evaluate
1m --+--+ ... +- .
1
. (1 1 1 )
n---+oo n + 1 n + 2 2n
P1970-2. Let f(x) = xn + an_IX
n
-
1
+ ... + aIX + aD be a polynomial
with real coefficients. Prove that any root c satisfies
Icl :::; 1 + lan-II + lan -2\ + ... + laol·
(Hint: consider Icl :::; 1 and Icl 2:: 1 separately.)
P1970-3. Squares ABEF, BCCH, CDJK, and DALM are placed
externally on the sides of a parallelogram ABCD, with X, Y, Z, and W
ilie respective centers of those squares. Prove that the lengili from X to
Z is the same as the length from Y to W, that the line segment from X
12 Exams
to Z is perpendicular to the line segment from Y to W, and finally that
XY ZW is a square.
P1970-4. On the border of a disk select an even number, e, of points.
Draw e/2 non-overlapping curves in the disk whose ends are the e dots.
For instance, in the case e = 10 we may have the figure below. The curves
cut the disk into e/2 + 1 regions. Prove that the regions can be colored
with two colors in a way such that adjacent regions are colored differently.
P1970-5. Find the smallest natural number n that has the following
properties:
(a) Its base ten representation has a 6 as the last digit.
(b) If the last digit, 6, is erased and placed as the first digit in front of
the remaining digits, then the resulting number is four times as large
as the original number n.
Exam #6-1971
This competition was held at Earlham College, in Richmond. First place
was won by a team from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology-the first
of their many wins-consisting of Tom Dehne, Bill Lipp, and Robert Klim.
There was a tie for second place between teams from Earlham College and
Goshen College.
There was a glossary of terms at the beginning of this exam, but this
has been lost over time.
P1971-1. Let S be a set and let P be an equivalence relation on S. That
is, for all x, y, z in S, xPx; xPy =} yPx; and xPy 1\ ypz =} xPz. For
each subset A of S, define A = {x E S::::I Yt A such that yPx}.
Exam #6-1971
(a) Prove that A c 5 and B c 5 implies
1. A c A,
11. A = A, and
Ill. Au B = Au B.
(b) Let 5 be the set of points in the Cartesian plane. Define
R: (Xl, Yl)R(X2, Y2) iff Yl - Y2 = 3(Xl - X2).
13
Granted that R is an equivalence relation on 5, describe or sketch A,
where A is the unit circle with center at (0,0). That is A = {(x, y) E
5 : X2 + y2 = I}.
P1971-2. Granted that the last three digits in the decimal representation
of 7
400
are 0, 0, 1, so that 7
400
= 10
3
k + 1 for some positive integer k,
find the last three digits in the decimal representation of 7
9999
.
P1971-3. Compute the derivative of I_el,/X' Then compute
1
1 I e-
1
/
x
I
-1 x2(1- e-1/X)2 dx.
P1971-4. Let A be a countable subset of a Euclidean plane. Show that
there exists a line in the plane which contains no point of A.
P1971-5. For any real number x, let lxJ denote the greatest integer in x.
Thus, if n is the (unique) integer such that n :s: X < n + 1, then l X J = n.
Let X - l X J be called the fractional part of x.
(a) What is the limit of the fractional part of (2 + -/2)k as k ---7 oo?
(b) What is the behavior of the fractional part of (1 + .J2)k as k ---7 oo?
P1971-6. A set of eleven bank robbers decided to store their loot from
a successful job in a safe (where else?) until the heat was off. Being
somewhat but not completely trustful of one another, they decided to be
able to open the safe when and only when a majority of the robbers was
present. Therefore, the safe was provided with a number of different locks
(the key to anyone not being able to open any other), and each robber was
given keys to some of the locks. How many locks were required, and how
many keys had to be given to anyone bank robber?
P1971-7. Is the following a Boolean algebra? Explain.
Given a non-empty set 5 together with a binary operation n and a unary
operation *. Suppose that
14
(a) for all A, B in S, AnB = BnA; and
(b) for all A, B, C in S, (A n B) n C = An (B n C); and
(c) for all A, B, C in S, An *B = C n *C {:} A n B = A.
Exam #7-1972
Exams
This year's competition was held at DePauw University, located in Green-
castle, just west of Indianapolis. The winning team was from Purdue
University-Calumet, and it consisted of Reinhard Fritz, David Hasza, and
Lawrence Kus.
P1972-1. Suppose that A, B, C, and D are square matrices. A and Bare
not invertible. What conditions on A and B are necessary for the existence
of matrices X and Y such that AX + BY = C and BX + AY = D?
P1972-2. If A is a square matrix such that A
3
+ 4A2 + 3A + 2I = 0,
show that A is invertible (I denotes the identity matrix and 0 the matrix
all of whose entries are zero.)
P1972-3. Which is bigger: e
7r
or 7r
e
?
P1972-4. If I : ~ = l an converges, where an > 0 and an -I- 1 for all n,
does
converge? (Prove or give a counterexample.)
P1972-5. A card-shuffling machine always rearranges cards in the same
way relative to the order in which they were given to it. All of the hearts
arranged in order from ace to king were put into the machine, and then
the shuffled cards were put into the machine again to be shuffled again. If
the cards emerged in the order 10, 9, Q, 8, K, 3, 4, A, 5, J, 6, 2, 7, what
order were the cards in after the first shuffle?
P1972-6. Find the points of intersection of the curves whose equations
in polar form are
r = cos(O/2) and r = sin(O/2).
P1972-7. Can a group be a union of two proper subgroups?
Exam #8-1973 15
Exam #8-1973
This competition was held at St. Mary's-of-the-Woods College, in Terre
Haute. The team consisting of Tom Seilke, Tom Stocks, and John VanDrie
from Wabash College won, with teams from Earlham College and Rose-
Hulman taking second and third places respectively.
P1973-1. Evaluate lim x(e
1
/
X
- 1).
x---+oo
P1973-2. A rectangle is inscribed in a sector of a circle of radius 1 as
shown in the figure below. The central angle of the sector is a given angle
0, with 0 < 0 :s; 1f /2. Show that the maximum possible area for the
rectangle is
1 - cos 0
2sinO'
P1973-3. Let n be a fixed positive integer greater than 1. Determine the
maximum value of IT:=1 ni, where ni are positive integers whose sum is
n. Note that IT is the product symbol and k is not fixed but can assume
any value from 1 to n.
P1973-4. Evaluate
1
1 nyn-l
lim --dy.
n---+oo 0 1 + y
P1973-5. Let A and B be ideals of a commutative ring R. The quotient,
A: B, of A by B is defmed as A : B = {r E R: rb E A for all bE B}.
Is A : B an ideal of R? Prove or disprove.
P1973-6. If n is a positive integer, show that an+! - n(a - 1) - a is
divisible by (a - 1)2.
P1973-7. Let A and B be square matrices. Prove that if AB IS non-
singular, then both A and B are non-singular.
16 Exams
P1973-8. Find all solutions in integers of x
2
+ y2 = Z2 with X, y, and z
in arithmetic progression.
P1973-9. A group of 5 men contains 3 Democrats and 2 Republicans.
Three men are chosen at random from the group. What is the probability
that both of the Republicans were selected?
Exam #9-1974
This competition was held at Butler University for the second time, where
the team of Stanley Lyness, Tom Sielke, and David Wilde from Wabash
College won the competition.
P1974-1. Let
P(x) = (1 + x) 1000 + x(l + x)999 + x
2
(1 + x)998 + ... + xlOOO.
(a) Find the coefficient of x
50
in P(x).
(b) What is the sum of all the coefficients of this polynomial?
P1974-2. Let S be a set with an associative multiplication, (x, y) -t xy.
Suppose that for all x, y in S we have x
3
= x and x
2
y = yx
2
. Show that
the multiplication is commutative.
P1974-3. For each positive integer m, find two distinct pairs of positive
integers (nl, N
I
) and (n2, N2)(depending upon m) such that
(m
2
+ 1)( n; + 1) = Nl + 1 (i=1,2).
P1974-4. Determine whether at (0,0) f achieves a local maximum,
minimum, or neither, for the function f (x, y) = (y2 - x) (2y2 - x).
P1974-5. Suppose that y is a continuously differentiable function of x
which satisfies the condition y(O) = 1 and the inequality ~ +eXy+ 1 :s: o.
Show that y has a zero in the interval [0,3/4J.
P1974-6. Examine the validity of the following conjecture: The series
of positive terms I : ~ = o an diverges if and only if the series I : ~ = o a ~
diverges.
Exam #10-1975
A team from Rose-Rulman won this competition, which was held at
Wabash College. The winning team consisted of Robert E. Copus, Michael
J. Dominik, and Barry W. Carlin.
Exam #11-1976 17
P1975-1. Show that
(Xl
7r L a 7r
-- < <-
2 a
2
+ n
2

n=l
P1975-2. A polygon having all its angles equal and an odd number of
vertices is inscribed in a circle. Prove that it must be regular.
P1975-3. Given m lines in the plane, with no two parallel and no three
concurrent; into how many components do they divide the plane? Prove
your assertion.
P1975-4. The expression alb means that a divides b. Suppose that
2ml(3m - 1).
(a) Show that if m i=- 1, then m is even, and
(b) Show that m = 1, 2, or 4.
P1975-5. Suppose that a > 0 and f is continuous for 0 ::; x ::; a. Define
g(x) = i
a
f(t) dt
x t
for 0 < x ::; a. Show that
loa g(x)dx = loa f(x) dx.
Exam #11-1976
This competition was held at DePauw University. The winning team of Jay
Ponder, Tom Sellke, and Matthew Wyneken was from Wabash College.
Teams from Rose-Hulman and Franklin College came in second and third,
respectively.
P1976-1. Determine all polynomials p( x) such that
p(x
2
- 1) = Ip(x)12 - 1 and p(2) = 2.
P1976-2. Let n be a positive integer such that n + 1 is divisible by 12.
Prove that the sum of all of the divisors of n is divisible by 12.
P1976-3. Let
f(x) = al tanx + a2 tan ( ~ ) + a3 tan ( ~ ) + ... + an tan (;) )
IS Exams
where a1, a2, ... , an are real numbers and where n is a positive integer.
Given that If(x)l:S: Itanxl for x E {-Jr/2,Jr/2}, prove that
I
a2 a3 an I
a1 + 2 + 3" + ... + -;;: :s: 1.
P1976-4. How many zeroes does the function f(x) = 3
x
1- 2X2 have
on the real line? Prove that your answer is correct. Hint: You may need to
know that 1 < In 3 < 1.1.
P1976-5. Let A, B, and C be three non-collinear points in a rectangular
coordinate plane with coordinates (alla2),(b
1
,b
2
), and (C1,C2) respec-
tively. Prove, using algebraic methods, that it is always possible to solve
for the coordinates of the center of the circle containing A, B, and C.
P1976-6. Suppose that f is a real-valued function of a real variable, and
that f(x + y) = f(x)f(y) for all x and y, f(1) -I- 0, and limx--+o f(x)
exists. Prove that limx--+o f (x) = 1.
Exam # 12-1977
This competition was held at Rose-Hulman and was also won by a team
from there. The team consisted of Rich Priem, Jan Slupesky, and Bob
Strickland.
P1977-1. Let f be a continuous function that maps the closed unit
interval J = [0, 1] into itself. Show that if f (f (x)) = x for all x III
J, then either f is strictly increasing on J or f is strictly decreasing.
P1977-2. Prove the following identities:
(a) cos
n
x = 2 ~ ~ ( ~ ) cos(n - 2k)x
1 r 2n (2n)!
(b) :; io cos xdx = 22n (n!)2'
P1977-3. Let A = (aij) be an n x n matrix of real numbers such that
2:.7=1 aij = 1 for each i. Show that the matrix A - I is not invertible.
P1977-4. Find all of the isometries of the set R of real numbers, that is,
functions f from R into R with the property that the distance between any
pair of points is the same as the distance between their images under f.
Hint: Consider first the special case in which f(O) = o.
Exam #13-1978 19
P1977-5. Use the fact that lin diverges to obtain a proof that
there are infinitely many prime numbers P1,P2, .... Rint: For each integer
N there is an integer r such that
111
-"7""-----c---,-- + + ... + -,,---,------,,-
... p';F ... pW ... p'j;
< (1 + + + ... + (1 + + + ... +
- P1 pi PI P2 P2
... (1 + + + ... +
PN P7v P'N
Exam # 13-1978
This competition, held at Earlham College, was again won by a team from
Wabash College. The team consisted of Kevin Fosso, Jay Ponder, and
Matthew Wyneken. Teams from Rose-Rulman and Manchester College
came in second and third, respectively. The exam came with instructions:
For problems 1 and 4 you need only show your computations, whereas
problems 2, 3, 5, and 6 require more justification.
P1978-1. The number 10 is a base for the positive integers because every
positive integer can be written uniquely as
where each d
i
is one of the digits 0,1,2,3,4,5,6, 7,8, or 9. The number
-2 is a base for all integers using the digits 0 and 1. For example 1101
represents -3, since
1( _2)3 + 1( _2)2 + O( -2) + 1 = -3.
Find the representation in base -2 for the decimal number -2374.
P1978-2. Prove the following generalization of the Theorem of Pythago-
ras: If ABCD is a 3-dimensional tetrahedron such that each of the triangles
ABC, ABD, and ACD has a right angle at A, then
(areaABC)2 + (areaABD)2 + (areaACD)2 = (areaBCD)2.
P1978-3. Let k be a positive odd integer and let.S (n) = 2:7=1 jk. Show
that 2S(n) is divisible by n + 1.
20 Exams
P1978-4. Let aI, a2, a3, ... , an be real numbers, not necessarily distinct,
and let f(x) = ' E ~ = l l x - akl. For which value(s) of x is f(x) small-
est? What is the minimum value of f(x)? You need not give a formal
justification for your answer.
P1978-5. Suppose that A, B, C, and D are four distinct points in the
plane. Find the point 0 in the plane so that the sum of the distances from
o to each of the four points is smallest, i.e., so that
10AI + lOBI + lOCI + 10DI
is smallest.
P1978-6. Design an experiment with a fair coin for which the probability
of success is 1/3. A fair coin is a coin for which the probability of tossing
heads and the probability of tossing tails are each 1/2. As an illustration,
we present the following experiment, for which the probability of success
is 1/4: Toss a fair coin twice. The experiment is a success if heads is
tossed both times.
Exam #14-1979
The team of Mike Hall, Tim Drabik, and Tony Mazzoni from Rose-Hulman
won this competition, which was again held at Butler University.
P1979-1. A piece of rope weighs four ounces per foot. It is passed over
a pulley, and on one end is suspended a weight, and on the other end a
monkey. The whole system is in equilibrium. The weight of the monkey
in pounds is equal to the age of the monkey's mother in years. The age of
the monkey's mother added to the age of the monkey is four years. The
monkey's mother is twice as old as the monkey was when the monkey's
mother was half as old as the monkey will be when the monkey is three
times as old as the monkey's mother was when the monkey's mother was
three times as old as the monkey. Each of the weight of the rope and the
weight at the end is half again as much as the difference in weight between
the weight and the weight plus the weight of the monkey. How long is the
rope? Assuming the pulley to be negligibly small, what fractional part of
the rope is on the same side of the pulley as the monkey when the system
is at rest?
P1979-2. Graph the relation sin x = sin y in the x, y-plane.
Exam #14-1979 21
P1979-3. Snow starts to fall in the forenoon and falls at a constant rate
all day. At noon a snow plow starts to clear a highway_ The velocity of
the snow plow is such that it removes a constant volume of snow per unit
of time. The plow goes a mile during the first hour. It goes a half mile
during the second hour. What time did it start to snow? Give the time to
the nearest minute.
P1979-4. A hole six inches long is drilled through a sphere. (The hole is
six inches long after it is drilled, and the hole is through the center of the
sphere.) What is the volume of the part of the sphere that remains?
P1979-5. Note that 1 = 1
979
,2 = (_1)97 + V9, 3 = 1
9
+ 17 - 91,
4=1+V9+l7/9j.
Continue this through consecutive numbers k as far as you can. The
rules of the game are as follows:
(i) The only constants you may use are 1, 9, 7, 9, which must be used
exactly once and in that order.
(ii) Algebraic grouping symbols, operations, and functions may be used
as often as desired. Note that rule (i) prohibits use of 7r or e, as well
as use of higher order roots.
P1979-6. Find all points with integer x and y coordinates which are
strictly inside the polygon ABCDEFGH (described below) and also
strictly outside the circle centered at (-4, -1) with radius 3/2. Here is a
description of the polygon:
B = (4, -21), D = (11, -1), E = (-2, -2), F = (-4,14)
Li (i = 1 to 8) are lines as follows:
Ll goes through Band (-6, -2)
L2 goes through B and has slope -9/4
L3 goes through D and has slope 2/15
L4 goes through D and E
L5 goes through E and F
L6 goes through F and is perpendicular to x - 16y = 4
L7 has equation x + 7y = 4
Ls has a y-intercept of 6 and angle of inclination 45°
A is the intersection of Ll and Ls
C is the intersection of L2 and L3
G is the intersection of L6 and L7
H is the intersection of L7 and Ls.
22 Exams
Exam #15-1980
This year, for the first time, the competition was held at Valparaiso
University, located in Valparaiso. The winning team from Rose-Hulman
consisted of Michael Call, Randall Ekl, and Douglas Englehart. A team
from Butler University came in second.
P1980-1. Let {an} be a sequence of positive numbers. If there exists a
sequence {b
n
} of positive numbers and a constant a > 0 such that
show that the series
00
is convergent.
P1980-2. Consider a balance that is used to measure loads of integral
weights. The balance has two scales, a load scale and a weight scale. On
the weight scale one can place only certain measuring weights. On the load
scale one can place the load to be measured and any desired subset of the
measuring weights. Show that with four suitably chosen weights one can
measure the weight of any load whose weight is an integer between 1 and
40 pounds.
P1980-3. Suppose that f is a function that satisfies
f"(x) + f'(x)g(x) - f(x) = 0
for some continuous function g. Prove that if f vanishes at a and at some
b> a, then f is identically zero on [a, b].
P1980-4. Show that det(I + xyt) = 1 + xty for any vectors x and y in
Rn. Note that t denotes transpose.
P1980-S. Find all positive functions f that satisfy
f(x) < 2(x-y)2
f(y) -
for all x, y.
P1980-6. Show (a) that the integral
roo sin x dx
10 x
Exam #16-1981
is convergent. Then show (b) that
P1980-7. If
show that
Exam #16-1981
.!£ ( roo sin ax dX) 2 = O.
da 10 x
n (_l)k+l
Sn = L k '
k=l
n 1
S2n= L-k·
k=l n +
23
This competition, again won by a team from Rose-Hulman, was held at
Indiana University-Purdue University in Indianapolis (IUPUI). The team
consisted of Michael Call, Thomas Douglas, and Tim Drabik.
P1981-1. Express 3/8 as a base 7 fraction of form 0.aOala2a3···.
P1981-2. Before steers are introduced to a pasture, there is a given
amount of grass per acre, and the grass keeps growing at a constant rate.
If 12 steers take 16 weeks to deplete the grass on 10 acres, and if 18 steers
take 8 weeks to deplete the grass on 10 acres, how many steers does it
take to deplete the grass on 40 acres in 6 weeks?
P1981-3. A ball of radius 1 is in a comer touching all three walls. Find
the radius of the largest ball that can be fitted into the comer behind the
given ball.
P1981-4. The winning team of the World Series must win four games out
of seven. Assuming that teams are equally matched, find the probabilities
that the Series lasts
(a) exactly four games,
(b) exactly five games,
(c) exactly six games, and
(d) exactly seven games.
P1981-5. A man is standing atop a tall building. At a point 50 feet above
his eye atop a building 100 feet away, a rock is dropped. If the man watches
the rock fall, at what point in its descent is his head moving the fastest?
24 Exams
Assume that the buildings are arbitrarily high, that air friction is neglected,
and that the acceleration of gravity is 32 ftlsec/sec.
P1981-6. A destroyer is hunting a submarine in dense fog. The fog
lifts for a moment, disclosing the submarine on the surface three miles
away, upon which the submarine immediately descends. The speed of the
destroyer is twice that of the submarine, and it is known that the latter
will depart at once at full speed on a straight course of unknown direction.
The wily captain of the destroyer sails straight to the point 2/3 of the way
to the spot where the submarine was sighted and then sets out on a spiral
course that is bound to make him pass directly over the submarine. What
is the equation of this spiral? HINT: Use polar coordinates with the origin
at the point where the submarine was sighted.
Exam #17-1982
This was the first time that the competition was held at Ball State
University, located in Muncie. The winning team of Jeffery Baldwin,
Randall Ekl, and 1. Anthony Kirk was from Rose-Hulman.
P1982-1. Find a cubic equation whose roots are the reciprocals of the
roots of the equation x
3
+ ax
2
+ bx + c = 0, with c i= O.
P1982-2. A subset {al, a2, ... ,ad of the set {I, 2, ... , n} is said to be
separated if ai+l - ai ;::: 2 for i = 1,2, ... ,n - 1. For example, {2, 5, 7}
is a separated subset of {I, 2, ... , 8}, but {3, 4, 8} is not. Show that the
number of separated subsets of {I, 2, ... , n}, each having k elements is
(n-Z+l).
P1982-3. Given finitely many points in the plane situated so that any
three of them are the vertices of a triangle of area :::; 1. Show that all the
points can be enclosed in a rectangle of area :::; 4.
P1982-4. Is the function
f(x) = {e-
1jX2
, x i= 0
0, x =0
differentiable at x = O? Prove your answer. Hint: You may use the fact that
lim yTe-
Y
= °
Y-+OO
for any r.
Exam # 1 8-1983 25
P1982-5. A real-valued function f of a real variable is said to satisfy
a Holder condition with exponent a if there is a constant c such that
If(x) - f(y)1 ::; clx - yin for all x, y. Wherever these functions are used,
a is restricted to be ::; 1. Can you explain why?
P1982-6. The probability that the square of a positive integer (in decimal
notation) ends with the digit 1 is 2/10 because out of every 10 numbers
those and only those ending with the digits 1 or 9 have squares ending
with 1. What is the probability that the cube of a positive integer chosen
at random ends with the digits 11? Prove your answer.
P1982-7. Find the volume of a torus (doughnut) of inner radius b whose
cross-section by a plane through the axis is a semicircle of radius a, with
its straight boundary parallel to the axis and curved boundary away from
the axis.
Exam # 18-1983
Rose-Hulman won the competition again this year. Its winning team con-
sisted of Baron Gemmer, 1. Anthony Kirk, and Tom Moss. The competition
was held at the Indiana University, Bloomington, campus for the first time.
Teams from Butler University and Manchester College tied for second
place.
P1983-1. Find limn-+oo \inTo
P1983-2. Suppose you repeatedly toss a fair coin until you get two heads
in a row. What is the probability that you stop on the 10th toss?
P1983-3. Consider an isosceles right triangle with legs of fixed length
a. Inscribe a rectangle and a circle inside the triangle as indicated in the
figure below. Find the dimensions of the rectangle (and the radius of the
circle) which make the total area of the rectangle and circle a maximum.
P1983-4. Show that every positive real number is a sum (possibly
infinite) of a subset of the numbers {I, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, ... }.
26 Exams
P1983-S. This problem is a repeat of problem #3 on EXAM #7.
P1983-6. Prove the "restricted" Fermat conjecture: For any integer n > 2,
xn + yn = zn has no solutions in positive integers if z < n.
P1983-7. Let N be one more than the product offour consecutive positive
integers. What can you say about N? Prove it.
P1983-8. Let Xl, X2,"" Xn be (distinct) real numbers. Define polyno-
mials PI(X), P2(X), ... ,Pn(x) by
Pk(X) = II X-Xj ,
j#k xk - Xj
Prove that = 1 for all X in R.
xER.
P1983-9. Suppose that g : [0,1] --+ [0,1] is a continuous function and
that gm(x) = X (g composed with itself m times) for all X and for some
positive integer m. Prove that g2 (x) = x for all x.
Exam #19-1984
This competition was held at Rose-Hulman and a team from Rose-Hulman
consisting of Todd Fine, Byron Bishop, and Dan Johnson won. Teams
from Wabash College and Valparaiso University came in second and third,
respectively.
P1984-1. What is the prime factorization of 1,005,010,010,005,001 ?
P1984-2. In the graph below, how many paths that never go up connect
node A to node B? (Paths must follow edges indicated.)
A
B
Exam #19-1984 27
P1984-3. A very long hallway has 1000 doors numbered 1 to 1000; all
the doors are initially closed. One by one, 1000 people go down the hall:
the first person opens each door, the second person closes all doors with
even numbers, the third person closes door 3, opens door 6, closes door
9, opens door 12, etc. That is, the nth person changes all doors whose
numbers are divisible by n. After all 1000 people have gone down the
hall: which doors are open and which are closed?
P1984-4. In Subsylvania, there is no paper money and there are only two
kinds of coins, one worth 7 quanta, the other worth 12 quanta. Find the
largest price for which it is not possible for a Subsylvanian customer to
give exact change, or prove there is no such price. [Naturally, all prices
are whole numbers of quanta. Note that it is possible for a Subsylvanian
customer to buy an item costing 5 quanta (she gives the merchant a 12
quanta coin and receives a 7 quanta coin in exchange), but it is not possible
for her to give the merchant 5 quanta in exact change.]
P1984-5. Choose two points at random in the interval [0,1]. These two
points cut the interval into three segments. What is the probability that these
three segments can form the sides of a triangle? Note: "at random" means
the two points are chosen independently and with uniform probability
distribution. The probability of choosing a point in the interval [a, b] is
b- a.
P1984-6. Let f be a continuous function on ° < x < 00 satisfYing
f(l) = 5 and f (_X_) = f(x) + 2 forO < x < 00.
x+1
(a) Find lim f(x).
x--+oo
(b) Prove that lim f(x) = +00.
x--+o+
(c) Find all such functions f. (Part credit for finding some f.)
P1984-7. A train is being made up of Boxcars, Flat cars, and Hopper
cars. Boxcars weigh 25 tons, and Flat cars and Hopper cars weigh 50
tons each. How many different trains of total weight 1000 tons (ignoring
caboose and engines) can be made up? Trains are considered identical if
and only if they have the same sorts of cars in the same order: e.g., H H B,
H BH and F BH are distinct trains of total weight 125 tons.
28 Exams
Exam #20-1985
ReId at Ball State University, this competition was again won by a team
from Rose-Rulman. The team consisted of Todd Fine, Erick Friedman,
and Dan Johnson. Teams from Rose-Rulman and Goshen College came in
second and third, respectively. Notice that the contest rules for assigning
second place were broken this year; it was the first of several in which
this occurred.
P1985-1. Let (Y, {3, 'Y, and 8 be the roots of X4 + bx
3
+ cx
2
+ dx + e = O.
Compute
((Y2 + 1)({32 + 1)("(2 + 1)(8
2
+ 1)
in terms of b, c, d, and e.
P1985-2. Prove: 3333
4444
+ 4444
3333
is divisible by 7. Make up some
more problems of this type.
PI985-3. Consider the set U = {I, 2, 4,5,8,10,11,13,16,17,19, 20}.
In the figure below, each of the three paths-the solid, the dotted, and
the dashed-represents a subgroup of order 6 of U under a certain binary
operation. Three of the points of these paths have been labeled. Find all
the others .
.................. ................. .

: ".' :
:. " ".:
\ ".... j
\ .......•...... /
PI985-4. Each side of a square is subdivided into 101 segments. Find
the number of different triangles that have their vertices at these 400 points
of subdivision.
P1985-5. Let al = 0 and a2 = 1, and for n 3,
an = (n - l)(an-l + an-2).
Find
(a) a formula for an and
(b) lim
n
--+
oo
';" .
Exam #21-1986 29
P198S-6. Given n + 1 integers between 1 and 2n inclusive, prove that
one of them must be a multiple of some other one.
P198S-7. Let a and b be positive constants with b > 1. Given that
x + y = 2a and all values of x between 0 and 2a are equally likely,
find the probability that
Exam #21-1986
This competition was held at Butler University. The winning team consist-
ing of Erich Friedman, John Hoffman, and Dan Tretter was from Rose-
Hulman. The second place team was also from Rose-Hulman, and the third
place team was from Valparaiso University.
P1986-1. This is a repeat of problem #1 on EXAM #14.
P1986-2. Let {b
l
, b
2
, b
3
} be an orthonormal basis for C
3
and let ¢ E
L(C
3
, C3) be given by
¢(bd = 2b
2
, ¢(b
2
) = 2ib
l
, and ¢(b
3
) = (1 + i)b
3

Find the eigenvalues, if any, for ¢.
P1986-3. Evaluate ii.
P1986-4. N points are chosen on a circle so that when all segments are
drawn between all pairs of points, no three segments intersect at the same
point. In how many points do these segments intersect in the interior of
the circle?
P1986-S. Find an equation with integral coefficients one of whose roots
is y'2 + ~ .
P1986-6. Let f : R2 -+ R be given by
f( )
- { ~ I X ~ 4' if (Xl, X2) i= (0,0);
XI,X2 - Xl +X
2
0, if(Xl,X2) = (0,0).
(a) Is f continuous at (0, O)? JustifY your answer.
(b) Is f differentiable at (0, O)? JustifY your answer.
30 Exams
Exam #22-1987
This competition was held at Butler University. The team consisting of
Daniel W. Johnson, Brenton Young, and Daniel Kniep from Rose-Hulman
won the competition. A team from Indiana University, Bloomington, came
in second, and a team from Wabash College came in third.
P1987-1. A positive integer n is called composite if there are positive
integers P i= 1 and q i= 1 so that n = pq. Find a sequence of 10 consecutive
positive integers each of which is composite and less than 1,000,000.
P1987-2. John's job at the Acme Cannonball Factory is to stack the
cannonballs (which are 6-inch diameter spheres) neatly into tetrahedral
piles. For example, using 4 cannonballs, John can make a tetrahedral
pile with 2 cannonballs on each edge: three balls forming the bottom
triangle and one in the center on the top. Find a formula for the number
of cannonballs in a tetrahedral stack whose base is an equilateral triangle
with n balls on each edge.
P1987-3. Experiments have determined that when a particular steel ball
is bounced on a hard surface, it bounces to half its original height. For
example, if it is dropped from a height of 6 feet, it will bounce to 3 feet.
Assuming that the ball obeys this law exactly, for what length of time will
the ball continue to bounce if it is dropped from a height of 16 feet (or will
it bounce forever)? [Recall from calculus that since the acceleration due
to gravity is 32 ft/sec/sec, an object failing to the ground from height h
(in feet) or bouncing from the ground to height h requires Vli/4 seconds
to do so.]
P1987-4. Ten seniors who share a house decide to exchange graduation
presents. They each put their name into a hat, mix the name cards
thoroughly, and draw a card out at random. What is the probability that
none of the ten draws his or her own name?
P1987-5. Euclidean four-space is R4 with
IXYI = ((Y1 - X1)2 + (Y2 - X2)2 + (Y3 + X3)2 + (Y4 + X4)2) 1/2.
(a) Find five points in the unit ball of Euclidean four-space that are as
far from each other as you can make them. That is, find points A, B,
C, D, and E such that
10AI :s; 1, 10BI:S; 1, 10CI:S; 1, 10DI:S; 1, and 10EI:S: 1,
Exam #23-1988 31
where 0 is the origin, such that
min{IABI, IAOI, IADI, IAEI, IBOI, IBDI, IBEI, IODI, IOEI, IDEI}
is as large as you can make it.
(b) If your answer is best possible, prove that it is.
P1987-6. Jane begins a journey at Quito, Ecuador (at 80° west longitude
on the equator) and flies steadily northwest.
(a) How far does she fly before reaching the North Pole?
(b) How many times does she cross the Greenwich Meridian (longitude
0°) in the journey?
(Note: You should suppose that the earth is a perfect sphere of radius
4000 miles, that there is no effect of wind, etc., that compass headings are
exactly accurate, and that Jane's plane has an unlimited amount of fuel
available.)
Exam #23-1988
This competition was held at Butler University. The contest was won by a
team of two students from Indiana University, Bloomington: Radu Tudorica
and Kevin Pilgrim. A team from IUPUI came in second, and a team from
Purdue University came in third.
P1988-1. Going at top speed, Grand Prix driver x leads his rival y by
a steady three miles. Only two miles from the finish, x runs out of fuel.
Thereafter x's deceleration is proportional to the square of his remaining
velocity, and, in the next mile, his speed exactly halves. Who wins and
why?
P1988-2. Let (G, *) be a group with the following cancellation rule:
x * a * y = b * a * c implies x * y = b * c for all x, y, a, b, and c in G.
Prove that G is Abelian, i.e., that * is commutative.
P1988-3. Define
n
n(x) = IT (x - i),
i=l,i#k
and let P(x) be a polynomial of minimum degree in which P(k) =
5T
k
(k), k = 1,2, ... , n. If sand t are both integers such that 1 :s; s :s; n
and 1:S; t:s; n, prove that fst P(x)dx = o.
32 Exams
P1988-4. let 5
n
be the sum of the squares of the first n positive odd
integers. What is the units digit of 512345? Prove your answer.
P1988-5. Find the shaded area of the figure below, where the interior
circular arcs have their centers on the outer circle. (This was a proposed
problem in the then current issue of The Journal of Recreational Mathe-
matics. Students were encouraged to send in solutions they liked.)
P1988-6. Show, with proof, how to construct with unmarked straightedge
only, a perpendicular from the point P to the line L, as shown in the figure
below. (This is problem 13 in the 1988 issue of The Old Farmer's Almanac.
A solution to this plus several other problems could have won the solver
50 dollars.)
o

p
L
P1988-7. A fair coin is tossed ten times. Find the probability that two
tails do not appear in succession.
Exam #24-1989
This competition was held on the Indiana University, Bloomington, cam-
pus. A team from Purdue University won the competition. The members
of this team were Alex Gottlieb, Aaron Weindling, and Nung Kwan Yip.
Teams from Earlham College and Wabash College came in second and
third, respectively.
P1989-1. Three students A,B, and C compete in a series of tests. For
coming first in a test, a student is awarded x points; for coming second,
Exam #24-1989 33
y points; for coming third, z points. Here x, y, and z are positive integers
with x > y > z. There were no ties in any of the tests. Altogether A
accumulated 20 points, B 10 points, and C 9 points. Student A came in
second in the algebra test. Who came in second in the geometry test?
P1989-2. Describe all sequences {x 1, X2, ... ,x
n
} of real numbers that
satisfy
2mn
IXm - Xnl:::; 2 2
m +n
for all positive integers m and n.
P1989-3. Show that the area of the shaded triangle formed by the side-
trisectors of a triangle (as shown) is 1/7 of the area of the whole triangle.
P1989-4. Two coins are given. One is fair [Prob(heads) = 1/2] and the
other is biased with Prob(heads) = 2/3. One of the coins is tossed once,
resulting in heads. The other is tossed three times, resulting in two heads.
Which coin is more likely to be the biased one?
P1989-S. Two identical pipes have elliptical cross-sections with semi-
axes a and b. The pipes intersect at right angles as shown below. Find the
volume of their intersection.
34 Exams
P1989-6. Find the determinant of the matrix
X1Yn )
X2Yn
1 + ~ n Y n .
P1989-7. What are the dimensions of Smith's ranch, described in the
following conversation?
Smith. Down in Todd County, which is a 19 x 19 miles square, I have
a ranch. It is rectangular, not square, the short side and the long side both
measuring a whole number of miles.
James. Hold on a minute! I happen to know the area of your ranch. Let
me see if I can figure out its dimensions. (He figures furiously.) I need
more information. Is the short side strictly less than half the long side?
(Smith answers his question.)
James. Now I know the dimensions.
Kathy. I, too, know the area of your ranch, and although I did not hear
your answer to James's question, I, too, can tell you the dimensions.
Bill. I did not know the area of your ranch, but having heard this entire
conversation, I can now figure it out.
Exam #25-1990
Beginning in 1990, significantly more information was collected about the
competitions. This year, the contest was held at Purdue University (located
in West Lafayette) for the first time, on March 31, 1990 in connection with
the spring meeting of the Indiana Section of the MAA. Twenty-four teams
from twelve colleges participated. The winning team from Rose-Hulman
consisted of Joel Atkins, John O'Bryan, and Kevin O'Bryant. They scored
51 out of 60 points on the following examination. The second place team
from Purdue University consisted of Mark Sepanski, Peter Sepanski, and
Nung Kwan Yip. The third place team from Indiana University consisted
of Urmi Bhatacharya, Lucia Demetrios, and Radu Tudorica.
P1990-1. Find all positive integers which are one more than the sum of
the squares of their base ten digits. For example, 35 = 1 + 3
2
+ 52.
P1990-2. A digraph in a word is an ordered pair of consecutive letters;
a word with n letters has n - 1 digraphs. How many ways can the letters
Exam #25-1990 35
I, N, D, I, A, N, A be arranged so that no digraph is repeated? (Thus, the
arrangement A, N, D, I, I, N, A is counted, but not I, A, N, N, I, A, D,
which contains "I, A" twice.)
P1990-3. Find all real functions f such that, for all real x,
f(x + 2) = f(x) and f'(x) = f(x + 1) - 2.
P1990-4. Let ABCDEFG denote a regular heptagon with side 1. By
connecting the vertices ACEGBDF A, in that order, we create a new reg-
ular heptagon HIJKLM with side r. (See the figure below). Determine
r.
A
F c
P1990-S. Evaluate the following limit.
P1990-6. A regular hexagon of side 1 is inscribed in the intersection of
two identical parabolas, oriented (in opposite directions) with their axes
parallel to the y-axis (see the figure below). Find the area of the (shaded)
region inside the parabolas and outside the hexagon.
36 Exams
Exam #26-1991
The contest was held at Anderson University, located in Anderson, on
March 23, in connection with the spring meeting of the Indiana Section
of the MAA. Twenty-three teams from fourteen colleges participated.
The winning team from Rose-Hulman consisted of Jonathan Atkins, John
O'Bryan and Mark Roseberry. The second place team from Purdue Univer-
sity consisted of Alex Gottlieb, Peter Sepanski and Boon-Lock Yeo. The
third place team from Goshen College consisted of Dave Cooper, Kathy
Steiner and Ken Wenger.
P1991-1. Find the area of that portion of the xy-plane which is enclosed
by the curve with equation
12x - 11 + 12x + 11 + ~ = 4.
P1991-2. Between I and 1,000,000 inclusive, which are more numerous,
those integers whose base-ten representations contain a "1" or those that
do not? How many of each type are there?
P1991-3. P, Q and R are arbitrary points on sides BC, DA and CD
respectively, of the parallelogram ABCD, illustrated below. A is joined to
P, P to Q, Q to B, B to Rand R to A to fonn a star-pentagon APQBR.
The regions inside the parallelogram and outside the star-pentagon are
colored red (r). The pentagonal region bounded by the sides of the star-
pentagon is colored blue (b). Show that the red area minus the blue area
is independent of the choice of the points P, Q and R.
R C
A ~ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~ .
P1991-4. If a, band e are integers and if a+b+e is even, find an integer
n (in tenns of a, b and e) such that ab + n, be + nand ea + n are all
squares of integers.
Exam #27-1992 37
P1991-5. (a) Show that there exist infinitely many twosomes of consec-
utive positive integers each of which can be written as the sum of two
nonzero perfect squares. For example, 17 = 12 + 4
2
, 18 = 3
2
+ 3
2
and
25 = 3
2
+ 4
2
, 26 = 12 + 52.
(b) Find three consecutive positive integers each of which can be written
as the sum of two nonzero perfect squares. Are there infinitely many
such trios?
(c) Do there exist four consecutive positive integers each of which can be
written as the sum of two nonzero perfect squares?
P1991-6. The harmonic mean of a set of positive numbers is the recip-
rocal of the arithmetic mean (ordinary average) of the reciprocals of the
numbers. Find limn-+oo(Hn/n), where Hn is the harmonic mean of the n
positive integers n + 1, n + 2, n + 3, ... , n + n.
P1991-7. The centroid of a set of n points {(Xi, Yi), i = 1,2,···, n}, in
n n
the xy-plane is given by ( ~ 2: Xi, ~ 2: Yi). A lattice point in the xy-plane
1 1
is a point whose coordinates are integers. Given nine lattice points in the
xy-plane, show that some three of the points have a lattice point as centroid.
Exam #27-1992
The contest was held at The University of Indianapolis on April 11, in
connection with the spring meeting of the Indiana Section of the MAA.
There were 24 teams with a total of 67 participants from 13 colleges.
The winning team from Rose-Hulman consisted of Jonathan Atkins, Tony
Hinrichs, and Kevin o 'Bryant. The second place team from Indiana-Purdue
University at Fort Wayne consisted of Jeff Gerardot, Aaron Pesetski, and
Mark Pragan. The third place team from Purdue University consisted of
Peter Sepanski and Pok-Yin Yu.
P1992-1. A car rode over an ant on the pavement. The ant stuck to the
tire for one revolution and then was deposited back onto the pavement.
Assuming that the radius of the tire is one foot, find the length of the
curve traveled by the ant between its death and its final resting place.
P1992-2. At a movie theater, n patrons have lined up to buy tickets.
The ticket seller calls a patron viewable if he (she) is taller than all the
people in front of him (her) in line; otherwise he (she) is hidden. Given
that no two patrons are precisely the same height, find the average number
of viewable patrons among all possible permutations of the patrons.
38 Exams
P1992-3. A collection of n gossips each knows a unique tidbit of scandal
not known to any of the others. They communicate by mailing letters. Of
course each gossip will share all of the scandal he (she) knows at that time
whenever he (she) sends a letter. Find, with proof, the minimum number
of letters that can suffice to share all of the scandal.
P1992-4. Identify all finite groups G of order n having at least 2
n
-
2
proper subgroups.
P1992-5. Evaluatei: e-
x2
dx.
P1992-6. For A = ( _ ~ 9 0 _56 )
(a) find the eigenvalues of A.
(b) Find four different integral matrices B so that B2 = A. (Hint: How
do the eigenvalues of B relate to the eigenvalues of A 7)
(c) For an arbitrary 2 x 2 matrix A, what is the maximum number of
integral matrices B that can satisfy B2 = A7
P1992-7. Evaluate
P1992-8. We all know that the lengths 3, 4, and 5 form the sides of a right
triangle. Notice that 3 and 4 are consecutive integers. Determine all other
integral right triangles whose legs are consecutive integers.(The hypotenuse
must also be an integer, but need not be consecutive as 5 happens to be.)
Exam #28-1993
The contest was held at Saint Mary's College, located at the northern edge
of South Bend, on April 24, in connection with the joint spring meeting of
the Indiana Section of the MAA with the Illinois and Michigan Sections.
There were 30 teams, with representation from all three states. The winning
team from Rose-Hulman consisted of Jon Atkins, Tony Hinrichs, and
Nick Tallyn. The second place from from Indiana-Purdue University, Fort
Wayne, consisted of Joel Holcombe, Brian Johnson, and Aaron Pesetski.
The third place team from Calvin College, Michigan, consisted of Alan
Baljeu, Milce Bolt, and Tim Hotlebeek.
Exam #28-1993 39
P1993-1. Let P(x) be a real cubic polynomial for which P'(x) has
distinct real zeros. Prove that
pili ( X ) (P" ( x ) ) 2
P'(x) < 2 P'(x)
for all x for which P' (x) -I- O.
P1993-2. Let f and 9 be mappings from the set A to itself for which
f(g(f(a))) = g(a) and g(f(f(a))) = f(a) for all a in A. Prove that
f = g.
P1993-3. Let A be a square matrix of rank 1 and trace 1. Prove that
A2 = A.
P1993-4. For n > 1, a permutation al,a2, ... ,a
n
of {l,2, ... ,n} is
"orderly" if, for each i = 1,2, ... , (n - 1), there is a j > i for which
laj - ai I = 1. (For example, for n = 4, the permutation 1,4,2,3 is orderly
whereas 3,1,4,2 is not.) How many permutations of {I, 2, ... ,n} are
orderly? HINT: What are the possible values for al ?)
P1993-5. Let al = 1 and a,+l = val + a2 + ... + ai, for i > O.
Determine lim (an).
n---+oo n
P1993-6. Prove that 2
n
+
l
is a factor of 1(V3 + 1)2nl for all positive
integers n. (Here I x l denotes the smallest integer not less than x.)
P1993-7. Find all integers A, B, C, D, E (A :-::; B :-::; C :-::; D :-::; E)
which, when added in pairs, yield only the sums 401, 546, 691, and 836.
P1993-S. In the figure below, ABCD is a rectangle. Find the area of the
parallelogram abed.

5
5
A
6 2
40 Exams
Exam #29-1994
The contest was held at Depauw University, on March 19, in conjunction
with the spring meeting of the Indiana Section of the MAA. Twenty teams
from eleven colleges participated. The winning team from Wabash College
consisted of Faisal Ahmed, Avijit Sarkar, and Faisal Syud. The second
place team from Rose-Hulman consisted of Jonathan Atkins, Nick Tallyn,
and James Moore. The third place team from Purdue University consisted
of Ilya Gluhovsky, Brian Singer, and William Stier. (These problems were
used with the permission of Crux Mathematicorum, © 1975, 1976, 1977.)
P1994-1. Calculate
l
x
2 2
lim e
t
-x dt.
x--+= 0
P1994-2. Show that for positive integers n, vn < 1 + y'27n.
P1994-3. If x > y > 0, show that
P1994-4. The sides of a triangle have lengths 4, 5, and 6. Show that one
of its angles is twice another.
P1994-5. Find all sets of five positive integers whose sum equals their
product.
P1994-6. Show that if one of the coordinates of the center of a circle
is irrational, then the circle contains at most two points both of whose
coordinates are rational.
Exam #30-1995
The contest was held at Tri-State University, located in the far northeastern
community of Angola on March 31, in conjunction with the spring meeting
of the Indiana Section of the MAA. Twenty-three teams from eleven
colleges participated. The winning team from IU, Bloomington, consisted
of Daniel Bliss, Matt Laue, and Seth Patinkin. The second place team from
Wabash College consisted of Eham Ahmed Chowdhury, Matthew Gladden,
and Shirish Ranjit. The third place team from Rose-Hulman consisted of
Jamie Kawabata, Rick Mohr, and Nick Tallyn.
Exam #31-1996
P199S-1. Let Zl and Z2 be complex numbers. Prove that
IZl + Jzi - + IZl - Jz? - = IZl + z21 + IZI - z21·
P199S-2. Find a closed formula for the sum

k=O
P199S-3. Let p be an odd prime. Prove that the integer part of
(V5 + 2)P - 2
P
+
1
is divisible by 20p.
P199S-4. Prove that
4(x
2
+ x + 1)3 - 27x
2
(x + I? = (x - 1?(2x + 1)2(x + 2)2.
P199S-S. Let n be any integer greater than 1. Prove that
n(n+I)
1 2 3 n (2n + 1) -2 -
1 ·2 ·3 ···n < -3-
41
P199S-6. ABC is an equilateral triangle with each side of length a. L
is a line parallel to BC and b units below BC. A solid S is generated by
rotating the triangle ABC about the line L; find the volume of S.
P199S-7. The vertices of a triangle ABC have coordinates (a cos ai,
a sin ad, i = 1,2,3. Find the coordinates of the orthocenter of triangle
ABC.
P199S-S. Find the coefficient of x2n in the expansion of in closed
form.
Exam #31-1996
The contest was held at Butler University on March 29, in conjunction
with the spring meeting of the Indiana Section of the MAA. Twenty-five
teams from eleven colleges participated. The winning team from Rose-
Hulman consisted of Rick Mohr, Nick Tallyn, and James Moore. Indiana
University, Bloomington, Purdue University, and Wabash College tied for
second place. The IU team consisted of Seth Padnkin and Richard Swartz.
The Purdue University team consisted of Dan Crosby, Lukito Muliadi,
and Tze Chao, Ng. The Wabash College team consisted of Alexander
Radnovich, Andrew Jones, and David Whittaker.
42 Exams
P1996-1. The San Francisco 4gers derive their name from the last two
digits of the year of the California Gold Rush, 1849. Note that both
numbers are perfect squares (49 = 7
2
and 1849 = 43
2
). How many other
four-digit squares have this property, that their last two digits also form
squares (count 00, 01, 04, and 09 as squares)?
P1996-2. Find the largest possible area of a pentagon with five sides of
length 1 and a right interior angle.
P1996-3. A hundred armed rats enter a bar containing a hundred fat cats.
After the cats are lined up against the wall, the first rat marches down the
line taking a dollar from every cat. On his return, he passes the $100
that he collected to the second rat who proceeds to give a dollar to every
second cat. On his return, he passes the remaining $50 to the third rat who
proceeds to take a dollar from every third cat. This continues with the rats
alternately giving and taking until the 100th rat gives a dollar to the lOOth
cat. At this point the rats and the money they have taken disappear in a
cloud of smoke.
(a) How many cats profited? lost money? broke even from this?
(b) Which cat(s) profited the most and how much did they get?
(c) How much money did the rats leave with?
P1996-4. A square with sides parallel to the coordinate axes is inscribed
in the region
{(x,y): x,y > 0, y ~ 3x - x
3
}.
If its area is written as ijA + ifIj, where A and B are integers, find
A+B.
P1996-5. In triangle ABC, LA = 90
c
irc and AB = AC = 2. If curve
I joins points of AB and AC to bisect the area of triangle ABC, find the
length of the shortest possible such curve.
P1996-6. Two couples each agree to have exactly n children. They plan
to eventually pair off all their children in marriage so that sons and
daughters of the first couple marry daughters and sons of the second couple.
Assuming that sons and daughters are equally likely to be born, find the
a priori probability p that such an arrangement is mathematically possible.
Using Wallis' product, Sterling's formula, or any other well-known result,
determine limn->CXJ (Pn)( yin).
Exam #32-1997 43
P1996-7. Call two datasets "statistically equivalent" if they have the same
number of elements, the same mean, and the same standard deviation.
Find all datasets of positive integers (in any order) which are statistically
equivalent to {I, 9, 9, 6}.
P1996-8. Find all continuous functions f(x) whose graph G (of y =
f(x)) has the following property: For each chord C of G, if C's projection
onto the x-axis has length d
2
, then C's midpoint lies d units above G.
Exam #32-1997
The contest was held at Franklin College, on March 14, in conjunction
with the spring meeting of the Indiana Section of the MAA. Twenty-
five teams from thirteen universities participated. The winning team from
Wabash College consisted of lun Ma, Robert Dirks, and Abishai Daniel.
Teams from Rose-Hulman and Purdue University placed second and third,
respectively. The Rose-Hulman team consisted of Kyle Lacey, Chris Prince,
and Tyson Patterson. The Purdue team consisted of Dan Crosby, Tze-Chao
Ng, and Elad Harel.
P1997-1. In Indiana, license plates consist of2 digits followed by a letter
and then 4 more digits. Find the probability of getting a license plate in
which the last four digits are nondecreasing.
P1997-2. It is well known that 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + ... + n = n(n + 1)/2
for any positive integer n. Find a similar expression for the sum
1 + (1 + 2) + (1 + 2 + 3) + ... + (1 + 2 + 3 + ... + n).
P1997-3. Find the smallest positive number A so that
21 < A
Iz4 - 5z
2
+ 61 -
for every complex number z on the circle Izl = 3. Prove that A is the
smallest such number.
P1997-4. Find all solutions (x, y) of the equation x
Y
numbers x, y > O.
P1997-5. Given the following set of axioms:
(1) Every line contains exactly four points.
(2) No pair of points may be on more than one line.
yX for real
44
(3) Each point must be on at least four lines.
(4) Not all the points are on one line.
(5) There is at least one line.
Exams
(6) If a point is not on a given line, then the point must be on exactly
one line that has no points in common with the given line
(a) What is the fewest number of points and lines necessary to satisfy
these six axioms?
(b) If n were substituted for "four" in (1) and (3), what is the fewest
number of points and lines necessary to satisfy these six axioms?
P1997-6. The usual way of measuring the length of a vector x
(Xl, X2,"" xn) in n-dimensional Euclidean space is the Euclidean norm
But there are other norms which can be used, such as
n
IlxliI = L IXil
i=l
( a) We know that the set of points {xER2 : II X 112 = I} is the unit circle.
Find each of the following sets of points:
{X E R2 : Ilxlll = I} and {x E R2 : Ilxll= = I}.
(b) The triangle inequality Ilx + yll :s:: Ilxll + Ilyll holds for all norms.
For the 2-norm, equality only holds if X and yare colinear. Determine
when equality holds for the i-norm and the (Xl-norm.
P1997-7. A farmer has a trough 4 feet long with semicircular cross
sections that are 2 feet in diameter. The top of the trough is parallel to the
ground. Initially, the trough is full of water. If the farmer tilts the trough
(along the side) at an angle ex with the horizontal, express the volume (in
terms of ex) of the remaining water.
Exam #33-1998
This was the largest ICMC to date. Twenty-nine teams from 22 universities
and schools participated in this ICMC, held at Ball State University.
The winning team from Wabash College consisted of Robert Dirks,
Exam #33-1998 45
Abishai Daniel, and Jun Ma. Teams from Rose-Rulman and the University
of Evansville placed second and third, respectively. The Rose-Rulman
team consisted of Kyle Lacey, Randy Motchan, Matt Lepinski, and the
Evansville team consisted of Siddartha Naidu, Robert Linne, Riten Sonpal.
P1998-1. Let C be a circle with diameter AB. Let P be any point
of segment AB. Let C, D, E be distinct points of C all on the same
side of line AB such that DPl..AB and L.CPD = L.DPE. Show that
(PD)2 = PC· PE.
P1998-2. Show that an integer n with final (decimal) digit u is divisible
by 7 if and only if nlou - 2u is divisible by 7.
P1998-3. Prove that an odd integer n > 1 is composite iff there exist
nonnegative integers p and q such that n = p2 - q2 with p - q > 1.
P1998-4. Let fa = 0, il = 1, and fk = fk-l + fk-2 be the Fibonacci
numbers.
(a) Show that the points F = {Uk, fk+d} lie on two hyperbolas: y2 -
xy - x
2
= ±1.
(b) Show that the only points on the hyperbolas y2 - xy - x
2
= ±1 with
nonnegative integer coefficients are points in F.
P1998-S. Let fa, il, h be three nonnegative increasing real-valued func-
tions defined on the nonnegative real numbers with fi(O) = 0 and
fa (x) :s: il(x) :s: h(x). For any nonnegative x, let R(x) denote the
rectangle whose vertices are (0,0), (x, 0), (0, il(x)), and (x, h(x)) Then,
il is said to bisect fa and h in area if for every nonnegative x, the area of
the portion of the R( x) lying between the curves y = fa (x) and y = il (x)
has the same area as the portion of R( x) lying between the curves
y = il (x) and y = h ( x ). If fa ( x) = xf3 and il ( x) = ax
f3
(a > 1,,8 > 0),
and il bisects fa and h in area, then what is h(x)?
P1998-6. Let Xn = {1,2, ... ,n}. A permutation ofn objects is a 1-1
function, cp, from Xn onto itself. cp is called a derangement if cp( x) i= x
for all x in X
n
.
(a) Find a closed-form expression for Dn the number of derangements of
n objects.
(b) Show that Dn is equal to the nearest integer to ~ .
(c) Find the radius of convergence of the power series 2 : ~ = 1 D;.(.
46 Exams
P1998-7. Let us say that two non-singular 2 x 2 matrices (with complex
entries) A and B are equivalent if there exists a complex number w such
that A = wB. Let [A] denote the equivalence class of A, that is, the set of
all matrices equivalent to A. Note that multiplication of such equivalence
classes is a well-defined operation.
(a) Find as simple a method as possible for calculating the square root(s)
of an equivalence class of matrices other than Here is an
important example to consider: the square root(s) of are

and

since

5) = (14 35) = 7 (2
4 7 21 1
and


(b) How many distinct square roots can an equivalence class that is not
equal to have? Realize that [-A] = [A] so that the usual sign
ambiguity doesn't exist here.
(c) How many distinct square roots does have?
Exam #34-1999
This year the competition was held on the Indiana University in Bloom-
ington. The team of Thomas Horine, James Lee, and Keith Henderson of
Purdue University won the contest. Teams from Rose-Hulman and Wabash
College placed second and third, respectively. The Rose-Hulman team
consisted of Matt Lepinski, Dennis Lin, Randy Motchan, and the Wabash
team consisted of Robert Dirks, Barry Weliver, Jun Ma.
P1999-1. In a large urn there are 1999 orange balls and 2000 yellow balls.
Next to the urn is a large pile of yellow balls. The following procedure is
performed repeatedly.
Two balls are chosen at random from the urn:
(i) If both are yellow, one is put back, the other thrown away;
(ii) If both are orange, they are both thrown away and a yellow ball from
the pile is put into the urn;
Exam #34-1999 47
(iii) if they are of different colors, the orange one is put back into the urn
and the yellow one is thrown away.
What is the color of the last ball in the urn?
P1999-2. Let P be any point inside an equilateral triangle T. Show that
the sum of the three distances from P to the sides of T is constant.
P1999-3. If x and yare positive numbers, show that
CiY + (XiY)2 J('f)2 + V
X2
i
y2
~ - - - - ~ ~ - < - - - - - - ~ - - - - -
2 2
and find all cases of equality.
P1999-4. The statement
1 n (k) r
1
-:;;, 2:.f -:;;, -+ 10 f(x)dx
k=l
as n -+ 00
is familiar to all students of calculus. Several textbooks claim that the
convergence is monotone in n. Show that this claim is false even for
continuous increasing functions.
P1999-S. What is the probability that a dart, hitting a square board at
random, lands nearer the center than the edge?
P1999-6. Does any row of Pascal's triangle contain three consecutive
entries that are in the ratio 1: 2 : 3? Recall that the nth row (n = 0, 1, 2, ... )
consists of the entries
(
n) n!
k - k!(n - k)!
(k=0,1,2, ... ,n).
P1999-7. Does the series
f COS(I;(k))
k=l
converge or diverge?
P1999-S. Let A be a square matrix and suppose that there exist positive
integers m and n such that Am = I and An -I I. Calculate
48 Exams
Exam #35-2000
This year's winning team was from Purdue University and consisted of
James Lee, Thomas Horine, and Keith Henderson. The second place team
from Wabash College consisted of Roberts Dirks, Zhenyu Yang, and Chris
Duefel. The team consisting of Matt Lepinski, Dennis Lin, and Lucas
Beverlin from Rose-Hulman came in third. The contest was held at Earlham
College.
P2000-1. Four suspects, one of whom was known to have committed a
murder, made the following statements when questioned by police. If only
one of them is telling the truth, who did it?
Arby: Becky did it.
Becky: Ducky did it.
Cindy: I didn't do it.
Ducky: Becky is lying.
P2000-2. Call a number N fortunate if it can be written with four equal
digits in some base b E Z+.
(a) Clearly 2222 is fortunate; why is 2000 fortunate?
(b) Find the greatest fortunate number less than 2000.
P2000-3. Determine whether
converges or diverges.
P2000-4. Prove that a group G of order 15 must be cyclic.
P2000-S. Let the Fibonacci sequence Fk be defined as Fo = 0, Fl = 1,
and Fk+2 = Fk+l + Fk for k ~ O. It is known (and you may assume) that
Fk is the closest integer to Tk / V5 where T = (1 + V5) /2. Show that
P2000-6. In a triangle one angle is twice another. What is the largest
possible ratio of the area of the triangle to that of its circumcircle? You
Exam #35-2000 49
may express your answer in terms of
_J4+VfO
g - 12'
P2000-7. Prove or disprove the statement: an irrational power of an
irrational number is irrational. You may assume that V2 is irrational but
be sure to prove all other results used.
P2000-S. Find all functions f (x) which satisfY the equation
f(x) + f"(x) = f(3)(x) + f(5)(x)
and have
lim f(x) = f(O) = O.
x--+oo
This page intentionally is no longer blank
Solutions
Exam #1-1966
51966-1
We will solve the more general problem of determining which integers A
yield integer solutions x and y to the equation x
2
- y2 = A. Since the
LHS factors, we have the system of equations
x - y = r and x + y = s,
with the condition that A = rs. The system has solutions
r+s
x=--
2
r-s
and y = -2-'
Thus x and yare integers whenever rand s have the same parity. This
happens for all odd values of A (r = A, s = 1) and when A is a multiple
of 4.
For our particular problem, let a
3
= A. If a is odd, then so is A, and
if a is even, then A is a multiple of 4, so solutions exist for all positive
integer values of a.
Look under Diophantine Equations in the Index for similar problems.
51966-2
Divide the unit square into four smaller squares each of side length 1/2
(by drawing two lines which bisect parallel sides of the original square).
Since there are five points and only four smaller squares, two points must
lie in the same square. It is clear that any two such points can be separated
by a distance of less than V2/2 unless the two points are at opposite ends
51
52 Solutions
of the diagonal of the smaller square, which cannot happen since they are
both interior to the original square.
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51966-3
Consider the numbers
There are p + 1 numbers in this list so two of them are congruent mod p.
The difference between those two is the required sum divisible by p. (Note
that p being prime is irrelevant.)
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51966-4
Solution 1: Suppose the functions are f(x) and g(x), then we must have
(
f(X))'
g(x)
f'(x)
g'(x) .
Applying the quotient rule, you get
g(x) f'(x) - f(x) g'(x)
(g(x) )2
f'(x)
g'(x) .
Multiply this equation by (g (x)) 2 g' ( x) to simplify the equation and we
get
g(x) g'(x) f'(x) - (g'(x))2 f(x) = (g(X))2 f'(x).
Ifwe know one of the functions, say g(x), then we have a first order linear
differential equation for the other function, that we can solve. Choosing
g(x) = x so g'(x) = 1, we find that f(x) must satisfy
x f'(x) - f(x) = x
2
f'(x).
Rewriting this equation, we get
f'(x) = ~ ~ = x(1 ~ x) f(x),
or
df dx
f x(1-x)"
Integrating, we have
In If(x)1 = In Ixl -In Ix -11 + C,
Exam #1-1966 53
so f(x) must be
x
f(x) = C x _ l'
An example of two functions f (x) and g( x) having the property that the
derivatives of their quotient is the quotient of their derivatives is given by
f(x) = x/(x - 1) and g(x) = x.
Solution 2: Begin the same as in Solution 1, but let g(x) = exp(kx),
so that g' (x) = ke
kx
and the differential equation simplifies to
(k - 1)f'(x) = f(x).
Solving this yields
f(x) = Cek"'-,.
Then, for any k =J 0, 1, the functions f and g satisfY the necessary
requirement.
Look under Differentiation or Real-Valued Functions in the Index for
similar problems.
51966-5
Solution 1: (In what follows, "sequence" refers to an ascending sequence
of positive integers as in the problem.) Let S(n, k) be the number of
different sequences of length k in which every number from 1 to n occurs
at least once. Then S (n, k) is simply the number of ways to partition a k
element sequence into n non-empty subsets. Hence, S (n, k) = i). Let
T (n, k, r) be the number of different sequences of length k in which only
r (out of n) distinct numbers occur, then we have
T(n,k,r) =
Finally, we see that the solution is
where the latter equality is an invocation of the Vandermonde convolution.
Solution 2: Make n + k - 1 blanks and fill in k of them with x' s. For
any such arrangement of x's, define
ai = 1 + the number of blank to the left of the ith x
54 Solutions
for each i from 1 to k. This gives a 1-to-1 correspondence between the
sequences we are trying to count and the ways of putting k x's in some
of the n + k - 1 blanks. But the number of ways of doing the latter is
obviously
Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.
S 1966-6
Solution 1: Let f(x) = v'ax
2
+ b. We want to show that f(x) is a
contraction, i.e. :30 < C < 1 s.t. If(x) - f(y)1 :; Clx - yl for all
x, y E R. In this case, the sequence Xl = C, Xn+l = f(xn) converges to
the unique fixed point of f.
If(x) - f(y)1 = Ivax
2
+ b - vay2 + bl
= valvx
2
+ b/a - Vy2 + b/al
:; val
x
- YI·
To see that lv'x
2
+ c - Vy2 + cl :; Ix - yl for any c 2: 0, Multiply and
divide by the conjugate to get
Iv' x
2
+ c + V y2 + cl'
Since
h/x
2
+ c+ Vy2 + cl 2: Ixl + Iyl 2: Ix + YI,
the inequality follows.
Since 0 < va < 1, f is a contraction. The limit of the sequence
{x
n
} is simply the fixed point of f. Solving x = v' ax
2
+ b yields
limn-too Xn = Vb/(l - a).
Solution 2: After computing the first several terms of the sequence,
we see that
xn+1 = va
n
c
2
+ b(l + a + a
2
+ ... + a
n
-
l
)
Exam #2-1967 55
Since 0 < a < 1, we may take the limit giving
V
1-0 M
lim (xn+d = O· c
2
+ b(--) = --.
n-tcx; 1 - a 1 - a
Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems.
51966-7
Assume that the set {h} is minimal in the sense that none of the intervals is
a proper subset of the union of some others. Then we can order the intervals
by the value of their left-endpoint, so that Ii begins to the left of IiH for
all i. Then we have I
j
and 1)+2 are disjoint for each j = 1, ... , n - 2;
otherwise Ij+1 c 1j U 1)+2, or 1)+2 C 1jH' either of which violate the
minimality assumption.
Thus, the set of intervals with odd subscripts consists of mutually
disjoint sets, as does the set of intervals with even subscripts. At least
one of these two sets covers 1/2 of I, since their union covers all of I.
51966-8
Choose a person P. If P is a friend of k other people, then P is a stranger
of 5 - k other people, and one of k or 5 - k must be at least 3. Without
loss of generality, assume that P is a friend of at least 3 other people:
Q1, Q2, Q3. If Q1, Q2, Q3 are all pairwise strangers, then we are done.
Otherwise, Q i and Q j are friends (for some i, j). In this case, P, Q i, Qj
forms a triple of pairwise friends.
Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #2-1 967
51967-1
In a symmetric matrix, all non-diagonal entries are paired with another;
the two must be the same. There are n( n - 1) such entries. If each row is
a permutation of the set {I, 2, ... , n}, then there must be n copies of each
number in the matrix and, since n is odd, at most n - 1 copies of each
number can paired off. The remaining copy of each number must be on
the diagonal of the matrix, implying that the diagonal is also a permutation
of the set {1,2, ... ,n}.
Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems.
56 Solutions
51967-2
Without loss of generality, assume that the axes of the parabolas lie parallel
to the x-axis; let (Xl, Yl) and (X2' Y2) be the points of contact of the
common tangent with the parabolas. Then the equations for the parabolas
can be given by
and
y2 + 2B
2
x + 2C
2
y + D2 = o.
Using implicit differentiation, we have the tangent line to parabola
through (Xi, Yi) is given by
YYi + Bi(X + Xi) + Ci(y + Yi) + Di = o.
Since both of the points (Xl, Yl) and (X2' Y2) lie on each of these lines,
we have
and
Subtracting equation (2) from equation (1), we obtain
2(Bl - B
2
) (Xl; X2 ) + 2(C
l
_ C
2
) (Yl ; Y2) + (Dl - D
2
) = 0,
that is, the midpoint lies on the line
which is the common chord of the parabolas. (The common chord is the
line segment connecting the two points of intersection of the parabolas.
That this chord exists is implicitly assumed here.)
Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51967-3
Let f (a, b) = e
a
+ b(log b - 1) - ab, for a ;::: 0 and b ;::: 1. If f ( a, b) ;::: 0,
then the result follows. Note that if b = e
a
, then f(a, b) = O.
Further, since
we have
of
ob = 10gb - a,
of =O·fb= a
ob 1 e ,
of 0 ·f b a
ob < 1 < e ,
Exam #2-1967
and
of O'f b a
ob > 1 > e .
57
Therefore, fixing ao greater than or equal to zero, consider the function
f(ao, b), for 1 :::; b:::; 00. From the facts about of job above, f(ao, b) has
an absolute minimum at b = e
ao
. Further, since f (ao, e
ao
) = 0, we have
f(ao, b) 2: 0, for 1 :::; b:::; 00. Since ao was arbitrary, the result follows.
Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems.
51967-4
Suppose the proposition false and let n be the smallest positive integer
such that the number of odd coefficients in the expansion of (x + y)n is
not a power of 2. By inspection n is not 1, nor is n equal to 2.
Case 1. Let n = 2k, with k a positive integer. If m is odd, then
(
n) = n-m+1( n )
m m m-1
is an even integer since n - m + 1 is even. Thus all the odd coefficients
must occur for even values of m. Let m = 2q. Then (;:,) is congruent
(mod 2) to
2x4x .. ·xn
2 x 4 x ... x m x 2 x 4 x ... x (n - m)
by removing all odd factors and divisors. (That is, if x and yare congruent
(mod 2) then so are hx and ky for any odd integers hand k, and
conversely.) But the latter fraction is evidently thus (;:,) = is
odd if, and only if, is odd and so the number of odd coefficients in
(x + y) n is the same as the number of odd coeficients in (x + y) k, which
contradicts the assumption that n was the least positive integer for which
the proposition fails.
Case 2. Let n = 2k + 1, with k a positive integer. Since (;:J =
and, since nand n - m are not congruent (mod 2), the number of
odd coefficients is twice the number of odd coefficients obtained by
considering only even values of m in the symbols (;:,). But as before
we find
1
) == (mod 2). Thus the number of odd coefficients in
(x + y)n, is just twice the number of odd coefficients in (x + y)k, again
giving a contradiction. Thus the proposition is true.
Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.
58 Solutions
51967-5
Suppose that z is a root and Izi < 1/3. Then
implies that
or
lalz + a2z
2
+ ... + aNzNI = l.
But using the triangle inequality, the requirement that Ian I < 2, and
Izi < 1/3, we obtain
a contradiction.
Look under Complex Numbers or Polynomials in the Index for similar
problems.
51967-6
In the illustration below, the distance from A to F, and the distance from
B to G are each V65/8. The distances AG, AH, AT, BH, and BJ are
all larger. If the square is divided as illustrated, each piece has a diameter
of V65/8.
N M
o
Q
R
A .! B
8
3
8
L K J
H
G
F
c D E
Exam #2-1967 59
Now suppose that the square is divided into three arbitrary pieces. One
of the three pieces must contain at least six of the sixteen boundary points
symmetrically arranged in the illustration. We will now show that this piece
has a diameter of at least V65/8.
Suppose the set contains a comer point, WLOG point A. If the set
contains any of points F, G, H, J, K, L, or M, the set has diameter at
least V65/8. If the set contains none of those points, but contains, WLOG,
comer E then the set must also contain one of N, P, Q, or R, and again
the diameter is at least V65/8. Finally, if the set contains none of E, F,
G, H, J, K, L, M, or N, then the set must contain one or both of D and
P, and one or both of C and Q. Again the diameter is at least V65/8.
Suppose the set contains none of the comer points, but does contain a
non-midpoint of one of the sides, WLOG, say B. If the set also contains
G, H, K, or L, the set has diameter at least V65/8. If the set contains
none of those points, but does contain M, then it must contain one of C,
D, or F. Again the set has diameter at least V65/8. If the set doesn't
contain M either, it may contain P. In this case, it must also contain D or
F, and hence has a diameter of at least V65/8. This leaves the possibility
of the set consisting of B, C, D, F, Q, R, in which case it has a diameter
of at least V65/8.
This leaves the possibility of a set consisting solely of the midpoints,
but there are only four, so this can't happen.
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51967-7
First note that for a > 0, y > 0, the equation x + x
a
= y has a unique
solution with x > 0. This is because x + x
a
is a continuous, monotonic
increasing function of x with limx-too x + x
a
= 00 and is equal to zero
at x = 0. Thus it assumes every positive real value exactly once for
x E (0,00). Now, if the sequence {x
n
} satisfies the conditions given in
the problem, then
00 00
xn = L xj = Xn + 1 a + L xj
j=n+l j=n+2
= X ~ + l + Xn +1·
So Xn+1 must be the unique solution of this equation. If follows that the
sequence {x
n
} is unique. Further, if we define Xn inductively by setting
60 Solutions
Xn+l equal to the solution of x + x
a
= x
n
, then it is clear that
xn = + Xn+l
= + + Xn+1 = ...
co
= L xj.
j=n+l
Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems.
51967-8
Suppose that p, q E R
2
and let m be the midpoint of p and q. Let 5 be
the line segment of length 1 which is perpendicular to pq and has m as
its midpoint. By symmetry, for every S E 5, Ip - sl = Iq - sI- Now, for
each n E N, let Sn E 5 be such that Ip - snl E Q and 1m - snl < lin.
Such a choice is possible because Q is dense in Rand Ip - xl is a
continuous function of x. So as x varies along 5 in a of
m, Ip - xl assumes rational values. Now, as n 00, Sn m, hence
Ip - snl + Iq - snl Ip - ql, and we see that
IT(p) - T(q)1 ::::; IT(p) - T(sn)1 + IT(q) - T(sn)1
= Ip - snl + Iq - snl·
Letting n 00, we have IT(p) - T(q)1 ::::; Ip - ql·
Now, suppose c > 0. We can choose q' E R2 such that Iq - q'l < c and
Ip - q'l E Q. As a consequence of the previous argument, we have that
IT(q) - T(q')1 ::::; Iq - q'l· Also, we can invoke the triangle inequality to
see that IIT(P) -T(q)I-IT(p) -T(q')11 ::::; IT(q') -T(q)1 ::::; Iq-q'l < c.
IIT(p) - T(q)1 - Ip - qll
::::; IIT(p) - T(q)I-lp - q'll + lip - q'I-lp - qll
= IIT(p) - T(q)I-IT(p) - T(q')11 + lip - q'I-lp - qll
::::; IIT(p) - T(q)I-IT(p) - T(q')11 + Iq - q'l
< 2c.
Letting c 0, we see that IT(p) - T(q)1 = Ip - ql for all p, q E R2.
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #3-1968 61
Exam #3-1 96 S
51968-1
Since the set of Riemann sums is bounded, there exists an M such that
n
M;::: I L:!(ti)(Xi Xi-I)I for all ti,xi,Xi-l.
i=1
Thus we have
implying
that is, that ! is bounded.
Look under Riemann Sums in the Index for similar problems.
51968-2
Assume the claim is false for quadrilateral ABC D and five interior points.
If P and Q are two of the five interior points, then the line through P and
Q cannot intersect ABC D in adjacent sides. To see this, suppose, without
loss of generality, that the line intersects AB and BC. Then the points A,
C, D, P, and Q form a convex pentagon. Therefore, exactly one of the
rays PQ or QP intersects either AB or BC. Let S AB be those rays PQ
intersecting AB and S BC be those rays PQ intersecting BC, where P
and Q range over the five interior points. Thus S AB U S BC contains ten
rays, one for each pair of points P, Q. If rays PQ and QR are both in,
say, SAB, then either the points P, Q, R, B, and C or the points P, Q, R,
A, and D form a convex pentagon, depending on which side of line P R
the point Q lies. It follows furthermore that if PQ and PR or if QP and
RJ3 are both in, say, SAB, then QR or RQ must be in SBC. Without loss
of generality, assume S AB contains at least five rays. Because no point can
be both the initial and second point of such rays, it follows that some point
P is the initial or second point in at least three of these rays. Let the other
points of these rays be Q, R, and S. The previous discussion showed that
the rays QR or RQ, QS or stJ, and Ri; or sR must be in S BC. However,
this possibility is also precluded by the previous discussion, proving the
claim.
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
62 Solutions
51968-3
Fix t and define L : R
n
I-t R
n
by L(x) = tx. Then L is differentiable
on Rn, with L'(x) = tI, where I is the identity matrix. Now let F(x) =
f(L(x)), so that by the chain rule we have F'(x) = I'(L(x))L'(x) =
tf(tx). By the definition of f, F(x) = tf(x), so that F'(x) = tf'(x)
also. Therefore l' (tx) = l' (x) for any t > O. Therefore l' (x) is constant
and f ( x) must be linear.
Look under Multivariate Calculus in the Index for similar problems.
51968-4
The only integral solutions to the first equation are (1,0) and (2,1). The
only solutions to the second are (2,3) and (1,1). This is a special case
of Catalan's Conjecture and a general exposition of the progress that has
been made on the conjecture can be found in MAA FOCUS, vol 21 #5.
Look under Diophantine Equations in the Index for similar problems.
51968-5
This conjecture is false. Let
fn(x) = {nIx, on[1,e
n
],
0, otherwise.
Since 0 ::::; fn(x) ::::; ~ , for all x, fn -7 0 uniformly on R. Now
I: fn(x) dx = 1
so that limn--+oo J ~ o o f n = l.
Look under Infinite Series, Limit Evaluation or Riemann Sums in the
Index for similar problems.
51968-6
Consider any two sequences {c
n
} and {d
n
} each tending monotonically
to zero, with d
n
> en, and L: C
n
converging while L: d
n
diverges.
Since J;i d
n
diverges, for each n there exists an integer ¢( n) such
that L:j=: d
j
2: e where e is any fixed positive number. Define the
sequence nk recursively by nI = 1 and dnk+l < cq,(nk)' It is clear that
nk < ¢(nk) < nkH'
Exam #3-1968 63
Now a solution to the problem can be given by the two series with terms
{an} = {Cnl , Cnl +1,"" c</>(nt},dn2 , d n2+1 , ... , d</>(n2)' Cn
3
,···,
C</>(n3)' d n4 ,·· .},
{bn } = {d
n"
d n, +1, ... , d</>(n,), C
n2
, C
n2
+1, ... , C</>(n2)' d
n3
, ... ,
d</>(n3)' Cn4 ,·· .}.
Clearly, each of the series z= an and z= b
n
diverge since they con-
tain infinitely many stretches of terms adding up to more than e, and
z= min(a
n
, b
n
) converges by comparison with z= Cn·
Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems.
51968-7
f(z, B) = max{lzl cos(B - arg z), O}. Then
1 J7I" Izl J7I"/2 Izl
- f(z, B) dB = - cosBdB = -.
27f -71" 27f -71"/2 7f
Therefore,
J7r f(z·,B)dB = t hl
J 7f 7f
-71" j=1 j=1
Because the maximum of a function is at least its average, it follows that
there exists B such that
1 n

7f j=1
L I Zj I cos( B - arg Zj)
cos(O-arg Zj
L IZjlcos(argzj-B)
cos(O-arg Zj
=Re
z·e-
iO
<
J -
cos(O-arg Zj cos(O-arg Zj
L Zj.
cos(O-arg ZJ
Look under Complex Numbers in the Index for similar problems.
64 Solutions
51968-8
This problem asks you to look for the Ramsey number n = r(k, k). We
will give an existence result for the more general problem of finding r (s, t),
that is, for what n can we find a set of s blue arcs or a set of t arcs. In
particular, we show that
r(s, t) :::; r(s - t, t) + r(s, t - 1).
Working inductively on k = s + t, we have the result holding for k = 4
by inspection. Now suppose the result holds for all values smaller than k.
Let n = r(s - 1, t) + r(s, t - 1) be the number of points that we have,
and let each arc be colored blue or red. Let v be any point. There are either
r(s -1, t) blue arcs or r(s, t -1) red arcs at v. If there are r(s -1, t) blue
arcs, then the set of points at the other end of these arcs contain s - 1 blue
arcs or t red arcs among them, by our induction hypothesis. In the first
case these blue arcs, plus those from v to these points, form a collection
of s blue arcs, as required. In the second case, we already have t points
all of whose arcs are red.
A similar argument holds if there are r (s, t - 1) red arcs at v.
Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #4-1969
51969-1
We will show that
x
2
f(x) = sin x - x + - 2: °
Jr
on [0, Jrj. By observation of f' (x) = cos x-I + 2:, we find that 0, ~ ,
and Jr are critical points of f(x). By noting that
f
"( ) . 2
x = - SIll X +-
Jr
has exactly two zeros on [0, Jrj, we can apply Rolle's Theorem to verifY
that 0, ~ , and Jr are the only critical points of f (x). (If f' had another zero,
f" would have a third zero.) Since f(O) = f(Jr) = ° and f ( ~ ) = 1 - ~ ,
we can see that the minimum value of f(x) on [0, Jrj is 0.
Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #4-1969
51969-2
Suppose that
P + Q + R =A.
p q r
Multiply through by pqr yielding Pqr + Qpr + Rpq = Apqr. Now,
Pqr = Apqr - Qpr - Rpq = p(Aqr - Qr Rq),
65
hence p divides Pqr. But since (p, q) = 1 and (p, r) = 1, it must be that
p divides P. In the same manner, q divides Q and r divides R.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51969-3
Let w = {h5 + 5J20 and w
8 = W + w. We have
V 25 - 5J20. We wish to determine
8
3
= w
3
+ w
3
+ 3ww(w + w) = 50 + 3·5·8.
To solve for 8 we note that 0 = 8
3
- 15 - 50 = (8 - 5)(8
2
+ 58 + 10) has
one real solution, 8 = 5.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51969-4
Label acceleration, a, downward at all points along the trajectory of height
h, and 9 the acceleration due solely to gravity. Let v be the velocity of the
ball at any time, in the general direction of travel (downward or upward)
and Vo be the upward velocity with which the ball is launched.
At launch, a = 9 + av, so v continually decreases until the highest
point of ascent, where v = 0 (by Rolle's theorem), so a = g. Thus, going
upward, the ball will always experience an acceleration downward greater
than g. The ascent will take the same amount of time as an object travelling
on a straight line with initial velocity v = 0 and initial acceleration a = g,
with a continually increasing through the distance h, to a final value of
a = 9 + avo. Since a is continually increasing, the amount of time to
traverse this distance, t
up
, is less than t, the amount of time for an object
with uniform acceleration 9 to traverse this distance.
Going downward, the acceleration begins with a = 9 and continues
with a = 9 - av (since the air resistance is now upward, but the velocity
is downward). So the descent will take the same amount of time as
66 Solutions
an object travelling on a straight line with initial acceleration a = g,
with a continually decreasing through the distance h to a final value of
a = 9 - aVj. Again, tdown, the time required to traverse this distance,
is greater than t, the time an object under uniform acceleration 9 would
require. Thus, tup < t < tdown.
Look under Differential Equations in the Index for similar problems.
51969-5
Let B denote the angle just above A. Using the law of sines to compute
the left side of the equilateral triangle, we find its area to be
v'3 [bsin(27f/3-B) + CSin(B+A-7f/3)]2
4 v'3/2 v'3/2
= ~ [bsin(27f/3 - B) - csin ((27f/3 - B) - (A + 7f/3)) r
= ~ [(b sin(27f /3 - B) - c cos(A + 7f /3)) sin(27f /3 - B)
+csin(A + 7f/3) cos(27f/3 - B)r.
Now, if w is such that cosw = x/ Jx
2
+ y2 and sinw = y/ Jx
2
+ y2,
we may write x sin a + y cos a as J x
2
+ y2 sin( a + w), from which we
see that its maximum value is J x
2
+ y2. It follows that the maximum
area of the equilateral triangle is
v; [(b - ccos(A + 7f /3)) 2 + (csin(A + 7f /3)) 2]
v'3
= """4 (b
2
+ c
2
- 2bccos(A + 7f/3)).
The claimed upper bound has been established. However, it need not
be the maximum value. To conform to the geometric setup, B must satisfY
° < B < 27f/3 and ° < 7f - (B + A) < 27f/3, which is equivalent to
7f/3 - A < B < 7f - A. For instance, for b = 10, c = 1, and A = 7f - .1,
the maximum occurs for B outside this range.
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #5-1970 67
51969-6
From the Trapezoidal Rule we have
I
b
f(x) dx = b - a (f(a) + 2 ~ f(a + kh) + f(b)) _ (b - ~ 3 f"(c)
a 2n ~ 12n
k=l
for some c E [a, b]. If we set n = 1, the result follows immediately. A
complete proof of the Trapezoidal Rule itself can be found many places.
Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #5-1970
51970-1
We have
. 1 1 1. n 1
hm (-- + --+ ... +-) = hm ~ - -
n---+oo n + 1 n + 2 2n n---+oo ~ n + k
k=l
n (1 1)
- lim -.--
- n---+ooL n Is. + 1
k=l n
1
1 1
= --dx = In(2).
o 1 + x
Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems.
51970-2
If lei :::; 1, then we are done. If Icl > 1, then we have
n n-1 n-2
C = -an-1C - an-2c - ... - a1C - ao.
Divide by c
n
-
1
to obtain
Take absolute values and use the triangle inequality to see that
Since Icl > 1, we have the desired inequality.
Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems.
68 Solutions
51970-3
Solution 1: Without loss of generality, we may assume that the coordi-
nates of the vertices of the parallelogram are A: (0,0), B: (1,0), C: (a, b),
D: (a + 1, b + 1). Then the coordinates of X, Y, Z, Ware
Y:(1+a;b, b;a),
w:(a;b, a;b).
Then XZ = Ja
2
+ (b+ 1)2 = YW.
We also have XZ = (a, b + 1) and YW = (b + 1, -a). Thus, XZ·
YW = 0 and XZ -.l YW.
Since the diagonals of a parallelogram bisect each other, the length of
each side is the hypotenuse of an isosceles right triangle with legs of length
J a
2
+ (b + 1)2 /2 and XY ZW must be a rhombus.
To see that the rhombus is a square, let E denote the intersection of X Z
with YW. Then mLW XY = mLW X E + mLY X E = a right angle.
Similarly, the other angles of XY ZW are right angles, and XY ZW is a
square.
Solution 2: Let YW and X Z meet at P. Then P is a center of
symmetry for the figure, so a 180° rotation maps the figure to itself.
Hence WXYZ is a parallelogram. Next, ZC = ZD and CY = DW.
Also LCZD = 90°, LZCB = LZDW = 90° + the acute angle of the
given parallelogram. Hence triangles ZCY and ZDW are congruent and
similarly oriented, so a 90° rotation carries one triangle into the other. Thus
ZY = ZW and LY ZW = 90
0
• Thus W XY Z is a square.
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51970-4
The problem is trivial for e = 2, so we proceed by induction. Suppose
the result is true for all sets of points of order e, where e = k, k even.
Consider a set of points and arcs of order e = k + 2. Pick any arc A, say
from PI to P
2
and remove it together with its endpoints. By our induction
hypothesis, we can color the remaining regions with two colors.
Because of the non-intersection constraint on the arcs, PI and P
2
must
either be consecutive points around the circle, or be situated such that arc
A divides the remaining arcs into two sets, as illustrated below. In the first
Exam #6-1971 69
case, color the region created by arc A opposite of the color of the region
it is contained in. In the second case, color one of the two regions created
by arc A the other color (from what is was before) and switch colors for
all of the other regions on that side of arc A.
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51970-5
Let d be the number of digits in n, then it is necessary that 6· 10
d
-
1
+
(n - 6)/10 = 4n (from condition (b)). Multiplying through by 10 yields
6·lO
d
+(n-6) = 40n (note here that n will also satisfY (a)) or equivalently
6.10
d
-62(10
d
-1)
n=----
39 13
Hence it is necessary that 13 divide 10d - 1. So we need
d-1
10d - 1 = 9 L 10
k
== 0 (mod 13).
k=O
Since gcd(9, 13) = 1, this is equivalent to
d-1 d-1
L 10
k
== L( _3)k == 0 (mod 13).
k=O k=O
Now we may simply add alternating powers of 3 until we reach zero:
(-3)0 = 1,1 + (_3)1 = -2, -2 + (_3)2 = 7, 7+ (-3)3 = -20 = -7,
-7 + (-3)4 = 74 = 9, 9 + (-3)5 = 9 - 243 = -234 = -18 ·13 = O. So
d - 1 = 5 =} d = 6. Thus if n = 2(10
6
- 1)/13 = 153, 846 satisfies (a)
and (b) then it is the smallest such number. Indeed, since d is the correct
number of digits, (a) and (b) are true by construction.
Exam #6-197 1
51971-1
For part (a) we have
(i) x E A =} xES =} xRx (with x E A) =} x E A, hence A c A.
- -
(ii) By (1), A cA. Now, x E A =} :3y E A S.t. xPy. y E A=} :3z E A
S.t. yPz. xPy ~ y P z =} xpz (with z E A), so x EA. It follows that
A c A, hence A = A.
70 Solutions
(iii) x E Au B =} ::ly E A u B s.t. xPy. If yEA, then x E A
and if y E B, then x E B. Therefore AU B c Au B. Also,
x E Au B =} (x E A) V (x E B). So one of A or B contains a
y s.t. xPy. It follows that x E Au B and hence AU B = Au B.
(b) A = ((u,v) E S : v - y = 3(u - x) for some (x,y) E A} =
{(u, v) E S : v - 3u = y - 3x 1\ x
2
+ y2 = I}. First, we determine the
values that y - 3x can take when x
2
+ y2 = 1. Thus we look at the minima
and maxima of the two functions VI - x
2
- 3x and -VI - x
2
- 3x on
[-1,1]. Since these functions are continuous, they will assume every value
between their respective minimum and maximum.
~ ( ± ~ - 3x) = =f x - 3 = 0 =} 9(1 - x
2
)
dx Vl- x
2
= x
2
=} X = ±_3_.
v'lO
Checking the values x = ±1, ± Jk in ±Vl - x
2
- 3x yields a
minimum and maximum of - v'lO and v'lO, respectively. Hence y - 3x
assumes every value on [-v'lO, v'lO]. Now we can write
A = {(u,v) E S: v - 3u E [-v'lO, v'lO]}
= {(u,v) E S: 3u - v'lO::; v::; 3u+ v'lO}.
It follows that A is the strip between the two parallel lines v = 3u - v'lO
and v = 3u + v'lO.
Look under Algebraic Structures in the Index for similar problems.
51971-2
We want to compute 7
9999
(mod 1000).
7
9999
== 7-
1
(7
400
)25 == 7-
1
(10
3
k + 1)25 == 7-
1
• 1 == 143 (mod 1000).
So the last three digits are 1, 4, 3.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51971-3
The derivative of (1 - e -,,1 )-1 is
-1
ex
Exam #6-1971 71
Note, however that this is valid only for x =I- 0; worse yet, (1 - e ~ l )-1
has a jump discontinuity at x = 0.
(b) (1-e ~ l )-1 is not an anti derivative of the integrand on the interval
[-1, 1], but the function 9 is, where
{
(1 - e ~ l )-1 for x > 0,
g(x)= 1 for x =0,
1 + (1 - e ~ l )-1 for x < 0.
Hence the integral is g(1) - g( -1) = e':l'
A more direct approach would be to express the integral as the sum
of two integrals, one on the interval [-1,0] and the other on the interval
[0,1].
Look under Differentiation or Integration in the Index for similar prob-
lems.
51971-4
For each t E R, let L
t
be the line y(x) = t. Clearly the set B =
{Lt : t E R} is uncountable, Ltl n Lt2 = 0 for t1 =I=- t2, and UtER Lt =
R
2
. It follows from the latter two statements that for any a E A, there is
exactly one line L
t
for which a E Lt. Let f : A ~ B be the function
which takes points in A to the line in B which contains them. Since A
is countable and B is uncountable, f cannot be smjective. It follows that
there exists an L
t
E B which does not contain a point of A.
Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.
51971-5
For each positive integer k,
Lk/2J
(2 + Y'2)k + (2 - Y'2)k = f; C:) 2
k
-i+\
which is an integer; but ° < (2 - J2)k < 1. Therefore, the fractional part
of of (2 + J2)k is 1 - (2 - V2)k, and its limit is 1.
(b) A similar calculation shows that the fractional part of
if k is odd,
if k is even.
72 Solutions
The first of these has limit 0 and the second the limit 1. Hence the fractional
part of of (1 + y'2)k has cluster points at 0 and 1.
Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems.
51971-6
For each group of five robbers, there must be at least one lock to which
none has the key, and for any two groups, these locks must be different
(else the addition to one group of a new robber from the other would
provide a majority no member of which contains a key for such a lock as
we have associated with the first group). Therefore there are at least as
many locks as there are groups of five robbers, namely C;) = 462.
Now consider anyone robber. For each group of five among the
remaining 10 robbers, he must have a key to each lock to which they
collectively do not. Since each group has at least one such lock, he must
have at least as many keys as there are such groups, namely C50) = 252.
In order to show that no more locks or keys are required, we now
demonstrate that 462 locks and 252 keys are sufficient. In accordance with
any one-to-one correspondence between a set of 462 different locks and the
collection of six-member subsets of the robber band, we give keys for any
one lock to each member of its associated subset and to no other robber.
Each minority, being a subset of the complement of such a six-member
subset, cannot open the lock associated with that subset. On the other
hand, consider any majority and any lock. Since only five robbers do not
have the key to that lock, at least one of the robbers in the given majority
does have the key.
Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.
51971-7
We define three new items from the given operations as follows:
0=Xn*X, forallX,and
A C B iff An B = A.
With these definitions and the axioms given we can show, after a consider-
able amount of simple but lengthy work, that we do indeed have a Boolean
Algebra.
Exam #7-1972 73
In fact, the converse is also true. If you start with the standard axioms
for a Boolean Algebra, you can derive (a), (b), and (c). Therefore, the
conditions of the problem give an alternate characterization of a Boolean
Algebra.
Look under Algebraic Structures in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #7-1972
51972-1
The following calculation shows that it is sufficient that A + B and A - B
be invertible. Supposing the existence of X and Y such that the desired
conditions hold, the equations
AX+BY=C,
BX+AY=D
yield (A + B)(X + Y) = C + D. Subtracting the second from the first
yields (A - B)(X - Y) = C - D. If A + B and A - B are invertible,
then
X - Y = (A - B)-I(C - D),
X + Y = (A+B)-\C+D),
and from these equations X and Y can be found. The only conditions are
that A, B, C, and D are the same size.
Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems.
51972-2
From the given equation
I = A - 2A -
22'
so A-I exists and is equal to - 2A -
51972-3
Let f(x) = lnx/x. Then f'(x) = (1 - Inx)/x
2
and f'(x) = 0 when
lnx = 1, or when x = e. Since f'(x) changes sign from + to - as x
passes through e, f has a relative maximum at x = e. Further, it is an
74 Solutions
absolute maximum since f(x) --t 0 as x --t 00, and f(x) --t -00 as
x --t O. Thus f(7r) < f(e), so In7r/7r < Ine/e whence 7r
e
< e
7r

Look under Matrix Algebra or Real-Valued Functions in the Index for
similar problems.
51972-4
There exists N such that for all n > N, sufficiently large, 0 < an < 1/2.
Thus for n > N, a
n
/(l - an) < 2a
n
. So
00 N 00
0 < " ~ < " ~ + 2 " an
L....-1-a
n
L....-1-a
n
L....-
n=1 n=1 n=N+I
and the series converges.
Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems.
51972-5
Let P denote the permutation made by the machine. We are given
p2 = (A, 10, J, 6, 3, Q, 2, 9, 5, K, 7,4, 8)
in cycle notation. Since p2 is a cyclic permutation, P is also. Therefore
pI3 is the identity permutation. Thus
p = (p2)7 = (A, 9, 10,5, J, K, 6, 7, 3,4, Q, 8,2).
Look under Permutations in the Index for similar problems.
51972-6
The curves are identical, since (r, B) and (-r, 37r - B) are different
coordinates for the same point. If r = cos( B /2), ilien
37r-B 3 .3. .
-r = cos -2- = cos 27rcos(B/2) + sm 27rsmB/2 = - smB/2.
51972-7
Suppose G = H U K with Hand K proper subgroups. Since H is proper,
there exists h E H such that h rt K. Similarly, there exists k E K such
that k rt H. Let 9 = hk. If 9 E H, then k = h-Ig E H, which is
impossible; if 9 E K, then h = gk-
I
E K, which is also impossible. Thus
G cannot be H U K.
Look under Group Theory in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #8-1973
Exam #8-1973
51973-1
Using L'Hopital's rule,
e
1
/
x
- 1
lim x(e
1
/
x
- 1) = lim
x--+oo x--+oo 1/ x
. e
1
/
X
( -1/x
2
)
= hm = lim e
1
/
x
= 1.
x--+oo -1/ x
2
x--+oo
Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems.
51973-2
75
Let a be the angle shown in in the figure below, with a variable and ()
fixed.
o
Let A be the area of rectangle ABCD. Since cot () = ~ ~ and BC =
OC sin a = sin a, We have
AB =OB-OA
= OC cos a - AD cot ()
= cos a - BC cot ()
= cos a - sin a cot () .
Thus the area, A, of the rectangle is given by
A=BC·AB
= sin a cos a - sin
2
a cot ()
= ~ sin 2a - sin
2
a cot (),
76
which we differentiate to obtain
dA = cos 200 - sin 200 cot O.
dr
Solutions
Setting this equal to 0, we find a = 0/2. Substituting into our area function,
we get
A= I-cosO.
2sinO
Look under MaxIMin Problems in the Index for similar problems.
S 1973-3
Observe that the maximum occurs when no ni = 1. Further, (m-2)·2 > m
if, and only if, m > 4. Thus, each ni > 4 can be replaced by (ni - 2) + 2 in
the partition and the associated product will be increased. If some ni = 4,
replace it by 2 + 2, leaving the product unchanged. If three 2's occur
replace them by 3 + 3, increasing the product. Thus the maximum occurs
when each ni is a 2 or a 3, with at most two 2's occurring. Indeed, the
maximum is:
n - 1 . 2i/2 where
33 )
S 1973-4
{
i = 4 if n = 1 (mod 3),
i = 2 if n = 2 (mod 3),
i = 0 if n = 0 (mod 3).
Integration by parts with u = 1/(1 + y) and dv = yn-
1
dy gives
1
1 nyn-1 yn 1 11 yn
--dy---I + dy
o 1 + y - 1 + y 0 0 (1 + y)2 .
Since
the integral on the right-hand side of the last equation approaches zero as
n approaches infinity. The desired limit is thus
lim (LI1) = 1/2.
n--+oo 1 + Y 0
Look under Integration or Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar
problems.
Exam #8-1973 77
51973-5
The quotient A: B is an ideal of R. If a E A : B, then Vb E B,
ab E A=} -(ab) E A =} (-a)b E A,
hence -a E A: B. Ifx,y E A: B, then
Vb E B, xb, yb E A =} xb + yb E A =} (x + y)b E A,
hence x + yEA: B. Finally, if a E A : B, r E R, then Vb E B,
ab E A =} r(ab) E A =} (ra)b E A so that ra E A : B (in particular,
° E A : B). It follows that A : B is an ideal.
51973-6
Let f(a) = a
n
+
1
- n(a 1) - a. Then
d
daf(a) = (n + l)a
n
- (n + 1).
Since f(l) = f'(1) = 0, f(a) is divisible by (a - 1)2.
Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems.
51973-7
We will prove the contrapositive: If A or B is singular, then the product
AB is singular. Let B be singular. Then for some x =1= 0, we have Bx = O.
It follows that
A(Bx) = (AB)x = 0
implying that AB is singular. Now let A be singular. Then for some x =1= 0,
Ax = O. If B is non-singular, there is a non-trivial solution to By = x.
Hence
Ax = A(By) = (AB)y = 0,
from which we see that AB is singular.
Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems.
51973-8
Let x = a - d, y = d, and z = a + d. Then
(a-d)2+d
2
= (a+d)2,
or
78 Solutions
or
a
2
= 4ad.
Thus a = 0 or a = 4d, and all solutions are (x, y, z) = (-d, 0, d) or
(3d, 4d, 5d), where d is any integer.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51973-9
There are ( ~ ) = 10 equiprobable ways to choose 3 men from the group.
Exactly 3 of those choices result in 2 Republicans being chosen (2
Republicans and the choice of lout of 3 Democrats). It follows that the
probability of both Republicans being selected is 3/10.
Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #9-1974
51974-1
(a) For a polynomial p(x), let [x
7n
Jp(x) denote the coefficient of x
7n
in
p(x). First, by the binomial theorem,
From this, we see that
It follows that
[X7nJ(XlOOO-k(X + l)k) = [x
7n
-(lOOO-k»J(x + l)k
= (m -( 1 ~ 0 0 - k)) = Coo: -m).
Now, the polynomial given in the problem is equal to
1000
L xlOOO-k(x + 1)k,
k=O
Exam #9-1974
so
Therefore the coefficient of x
50
is C ~ g l ) .
(b) From part (a), we see that the sum of all the coefficients is
1000 1000 ( )
fo[X
m
] = fo 1 ~ 1 = 2
1001
_l.
Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems.
51974-2
We have
yx = (yx)3 = (yx)(YX)2 = (yx?(yx)
= ((yx)2y)X = y(yx)2x = y(yx)(yx)x
= xy2yx
2
= xyx
2
= x
3
y = xy.
Look under Group Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51974-3
If m > 1, set
Then we have
(m
2
+ l)(ni + 1) = (m
2
+ 1) ((m - 1)2 + 1)
= (m
2
+ 1)(m
2
- 2m + 2)
= (m
4
- 2m
3
+ 3m
2
- 2m + 1) + 1
=(m
2
-m+1)2+1
= Nl + 1,
79
so
(m
2
+ 1 ) ( n ~ + 1) = (m
2
+ 1)((m + 1)2 + 1)
= (m
2
+ 1)(m
2
+ 2m + 2)
= (m
4
+ 2m
3
+ 3m
2
+ 2m + 1) + 1
=(m2+m+1)2+1
= N ~ + 1.
Solutions
If m = 1, then n1 = 2,N1 = 3,n2
solutions.
17 are the smallest
S 1974-4
The point (0,0) is neither a minimum nor a maximum. We have f(O, 0) = 0;
let x = 8 and y = ~ where 0 < E < 8/2. Then f(x,y) < O. But
f(x,O) > 0 for all x.
Look under Multivariate Calculus in the Index for similar problems.
S 1974-5
Assume that y is never zero on [0,3/4]. We note that ~ < -1, so
y(3/4) > 0 means that y(x) > ~ - x on [0,3/4]. Therefore
dy x x (3 )
- < -1- e y < -1- e - - x .
dx - - 4
We see that
y(3/4) = 1 + - dx < 1- 1 + eX - - x dx = 2 - e
3
/
4
.
1
3/4 dy 1
3
/
4
(3)
o dx 0 4
Since In(2) R::: .7, 2 - e
3
/
4
< O.
(Or, 2
4
/
3
= 16
1
/
3
< 17.576
1
/
3
= 2.6 < e.)
Thus, y(3/4) < 0, contradicting our assumption. Hence, y must have a
zero on [0,3/4].
Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems.
S 1974-6
This conjecture is clearly false. Let an = 1/(n + 1), then
Exam #10-1975
(the harmonic series) diverges while
Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #10-1975
51975-1
The result is obvious if a = 0, so consider a > O. Also let
a
f(x)= 2 2'
a +x
We see, using a lower Riemann Sum, that
00 a 1
00
a 7r
0<'" < dx=-
a
2
+ n
2
a
2
+ x
2
2
n=l 0
81
and the result follows. If a < 0, the infinite sum is an odd function of a,
so the result follows in this case also.
Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems.
51975-2
First we show, by way of contradiction, that no two of the vertices can
be joined by a diameter through the center of the circle. Let V be the
set of vertices, with [VI = n, odd. Suppose that Vo and are two
vertices joined by a chord through the center of the circle. This chord
partitions V - {vo, into two disjoints sets, V
l
and V
2
, of orders a and
b respectively. We have a + b = n - 2, and without loss of generality, a is
odd and b is even.
Label the vertices of V
l
as vi, vi, ... , VI as we move around the circle
from Vo to Label the vertices of 112 as ... , as we again move
around the circle the other way from Vo to
Now each of the at
l
triplets
(
1 2) (2 3 4) (a-l a ')
VO'Vl'V
l
' Vl,Vl,V
l
, ... , V
l
,Vl,VO,
has the same angle, say fJ. Also note that the angles
L(vo, 0, vi), L(vi, 0, vi), ... , 0,
82 Solutions
(where 0 is the center of the circle) are all equal to 2n - 2{3, and they
sum to n. Therefore a simple calculation gives us (a + 1) ( n - (3) = n.
Now consider the triplets
( V
I 2) (2 3 4) (b-2 b-I b)
vo, 2, v2 , V2' v
2
, v2 , ... , v2 , v
2
, v2 .
As before, each of these form an angle of measure (3 . The angles
...
each have measure 2(n - (3) and angle 0, vb) = a < 2(n - (3).
Therefore we have
(2)(n - (3) + a = n,
(a + l)(n - (3) = b(n - (3) + a,
and
a = (n - (3) (a - b + 1).
Now 0 < a < n - {3 implies that 0 < a - b + 1 < 2 and therefore, since
a and b are integers, a - b = 0, a contradiction.
Therefore, a chord starting a vertex Vo going through the center 0 of
the circle and ending at the point w on the circle divides the other vertices
into two sets of equal order. Thus
If nZ-1 is even, we can proceed as before to obtain
In-l In-l
---(2)(n - {3 + ad = ---(2)(n - (3 + (2)
2 2 2 2
n-l
as illustrated below. This implies that the triangles 0, Wi, v;:- and
n-l
0, Vi, v:;:' are congruent. Letting the radius of the circle be r, this gives
us the result that an arbitrary side of the polygon has length 2r sin a, where
n-l
a = n - --(n - (3).
2
Exam # 10-1975 83
n-I
---I
VI
2
w
If n;-l is odd, we let
n-l
=/'1,
n-l
0, W) = /'2,
n-l -1 n-l
L(V22 ,0,V
1
2
)=(/JI,
and can proceed as before to obtain
1 (n -1 ) 1 (n -1 )
2 -2-- 1 (2)(7f-,6+a1 )=2 -2-- 1 (2) (7f-,6+a2)
as illustrated below. This implies that the triangles O,W
'
,V;;-l_l and
n-l_l
0, Wi, v
2
2 are congruent. From this we can see that /'1 = /'2, so that
n-l n-l
triangles 0, Wi and 0, Wi are congruent. Again letting the
84 Solutions
radius of the circle be r, this gives us the result that an arbitrary side of
the polygon has length 2r sin ,,(, where "( = ¢ - c¥.
w
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51975-3
Let T m be the number of components yielded by m lines in the plane.
Clearly we have To = 1 (the whole plane). Also, if there are m - 1 such
lines forming T m-l components, then adding an mth line according to the
rules given will yield m more components. To see this, note that the new
line will intersect each of the existing lines at a unique point. If there are
m - 1 lines, then the new line will split m previous components yielding
m new components. It follows that T m = T m-l + m. We see that the T m
are just partial sums so that
m m m(m+l)
T m = To + I> = 1 + I> = 1 + 2 .
k=l k=l
Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #10-1975 85
51975-4
(a) Ifm is odd, then 3
m
== (-l)m == -1 (mod 4), so 3
m
-1 == 2 (mod 4)
and is not divisible by 2
m
for odd m larger than 1.
(b) We note that 3
1
- 1 = 2 is divisible by 2
1
,3
2
- 1 = 8 = 4·2 is
divisible by 2
2
, and 3
4
- 1 = 80 = 16 . 5 is divisible by 24.
By Euler's generalization of Fermat's little theorem 3<P(2"') == 1 (mod 2
m
),
where ¢(2=) is the Euler totient function. Thus, ¢(2m) = 2=-1. Therefore
the order of 3 modulo 2
m
, ord
2
", (3), is a power of 2. Hence, 2=13= - 1
only if m is a mUltiple of ord
2
", (3).
We now prove by induction that for m 2: 4, 3
2
"'-3 == 1 + 2=-1 (mod 2= ).
When m = 4, we have 3
21
= 9 == 1 + 2
3
(mod 2
4
). Assume that the
result is true for m = k, i.e., that 3
2k
-
3
== 1 + 2
k
-
1
(mod 2k).
Now consider the case m = k + 1. We recall that, by our induction
hypothesis,
Squaring, we see that
3
2k
-
2
== 1 + 2
2k
-
2
+ j
2
2
2k
+ 2· 2
k
-
1
+ 2j2
k
+ 2j2
2k
-
1
(mod 2k+l).
Since k 2: 4, this is 3
2k
-
2
== 1 + ·2
k
(mod 2
k
+
1
). Thus,
3
2
"'-3 == 1 + 2=-1 (mod 2=)
and the claim is proved.
Next, we will prove that when m 2: 3, ord
2
",(3) = 2
m
-
2
• Since the
order of 3 modulo 2
m
is a power of two, we need only check exponents
that are powers of 2. Since
3
2
"'-3 == 1 + 2
m
-
1
(mod 2=), ord(3) > 2=-3.
2'"
Squaring 3
2
"'-3, we see that
3
2
"'-2 == 1 + 2· 2
m
-
1
+ 2
2
=-2 (mod 2=).
As m > 2, we have 3
2
"'-2 == 1 (mod 2=). Hence ord2m(3) = 2m-2.
When m > 4, m < 2=-2. (This is also easy to see by induction. It's
clearthatm = 5 < 8 = 2
3
andm+1 < m+m = 2m < 2·2=-2 = 2
m
-
1
.)
Therefore, m ::; 4 and the only values for which 2
m
l(3= -1) are m = 1,
2, or 4.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
86
51975-5
By reversing the limits of integration, we have
r g(t)dt = r l
a
f(t) dtdx
J
o
J
o
x t
i
a
it f(t)
= -dxdt
~ O t
= r f(t) . tdt = r f(t) dt.
J
o
t J
o
Solutions
Look under Multivariate Calculus in the Index for similar problems.
Exam # I 1 -I 976
51976-1
By inspection, p( x) = x satisfies the conditions. Suppose that there
is another solution, and let its degree be n. From p(2) = 2 follows
p(22 - 1) = (p(2))2 - 1 or p(3) = 3. Similarly, p(8) = 8 and p(r) = r
implies p(r2 -1) = r2 -1. Thus n+ 1 numbers al, i = 1,2, ... n+ 1 can
be found such that p( ai) = ai. Thus the polynomial p( x) - x, of degree
n has n + 1 roots and this is impossible.
Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems.
51976-2
We are given that n == 11 (mod 12), whence n == 5 (mod 6). This
implies that the prime-power decomposition of n contains a prime p,
p == 5 (mod 6) raised to an odd power. (If not, it would follow that
n == 1 (mod 6).) So we can write n = peN, (p, N) = 1, e odd. Then
a(n) = a(pe)a(N), and
a(pe) = 1 + p + p2 + ... + pe-l + pe
== 1 -1 + 1-··· + 1 -1 == 0 (mod 6).
Hence 6Ia(n). If n == 11 (mod 12), then n == 3 (mod 4), and the
prime-power decomposition of n contains a prime q, q == 3 (mod 4),
raised to an odd power. A calculation similar to the above shows that
4Ia(n), which gives the result.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #11-1976 87
51976-3
The quantity whose absolute value is to be shown to be less than 1 is
f' (0). Since
If' (0) I = I lim f ( h) I = lim If ( h) I < lim I tan hi = 1
h--+O h h--+O Ihl - h--+O Ihl '
we are done.
Look under Differentiation or Real-Valued Functions in the Index for
similar problems.
51976-4
f"' > 0 for all x, so f" has at most one zero, f' has at most two, and f
at most three. Since f(O) = f(l) = 0, and f'(1)31n3 - 4 < 3.3 - 4 < 0,
and f (x) -7 00 as x -7 00, f has another zero to the right of 1. f has
exactly three zeros.
Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems.
51976-5
Suppose that the equation of the circle is
Then
x
2
+ y2 + rx + sy + t = O.
ral + sa2 + t = -ai - a3,
rh + sb
2
+ t = -bi - b ~ ,
rCI + SC2 + t = -ci - c ~ .
The determinant of the coefficients is (b
l
-al)(c2-b2)-(CI -bl)(b2-a2),
and since the points are not collinear
bl - al =I- CI - bl .
b
2
- a2 C2 - b
2
Thus the determinant is not zero, and the system has a unique solution.
Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
S 1976-6
Since for all i E R, x = 2y for some y, we have f(x) = f(2y) =
f(y)2 ~ O. Further,f(l) = f(O + 1) = f(O)f(l), and since f(l) =I- 0,
ss Solutions
f(O) = 1. Now let L = limx---+o f(x). Then
1 = f(O) = f(x - x) = f(x)f( -x) -t L2.
Since L cannot equal -1 since this would imply f (x) ::::; 0 for some x, we
have L = 1.
Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #12-1977
51977-1
f(a) = f(b) =} f(J(a)) = f(J(b)) =} a = b;
therefore f is injective on J. Since f is continuous, it assumes all
intermediate values. It follows that if f were not strictly monotone then it
could not be injective.
Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems.
51977-2
(a) Since, for n = 1, we have cos x = H cos x + cos( -x)), we proceed
by induction. We therefore assume that
cos
m
x = 2 ~ f (;) cos(m - 2k)x
k=O
and consider
= 2 ~ f (;) cos(m - 2k)x cos x
k=O
= 2 ~ + l f [ (;) cos (( m + 1) - 2k) x + cos (( m - 1) - 2k) x]
k=O
since
b
cos(a + b) + cos(a - b)
cos a cos = 2 .
The result now follows after some tedious, but routine manipulation of the
summation, including shifting an index of summation and adding binomial
coefficients.
Exam #12-1977 89
(b) We have
1 r 1 1 2n (2 ) r
-;10 cos2nxdx=-;22nL : 10 cos((2n-2k)x)dx
k=O
= !_1 ( ~ (2n) sin(2n- 2k)x[1f + (2n)7r)
7r 22n 6 k 2n - 2k ° n
k=O,k#n
1 1 ((2n)!) (2n)!
= -; 22n (n!)2 7r = 22n(n!)2'
Look under Integration or Trigonometry in the Index for similar prob-
lems.
51977-3
MUltiply the matrix A by the vector 1 = (1,1, ... ,1) to obtain Al = 1.
Thus (A - I)x = 0 has a nonzero solution and A - I is therefore not
invertible.
Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems.
51977-4
Suppose that f(O) = t. Then
If(t) - tl = If(t) - f(O)1 = It I
and
If( -t) - tl = If( -t) - f(O)1 = Itl·
Also, If(t) - f( -t)1 = 2It1 so that one of f(t) = 0 or f( -t) = 0 must
hold. It follows that f (x) = 0 for some x in R. Now for any y in R,
If(y)1 = If(y) - f(x)1 = Iy - xl
so that any isometry must be of the form f (y) = ± (y - x) for some x in
R. It is also easy to see that anything of that form must be an isometry.
(These are translations followed by reflections.)
Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems.
90 Solutions
51977-5
Assume that there are only N primes. Then for each k, the kth partial sum
of the harmonic series can be written
k 1 1 1 1
L; = pa1pa2 •. • paN + bl b
2
bN + ... + p-C-=-1-p-=-C2-.-.-.-
p
-=-CN-
n=1 I 2 N PI P2 ... PN I 2 N
since each integer n can be written as a product of our N primes. From
the hint, we therefore have
N 1
<II-
- I-p··
i=1 2
This implies that the harmonic sequence is increasing and bounded above,
and therefore converging; a contradiction. (The hint is verified by picking
r 2: max{ai,b
i
, ... ,ei}, a finite set.)
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #13-1978
51978-1
To find the decimal expansion of an integer M, one divides by 10
successively, recording the remainders:
M = lOM
I
+d
o
,
MI = 10M2 + dl ,
where the d
i
are 0, 1, ... ,8, or 9 to obtain the expansion
Exam #13-1978 91
To write M in the base -2, one proceeds by an analogous algorithm,
bearing in mind that the remainders must be 0 or + 1. So
-2374(10) = 101111001110(_2)·
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51978-2
To solve this problem, one must get at the area of a non-right-angled
triangle. One technique is to use the cross product. Recall that Ilv x wll
gives the area of the parallelogram with sides v and w. To set this up, we
may assume that A is the origin in 3-space, and that B, C, and D lie on
the axes, say at (x, 0, 0), (0, y, 0), and (0,0, z), respectively. Then
xy xz yz
area(ABC) = 2' area(ABD) = 2' area(ACD) = 2'
and the area of (BCD) is
1 1
:2IICD x CBII = :2
V
(x
y
)2 + (xz)2 + (yz)2.
Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51978-3
We recall that when k is odd, a
k
+ b
k
factors as
a
k
+ b
k
= (a + b)(a
k
-
1
_ a
k
-
2
b + a
k
-
3
b
2
+ ... + b
k
-
1
).
Now S(n) = 'L.?=l jk, and also S(n) = 'L.?=l (n+ 1- j)k. Adding these
two expressions, we get
n
2S(n) = 2)(n + 1- j)k + II
j=l
Look under Finite Sums in the Index for similar problems.
92 Solutions
51978-4
A first step in discovering the solution of this problem might be to graph
the function for small values of n, as illustrated. The x for which f (x)
is smallest is the median of aI, a2,' .. , an. That is, if n is odd, f(x) is
smallest at the middle a and if n is even, f (x) is smallest in the interval
between the middle a's.
n = 1 n=2
n=3 n=4
In view of this, the proof will be easier to write down if we re-index
the given numbers so that a1 ::; a2 ::; ... ::; an. We divide the proof into
two cases.
If n = 2m + 1, then
2m+1
f(am+d = L lam+! - akl
K=l
m 2rn+1
= L(arn+1 - ak) + L (ak - am+!)
k=l k=rn+2
m 2rn+1
= marn+1 - L ak + L ak mam+1
k=l k=rn+2
2rn+1 rn
L ak- Lak.
k=rn+2 k=l
Exam #13-1978
Now suppose that az :::; x :::; aZ+1 where I :::; m. Then
2m+l Z 2m+l
f(x) = L IX-akl=Lx-ak= L ak-
x
k=l k=l k=l+l
2m+l Z
= L ak - L ak - (2m - 21 + l)x.
k=l+l k=l
So that
[
2m+l t 1
f(x) - f(am+d = k ~ l ak - ~ ak - (2m - 21 + l)x
m
= 2 L (ak - x) + (am +1 - x) 2: O.
k=l+l
93
In an analogous way, we see f(x) 2: f(am+d if x:::; 0, x 2: an, or if
az :::; x :::; at+1 and I 2: m + 1.
If n = 2m, and am:::; x :::; a
m
+1, then
2m m 2m 2m m
f(x)=Llx-akl=Lx-ak+ L ak-X= L ak-Lak'
k=l k=l k=m+l k=m+l k-l
Now if az :::; x :::; aZ+l, where I 2: m + 1, then
2m Z
f(x) = L ak-Lak+(21-2n)x
k=Z+l k=l
and
Analogously, we can show
2m m
f(x) 2: L ak - Lakl
k=m+l k=l
if x :::; ao, x 2: an, or if az :::; x :::; aZ+l for I :::; m - 1.
Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems.
94 Solutions
51978-5
We distinguish three cases. If A, B, C, and D lie on a line, this is problem
1978-4 restated; any point on the middle segment solves the problem.
If A, B, C, and D are the vertices of a convex quadrilateral, suppose
AC and BD are the diagonals and that they intersect at O. Let 0' be any
other point on the plane. Since AOC is a straight line and 0 is between
A and C,
IAOI + 1001 = IACI ~ IAO'I + 10'CI·
Similarly,
IBOI + 10DI = IBDI ~ IBO'I + 10' DI·
Thus,
IAOI + lOCI + IBOI + 10DI ~ IAO'I + 10'01 + IBO'I + 10'DI·
If A, B, C, and D are not the vertices of a convex quadrilateral, then
one of the points, say D, is contained in the triangle whose vertices are
the other three points, and 0 = D. Let 0' be any point in the plane other
than D. For one pair of the points A, B, and C, the triangle formed by
this pair and 0' contains the triangle formed by this pair and D, so let's
say AO'C contains ADC, so that
IAO'I + 10'01 2 IADI + IDCI·
By the triangle inequality, we have
10' BI + 10' DI 2IBDI,
so we then have
IAO'I + 10'CI + IBO'I + 10' DI 2 IADI + IBDI + ICDI·
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51978-6
The first step in this solution is to realize that no experiment that always
finishes after N tosses of the coin can have probability of success 1/3.
(That is, there are 2N possible outcomes of flipping a coin N times, and
k/2
N
i= 1/3 for any integer k. Thus the solution should be an experiment
which a patient experimenter would expect to finish in a finite amount of
time with probability 1/3. One such experiment is:
Exam #14-1979 95
Toss a coin until (a) the coin has been tossed an even number of times
and (b) at least one head has been tossed. The experiment is a success
if two heads have been tossed.
Thus the experiment consists of two tosses, or four tosses, or six tosses,
or .... The experiment is over after two tosses unless both are tails;
after four tosses unless all four are tails; and so forth. The experiment
will terminate unless the experimenter tosses tails forever, an event whose
probability is zero.
The probability that the event is a success is given by
Pr ( success)
00
= L Pr(success given that the experiment requires exactly 2n tosses)
n=l
x Pr( experiment requires exactly 2n tosses)
00 1 3 1
= "'"""' - . - = -.
63 4
n
3
n=l
Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #14-1979
51979-1
Let Mo (resp., Bo) be the age of the monkey's mother (resp., the monkey)
at the present time; let Ml (resp., Bd be the age of the monkey's mother
(resp., the monkey) at the time t
1
; let M2 (resp., B
2
) be the age of the
monkey's mother (resp., the monkey) at the time t2; and let M3 (resp.,
B3) be the age of the monkey's mother (resp., the monkey) at the time t3.
Let W w be the weight of the weight in ounces, W m be the weight of the
monkey in ounces, L be the length of the rope, Lm be the length of the
rope on the side of the monkey, and Lw be the length of the rope on the
side of the weight. Then we have
(1) Mi - Bi = k, a fixed difference in ages,
(2) Mo + Bo = 4,
(3) Mo = 2Bl,
(4) Ml = ~ B l '
96
(5) B2 = 3M
3
,
(6) M3 = 3B3·
Solutions
Since B3 = M3 - k, equation (6) gives M3 = (3/2)k. So by (5)
B2 = (9/2)k and by (4) Ml = (9/4)k. Therefore
Bl = Ml - k = (9/4)k - k = (5/4)k
and by (3) Mo = (5/2)k. But by (1) and (2), Mo + Mo - k = 4, so k = 1
and Mo = 5/2.
Thus Wm = (5/2) . 16 = 40 OZ, WW = (3/2) ·40 = 60 OZ, and
L = 6
4
0 = 15 ft. Finally, p = 3/4 of the rope is on the side of the monkey
when the system is at rest since we have
60 + 40(1 - p) = 40 + 40p.
51979-2
If sin x = sin y, then
O· . 2 x+y. x-y
= SIn x - SIn y = COS -2- sm -2-·
Therefore
x+y 7r x-y
-- = - + n7r or -- = m7r
2 2 2'
where m and n are integers. The graph thus consists of the two families of
lines y = x + 7r + 2n7r and y = -x + 2m7r, where m and n are integers.
Look under Trigonometry in the Index for similar problems.
51979-3
Let V(t) be the volume of snow removed at time t, d(t) be the depth
of the snow, a = ~ ~ be the rate at which snow is removed, b = ~ ~ be
the rate at which snow falls, and S(t) be the location of the plow. Then
dV = kd(t)ds, so ~ ~ = kd(t). Since
dV dV ds ds a
dt ds dt' dt kd(t)"
Noting that d(t) = bt + c, if to is the time at which it starts snowing,
then to = -c/b. Suppose t = 0 at noon. We have
r
1
ds r
1
abdt * 1
1 = S(I) - S(O) = Jo dt = Jo kbd(t) = k In (d(t)lo
= k* (In(c + b) -In(c)) = k* In (1 + n = k* In ( 1 -t ~ ) .
Exam #14-1979 97
(Letting k* = a/k.) Similarly,
3/2 = 8(2) - 8(0) = k* In (1 - .
Therefore multiplying corresponding sides of these two equations gives
us
3k* In(1 - = 2k* (In 1 - .
to to
Solving for to, we get to = Since it started snowing before noon,
to must be negative and therefore we choose to = -0.618 hours. We
convert this to minutes by multiplying by 60, to get 37 minutes before
noon. Therefore it started snowing at 11 :23 a.m.
Look under Differential Equations in the Index for similar problems.
51979-4
Let r be the radius of the original sphere. Drill the hole along the x-axis,
as illustrated in the figure below. Then
V = Jr 27rY' (2V
r2
- y2) dy
v'r2-9
_ _ (r2 _ y2)3/2Ir
- 27r (3/2) v?-=9
= 47r . 93/2 = 367r.
3
y
x
Look under Volumes in the Index for similar problems.
98
51979-5
The next several positive integers are:
5 = 1 . 9 - 7 + v'9,
6 = 1 + 9 - 7 + v'9,
7 = 1 . )9 + 7 + v'9,
8 = 1- 9 + 7 + 9,
9 = (_1)9 + 7 + v'9,
10 = 1 + 9 + l7 /9 J.
This list can be extended to at least 38.
51979-6
The set of points consists of
Solutions
(-6,-1), (-5,-3), (-4,-5), (-4,-4), (-4,1), (-3,-7),
(-3, -6), (-3,1), (-3,2), (-3,3), (-3,4), (-3,5), (-2, -9),
(-2, -8), (-1, -16), (-1, -10), (-1, -2), (0, -13), (0, -2),
(1, -15), (1, -2), (2, -17), (2, -2), (3, -19), (3, -2).
Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
Exam # 1 5-19 SO
51980-1
We have
hence
albl > albl - aN+lbN+l
N
= 2 ~ ) a n b n - an+lbn+d
n=l
n=l
Look under Inequalities in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #15-1980 99
51980-2
The problem is to find the weights W1 < W2 < W3 < W4 such that every
positive integer I ::::; 40 can be written in the form I = 2::;=1 XiWi, where
the Xi is either -1, 0, or 1. (A given weight can be placed on the load
pan, not used, or on the weight pan to achieve a balance.)
It seems reasonable to choose W1 = 1 and W1 + W2 + W3 + W4 = 40.
To measure a 2 pound load, we need W2 = 3 (I + W1 = W2). Then we can
measure the loads I = 1,2,3,4. As 5 + 3 + 1 = 9, we can also measure
1=5 if we take W3 = 9. Then W4 = 40 - 2::{ Wi = 27.
Now note that if
4
o = L ZiWi = Z1 + Z2
W
2 + Z3
W
3 + Z4W4,
1
with each IZi I ::::; 2, then 3 divides Z1 and hence Z1 = O. So 0
3(Z2 + 3z
3
+ 3
2
z
4
) and this gives Z2 = O. Similarly, Z3 = Z4 = O.
Therefore, the set
s = { ~ X ' W ' : -1 < X· < 1} ~ 'l, 1, _ 1,_
i=1
has exactly 3
4
= 81 members.
As I E S implies -I E S, it follows that there are exactly 40 positive
integers in S and each of these is at most 2::i Wi = 40. So S coincides
with the set of integers 1,2, ... ,40.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51980-3
Choose Xo in [a, bj such that f(xo) is the maximum value of f on [a, bj.
Then f'(xo) = 0 and we must also have f"(xo) ::::; O. Therefore
0= f(a) ::::; f(xo) = !" ::::; 0,
so f (xo) = O. That is f (x) ::::; 0 for all X in [a, bj. A similar argument
shows that f (x) ~ 0 on [a, bj and hence f vanishes identically on [a, bj.
Notice iliat this argument assumes that Xo is in the interior of [a, bj, but
the same conclusions can be drawn if Xo = a or b.
Look under Differential Equations in the Index for similar problems.
100 Solutions
S 1980-4
For
and yt = (Yl Y2 . .. Yn ) ,
the matrix
c
y
,
XIY2
x,Yn)
X2Yl X2Y2 X2Yn
A = xyt = :
. .
XnYl X n Y2 XnYn
(We can assume Y i= 0, as the result is trivially true otherwise.) A short
computation shows that if
then the vector Az = (y, z)x where (-,.) denotes the usual inner product
in Rn. If z(l),ze
2
), ... ,ze
n
) is an orthonormal basis with ze
i
) = y/llyll,
then, with respect to this basis, the matrix I + A has the form
I+A=
(
(Z(1),y)(x,ze
1
») +1 0
(z(1),y)(x,Z(2») 1
o
(ze1),y)(x,z(n») 0
o
o
.:. 0)
: 0
o
1
so the determinant of I + A is the product of the diagonal entries, that is
det(I + A) = (ze
1
),y)(x,z(1») + 1
= (y/llyll,y)(x,y/llyll) + 1 = (x,y) + 1.
Another proof can be given based on the fact that the determinant is
unchanged on adding a multiple of one column to another. With this, one
reduces A to a lower triangular matrix and then det(I + A) is easy to
compute.
Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #15-1980 101
51980-5
::; 2(x-y)2 =} log2 f(x) -Iog
z
f(y) ::; (x _ y)2.
If we fix x = xo, divide by y - xo, with y > xo, and then let y tend to
xo, we get
f'(xo) d
-f( ) = -d log2 f(x)1 _ ::; 0.
Xo x X-Xo
A similar argument with y ::; Xo gives f' (xo) If (xo) 2: 0. Hence l' (xo) =
° for all xo, so that f must be a constant function. Conversely, any constant
function satisfies the condition.
Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems.
51980-6
(a) The improper integral has two apparent singularities, at x = ° and
x = 00. But as the function
{
sinx
f(x) = ('
xolO
x=o
is continuous on [0,00], the integral 10
1
dx makes sense. So we need
only check that
j
oo sinx d _ I' jb sinx d
-- x- 1m -- x
1 X b-+oo 1 X
exists and is finite.
Now
j
b sin x dx = _ cos x I b _jb x dx
1 X XII x
cosb jb cosx
= cos 1 - -- - -- dx
b 1 x
2
and Icotbl ::; lib 0. If g(x) = cosxlx
2
, then
lb Ig(x)1 dx 50 lb :2 dx = 1-
so that limb-+oo I: Igl exists and is finite. This implies that 1imb-+00 lIb g( x) dx
exists and is finite by an argument similar to the one used to show that an
absolutely convergent series is convergent.
Put g+ = + g), g- = g). Then g+ 2: 0, g- 2: 0, so that
I: g+ and I: g- are increasing functions of b that are each bounded above
102 Solutions
by It Igl, hence limb-+oo I: g+, limb-+oo I: g- both exist and are finite
so that
has a finite limit as b -7 00. It now follows that 10
00
S i ~ x dx is convergent.
(b) Fix a 2 O. Then
1
00 sin ax d l' lb sin ax d l' lQb sin Y d 1
00
sin x d
-- x = 1m -- x = 1m -- y = -- x.
o X b-+oo 0 X b-+oo 0 Y 0 x
Similarly, if a :::; 0,
1
00 sin ax dx = -1
00
sin x dx.
o x 0 x
Therefore, (10
00
SinxQx dx) 2 = (10
00
S i ~ x dx) 2 is constant for a i=- O.
Hence its derivative with respect to a is 0 for any a i=- O. The derivative
fails to exist at a = 0 because of the discontinuity at that point.
Look under Integration in the Index for similar problems.
51980-7
We have
= 1 + ( ~ - ~ ) + ~ + ( ~ - ~ ) + ... + ( ~ - 2)
2 2 3 4 4 2n 2n
2n 1 n 2 n 1 n 1 n 1
= L k - L 2k = L k + L n + k - L k
k=l k=l k=l k=l k=l
n 1
= L
n
+
k
'
k=l
Look under Finite Sums in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #16-1981
Exam #16-1981
5198 I-I
If
then
3 a1 a2

7
=ao +7"+7
2
+ ...
103
so that ao must be the greatest integer in 28
1
, that is, ao = 2. Consequently,
21 16 a1 a2
-=-+-+-+ ...
8 8 7 7
2
5 a1 a2
or - = - + - + ....
8 7 7
2
Since 7 . ~ = a1 + a! + ... , a1 must be the greatest integer in 3;, so
a1 = 4. Continuing in this manner, we find a2 = 2, a3 = 4, a4 = 2.
Apparently, (iho = (.24)r.
For an alternate solution, we have
310
810
from which we can obtain the result by long division in base 7.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51981-2
Letting A denote the number of acres, Go denote the initial amount of
grass per acre, S the number of steers, t the number of weeks until the
grass is depleted, v the growth rate of the grass per acre per week, and r
the rate of consumption of the grass per week, we have the relationship
GoA + Avt = Srt.
The information given yields the following equations:
(1) Go· 10 + 10· v . 16 = 12· r . 16,
(2) Go . 10 + 10 . v . 8 = 18 . r . 8,
(3) Go· 40 + 40 . v . 6 = S . r . 6.
Subtracting equation (2) from (1) gives 40v = 24r, and subtracting
equation (3) from four times equation (1) gives 200v = 384r - 3Sr. Solve
for v, substitute, and cancel the r, to find S = 88 steers.
Look under Systems of Equations in the Index for similar problems.
104 Solutions
51981-3
Draw a plane passing through the center C of the given sphere, the comer
0, and the point P of tangency of the given sphere with one side of the
comer. On this plane, we have the trace of the given sphere and the trace
of the sphere whose radius we seek, as illustrated below. Since the radius
of the given sphere is 1, we know that CO = v'3. If C' is the center of
the sphere of radius r that we seek, then C'O = rv'3. Thus
CO = CQ + QC' + C'O,
V3 = 1 + r + rV3,
V3 - 1 = r(1 + V3),
v'3 -1
r = -v'3=-3 -+-1 .

Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51981-4
The probability of winning the world series in exactly n games is
1) . 2 __ 1 (n -1)
2 2
n
-
1
- 2
n
-
1
3 '
since 1/2 is the probability of winning the nth game, is the
probability of winning exactly 3 of the previous n - 1 games, and we
have 2 teams to choose from. We have Pr(n = 4) = Pr(n = 5) = i,
Pr( n = 6) = 1
5
6' Pr( n = 7) = 1
5
6' which sum to one.
Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #16-1981 105
51981·5
Let y be the position at time t, measured from the horizontal. Then
y = 50 - 16t
2
, 1;jf = -32t, 0 = tan -1 160' and by the chain rule,
dO dO dy
=
dt dy dt
100
y2 + 100 (-32t).
Therefore
100 -100(2y) dy
y2 + 1002 (-32) - 32t (y2 + 1002)2 dt = O.
Substituting for 1;jf, and then y, after some simplification we arrive at
3125 + 400t
2
- 192t
4
= O. By the quadratic formula, y2 = 125/24, and
so y = -100/3 feet below the observer's eye level.
Look under MaxIMin Problems in the Index for similar problems.
51981-6
Suppose the path of the destroyer is given by
x = r cos 0,
y = rsinO,
where r = reO) is some function of O. If s denotes arclength along the
destroyer's path as illustrated below, then
Since dx = -r sin 0 dO + cos 0 dr, and dy = r cos 0 dO + sin 0 dr,
Since the submarine is moving at a constant rate c, the distance r that it
travels in a straight line is given by r = ct. Equating the distance s + 2
that the destroyer has gone at the time t of interception with the distance
2ct that the submarine has gone, we find s + 2 = 2ct. Thus s + 2 = 2r,
so ds = 2dr. Consequently,
and thus 3(dr)2 = r2(dO)2. Taking square roots, separating the variables,
and integrating gives r = K exp(O/V3) for some constant K. Since r = 1
when 0 = 0, K = 1. .
106 Solutions
Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #17-1982
51982-1
Let Xl, X2, X3 be the roots of x3 + ax2 + bx + c. It is known that the
coefficients of a polynomial are symmetric functions in the roots. Let
Then we have
Let a', b', c' be the corresponding coefficients of the cubic whose roots
are reciprocals of the original cubic. Then
, 111 1
c =----=-,
Xl X2 X3 C
Exam #17-1982 107
b' = _1_ + _1_ + _1_ = Xl + X2 + X3
a
,
XlX2 XlX3 X2X3 XlX2X3
C
and
a' = _ + + = _ XlX2 + XlX3 + X2
X
3 =
Xl X2 X3 XlX2X3 c
Therefore the desired cubic is
3 b 2 a 1
X + -x + -x +-.
c c c
Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems.
51982-2
A separated subset of order k from a set of order n can be represented by a
sequence of k dashes and n - k slashes where no two dashes are adjacent.
For example, the separated subset {2, 5, 7} with n = 8 can be represented
as /-//-/-/. Given a set ofn-k slashes, and conditions of this problem, there
are n - k + 1 places to possibly place the k dashes (this includes before
the first slash and after the last slash). Thus there are different
separated subsets.
Look under EnUllleration in the Index for similar problems.
51982-3
Let the two points that are furthest apart be denoted A and B. Join them by
a line, wlog horizontal. Now draw the smallest rectangle containing all of
the points with top and bottom sides parallel to the line AB, vertical sides
through A and B. There will be points C and D on the top and bottom,
respectively, of the rectangle. We consider the quadrilateral formed by
ACBD. The area of triangle ACB is :::; 1 and the area of triangle
ABD is AB :::; 1, where hand h' are the altitudes of the triangles.
Thus the area of the rectangle is
(h + h')AB = hAB + h' AB :::; 2 + 2 = 4.
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51982-4
f (x) is differentiable at x = 0 if
( ) -1/h
2
lim f(h) - f 0 = lim _e _
h h
lOS Solutions
exists. Set y = Ilh
2
, then
_1/h
2
lim _e __ = lim yl/2e-Y = o.
h--+O h y--+oo
Look under Differentiation in the Index for similar problems.
51982-5
If a :::; 1, then f is uniformly continous on its domain.
Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems.
51982-6
If a
3
ends in the digits 11, then a
3
== 11 (mod 100). This is equivalent
to the two conditions a
3
== 11 == 3 (mod 4) and a
3
== 11 (mod 25). By
an easy calculation, 3 is the only residue satisfying a
3
== 11 modulo 4.
Now, a
3
== 11 (mod 25) =} a
3
== 1 (mod 5). By another easy calculation,
a = 1 is the only residue modulo 5 which satisfies this equation. That
means we need only check the cubes of 1, 6, 11, 16, and 21 modulo 25.
1
3
= 1,6
3
= 36 . 6 = 11 . 6 = 16, 16
3
= 256· 16 = 6· 16 = 96 = 21,
21
3
= (-4)3 = -64 = -14 = 11. So a = 21 is the only solution
modulo 25. By the Chinese remainder theorem, there is only one number
satisfying a == 3 (mod 4) and a == 21 (mod 25) (that number is 71). It
follows that the probability that a random cube ends with the digits 11 is
1/100.
Look under Number Theory or Probability in the Index for similar
problems.
51982-7
Using the disk method for finding volumes of revolution, we obtain the
integral
f
a ( 2) 2 47fa
3
7f ( va
2
- y2 + b) - b
2
dy = 7f2 • a . b + --.
-a 3
Look under Volumes in the Index for similar problems.
Exam # 18-1983 109
Exam #18-1983
51983-1
lim \YrJ> lim = lim v:;;ri = 00

Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems.
51983-2
There are 2
10
possible outcomes when one flips a com 10 times. Let
Ti be the result of the ith flip. We want to compute the number of
possible outcomes which have Tg = TlO = H and no adjacent H's in
T
1
, T
2
, ..• , T
s
, Tg• Certainly then, Ts = T and we wish to know how
many sequences of length 7 have no adjacent H's. Let Sn be the number
of sequences of length n without 2 consecutive occurrences of H. Each
such sequence must either start with HT followed by a sequence of length
n - 2 with no consecutive H's or start with T followed by a sequence
of length n - 1 with no consecutive H's. Therefore Sn = Sn-l + Sn-2.
Also, SI = 2, S2 = 3. We see then that Sn = Fn+2 where Fi denotes
the ith Fibonacci number. Hence S7 = Fg = 34. It follows that there
are 34 possible outcomes which satisfy our condition. The probability that
such an outcome occurs is then 34/1024. (We have solved a more general
version of the problem: if 10 is replaced by an arbitrary n E N, then the
probability that we stop after the nth flip is Fn_I/2n.)
Look under Fibonnacci Sequences or Probability in the Index for similar
problems.
51983-3
From the illustration below, we want to maximize
f(x) = (a - x)x + 7fr2.
Since we have the relationship
- x)(a - x) = - x) + - x) + - x)
2 2 22'
we see that
(a-x)(a-x)
r=
(a - x) + (a - x) + J2(a - x)
a-x
2+J2·
110
Thus we want to maximize
7f(a-x)2
f(x) = (a - x)x + (2 + V2)2'
where 0:::; x:::; 1. Letting A = 7f/(2 + V2)2, we can write
f(x) = x
2
(A - 1) + x(a - 2aA) + Aa
2
.
Differentiating gives us
f'(x) = 2x(A - 1) + a(1- 2A),
Solutions
which has a critical point at x = a(1 - 2A)/2(1 - A). Further this is a
maximum since A :::; 1 gives us f"(x) = 2(A - 1) :::; O. The dimensions
of the rectangle and circle easily follow.
a
a
Look under Geometry or MaxIMin Problems in the Index for similar
problems.
51983-4
Solution 1. Suppose that t E R is not a finite sum of elements from
S = {1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4,·· .}. Define f(x) = m a x { ~ E S : ~ :::; x}. Since
zero is a limit point of S, f is well defined for x > O. Finally, define
to = f(t), ti+l = ti + f(t - ti). Since t is not a finite sum of elements
from S, we must have t - ti =1= 0 for all i. Now, since f only attains
positive values, the sequence {ti} is monotone increasing. Furthermore,
since f(t - ti) < t - ti, we have ti < t for all i so that {til is bounded
above. Every bounded monotone sequence converges, so ti ---+ s for some
Exam # 1 8-1983 III
s E R. If s < t, then let = f(t - s). ti --t S, so there exists II t, Itlr
which s - ti < 1... It follows immediately that ti+l > ti + > II
m - lit C
contradiction. Therefore t = s.
Solution 2. Case 1: assume that our positive number, p, satisfies
o < p < 1. Then p has a binary representation of the form
1 1 1
P = O.hb2 b3 ... = b1 "2 + h4" + b
38
+ ...
with each b
k
either zero or one. This gives a representation of p as a sum
(possibly infinite) of a subset of the numbers {1/2, 1/4, 1/8, ... }. Case
2: assume that our positive number M satisfies M 2:: 1. Since the series
+ i + + ... diverges, there is a finite sum S = such that
M = S + q with 0 < q < 1. Applying case 1 to this q gives the result.
Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems.
S 1983-5
This is a repeat of problem # 3 on Exam # 7 (1972).
51983-6:
Assume that there is a solution with z < n. Without loss of generality we
have x :s; y, and therefore x :s; y < z < n. From
= (z - y)[zn-l + yzn-2 + ... + yn-l]
> (1)[x
n
-
1
+ x
n
-
1
+ ... + xn-l]
= nx
n
-
1
.
But now xn > nx
n
-
1
implies x > n, a contradiction.
Look under Diophantine Equations in the Index for similar problems.
S1983-7
N is a perfect square.
N = (n - l)n(n + l)(n + 2) + 1 = n
4
+ 2n
3
- n
2
- 2n + 1
=(n2+n-1)2.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
112 Solutions
51983-8
First, note that Pk(Xk) = 1 (this is obvious from the definition) and
Pk(Xj) = 0 for j i= k (because of the x - Xj term in the numerator).
Let
n
P(X) = LPk(X) - 1,
k=l
then P( x) is a polynomial of degree at most n - 1 because each Pk (x) is
a polynomial of degree n - 1. But notice that for each Xj,
Since the Xj are distinct, it follows that P(x) has n distinct zeros. Any
polynomial of degree at most n - 1 with n zeros must be identically zero,
therefore P(x) = 0 which implies = 1.
Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems.
51983-9
g(X) = g(y) =} gm(x) = gm(y) =} X = y, therefore 9 is injective. Any
injective real-valued continuous function must be strictly monotone on its
domain. Suppose that 9 is increasing on [0,1], then for x E [0,1],
X> g(x) -1 g(x) > g2(X) =} ... =} gm-l(x) > gm(x),
hence x > gm (x) = x which is obviously false. Also,
x < g(x) =} g(x) < g2(X) =} ... -1 gm-l(x) < gm(x),
so that x < gm(x) = X. SO we must have g(x) = x. Now if 9 is decreasing
on [0,1]' then for x, y E [0,1], x < y =} g(x) > g(y) =} g2(X) < g2(y)
so that g2 is increasing on [0,1]. Using the above argument we see that
g2(x) = x must hold.
Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #19-1984
51984-1
By the binomial theorem 1,005,010,010,005,001 is equal to (1001)5
7
5
(11
5
) 13
5
.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #19-1984 113
51984-2
Every path from A to B goes along 9 edges, 5 slanting right, 4 slanting
left and any such path joins A to B. Thus there are (;) = 126 paths.
Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.
51984-3
Door D is changed by the nth person if and only if n divides D. Doors
that have an even number of divisors are closed, those with an odd number
are open. If n divides D, then so does D / n, thus D has an even number of
divisors unless D is a perfect square. Thus, doors 1,4,9,16, ... are open,
the rest are closed.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51984-4
This problem concerns the numerical semigroup
S = {ap + bql a, b are nonnegative integers}
generated by p = 7 and q = 12 and asks "What is the largest integer
not in S?" (In the general solution here, all variables will be integers and
p and q will denote relatively prime positive integers.) In this question
the emphasis is on the nonnegativity because, since p and q are relatively
prime, every integer can be expressed in the form ap + bq for some integers
a and b.
Two fairly easy observations, which we offer without proof, enable one
to do the stated problem with a little trial and error.
Lemma 1. If n is a positive integer such that for each k = 0,1,2, ... ,
p - 1 there are nonnegative ak and b
k
with n + k = akP + bkq, then every
integer greater than n is in the semigroup S.
Lemma 2. Let m = ap + bq where a and b are integers. Then
m = a' p + b' q if and only if there is an integer k so that a' = a + kq and
b' = b- kp.
Corollary. If m is an integer; then there are unique integers a and b
with ° :s; a :s; q - 1 so that m = ap + bq.
Now since 65 = (11)7 + (-1)12 and 65 = 7a + 12b with a and b
nonnegative implies a :s; 9, the uniqueness in the corollary shows that it
is not possible to give exact change of 65 quanta. Moreover,since 66 =
6(7) + 2(12), 67 = 1(7) + 5(12), 68 = 8(7) + 1(12), 69 = 3(7) + 4(12),
114 Solutions
70 = 10(7) + 0(12), 71 = 5(7) + 3(12), and 72 = 0(7) + 6(12), Lenuna
1 shows 65 is the largest such price. This is actually a special case of an
old (1884) theorem by Sylvester.
Theorem. If p and q are relatively prime positive integers, then
(p - 1) (q - 1) - 1 cannot be written in the form ap + bq for nonnegative
integers a and b, but every larger integer can be. (Proof omitted.)
The following theorem, also by Sylvester in 1884, shows that there are
33 prices for which Subsylvanians cannot give exact change.
Theorem. If p and q are relatively prime positive integers and S is the
numerical semigroup generated by p and q, then there are (p -1) (q -1) /2
positive integers not in S. (Proof omitted.)
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51984-5
In order for three segments to form the sides of a triangle, it is necessary
and sufficient that the sum of the lengths of any two segments must be
greater than the length of the third. In our situation, this means that none
of the segments formed may have length greater than or equal to 1/2.
The easiest way to find the required probability is to represent the
two points chosen in the interval as an ordered pair from the unit square
and decide which pairs lead to triangles. In the figure below, the region
corresponding to possible triangles has been shaded.
~ - - - - - - ~ ~ - - - - - - ~ - - - - - - - - - - - - x
Because of the independence and uniformity assumptions, the probability
that the first point is chosen from the interval [a, bJ and the second from
the interval [c, dJ is just (b - a) (d - c). More generally, the probability that
the points x and y are chosen from [0, 1], so that (x, y) is in the subset A
Exam # 19-1984 115
of the unit square, is equal to the area of A. Thus the probability that a
triangle can be formed is the area of the shaded region in the figure, 1/4.
We may obtain the same result more analytically with the principles of
conditional probability. Recall that if Xl, X2, •.. , Xn form a partition of the
space of outcomes and z is any event, then
n
Pr(z) = LPr(zlxi) Pr(xi).
i=l
In our situation, letting X be the random variable for the choice of the
first point, then this becomes
Pr(a triangle) = l ~ o Pr(a triangle X = x) dx.
Now, when 0 :::; x :::; 1/2, in order for a triangle to be formed, the
other point must be in the interval (1/2,1/2 + x), which has probability
(x + 1/2) - x = x. When 1/2 < x :::; 1, in order for a triangle to be
formed, the second point must be in the interval (x -1/2,1/2), which has
probability 1/2 - (x - 1/2) = 1 - x. Thus, the probability of having a
triangle is
1
1/2 11
xdx+ (1-x)dx=1/4.
x=O x=1/2
(This might be interesting to verify with a computer simulation.)
Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems.
51984-6
(a) From the functional equation and the continuity of 1 at 1, we have
lim f(x) = lim 1 (x/[x + 1]) - 2 = 1(1) - 2 = 3.
x --+ 00 x --+ ex)
(b) We note first of all that it is not sufficient to observe that 1 (1/ n) =
2n + 3 for n = 1,2,3, ... ; the function g(x) = (2/x) cos(2n/x) + 3
has the property that g(l/n) = 2n + 3 for n = 1,2,3, ... but certainly,
limx-+o+g(x) -=J +00.
Since 1 (x) is continuous on 0 < x < 00, it has a finite minimum value
on every bounded closed interval. Let c be the minimum value of 1 on the
interval [l/(n + 1), l/n]. Since l/(n + 1) equals (l/n)/[(l/n) + 1], the
functional equation shows that Cn+l = Cn +2, hence that Cn+1 = C1 + 2n.
116
Thus, if 0 < x::; 1/(1 + n), we have
f(x) 2: inf Cn = cn+l = Cl + 2n
m ~ n + l
which means limx--+o+ f(x) = +00.
Solutions
(c) The given conditions relate the values of f on the intervals [1, (0),
[1/2,1), [1/3,1/2), ... to each other and specify the values at the end
points, but besides f(l) = 5 and limx--+oo f(x) = 3, the function f is
an arbitrary continuous function on [1, (0). A succinct way of say this is:
if 9 is any continuous function on (-00,00) such that limx--+±oo g(x) = 0,
then f(x) = 3 + (2/x) + g(cot(7r/x)) satisfies the given conditions and
any solution can be written in this way for some g.
Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems.
51984-7
It is helpful to consider 25 tons as one unit of weight; we want to count
the number of trains of total weight 40 units. Let f (n) denote the number
of trains of total weight n units: we want to find f (40).
It is easy to find f(n) when n is small: f(l) = 1 (the only train is B);
f(2) = 3 (BB, F, H); f(3) = 5 (BF, BH,BBB,FB,HB); f(4) = 11
(BFF, FF, HF, BBH, FH, HH, BFB, BHB,BBB,FBB,HBB);
etc. More importantly, we notice that an n unit train is either an n - 1 unit
train with a boxcar stuck on the end or an n - 2 unit train with a flat car or
hopper car stuck on the end. That is, f satisfies f(n) = f( n-1)+2f(n-2)
where f(l) = 1 and f(2) = 3. Thus f(5) = 11 + 10 = 21, f(6)
21 + 22 = 43, f(7) = 43 + 42 = 85, and so on until we arrive at
and
241
f(40) = 3'
our answer.
(It is easy to prove by induction, but perhaps hard to discover, that
f(n) = f(n - 1) + 2f(n - 2) where f(l) = 1 and f(2) = 3 implies:
22k - 1
f(2k-1)= 3
and
22k+l + 1
f(2k) = 3
for k = 1,2,3, .... )
Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #20-1985 117
Exam #20-1985
51985-1
We have
X4 + bx
3
+ CX
2
+ dx + e = (x - a)(x - (J)(x -,,)(x - 6).
In the above equality, first put x = i, and then x = -i, where i = A,
to get
1 - c + e - (b - d)i = (i - a)(i - (J)(i -,,)(i - 6),
and
1 - c + e + (b - d)i = (-i - a)( -i - (J)( -i -,,)( -i - 6).
Noting that (u+vi)( u- vi) = u
2
+v
2
, multiplication of the corresponding
sides of the two equalities above yields
Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems.
51985-2
Since 3333 == 1 (mod 7) and 4444 == -1 (mod 7), we have
3333
4444
+4444
3333
== 14444 + (_1)3333 (mod 7) == 1-1
== 0 (mod 7).
Some more problems of this type:
(i) 22221111 + 11112222 is divisible by 3.
(ii) 11114444 + 44441111 is divisible by 5.
(iii) 2222
5555
+ 5555
2222
is divisible by 7.
(iv) 8888833333 + 3333388888 is divisible by 11.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51985-3
Clearly U is the multiplicative group of units modulo 21. Since 6 is a
square-free integer and U is abelian, each subgroup to be found is cyclic.
Hence the subgroup along the solid path could be {I, 2, 4, 8,16,11}; the
liS Solutions
one along the dashed path could be {I, 5, 4,20,16, 17}; and the one along
the dotted path could be {I, 13,4,10,16, 19}.
Look under Group Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51985-4
There are 2 types of triangles that can be formed: either each vertex lies
on a different side of the square, or 2 vertices lie on one side and the third
on another side.
We find the number of triangles of the first type as follows: Select 3
of the 4 sides of the square (this can be done in (i) or 4 ways) and then
select 1 of the 100 points of subdivision on each of these 3 sides (this can
be done in 100
3
ways). Thus, there are 4.100
3
triangles of the first kind.
The number of triangles of the second type is found as follows: Select
1 side of the square (4 ways of doing this) and 2 of the division points on
this side ( C ~ O ) ways) and then select 1 of the 3 remaining sides (3 ways)
and 1 of the 100 points of subdivision (100 ways) on this side. The total
number of triangles of the type is 4 . 3 . 100 . e ~ O ) = 6 . 99 . 100
2
.
Hence the required number is 4.100
3
+ 6.99.100
2
= 9,940,000.
Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.
51985-5
From an = (n - 1)(a
n
-l + a
n
-2), we get
an - nan-l = - [an-l - (n - l)an-2]'
Iterating this relation n - 3 times, we have
Hence,
an an-l
n! (n -I)!
and
~ (a
r
_ ar-l ) = ~ (-It = ~ (-It.
L..J r! (r - I)! L..J r! L..J r!
r=2 r=2 r=O
Since al = 0, the sum on the left telescopes to %3-. Thus
(
n (-It)
an = n! L--;:y-
r=O
Exam #20-1985 119
and
lim an = lim ~ (-It = e-
1
.
n--+oo n! n--+oo ~ r!
r=O
(Observe that an is the number of derangements of a set of n objects .)
Look under Limit Evaluation or Sequences in the Index for similar
problems.
S 1985-6
We will prove this result by induction. The result is clearly true for n = 1.
Assume the result true for n = m. Let S be a set of m + 2 integers between
1 and 2m + 2.
Suppose S does not contain both 2m + 1 and 2m + 2. Let Sl be the
subset of S not containing 2m + 1 or 2m + 2. Then Sl contains m + 1
integers between 1 and 2m. By the induction hypothesis, the result is true
for Sl and therefore for S.(Of course if neither 2m + 1 nor 2m + 2 is in
S, then by the induction assumption, the result is already true for S ).
Suppose S contains both 2m + 1 and 2m + 2. If m + 1 is in S, then
2m + 2 is a multiple of S, and thus the result is true for S. Therefore,
assume m + 1 is not in S. Let Sl be the set obtained from S by throwing
out 2m + 1 and 2m + 2 and putting in m + 1. Then Sl has m + 1 integers
between 1 and 2m. By the induction hypothesis, some element b of Sl is
a multiple of some other element a of Sl. If a and b are both in S, then
the result is true for S. Now a cannot be m + 1. Because the only positive
integers m + 1 can divide other than itself are k(m + 1), where k is an
integer ~ 2. But Sl does not contain such integers. Hence a must be in
S. If b is m + 1, then since 2m + 2 is a multiple of band b is a multiple
of a, 2m + 2 is a mUltiple of a. Thus the result is true for S.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
S 1985-7
From x+y = 2a, we have y = 2a-x. Substituting in xy > [(b
2
-1)/b
2
Ja
2
,
we get b
2
x(2a - x) > (b
2
- l)a
2
,
i.e., b
2
x
2
- 2ab
2
x + (b
2
- l)a
2
< 0,
i.e., (bx-(b-l)a)(bx-(b+l)a) <0,
l.e.,
(b-l)a (b+l)a
b <x< a .
110
Thus, the number of favorable cases is
(b + 1)a
b
(b - 1)a
b
Solutions
2a

The number of all possible cases is when 0 < x < 2a , and hence is 2a.
The required probability is therefore
2a/b
2a
1

Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #21-1986
51986-1
See Solution #1 on Exam #14.
51986-2
Let B = {b
1
, b
2
, b
3
}. The matrix of ¢; with respect to B is given by
A = ( ~ ~ ~ ) .
o 0 1 +i
To find the eigenvalues we set
det(A - {3I) = 0 = [(1 + i) - {3] [{32 - 4i]
which implies that {3 = 1 + i, {3 = V2 + V2i or {3 = -V2 - V2i.
Look under Complex Numbers or Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar
problems.
51986-3
ii = (e
7ri
/
2
)i = e-7r/2.
Look under Complex Numbers in the Index for similar problems.
51986-4
For every four distinct points of the N points there is one and only one
pair of segments that intersect and have the given four points as endpoints.
Exam #21-1986
Thus the number of intersections is given by:
(
n) = n(n - l)(n - 2)(n - 3) .
4 24
Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.
51986-5
Let x = V2 + ( V'3). Then
x
2
= 2 + 2V2( ij3) + ( ij3)2,
x
3
= 2V2 + 3(2( ij3)) + 3V2( ij3)2 + 3.
Similarly
(ij3)2 = ij9 = x
2
- 2 - 2V2ij3,
But V'3 = x - V2, so
Now
ij9 = x
2
- 2 - 2V2(x - V2) = x
2
- 2V2x + 2.
x
3
= 2V2 + 6(x - V2) + 3V2(x
2
- 2V2x + 2) + 3
= 2V2 + 6x - 6V2 + 3V2x2 - 12x + 6V2 + 3
= 2V2 + 3V2x2 - 6x + 3.
Thus x
3
+ 6x - 3 = V2(3x2 + 2). Squaring both sides gives
x
6
+ 36x
2
+ 9 + 12x4 - 6x- 36x = 18x
4
+ 24x2 + 8
or
Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems.
51986-6
121
(a) If the limit of f(xl, X2) exists as (Xl, X2) tends to (0,0), then the limit
exists along any path to (0,0). In particular the limit must exist along the
path defined by Xl = Then the limit of f(xl, X2) as (Xl, X2) tends to
(0,0) now becomes
lim X2) = lim = ! -1= o.
X2--+0 X2--+0 x
2
2
Thus f(xl, X2) is not continuous at (0,0).
122 Solutions
(b) Since !(Xl,X2) is not continuous at (0,0), !(Xl,X2) is not differ-
entiable at (0,0).
Look under Multivariate Calculus in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #22-1987
51987-1
The well-known proofthat there are arbitrarily long sequences of composite
integers suggests that the solution should be 11!+2, 11!+3, ... ,11!+11, but
a calculation shows that these numbers are much too large. An appropriate
idea is present though; we should replace 11! by a number divisible by
2,3, ... ,11. For example, the least common mUltiple of these integers is
2
3
. 3
2
. 5 . 7 . 11 = 27720, so the sequence 27722,27723, ... ,27731 is a
solution. There are smaller solutions, the smallest solution is the sequence
beginning with 114.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51987-2
Each layer is a triangle of cannonballs, the kth having k balls on each
edge. Thus, each layer has
1 2 k
_k(k+l)_I(k2 k)
+ + ... + - 2 -"2 +
cannonballs. The total number of cannonballs in a stack is therefore
1
2((1
2
+ 1) + (22 + 2) + ... + (n
2
+n))
= + 22 + ... + n
2
) + (1 + 2 + ... + n))
2
n(n+l))
2 6 + 2
1
= "6n(n + 1)(n + 2).
Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.
51987-3
If the ball obeys the law exactly, it must bounce an infinite number of
times, but it is not clear wheilier it bounces for an infinite time. We should
Exam #22-1987 123
find the infinite series that represents the total time, decide if it converges,
and if it converges compute the sum.
Since it is dropped from a height of 16 feet, it will require vT6/4 =
1 second to fall to the ground. It then bounces to a height of 8 feet,
requiring VS /4 second to rise and VS / 4 second to fall to the ground
again. Continuing, we see that the total time is the sum of the series
1 + 2(VS/4) + 2(V4/4) + 2(v'2/4) +"',
or
(
2) 00 00 ( 1 )j
1+ "4 v'2
Since this is a geometric series with ratio less than 1, the series converges
and its sum is
1 + v'2 __
1
--c:::
1-1/v'2
v'2+1
v'2-1'
Thus, this model predicts the ball will bounce slightly more than 5.8
seconds. (In fact, this model is in fair agreement with experiment; the
constant 1/2 in this problem is called the coefficient of restitution of the
ball.)
Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems.
51987-4:
Let Sj denote the event that the jth senior draws hi1> or her own name
from the hat. We wish to find the probability that none of these events
occurs, that is, we want
Pr(Sf n S2 n ... Sfo)·
We may expand this as
Pr(Sf n S2 n··· n Sfo)
= 1 - Pr(S1 U S2 U ... U S1O)
= 1- [ L Pr(Sj,) - L Pr(Sj, n Sj2)
1:'OiI:'01O 1:'Oj,:'012:'01O
+
PreS n S· n S· ) - ...
)1 )2 )3
124 Solutions
But Pr( Sj, = ;6, and Pr( Sjl n S12) = 1
8
6, and so forth. Since the number
of ways to choose k indices from lOis the above becomes
Pr(Sf n n··· Sfo)
= 1 -[ CI0) -C20) + -... -
= 1 - [:! -;! + :! -... -
1 1 1 1
= - + - - - + ... + - .368.
I! 2! 3! 1O!
Look under Derangements or Probability in the Index for similar prob-
lems.
51987-5
A geometric construction: We give a construction that is an induction on
the dimension. This construction and plausibility argument can be made
into a proof, but the analytic proof below is more concise. For me, the
idea comes from the inductive step from dimension 2 to dimension 3, but I
will begin here with dimension 1, where the logic begins. Clearly, the two
most distant points in the unit ball of dimension 1, i.e., the unit interval,
are the points + 1 and -l.
The three most distant points in the unit ball in dimension 2, i.e., the
unit disk, are the vertices of any equilateral triangle with vertices on the
unit circle. Indeed, if A, B, and C are points of the disk that do not satisfY
this condition, then assuming A and B are on the circle and the length
of AC is least, then the triple A, B, C' is an improvement, where C' is
the more distant intersection of the perpendicular bisector of AB and the
circle. To find the coordinates of such points, we choose the north pole
(0, 1) as the first point and note that the center of gravity of the three
points must be the origin. Thus, the other two points, being symmetrically
placed, have coordinates (?, -1/2). Since they are on the circle, and at
opposite ends of the segment (the I-dimensional case), the coordinates
must be (±-J3/2, -1/2).
The four most distant points in the unit ball in dimension 3 are four
equidistant points on the sphere, (As before, if not, assuming A, B, and
C are on the sphere and and the length of AD is least, then the 4-tuple
A, B, C, D' is an improvement, where D' is the more distant intersection
of the sphere and the line perpendicular to the disk determined by A, B,
Exam #22-1987 125
and C and through the center.) Again assuming the north pole (0,0,1)
to be one of the points, we find that the other three points must have
coordinates (7,7, -1/3), Moreover, these three points solve the problem
for the disk they determine, that is, they are a scaled version of the
solution of the 2-dimensional problem. To be on the sphere, since the third
coordinate is -1/3, the scale factor must be J879 so the three points are
(0, J879, -1/3) and (±y'273, -y'279, -1/3).
The solution to the stated problem is five equidistant points on the unit
sphere in dimension 4. Assuming the north pole is one of the points, the
others have coordinates (7,7,7, -1/4). The first three coordinates must
be a scaled version of the solution to the 3-dimensional problem, and the
scale factor must be VI5/16. Thus,the solution to the problem is
(0,0,0,1); (0,0, VI5/16, -1/4); (0, V576, -V5/48, -1/4);
(±/578, -V5/24, -V5/48, -1/4)
and the mutual distance is V512.
An analytic proof: Letting Vl, ... ,V5 be the five vectors above, we see
that, for all i, j,
Now, if Xl,'" ,X5 are any vectors in the unit ball of R
4
, then
But
so
i#j
::::; 40 - 2 LXiXj.
if.j
- LXiXj::::; 5.
i#j
Combining this with the earlier inequality, we find
S ::::; 40 + 10 = 50.
Since the sum for S contains 20 terms, either all of the terms are 2.5 or
there is at least one of the terms that is less than 2.5. That is, the minimum
126 Solutions
distance between points is no more than V5fi and the above solution is
optimal.
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
S 1987-6
If Jane were flying straight north, she would fly a quarter of the way
around the earth before reaching the north pole, that is, she would fly
2l7r(4000)/4 = 20007r miles. Instead, her path is northwest, so she flies
further. To be precise, at each instant, her path is along the hypotenuse of
a right triangle with north-south and east-west legs and, since the surface
of a sphere is locally like the Euclidean plane, the distance along the
hypotenuse is J2 times the distance along the north-south leg. Since this
is true at every instant of her journey, the total distance she flies before
reaching the north pole is 2000J27r miles.
To see how many times she crosses the Greenwich Meridian, we look at
the same infmitesimal triangle and relate the latitude and longitude angles.
In the usual spherical coordinates with the origin at the center of the earth,
longitude corresponds to the angle (J and (north) latitude corresponds to
7r /2 - VJ. Thus, we want the total change in () when VJ changes from 7r /2
to 0, that is, we want
The north-south leg of the triangle has length 4000dVJ whereas the east-west
leg of the triangle has length 4000 sin VJd(J since the parallel corresponding
to VJ is a circle of radius 4000 sin VJ. Thus, the total change in () is then
11
° _.1 d(VJ) I = 00.
1r/2 SlllVJ
which means Jane crosses the Greenwich Meridian infinitely often.
Look under Integration in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #23-1988
S1988-1
Let x(t) denote distance between x's car and the finish line, and y(t)
denote the distance between y's car and the finish line. Suppose x(O) = 2
Exam #23-1988
and y(O) = 5. For t > 0,
d
2
x _ (dX)2 dx _ ~ () _ -In(at+b)
d
2 - ad=} d - b =} x t - + c.
t t t at+ a
But
Inb In(-b-)
x(O) = 2 =} c = 2 + - =} x(t) = 2 + Hat.
a a
Let it > 0 be such that x(tt) = 1 and, hence,
We have
dxl 1 dxl
dt tl = 2 dt o·
In( b )
1=2+ ~
a
-1 1-1
and atl +b = 2(T)'
implying that a = In 2.
127
Let tx be the time required for driver x to reach the finish line. Then
o = x (tx) and a = In 2 together imply tx = 1 ~ b 2 ' Let ty be the time
required for driver y to reach the finish line. Then
dyl
dt all t
dxl
dt t=O
-1
b
and y(O) = 5 together imply y(t) = 5 - t, so that ty = 5b.
Finally,
since
3 3b
In 2 > - =} ty = 5b > - = t
x
,
5 In2
0> dxl
dt t=O
-1
b
implies b > O. Driver x finishes first.
Look under Differential Equations in the Index for similar problems.
51988-2
Let x and y denote any two members of the group. Then
x * x-I * Y = e * y = y = y * e = y * x-I * X =} X * Y = Y * x,
by the given cancellation rule.
Look under Group Theory in the Index for similar problems.
128 Solutions
51988-3
Note that
So if sand t are as prescribed,
51988-4
The unit's digit of 512345 = 5. To verify this it suffices to show, using
induction on n, that 5
5n
= 5n + 10k
n
where k
n
is a positive integer for
each n. 55 = 12 + 3
2
+ 52 + 7
2
+ 9
2
= 165 = 5 + 10(16). Assuming the
result true for n gives
55(n+1) = 55n+5
= 5
5n
+ [2(5n + 1) - 1]2 + ... + [2(5n + 5) - 1]2
= 5
5n
+ (1On + 1)2 + (IOn + 3)2 + ... + (IOn + 9)2
= 5
5n
+ 10jn + (12 + 3
2
+ ... + 9
2
)
= 5n + 10kn + 10jn + 165
= 5(n + 1) + 10kn+1)
where kn+1 = kn + jn + 16.
Look under Number Theory or Sequences in the Index for similar
problems.
51988-5
The desired area is 8 times that of the shaded region 5 in shown below. If
the circle has radius a, then a Cartesian equation for the curve bounding 5
on the right is (x + a)2 + y2 = 2a
2
. Changing to polar coordinates gives
the polar equation r = f(O) = a[yll + cos
2
0 - cosO]. So the area of 5 is
{'i f(O)2 dO = a
2
[1- v'3 + ~ l
Jo 2 2 2 3
Exam #23-1988 129
after much work. Hence, the desired area is
2a
2
[1 - v'3 + iJ .
Look under Geometry or Integration in the Index for similar problems.
51988-6
First draw the two straight lines BAP and CDP, where Band Dare
opposite ends of the diameter lying within L. Extend straight lines AD
and BC downward until they intersect in a point E. P E is then a straight
line perpendicular to L.
p
B ~ - - - - ' - - - - - ~ - - - - ~ ~ - - ~ L
To prove this, notice that line segments EA and PC are altitudes of
6BP E. Since these segments are concurrent with the line segment through
BD, that line segment must also be an altitude of 6BPE. Thus PE is
perpendicular to line L.
Look under Analytic Geometry or Geometry in the Index for similar
problems.
130 Solutions
51988-7
There are 2
10
= 1024 possible lO-flip sequences. Let Hn denote the
number of n-flips sequences not having two or more tails in a row but
ending with heads and let Tn denote the number of n-flips sequences not
having two or more tails in a row but ending with a tail. Clearly H2 = 2
and T2 = HI = 1. For n 2:: 3, Tn = Hn- l and Hn = Hn-
l
+ Tn- l =
Hn- l + Hn- 2. So H3 = H2 + HI = 2 + 1 = 3, H4 = 3 + 2 = 5, ... ,
Hg = 55, and HlO = 89. We need HlO + TlO = 89 + 55 = 144 and the
desired probability is / o ~ ~ = ;4'
Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #24-1989
51989-1
It is easy to show that there are three tests and that x + y + z = 13. From
C's total we deduce that 3z ~ 9, so that z = 1, 2, or 3. The only solution
satisfYing all the constraints of the problem is z = 1, y = 4,x = 8. It
follows that A scored 4 + 8 + 8, B scored 8+ I + 1, and C scored 1 + 4 + 4.
Thus C came in second on the Geometry test.
Look under Logic in the Index for similar problems.
51989-2
Any constant sequence satisfies the hypothesis of the problem. Conversely,
if we fix m and let n tend to infinity, we see that limn-too Xn = X
m
• By
uniqueness of limits, we deduce that Xl = X2 = ... , so that {Xl, X2, ••• }
must be a constant sequence.
Look under Sequences in the Index for similar problems.
51989-3:
If we label the figure as shown below and compare areas, we deduce that
2a = d,
2(a+h) =d+g+j,
2(a + h + e + b) = d + g + j + c + f + i.
Exam #24-1989
These equations may be reduced to
2a= d,
2h = 9 + j,
2(e+b)=c+f+i.
In a similar fashion we have
2b = e,
2i = h + j,
2(f + cO = a + d + g,
and
2c= f,
2g = i + j,
2(d + a) = b + e + h.
From these nine equations we deduce that
6j = a + b + c + d + e + f + 9 + h + i,
and this is equivalent to the assertion of the problem.
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
131
132 Solutions
51989-4
Assuming independence, if the fair coin is the one flipped only once, then
the probability of obtaining the results noted is
2
-
9
On the other hand, if the biased coin is the one flipped only once, then the
probability of obtaining the results noted is
~ ' G ) ( ~ ) 2 ( ~ ) 1
1
-
4
Hence it is more likely that the biased coin was the one flipped only once.
Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems.
51989-5
Let the y- and z-axes be the axes of the cylinders. If we slice the
intersection by planes parallel to the yz-plane, the cross-sectional areas
are all squares (by symmetry). Hence the volume is
[aa 4b
2
(1 _ ::) dx = 16;b
2

Look under Volumes in the Index for similar problems.
51989-6
The characteristic equation is
Hence the eigenvalues are ,\ = 1 (multiplicity n - 1) and
,\ = 1 + XlYl + ... + XnYn'
The determinant, being the product of the eigenvalues, is
1 + XIYl + ... + XnYn'
Look under Integration or Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar
problems.
Exam #25-1990 133
51989-7
The dimensions are 4 x 18. A complete solution requires lengthy discussion
to eliminate many potential solutions. A key ingredient is the fact that the
number 72 has three "admissible" factorizations: 4 x 18, 6 x 12, and 8 x 9
with answers YES, NO, NO to the question "is the short side strictly
less than half the long side?" Several other possible areas admit triple
factorizations, e.g., 48 = 3 x 16, 4 x 12 and 6 x 8, but here the answers
are always two YESes and one NO.
Note: The students were told at the beginning of the contest to assume
that the sides of Smith's ranch are parallel to the side of Todd county.
Look under Logic in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #25-1990
1990-1
Write n = 10
k
ak + 10
k
-
l
ak_l + ... + lOal + ao, where ai E {O, ... ,9}
and ak 2: 1. We assume
which implies
(10
k
- ak)ak + ... + (10 - adal = a6 - ao + 1. (*)
The right-hand side of (*) is at most 9
2
- 9 + 1 = 73. Since ak 2: 1,
the left-hand side of (*) is at least 10
k
- 9. Therefore k :::; 1. Clearly,
there are no 1 digit solutions. It is easy to check that the only solutions to
(10 - al)al = a6 - ao + 1 are ao = 5, al = 3 or 7, so 35 or 75 are the
only solutions.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
1990-2
This is an inclusion-exclusion problem, where the universe U is the set of
arrangements of I, N, D, I, A, N, A and the subsets AI' ... ' A6 are those
arrangements in which each possible digraph lA, AI, IN, NI, AN, NA, is
repeated. If, say, IA is repeated, then neither IN, nor NA can occur at all,
and AI could occur at most once. However AN or NA might occur twice
134 Solutions
if the tuples IA or NIA were repeated. In other words,
Continuing in this way, we find that 6 of the pairs Ai n Aj are possible
and none of the 20 tuples Ai n Aj n Ak may occur simultaneously. Thus
the total number of possibilities (by symmetry) is
assuming Ai n Aj is possible.
Note that lUI = 7!/[(2!)3 . I!] = 630. If IA is repeated, then we
wish to write (IA), (IA), N, D, N in some order which can be done in
5!/ [(2!)2 . I!] = 30 ways. If IA and AN are repeated, then we need to
arrange (IAN),(IAN), D, which can be done in 3!/(2! ·1!) = 3 ways. Thus
the desired answer is 630 - 6 . 30 + 6 . 3 = 468.
Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.
51990-3
Since f' (x) = f (x + 1) - 2, l' is differentiable and
f"(x) = f'(x + 1) = f(x + 2) - 2 = f(x) - 2.
It follows that f(x) = 2 + cle
x
+ C2e-x, and, since f(x + 2) = f(x),
Cle
2
= Cl and C2e-2 = C2 so Cl = C2 = o.
51990-4
A variety of approaches work. This one refers to the figure below. Since
the exterior angle to a regular heptagon has measure 2;, LGAB = 5;.
Since LGAF subtends an arc of J,f on the circle, its measure is J,f =
LGAK = LLAB, and LKAL = 3;, so LAKL = LALK = 2;. The
law of sines applied to r and to sand l gives
so
r s
and
s 1
sin 371" - sin 271"
7 7
sin]I - sin 571" '
7 7
sin ]I sin 371"
r = 7 7.
sin 271" sin 571"
7 7
This may be reduced to (among others):
sin ]I sin 371"
7 7
sin2 271"
7
7r 1
2cos- ---
7 cos J,f'
cos 271"
__ 7_
cos]I .
7
Exam #25-1990 135
Other proofs use the law of cosines, and dropping a perpendicular from
K to AG, etc.
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51990-5
Construct the Riemann sum
-2 t t 1 n n
2
1 1 1
n i=1 j=1 yn
2
+ ni + j = 8 n
2
J1 + i/n + j/n
2
'
which in the limit, gives us
[1 [1 v'1
dXdY
= [\2J1+x+y)l
y
1
=odx
Jo Jo + x + y Jo
= 10
1
(2v'2 + x - 2v'1 + x) dx
= i(3
3
/
2
_ 2.2
3
/
2
+ 13/2) = i(3V3 - 4V2 + 1)
3 3
(;::::0 .719).
Look under Limit Evaluation or Riemann Sums in the Index for similar
problems.
51990-6
Insert a coordinate system centered at the center of the hexagon, so the
vertices of the hexagon are (0, ±1), (±4, The parabolas must have
the form y = ax
2
+ {3, and the points show that they are y = 1 -
and y = -1 + which intersect at (±1,0). A routine calculation
136 Solutions
shows that the area between the parabolas is i V6 and that of the hexagon
is 6· "'1, so the total area of the shaded region is
8V2 - 9 8V6 - 9V3
2V3 6
Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #26-1991
51991-1
The curve, clearly symmetric with respect to both the x-axis and the y-axis,
lies on or between the lines x = ±l. On [-1, -1/2], Y = ±V3(x+ 1). On
[-1/2,1/2]' Y = V3/2. On [1/2, 1], Y = V3(l-x). The curve is a regular
hexagon of edge length 1 with vertices (±1/2, V3/2), (±1/2, V3/2) and
(±1,0). The enclosed area (that of six equilateral triangles of unit edge
length) is 6 x 1/2 x 1 x 1 x V3/2 = 3V3/2.
Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
S 1991-2
The number of k-digit numbers without any 1 's is 8 X 9
k
-
l
, so between
1 and 1,000,000 inclusive there are 8(1 + 9 + 9
2
+ ... + 9
5
) = 9
6
- 1 =
531,440 numbers without 1 's and 468,560 numbers with 1 'so
Alternate Solution The number of ways of filling six spaces with
digits 0, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 is 9
6
. But 000000 is not between 1 and
1,000,000, so there are 9
6
-1 = 531,440 numbers without 1 's and 468,560
with l's.
Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.
51991-3
Label the areas of the eleven regions inside the parallelogram as illustrated
below.
Let K be the area of the parallelogram ABGD; then
(1) area ABR = K/2 = r3 + W2 + W3 + W5 + b,
(2) area ARD + area BRG = K/2 = r2 + Wl + rl + r4 + W4 + r5,
Exam #26-1991 137
r - - - - - - - - - ~ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~ c
A ~ ~ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~ ~
(3) area QAB = area QAF, so T3 = Wl + b + W4'
(4) From (1) and (2), T3 +W2+W3 +W5 +b = T2 +Wl +Tl +T4 +W4 +T5.
(5) Substituting T3 = Wl + b + W4 from (3) in the left side of (4) and
Wl + W4 = T3 - b (from (3)) in the right side, z= Wi + 2b = z= Ti - b.
Using K as the sum of the reds + sum of the "whites" + blue, we get
red area less the blue area is K/2 regardless of the choices of points F,
Q, and R.
Look under Enumeration or Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51991-4
The sum a + b + c is even, so the sum -a + b + c is even since parity is
not affected by a sign change in a summand. The identity
a
2
+ b
2
+ c
2
- 2ab - 2bc - 2ca = a
2
+ b
2
+ c
2
- 2ab + 2bc - 2ca - 4bc
suggests taking
Indeed,
a
2
+ b
2
+ c
2
- 2ab - 2bc - 2ca
n= -----------------------
4
(
-a+b+c)2 b
=n+ c
2 '
(
a-b+c)2 b
=n+ a
2 '
(
a+b-c)2
2 = n+ abo
and
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
138 Solutions
51991-5
Remark: Ifn = a
2
+b
2
and m = c
2
+rf2, then nm = (ac-bd)2+(ad+bc)2.
Thus, the product of two sums of squares is also a sum of squares.
(a) Take a = c and b = d, then (a
2
- b
2
)2 + (2ab)2 = (a
2
+ b
2
)2. It
follows that if n is a sum of two squares, then n
2
is a sum of two squares.
The first example 12 + 4
2
= 17, 3
2
+ 3
2
= 18 leads to infinitely many
more, namely 8
2
+ 15
2
= 172 = 289, 12 + 172 = 290, and so on. From the
example 3
2
+4
2
= 52 = 25, 12 +5
2
= 26, one can generate infinitely many
more by taking (3k)2 + (4k)2 = (5k)2 = 25k
2
and 12 + (5k)2 = 1 + 25k
2
.
Any Pythagorean triple will serve as a starting point.
(b) If n - 1, n, n + 1 are consecutive sums of two squares, then
n
2
-1 = (n -l)(n + 1), n
2
, n
2
+ 1 are consecutive sums of two squares.
For starters, take 72 = 6
2
+ 6
2
,73 = 3
2
+ 8
2
,74 = 52 + 7
2
.
(c) In any set of four consecutive positive integers one must be
congruent to 3 modulo 4. This integer cannot be a sum of squares since
a
2
+ b
2
== 0, 1 or 2 mod 4 for any a and b. Therefore, it is not
possible to have four consecutive positive integers which are sums of two
squares.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51991-6
We have
lm-= lmn - --+--+ ... +-- 1
. n 1· ( 1) (1 1 1 )
n-+oo Hn n-+oo n n + 1 n + 2 n + n
= lim (.!.) ( 1 + 1 + ... + -:--_1-;-)
n-+oo n 1 + l/n 1 + 2/n 1 + n/n
- lim (.!.) t 1
- n-+oo n k=l 1 + k/n
[1 1
= J
o
1 +x dx
= In(l + = In2.
Therefore,
lim Hn = _1_.
n-+oo n In2
Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #27-1992 139
51991-7
By reducing the coordinates of each of the nine given points modulo 3,
each can be identified with one of the nine points in the square array S:
{( -1, -1), (-1,0), (-1,1), (0, -1), (0,0), (0,1), (1, -1), (1,0), (1, I)}.
The existence of three lattice points with a lattice point as centroid
is equivalent to having a row, column, or diagonal (broken diagonals
included) of a 3 x 3 square array completely occupied. If only four or
fewer squares were occupied by the nine points, then one or more would
be occupied by at least three points which would have a lattice point as
centroid. Therefore, at least five of the squares in the 3 x 3 square array
must be occupied. To avoid three points in a row, two rows would contain
just two points each. It is now easy to show that it is impossible to place
the fifth without completing a row, column, or diagonal, (possibly broken).
Look under Analytic Geometry or Enumeration in the Index for similar
problems.
Exam #27-1992
51992-1
The curve is a cycloid which can be parameterized as x = t - sin t and
y = 1 - cos t for ° ::; t ::; 27r. The arc length is given by
127r J(l- cOS(t))2 + (sin(t))2 dt = 127r J2(1- cos(t)) dt
= 127r V4sin2(t/2)dt
= = 8.
Look under Integration in the Index for similar problems.
51992-2
Observe that the ith tallest person is viewable if and only ifhe is in front of
all the people 1,2,3, ... , i-I. This happens with probability t. Therefore,
the answer is
n 1
L - ::.:::; In n + 0.5772157 ....
i=l n
Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems.
140 Solutions
51992-3
Select a head gossip Va. First have all n -1 other people send a letter with
their scandal to Va; then have Va distribute the assembled information via
n - 1 letters to everyone else. We claim that this total of 2n - 2 letters is
the minimum.
Let each letter be represented by an arc in a directed graph. No one can
know all the scandal until at least n - 1 letters have been sent, for we
need a sub graph of arcs unilaterally connected with directed paths from
every vertex into whichever vertex becomes fully informed. Then each
subsequent letter can inform one more person, so at least n - 1 more
letters are required. This gives a bound of 2n - 2 which we have already
achieved above.
Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.
51992-4
For n = 1, Zl has no proper subgroup, contrary to the stated condition. For
n = 2, Z2 works because it has 1 subgroup. For n = 3, Z3 fails because
it has 1, and not 2, proper subgroups. For n = 4, we need 4 subgroups.
The Klein 4-group works, whereas Z4 only has 2. Thus we have found 2
groups that satisfy this condition, namely Z2 and K
4
.
We shall now show that no group of order n ::::: 5 has so many subgroups.
First, every subgroup contains the identity element, e, so the number of
subgroups of order i cannot exceed the number of subsets of order i - 1
selected from G - { e }. There are ( 7 ~ ; ) of these, and the largest subgroup
order i is at most l ~ J. For any odd n = 2k + 1, this yields at most
k
8 (7 ~ n < 2
2k
-
1
= 2
n
-
2
subgroups. For any even n = 2k, we can find at most
k
L (7 ~ :) = 2
2k
-
1
t=l
= 2
n
-
2
subgoups. That is just barely enough, but only if every set of order l ~ J is
a subgroup. For n :s; 4, this is true of Z2 and K
4
.
But for n ::::: 6 this requires every subset of order 2 and 3 be a subgroup.
That is, {e, a} and {e, a, b} must both be subgroups. But the first forces
Exam #27-1992 141
the order of a to be 2 while the second requires the order of a to be 3, a
contradiction.
Look under Group Theory in the Index for similar problems.
_r2 (Xl
= -He 10 = H.
Therefore I = Vi.
Look under Integration in the Index for similar problems.
51992-6
(a) The characteristic polynomial of A is
X2 -13X +36 = (X -4)(X - 9).
We find that the eigenvectors for A are and C2). This gives
p=(-1 1)
3 -2
and
p-l = (2 1)
3 1 '
and therefore
(
-1 1) (4 0) (2 1)
A = 3 -2 0 9 3 1 .
(b) Clearly all four choices of signs in C = :3) yield C
2
=
Therefore, all four choices of B = PCp-l give
142 Solutions
as desired. These are
(
5 1 ) ( -5 -1) (13 5) ( -13 -15 )
B = -6 0' 6 0 ' -30 -12' 30 12 .
(c) If A has a repeated eigenvalue, for example if A = 2
n
I, we can
find at least 2(n + 1) different B's; namely, for any i with 0:::; i :::; n we
may have
(
0 2i)
B = ± 2n-i 0 .
Thus, there is no maximum.
Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems.
51992-7
Solutiou 1 Since y
x/VI - e-
2x2
to get
x
2
is a continuous function, we may square
Now this has the form ~ so we may apply L'H6pital's Rule to get
lim 2x 2 = L2 = !.
x--+o+ 4xe-
2x
2
Therefore L = ± (1/ V2). But L 2: 0 since the fraction is positive on the
domain. Therefore L = + (1/ V2).
Solutiou 2 Since the form is g, we apply L'H6pital's Rule to get
VI - e-
2x2
lim 2 2
x--+o+ 2xe- x
Since e-
2x2
~ 1, this reduces to
VI - e-
2x2
lim ,
x--+o+ 2x
provided this limit exists. But this also equals L/2 provided L =1= o. We
find L = A so that, as above, L = ±(I/V2).
Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems.
51992-8
We want integer solutions to a
2
+ (a + 1)2 = b
2
. This can be rewritten as
1 = 2b
2
- (2a+ I?
Exam #27-1992 143
Upon replacing c = 2a + 1, we have a Pell equation 1 = 2b
2
- c
2
• The
first solution is b
l
= Cl = 1. In general, given a solution (b
n
, cn), we can
generate another solution
because
Thus, we find the solutions (b
2
, C2) = (5,7), (b
3
, C3) = (29,41), (b
4
, C4) =
(169,239), ....
Can there be any other solutions? We can also write the recurrence in
reverse as (bn, cn) = (3b
n
+
1
- 2C
n
+l, -4b
n
+
1
+ 3c
n
+d. Suppose that
(b, c) is the smallest solution not on our indexed list.
Upon applying the reverse recurrence we find that (3b - 2c, -4b +
3c) is another smaller solution that also cannot be in our list. But this
contradicts our selection of (b, c). Consequently. the list includes every
possible solution.
Can we find an explicit solution of the simultaneous recurrence? Ap-
plying the recurrences repeatedly we find
bn+1 = 3bn + 2cn
= 3bn + 2( 4bn - 1 + 3Cn -l)
= 3bn + 8b
n
-
1
+ 6( -4bn + 3c
n
)
= -21b
n
+ 8bn- 1 + 18cn·
Now nine times the first equation minus the last yields
Similarly, we can show that Cn satisfies the same recurrence. Namely
Cn+! = 6c
n
- Cn-I' The roots of x
2
- 6x + 1 are associated with this
recurrence, namely r = 3 ± VS.
We find that
b
n
= (2-
4
J2) (3+vs)n+ (2+4J2) (3-vs)n,
C
n
= ( J2
2
-1 ) (3 + vs)n - ( J2
2
+ 1) (3 - vs)n,
144 Solutions
and recall
an = en;l = ( \1"24-
1
) (3 + V8)n _ ( \1"2
4
+ 1) (3 _ V8)n.
Look under Diophantine Equations in the Index for similar problems.
Exam#2S-1993
51993-1
Let P(x) = ax
3
+ bx
2
+ ex + d. Then P'(x) = 3ax
2
+ 2bx + e;
P" (x) = 6ax + 2b; and pili (x) = 6a. The following inequalities are
equivalent:
pili ( X ) ! . (P" ( x ) ) 2
P'(x) < 2 P'(x) ,
2P'(x)P"'(x) < (p"(x)) 2,
2(3ax2 + 2bx + e)(6a) < (6ax + 2b)2,
36a
2
x
2
+ 24abx + 12ae < 36a
2
x
2
+ 24abx + 4b
2
,
12ae < 4b
2
,
(2b)2 - 4(3a)e > O.
Since P' (x) has distinct zeros, the last inequality holds and the result
follows.
Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems.
51993-2
For simplicity of notation, we write f and 9 for f(a) and g(a) and omit
parentheses.
f = gff = (fg!)ff = f(gff)f = fff
= ff(gff) = f(fg!)f = fgf
=g.
Look under Group Theory in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #28-1993 145
51993-3
Since A has rank 1, it has at least one nonzero row, r, and each of its
rows is a multiple of r. Therefore there is a 1 x n row vector X for which
A = XT . r. Now, for any p x q and q x p matrices Band C, the trace of
B . C equals the trace of C . B. Therefore we have
1 = trace of A = trace of (r . XT) = r . XT.
(The last equality holds since (r . XT) is a 1 x 1 matrix.) Thus,
A2 = (XT . r) . (XT . r) = XT . (r· XT) . r = XT . r = A.
Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems.
51993-4
Let O(n) be the number of orderly permutations of {I, 2, ... , n}. We will
prove by induction that O(n) = 2
n
-
1
. Since both 12 and 21 are orderly,
0(2) = 2
2
-
1
= 2. Now assume that O(k) = 2
k
-
1
and note that any orderly
permutation of {I, 2, ... , k} must begin with 1 or k. (Let j be the first
number. Wherever the 1 is, 2 must follow it; 3 must follow the 2; and so
on and inductively, j must follow the 1.) For any orderly permutation, P,
of {I, 2, ... , n} we create two orderly permutations of {I, 2, ... , (k + I)}
as follows:
1) place (k + 1) at the begining of P, or
2) increase each number in P by 1 and place 1 at the beginning.
(For example, with k = 4 and P = 1423, we create 51423 and 12534.)
This process thus creates 2k distinct orderly permutations of {I, 2, ... ,
(k + I)}. Since, for any orderly permutation of {I, 2, ... , (k + I)}, we
can reverse the process and obtain the orderly permutation of {I, 2, ... ,k}
which created it, we see that 0 (k + 1) = 2k, completing our induction.
Look under Permutations in the Index for similar problems.
51993-5
Solution 1 Since a;+l = a; + an, one can show by induction that
n n
-- 'n<a <-
2 YH_n_
2
,
so
an 1
- ~ - .
n 2
146
Solution 2 Since a;+l = a; + an, one has
an+ 1 - an = va; + an - an
a; + an - a;
va; + an + an
1
Solutions
Next since al = 1, the an's are increasing and the calculations above
show that
so an -7 00. Next, using an -700, the same calculations show that
This, in turn, shows
an 1
- -7-.
n 2
Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems.
51993-6
First note that there are integers An and En for which
and further that
Thus, since (A
n
/2
n
) is an integer, An is divisible by 2n. Note that
is divisible by 2n+l. Finally, since 0 < (J3 . 1)2n < 1, it follows that
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #28-1993 147
51993-7
If there are only two distinct integers, X < Y, among A, B, C, D,
E then there would be at most three distinct sums of pairs of them:
X + X < X + Y < Y + Y. Also, if there are at least four distinct
integers, W < X < Y < Z among A, B, C, D, E then there would be at
least five distinct sums of pairs of them: W + X < W + Y < X + Y <
X + Z < Y + Z. Therefore there are exactly three distinct integers among
A, B, C, D, E and we have the following six cases:
1) A = B = C < D < E,
3) A = B < C < D = E,
5) A < B = C < D = E,
2) A = B < C = D < E,
4) A < B = C = D < E,
6) A < B < C = D = E.
The first three cases are impossible since the smallest sum 401, is odd.
In case (4), we must have
A + B = 401, 2B = 546, A + E = 691, and B + E = 836.
(Why?) This yields
A = 128, B = C = D = 273, E = 563.
Similarly, in case (5) we have
A + B = 401, 2B = A + D = 546, B + D = 791, and 2D = 836,
which yields
A = 128, B = C = 273, D = E = 418.
In case (6) we have
A + B = 401, A + C = 546, B + C = 691, and 2C = 836,
from which we obtain
A = 128, B = 273, C = D = E = 418.
In summary, there are three collections of integers satisfYing the given
conditions:
A = 128, B = C = D = 273, E = 563;
A = 128, B = C = 273, D = E = 418;
and A = 128, B = 273, C = D = E = 418.
Look under Logic or Systems of Equations in the Index for similar
problems.
148 Solutions
51993-8
Let the area of abed be one 'unit'. We will determine the area of ABCD
in units. Since = = 5, and = = 4, we see that LAdD
contains 5x4 = 10 units Similarly since Ba = £ = 6 and Aa = £ = 3
2 . , ba 1 ad 2 '
LAaB contains = 9 units. Noting that 6AdD = 6CbB and
6AaB = 6CeD, we see that ABCD contains 2 x 10 + 2 x 9 + 1 = 39
units.
Finally, since area of ABC D = 48, we see that the area of abed is
Note: In general it can be shown that if 1, 5, 2, and 6 are replaced by
w, x, y, and z, then the area of abed is
wy(w + x)(y + z)
xz + (w + x)(y + z)·
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #29-1994
51994-1
Using L'H6pital's Rule,
fX et2dt x2
1
· Jo l' e
1m 2 = 1m
x--+oo eX / x x--+oo x·2xe
x
-eX
x2
x
2
1
= lim
x--+oo 2X2 - 1 2"'
Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems.
51994-2
We have
n(n -1) 2 (2)n/2
(1 + J2/n)n = 1 + + . - + ... + -
2 n n
(
2)n/2
... +:;;: >n.
Now take nth roots.
Look under Inequalities in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #29-1994 149
51994-3
The inequality is
x
2
X Y
In-<---.
y2 y x
Let f(p) = Inp2 - p + p-l. Then l' (p) = _p-2(p - 1)2 < 0, for p > 1.
Since f(l) = 0, it follows that f(p) < 0 when p > 1. This implies the
inequality.
Look under Inequalities in the Index for similar problems.
51994-4
If C is the largest and A the smallest angle of the triangle, then the
law of cosines gives cos C = 1/8 and cos A = 3/4. Then cos 2A =
2 cos
2
A - 1 = 1/8 and it follows that, since A and C are between 0 and
7f, 2A = C.
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51994-5
Let the integers in non-decreasing order be a, b, c, d, and e. Then abede =
a + b + e + d + e ::; 5e so abed::; 5.
There are five cases:
abed = 1 implies e = 4 + e, impossible,
abed = 2 implies 2e = 5 + e, so e = 5,
abed = 3 implies 3e = 6 + e, so e = 3,
abed = 4 implies 4e = 6 + e or 4e = 7 + e; the first gives e = 2 and the
second is impossible, and
abed = 5 implies 5e = 8 + e, but since d = 5, e = 2 is impossible.
The three solutions are thus {1, 1, 1,2, 5}; {1, 1, 1, 3, 3}; and {1, 1,2,2, 2}.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51994-6
Suppose that the circle contains three distinct rational points. Then, sub-
stituting their coordinates in x
2
+ y2 + Ax + By + C = 0 determines
rational values for A, B, and C. But then the coordinates of the center,
(-A/2, - B /2), are both rational, a contradiction.
Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
150 Solutions
Exam #30-1995
S 1995-1
Let u = Z1 + -/zr - z ~ , and v = Z1 - -/zr - z ~ . Then u+v = 2zl. and
u - v = 2-/zr - z ~ . By the Parallelogram Identity,
1
lul
2
+ Ivl2 = 2(1u + vl
2
+ lu - v1
2
)
= 21z112 + 21zr - z ~ l ,
from above. But, luvl = Izr - (zr - z ~ ) 1 = IZ212. Hence
(lui + IV\)2 = lul
2
+ 21uvl + Ivl
2
= 21z112 + 21z212 + 21zr - z ~ l .
Again, by the Parallelogram Identity,
21z112 + 21z212 = IZ1 + z21
2
+ IZ1 - z212.
Noting that Izr - z ~ 1 = IZ1 + z21·lz1 - z21, we see that
(lui + IV\)2 = (IZ1 + z21 + IZ1 - z21)2.
Since both bases are nonnegative, this yields lui + Ivl = IZ1 + z21 + IZ1 - z21
which establishes the required result.
Look under Complex Numbers in the Index for similar problems.
S 1995-2
Let w be a complex cube root of unity, with w i=- 1. Then w is a root
of x
3
- 1 = (x - 1)(x
2
+ X + 1) = 0, Since w i=- 1, we must have
w
2
+ w + 1 = 0. Let 8 be the given sum,
8 _ ~ ( 3n )
1 - 6 3k+ 1 '
k=O
8
2
= I: (3k
3
: 2)'
k=O
Use w
3
= 1 and the Binomial Theorem to get
(1 + 1)3n = 8 + 8
1
+ 8
2
,
(1 + w)3n = 8 + w8
1
+ w
2
8
2
,
(1 + w
2
)3n = 8 + w
2
8
1
+ w8
2
.
Exam #30-1995 151
Use 1+w+w
2
= 0, so that (1+w)3n = (_w
2
)3n = (_1)
3n
w
6n
= (_1)n,
since w
3
= l, and(1 + w
2
)3n = (_w)3n = (_1)
3n
w
3n
= (_1)n, and add
the three results above to get
Hence
2
3n
+ 2. (-1)n
S = ---:3,.....-'-------'-.
Look under Finite Sums in the Index for similar problems.
51995-3
Let (y'5 + 2)P - 2
P
+
1
= N + f, where N is an integer and ° < f < 1.
We need to show 20p divides N. Let f' = (y'5 - 2)p. Then, since
° < y'5 - 2 < 1, we have ° < f' < 1. Hence -1 < - f' < 0, and
-1 < f - f' < 1. But
N + f - !' = (y'5 + 2)P - 2
P
+
1
- (y'5 - 2)P
= 2(p . 1 . 2 . 5(p-l)/2 + P . 3· 2
3
. 5(p-3)/2
+ ... + p . p - 2 . 2
P
-
2
. 5 + 2
P
) - 2
P
+
1
is an integer, since p is odd. Hence f - f' is an integer, which must be
= 0, since -1 < f - f' < 1. Thus
N = 4 . 5(p . 1· 5(p-3)/2 + p . 3 . 22 . 5(p-5)/2 + ... + pp - 22
P
-
1
.
But p is an odd prime implies p divides pr for every r such that 1 :::; r :::;
p - 1. This shows that 20p divides N.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51995-4
Let
Then
!,(x) = 12(x
2
+ X + 1)2(2x + 1) - 27(2x(x + 1) + 2x
2
(x + 1)).
We can easily verify that
° = f (1) = f ( - ~ ) = f ( - 2) = !' (1) = !' (-~ ) = f' ( - 2).
152 Solutions
Since f (x) is a sextic, we conclude that 1, - ~ , and -2 are double zeroes
of f (x) and that f (x) has no other zeros. As the leading coefficient of
f(x) is 4, we now see that
f(x) = (x - 1)2(2x + 1)2(x + 2)2.
This establishes the result.
Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems.
51995-5
Let N = 11 .2
2
.3
3
... nn. Then there are
n(n + 1)
1+2+3+"'+n= 2
factors in N, their geometric mean is N2/n(n+l), and their arithmetic mean
equals
1 + (2 + 2) + (3 + 3 + 3) + ... + (n + n + ... + n)
n(n+l)
-2-
2(1 + 22 + 3
2
+ ... + n
2
)
n(n + 1)
2n(n + 1)(2n + 1)
6n(n + 1)
2n+ 1
3
But the geometric mean of k unequal positive nUlllbers is always less than
their arithmetic mean. Hence, N
2
/
n
(n+l) < 2n + 1/3, that is,
(
2n+ 1)n(n+l)/2
N< --
3
Look under Inequalities or Integration in the Index for similar problems.
51995-6
Let G be the centroid of the triangle. Then G is
b+! (aV3) = b + ~ = c
3 2 2V3
units above L.
1 aV3 a
2
V3 .
The area of the triangle ="2a ' -2- = -4- square umts.
Exam #30-1995
By Pappus's Theorem, the required volume
V = (27rc) a
2
J3
4
= 7ra
2
J3 ( b + ~ )
2 2J3
7ra
2
J3 7ra
3
=--+-
'f 4
or = 7r: (2J3b + a) cubic units.
Look under Volumes in the Index for similar problems.
S1995-7
153
Solution 1 Let G be the centroid of the triangle. Then G has coordinates
- "" acoso' -"" asino' .
(
1 3 1 3 )
3 ~ " 3 ~ t
i=l i=l
Clearly, by looking at the coordinates of the vertices, we see that the
circumcenter of the triangle is the origin, 0. Let H be the orthocenter of the
triangle. Since, by geometry, 0, G, H are collinear and OG : OH = 1 : 3,
we see that the coordinates of Hare
(t, a cos Oi, t, a sin Oi) .
Solution 2 (Solution 2 does not use the property of the Euler line
quoted and used in Solution 1. In fact, it proves that 0, G, Hare
collinear and that OG : OH = 1 : 3.) Let A, B, C be respectively
(a cos 0i, a sin Oi), i = 1, 2, 3, and H be the orthocenter. Observe that the
origin, 0, is the circumcenter of triangle ABC. If L is the middle point
of BC, then OL.lBC. But AH.lBC also. Hence AHIIOL, i.e., AH is
parallel to the vector
II
I (02+03) (0
2
-0
3
). (0
2
+0
3
) (0
2
-0
3
))
\ cos 2 cos 2 ' sm 2 cos 2
II
I (02+03) . (0
2
+0
3
))
\ cos 2 ,sm 2 .
154
Hence, the parametric equations of AH are
{
X = aCOSDl + tcOS(<>2t<»)
, t E R.
Y = a sin Dl + t sin( <>2t<>3 )
Similarly, the parametric equations of BH are
{
X = aCOSD2 + UCOS(<>3t<»)
, t E R.
Y = a sin D2 +usin(<>3t<>3)
These two lines meet at H(x, y), where
= -aCOSDl + aCOSD2
2 . (ct
1
- D2) . (Dl + D2)
= asm 2 sm 2
and
. (D2 + D3) . (ct
3
+ Dl )
tsm 2 - usm 2
= -a sin Dl + asinD2
2 . (ct
1
- D2) (Dl + D2)
= - a sm 2 cos 2 '
Solving for t we find,
D3 - D2
t = 2acos 2 .
Thus,
Solutions
x = a cos ctl + 2a cos ( D3 ; D2 ) cos ( ct3 ; D2 ) cos ( D3 ; D2 )
= a cos ctl + a cos D2 + a cos D3.
Since y is obtained from x by replacing cos with sin, we see that y =
a sin Dl + a sin D2 + a sin D3. Thus the coordinates of H are
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #30-1995
51995-8
We have
(1+x)n k) k}
(1- x)3 = k x "2 + 1)(k + 2)x .
The coefficient of x2n is
(7) (2n)(2n + 1)
+ ... +
= t - k + 1)(2n - k + 2)
k=O
= ta {(2n + 1) - k}{ (2n + 1) - (k - 1)}
= ta 1)2 - 2n: 1 ta -1)
+ ta -1)
= +4n+ 1 +2n+ 1) ta -(2n+ 1) ta
+ ta -1)
1 1
= "2 (4n
2
+ 6n + 2)2n - (2n + 1)(n· 2
n
-
1
) + "2 n(n - 1)2
n
-
2
= 2
n
-
3
{ 4(4n
2
+ 6n + 2) - 4n(2n + 1) + n
2
- n}
= 2
n
-
3
(9n
2
+ 19n + 8).
155
Note: We have used the following results, obtained by putting x = 1
in the binomial expansion of (1 + x)n and in the results obtained by
differentiating with respect to x once and twice.
156 Solutions
Of course, we have also assumed that Ixl < 1, so that
1 ~ k 1 ~ k-l
1 - x = L.. x, (1 _ x )2 = L.. kx ,
k=O k=O
and
1 1 L:
oo
k-2
( )3 = - k(k-1)x .
1- x 2
k=O
Exam #31-1996
51996-1
The problem is equivalent to finding digits (integers from 0 to 9) a, b,
c such that n = lOa + b ;::: v1000 and n
2
- c
2
is divisible by 100.
Factoring, we see that (lOa + b + c)(10a + b - c) is divisible by 100. If
5 divides both factors, then 5 divides their sum 20a + 2b and therefore
divides b. Otherwise, one of the factors must be divisible by 25, and in
fact by 50 since the two factors differ by the even number 2c. Thus one
of a + (b + c)/10), a + (b - c)/10 is a mUltiple of 5. Since band c are
digits, (b ± c)/10) must be 0 or 1 and a = 0,4,5,9. But for this problem,
lOa + b ;::: 32, so either a = 4,5,9 or b = 0,5. There are 30 + 13 - 6 = 37
numbers of this form and thus 36 others besides 43
2
= 1849.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51996-2
Let ABCDE denote the pentagon P with LA = 90°. Then the area oftri-
angle EAB is 1/2 and quadrilateral T = EBCD has sides y'2, 1, 1, 1, l.
We may assume that P is convex. Note that
area(EBCD) = area(BCD) + area(DEB) = 1/2sinC + V2/2sinE.
Also, by the law of cosines,
so
BD2 = 2 - 2cosC = 3 - 2V2cosE
1 y'2 -1
- cos C - - cos E = -.
224
Squaring and adding both equations,
2 11 V2
(area(EBCD)) = 16 - 2 cos(C + E).
Exam #31-1996 157
This is clearly maximized when C + E = n, (which is true if and only if
EBCD is a trapezoid) and the area of EBCD is
Jll yf2
16 + 2 .
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51996-3
(a) Number the cats from 1 to 100, and consider the nth cat. For each
even divisor of n, he will get a dollar and for each odd divisor, he'll
lose a dollar. If n = 2
a
then the number of even divisors is
a (ai + 1) and the number of odd divisors is (ai + 1). Hence
the nth cat will get f (n) = (a - 1) (ai + 1). The cat loses money if
a = 0, i.e., n is odd, so 50 cats lose money. If a = 1, the cat breaks even,
and there are 25 of these. Finally, the remaining 25 cats profit.
(b) To maximize f(n), note that if a < 2, f(n) ::::; a and if2
a
b ::::; 100,
for a = 6, 5,4, 3, 2, then b ::::; 1, b ::::; 3, b ::::; 6, b ::::; 12, b ::::; 25. So
calculating f(2
6
) = 5, f(2
5
·3) = 8, f(2
3
.3
2
) = 6, and f(22 ·3·5) = 4
gives the 96th cat to gain the most with $8.
(c) The total amount the rats left with is
100
2) J = 68.
k=l
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51996-4
Let the two x coordinates of the square's vertices be a and b with a> b.
Then a
3
-3a = b
3
-3b = a-b so a = b
3
-2b and b = 4a-a
3
. Equivalently,
a
3
= 4a-b and b
3
= a+2b. Subtracting, (a-b)(a
2
+ab+b
2
) = 3(a-b)
so a
2
+ ab + b
2
= 3. Substituting a = b
3
- 2b,
b
6
- 4b
4
+ 4b
2
+ b
4
- 2b
2
+ b
2
= 3,
b
6
- 3b
4
+ 3b
2
= 3,
b
6
- 3b
4
+ 3b
2
- 1 = 2,
(b
2
- 1)3 = 2,
b
2
= 1 +-v2.
ISS
The area of the square is
(b
3
_ 3b)2 = b
2
(b
2
_ 3)2
so A + B = 108.
= (1 + ?'2)(?'2 - 2)2
= (1 + ?'2)( + 4 - 4?'2)
= 6 - = 6 + {I-108
= {l216 + {I-108
Solutions
Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51996-5
Reflecting ABC about the y-axis and then the result about the x-axis, gives
a closed curve r bisecting the area of a square of side length VB. Thus r
encloses a region of area (VB)2 = 4. By the isoperimetric theorem, if a
closed curve r encloses a fixed area, the length of r is minimized when
r is a circle. Therefore r is a circle, say of radius r, with 7fr2 = 4, so
r = vf41ir and the length of 'Y is
1 1
'Y = -(27fr) = -(27f) - = Vi·
4 4 7f
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51996-6
Such an event is mathematically possible if out of the 2n children, exactly
n are males. Thus, Pn = 2n e:). The expression n . P; can be written
as
2 = (1/2)4n(2n)2 = (2n)!(2n)!
nPn n n n (2nn!)4
1 . 2 . 3 ... 2n 1 . 2 . 3 ... 2n
= n-,--------:--::- -,-------:-:::-
(2·4·6···2n)2 (2·4·6··· 2n)2
1·3·5· .. (2n - l) 1 ·3·5· .. (2n - l)
= n -..,------=----''-------'- ------,----:---:--'---::----'-
2 . 4 . 6 ... 2n 2 . 4 . 6 ... 2n
1 . 3 . 3 . 5 . 5· .. (2n - l) ... (2n - l)

2 . 2 . 4 . 4 . 6 ... 2n . 2n
1 3 3 5 5 2n - 1 2n - 1 n
22446 2n - 2 2n 2n
Exam #31-1996 159
Thus,
. 2 13355 2
2 hm np = - - - - - ... = -
n--+oo n 2 2 4 4 6 n
by Wallis' formula, and the answer is 1/ yI7f.
An alternate solution can be found using Stirling's Formula: Since
n!
(
2n) = 2
2n
n [( )ny'2nn ] 2 y7m
whence Vii . Pn fir·
Look under Limit Evaluation or Probability in the Index for similar
problems.
S 1996-7
If {Xl, X2, X3, X4} is statistically equivalent to {I, 9, 9, 6} then
1 4 1
4 LXi = 4(1 + 9 + 9 + 6)
i=l
so that Xi = 25. If (J" is the standard deviation, then
and we must have
4
LX: = 12 + 9
2
+ 9
2
+ 6
2
= 199.
i=l
Letting Yi = Xi - 6,
4 4
LYi = 1 and LY; = 43.
i=l i=l
Since squares are congruent to either 0 or 1 mod 4, three of the Yi (say
Yl, Y2, Y3) must be odd and one (say Y4) must be even. As odd squares
are congruent to 1 mod 8, we have + 3 == 43 mod 8 whence Y4 must
be a multiple of 4. Since each iYii < 7, iY4i = 0 or 4. If iY4i = 4, then
we must have three odd squares which add to 27. This is possible in two
different ways: 27 = 25 + 1 + 1 = 9 + 9 + 9. Checking to see if any of
the signed sums of the elements from {5, 4, 1, I} or {4, 3, 3, 3} equals 1,
160 Solutions
we find 5 - 4 + 1 - 1 = 1, 4 - 5 + 1 + 1 = 1, and 4 - 3 + 3 - 3 = 1. The
Xi = Yi + 6 = {11, 2, 7, 5}, {10, 1, 7, 7}, and {10, 3, 9, 3}. If IY41 = 0,
we must have three odd squares which add to 43. This is possible only
one way: 43 = 9 + 9 + 25. Checking to see if any of the signed sums of
the elements from {O, 3, 3, 5} equals 1, we find 0 + 3 + 3 - 5 = 1. Then
Xi = Yi + 6 = {1, 9, 9, 6}.
Look under Diophantine Equations in the Index for similar problems.
51996-8
Let (a, f(a)) and (b,J(b)) be arbitrary points on the graph with b > a
and let c = at
b
• We are given that
or equivalently,
f(b) - f(c) f(c) - f(a)
_.....:b'----=c'---::--_---=c'----=a=--_ = 8.
b- a
Take the limit as b --+ a (and a fortiori b --+ c, c --+ a) to see that f" (a) = 8.
Since a was arbitrary, we have Y = 4X2 + Ax + B.
Look under Differentiation in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #32-1997
51997-1
We will consider combinations of the last four digits only. If the four digits
are all different, then there are C40) = 210 combinations. If we have three
different digits, then there are 3 . C30) = 360 combinations (e.g., the digits
{1, 2, 3} generate three combinations, 1123, 1223, and 1233). If we have
two different digits, then there are 3 C20) = 135 combinations (e.g., the
digits {1, 2} generate three combinations 1112, 1122, and 1222). Finally,
if all the digits coincide then there are ten combinations. The total number
of combinations is 210 + 360 + 135 + 10 = 715 and the probability is
p = 715/10,000 = 0.0715
Look under Enumeration or Probability in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #32-1997
S 1997-2
We calculate sums directly,
By using two well-known formulas the above is equal to
~ (n(n+ 1)(2n+ 1) n(n+ 1)).
2 6 + 2
161
SimplifYing we get our answer n(n + 1)(n + 2)/6. It is interesting to note
that these numbers appear as the first n numbers in the 3rd diagonal of
Pascal's triangle.
Look under Finite Sums in the Index for similar problems.
S 1997-3
Note first that z4 - 5z
2
+ 6 = (z2 - 3)(z2 - 2). So
\z4 - 5z
2
+ 6\ = \(z2 - 3)(z2 - 2)\ = \Z2 - 3\\z2 - 2\.
But we know that \Zl - Z2\ ~ \\Zl\-\Z2\\ for all Zl and Z2 in C. So
\z2 - 3\ ~ \\z2\ - 3\ = \\Z\2 - 3\ = \9 - 3\ = 6
and
\Z2 - 2\ ~ \\Z2\_ 2\ = \\Z\2 - 2\ = \9 - 2\ = 7.
Thus, \z2 - 3\\Z2 - 2\ ~ (6)(7) = 42. Finally,
21 21 1
.,..-;--,----;::---:-;- < - = -.
\z4 - 5z
2
+ 6\ - 42 2
So letting A = 1/2 we get an upper bound. Further, A is the smallest
upper bound since if Z = ±3, then equality holds.
Look under Complex Numbers in the Index for similar problems.
S 1997-4
If x
Y
= yX for x, y > 0, then taking the natural logarithm of each side we
obtain y In x = x In y, which implies
lnx Iny
x y
162 Solutions
Obviously all the above is true if x y. So suppose x =1= y. Then if
we graph the function v = In u, we see that the line through the points
(x,lnx) and (y,lny) goes through the origin and has equation
v=mu.
Hence In y = my and In x = mx. We also note that this is possible only
if x, y > 1 and m > O. Let y = tx where t > 0 and t =1= 1. Then
Simplifying we get
lntx = mtx,
In t + lnx = t(mx),
lnt + lnx = tlnx.
tl!(t-l) = x.
Then y = tx = tt!(t-l). So all pairs of the form (tl!(t-l), tt!(t-l)) satisfy
the original equation. (If we restrict t > 1 we get all solutions with x < y.)
Some pairs include:
51997-5
t = 2 =} (2,4),
t = 3 =} (J3,3J3),
t = 3/2 =} (9/4,27/8).
We claim that 16 points and 16 lines satisfy the six axioms. The proof
that this is the fewest number of points and lines will be deferred to the
solution of part (b) below. The six axioms will guide us in constructing
what is essentially a 4 x 4 array. Each row (and column) will contain four
points, thus giving us 16 points in our solution. The fact that we also have
16 lines will become apparent later. Let us begin the construction.
By Axiom 5, there is at least one line, call it rl. By Axiom 1, there
are exactly four points on this line, call them AI, BI, Cl, and D
1
. We
adopt the convention that a line in our system can be described by the four
points that it contains. So in particular, we write rl = AlBlClD
l
. Now
by Axiom 3 and Axiom 2, there is a line Cl that contains the point Al but
does not contain any of the points B
l
, C
l
, and D
l
. Let A
2
, A
3
, and A4 be
the other three points on line Cl. By Axiom 6 and Axiom 2, there are three
new lines r2 = A
2
B2C
2
D2, r3 = A3B3C3D3, and r4 = A
4
B4C4D
4
.
These lines together add a total of nine new points, namely, B
i
, Ci, and
Di for 1 :S i :S 3. We now have the 16 points in our system. By Axiom
6, we now add three new lines, C2 = BlB2B3B4, C3 = C
l
C
2
C
3
C
4
, and
Exam #32-1997 163
C4 = DID2D3D4. It is now easy to picture the 4 x 4 array: we have four
row lines rb r2, r3, and r4 and four column lines CI, C2, C3, and C4. Note
that this simple construction satisfies all of the axioms except Axiom 3.
To satisfy Axiom 3, we must add more lines (this is the tricky part).
We start by satisfying Axiom 3 for the point AI' The possible lines
through Al are:
(a) A
I
B
2
C
3
D
4
,
(d) A
I
C
2
D
3
B
4
,
(c) A
I
C
2
B
3
D
4
,
(f) A
I
D
2
B
3
C
4
·
Let us choose line (a). Then by Axiom 2, we must exclude lines (b), (c),
and (e). However, we can choose line (d) and that gives us four lines that
contain point AI. We now want to satisfy Axiom 3 for the point B
I
. As
above, Axiom 2 limits the possible lines that we can choose. The possible
lines through Blare:
We choose lines (1) and (3) to satisfy Axiom 3 for B
I
. Note that Axiom 3
is also satisfied for the points C
3
and D
3
. In a similar fashion we choose
the following four lines to complete our system:
(i) C
I
A
2
B
3
D
4
, (ii) C
I
D
2
A
3
B
4
,
This system of 16 points and 16 lines satisfies all of the axioms.
For each positive integer n, the problem statement associates a set of
six axioms to n. Say that a collection of points and lines satisfying these
axioms is an n-configuration. If C is an n-configuration and x, y are lines
in C, we say that x and y are parallel if they share no points in C. For each
line, the set consisting of the line and all those parallel to it is a family
of parallels. For n = 1, there is a configuration with two points and two
lines that satisfies the axioms, and no configuration with fewer points or
fewer lines will do. The rest of the solution to part (b) follows from the
following:
Theorem. Let n be a positive integer with n > 1. If an n-conjiguration
exists, then there is one with n
2
points and n
2
lines, and no n-conjiguration
with fewer points or fewer lines exists.
Proof Let n be an integer, n > 1, and let C be an n-configuration. Let
x be any line of C and choose a point P on x. By Axiom 3, there exists
another line y that contains p. By Axiom 1, Y contains exactly n points,
say PI = P,P2,'" ,Pn' For each i,2 ::; i ::; n, there is by Axiom 6 a
unique line Xi containing Pi and parallel to x. Let Xl denote x.
164 Solutions
Using Axiom 6, it is easy to verify that "equal to or parallel to" defmes
an equivalence relation on the set of lines of C, so Xi is parallel to Xj
when i -# j. Thus, the n lines Xl, ... , xn together contain n
2
points. We
wish to show that these are all the points of C. To this end, let Q be any
point of C that is not on Xl. Then there exists (by Axiom 6) a unique line
z through Q and parallel to Xl. Again by Axiom 6, there Camlot be two
lines through P and parallel to z. So since z is parallel to Xl, necessarily
z meets y, say at Pj' But then z must be Xj, so Q is on Xj, which is a
contradiction.
Therefore C has exactly n
2
points. It is then clear that every line has
exactly n lines in its family of parallels.
Let k be the number of families of parallels for C. Since each point
is on exactly one line from each family, Axiom 3 implies k ~ n. This
shows that C must have at least n
2
lines. Suppose that k > n. Choose any
family of parallel lines and discard it to obtain a collection B of n
2
points
and k - 1 families of parallel lines. Since we discarded an entire family
of parallels, B satisfies Axiom 6. Each point of B is on at least n lines
of B, so Axiom 3 is satisfied. Since n > 1 and C is an n-configuration,
B satisfies Axioms 1, 2, 4, and 5, and thus B is an n-configuration. It is
clear that we may continue in this fashion and discard families of parallel
lines until we have a minimum of n families of parallel lines. The resulting
n-configuration then has n
2
points and n
2
lines.
We have shown that any n-configuration must have at least (exactly)
n
2
points and at least n
2
lines. We also showed that if an n-configuration
exists, then there is one with exactly n
2
points and exactly n
2
lines. Thus
n
2
is the fewest number of points and lines for an n-configuration. This
proves the Theorem.
Look under Synthetic Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51997-6
Part (a) is a standard exercise in norms. The first set of points {x E R2 :
Ilxlh = 1} is the square in the plane with vertices (1,0), (0, 1), (-1,0),
and (0, -1). The second set of points {x E R2 : Ilxlloo = 1} is the square
in the plane with vertices (1,1), (-1,1), (-1, -1), and (1, -1).
For part (b), we first consider the 1-norm. If x = (Xl, X2) and y =
(Yl, Y2), then x + y = (Xl + Yl, X2 + Y2). Then
Exam #32-1997 165
holds if and only if
Equality holds in this second equation if and only if
Thus, Xl and YI must have the same sign and similarly for X2 and Y2.
Geometrically, this means that x and y must be in the same quadrant.
For the oo-norm,
Ilx + Ylloo = Ilxll oo + IIYlloo
holds if and only if
max{IXI + YII, IX2 + Y21} = max{lxII, IX21} + max{IYII, IY21}·
Let IXi + Yil = max{lxI + YII, IX2 + Y21}. Then
IXi + Yil :::; IXil + IYil :::; max{l
x
II,X21} + max{IYII, IY21}
and equality holds if and only if each of the following holds:
(1) IXil = max{lxII, IX21},
(2) IYil = max{IYII, IY21},
(3) Xi and Yi have the same sign.
The solution is easier to view geometrically. The diagonals Y = X and
Y = -x partition the plane into the following four parts:
(a) RI = {(Xl, X2) E R2 : X2 :::: IXII},
(b) R2 = {(Xl, X2) E R2 : X2 :::; -IXII},
(c) R3 = {(Xl, X2) E R2 : Xl :::: IX21},
(d) R4 = {(Xl, X2) E R2 : Xl :::: -IX21}.
Then
Ilx + ylloo = Ilxll oo + IIYlloo
holds if and only if X and Y lie in the same part. The proof easily follows
from the properties (l), (2), and (3) above.
Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51997-7
The volume of water can be found by multiplying the cross-sectional area
of the remaining water with the length (4 feet) of the trough. Thus, it
166 Solutions
suffices to find the cross-sectional area of the remaining water when the
trough is tilted through an angle a with the horizontal, as illustrated.
To find the cross-sectional area of the remaining water (region W) we
subtract the areas of the sector on the left and the isosceles triangle in the
middle of the figure above. One can show that the angle subtended by the
arc in the sector is 2a. So the area of the sector is
1 2
Asector = 2(2a)r = a.
The isosceles triangle has congruent angles of measure a. Using trigonom-
etry, we get the area of the triangle
Atriangle = = = cos a sin a.
We subtract these areas from the total area of the cross-section, which is
7r /2, to get 7r /2 - cos a sin a for the cross-sectional area of the remaining
water. Now mUltiplying by the length of the trough, we get the volume of
the remaining water 27r - 4a - 4 cos a sin a feet
3
.
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #33-1998
51998-1
Here is a Cartesian proof: put P at the origin with AB along the x-axis and
C, D, E in the upper half-plane. Let C have equation (x - a? + y2 = r2,
and let the lines P E and PC have equations y = bx and y = -bx,
respectively. Note that the slopes of these two lines are opposite since D
must lie on the y-axis and LCP D = LDP E. The coordinates of E and C,
then, are (Xl, bxd and (X2' -bX2), respectively, where Xl and X2 are the
positive and negative (resp.) roots of the equation (x - a)2 + b
2
x
2
= r2.
Furthermore, D = (0, vr2 - a
2
). Now, we calculate distances: PE =
xIVl+b
2
, PC = -x2Vl+b
2
. Since Xl and X2 are solutions of the
same quadratic equation, we know that their product is the ratio of the
Exam #33-1998
167
constant term of that equation to the leading term. Therefore,
PE. PO = -XlX2(1 + b
2
) = -(a
2
- r2)(1 + b
2
) = r2 _ a
2
= PD
2
(1 + b
2
)
A transformational proof: reflect through AB to obtain 0", D" and E",
then observe that P E" is a continuation of PC and PO" is a continuation
of PE. Apply "mean proportional" to the chords D D" and 0 E".
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51998-2
Let k = n/7 and m = (nw
u
- 2u)/7. Then, 70m = 7k - 21u so that k
is an integer if and only if m is an integer .
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51998-3
One direction is obvious: if n = p2 - q2, then n = (p + q) (p - q) and
both of these factors are greater than 1. In the other direction, if n = 8t
with 8 2: t > 1, then we set p = (8 + t)/2 and q = (8 - t)/2. Since n is
odd, both 8 and t must be odd, so that both their sum and difference are
even. Thus, p and q are nonnegative integers, with n = p2 - q2. To see
that p - q > 1 observe that p - q = t.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
51998-4
For part (a), use induction. First, observe that (0, 1) is on one of the
hyperbolas. Then, assume that (fk-2, h-l) is on one of the hyperbolas,
that is, iLl - ik-dk-2 - R-2 = ±1.
Then, we verify that
R - hh-l - ILl
= (fk-l + h_2)2 - (fk-l + ik-2)!k-l - /;-1
= ILl + 2ik-dk-2 + IL2 - iLl - ik-dk-2 - iLl
= -iLl + ik-dk-2 + iL2
==F1.
Thus, inductively, we see that all points of':S are on one of these hyperbolas
(and they alternate between the two).
168 Solutions
For part (b), we will repeatedly need the following solution of y in terms
of x for fIrst quadrant points (the choice of sign corresponds to the choice
of hyperbola):
x + V5x
2
± 4 1 + J5 ± 4/ x
2
y= =x .
2 2
Now, using this, we observe a few preliminary facts: if (a, b) is a
fIrst-quadrant integer point on one of these hyperbolas and a 2:: 2, then
b 2:: a (since 5 ± 4/ a
2
2:: 4). Furthermore, if a 2:: 2, then b :s; 2a (since
5 ± 4/ a2 :s; 9). Also, if a < 2 and is a nonnegative integer, then we
have only a few possibilities to consider (a = 0 and a = 1) with both
sign choices), leading to three integer points: (0,1), (1, 1) and (1,2), all
of which are in F.
Next, assume that there is a point (a, b) which is an integer, fIrst-quadrant
point on one of the two hyperbolas, but is not in F. Let (ao, b
o
) be such a
point with ao as small as possible. From above, we know that ao 2:: 2 and
that ao :s; b
o
:s; 2ao. Consider the point (b
o
- ao, ao): it is clear that this
is still a fIrst-quadrant integer point and that b
o
- ao :s; ao. We now show
that this point is on one of the hyperbolas:
a6 - (b
o
- ao)ao - (b
o
- ao)2 = a6 - boao + a5 - b5 + 2b
o
ao - a5
= a6 + boao - b6 = ±1
since (ao, b
o
) is on one of the hyperbolas. Furthermore, there is exactly one
point at which b
o
= 2ao, namely,(1,2) so that (b
o
- ao, ao) has a strictly
smaller fIrst coordinate than (ao, b
o
), implying by our assumption that it
must be in F. But, then (ao, b
o
) must have been in F as well, contradicting
our choice of (ao, b
o
).
Look under Analytic Geometry or Fibonnacci Sequences in the Index
for similar problems.
51998-5
Denote by Al(X) the area of the portion of R(x) lying between fo and h.
Denote by A
2
(y) the area of the portion of R(r;\y)) lying between h
and h- Then,
Exam #33-1998 169
Furthermore,
r r t1/f3
A2(Y) = io r;1(t) - r;1(t)dt = io a
1
/f3 - f:;1 dt.
Now, the condition that it bisect fo and h in area may be rephrased
as A
2
(y) = A1U;1(y)) or
13+1
l
y
t1/f3 _ -1 _ (a - 1)y13
1/13 f2 dt - 13+1 •
o a (,8 + 1)a 13
Integrating and solving a bit further, we find that
l
y
-1 13+1 a,8 + 1 - a
f
2
(t)dt=y13 13+1·
o (,8+1)a13
Solving for f:;1 and then inverting, we find that
x
f3
a
f3
+
1
,8f3
fz(x) = (a,8 + 1 - a)f3·
Look under Integration in the Index for similar problems.
51998-6
(a) An inclusion-exclusion argument gives
Dn =nl-n(n-1)1+ (;)(n-2)1- ....
Rewriting this a bit gives
This latter form is useful for part (b): Since
00 (_1)i
e=L-·,-,
z.
i=O
it is clearly sufficient for part (b), to show that
00 (-1)in'
\n!/e-Dn \=\ L ., ·\<1/2.
z.
i=n+1
Since this latter series is an alternating series with terms decreasing in
absolute value, its limit has absolute value strictly less than the absolute
value of the first term which is 1/ (n + 1). So, for n > 0 we have part (b).
170 Solutions
For part (c), using the expression above, together with the ratio test
method for computing radius of convergence, yields the following expres-
sion for the radius:
. Dn+In! . n!(n + I)!
hm = hm , ..
n--+oo Dn(n + I)! n--+oo (n + l)!n!
(
_l)n+I
= lim 1+ .=l.
n--+oo (n + 1) "n (-.1)'
L..,,=o ,!
Look under Derangements in the Index for similar problems.
51998-7
For part (a), one very simple method is to observe that the example
generalizes in the following way: if det A = 1, then(A±I)2 = (tr A±2)A
so that one simple method of coming up with two square roots of [A] is
to find a representative of the class, say A', which has determinant 1 (do
this by dividing A by the square root of its determinant, which is possible
since we're dealing with complex matrices), then adding or subtracting I.
An alternate form would be
v1AT = [A ± v'det AI].
Generally, this will produce two distinct valid square roots, but occasionally
one of the two will be singular. This occurs when =Fv'det A is an
eigenvalue of A which occurs only when A has a repeated eigenvalue.
In this case, one of the two square roots will be singular (and its square
will be the zero matrix).
(b) This provides us with one or two distinct square roots. Is this all?
The answer, for classes other than the class of the identity, is "yes." The
way to see this is to take a representative of the equivalence class which
has determinant 1 and put it in Jordan canonical form, say 0 = BAB-
I
is in Jordan form. Any square roots [D] of [0] correspond to square roots
[B-
1
DB] of [A]. So, we are reduced to examining determinant 1 Jordan
forms. There are two such, diagonal and nondiagonal. .
Consider the nondiagonal form first. Here 0 = and we are
looking for D = such that D2 = wO for some w.
We calculate that
(
a b) 2 ( a
2
+ be
e d - e(a + d)
b(a + d))
d
2
+be'
Exam #34-1999 171
For this to be equal to we need e(a + d) = 0 and b(a + d) =
a
2
+ be = d
2
+ be = W =1= O. The first equation (together with one of the
latter) implies that e = 0 and a + d =1= O. But, since clearly a
2
= d
2
, we
must have a = d. Thus we are reduced to 2ab = a
2
which gives us one
equivalence class, namely [( ) ] .
In the diagonal case, C = A 1) with A =1= A-I (otherwise C is
equivalent to J). So, we have b( a + d) = e( a + d) = 0, a
2
+ be = W A and
d
2
+ be = W A -1. The former implies that either b = e = 0 or a + d = 0, but
if a = -d, the latter two cannot hold, since this would force WA = WA -1.
So we must have b = e = 0, a
2
= WA and d
2
= WA -1. This gives us two
classes of square roots,
l/Jx)] and
which are equivalent to the two square roots computed by the simpler
method above.
For part (c), we apply the calculations for part (b) and obtain:
b(a + d) = e(a + d) = 0, a
2
+ be = d
2
+ be.
These are all satisfied whenever a + d = 0, giving infinitely many
equivalence classes of square roots of [1], in addition to the obvious fact
that [1] is its own square root. To show that there are infinitely many
nonequivalent square roots, consider the matrices (! where a, bare
arbitrary complex numbers.
Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems.
Exam #34-1999
51999-1
The key observation is that the procedure never alters the parity (even/odd
count) of the orange balls. Each performance results in a loss of one ball
from the urn, so that, eventually, just one is left. Its color must be orange
since the original number of such balls is odd.
Look under Logic in the Index for similar problems.
172 Solutions
51999-2
Various correct proofs can be given, some using trigonometry, some via
analytic geometry. The simplest and most elegant proof, however, is to
consider area. We have
area of T = area of AB P + area of BC P + area of CAP,
where A, B, and C are the vertices of T. The standard area formula
( ~ b a s e x height) for triangles then shows that the constant of the problem
is the altitude of T.
Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.
51999-3
The inequality may be rewritten as
(i)
We square both sides, in attempting to eradicate the radicals, giving
5x
2
+ 2xy + y :s; 2x2 + 2V2x V x
2
+ y2 + x
2
+ y2. (ii)
Cancellation leads to the simpler inequality
(iii)
Squaring again gives
(iv)
or
(v)
Inequalities (i) to (v) are all equivalent. (v) is valid, with equality only
when y = x, so that the same is true of (i).
Look under Inequalities in the Index for similar problems.
51999-4
There is a grain of truth to the claim mentioned in the question. Iff is a
convex jUnction, increasing or not, then the Riemann sums (over uniform
partitions) do tend monotonically to the integral. This is true whether the
sums are evaluated at the right-hand endpoints (as they are here), or at the
left, or whether they are inscribed or circumscribed. A counterexample to
Exam #34-1999 173
the claim is provided by the piecewise linear function
{
0, if 0:::; x :::; 1/2,
f(x)= 6x-3, if1/2:::;x:::;2/3,
1, if 2/3 :::; x :::; 1.
It is clear that
f(1/2) + f(l) = 1/2
2 '
and
f(1/3) + f(2/3) + f(l) _ 2/3
3 -.
Look under Riemann Sums in the Index for similar problems.
51999-5
We take the dartboard to be the square centered at the origin with comers at
(±1, ±1). The points closer to the center than the edge are those enclosed
by four parabolic arcs as illustrated.
The desired probability is the ratio of the shaded area to the total area
of the square. The symmetry of the problem enables us to compute this
ratio by restricting our attention to the triangle indicated below.
(1, 1)
(0,0)
p __ ---I (1,0)
174 Solutions
The parabolic arc is the locus of points equidistant from (0,0) and the
line l. We have
J x
2
+ y2 = 1 - x,
so that the equation of the arc is x = (1- y2)/2.
P is the point (1/2,0), while Q is the intersection of the arc with the
line y = x. Letting Q = (q, q), we must have q = (1 - q2)/2, so that
Q=(}2-1,}2-1).
The shaded area of the triangle is
4}2-5
6
The total area of the triangle is 1/2, so the probability is 41-
5
.
Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems.
51999-6
Three consecutive entries of the nth row, say
stand in the ratio 1 : 2 : 3 if and only if
n-k n-k-l
-- = 2 and
k+l k+2
3
-
2
These equations, obtained by expanding the binomial coefficients as pre-
scribed in the question, may be rephrased as n = 3k + 2 and 2n = 5k + 8.
There is one, and only one, solution: n = 14, k = 4.
51999-7
The series diverges. Its terms lie between those of the (divergent) harmonic
series, :Z::::;;:O=ll/k, and those of the (convergent) alternating harmonic
series, :Z::::;;:O=l ( -1)k / k. There is some cancellation in our series, courtesy
of the cosine, but this occurs too slowly for convergence because of the
logarithm.
We show that the partial sums of our series are not Cauchy: more
precisely, we prove
(2n+i)"-
e L cos(1og k) >
k=e(2n- i)"- k
(n=I,2, ... ).
Exam #34-1999
To do this, we observe that
whenever
so that
whenever
1
cos x > M
- y2
1
cos (log k) ;::: V2
The series (*) contains at least
terms, all of which are greater than
1
Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems.
51999-8
175
The standard formula for the sum of a finite geometric series has a matrix
analogue,
1 - Am = 0 by hypothesis, so that
(1 + A + ... + A
m
-
1
)(1 - A)x = 0
no matter what the vector x. Since 1 - A i=- 0, there exist nonzero vectors
x and y with
(1 - A)x = y.
But then, by (**),
(1 +A+ ... + Am-1)y = 0
so that 1 + A + ... + Am-l is singular and det(1 + A + ... + Am-l) = o.
Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems.
176 Solutions
Exam #35-2000
52000-1
If Cindy didn't do it, the other three are lying. In particular, Becky must
be lying. This means that Ducky is telling the truth. Therefore Cindy is
the only possibility.
Look under Logic in the Index for similar problems.
52000-2
The solution to part (a) is 2000 = 5555
7
.
(b) 1885 = 1111
12
. Let the number be N = aaaab = aMb where
Then since 1 ::; a ::; b - 1,
Since N < 2000, Mb < 2000, b::; 12 and since 111112 = 1885, we have
N :::::: 1885 whence b
4
> 1885 so that b :::::: 7. The values of Mb for b = 7,
8, 9, 10, and 11 are 400, 585, 820, 1111, 1464 and no multiples of these
lie between 1885 and 2000.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
52000-3
It converges. Let
Since n + vn + 1 > n, Sn+1 :::::: Sn and therefore Sn are increasing. We
show the Sn < 2 for all n and thus we have convergence. For x:::::: 6, we
have
x + ffx < 2x - 2.
Thus we see that
Exam #35-2000
Sn < 1+ + Vn- 2+ Vn-1 + y2n- 2
< ... +Vn-2+V2n=4
1 + )2+ V3+'" + Vn- 3+ y2n -6
< ...
<
< 1+)2+ V3+ V4+V9
< VI + V2 +..)3 + 3
< VI + v'5 < 2.
The actual value is 1.75793 ....
Look under Sequences in the Index for similar problems.
52000-4
177
The order of an element divides the order of G, and can therefore be 1, 3,
5, or 15. For these k, let nk be the number of elements of order k. Clearly
nl = 1. We'll show that n15 > 0 (an element x of order 15 exists) and
so G =< x > is cyclic. Suppose G has A subgroup(s) of order 3 and
B subgroup(s) of order 5. Since 3 and 5 are prime, by Sylow's theorem,
A == 1 (mod 3), B == 1 (mod 5), and both A and B divide 15. Thus
A = B = 1 and n3 = 2, n5 = 4. Since nl + n3 + n5 + n15 = 15,
n15 = 15 - 1 - 2 - 4 = 8 > O.
Look under Group Theory in the Index for similar problems.
178
52000-5
Since
- - T)k
V5 V5
Solutions
is an integer for k 2: 1, and 11 - TI < 1, we have
so
and
Fk = _l_
T
k - - T)k
V5 V5
(-l)kFk = __ 2-
sinh
(V5)
k! J5e 2
k=O
) (-li!k Fk ) = sinh2 (V;) = cosh Vs)
by the double angle formula cosh 2x = 2 sinh2 x + l.
Look under Fibonnacci Sequences or Infinite Series in the Index for
similar problems.
52000-6
The desired ratio is p = K / 7f R2, where K denotes the area of the
triangle. We use the law of sines, sinG = c/2R and the area formula
K = to write
(a/R) (b/R) sinG 2. A . B . G
p = 27f = ;;: sm sm sm
= sin2BsinBsin3B
7f
= cos Bsin
3
B(4cos
2
B-1)
7f
= - X
2
)3/2(4x
2
- 1)
7f
where x = cos BE (1/2,1). Thus we seek the maximum of
4
p = - f(x), f(x) = (1 - x
2
)3/2(4x
3
- x) on (1/2,1).
7f
Exam #35-2000 179
f'(x) = (1- x
2
)3/2(12x
2
-1) + (4x
3
- x)(3/2)(1- X
2
)1/2(_2x)
= (1- X
2
)1/2 [(1- x
2
)(12x
2
- 1) + (4x
3
x)(
= (1 - X
2
)1/2(16x
2
- 1- 24x4)
so
16x
2
- 1 - 24x4 = 0 or
2 4+v'IO
x =---
12 '
the other root being less than 1/2. Thus the answer is
ig( -1l)3/2(4g
2
- 1).
7r
This can be written as
i (1- (4 -1) . h +
7r 3 12 3 12 V 3 12
= 7v'IO - 2 /22 4v'iO
1087r V +
(7v'IO - 2)( V20 + J2)
1087r
34J2 +5V5
547r
Look under Geometry or MaxIMin Problems in the Index for similar
problems.
52000-7
Consider x = J2v'2. If x is rational, it is a counterexample. Otherwise,
y = xv'2 is a counterexample since y = 2 is rational.
Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.
52000-8
If D f = 1', the characteristic polynomial factors as
(D2 + 1)(D - 1)(D2 + D + 1)f = 0,
which yields five linearly independent solutions, which can be combined
under the Principle of superposition to yield the general solution
f(x) = LCieTiX,
ISO Solutions
where ri is a root of the characteristic polynomial (±i, 1, w, w), with w =
(-1 + v3i)/2. Since limf(x) = 0, Re(ri) < 0 and f(x) = Ae
iw
+ Be
iw
.
Since f(O) = 0, B = -A and
f(x) = Ae-X/2[eixv'3/2 _ e-
ix
v'3/2]
= Ce-
x
/
2
(sin V; x)
for some constant C.
Look under Differential Equations in the Index for similar problems.
Index by Problem Type
Algebraic Structures
1971-1, 1971-7
Analytic Geometry
1967-2, 1976-5, 1978-2, 1979-6, 1981-6, 1988-6, 1990-6, 1991-1, 1991-7,
1994-6, 1996-4, 1997-6, 1998-4
Arclength
1992-1
Binomial Coefficients
1999-6
Complex Numbers
1967-5, 1968-7, 1986-2, 1986-3, 1995-1, 1997-3
Derangements
1987-4, 1998-6
Differentiation
1966-4, 1971-3, 1976-3, 1982-4, 1996-8
Differential Equations
1969-4, 1979-3, 1980-3, 1988-1,2000-8
181
182 Index by Problem Type
Diophantine Equations
1966-1, 1968-4, 1983-6, 1992-8, 1996-7
Enumeration
1966-5, 1966-8, 1967-4, 1968-8, 1971-4, 1971-6, 1975-3, 1982-2, 1984-2,
1984-7, 1985-4, 1986-4, 1987-2, 1990-2, 1991-2, 1991-3, 1991-7, 1992-3,
1997-1
Field and Ring Theory
1973-5
Fibonnacci Sequences
1983-2, 1998-4, 2000-5
Finite Sums
1978-3, 1980-7, 1995-2, 1997-2
Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
1988-3
Geometry
1966-2, 1967-6, 1967-8, 1968-2, 1969-5, 1970-3, 1970-4, 1975-2, 1978-5,
1981-3,1982-3, 1983-3, 1987-5, 1988-5, 1988-6, 1989-3, 1990-4, 1991-3,
1993-8, 1994-4, 1995-7, 1996-2, 1996-5, 1997-7, 1998-1, 1999-2,2000-6
Group Theory
1972-7, 1974-2, 1985-3, 1988-2, 1992-4, 1993-2,2000-4
Inequalities
1980-1, 1994-2, 1994-3, 1995-5, 1999-3
Infinite Series
1967-7, 1968-5, 1968-6, 1972-4, 1974-6, 1975-1, 1983-4, 1987-3, 1999-7,
2000-5
Index by Problem Type 183
Integration
1971-3,1973-4,1977-2, 1980-6, 1987-6, 1988-5, 1989-6, 1992-1, 1992-5,
1995-5, 1998-5
limit Evaluation
1966-6,1968-5,1970-1, 1971-5, 1973-1, 1973-4, 1976-6, 1983-1, 1984-6,
1985-5, 1990-5, 1991-6, 1992-7, 1993-5, 1994-1, 1996-6
logic
1989-1, 1989-7, 1993-7, 1999-1,2000-1
Matrix Algebra
1967-1, 1972-1, 1972-2, 1973-7, 1977-3, 1980-4,1986-2, 1989-6, 1992-6,
1993-3,1998-7,1999-8
Max/Min Problems
1973-2, 1981-5, 1983-3, 2000-6
Miscellaneous
1966-7, 1974-3, 1979-1, 1979-5
Multivariate Calculus
1968-3, 1974-4, 1975-5, 1986-6
Number Theory
1966-3,1969-2,1969-3,1970-5,1971-2,1973-8, 1975-4, 1976-2, 1977-5,
1978-1, 1980-2, 1981-1, 1982-6, 1983-7, 1984-1, 1984-3, 1984-4, 1985-2,
1985-6,1987-1, 1988-4, 1990-1, 1991-4, 1991-5, 1993-6, 1994-5, 1995-3,
1996-1, 1996-3, 1998-2, 1998-3,2000-2,2000-7
Permutations
1972-5, 1993-4
Probability
1973-9, 1978-6, 1981-4, 1982-6, 1983-2, 1984-5, 1985-7, 1987-4, 1988-7,
1989-4, 1992-2, 1996-6, 1997-1, 1999-5
184
Polar Coordinates
1972-6
Polynomials
Index by Problem Type
1967-5, 1970-2, 1973-6, 1974-1, 1976-1, 1982-1, 1983-8, 1985-1, 1986-5,
1993-1, 1995-4
Real-Valued Functions
1966-4,1967-3, 1969-1, 1969-6, 1972-3, 1974-5, 1976-3, 1976-4, 1977-1,
1977-4, 1978-4, 1980-5, 1982-5, 1983-9
Riemann Sums
1968-1, 1968-5, 1990-5, 1999-4
Sequences
1985-5, 1988-4, 1989-2, 2000-3
Solving Equations
1997-4
Systems of Equations
1976-5, 1981-2, 1993-7
Statistics
1996-7
Synthetic Geometry
1997-5
Taylor Series
1995-8
Trigonometry
1977-2, 1979-2
Index by Problem Type 185
Volumes
1979-4, 1982-7, 1989-5, 1995-6

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A Friendly Mathematics Competition
35 Years of Teamwork in Indiana

© 2003 by The Mathematical Association of America (Incorporated) Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 2002107971 ISBN 0-88385-808-8 Printed in the United States of America Current Printing (last digit): 109 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 .

A Friendly Mathematics Competition 35 Years of Teamwork in Indiana Edited by Rick Gillman Valparaiso University Published and Distributed by The Mathematical Association of America .

Richard K. DC 20090-1112 1-800-331-1622 fax: 1-301-206-9789 www. and Loren L. edited by Rick Gillman The Inquisitive Problem Solver.maa. Kiran S. Box 91112 Washington. Bjorn Poonen. edited by Titu Andreescu and Zuming Feng The William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition 1985-2000: Problems. Chair Roger Nelsen Editor Irl Bivens Clayton Dodge Richard Gibbs George Gilbert Art Grainger Gerald Heuer Elgin Johnston Kiran Kedlaya Loren Larson Margaret Robinson A Friendly Mathematics Competition: 35 Years of Teamwork in Indiana. compilations of problems (including unsolved problems) specific to particular branches of mathematics. Ravi Vakil USA and International Mathematical Olympiads 2000. Kedlaya. books on the art and practice of problem solving. Guy. O.MAA PROBLEM BOOKS SERIES Problem Books is a series of the Mathematical Association of America consisting of collections of problems and solutions from annual mathematical competitions. edited by Titu Andreescu and Zuming Feng USA and International Mathematical Olympiads 2001. Paul Vaderlind.org . Committee on Publications Gerald Alexanderson. Larson Mathematical Olympiads 1998-1999: Problems and Solutions From Around the World. edited by Titu Andreescu and Zuming Feng Mathematical Olympiads 1999-2000: Problems and Solutions From Around the World. and Commentary. etc. Solutions. edited by Titu Andreescu and Zuming Feng MAA Service Center P.

Pat Sullivan. and extend a very special thank you to Paul Mielke on . Unfortunately. However. its official title became the Indiana College Mathematics Competition. Eric Tkaczyk. exam authors have borrowed many classic problems from other sources. Among all of these people. These have been included to provide a complete record of the exam. I'd like to take this opportunity to thank all of the people who have made this book possible by helping in one way or another. Steve Shonefeld. Ken Luther. and the Purdue University Math Club. I would like to specifically identify the individual faculty members who have composed the exams. this is the one piece of the history that has been lost over the years. It is really more about getting together to do mathematics and to challenge oneself than it is about winning a competition. but have not generally been attributed to an original source. Their attentive work at identifying or creating good questions has been a major reason why the competition has been a success for so long. This book shares the efforts of the many students and faculty who have participated in the Indiana College Mathematics Competition over its first 35 years. Orginally known as the Indiana Small College Mathematics Competition. many people refer to it by its popular nickname "The Friendly Exam" earned because of the collegial nature of the competition and the modest level of competitiveness between the participants and the institutions involved. I would also like to thank Pete Edson for having the idea for the competition. Over the years. the following individuals provided noteworthy help: James Lee.Preface A college level mathematics competition has been held in Indiana for more than 35 years as of the writing of this book.

to support it over the years. and to lead the section in building the endowment Indiana and the MAA would not have this wonderful example of a "friendly" competition that does so much to build the mathematical community in Indiana. Without Paul's efforts to develop the contest.vi Preface behalf of myself and my colleagues in Indiana. .

. . . . . . . . .Contents Preface The Indiana College Mathematics Competition: A Short History An Update of the History of the ICMC Exams Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exwn Exam Exam v 1 5 7 7 8 9 10 II 12 14 15 16 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 25 26 28 vii # 1-1966 #2-1967 #3-1968 #4-1969 #5-1970 #6-1971 #7-1972 #8-1973 #9-1974 #10-1975 #11-1976 #12-1977 #l3-1978 #14-1979 #15-1980 #16-1981 #17-1982 #18-1983 #19-1984 #20-1985 . . .

. . . 29 30 31 32 34 36 37 38 40 40 41 43 44 46 48 51 51 55 61 64 67 69 73 75 78 81 86 88 90 95 98 103 106 109 112 117 120 122 Solutions Exam #1-1966 Exam #2-1967 Exam #3-1968 Exam #4--1969 Exam #5-1970 Exam #6-1971 Exam #7-1972 Exam #8-1973 Exam #9-1974 Exam #10-1975 Exam #11-1976 Exam #12-1977 Exam #13-1978 Exam #14--1979 Exam #15-1980 Exam #16-1981 Exam #17-1982 Exam #18-1983 Exam #19-1984 Exam #20-1985 Exam #21-1986 Exam #22-1987 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .viii Contents Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam #21-1986 #22-1987 #23-1988 #24--1989 #25-1990 #26-1991 #27-1992 #28-1993 #29-1994 #30-1995 #31-1996 #32-1997 #33-1998 #34--1999 #35-2000 . . . .. . . . . .

. 126 130 133 136 139 144 148 150 156 160 166 171 176 181 Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Exam Index by Problem Type . . . . . . . . . . .Contents ix #23-1988 #24-1989 #25-1990 #26-1991 #27-1992 #28-1993 #29-1994 #30-1995 #31-1996 #32-1997 #33-1998 #34-1999 #35-2000 . .

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Campus Center. Edson wondered if anything of that sort was done at the college level. Peter Edson. I wrote a letter to heads of departments in the small colleges of Indiana relaying Edson's suggestion. Registration. is as follows: 11 :30 A.M. Mielke On April 27. South Mezzanine.The Indiana College Mathematics Competition: A Short History Paul T. so I wrote a second letter. Response to my letter was immediate and favorable. a trustee of Wabash College. Participants will be guests of the College. Wabash College 12:30 P. In this competition. March 12. I answered that I knew of no such competition but that I would be willing to suggest the idea to my Indiana colleagues. 1966. which we are calling "Pete Edson Day" in honor of the Wabash College trustee who conceived the idea for the contest.M.M. Crawfordsville. 2:00 P. Thus. . Baxter Hall Lounge. a written examination for undergraduates . Program for the day. sent our dean a memorandum that included a newspaper clipping about a unique mathematics competition that was held among high schools in New Jersey.M. which read in part: The Mathematics Department of Wabash College is pleased to invite its counterparts in the other colleges of Indiana to a friendly mathematics competition to be held on Saturday afternoon. at Wabash College.12:30 P.4:00 P.M. The purpose of this competition is to stimulate friendship and mathematical interest among members of the various departments and their undergraduate students. each school entered a team that worked as a team on a set mathematics examination. . on May 18.Luncheon. . 1965. 1965. .The competition.

Coffee hour at which test papers will be gathered. though (one hopes) not as difficult as. St. Earlham College. Ranking of other teams will not be revealed by Professor Springer. Joseph's. and Wabash College. and an average participation of over thirteen schools. The nineteen participants in the 1972 competition were Butler. the Putnam test. Rose Polytechnic Institute (now Rose-Hulman). and Wabash. DePauw. "The Friendly Math Competition". Oakland City.M. Taylor. IV Southeast. IVPUI Indianapolis.M. There will be a significant difference. Manchester.4:00 P. Franklin. Earlham. the essential nature of the contest as a team competition has remained the same. Valparaiso. Baxter Lounge The test. with a minimum participation of eight schools in that first year. will be similar to. a total of 24 times as of 1989. prepared by Professor George F. Taylor. and Wabash. Purdue Ft. Throughout its history. Marian College.Informal seminar for members of the various departments 4:00 P. Marian. Wayne. . Marian. Mary-of-the-Woods. Springer of Indiana University. St. IV Northwest. . consulting with one another as needed. DePauw. with eight schools participating: Anderson College. Each school is invited to bring a team of three undergraduates who will work on the test as a team. Franklin College. Valparaiso. Rose-Hulman. The tests have usually been set and graded by a single person. Since its beginning. Tests will be sent to Professor Springer for grading and announcement of results. St. Manchester. Mary-of-the-Woods. a team member from each school draws a number which is given to an impartial judge. . most often a professor from one of the large state universities. the contest has been called familiarly. Duration of the tests has been maintained at two hours. . Evansville. with a team consisting of at most three members.M. Huntington. Valparaiso University. St. a maximum participation of nineteen in 1972. In the spring of 1967 the second competition was held at Marian College with 15 participants: Anderson. Evansville. DePauw University.2 The Indiana College Mathematics Competition: A Short History 2:00 P. Rose-Hulman. from the phrase used in the above letter. A suitable prize will be awarded by Wabash College to members of the winning team. Butler. Mary's (of Notre Dame). Earlham. Purdue Calumet. however. Before each test. This first contest was held as scheduled. It has been held every year. who attaches the number to the school's name in a memo. Franklin.

A consensus was reached that mUltiple teams of three could be entered. including branches of IU and Purdue. The contests have always been managed by the host schools.The Indiana College Mathematics Competition: A Short History 3 Teams are instructed to identify their test papers with only their numbers. Since this fund was exhausted. The books are traditionally selected from those offered by the MAA. including the large universities. the grader announces the results by team number to the judge who holds the identification key. Upon completing hislher work. so that only these are seen by the person who sets and grades the test. and the winners' names are inscribed on the Edson Trophy. so that if two teams from a given school scored second and third. Each member of the winning team is awarded a suitably inscribed book prize. Some other ground rules developed naturally." It was then decided that public announcement of the top three places in the competition would refer to schools rather than teams. The Edson Trophy is a rectangular walnut plaque measuring 9 x 12 inches. and third place would be awarded to the next highest school. This person in turn reports the results to the contestants. and this practice has been followed since 1978. but in 1987 it was opened to all colleges. which had a small fund for that purpose. Rose-Hulman has always been a worthy adversary in this Indiana competition. to which Mr. though in its fall meeting of 1977. but it led to another problem. I have had the pleasure of supplying both trophy and prizes. There was early agitation for publicly announcing the ranking of the first three teams. This idea was accepted. and a decision had to be made with regard to its wish to enter several teams. Maintaining the "Edson Trophy" and awarding of prizes was assumed by Wabash College. the school would be awarded second place in the competition. the Indiana Section of the Mathematical Association of America agreed to make them a part of its spring meeting. A school may enter any number of contestants in the Putnam competition. but it must name its team of three for the competition beforehand. Edson contributed while he was alive. Until 1987 the competition was restricted to the small colleges of Indiana. and that a school need not designate "its team. for instance. To it is affixed a permanent identifying plate with this inscription: THE PETER EDSON TROPHY INDIANA COLLEGE MATHEMATICS COMPETITION .

this smaller plate is moved to the back of the plaque. and a new one replaces it. (Since writing the above. Each year. so that there will be enjoyment for everyone involved. The current trophy is at Purdue University. a non-travelling trophy will be awarded to each winner. one of Indiana's most beautiful hardwoods. the actual examinations varied in their success according to these criteria. Henceforth.4 An Update of the History of the ICMC Below this plate is a smaller one containing the year and the name of the most recent winning college and its team members. . so it resides permanently at Wabash College. it resides each year at the winning college. the 1989 winner. I have succeeded in making individual trophies for each of the past winners.) It should finally be noted that the task here has been to write examinations that will challenge and separate the competitors. As one might guess. affixing all the old winners' plates to them. where they record its six wins. The trophy "travels". Three special walnut trophies have been made to hold the 12 winning plates for Rose-Hulman. yet present some problems that all can solve. The new trophies are made of sassafras. The back of the first trophy was filled by 1978. which was the winner in that year. The two old trophies have been retired to Wabash College.

I have been an enthusiastic supporter of the competition ever since. at a joint meeting of the Indiana. The largest competition was at Ball State University in 5 . In 1992. the first year that the competition was opened up to the large state universities and explains why I had not known of the competition while an undergraduate student at Ball State University. and to hear their conversations with each other and with their faculty advisors after the exam. Indiana. the average number of teams participating in the ICMC has been 25. during my first year on the faculty at Valparaiso University. Michigan. Mary's College in Notre Dame. as you read in Paul's comments. It is always very exciting and refreshing to be around the students from the various schools as they wait for the exam to begin. Occasionally. and Illinois sections.An Update of the History of the . a team from the Indiana Mathematics and Science Academy also participates. a lot of friendly banter and good mathematical conversations occur among my VU students during the drive back to campus from the meeting. Subsequent Student Chapter Coordinators have helped implement changes to the ICMC that have made it the central part of the section's efforts to reach undergraduate students. generally from twelve or thirteen colleges or universities. In many years. While the nickname "friendly" has not been used very much in recent years. This was. Since 1990. I became the Indiana section's first Student Chapter Coordinator and one of the responsibilities was to manage the ICMC. Thirty teams from the three states participated in the competition that year.CMC I was introduced to the Indiana College Mathematics Competition (ICMC) during the spring of 1987. The first competition that I organized was at St. the competition still maintains the same friendly approach that it had when it began.

Students can then stay for a banquet and after dinner speaker. knowing that students will be staying overnight for the Saturday portion of the meeting. If they decline this opportunity. 29 teams from 22 institutions participated.00 registration fee. the Indiana section had established a small endowment to support the ICMC. This endowment will enable the section to continue to hold the exam each year and present prizes to the winning team members and the winning institution in the form of books and the Peter Edson Trophy. the large state universities have not dominated the competition since their inclusion. That year. both as presenters and as members of the audience. This format has increased the number of students participating in the mathematics sessions of the meeting. Rick Gillman Spring. a team of faculty graders do this work overnight. respectively. so that mathematical presentations are the central focus when students are part of the audience. On Saturday. Somewhat surprisingly. It has also established a new structure for the section meeting. The institution hosting the ICMC and the section meeting is invited to have one of its faculty members write the exam and solutions. Rather than having a single person grade the exams. in either the number of teams participating or the number of competitions won. The after-dinner speaker on Friday night is selected with the knowledge that at least half of the audience of 100-120 individuals are students. By 1996. Sessions on professional and pedagogical issues are now held on Friday afternoons during the competition itself.6 An Update of the History of the ICMC 1998. Each team competing pays a $5. Now these fees are paid to the writer for writing the exam and for leading the problem solving session on Saturday. Proceeds from the sale of this volume will go the Indiana section to support undergraduate student activities in the section. The section has also been able to experiment with late night workshops for students on Friday evenings. Originally this fee was paid to the exam writer for composing and grading the exam. 2002 . there is a session where solutions to the exam are discussed and the winners of the competition are announced late in the day during the section's business meeting. The most significant change in the competition came in the form of a decision to move the competition from Saturday afternoon (on the second day of a day and a half meeting) to Friday afternoon as a lead off event for the meeting. the section finds an external source to do this work.

. a bit northwest of Indianapolis. P1966-4. P4 . P1966-2. Albert Hart. Establish the existence of integers m and n such that 1 ::::: m ::::: n ::::: p and such that L j=m n aj is divisible by p. P2 . the first "friendly competition" was held at Wabash College... P1966-1.Exams Exam #1-1966 As stated in the introduction.y2 = a3 always has integer solutions for x and y whenever a is a positive integer. Prove that at least one of the distances dij is less than V2/2. Jr. Eight schools participated in the competition that year. Denote by dij the distance between points Pi and Pj . Consider any five points P l . a2. Let p be a prime number and let al. ::::: ak are there in which ak ::::: n? P1966-6. . Show that the equation x 2 . It was won by the team from Wabash College consisting of James Clynch. and Larry Haugh. P1966-S. how many different sequences of positive integers al ::::: a2 ::::: a3 ::::: .. Ps in the interior of a square of side length 1 (one). Two functions of x are differentiable and not identically equal to zero. Find an example of two such functions having the property that the derivative of their quotient is the quotient of their derivatives. viax. + A sequence {x n } is defined by the following rule: Xn+l = b with Xl = c. located in Crawfordsville. .ap be integers not necessarily arranged in consecutive order and with possible repetitions. Show that this sequence converges whenever 7 . For two given positive integers n and k.. P1966-3. P3 .

+ aNz N = 0 has no root z such that Izl < 1/3. For each positive integer n the binomial coefficients (~). Exam #2-1967 This competition was held at Marian College in Indianapolis.2. . A = {aij} is a symmetric (i. P1966-S. and C. some even. and Robert Spear.. . Suppose that we are given a collection of intervals h. If six people enter a room. and determine the limit of the sequence.e. Prove that their common chord bisects their common tangent. h. . i. B. Show that if lanl < 2 for 1 :s: n :s: N. ..n. Prove that if the set S of points in or on the boundary of the unit square is partitioned into three disjoint sets A. P1967-6. ab :s: e a + b(ln b - 1). Two parabolas have parallel axes. P1967-5.... and C is greater than or equal to V65 /8. was again from Wabash College.e. The diameter of a set is the least upper bound of the distances between two points of the set.s o< a < Exams 1 and b > 0 regardless of the value of the real number c. then the equation 1 + alz + a2z2 + . Show that for each n the number of odd binomial coefficients is a power of 2.. show that there must be either three people who know each other pairwise or three people who are pairwise strangers. Albert Hart Jr. P1967-2. P1967-1. then the least upper bound of the diameters of A. In which cover an interval I. and each row of the matrix is a permutation of the integers 1..n. consisting of David Hafting. The winning team. Show that for all a ~ 0 and b ~ 1. some odd. By an interval we shall mean a set of points x on the real line satisfYing a :s: x :s: b for a pair of real numbers a and b with a < b. are integers. P1967-3. P1967-4.. . . Let us assume that a given pair of people either know each other or are strangers. 0 :s: r :s: n. that is I ~ U~=l I k . aij = aji) n x n matrix with n odd.. Prove that the main diagonal is also a permutation of 1.. 2. B. .. S = A U B U C and A n B = A n C = B n C = 0. Prove that we can select mutually disjoint intervals from this collection which cover at least half of I. P1966-7.

Exam #3-1968

9

P1967-7. Given a > 0 and Xo > 0, show that there exists one and only one sequence of positive numbers {Xo, Xl, X2, ... } such that

Xn=
for n

L
j=n+l

00

xj,

= 0, 1,2, ....

P1967-8. Let T be a mapping of the Euclidean plane into itself which preserves all rational distances. Prove that T preserves all distances.

Exam #3-1968
Held at Franklin College, located just south of Indianapolis, this competition was won by a team from Earlham College. The team members were William Roha, Thorn Sulanke, and William Wilson. It is unique because it is the only competition that came with a warning. WARNING: The statements below should be viewed as conjectures. At least one cannot be done.
P1968-1. Let f be a real-valued function defined on the closed interval [a, b]. Show that if the set of Riemann sums for f is bounded, then f is bounded. By Riemann sum we mean a sum of the form

L
i=l

n

f(ti)(Xi - xi-d
Xi-l

where a = Xo <

Xl

< ... < Xn = band

:s: ti :s: Xi

for 1

:s: i :s: n.

P1968-2. Given four points which are the vertices of a convex quadrilateral in the plane and five points inside the quadrilateral such that no three of the nine points are collinear, show that five of the nine points are the vertices of a convex pentagon. P1968-3.

Let

f : Rn

H

R n be a differentiable function such that

f(tx) = tf(x) for X E Rn and t > O. Show that f is linear.
P1968-4. Find all integral solutions of the equation 2 X the equation 3x - 2Y = 1.
-

3Y = 1 or of

P1968-S. Let Un} be a sequence of real-valued functions defined on R. Suppose that for each n, {xlfn(x) i= O} is bounded and that the sequence

10 converges unifonnly on R to the zero function. Show that
n--+oo

Exams

lim

/00 in = O.
-(X)

P196S-6. Find two decreasing sequences {an} and {b n } of positive numbers such that

00

00

00

Lan =
n=l

00

and Lbn
n=l

= 00,

but LCn <
n=l

00

where C n
P196S-7.

= min{ an, bn }.
Let
Zl, Z2, ... , Zn

be complex numbers such that

Show that for some iI, i 2, ... ,ib we have

Iz + z· + ... + z· I > 7r.
1.1 t2

1

tk

-

P196S-S. Let nand k be positive integers. Suppose line segments are drawn joining each pair of n points and that each segment is painted blue or green. Are there k points such that all the line segments with end points among these k points are of the same color? Show that the answer is yes if n is large enough. Can you guess how large n must be?

Exam #4-1969
This competition was held at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, located in Terre Haute. The winning team from Valparaiso University consisted of Gerald Anderson, Charles Frank, and Charles Spear.
P1969-1.

Prove that sin x :::: x - (x 2 / 7f) if 0 ::; x ::; 7f.

P1969-2. Suppose p, q, and r are positive integers no two of which have a common factor larger than 1. Suppose P, Q, and R are positive integers such that + ~ + is an integer. Prove that each of ~, and is an integer.

f

!f

f,

!f

P1969-3. Determine whether {i25 or irrational.

+ 5V20 + {i25 -

5V20 is rational

P1969-4. A ball is thrown into the air. The only forces acting are gravity (constant) and air resistance (proportional to the velocity). Which takes it longer, to go up, or to come down?

Exam #5-1970

II

P1969-S. An equilateral triangle is circumscribed about an arbitrary triangle as shown in the figure below. Show without using calculus that the maximum area it can have is

~ (b 2 + c2 I

2bc cos ( A
I'
'

+

i) ).

I
I

' ,
,

I
I I

I
I I

,
, ,

tJ!7\
P1969-6. that f(a)

= feb) = 0,

Assume that f has a continuous second derivative, that a < b, and that 1f"(x)1 :::; M on a:::; x :::; b. Prove that

lib f(x)dxl:::;

~(b-a)3.

Exam #5-1970
Held at Butler University, in Indianapolis, for the first of many occasions, this competition was again won by a team from Valparaiso University. The team consisted of Gerald Anderson, Jonathon Berke, and George Lueker. A team from Rose-Hulman came in second.
P1970-1.

Evaluate . 1 1m
n---+oo

(1+ + ... +-) . 1 1 --+--+
n
1

n

2

2n

P1970-2. Let f(x) = xn + an_IX n- 1 + ... + aIX + aD be a polynomial with real coefficients. Prove that any root c satisfies

(Hint:

Icl :::; 1 + lan-II + la n -2\ + ... + laol· consider Icl :::; 1 and Icl 2:: 1 separately.)

P1970-3. Squares ABEF, BCCH, CDJK, and DALM are placed externally on the sides of a parallelogram ABCD, with X, Y, Z, and W ilie respective centers of those squares. Prove that the lengili from X to Z is the same as the length from Y to W, that the line segment from X

There was a tie for second place between teams from Earlham College and Goshen College. Let S be a set and let P be an equivalence relation on S. Prove that the regions can be colored with two colors in a way such that adjacent regions are colored differently. There was a glossary of terms at the beginning of this exam. The curves cut the disk into e/2 + 1 regions. Exam #6-1971 This competition was held at Earlham College. P1970-5. define A = {x E S::::I Yt A such that yPx}. First place was won by a team from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology-the first of their many wins-consisting of Tom Dehne. That is. and xPy 1\ ypz =} xPz. P1971-1. Find the smallest natural number n that has the following properties: (a) Its base ten representation has a 6 as the last digit. P1970-4. 6. For instance. On the border of a disk select an even number. is erased and placed as the first digit in front of the remaining digits. but this has been lost over time. y. of points. Draw e/2 non-overlapping curves in the disk whose ends are the e dots. in the case e = 10 we may have the figure below. Bill Lipp. xPy =} yPx. then the resulting number is four times as large as the original number n. in Richmond. xPx. e. for all x. (b) If the last digit. and Robert Klim. z in S. and finally that XY ZW is a square. . For each subset A of S.12 Exams to Z is perpendicular to the line segment from Y to W.

and how many keys had to be given to anyone bank robber? P1971-7.Y2 = 3(Xl . Show that there exists a line in the plane which contains no point of A. Granted that R is an equivalence relation on 5. 1. For any real number x. P1971-2. Granted that the last three digits in the decimal representation of 7400 are 0. describe or sketch A. Let A be a countable subset of a Euclidean plane.l X J be called the fractional part of x. Y2) iff Yl . where A is the unit circle with center at (0. P1971-3. let lxJ denote the greatest integer in x. Thus. find the last three digits in the decimal representation of 79999 .e-1/X)2 e. A set of eleven bank robbers decided to store their loot from a successful job in a safe (where else?) until the heat was off. P1971-5. and each robber was given keys to some of the locks. 0.J2)k as k oo? P1971-6. then l X J = n. How many locks were required. Ill. Therefore.1 / x I dx. Compute the derivative of I_el. Given a non-empty set 5 together with a binary operation operation *. Being somewhat but not completely trustful of one another. Is the following a Boolean algebra? Explain.Exam #6-1971 13 (a) Prove that A 1. That is A = {(x. Suppose that n and a unary . Yl)R(X2. (a) What is the limit of the fractional part of (2 + -/2)k as k (b) What is the behavior of the fractional part of (1 ---7 oo? ---7 + . so that 7400 = 103 k + 1 for some positive integer k. A = A. P1971-4. and = Au B Au B. c A./X' Then compute 1I 1 -1 x2(1. they decided to be able to open the safe when and only when a majority of the robbers was present. y) E 5 : X2 + y2 = I}. Define R: (Xl. the safe was provided with a number of different locks (the key to anyone not being able to open any other). c 5 and B c 5 implies A 11. Let X . (b) Let 5 be the set of points in the Cartesian plane.X2).0). if n is the (unique) integer such that n :s: X < n + 1.

and S. A and Bare not invertible. what order were the cards in after the first shuffle? P1972-6. converge? (Prove or give a counterexample.1 for all n.) P1972-5. where an > 0 and an -I. The winning team was from Purdue University-Calumet. If A is a square matrix such that A 3 + 4A2 + 3A + 2I = 0. and D are square matrices. What conditions on A and B are necessary for the existence of matrices X and Y such that AX + BY = C and BX + AY = D? P1972-2. Q. AnB Exams = BnA. B. Can a group be a union of two proper subgroups? . B. and (b) for all A. 7. Find the points of intersection of the curves whose equations in polar form are r P1972-7. show that A is invertible (I denotes the identity matrix and 0 the matrix all of whose entries are zero. C. An *B = C n *C {:} A n B = A. 9. K. 2. just west of Indianapolis. 6. 4. J. located in Greencastle. (A n B) n C (c) for all A. David Hasza. If the cards emerged in the order 10. 5. All of the hearts arranged in order from ace to king were put into the machine.) P1972-3. C in = An (B n C). A. and it consisted of Reinhard Fritz. and Lawrence Kus. A card-shuffling machine always rearranges cards in the same way relative to the order in which they were given to it. and then the shuffled cards were put into the machine again to be shuffled again. P1972-4. 8. 3. Suppose that A. does Which is bigger: e7r or 7r e ? If I:~=l an converges. B in S. = cos(O/2) and r = sin(O/2).14 (a) for all A. Exam #7-1972 This year's competition was held at DePauw University. C in S. B. P1972-1.

with 0 < 0 :s. 1+y P1973-5. P1973-6.1)2. A rectangle is inscribed in a sector of a circle of radius 1 as shown in the figure below. where ni are positive integers whose sum is n. Let A and B be square matrices. of A by B is defmed as A : B = {r E R: rb E A for all bE B}. P1973-7. P1973-2.1) . The quotient. Note that IT is the product symbol and k is not fixed but can assume any value from 1 to n. Let n be a fixed positive integer greater than 1. then both A and B are non-singular. and John VanDrie from Wabash College won. 1f /2.n(a .cos 0 2sinO' P1973-3. in Terre Haute. show that an+! . with teams from Earlham College and RoseHulman taking second and third places respectively. Determine the maximum value of IT:=1 ni. Tom Stocks. The central angle of the sector is a given angle 0. Show that the maximum possible area for the rectangle is 1 . IS non- . Mary's-of-the-Woods College. The team consisting of Tom Seilke.a is divisible by (a . Evaluate lim n---+oo 1 0 1 nyn-l --dy. A: B. P1973-1. Let A and B be ideals of a commutative ring R. Is A : B an ideal of R? Prove or disprove. P1973-4. If n is a positive integer. Evaluate lim x(e 1 / X x---+oo - 1). Prove that if AB singular.Exam #8-1973 15 Exam #8-1973 This competition was held at St.

For each positive integer m. which was held at Wabash College. Carlin. Three men are chosen at random from the group.x). Let S be a set with an associative multiplication. y in S we have x 3 = x and x 2y = yx 2. y. y) = (y2 . (b) What is the sum of all the coefficients of this polynomial? P1974-2. Determine whether at (0. P1974-4. Let P(x) = (1 + x) 1000 + x(l + x)999 + x 2(1 + x)998 + . . Show that y has a zero in the interval [0. Suppose that y is a continuously differentiable function of x which satisfies the condition y(O) = 1 and the inequality ~ +eXy+ 1 o.x) (2y2 . P1974-3. or neither. Exam #10-1975 A team from Rose-Rulman won this competition. Michael J. Show that the multiplication is commutative. + 1) = Nl + 1 (i=1. minimum. A group of 5 men contains 3 Democrats and 2 Republicans. N2)(depending upon m) such that (m 2 + 1)(n. where the team of Stanley Lyness.. Exams = Z2 with X. Copus. (a) Find the coefficient of x 50 in P(x). find two distinct pairs of positive integers (nl. P1974-5. N I ) and (n2. y) -t xy. Examine the validity of the following conjecture: The series of positive terms I:~=o an diverges if and only if the series I:~=o a~ diverges. Find all solutions in integers of x 2 + y2 in arithmetic progression. :s: P1974-6.16 P1973-8. for the function f (x.3/4J.2). + xlOOO.0) f achieves a local maximum. Dominik. What is the probability that both of the Republicans were selected? Exam #9-1974 This competition was held at Butler University for the second time. Tom Sielke. P1974-1. and David Wilde from Wabash College won the competition. and Barry W. (x. and z P1973-9.. Suppose that for all x. The winning team consisted of Robert E.

P1975-4.1 and p(2) = 2.. Exam #11-1976 This competition was held at DePauw University. Prove that the sum of all of the divisors of n is divisible by 12. + an tan (. P1976-1.) ) . Suppose that a > 0 and g(x) = for 0 < x ::. then m is even. Let n be a positive integer such that n + 1 is divisible by 12. P1976-2. Show that 7r -. and Matthew Wyneken was from Wabash College.1). Given m lines in the plane. P1976-3.< 2 L (Xl n=l a2 a 7r + n 2 <2· P1975-2. P1975-5. (a) Show that if m i=.. into how many components do they divide the plane? Prove your assertion. Let f(x) = al tanx + a2 tan (~) + a3 tan (~) + . 2. Teams from Rose-Hulman and Franklin College came in second and third. Suppose that 2ml(3m . The expression alb means that a divides b. P1975-3. Prove that it must be regular.Exam #11-1976 17 P1975-1. and (b) Show that m = 1. a.1) = Ip(x)12 . The winning team of Jay Ponder. Determine all polynomials p( x) such that p(x 2 .1. x ::. Tom Sellke. Define a f(t) dt t loa g(x)dx = loa f(x) dx. A polygon having all its angles equal and an odd number of vertices is inscribed in a circle. respectively. Show that i x f is continuous for 0 ::. or 4. with no two parallel and no three concurrent. a.

then either f is strictly increasing on J or f is strictly decreasing. Prove that limx--+o f (x) = 1.IS Exams where a1. 1] into itself. B. P1976-4.(b 1. and C be three non-collinear points in a rectangular coordinate plane with coordinates (alla2). Jan Slupesky.. How many zeroes does the function f(x) = 3x 1. Show that the matrix A - I is not invertible. B. and Bob Strickland. that is. P1977-1. using algebraic methods. Hint: You may need to know that 1 < In 3 < 1. Hint: Consider first the special case in which f(O) = o. The team consisted of Rich Priem.C2) respectively.Jr/2}. io cos xdx r P1977-3. functions f from R into R with the property that the distance between any pair of points is the same as the distance between their images under f..7=1 aij = 1 for each i. and limx--+o f(x) exists. f(1) -I.. and C. a2.. Let f be a continuous function that maps the closed unit interval J = [0.0.1. Let A. Exam # 12-1977 This competition was held at Rose-Hulman and was also won by a team from there. P1977-4.2X2 have on the real line? Prove that your answer is correct. P1976-5. + -. and that f(x + y) = f(x)f(y) for all x and y. P1977-2. Find all of the isometries of the set R of real numbers.b2). prove that a2 a3 an Ia1 + 2 + 3" + . Let A = (aij) be an n x n matrix of real numbers such that 2:. . and (C1.: I :s: 1. Prove. that it is always possible to solve for the coordinates of the center of the circle containing A. (a) cos n x Prove the following identities: = 2~ ~ (~) cos(n = 22n (n!)2' (2n)! 2k)x 1 2n (b) :. Given that If(x)l:S: Itanxl for x E {-Jr/2. P1976-6. an are real numbers and where n is a positive integer. .. Suppose that f is a real-valued function of a real variable. . Show that if f (f (x)) = x for all x III J.

F -"7""-----c---. and ACD has a right angle at A. Rint: For each integer N there is an integer r such that 1 1 1 p~l p~2 . Jay Ponder.-- + p~l p~2 . Let k be a positive odd integer and let.2..p~l p~2 . - < (1 + ~ + ~ + . + PI (1 + ~ + ~ + ..------. p'j.. + ~) ~) pi .P2.6.. p'. . + ~) ~ P1 P2 p~ P2 PN P'N Exam # 13-1978 This competition. Find the representation in base -2 for the decimal number -2374.. and 6 require more justification.. 5. For example 1101 represents -3. was again won by a team from Wabash College. and Matthew Wyneken.S (n) that 2S(n) is divisible by n + 1.5. or 9. + -.. The number -2 is a base for all integers using the digits 0 and 1..4... respectively. 7. Use the fact that 2:~=1 lin diverges to obtain a proof that there are infinitely many prime numbers P1. 3. = 2:7=1 jk. P1978-2.. Prove the following generalization of the Theorem of Pythagoras: If ABCD is a 3-dimensional tetrahedron such that each of the triangles ABC. since 1( _2)3 + 1( _2)2 + O( -2) + 1 = -3. Teams from Rose-Rulman and Manchester College came in second and third.3. .. pW + .Exam #13-1978 19 P1977-5. P1978-1. The number 10 is a base for the positive integers because every positive integer can be written uniquely as where each di is one of the digits 0...---.. The exam came with instructions: For problems 1 and 4 you need only show your computations...1.. then (areaABC)2 + (areaABD)2 + (areaACD)2 = (areaBCD)2.. The team consisted of Kevin Fosso.. (1 + ~ + P7v + . whereas problems 2. Show P1978-3.8. held at Earlham College. ABD..

and on the other end a monkey. and Tony Mazzoni from Rose-Hulman won this competition. Graph the relation sin x = sin y in the x. P1979-1. Each of the weight of the rope and the weight at the end is half again as much as the difference in weight between the weight and the weight plus the weight of the monkey. It is passed over a pulley. Let aI. As an illustration. which was again held at Butler University. A piece of rope weighs four ounces per foot. and D are four distinct points in the plane. The experiment is a success if heads is tossed both times. The whole system is in equilibrium. a2. . y-plane. for which the probability of success is 1/4: Toss a fair coin twice. an be real numbers. C. i. and on one end is suspended a weight. we present the following experiment.e. P1978-5. P1978-6. not necessarily distinct. so that 10AI + lOBI + lOCI + 10DI is smallest. The monkey's mother is twice as old as the monkey was when the monkey's mother was half as old as the monkey will be when the monkey is three times as old as the monkey's mother was when the monkey's mother was three times as old as the monkey. a3. .. The weight of the monkey in pounds is equal to the age of the monkey's mother in years. . The age of the monkey's mother added to the age of the monkey is four years. Suppose that A. Find the point 0 in the plane so that the sum of the distances from o to each of the four points is smallest.. Design an experiment with a fair coin for which the probability of success is 1/3.20 Exams P1978-4. Tim Drabik. B. and let f(x) = 'E~=llx . How long is the rope? Assuming the pulley to be negligibly small.akl.. A fair coin is a coin for which the probability of tossing heads and the probability of tossing tails are each 1/2. Exam #14-1979 The team of Mike Hall. For which value(s) of x is f(x) smallest? What is the minimum value of f(x)? You need not give a formal justification for your answer. what fractional part of the rope is on the same side of the pulley as the monkey when the system is at rest? P1979-2.

The rules of the game are as follows: (i) The only constants you may use are 1. Here is a description of the polygon: B = (4. E = (-2. 9. Note that rule (i) prohibits use of 7r or e. 9. (The hole is six inches long after it is drilled. 4=1+V9+l7/9j.91. P1979-4.14) Li (i = 1 to 8) are lines as follows: Ll goes through Band (-6. 7. -1). What time did it start to snow? Give the time to the nearest minute.) What is the volume of the part of the sphere that remains? P1979-5. 3 = 19 + 17 . Continue this through consecutive numbers k as far as you can.2 = (_1)97 + V9. -2) L2 goes through B and has slope -9/4 L3 goes through D and has slope 2/15 L4 goes through D and E L5 goes through E and F L6 goes through F and is perpendicular to x . At noon a snow plow starts to clear a highway_ The velocity of the snow plow is such that it removes a constant volume of snow per unit of time. . which must be used exactly once and in that order. -2). -21).16y = 4 L7 has equation x + 7y = 4 Ls has a y-intercept of 6 and angle of inclination 45° A is the intersection of Ll and Ls C is the intersection of L2 and L3 G is the intersection of L6 and L7 H is the intersection of L7 and Ls. and the hole is through the center of the sphere.Exam #14-1979 21 P1979-3. Snow starts to fall in the forenoon and falls at a constant rate all day. P1979-6. F = (-4. The plow goes a mile during the first hour. D = (11. A hole six inches long is drilled through a sphere. -1) with radius 3/2. as well as use of higher order roots. It goes a half mile during the second hour. operations. (ii) Algebraic grouping symbols. and functions may be used as often as desired. Find all points with integer x and y coordinates which are strictly inside the polygon ABCDEFGH (described below) and also strictly outside the circle centered at (-4. Note that 1 = 1979 .

Prove that if f vanishes at a and at some b> a. On the load scale one can place the load to be measured and any desired subset of the measuring weights. P1980-S.f(x) = 0 for some continuous function g. P1980-1. Consider a balance that is used to measure loads of integral weights. Note that t denotes transpose. P1980-6. Suppose that f is a function that satisfies f"(x) + f'(x)g(x) . and Douglas Englehart. Show that with four suitably chosen weights one can measure the weight of any load whose weight is an integer between 1 and 40 pounds. Let {an} be a sequence of positive numbers. P1980-3. located in Valparaiso. 2(x-y)2 Show (a) that the integral 10 roo sin x dx x . b]. If there exists a sequence {b n } of positive numbers and a constant a > 0 such that show that the series 00 is convergent. Find all positive functions f that satisfy f(x) < f(y) for all x. P1980-4. for the first time.22 Exams Exam #15-1980 This year. On the weight scale one can place only certain measuring weights. The winning team from Rose-Hulman consisted of Michael Call. P1980-2. A team from Butler University came in second. Show that det(I + xyt) = 1 + xty for any vectors x and y in Rn. The balance has two scales. Randall Ekl. a load scale and a weight scale. then f is identically zero on [a. the competition was held at Valparaiso University. y.

and if 18 steers take 8 weeks to deplete the grass on 10 acres. If 12 steers take 16 weeks to deplete the grass on 10 acres. If Sn show that =L n (_l)k+l k ' n k=l S2n= L-k· n+ k=l 1 Exam #16-1981 This competition. P1981-5. The team consisted of Michael Call. Then show (b) that . If the man watches the rock fall. At a point 50 feet above his eye atop a building 100 feet away. Assuming that teams are equally matched. and Tim Drabik. and the grass keeps growing at a constant rate. and (d) exactly seven games. P1981-1. (c) exactly six games. again won by a team from Rose-Hulman.Exam #16-1981 23 is convergent. Before steers are introduced to a pasture. Thomas Douglas. A man is standing atop a tall building. how many steers does it take to deplete the grass on 40 acres in 6 weeks? P1981-3. at what point in its descent is his head moving the fastest? . Find the radius of the largest ball that can be fitted into the comer behind the given ball. (b) exactly five games.!£ ( roo sin ax dX) 2 = O. was held at Indiana University-Purdue University in Indianapolis (IUPUI). a rock is dropped. Express 3/8 as a base 7 fraction of form 0.aOala2a3···. find the probabilities that the Series lasts (a) exactly four games. P1981-2. da 10 x P1980-7. P1981-4. The winning team of the World Series must win four games out of seven. there is a given amount of grass per acre. A ball of radius 1 is in a comer touching all three walls.

Randall Ekl.1jX2 . Anthony Kirk was from Rose-Hulman.. 7} is a separated subset of {I. Show that all the points can be enclosed in a rectangle of area :::. . and it is known that the latter will depart at once at full speed on a straight course of unknown direction. Show that the number of separated subsets of {I. that air friction is neglected.. The winning team of Jeffery Baldwin. disclosing the submarine on the surface three miles away. 2.. n}. 1. a2. Find a cubic equation whose roots are the reciprocals of the roots of the equation x 3 + ax 2 + bx + c = 0.Y = ° for any r. . Given finitely many points in the plane situated so that any three of them are the vertices of a triangle of area :::. and that the acceleration of gravity is 32 ftlsec/sec. . 2. . 8}. with c i= O. Exam #17-1982 This was the first time that the competition was held at Ball State University.. P1982-2. A destroyer is hunting a submarine in dense fog. P1982-4. What is the equation of this spiral? HINT: Use polar coordinates with the origin at the point where the submarine was sighted. {2. x i= 0. A subset {al. upon which the submarine immediately descends. n} is said to be separated if ai+l .. 4. . located in Muncie. and 1. 2. 4. each having k elements is (n-Z+l). The wily captain of the destroyer sails straight to the point 2/3 of the way to the spot where the submarine was sighted and then sets out on a spiral course that is bound to make him pass directly over the submarine. The fog lifts for a moment. .. 0 x =0 O? Prove your answer. P1982-3. 8} is not. P1982-1. For example. P1981-6.ad of the set {I. . Is the function f(x) differentiable at x = = {e. 5.. The speed of the destroyer is twice that of the submarine.ai . .. .n . . but {3. Hint: You may use the fact that Y-+OO lim yTe.::: 2 for i = 1.2..24 Exams Assume that the buildings are arbitrarily high.1.. .

What is the probability that you stop on the 10th toss? P1983-3. Bloomington. What is the probability that the cube of a positive integer chosen at random ends with the digits 11? Prove your answer. 1.. Find the volume of a torus (doughnut) of inner radius b whose cross-section by a plane through the axis is a semicircle of radius a. campus for the first time.. Find the dimensions of the rectangle (and the radius of the circle) which make the total area of the rectangle and circle a maximum. clx . A real-valued function f of a real variable is said to satisfy a Holder condition with exponent a if there is a constant c such that If(x) . Consider an isosceles right triangle with legs of fixed length a. . and Tom Moss. 1/2. .Exam # 18-1983 25 P1982-5. 1/4. Its winning team consisted of Baron Gemmer. with its straight boundary parallel to the axis and curved boundary away from the axis. Anthony Kirk. Show that every positive real number is a sum (possibly infinite) of a subset of the numbers {I. P1983-1. a is restricted to be ::. 1/3. }. Teams from Butler University and Manchester College tied for second place. P1983-4. Find limn-+oo \inTo P1983-2. The probability that the square of a positive integer (in decimal notation) ends with the digit 1 is 2/10 because out of every 10 numbers those and only those ending with the digits 1 or 9 have squares ending with 1. Suppose you repeatedly toss a fair coin until you get two heads in a row. The competition was held at the Indiana University.f(y)1 ::.yin for all x. Exam # 18-1983 Rose-Hulman won the competition again this year. P1982-7. y. Can you explain why? P1982-6. 1. Wherever these functions are used. Inscribe a rectangle and a circle inside the triangle as indicated in the figure below.

In the graph below. P1983-9. What is the prime factorization of 1. P2(X).005.005. Exam #19-1984 This competition was held at Rose-Hulman and a team from Rose-Hulman consisting of Todd Fine. has no solutions in positive integers if z < n. Teams from Wabash College and Valparaiso University came in second and third.Xj II xER. What can you say about N? Prove it.1] is a continuous function and that gm(x) = X (g composed with itself m times) for all X and for some positive integer m.26 Exams P1983-S. Prove the "restricted" Fermat conjecture: For any integer n > 2. Prove that I:~=IPk(X) = 1 for all X in R. Let N be one more than the product offour consecutive positive integers.1] --+ [0. P1984-1. P1983-8.010.Pn(x) by Pk(X) = X-Xj . and Dan Johnson won. Suppose that g : [0. P1983-6. ..) A B . . how many paths that never go up connect node A to node B? (Paths must follow edges indicated. + yn = zn P1983-7. Prove that g2 (x) = x for all x."" Xn be (distinct) real numbers. xn This problem is a repeat of problem #3 on EXAM #7. Byron Bishop.010.001 ? P1984-2. respectively. Let Xl.. X2. j#k xk . Define polynomials PI(X).

f(l) = 5 and (a) Find lim f(x). One by one. or prove there is no such price.1].. How many different trains of total weight 1000 tons (ignoring caboose and engines) can be made up? Trains are considered identical if and only if they have the same sorts of cars in the same order: e. After all 1000 people have gone down the hall: which doors are open and which are closed? P1984-4. b] is b.g. H H B. A very long hallway has 1000 doors numbered 1 to 1000. and Hopper cars.Exam #19-1984 27 P1984-3. H BH and F BH are distinct trains of total weight 125 tons. [Naturally. In Subsylvania. What is the probability that these three segments can form the sides of a triangle? Note: "at random" means the two points are chosen independently and with uniform probability distribution. the third person closes door 3.) P1984-7. all prices are whole numbers of quanta. forO < x < (b) Prove that lim f(x) = x--+o+ (c) Find all such functions f. one worth 7 quanta. P1984-6.] P1984-5. all the doors are initially closed. Boxcars weigh 25 tons. Find the largest price for which it is not possible for a Subsylvanian customer to give exact change.a. That is. Choose two points at random in the interval [0. there is no paper money and there are only two kinds of coins. closes door 9. and Flat cars and Hopper cars weigh 50 tons each. Let f be a continuous function on < x < f ° 2 00 satisfYing 00. . etc. (Part credit for finding some f. A train is being made up of Boxcars. 1000 people go down the hall: the first person opens each door. These two points cut the interval into three segments. opens door 12. Note that it is possible for a Subsylvanian customer to buy an item costing 5 quanta (she gives the merchant a 12 quanta coin and receives a 7 quanta coin in exchange). the second person closes all doors with even numbers. The probability of choosing a point in the interval [a. opens door 6. the nth person changes all doors whose numbers are divisible by n. but it is not possible for her to give the merchant 5 quanta in exact change. the other worth 12 quanta. Flat cars. x--+oo (_X_) = f(x) + x+1 +00.

28

Exams

Exam #20-1985
ReId at Ball State University, this competition was again won by a team from Rose-Rulman. The team consisted of Todd Fine, Erick Friedman, and Dan Johnson. Teams from Rose-Rulman and Goshen College came in second and third, respectively. Notice that the contest rules for assigning second place were broken this year; it was the first of several in which this occurred.

P1985-1. Compute

Let

(Y,

{3, 'Y, and 8 be the roots of X4 + bx3 + cx2 + dx + e = O.

((Y2

+ 1)({32 + 1)("(2 + 1)(82 + 1) + 44443333
is divisible by 7. Make up some

in terms of b, c, d, and e.

P1985-2. Prove: 33334444 more problems of this type.

PI985-3. Consider the set U = {I, 2, 4,5,8,10,11,13,16,17,19, 20}. In the figure below, each of the three paths-the solid, the dotted, and the dashed-represents a subgroup of order 6 of U under a certain binary operation. Three of the points of these paths have been labeled. Find all the others .

(:~:=~.::::.;~:U:::::.·:::::::::=)
: ~~
:.

.................. ~ ..................

" "....

".:

".' :
j

\

\ .......•....../
PI985-4. Each side of a square is subdivided into 101 segments. Find the number of different triangles that have their vertices at these 400 points of subdivision. P1985-5.
Let
al =

0 and a2 = 1, and for n

~

3,

an = (n - l)(an -l
Find (a) a formula for an and (b) limn --+ oo
';" .

+ an-2).

Exam #21-1986

29

P198S-6. Given n + 1 integers between 1 and 2n inclusive, prove that one of them must be a multiple of some other one. P198S-7. Let a and b be positive constants with b > 1. Given that x + y = 2a and all values of x between 0 and 2a are equally likely, find the probability that

Exam #21-1986
This competition was held at Butler University. The winning team consisting of Erich Friedman, John Hoffman, and Dan Tretter was from RoseHulman. The second place team was also from Rose-Hulman, and the third place team was from Valparaiso University.
P1986-1.

This is a repeat of problem #1 on EXAM #14.

P1986-2. Let {b l , b2 , b3 } be an orthonormal basis for C 3 and let ¢ E L(C 3 , C3) be given by

¢(bd = 2b2 , ¢(b2 ) = 2ibl , and ¢(b3 ) = (1
Find the eigenvalues, if any, for ¢.
P1986-3.

+ i)b3 •

Evaluate ii.

P1986-4. N points are chosen on a circle so that when all segments are drawn between all pairs of points, no three segments intersect at the same point. In how many points do these segments intersect in the interior of the circle? P1986-S. Find an equation with integral coefficients one of whose roots is y'2 +~. P1986-6.

Let

f : R2 -+ R be given by
if (Xl,
X2)

~IX~ 2 f( XI,X2 ) - { Xl +X4' 0, (a) Is

i= (0,0);
=
(0,0).

if(Xl,X2)

f continuous at (0, O)? JustifY your answer. (b) Is f differentiable at (0, O)? JustifY your answer.

30

Exams

Exam #22-1987
This competition was held at Butler University. The team consisting of Daniel W. Johnson, Brenton Young, and Daniel Kniep from Rose-Hulman won the competition. A team from Indiana University, Bloomington, came in second, and a team from Wabash College came in third.
P1987-1. A positive integer n is called composite if there are positive integers P i= 1 and q i= 1 so that n = pq. Find a sequence of 10 consecutive positive integers each of which is composite and less than 1,000,000. P1987-2. John's job at the Acme Cannonball Factory is to stack the cannonballs (which are 6-inch diameter spheres) neatly into tetrahedral piles. For example, using 4 cannonballs, John can make a tetrahedral pile with 2 cannonballs on each edge: three balls forming the bottom triangle and one in the center on the top. Find a formula for the number of cannonballs in a tetrahedral stack whose base is an equilateral triangle with n balls on each edge. P1987-3. Experiments have determined that when a particular steel ball is bounced on a hard surface, it bounces to half its original height. For example, if it is dropped from a height of 6 feet, it will bounce to 3 feet. Assuming that the ball obeys this law exactly, for what length of time will the ball continue to bounce if it is dropped from a height of 16 feet (or will it bounce forever)? [Recall from calculus that since the acceleration due to gravity is 32 ft/sec/sec, an object failing to the ground from height h (in feet) or bouncing from the ground to height h requires Vli/4 seconds to do so.] P1987-4. Ten seniors who share a house decide to exchange graduation presents. They each put their name into a hat, mix the name cards thoroughly, and draw a card out at random. What is the probability that none of the ten draws his or her own name? P1987-5.

Euclidean four-space is R4 with
=

IXYI

((Y1 - X1)2

+ (Y2 -

X2)2

+ (Y3 + X3)2 + (Y4 + X4)2) 1/2.

(a) Find five points in the unit ball of Euclidean four-space that are as far from each other as you can make them. That is, find points A, B, C, D, and E such that

10AI :s; 1, 10BI:S; 1, 10CI:S; 1, 10DI:S; 1,

and

10EI:S: 1,

IDEI} is as large as you can make it. Grand Prix driver x leads his rival y by a steady three miles. IOEI. IADI. and. . that compass headings are exactly accurate. Only two miles from the finish. Jane begins a journey at Quito. and that Jane's plane has an unlimited amount of fuel available. If sand t are both integers such that 1 :s.Exam #23-1988 31 where 0 is the origin. that there is no effect of wind. P1987-6. .i). x runs out of fuel. in the next mile. n.) Exam #23-1988 This competition was held at Butler University. IBEI. Let (G. IAEI. that * is commutative. IODI. Ecuador (at 80° west longitude on the equator) and flies steadily northwest. P1988-3.. prove that fst P(x)dx = o. s :s. etc.e. n and 1:S. P1988-1. Who wins and why? P1988-2. k = 1. and c in G. . Thereafter x's deceleration is proportional to the square of his remaining velocity. Prove that G is Abelian. n.i#k n (x .. a. i. *) be a group with the following cancellation rule: x * a * y = b * a * c implies x * y = b * c for all x. (a) How far does she fly before reaching the North Pole? (b) How many times does she cross the Greenwich Meridian (longitude 0°) in the journey? (Note: You should suppose that the earth is a perfect sphere of radius 4000 miles. his speed exactly halves. IAOI. such that min{IABI. t:s. (b) If your answer is best possible. Define n(x) = IT i=l. prove that it is.. and let P(x) be a polynomial of minimum degree in which P(k) = 5Tk (k). y. IBOI. Bloomington: Radu Tudorica and Kevin Pilgrim.2. IBDI. A team from IUPUI came in second. Going at top speed. b. The contest was won by a team of two students from Indiana University.. and a team from Purdue University came in third.

how to construct with unmarked straightedge only. Exam #24-1989 This competition was held on the Indiana University. . and C compete in a series of tests. (This was a proposed problem in the then current issue of The Journal of Recreational Mathematics.B. P1989-1. P1988-5. for coming second. as shown in the figure below. and Nung Kwan Yip. let 5 n be the sum of the squares of the first n positive odd integers. a student is awarded x points. Students were encouraged to send in solutions they liked. A team from Purdue University won the competition. a perpendicular from the point P to the line L. For coming first in a test.32 Exams P1988-4. Bloomington. Show. Find the probability that two tails do not appear in succession.) P1988-6. (This is problem 13 in the 1988 issue of The Old Farmer's Almanac. with proof. The members of this team were Alex Gottlieb. campus. respectively. What is the units digit of 512345? Prove your answer. A solution to this plus several other problems could have won the solver 50 dollars. A fair coin is tossed ten times. where the interior circular arcs have their centers on the outer circle. Teams from Earlham College and Wabash College came in second and third. Find the shaded area of the figure below. Three students A.) p • o L P1988-7. Aaron Weindling.

and z are positive integers with x > y > z. and C 9 points. There were no ties in any of the tests. resulting in two heads. .xn } of real numbers that IXm . for coming third. resulting in heads. satisfy Describe all sequences {x 1.Exam #24-1989 33 y points. B 10 points. The pipes intersect at right angles as shown below. Find the volume of their intersection. for all positive integers m and n. X2. y. Two coins are given.. The other is tossed three times.. z points. Two identical pipes have elliptical cross-sections with semiaxes a and b. Show that the area of the shaded triangle formed by the sidetrisectors of a triangle (as shown) is 1/7 of the area of the whole triangle. Student A came in second in the algebra test. .Xnl:::. 2mn m 2 +n2 P1989-3. One is fair [Prob(heads) = 1/2] and the other is biased with Prob(heads) = 2/3. One of the coins is tossed once. Who came in second in the geometry test? P1989-2. Here x. P1989-4. Altogether A accumulated 20 points. . Which coin is more likely to be the biased one? P1989-S.

but having heard this entire conversation. P1990-1. Find all positive integers which are one more than the sum of the squares of their base ten digits.) James. Hold on a minute! I happen to know the area of your ranch. know the area of your ranch. This year. They scored 51 out of 60 points on the following examination. Lucia Demetrios.1 digraphs. Bill. For example.34 P1989-6. Is the short side strictly less than half the long side? (Smith answers his question. significantly more information was collected about the competitions. How many ways can the letters . P1990-2. It is rectangular. Exam #25-1990 Beginning in 1990. (He figures furiously. The third place team from Indiana University consisted of Urmi Bhatacharya. can tell you the dimensions. a word with n letters has n . which is a 19 x 19 miles square. the contest was held at Purdue University (located in West Lafayette) for the first time. The winning team from Rose-Hulman consisted of Joel Atkins. Let me see if I can figure out its dimensions. Twenty-four teams from twelve colleges participated. 35 = 1 + 32 + 52. and Radu Tudorica. P1989-7. Now I know the dimensions. I. Down in Todd County. Peter Sepanski. Find the determinant of the matrix X1Yn X2Yn ) Exams 1+ ~nYn . and Nung Kwan Yip. What are the dimensions of Smith's ranch. on March 31. not square. and although I did not hear your answer to James's question. I have a ranch. Kathy. 1990 in connection with the spring meeting of the Indiana Section of the MAA. James. A digraph in a word is an ordered pair of consecutive letters.) I need more information. too. too. I can now figure it out. I. and Kevin O'Bryant. described in the following conversation? Smith. The second place team from Purdue University consisted of Mark Sepanski. I did not know the area of your ranch. John O'Bryan. the short side and the long side both measuring a whole number of miles.

N. which contains "I. Find all real functions f such that. A F c P1990-S. we create a new regular heptagon HIJKLM with side r. N. N.) P1990-3. the arrangement A. A" twice. I. I. A. A. D. Evaluate the following limit. Find the area of the (shaded) region inside the parabolas and outside the hexagon. f'(x) = f(x f(x + 2) = f(x) and + 1) - 2. Determine r. but not I. D. for all real x. I. A is counted. By connecting the vertices ACEGBDF A. I. N. A. N. Let ABCDEFG denote a regular heptagon with side 1. P1990-4. (See the figure below). A be arranged so that no digraph is repeated? (Thus. .Exam #25-1990 35 I. A regular hexagon of side 1 is inscribed in the intersection of two identical parabolas. N. in that order. P1990-6. D. oriented (in opposite directions) with their axes parallel to the y-axis (see the figure below).

A is joined to P. The regions inside the parallelogram and outside the star-pentagon are colored red (r). on March 23. The second place team from Purdue University consisted of Alex Gottlieb. P1991-2. P1991-1. of the parallelogram ABCD. DA and CD respectively. P to Q. P. Q and R. band e are integers and if a+b+e is even. Q to B.36 Exams Exam #26-1991 The contest was held at Anderson University. Show that the red area minus the blue area is independent of the choice of the points P.11 + 12x + 11 + ~ = 4. John O'Bryan and Mark Roseberry. The pentagonal region bounded by the sides of the starpentagon is colored blue (b). Kathy Steiner and Ken Wenger.000 inclusive. find an integer n (in tenns of a.000. If a. . Q and R are arbitrary points on sides BC. located in Anderson. illustrated below. which are more numerous. Between I and 1. Twenty-three teams from fourteen colleges participated. b and e) such that ab + n. The winning team from Rose-Hulman consisted of Jonathan Atkins. The third place team from Goshen College consisted of Dave Cooper. B to Rand R to A to fonn a star-pentagon APQBR. R C A~--------------------------~. Find the area of that portion of the xy-plane which is enclosed by the curve with equation 12x . those integers whose base-ten representations contain a "1" or those that do not? How many of each type are there? P1991-3. P1991-4. be + nand ea + n are all squares of integers. Peter Sepanski and Boon-Lock Yeo. in connection with the spring meeting of the Indiana Section of the MAA.

. Find limn-+oo(Hn/n). find the average number of viewable patrons among all possible permutations of the patrons. in connection with the spring meeting of the Indiana Section of the MAA. The harmonic mean of a set of positive numbers is the reciprocal of the arithmetic mean (ordinary average) of the reciprocals of the numbers. P1992-2. P1991-7. Tony Hinrichs. . where Hn is the harmonic mean of the n positive integers n + 1. 17 = 12 + 4 2. At a movie theater. n + 3. Are there infinitely many such trios? (c) Do there exist four consecutive positive integers each of which can be written as the sum of two nonzero perfect squares? P1991-6. and Kevin o 'Bryant. P1992-1.Exam #27-1992 37 P1991-5. Exam #27-1992 The contest was held at The University of Indianapolis on April 11. Given nine lattice points in the xy-plane. in the xy-plane is given by (~ 2: Xi. n}. The third place team from Purdue University consisted of Peter Sepanski and Pok-Yin Yu. (b) Find three consecutive positive integers each of which can be written as the sum of two nonzero perfect squares. Yi). n + n. The ant stuck to the tire for one revolution and then was deposited back onto the pavement. show that some three of the points have a lattice point as centroid. Aaron Pesetski. . The ticket seller calls a patron viewable if he (she) is taller than all the people in front of him (her) in line. and Mark Pragan.2. A lattice point in the xy-plane is a point whose coordinates are integers. The winning team from Rose-Hulman consisted of Jonathan Atkins. There were 24 teams with a total of 67 participants from 13 colleges. Assuming that the radius of the tire is one foot. n + 2. n patrons have lined up to buy tickets.···. i n n 1 1 = 1. 18 = 32 + 32 and 25 = 32 + 42. (a) Show that there exist infinitely many twosomes of consecutive positive integers each of which can be written as the sum of two nonzero perfect squares. otherwise he (she) is hidden. find the length of the curve traveled by the ant between its death and its final resting place. . For example. ~ 2: Yi). Given that no two patrons are precisely the same height.. 26 = 12 + 52. The centroid of a set of n points {(Xi. A car rode over an ant on the pavement. The second place team from Indiana-Purdue University at Fort Wayne consisted of Jeff Gerardot.

on April 24. Michigan. The second place from from Indiana-Purdue University. Milce Bolt. Notice that 3 and 4 are consecutive integers.) Exam #28-1993 The contest was held at Saint Mary's College. Determine all other integral right triangles whose legs are consecutive integers. 2 P1992-6. Evaluate P1992-8. and 5 form the sides of a right triangle. Tony Hinrichs. Identify all finite groups G of order n having at least 2n proper subgroups. There were 30 teams.(The hypotenuse must also be an integer. but need not be consecutive as 5 happens to be. 4. . and Tim Hotlebeek. what is the maximum number of integral matrices B that can satisfy B2 = A7 P1992-7. and Aaron Pesetski. Evaluatei: e. They communicate by mailing letters. P1992-4. (Hint: How do the eigenvalues of B relate to the eigenvalues of A 7) (c) For an arbitrary 2 x 2 matrix A. P1992-5. Find. A collection of n gossips each knows a unique tidbit of scandal not known to any of the others. the minimum number of letters that can suffice to share all of the scandal. The third place team from Calvin College. and Nick Tallyn. located at the northern edge of South Bend. Fort Wayne. consisted of Alan Baljeu. with representation from all three states.38 Exams P1992-3. Of course each gossip will share all of the scandal he (she) knows at that time whenever he (she) sends a letter. with proof. The winning team from Rose-Hulman consisted of Jon Atkins. (b) Find four different integral matrices B so that B2 = A. For A = (_~90 _56 ) (a) find the eigenvalues of A. Brian Johnson.x2 dx. We all know that the lengths 3. in connection with the joint spring meeting of the Indiana Section of the MAA with the Illinois and Michigan Sections. consisted of Joel Holcombe.

..2. and 836. Prove that 2n + l is a factor of 1(V3 + 1)2nl for all positive integers n. (n . f(g(f(a))) f and 9 be mappings from the set A to itself for which g(a) and g(f(f(a))) = f(a) for all a in A. In the figure below. C :-::.) How many permutations of {I. + ai. . ..2. D. for n = 4.Exam #28-1993 39 P1993-1. Prove that f = g.. (For example. . there is a j > i for which laj .2. . a permutation al. (Here Ix l denotes the smallest integer not less than x. P1993-6. Prove that A2 = A. 546. n---+oo n + a2 + .3 is orderly whereas 3. for i > O.. For n > 1.ai I = 1.+l = val Determine lim (an). E (A :-::. 691.4.1). B. Let al = 1 and a. Let = (P" ( P'(x) x) ) 2 -I. for each i = 1.) P1993-7. D :-::... P1993-3. . . .a2. B :-::. Find all integers A. Prove that pili ( X ) ~ P'(x) < 2 for all x for which P' (x) P1993-2. Find the area of the parallelogram abed..:""------"?IC 5 5 A 6 2 . 2. P1993-4.4.O.n} is "orderly" if. yield only the sums 401. P1993-S.an of {l. C.. E) which.1. the permutation 1.. Let P(x) be a real cubic polynomial for which P'(x) has distinct real zeros. B~----'=-----'-----"':. Let A be a square matrix of rank 1 and trace 1. when added in pairs.n} are orderly? HINT: What are the possible values for al ?) P1993-5. ABCD is a rectangle..2 is not.

The sides of a triangle have lengths 4. © 1975. The third place team from Purdue University consisted of Ilya Gluhovsky. Exam #30-1995 The contest was held at Tri-State University. Avijit Sarkar. The third place team from Rose-Hulman consisted of Jamie Kawabata. in conjunction with the spring meeting of the Indiana Section of the MAA. on March 19. P1994-3. and 6. Show that for positive integers n. The second place team from Wabash College consisted of Eham Ahmed Chowdhury. 1976. P1994-4. and William Stier. Matt Laue. and Nick Tallyn.) P1994-1. . and James Moore. Twenty teams from eleven colleges participated. 5. Show that one of its angles is twice another. consisted of Daniel Bliss. and Shirish Ranjit. The second place team from Rose-Hulman consisted of Jonathan Atkins. Find all sets of five positive integers whose sum equals their P1994-6. If x > y > 0. The winning team from IU. in conjunction with the spring meeting of the Indiana Section of the MAA. P1994-5. (These problems were used with the permission of Crux Mathematicorum. The winning team from Wabash College consisted of Faisal Ahmed. Twenty-three teams from eleven colleges participated. located in the far northeastern community of Angola on March 31. Rick Mohr. and Faisal Syud. and Seth Patinkin. product. Nick Tallyn. Show that if one of the coordinates of the center of a circle is irrational. then the circle contains at most two points both of whose coordinates are rational.40 Exams Exam #29-1994 The contest was held at Depauw University. Matthew Gladden. 1977. show that vn < 1 + y'27n. 0 P1994-2. Bloomington. Brian Singer. Calculate lim x--+= l x et 2 2 -x dt.

Jz? . Prove that 1 ·2 ·3 ···n 1 2 3 n (2n + 1) < -3- n(n+I) .2- P199S-6. Lukito Muliadi.z21· Find a closed formula for the sum k=O tG~)' 2P+ 1 P199S-3. Let Zl be complex numbers. Prove that the integer part of (V5 + 2)P is divisible by 20p. Nick Tallyn. Bloomington. The vertices of a triangle ABC have coordinates (a cos ai. i = 1.Exam #31-1996 41 and Z2 P199S-1. P199S-7. a sin ad. Let n be any integer greater than 1.2. Prove that 4(x 2 + x P199S-S. form. Jzi . Let p be an odd prime. The Purdue University team consisted of Dan Crosby. Purdue University.1?(2x + 1)2(x + 2)2. Andrew Jones.z~1 + IZl . Indiana University. and David Whittaker. P199S-4. Twenty-five teams from eleven colleges participated. Ng. and Wabash College tied for second place. L is a line parallel to BC and b units below BC.z~1 = IZl + z21 + IZI . Find the coefficient of x2n in the expansion of g~:~: in closed Exam #31-1996 The contest was held at Butler University on March 29. The Wabash College team consisted of Alexander Radnovich. find the volume of S. in conjunction with the spring meeting of the Indiana Section of the MAA. and James Moore. P199S-S. The winning team from RoseHulman consisted of Rick Mohr. The IU team consisted of Seth Padnkin and Richard Swartz. Prove that IZl + P199S-2. . and Tze Chao.3. Find the coordinates of the orthocenter of triangle ABC. ABC is an equilateral triangle with each side of length a. + 1)3 - 27x 2 (x + I? = (x . A solid S is generated by rotating the triangle ABC about the line L.

How many other four-digit squares have this property. Using Wallis' product. 01. the first rat marches down the line taking a dollar from every cat. The San Francisco 4gers derive their name from the last two digits of the year of the California Gold Rush. 1849. determine limn->CXJ (Pn)( yin). and 09 as squares)? P1996-2.42 Exams P1996-1. where A and B are integers. find A+B. P1996-6. After the cats are lined up against the wall. They plan to eventually pair off all their children in marriage so that sons and daughters of the first couple marry daughters and sons of the second couple.x 3 }. A square with sides parallel to the coordinate axes is inscribed in the region {(x.y): x.y > 0. find the length of the shortest possible such curve. find the a priori probability p that such an arrangement is mathematically possible. A hundred armed rats enter a bar containing a hundred fat cats. Two couples each agree to have exactly n children. he passes the remaining $50 to the third rat who proceeds to take a dollar from every third cat. 04. On his return. . (a) How many cats profited? lost money? broke even from this? (b) Which cat(s) profited the most and how much did they get? (c) How much money did the rats leave with? P1996-4. If its area is written as ijA + ifIj. On his return. In triangle ABC. Note that both numbers are perfect squares (49 = 72 and 1849 = 43 2 ). This continues with the rats alternately giving and taking until the 100th rat gives a dollar to the lOOth cat. that their last two digits also form squares (count 00. LA = 90 c irc and AB = AC = 2. he passes the $100 that he collected to the second rat who proceeds to give a dollar to every second cat. Find the largest possible area of a pentagon with five sides of length 1 and a right interior angle. If curve I joins points of AB and AC to bisect the area of triangle ABC. At this point the rats and the money they have taken disappear in a cloud of smoke. or any other well-known result. Assuming that sons and daughters are equally likely to be born. P1996-5. y ~ 3x . Sterling's formula. P1996-3.

Tze-Chao Ng. on March 14. + 2) + (1 + 2 + 3) + . 21 Iz4 . license plates consist of2 digits followed by a letter and then 4 more digits. P1996-8. and the same standard deviation. Izl = 3. . Find the probability of getting a license plate in which the last four digits are nondecreasing. yX for real Given the following set of axioms: (1) Every line contains exactly four points. respectively.... Teams from Rose-Hulman and Purdue University placed second and third. The Purdue team consisted of Dan Crosby. and Tyson Patterson. Prove that A is the P1997-4. + (1 + 2 + 3 + . Find all solutions (x. and Abishai Daniel. Exam #32-1997 The contest was held at Franklin College. Find all continuous functions f(x) whose graph G (of y = f(x)) has the following property: For each chord C of G. (2) No pair of points may be on more than one line. P1997-5. P1997-1. Twentyfive teams from thirteen universities participated. y) of the equation x Y numbers x. in conjunction with the spring meeting of the Indiana Section of the MAA. + n = n(n for any positive integer n. 6}.Exam #32-1997 43 P1996-7. Find all datasets of positive integers (in any order) which are statistically equivalent to {I. The Rose-Hulman team consisted of Kyle Lacey. Find a similar expression for the sum + 1)/2 1 + (1 P1997-3. The winning team from Wabash College consisted of lun Ma.. P1997-2.. if C's projection onto the x-axis has length d 2 . Robert Dirks. and Elad Harel. Call two datasets "statistically equivalent" if they have the same number of elements. the same mean.5z 2 Find the smallest positive number A so that + 61 - <A for every complex number z on the circle smallest such number. Chris Prince. 9.. y > O. 9. + n). then C's midpoint lies d units above G. In Indiana. It is well known that 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + .

then the point must be on exactly one line that has no points in common with the given line (a) What is the fewest number of points and lines necessary to satisfy these six axioms? (b) If n were substituted for "four" in (1) and (3). the trough is full of water. Initially. express the volume (in terms of ex) of the remaining water. The winning team from Wabash College consisted of Robert Dirks. such as IlxliI = L i=l n IXil (a) We know that the set of points {xER2 : II X 112 Find each of the following sets of points: = I} is the unit circle."" xn) in n-dimensional Euclidean space is the Euclidean norm But there are other norms which can be used. If the farmer tilts the trough (along the side) at an angle ex with the horizontal. what is the fewest number of points and lines necessary to satisfy these six axioms? P1997-6. Exams (6) If a point is not on a given line. Twenty-nine teams from 22 universities and schools participated in this ICMC. Exam #33-1998 This was the largest ICMC to date. Determine when equality holds for the i-norm and the (Xl-norm. (b) The triangle inequality Ilx + yll :s:: Ilxll + Ilyll holds for all norms.44 (3) Each point must be on at least four lines. A farmer has a trough 4 feet long with semicircular cross sections that are 2 feet in diameter. The usual way of measuring the length of a vector x (Xl. X2. The top of the trough is parallel to the ground. (5) There is at least one line. P1997-7. {X E R2 : Ilxlll = I} and {x E R2 : Ilxll= = I}. . equality only holds if X and yare colinear. For the 2-norm. held at Ball State University. (4) Not all the points are on one line.

0).. (c) Find the radius of convergence of the power series 2:~=1 D. Let C. then what is h(x)? P1998-6. Prove that an odd integer n > 1 is composite iff there exist nonnegative integers p and q such that n = p2 . il = 1.. the area of the portion of the R( x) lying between the curves y = fa (x) and y = il (x) has the same area as the portion of R( x) lying between the curves y = il (x) and y = h (x ). and fk = fk-l + fk-2 be the Fibonacci (a) Show that the points F xy . h be three nonnegative increasing real-valued functions defined on the nonnegative real numbers with fi(O) = 0 and fa (x) :s: il(x) :s: h(x). h(x)) Then. Robert Linne. Show that (PD)2 = PC· PE.. P1998-1. and Jun Ma. Randy Motchan. (a) Find a closed-form expression for Dn the number of derangements of n objects. If fa (x) = xf3 and il (x) = ax f3 (a > 1.n}. let R(x) denote the rectangle whose vertices are (0. respectively. The Rose-Rulman team consisted of Kyle Lacey. cp is called a derangement if cp( x) i= x for all x in X n . (0. . Show that an integer n with final (decimal) digit u is divisible by 7 if and only if nlou . (x. and (x. P1998-3.AB and L. from Xn onto itself. For any nonnegative x. P1998-S.q > 1. numbers. Let fa.0). E be distinct points of C all on the same side of line AB such that DPl. il(x)). and the Evansville team consisted of Siddartha Naidu..CPD = L.x 2 = ±1. fk+d} lie on two hyperbolas: y2 - (b) Show that the only points on the hyperbolas y2 . Let Xn = {1.DPE.2u is divisible by 7.2.(. . P1998-2.Exam #33-1998 45 Abishai Daniel. P1998-4. D. = {Uk. A permutation ofn objects is a 1-1 function. cp. Riten Sonpal. Matt Lepinski. . (b) Show that Dn is equal to the nearest integer to ~. and il bisects fa and h in area. Let C be a circle with diameter AB..q2 with p . il is said to bisect fa and h in area if for every nonnegative x. Let P be any point of segment AB. Teams from Rose-Rulman and the University of Evansville placed second and third.x 2 = ±1 with nonnegative integer coefficients are points in F.8 > 0). Let fa = 0. il.xy .

one is put back. (a) Find as simple a method as possible for calculating the square root(s) of an equivalence class of matrices other than (~ ~) Here is an important example to consider: the square root(s) of (~ ~) are (~ ~) since and (~ ~) = (~ ~) (~ 5) (14 35) 7(21 ~) 4 7 21 = and (~~)(~ ~)=(~ 195)=3(~ ~). (ii) If both are orange. Let us say that two non-singular 2 x 2 matrices (with complex entries) A and B are equivalent if there exists a complex number w such that A = wB. Let [A] denote the equivalence class of A. The following procedure is performed repeatedly. In a large urn there are 1999 orange balls and 2000 yellow balls. and the Wabash team consisted of Robert Dirks. . that is. respectively. (b) How many distinct square roots can an equivalence class that is not equal to (~ ~) have? Realize that [-A] = [A] so that the usual sign ambiguity doesn't exist here. the set of all matrices equivalent to A. Two balls are chosen at random from the urn: (i) If both are yellow. The Rose-Hulman team consisted of Matt Lepinski.46 Exams P1998-7. Teams from Rose-Hulman and Wabash College placed second and third. The team of Thomas Horine. the other thrown away. and Keith Henderson of Purdue University won the contest. Dennis Lin. (c) How many distinct square roots does (~ ~) have? Exam #34-1999 This year the competition was held on the Indiana University in Bloomington. James Lee. Jun Ma. Randy Motchan. Note that multiplication of such equivalence classes is a well-defined operation. Barry Weliver. P1999-1. they are both thrown away and a yellow ball from the pile is put into the urn. Next to the urn is a large pile of yellow balls.

Does any row of Pascal's triangle contain three consecutive entries that are in the ratio 1: 2 : 3? Recall that the nth row (n = 0. What is the color of the last ball in the urn? P1999-2. Calculate . The statement -:.. ) consists of the entries n! ( n) k .n). P1999-3.. 2:.. . If x and yare positive numbers.k!(n . 1.. 1 as n -+ 00 is familiar to all students of calculus.(k)) converge or diverge? P1999-S. hitting a square board at random. the orange one is put back into the urn and the yellow one is thrown away. . .2. Several textbooks claim that the convergence is monotone in n...f k=l 1 n (k) -+ 10 f(x)dx r -:. P1999-4. Let P be any point inside an equilateral triangle T..1. Show that the sum of the three distances from P to the sides of T is constant. show that ~----~~- CiY + (XiY)2 2 < ------~----- J('f)2 + VX2 i y2 2 and find all cases of equality. 2. Does the series f k=l COS(I. P1999-7. What is the probability that a dart. P1999-S. Let A be a square matrix and suppose that there exist positive integers m and n such that Am = I and An -I I. Show that this claim is false even for continuous increasing functions.k)! (k=0.. lands nearer the center than the edge? P1999-6.Exam #34-1999 47 (iii) if they are of different colors.

Show that P2000-6. The contest was held at Earlham College. P2000-2. Ducky did it. Prove that a group G of order 15 must be cyclic. made the following statements when questioned by police. It is known (and you may assume) that Fk is the closest integer to Tk / V5 where T = (1 + V5) /2. Four suspects.48 Exams Exam #35-2000 This year's winning team was from Purdue University and consisted of James Lee. (a) Clearly 2222 is fortunate. one of whom was known to have committed a murder. Dennis Lin. Zhenyu Yang. Becky is lying. who did it? Arby: Becky: Cindy: Ducky: Becky did it. and Fk+2 = Fk+l + Fk for k ~ O. In a triangle one angle is twice another. Call a number N fortunate if it can be written with four equal digits in some base b E Z+. I didn't do it. P2000-4. P2000-S. and Keith Henderson. The team consisting of Matt Lepinski. If only one of them is telling the truth. The second place team from Wabash College consisted of Roberts Dirks. why is 2000 fortunate? (b) Find the greatest fortunate number less than 2000. and Chris Duefel. and Lucas Beverlin from Rose-Hulman came in third. Thomas Horine. What is the largest possible ratio of the area of the triangle to that of its circumcircle? You . Determine whether converges or diverges. P2000-1. Fl = 1. Let the Fibonacci sequence Fk be defined as Fo = 0. P2000-3.

Exam #35-2000 49 may express your answer in terms of g - _J4+VfO 12' P2000-7. P2000-S. You may assume that V2 is irrational but be sure to prove all other results used. . Find all functions f (x) which satisfY the equation f(3)(x) f(x) and have + f"(x) = x--+oo + f(5)(x) lim f(x) = f(O) = O. Prove or disprove the statement: an irrational power of an irrational number is irrational.

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Since there are five points and only four smaller squares. 51966-2 Divide the unit square into four smaller squares each of side length 1/2 (by drawing two lines which bisect parallel sides of the original square). then A is a multiple of 4. then so is A.y2 = A. The system has solutions x=-- r+s 2 and y = -2-' Thus x and yare integers whenever rand s have the same parity. let a 3 = A. r-s with the condition that A = rs. so solutions exist for all positive integer values of a. If a is odd. It is clear that any two such points can be separated by a distance of less than V2/2 unless the two points are at opposite ends 51 . This happens for all odd values of A (r = A. Look under Diophantine Equations in the Index for similar problems. s = 1) and when A is a multiple of 4. For our particular problem. we have the system of equations x . two points must lie in the same square.y = r and x + y = s. Since the LHS factors.Solutions Exam #1-1966 51966-1 We will solve the more general problem of determining which integers A yield integer solutions x and y to the equation x 2 . and if a is even.

52

Solutions

of the diagonal of the smaller square, which cannot happen since they are both interior to the original square. Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.

51966-3
Consider the numbers

There are p + 1 numbers in this list so two of them are congruent mod p. The difference between those two is the required sum divisible by p. (Note that p being prime is irrelevant.) Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.

51966-4
Solution 1:

Suppose the functions are f(x) and g(x), then we must have

( f(X))' g(x)
Applying the quotient rule, you get

f'(x) g'(x) . f'(x) g'(x) .

g(x) f'(x) - f(x) g'(x) (g(x) )2

Multiply this equation by (g (x)) 2 g' (x) to simplify the equation and we get

g(x) g'(x) f'(x) - (g'(x))2 f(x) = (g(X))2 f'(x).
Ifwe know one of the functions, say g(x), then we have a first order linear differential equation for the other function, that we can solve. Choosing g(x) = x so g'(x) = 1, we find that f(x) must satisfy

x f'(x) - f(x) = x 2 f'(x).
Rewriting this equation, we get

f'(x) =
or

~~ =

x(1

~ x) f(x),

df

dx

f
Integrating, we have In If(x)1

x(1-x)"

= In Ixl -In Ix -11 + C,

Exam #1-1966

53

so f(x) must be

f(x)

=

x C x _ l'

An example of two functions f (x) and g( x) having the property that the derivatives of their quotient is the quotient of their derivatives is given by f(x) = x/(x - 1) and g(x) = x.

Solution 2: Begin the same as in Solution 1, but let g(x) = exp(kx), so that g' (x) = ke kx and the differential equation simplifies to

(k - 1)f'(x)
Solving this yields

=

f(x).

f(x) = Cek"'-,.
Then, for any k =J 0, 1, the functions requirement.

f and

g satisfY the necessary

Look under Differentiation or Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems.

51966-5
Solution 1: (In what follows, "sequence" refers to an ascending sequence of positive integers as in the problem.) Let S(n, k) be the number of different sequences of length k in which every number from 1 to n occurs at least once. Then S (n, k) is simply the number of ways to partition a k element sequence into n non-empty subsets. Hence, S (n, k) = (~= i). Let T (n, k, r) be the number of different sequences of length k in which only r (out of n) distinct numbers occur, then we have

T(n,k,r)

=

(~)S(r,k)= (~)G=~)'

Finally, we see that the solution is

where the latter equality is an invocation of the Vandermonde convolution.
Solution 2: Make n + k - 1 blanks and fill in k of them with x' s. For any such arrangement of x's, define ai = 1 + the number of blank to the left of the ith x

54

Solutions

for each i from 1 to k. This gives a 1-to-1 correspondence between the sequences we are trying to count and the ways of putting k x's in some of the n + k - 1 blanks. But the number of ways of doing the latter is obviously (n+~-l). Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.

S1966-6
Solution 1: Let f(x) = v'ax 2 + b. We want to show that f(x) is a contraction, i.e. :30 < C < 1 s.t. If(x) - f(y)1 :; Clx - yl for all x, y E R. In this case, the sequence Xl = C, Xn+l = f(xn) converges to the unique fixed point of f.

If(x) - f(y)1 = Ivax 2 + b - vay2
=

+ bl

valvx

2

+ b/a - Vy2 + b/al

:; val x -

YI·

To see that lv'x 2 + c - Vy2 + cl :; Ix - yl for any c 2: 0, Multiply and divide by the conjugate to get

Iv' x 2 + c + Since

Vy2 + cl'

h/x 2 + c+ Vy2 + cl 2: Ixl + Iyl 2: Ix + YI,
the inequality follows. Since 0 < < 1, f is a contraction. The limit of the sequence {x n } is simply the fixed point of f. Solving x = v'ax 2 + b yields limn-too Xn = Vb/(l - a).

va

Solution 2: we see that

After computing the first several terms of the sequence,

xn+1 = va nc2 + b(l + a + a2 + ... + an - l )

.. a 2 Since 0 < a < 1. we may take the limit giving n-tcx. then we are done. Otherwise. . Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems. .k other people. At least one of these two sets covers 1/2 of I.k must be at least 3.2. otherwise Ij+1 c 1 j U 1)+2. at most n . assume that P is a friend of at least 3 other people: Q1. Q i. then there must be n copies of each number in the matrix and. . since n is odd.Exam #2-1967 55 1-0 O· -V c + b(--) = Ma. 51966-7 Assume that the set {h} is minimal in the sense that none of the intervals is a proper subset of the union of some others. all non-diagonal entries are paired with another.. as does the set of intervals with even subscripts. j). Qj forms a triple of pairwise friends.1) such entries. Q2. then P is a stranger of 5 . the two must be the same. 51966-8 Choose a person P. the set of intervals with odd subscripts consists of mutually disjoint sets. Q i and Q j are friends (for some i. . lim (xn+d = 1- 1- Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems..2. Exam #2-1 967 51967-1 In a symmetric matrix. There are n( n . implying that the diagonal is also a permutation of the set {1. since their union covers all of I.1 copies of each number can paired off. so that Ii begins to the left of IiH for all i.. or 1)+2 C 1jH' either of which violate the minimality assumption... If Q1. If P is a friend of k other people. Q3. and one of k or 5 . Then we have I j and 1)+2 are disjoint for each j = 1. Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems. The remaining copy of each number must be on the diagonal of the matrix. If each row is a permutation of the set {I. . n . P. 2. Q2. Then we can order the intervals by the value of their left-endpoint. Q3 are all pairwise strangers. n}. In this case. Thus. . Without loss of generality.n}.

Y2) + (Dl .B 2) (Xl. b) = O. that is.::: 0. ·f ob . Further. If f (a. 51967-3 Let f (a. we obtain 2(Bl . X2 ) + 2(Cl _ C 2 ) (Yl .::: 1. we have of ob =O·fb= 1 e . let (Xl.a. Since both of the points (Xl. the midpoint lies on the line which is the common chord of the parabolas. assume that the axes of the parabolas lie parallel to the x-axis. Yi) is given by YYi + Bi(X + Xi) + Ci(y + Yi) + Di = o. a of < 0 1 b < e a . we have and Subtracting equation (2) from equation (1). b) = ea + b(log b . we have the tangent line to parabola through (Xi.1) . Then the equations for the parabolas can be given by and y2 + 2B2x + 2C2 y + D2 = o.D 2 ) = 0. That this chord exists is implicitly assumed here. Yl) and (X2' Y2) lie on each of these lines. Note that if b = e a . b) .::: 0 and b .ab. then the result follows. Using implicit differentiation.56 Solutions 51967-2 Without loss of generality.) Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems. Yl) and (X2' Y2) be the points of contact of the common tangent with the parabolas. since of ob = 10gb . for a . then f(a. (The common chord is the line segment connecting the two points of intersection of the parabolas.

x m x 2 x 4 x . and only if. and conversely. the number of odd coefficients is twice the number of odd coefficients obtained by considering only even values of m in the symbols (.:. thus (.. Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems. By inspection n is not 1. with k a positive integer.) is congruent (mod 2) to 2x4x . 00. Thus the number of odd coefficients in (x + y)n.:. (That is. which contradicts the assumption that n was the least positive integer for which the proposition fails.) But the latter fraction is evidently (~). b). consider the function f(ao..). Let m = 2q..m + 1 is even. the result follows. if x and yare congruent (mod 2) then so are hx and ky for any odd integers hand k. then n (n) n-m+1(m-1 ) = m m is an even integer since n . 51967-4 Suppose the proposition false and let n be the smallest positive integer such that the number of odd coefficients in the expansion of (x + y)n is not a power of 2. with k a positive integer. 00. From the facts about of job above. fixing ao greater than or equal to zero. Therefore. If m is odd.. f(ao. since nand n . ·xn 2 x 4 x .m) by removing all odd factors and divisors.~) is odd if.m are not congruent (mod 2). for 1 :::. nor is n equal to 2. Since ao was arbitrary. Thus all the odd coefficients must occur for even values of m.Exam #2-1967 57 and of O'f b a ob > 1 > e . (~) is odd and so the number of odd coefficients in (x + y) n is the same as the number of odd coeficients in (x + y) k. since f (ao. Case 1. But as before we find e~~ 1 ) == (~) (mod 2). Let n = 2k + 1. Since = (n~m) and.) = (. Thus the proposition is true. Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems. b:::.:J . is just twice the number of odd coefficients in (x + y)k. Case 2. Let n = 2k. for 1 :::. e ao ) = 0. x (n . (.. again giving a contradiction. Then (. Further. b) 2: 0. b) has an absolute minimum at b = e ao .:. we have f(ao. b:::.

58 Solutions 51967-5 Suppose that z is a root and Izi < 1/3. the requirement that Ian I < 2. If the square is divided as illustrated.! 8 B 3 8 c D E . each piece has a diameter of V65/8. But using the triangle inequality.. AT. + aNzNI = l. and BJ are all larger. BH. The distances AG. and Izi < 1/3. N M L K J o H Q G R A F . the distance from A to F. Then implies that or lalz + a2z2 + . we obtain a contradiction. Look under Complex Numbers or Polynomials in the Index for similar problems. 51967-6 In the illustration below.. and the distance from B to G are each V65/8. AH.

Now. If the set contains any of points F. Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. and hence has a diameter of at least V65/8. the set has diameter at least V65/8. it must also contain D or F. Again the set has diameter at least V65/8. and again the diameter is at least V65/8. 51967-7 First note that for a > 0. Suppose the set contains a comer point. G. if we define Xn inductively by setting . This leaves the possibility of the set consisting of B. P. if the sequence {x n } satisfies the conditions given in the problem. WLOG point A. the equation x + x a = y has a unique solution with x > 0. so this can't happen. or M. or N. WLOG. y > 0. WLOG. R. If the set contains none of those points. the set has diameter at least V65/8. If the set contains none of those points. This leaves the possibility of a set consisting solely of the midpoints. Q. it may contain P. Further. Finally. J. monotonic increasing function of x with limx-too x + x a = 00 and is equal to zero at x = 0. then it must contain one of C. and one or both of C and Q. G. One of the three pieces must contain at least six of the sixteen boundary points symmetrically arranged in the illustration. Q. then the set must contain one or both of D and P. Thus it assumes every positive real value exactly once for x E (0. in which case it has a diameter of at least V65/8. or R. J. K. K. In this case. but does contain M. M. L. This is because x + x a is a continuous. comer E then the set must also contain one of N. C. D. H.00). but does contain a non-midpoint of one of the sides. H. H. then xn = L j=n+l 00 xj = Xn + 1a + L j=n+2 00 xj = X~+l + X n +1· So Xn+1 must be the unique solution of this equation. If the set doesn't contain M either. If the set also contains G. Suppose the set contains none of the comer points. K. but there are only four. Again the diameter is at least V65/8. or F. F. if the set contains none of E. L. but contains. D. F. say B. We will now show that this piece has a diameter of at least V65/8. or L. If follows that the sequence {x n } is unique.Exam #2-1967 59 Now suppose that the square is divided into three arbitrary pieces.

snl + Iq - Letting n ~ 00. Now.T(sn)1 = + IT(q) snl· . Sn ~ m. We can choose q' E R2 such that Iq . and we see that IT(p) .60 Xn+l equal to the solution of x + x a = x n. for each n E N. Iq ..xl is a continuous function of x. Ip . . we see that IT(p) .q'l E Q. we have IT(p) . = j=n+l L xj.T(q)I-lp - qll = IIT(p) .q'l· Also. IT(p) .T(q)1 .q'l < c and Ip .T(q)1 = Ip - ql Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. 51967-8 Suppose that p.Now.xl assumes rational values. < 2c. Iq-q'l < c. we have that IT(q) .qll ::::. suppose c > 0. let Sn E 5 be such that Ip .T(q')11 + lip . So as x varies along 5 in a ~-neighborhood of m.ql· Now.snl ~ Ip .T(q')11 + Iq . q E R2. Ip .. Such a choice is possible because Q is dense in Rand Ip . q E R 2 and let m be the midpoint of p and q. IIT(p) .T(sn)1 Ip . As a consequence of the previous argument. hence Ip . Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems. IIT(p) . IT(q') -T(q)1 ::::. By symmetry.sl = Iq .snl < lin.T(q)1 ::::.T(q)I-IT(p) .q'I-lp .snl E Q and 1m .Ip - qll q'll + lip q'I-lp - ::::.sI. Let 5 be the line segment of length 1 which is perpendicular to pq and has m as its midpoint. for every S E 5. Ip . IIT(p) . we can invoke the triangle inequality to see that IIT(P) -T(q)I-IT(p) -T(q')11 ::::. then it is clear that xn = x~+l co Solutions + Xn+l = x~+1 + X~+2 + Xn+1 = .ql.T(q')1 ::::. as n ~ 00.T(q)1 ::::.T(q)I-IT(p) .snl + Iq .q'l for all p. Letting c ~ 0.

there exists an M such that n M. 51968-2 Assume the claim is false for quadrilateral ABC D and five interior points. and D form a convex pentagon. Thus we have implying that is. R. and S. where P and Q range over the five interior points. one for each pair of points P. If P and Q are two of the five interior points. C. R. QP QR RJ3 QR PR QP QR stJ. rays. The previous discussion showed that or RQ. assume S AB contains at least five rays. Thus S AB U S BC contains ten are both in. Look under Riemann Sums in the Index for similar problems. However. the rays this possibility is also precluded by the previous discussion. Let S AB be those rays PQ rays PQ or intersecting AB and S BC be those rays PQ intersecting BC. or must be in S BC. Without loss of generality. A. then or RQ must be in SBC.Exam #3-1968 61 Exam #3-1 96 S 51968-1 Since the set of Riemann sums is bounded. proving the claim. Then the points A. Q.::: I L:!(ti)(Xi i=1 Xi-I)I for all ti. Let the other points of these rays be Q.Xi-l.xi. Because no point can be both the initial and second point of such rays. it follows that some point P is the initial or second point in at least three of these rays. sR Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. Q. Q. suppose. that the line intersects AB and BC. D. SAB. that ! is bounded. without loss of generality. depending on which side of line P R the point Q lies. P. If rays PQ and say. SAB. then either the points P. Therefore. . say. QS or and Ri. B. and C or the points P. It follows furthermore that if PQ and or if and are both in. then the line through P and Q cannot intersect ABC D in adjacent sides. To see this. exactly one of the intersects either AB or BC. and Q form a convex pentagon. R.

for each n there exists an integer ¢( n) such that L:j=: dj 2: e where e is any fixed positive number. with dn > en. for all x. so that by the chain rule we have F'(x) = I'(L(x))L'(x) = tf(tx). fn on[1. Since dn diverges. Then L is differentiable on Rn. otherwise. ~. Look under Multivariate Calculus in the Index for similar problems. F(x) = tf(x). Limit Evaluation or Riemann Sums in the Index for similar problems. so that F'(x) = tf'(x) also. The only solutions to the second are (2. 0. Therefore l' (tx) = l' (x) for any t > O. fn(x) ::::. Now let F(x) = f(L(x)).en ]. 0 uniformly on R. By the definition of f.62 Solutions 51968-3 Fix t and define L : R n I-t R n by L(x) = tx. 51968-4 The only integral solutions to the first equation are (1. 51968-6 Consider any two sequences {c n } and {d n } each tending monotonically to zero. Define the sequence nk recursively by nI = 1 and dnk+l < cq.(nk)' It is clear that J.0) and (2. with L'(x) = tI. Let fn(x) = {nIx. Look under Diophantine Equations in the Index for similar problems.1). This is a special case of Catalan's Conjecture and a general exposition of the progress that has been made on the conjecture can be found in MAA FOCUS.1).3) and (1. vol 21 #5. 51968-5 This conjecture is false. Since 0 ::::. where I is the identity matrix. Look under Infinite Series.i nk < ¢(nk) < nkH' . Therefore l' (x) is constant and f (x) must be linear. Now I: -7 fn(x) dx = 1 so that limn--+oo J~oo f n= l. and L: Cn converging while L: dn diverges.

j=1 7f 7f Because the maximum of a function is at least its average.}. Cn2 . . ..arg z).iO < J cos(O-arg Zj )~O L cos(O-arg ZJ )~O Zj.dn2 . {b n } = {d n" d n.. Clearly.·· . it follows that there exists B such that -~Lf(zj.. . d</>(n3)' Cn4 ."" c</>(nt}. B) dB = 27f J7I"/2 -71"/2 Izl cosBdB = -. and min(a n . each of the series an and bn diverge since they contain infinitely many stretches of terms adding up to more than e. d n2 + 1 . d</>(n.···. +1. bn ) converges by comparison with Cn· z= z= z= z= Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems.. Cnl +1.. .. O}..arg Zj) IZjlcos(argzj-B) L cos(O-arg Zj )~O =Re cos(O-arg Zj )~O z·e. Then -1 27f J7I" -71" Izl f(z..). . C</>(n2)' d n3 .Exam #3-1968 63 Now a solution to the problem can be given by the two series with terms {an} = {Cnl . d</>(n2)' Cn 3 .B) 7f j=1 1 n L cos(O-arg Zj )~O IZj I cos( B . .B)dB = ~ ~ J -71" j=1 t hl =~. 7f Therefore.·· . C</>(n3)' d n4 . 51968-7 f(z. . Look under Complex Numbers in the Index for similar problems. B) = max{lzl cos(B . ~ J7r ~ f(z·. Cn2 +1. . .}.

on [0. t). (If f' had another zero. Let n = r(s . 2 f "( x ) = . as required. Let v be any point. . then the set of points at the other end of these arcs contain s . By observation of f' (x) = cos x-I + and Jr are critical points of f(x). t - 1). and Jr are the only critical points of f (x). In the first case these blue arcs. form a collection of s blue arcs. By noting that . t .SIll X +Jr has exactly two zeros on [0. ° Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems. Working inductively on k = s + t.t.64 Solutions 51968-8 This problem asks you to look for the Ramsey number n = r(k. Jrj. t) blue arcs. we can apply Rolle's Theorem to verifY that 0. f" would have a third zero. If there are r(s -1. t . k).1. t) + r(s. Exam #4-1969 51969-1 We will show that f(x) = sin x . t) + r(s. We will give an existence result for the more general problem of finding r (s. t) :::. we show that r(s.1) be the number of points that we have. There are either r(s -1. Jrj. In the second case.x + -Jr 2: x2 ° 2:. ~. t -1) red arcs at v. we already have t points all of whose arcs are red. r(s . Now suppose the result holds for all values smaller than k. plus those from v to these points. we can see that the minimum value of f(x) on [0. by our induction hypothesis. ~. that is.1) red arcs at v. A similar argument holds if there are r (s. Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems. we have the result holding for k = 4 by inspection.) Since f(O) = f(Jr) = and f(~) = 1-~. and let each arc be colored blue or red. for what n can we find a set of s blue arcs or a set of t arcs. In particular.1 blue arcs or t red arcs among them. Jrj is 0. we find that 0. t) blue arcs or r(s.

going upward. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.Qpr . the ball will always experience an acceleration downward greater than g. t up . 8 = 5. so v continually decreases until the highest point of ascent. downward at all points along the trajectory of height h. We have 83 = w3 + w3 + 3ww(w + w) = 50 + 3·5·8. is less than t. a. So the descent will take the same amount of time as . q divides Q and r divides R. the acceleration begins with a = 9 and continues with a = 9 . Let v be the velocity of the ball at any time. In the same manner. Thus. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. the amount of time for an object with uniform acceleration 9 to traverse this distance. where v = 0 (by Rolle's theorem). 51969-3 Let w = {h5 + 5J20 8 = W and w V25 - 5J20. to a final value of a = 9 + avo. At launch. q) = 1 and (p. But since (p. r) = 1. and 9 the acceleration due solely to gravity. in the general direction of travel (downward or upward) and Vo be the upward velocity with which the ball is launched. Now. Since a is continually increasing. the amount of time to traverse this distance.Qr hence p divides Pqr. but the velocity is downward).15 .5)(82 + 58 + 10) has To solve for 8 we note that 0 one real solution.av (since the air resistance is now upward. Pqr = Apqr . The ascent will take the same amount of time as an object travelling on a straight line with initial velocity v = 0 and initial acceleration a = g. so a = g. with a continually increasing through the distance h.50 = (8 . it must be that p divides P. r Multiply through by pqr yielding Pqr + Qpr + Rpq = Apqr. a = 9 + av. 51969-4 Label acceleration.Rpq = p(Aqr . Rq). = 83 .Exam #4-1969 65 51969-2 Suppose that P p +Q+ q R =A. Going downward. We wish to determine + w.

the time an object under uniform acceleration 9 would require. is greater than t.csin ((27f/3 . For instance.B) . Again. Using the law of sines to compute the left side of the equilateral triangle.(B + A) < 27f/3.(A + 7f/3)) r = ~ [(b sin(27f /3 .aVj.1. Now.66 Solutions an object travelling on a straight line with initial acceleration a = g.B) +csin(A + 7f/3) cos(27f/3 . which is equivalent to 7f/3 . It follows that the maximum area of the equilateral triangle is J v.B) - c cos(A + 7f /3)) sin(27f /3 . Thus.A. B must satisfY < B < 27f/3 and < 7f . and A = 7f . the maximum occurs for B outside this range. . if w is such that cosw = x/ Jx 2 + y2 and sinw = y/ Jx 2 + y2. 51969-5 Let B denote the angle just above A. The claimed upper bound has been established. However.B)r.A < B < 7f . tdown. ° [(b - ccos(A + 7f /3)) 2 + (csin(A + 7f /3)) 2] v'3 = """4 (b 2 + c2 - 2bccos(A + 7f/3)). Look under Differential Equations in the Index for similar problems. we may write x sin a + y cos a as x 2 + y2 sin( a + w). ° Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. To conform to the geometric setup. with a continually decreasing through the distance h to a final value of a = 9 . for b = 10. the time required to traverse this distance. we find its area to be v'3 [bsin(27f/3-B) + CSin(B+A-7f/3)]2 4 v'3/2 v'3/2 = ~ [bsin(27f/3 - B) . it need not be the maximum value.. c = 1. from which we see that its maximum value is J x 2 + y2. tup < t < tdown.

. the result follows immediately. then we are done. 1 + -+ 2 + . Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems.n +1 . n 1 - = 1 1 lim n n---+ooL k=l 1 (1 1) -. Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems. 1.Exam #5-1970 67 51969-6 From the Trapezoidal Rule we have I b f(x) dx a = b . +-) = n---+oo ~-hm n 2n ~ n +k k=l 1 1. If Icl > 1.a (f(a) + 2 ~ f(a + kh) + f(b)) _ (b 2n k=l ~ 12n ~3 f"(c) for some c E [a. b].an-2c n-2 - .. then we have C n = 1 -an-1C n-1 . A complete proof of the Trapezoidal Rule itself can be found many places.. Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems.-n Is.. we have the desired inequality. - a1C - ao. + 1 n --dx o 1+ x = In(2). Divide by cn - to obtain Take absolute values and use the triangle inequality to see that Since Icl > 1. Exam #5-1970 51970-1 We have n---+oo hm ( . If we set n = 1. . 51970-2 If lei :::.

In the first . D: (a + 1. Then XZ = We also have XZ = (a.b. so a 180° rotation maps the figure to itself. Pick any arc A.a). Then the coordinates of X. XZ· YW = 0 and XZ -. C: (a. so a 90° rotation carries one triangle into the other. the other angles of XY ZW are right angles. the length of each side is the hypotenuse of an isosceles right triangle with legs of length a 2 + (b + 1)2 /2 and XY ZW must be a rhombus. -a).b. Hence triangles ZCY and ZDW are congruent and similarly oriented. Ware X:(~. Thus ZY = ZW and LY ZW = 90 0 • Thus W XY Z is a square. Because of the non-intersection constraint on the arcs. k even. b + 1) and YW = (b + 1. z:(a+~. we may assume that the coordinates of the vertices of the parallelogram are A: (0. Similarly. Hence WXYZ is a parallelogram. 2 + (b+ 1)2 = YW.l YW. we can color the remaining regions with two colors. By our induction hypothesis. Suppose the result is true for all sets of points of order e. 51970-4 The problem is trivial for e = 2. so we proceed by induction. LZCB = LZDW = 90° + the acute angle of the given parallelogram. PI and P 2 must either be consecutive points around the circle. and XY ZW is a square. Then mLW XY = mLW X E + mLY X E = a right angle. or be situated such that arc A divides the remaining arcs into two sets. let E denote the intersection of X Z with YW. Z. Ja J Solution 2: Let YW and X Z meet at P.0). Thus. b. a.b). Also LCZD = 90°. Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. b). Consider a set of points and arcs of order e = k + 2.68 Solutions 51970-3 Solution 1: Without loss of generality. Then P is a center of symmetry for the figure. Since the diagonals of a parallelogram bisect each other. say from PI to P 2 and remove it together with its endpoints. b + 1). Y:(1+a. b+~). _~). Next. B: (1. w:(a. as illustrated below. To see that the rhombus is a square.0). where e = k. ZC = ZD and CY = DW. Y.

-2 + (_3)2 = 7.Exam #6-1971 69 case. -7 + (-3)4 = 74 = 9.1 = 9L 10k == 0 (mod 13). 846 satisfies (a) and (b) then it is the smallest such number. (ii) By (1). In the second case. color the region created by arc A opposite of the color of the region it is contained in. 51970-5 Let d be the number of digits in n. hence A = A. Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. since d is the correct number of digits. this is equivalent to d-1 L 10 k == L( _3)k == 0 (mod 13). so x EA. hence A c A. yPz. k=O d-1 k=O Now we may simply add alternating powers of 3 until we reach zero: (-3)0 = 1.t.1)/13 = 153. 13) = 1. x E A =} :3y E A S. k=O Since gcd(9. xPy ~yPz =} xpz (with z E A). xPy.t.1. (a) and (b) are true by construction. color one of the two regions created by arc A the other color (from what is was before) and switch colors for all of the other regions on that side of arc A. then it is necessary that 6· 10 d .1 = 5 =} d = 6. So we need 10d .6)/10 = 4n (from condition (b)). So d . Thus if n = 2(10 6 . Exam #6-197 1 51971-1 For part (a) we have (i) x E A =} xES - =} xRx (with x E A) - =} x E A. . It follows that A c A. A cA. Multiplying through by 10 yields 6·lO d +(n-6) = 40n (note here that n will also satisfY (a)) or equivalently n=---- 6.10 d -62(10d -1) 39 13 d-1 Hence it is necessary that 13 divide 10d . Indeed. 7+ (-3)3 = -20 = -7. 9 + (-3)5 = 9 . Now.1 + (_3)1 = -2. y E A=} :3z E A S.1 + (n .243 = -234 = -18 ·13 = O.

70

Solutions

(iii) x E Au B =} ::ly E A u B s.t. xPy. If yEA, then x E A and if y E B, then x E B. Therefore AU B c Au B. Also, x E Au B =} (x E A) V (x E B). So one of A or B contains a y s.t. xPy. It follows that x E Au B and hence AU B = Au B.
(b) A = ((u,v) E S : v - y = 3(u - x) for some (x,y) E A} = {(u, v) E S : v - 3u = y - 3x 1\ x 2 + y2 = I}. First, we determine the values that y - 3x can take when x 2 + y2 = 1. Thus we look at the minima and maxima of the two functions VI - x 2 - 3x and -VI - x 2 - 3x on [-1,1]. Since these functions are continuous, they will assume every value between their respective minimum and maximum.

~ (±~ - 3x) = =f
dx

Vl- x 2

x

- 3

= 0 =} 9(1 - x 2)

= x 2 =} X = ±_3_. v'lO
Checking the values x = ±1, ± in ±Vl - x 2 - 3x yields a minimum and maximum of - v'lO and v'lO, respectively. Hence y - 3x assumes every value on [-v'lO, v'lO]. Now we can write A = {(u,v) E S: v - 3u E

Jk

= {(u,v)

E S: 3u -

[-v'lO, v'lO]} v'lO::; v::; 3u+ v'lO}.
= 3u - v'lO

It follows that A is the strip between the two parallel lines v and v = 3u + v'lO.

Look under Algebraic Structures in the Index for similar problems.

51971-2
We want to compute 79999 (mod 1000). 79999

== 7- 1 (7400 )25 == 7- 1 (10 3 k + 1)25 == 7- 1 • 1 ==

143 (mod 1000).

So the last three digits are 1, 4, 3. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.

51971-3
The derivative of (1 - e -,,1 )-1 is

ex

-1

Exam #6-1971

71

Note, however that this is valid only for x =I- 0; worse yet, (1 - e ~l )-1 has a jump discontinuity at x = 0.

(1-e ~l )-1 is not an anti derivative of the integrand on the interval [-1, 1], but the function 9 is, where
(b) (1 - e ~l )-1 { 1 g(x)= 1 + (1 - e ~l )-1 for x > 0, for x =0, for x < 0.

Hence the integral is g(1) - g( -1) = e':l' A more direct approach would be to express the integral as the sum of two integrals, one on the interval [-1,0] and the other on the interval

[0,1].
Look under Differentiation or Integration in the Index for similar problems.

51971-4
For each t E R, let L t be the line y(x) = t. Clearly the set B = {Lt : t E R} is uncountable, Ltl n Lt2 = 0 for t1 =I=- t2, and UtER L t = R 2 . It follows from the latter two statements that for any a E A, there is exactly one line L t for which a E Lt. Let f : A ~ B be the function which takes points in A to the line in B which contains them. Since A is countable and B is uncountable, f cannot be smjective. It follows that there exists an L t E B which does not contain a point of A. Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.

51971-5
For each positive integer k,
Lk/2J

(2 + Y'2)k

+ (2 -

Y'2)k =

f;

C:)

2 k -i+\

which is an integer; but < (2 - J2)k < 1. Therefore, the fractional part of of (2 + J2)k is 1 - (2 - V2)k, and its limit is 1.
(b)

°

A similar calculation shows that the fractional part of if k is odd, if k is even.

72

Solutions

The first of these has limit 0 and the second the limit 1. Hence the fractional part of of (1 + y'2)k has cluster points at 0 and 1. Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems.

51971-6
For each group of five robbers, there must be at least one lock to which none has the key, and for any two groups, these locks must be different (else the addition to one group of a new robber from the other would provide a majority no member of which contains a key for such a lock as we have associated with the first group). Therefore there are at least as = 462. many locks as there are groups of five robbers, namely Now consider anyone robber. For each group of five among the remaining 10 robbers, he must have a key to each lock to which they collectively do not. Since each group has at least one such lock, he must have at least as many keys as there are such groups, namely C50) = 252. In order to show that no more locks or keys are required, we now demonstrate that 462 locks and 252 keys are sufficient. In accordance with any one-to-one correspondence between a set of 462 different locks and the collection of six-member subsets of the robber band, we give keys for any one lock to each member of its associated subset and to no other robber. Each minority, being a subset of the complement of such a six-member subset, cannot open the lock associated with that subset. On the other hand, consider any majority and any lock. Since only five robbers do not have the key to that lock, at least one of the robbers in the given majority does have the key.

C;)

Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.

51971-7
We define three new items from the given operations as follows:

0=Xn*X,

forallX,and

A C B

iff An B = A.

With these definitions and the axioms given we can show, after a considerable amount of simple but lengthy work, that we do indeed have a Boolean Algebra.

and D are the same size. 51972-2 From the given equation I 51972-3 = A (_~A2 . it is an .~I) 22' so A-I exists and is equal to _~A2 .D. and from these equations X and Y can be found. you can derive (a). If you start with the standard axioms for a Boolean Algebra. If A + B and A .B)(X . f has a relative maximum at x = e.as x passes through e. Let f(x) = lnx/x. Look under Algebraic Structures in the Index for similar problems. then X . X + Y = (A+B)-\C+D). Exam #7-1972 51972-1 The following calculation shows that it is sufficient that A + B and A . Subtracting the second from the first yields (A . Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems. The only conditions are that A.Exam #7-1972 73 In fact. Supposing the existence of X and Y such that the desired conditions hold.D).B be invertible.Y) = C . and (c). the conditions of the problem give an alternate characterization of a Boolean Algebra.B)-I(C .2A . C.2A . or when x = e. Then f'(x) = (1 . Therefore. the equations AX+BY=C.~I. the converse is also true. Further. (b). Since f'(x) changes sign from + to . B.Inx)/x 2 and f'(x) = 0 when lnx = 1.Y = (A .B are invertible. BX+AY=D yield (A + B)(X + Y) = C + D.

there exists h E H such that h K.. K..-1-a n L. 51972-4 There exists N such that for all n > N. 9.. 2.= cos 27rcos(B/2) + sm 27rsmB/2 = .4. then k = h-Ig E H. then h = gk.B) are different coordinates for the same point. J. there exists k E K such that k H. K.n=1 n=1 00 N 00 an n=N+I and the series converges. Look under Permutations in the Index for similar problems. Similarly. 3. If r = cos( B/2). Thus G cannot be H U K.. sufficiently large. So 0<"~<"~+2 " L. Q. if 9 E K. . . Let 9 = hk. a n /(l . Thus for n > N.74 absolute maximum since f(x) --t 0 as x --t 00.smB/2. J. since (r. so In7r/7r < Ine/e whence 7r e < e7r • Solutions -00 as Look under Matrix Algebra or Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems..3. Therefore pI3 is the identity permutation. ilien -r = cos . Since H is proper.I E K.2). 0 < an < 1/2. 5. 7. 37r-B 3 . B) and (-r. 6. which is impossible. We are given p2 = (A. 51972-7 Suppose G = H U K with Hand K proper subgroups.. Thus p = (p2)7 = (A. Q... Thus f(7r) < f(e). If 9 E H. and f(x) --t x --t O. 51972-6 The curves are identical. 8) in cycle notation. 37r . 51972-5 Let P denote the permutation made by the machine. 3.an) < 2a n . 7. P is also. 6..4.2 . Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems. 8. rt rt Look under Group Theory in the Index for similar problems. 9.5. Since p2 is a cyclic permutation. 10. which is also impossible. 10.-1-a n L.

Thus the area. A. of the rectangle is given by A=BC·AB = sin a cos a . We have = ~~ and BC = AB =OB-OA = OC cos a . with a variable and () fixed.sin 2 a cot () = ~ sin 2a - sin 2 a cot ().Exam #8-1973 75 Exam #8-1973 51973-1 Using L'Hopital's rule. = hm . x--+oo lim x(e 1 / x - 1) = lim x--+oo e1 / x - 1 1/x e 1 / X ( -1/x 2 ) lim 1 x -1/ x 2 = x--+oo e / = 1. . 51973-2 Let a be the angle shown in in the figure below.BC cot () = cos a . Since cot () OC sin a = sin a.sin a cot () . o Let A be the area of rectangle ABCD. x--+oo Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems.AD cot () = cos a .

=1 (mod 3). =2 (mod 3). S1973-3 Observe that the maximum occurs when no ni = 1. The desired limit is thus lim n--+oo (LI1) = 1/2. .1+ y 0 1 11 + 0 and dv = yn dy (1 + y)2 .76 which we differentiate to obtain Solutions dA = cos 200 . with at most two 2's occurring. replace it by 2 + 2. Thus the maximum occurs when each ni is a 2 or a 3. 2sinO Look under MaxIMin Problems in the Index for similar problems. m > 4. each ni > 4 can be replaced by (ni . 2i/2 33 ) where i { i i =4 =2 =0 if n if n if n = 0 (mod 3). If three 2's occur replace them by 3 + 3.1 . dr Setting this equal to 0. the maximum is: n . Further. + 1 Y 0 Look under Integration or Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems.2) + 2 in the partition and the associated product will be increased. Indeed. and only if. increasing the product. (m-2)·2 > m if. Substituting into our area function. the integral on the right-hand side of the last equation approaches zero as n approaches infinity.sin 200 cot O. Thus. If some ni = 4. we find a = 0/2. yn. we get A= I-cosO. leaving the product unchanged.1dy gives S 1973-4 Integration by parts with u = 1/(1 + y) 1 Since 1 nyn-1 yn --dy---I o 1+ y .

Let B be singular.a. ab E A =} r(ab) E A =} (ra)b E A so that ra E A : B (in particular. Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems. Finally. then the product AB is singular. If a E A : B. then Vb E B. we have Bx = O. 51973-7 We will prove the contrapositive: If A or B is singular. yb E A =} xb + yb E A =} (x + y)b E A. there is a non-trivial solution to By = x. Then (a-d)2+d 2 = (a+d)2. Ax = O. or . Now let A be singular. Then for some x =1= 0. xb. It follows that A(Bx) = (AB)x = 0 implying that AB is singular. ab E A=} -(ab) E A hence -a E A: B.y E A: B. Hence Ax = A(By) = (AB)y = 0. then Vb E B. then Vb E B. It follows that A : B is an ideal. Ifx.Exam #8-1973 77 51973-5 The quotient A: B is an ideal of R.n(a 1) . If B is non-singular. 51973-6 Let f(a) = an + 1 . = f'(1) = 0. Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems. r E R. ° hence x + yEA: B. y = d. Then = d daf(a) Since f(l) (n + l)a n - (n + 1). 51973-8 Let x = a . E A : B). if a E A : B.1)2. Then for some x =1= 0. from which we see that AB is singular. f(a) is divisible by (a . =} (-a)b E A.d. and z = a + d.

where d is any integer. 4d. 5d).(1~00 - k)) = Coo:-m). First. Now. we see that It follows that [X7nJ(XlOOO-k(X + l)k) = = 1000 [x 7n -(lOOO-k»J(x + l)k (m . let [x 7n Jp(x) denote the coefficient of x 7n in p(x). From this. Solutions Thus a = 0 or a = 4d. It follows that the probability of both Republicans being selected is 3/10. Exam #9-1974 51974-1 (a) For a polynomial p(x). Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems. = (-d. and all solutions are (x. d) or Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. z) (3d. Exactly 3 of those choices result in 2 Republicans being chosen (2 Republicans and the choice of lout of 3 Democrats). by the binomial theorem. y. k=O . 51973-9 There are (~) = 10 equiprobable ways to choose 3 men from the group.78 or a 2 = 4ad. 0. the polynomial given in the problem is equal to L xlOOO-k(x + 1)k.

(b) From part (a).1)2 = (m 2 + 1)(m 2 - + 1) 2m + 2) +1 = (m 4 . 51974-2 We have yx = (yx)3 = (yx)(YX)2 = (yx?(yx) = ((yx)2y)X = y(yx)2x = y(yx)(yx)x = xy2yx 2 = xyx 2 = x 3y = xy.Exam #9-1974 79 so Therefore the coefficient of x 50 is C~gl). we see that the sum of all the coefficients is 1000 fo[X m ] = fo 1000 ( 1~1 ) = 2 1001 _l. Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems. Look under Group Theory in the Index for similar problems. 51974-3 If m > 1.2m + 1) =(m2 -m+1)2+1 = Nl + 1. . set Then we have (m 2 + l)(ni + 1) = (m 2 + 1) ((m .2m3 + 3m 2 .

17 are the smallest If m = 1.0) is neither a minimum nor a maximum.so (m 2 + 1)(n~ Solutions + 1) = = = + 1) (m 2 + 1)(m2 + 2m + 2) (m 4 + 2m 3 + 3m2 + 2m + 1) + 1 N~ (m 2 + 1)((m + 1)2 =(m2+m+1)2+1 = + 1..3/4].x 4 .3/4]. Then f(x. 24 / 3 = 16 1 / 3 < 17. y must have a zero on [0.-1. then .N1 = 3.n2 S1974-4 The point (0. 0) = 0.-1. Look under Multivariate Calculus in the Index for similar problems. contradicting our assumption. y(3/4) < 0.6 < e.- .e x y . Since In(2) R::: . so y(3/4) > 0 means that y(x) > ~ . But f(x. = 2.e x < dx We see that (3 ) . then n1 solutions. Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems. We note that ~ < -1. We have f(O.7.O) > 0 for all x.y) < O. 2 .576 1 / 3 = 2. Therefore dy < .) Thus. (Or. let x = 8 and y = ~ where 0 < E < 8/2. Hence.3/4]. S1974-5 Assume that y is never zero on [0. S 1974-6 This conjecture is clearly false. Let an = 1/(n + 1).e3 / 4 < O.x on [0. y(3/4) = 1+ 1 o 3/4 dy dx dx < 1- 1 0 3 4 / 1 + eX (3) 4 x dx = 2- e3 / 4 ..

Vl and V2 . l triplets Now each of the at a ') 1 2) Vl. the infinite sum is an odd function of a. 0. Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems. . v~. L(v~-l. Label the vertices of Vl as vi. Also let a 2 2' a +x We see.. so the result follows in this case also. odd. v~} into two disjoints sets.Vl. a is odd and b is even. . vi). 51975-2 First we show. Label the vertices of 112 as v~. This chord partitions V .Vl. .. (a-l .V l (VO'Vl'V l ' (2 3 4) .. using a lower Riemann Sum. vi. . by way of contradiction. v~). that f(x)= 0<'" 00 a ~ n=l a2 + n2 < 1 0 00 a a2 + x2 dx=2 7r and the result follows. vi).Exam #10-1975 81 (the harmonic series) diverges while Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems. We have a + b = n . say fJ. If a < 0. ..VO..... and without loss of generality. . Vl has the same angle. Suppose that Vo and v~ are two vertices joined by a chord through the center of the circle.2. with [VI = n. so consider a > O. v~ as we again move around the circle the other way from Vo to v~. 0. of orders a and b respectively. . L(vi. Exam #10-1975 51975-1 The result is obvious if a = 0. Let V be the set of vertices. . 0. that no two of the vertices can be joined by a diameter through the center of the circle.{vo. VI as we move around the circle from Vo to v~. Also note that the angles L(vo. .

b = 0. n-l v. and they sum to n. 0. a . vb) Therefore we have = a < 2(n . (b-2 .2{3.b + 1 < 2 and therefore. (2 v 2.v~). Letting the radius of the circle be r.(3).v~).O.vi). v2 .(3) = n.{3 + ad = ---(2)(n . each have measure 2(n . This implies that the triangles 0. this gives us the result that an arbitrary side of the polygon has length 2r sin a.(3) and = (3) +a = n.82 Solutions (where 0 is the center of the circle) are all equal to 2n .(3). we can proceed as before to obtain In-l In-l ---(2)(n .(3 + (2) 2 2 2 2 as illustrated below. . Vi.(3) + a.. a contradiction. V2. Now 0 < a < n .( n . v2 .. since a and b are integers.(3) and angle L(v~. Therefore a simple calculation gives us (a + 1) (n . L(v~. . The angles L(vo. V2' 3 4) v2 As before. each of these form an angle of measure (3 . v2 .O. b(n . Now consider the ~ triplets I 2) b-I b) (vo. v:.{3 implies that 0 < a . ..:' are congruent. Thus If nZ-1 is even.b + 1)..(3) (a . . where a =n - n-l . 2 . v2 . a = (n . (~) (2)(n (a + l)(n . a chord starting a vertex Vo going through the center 0 of the circle and ending at the point w on the circle divides the other vertices into two sets of equal order. Wi.:- n-l and 0.L(v~-\O. Therefore..

Wi.v~ are congruent.-l is odd.Exam # 10-1975 83 n-I .V.1 (2)(7f-. L(v~. Again letting the . n-l and can proceed as before to obtain 1 2 (n .V 1 2 )=(/JI.I ~------~~--~--r-------~------~ VI 2 w If n.0. we let L(v~.6+a )=2 (n .6+a2) as illustrated below.O.-l_l and n-l_l 0. so that triangles 0.W) =/'1.v~ and 0.. From this we can see that /'1 n-l n-l = /'2. Wi .. Wi . This implies that the triangles O. 0. W) = /'2.1 -2--2-1 ) 1 1 1 ) (2) (7f-. v 2 2 are congruent.W ' . n-l n-l n-l -1 L(V22 ..

then adding an mth line according to the rules given will yield m more components. w Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. . It follows that T m = T m-l + m. To see this. note that the new line will intersect each of the existing lines at a unique point. 2 m m k=l k=l Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems. We see that the Tm are just partial sums so that Tm = To + I> = 1 + I> = 1 + m(m+l) . Also. if there are m . where "( = ¢ . If there are m .1 lines.(.1 such lines forming T m-l components. Clearly we have To = 1 (the whole plane). 51975-3 Let Tm be the number of components yielded by m lines in the plane. then the new line will split m previous components yielding m new components. this gives us the result that an arbitrary side of the polygon has length 2r sin .c¥.84 Solutions radius of the circle be r..

and 34 . 2. Next. by our induction hypothesis. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. ord(3) > 2=-3.2 == 1 + 22k . Hence.Exam #10-1975 85 51975-4 (a) Ifm is odd. is a power of 2.3 == 1 + 2k.e. As m > 2. m < 2=-2.1 = 2 is divisible by 21. then 3m == (-l)m == 2m and is not divisible by -1 (mod 4). i. When m = 4.3 2 . Thus. 2'" Squaring 32"'-3. Therefore the order of 3 modulo 2m .2 • Since the order of 3 modulo 2m is a power of two. Assume that the result is true for m = k. We now prove by induction that for m 2: 4. .1 only if m is a mUltiple of ord 2". this is 3 2k . Now consider the case m = k + 1. m ::.1 (mod 2=). ord 2".1 = 8 = 4·2 is divisible by 22.1 . Thus. (3). we have 32"'-2 == 1 (mod 2=). Squaring. we will prove that when m 2: 3. It's clearthatm = 5 < 8 = 23 andm+1 < m+m = 2m < 2·2=-2 = 2m .1 = 80 = 16 . 2=13= . When m > 4. Since 32"'-3 == 1 + 2m .2 + j 2 22k + 2· 2k - 1 + 2j2 k + 2j2 2k - 1 (mod 2k+l). == 2 (mod 4) (b) We note that 31 . so 3m -1 for odd m larger than 1.2 == 1 + ·2 k (mod 2 k + 1 ). or 4. 4 and the only values for which 2m l(3= -1) are m = 1. we see that 32"'-2 == 1 + 2· 2m - 1 + 22=-2 (mod 2=). 32"'-3 == 1+ 2=-1 (mod 2= ).(3) = 2m . that 32k . ¢(2m) = 2=-1. Since k 2: 4. 5 is divisible by 24.1 (mod 2k). we have 321 = 9 == 1 + 23 (mod 24). ord 2". We recall that. By Euler's generalization of Fermat's little theorem 3<P(2"') == 1 (mod 2m ). where ¢(2=) is the Euler totient function.. we see that 32k . (This is also easy to see by induction. we need only check exponents that are powers of 2.) Therefore. (3). Hence ord2m(3) = 2m-2. 32"'-3 == 1 + 2=-1 (mod 2=) and the claim is proved.

it would follow that n == 1 (mod 6). and the prime-power decomposition of n contains a prime q. Thus n+ 1 numbers al.. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.. and let its degree be n. we have Jo r g(t)dt = = = i it x a Jo rl r a f(t) dtdx t ~Ot f(t) -dxdt Jo f(t) . A calculation similar to the above shows that 4Ia(n). of degree n has n + 1 roots and this is impossible. q == 3 (mod 4). . e odd.2. p(8) = 8 and p(r) = r implies p(r2 -1) = r2 -1. raised to an odd power. Suppose that there is another solution. p( x) = x satisfies the conditions.1 or p(3) = 3. 51976-2 We are given that n == 11 (mod 12). which gives the result. Look under Multivariate Calculus in the Index for similar problems. and a(pe) = 1 + p + p2 + . (p. Similarly. Then a(n) = a(pe)a(N). whence n == 5 (mod 6). n+ 1 can be found such that p( ai) = ai. (If not. .1) = (p(2))2 . tdt t = Jo r f(t) dt. + pe-l + pe == 1 -1 + 1-··· + 1 -1 == 0 (mod 6). i = 1.x. If n == 11 (mod 12).) So we can write n = peN. This implies that the prime-power decomposition of n contains a prime p.. Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems. N) = 1. Exam # I 1-I 976 51976-1 By inspection. Thus the polynomial p( x) .. From p(2) = 2 follows p(22 . Hence 6Ia(n).86 Solutions 51975-5 By reversing the limits of integration. p == 5 (mod 6) raised to an odd power. then n == 3 (mod 4).

Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems. rh + sb 2 + t = -bi . and f (x) -7 00 as x exactly three zeros. we have f(x) = f(2y) = f(y)2 ~ O.a3.al =I. and since f(l) =I. and f at most three.bl . Then ral + sa2 + t = -ai . b2 . and f'(1)31n3 .CI . Look under Differentiation or Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems.h--+O Ihl ' we are done.4 < 3. Since f(O) = f(l) = 0.a2 C2 . f has another zero to the right of 1. f has Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems. -7 00. and the system has a unique solution.Exam #11-1976 87 51976-3 The quantity whose absolute value is to be shown to be less than 1 is f' (0). rCI + SC2 + t = -ci - c~.3 . so f" has at most one zero.b2 Thus the determinant is not zero. f' has at most two. 51976-4 f"' > 0 for all x.f(l) = f(O + 1) = f(O)f(l).4 < 0. 51976-5 Suppose that the equation of the circle is x 2 + y2 + rx + sy + t = O. S1976-6 Since for all i E R. x = 2y for some y.0. Since If' (0) I = Ilim h--+O f ( h) I = lim If ( h) I < lim Itan hi = 1 h h--+O Ihl . and since the points are not collinear bl .b~. The determinant of the coefficients is (b l -al)(c2-b2)-(CI -bl)(b2-a2). . Further.

Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems. .2k)x cosm x and consider = 2~ f k=O (. we have cos x = by induction. 0 for some x.1) .2k) x] since cos a cos b = cos(a + b) + cos(a 2 b) .2k) x + cos (( m . 51977-2 (a) Since. including shifting an index of summation and adding binomial coefficients.) = = f (.x) = f(x)f( -x) -t L2. for n = 1. The result now follows after some tedious. but routine manipulation of the summation. Now let L = limx---+o f(x). it assumes all intermediate values.) 2~+l f [(. Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems. We therefore assume that Hcos x + cos( -x)). Exam #12-1977 51977-1 f(a) = f(b) =} f(J(a)) = f(J(b)) =} a = b. Then 1 = f(O) Solutions = f(x . therefore f is injective on J. It follows that if f were not strictly monotone then it could not be injective. we have L = 1.) 2~ k=O k=O cos(m .ss f(O) = 1. Since L cannot equal -1 since this would imply f (x) ::::.2k)x cos x cos (( m + 1) . we proceed cos(m . Since f is continuous.

1) to obtain Al = 1.k#n 6 ~ (2n) sin(2n.f(x)1 = Iy . 51977-4 Suppose that f(O) = t. .x) for some x in R.I)x = 0 has a nonzero solution and A .. Now for any y in R.. It follows that f (x) = 0 for some x in R. If(y)1 = If(y) .f( -t)1 = 2It1 so that one of f(t) = 0 or f( -t) = 0 must hold.xl so that any isometry must be of the form f (y) = ± (y . .22nL (2: ) 10 cos((2n-2k)x)dx k=O = !_1 ( 7r 22n k=O.1. 22n (n!)2 7r = 22n(n!)2' Look under Integration or Trigonometry in the Index for similar problems.10 cos2nxdx=-. If(t) .) Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems. (These are translations followed by reflections.2k (2n)! ° + (2n)7r) n = -.2k)x[1f k 2n .I is therefore not invertible. Thus (A . It is also easy to see that anything of that form must be an isometry.Exam #12-1977 89 (b) We have 1 r 1 1 2n r -.f(O)1 = Also. . Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems.f(O)1 = It I Itl· and If( -t) - tl = If( -t) . Then If(t) - tl = If(t) . 1 1 ((2n)!) 51977-3 MUltiply the matrix A by the vector 1 = (1.

1.. Exam #13-1978 51978-1 To find the decimal expansion of an integer M.90 Solutions 51977-5 Assume that there are only N primes..bi .) Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. (The hint is verified by picking r 2: max{ai.-..ei}. or 9 to obtain the expansion . where the di are 0... PN bl b2 bN + . . From the hint. + p-C-=-1-p-=-C2-.. Then for each k. . one divides by 10 successively.--=-CNp I 2 N 1 since each integer n can be written as a product of our N primes. a contradiction. and therefore converging. recording the remainders: M = lOMI +do . we therefore have <III-p·· i=1 2 N 1 This implies that the harmonic sequence is increasing and bounded above.. k 1 1 = pa1pa2 •. • paN I 2 N + 1 PI P2 . . MI = 10M2 + d l . the kth partial sum of the harmonic series can be written n=1 L.. a finite set. .8.-.

j)k. C. 1 Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems. 0. 0).3 b2 ak + bk = (a + b)(a k - 1 _ + . bearing in mind that the remainders must be 0 or +1. a k + bk factors as a k .j)k j=l + II Look under Finite Sums in the Index for similar problems. we may assume that A is the origin in 3-space. (0. To set this up. we get n 'L. 0). . One technique is to use the cross product.0. Recall that Ilv x wll gives the area of the parallelogram with sides v and w. and D lie on the axes. say at (x. one proceeds by an analogous algorithm. 51978-3 We recall that when k is odd.1 ).Exam #13-1978 91 To write M in the base -2. 51978-2 To solve this problem. y.2 b + a k ... one must get at the area of a non-right-angled triangle. Then area(ABC) = 2' xy area(ABD) = 2' xz area(ACD) = 2' yz and the area of (BCD) is :2IICD x CBII 1 = :2 V(x y )2 + (xz)2 + (yz)2. Adding these 2S(n) = 2)(n + 1. So -2374(10) = 101111001110(_2)· Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. and (0. + bk . respectively.?=l jk.?=l (n+ 1. Now S(n) = 'L. and that B. and also S(n) = two expressions. z).

as illustrated. We divide the proof into two cases..Lak. k=rn+2 k=l . That is. f (x) is smallest in the interval between the middle a's. a2 ::. an.akl K=l m 2rn+1 = L(arn+1 . The x for which f (x) is smallest is the median of aI. n= 1 n=2 n=3 n=4 In view of this. then 2m+1 f(am+d = L lam+! .am+!) k=l k=rn+2 m 2rn+1 = marn+1 . if n is odd. .ak) + L (ak . f(x) is smallest at the middle a and if n is even. an. a2.. If n = 2m + 1. the proof will be easier to write down if we re-index the given numbers so that a1 ::. ::.92 Solutions 51978-4 A first step in discovering the solution of this problem might be to graph the function for small values of n..' . .L ak + L ak mam+1 k=l k=rn+2 2rn+1 rn L ak.

In an analogous way. am +1.x k=l k=l+l Z = L ak .f(am+d = [ + l)x. m . x :::. we can show 2m m f(x) 2: ak . then 2m Z f(x) and = L ak-L ak+(21-2n)x k=Z+l k=l Analogously.21 k=l+l k=l So that f(x) . and am:::. If n = 2m. x :::.21 + l)x 2m+l t 1 m =2 L k=l+l (ak . ao.~ ak .(2m .1. m. we see f(x) 2: f(am+d if x:::. x :::.Lakl k=m+l k=l L if x :::. . 0.Exam #13-1978 93 Now suppose that az :::. or if az :::.(2m . Then 2m+l Z 2m+l f(x) = L k=l 2m+l IX-akl=Lx-ak= L ak. x :::.x) + (a m +1 - x) 2: O. Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems. aZ+l. or if az :::. then 2m m 2m 2m m f(x)=Llx-akl=Lx-ak+ k=l k=l L k=m+l ak-X= L k=m+l ak-Lak' k-l Now if az :::. x 2: an. where I 2: m + 1. at+1 and I 2: m + 1. aZ+1 where I :::. x :::. aZ+l for I :::. x 2: an.L ak . k~l ak .

94 Solutions 51978-5 We distinguish three cases. C. B. One such experiment is: . we have 10' BI + 10' DI 2IBDI. C. and D are the vertices of a convex quadrilateral. 51978-6 The first step in this solution is to realize that no experiment that always finishes after N tosses of the coin can have probability of success 1/3. B. C. say D. and D lie on a line. IBOI + 10DI = IBDI Thus. If A. For one pair of the points A. and k/2 N i= 1/3 for any integer k. Since AOC is a straight line and 0 is between A and C. this is problem 1978-4 restated. Let 0' be any other point on the plane. If A. the triangle formed by this pair and 0' contains the triangle formed by this pair and D. and D are not the vertices of a convex quadrilateral. Thus the solution should be an experiment which a patient experimenter would expect to finish in a finite amount of time with probability 1/3. there are 2N possible outcomes of flipping a coin N times. then one of the points. IAOI + 1001 = IACI ~ IAO'I + 10'CI· Similarly. B. so that IAO'I + 10'01 2 IADI + IDCI· By the triangle inequality. is contained in the triangle whose vertices are the other three points. Let 0' be any point in the plane other than D. (That is. suppose AC and BD are the diagonals and that they intersect at O. B. ~ IBO'I + 10'DI· IAOI + lOCI + IBOI + 10DI ~ IAO'I + 10'01 + IBO'I + 10'DI· If A. and 0 = D. so let's say AO'C contains ADC. any point on the middle segment solves the problem. so we then have IAO'I + 10'CI + IBO'I + 10' DI 2 IADI + IBDI + ICDI· Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. and C.

and Lw be the length of the rope on the side of the weight.. W m be the weight of the monkey in ounces. and let M3 (resp. Exam #14-1979 51979-1 Let Mo (resp.. = a fixed difference in ages. or four tosses. "'"""' ... (4) Ml = ~Bl' .n = -. after four tosses unless all four are tails..4 3 n=l 00 1 3 1 Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems.Exam #14-1979 95 Toss a coin until (a) the coin has been tossed an even number of times and (b) at least one head has been tossed. Lm be the length of the rope on the side of the monkey. an event whose probability is zero. Thus the experiment consists of two tosses.. The experiment is over after two tosses unless both are tails. let Ml (resp. the monkey) at the time t2. The experiment will terminate unless the experimenter tosses tails forever.. and so forth.Bi = k.. Then we have (1) Mi . the monkey) at the time t3.. The probability that the event is a success is given by Pr (success) =L 00 Pr(success given that the experiment requires exactly 2n tosses) n=l x Pr( experiment requires exactly 2n tosses) = 6 3 . Bo) be the age of the monkey's mother (resp. or six tosses.. or . (3) Mo = 2Bl. B 2 ) be the age of the monkey's mother (resp. Let W w be the weight of the weight in ounces.. Bd be the age of the monkey's mother (resp. the monkey) at the present time. let M2 (resp. The experiment is a success if two heads have been tossed. L be the length of the rope. (2) Mo + Bo 4. the monkey) at the time t 1 . . B3) be the age of the monkey's mother (resp.

Thus Wm = (5/2) . x-y -2.k = (5/4)k and by (3) Mo = (5/2)k. WW = (3/2) ·40 = 60 OZ. (6) M3 = 3B3· Since B3 = M3 . Since dV dt dV ds ds dt' ds dt a kd(t)" Noting that d(t) = bt + c. 51979-3 Let V(t) be the volume of snow removed at time t. But by (1) and (2). 16 = 40 OZ..= .SIn y x+y 2 = 2 COS x+y.= m7r 2 2' where m and n are integers.p) = 40 + 40p. b = ~~ be the rate at which snow falls.k. Suppose t = 0 at noon. and S(t) be the location of the plow. so k = 1 and Mo = 5/2.k = (9/4)k . So by (5) Bl = Ml . The graph thus consists of the two families of lines y = x + 7r + 2n7r and y = -x + 2m7r. Then dV = kd(t)ds. where m and n are integers. if to is the time at which it starts snowing. d(t) be the depth of the snow.t~) . . and L = 640 = 15 ft. Finally. a = ~~ be the rate at which snow is removed. 51979-2 If sin x = sin y. then O· Therefore . equation (6) gives M3 B2 = (9/2)k and by (4) Ml = (9/4)k.96 (5) B2 Solutions = 3M3 . so ~~ = kd(t). We have 1 = S(I) . p = 3/4 of the rope is on the side of the monkey when the system is at rest since we have 60 + 40(1 .S(O) = = Jo dt = Jo kbd(t) = k r ds r 1 1 abdt * k* (In(c + b) -In(c)) = k* In (1 + n In (d(t)lo 1 = k* In ( 1. = SIn x . Therefore = (3/2)k.sm -2-· 7r x-y or . then to = -c/b..+ n7r Look under Trigonometry in the Index for similar problems. Mo + Mo .k = 4. .

Exam #14-1979 97 Similarly. We convert this to minutes by multiplying by 60. to Therefore multiplying corresponding sides of these two equations gives us 3k* In(1 - ~) = to 2k* (In 1 - Solving for to. we get to = 1~v'5.) 3/2 = 8(2) . ~) . (Letting k* = a/k. Look under Differential Equations in the Index for similar problems. . 51979-4 Let r be the radius of the original sphere. Drill the hole along the x-axis. 3 y -+--+----f---::--I--+~ x Look under Volumes in the Index for similar problems.618 hours. to get 37 minutes before noon. to must be negative and therefore we choose to = -0. Since it started snowing before noon. 93/2 = 367r. as illustrated in the figure below.y2) dy _ _ 27r (r2 _ y2)3/2Ir (3/2) v?-=9 = 47r .m. Therefore it started snowing at 11 :23 a. Then V = Jr v'r2-9 27rY' (2V r2 .8(0) = k* In (1 - ~) .

(-3. (-4. 51979-6 The set of points consists of (-6. (0. (-3.-7). (1. (-3. (-3. -16). (3. (0. -13). 1. 1 + 9 . (1. (-3. -2). -6). (_1)9 + 7 + v'9.-4). 1 . -2). Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems. (-4. (-3. )9 + 7 + v'9. -2). (-1.-1).-3). -2). -8). (-2. (-3. -9).aN+lbN+l N = 2~)anbn . (-1.an+lbn+d n=l n=l Look under Inequalities in the Index for similar problems.98 Solutions 51979-5 The next several positive integers are: 5 = 1.5). (2. -17).2). (-4. (3. -2). -10).7 + v'9. (-1.3).1). (-2. -15). (-5.9- 6= 7= 8= 9= 10 = v'9.1). Exam # 15-19 SO 51980-1 We have hence albl > albl .-5). . -19). 7+ This list can be extended to at least 38.4).9 + 7 + 9. 1 + 9 + l7 /9 J. (2.

.4. (A given weight can be placed on the load pan. 40 can be written in the form I = 2::.=1 XiWi. Now note that if o= L 1 4 ZiWi = Z1 + Z2 W 2 + Z3 W 3 + Z4 W 4.Exam #15-1980 99 51980-2 The problem is to find the weights W1 < W2 < W3 < W4 such that every positive integer I ::::. A similar argument shows that f (x) ~ 0 on [a. we can also measure 1=5 if we take W3 = 9.) It seems reasonable to choose W1 = 1 and W1 + W2 + W3 + W4 = 40.40.. Notice iliat this argument assumes that Xo is in the interior of [a. 0. so f (xo) = O. 2. . bj. bj and hence f vanishes identically on [a. bj. So S coincides with the set of integers 1.2::{ Wi = 27. O. or 1. bj. it follows that there are exactly 40 positive integers in S and each of these is at most 2::i Wi = 40. Then W4 = 40 .3. Look under Differential Equations in the Index for similar problems. Z3 = Z4 = O. bj such that f(xo) is the maximum value of f on [a. . Then f'(xo) = 0 and we must also have f"(xo) ::::. To measure a 2 pound load. Similarly. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.2. Then we can measure the loads I = 1. That is f (x) ::::. or on the weight pan to achieve a balance. with each 3(Z2 IZi I : : . 51980-3 Choose Xo in [a. we need W2 = 3 (I + W1 = W2). Therefore. where the Xi is either -1.. i=1 -1 < _ X· . 0 for all X in [a.< 1 _ 1} has exactly 34 = 81 members.2. then 3 + 3z3 + 3 2 z 4 ) and this divides Z1 and hence Z1 = O. So 0 gives Z2 = O. As 5 + 3 + 1 = 9. As I E S implies -I E S. 0. f(xo) = !" : : . but the same conclusions can be drawn if Xo = a or b. not used. the set s = {~X'W' : ~ 'l. Therefore 0= f(a) ::::. 1. bj.

the matrix I + A has the form (Z(1).. the matrix A = xyt = c y X2Yl XIY2 X2Y2 x.100 Solutions S1980-4 For and yt = (Yl Y2 . that is det(I + A) = = (ze 1). .y)(x. Another proof can be given based on the fact that the determinant is unchanged on adding a multiple of one column to another.ze 2).y)(x..z(1») +1 (x. one reduces A to a lower triangular matrix and then det(I + A) is easy to compute.Z(2») (ze1).y)(x. If z(l). z)x where (-.Yn) X2Yn :. as the result is trivially true otherwise.y)(x. .. with respect to this basis.ze n ) is an orthonormal basis with ze i ) = y/llyll.) A short computation shows that if then the vector Az = (y. . then.:. . . With this.) denotes the usual inner product in Rn..y) (y/llyll.y/llyll) + 1 = + 1. 0) : 0 o 0 o 1 so the determinant of I +A is the product of the diagonal entries.ze 1») +1 0 1 I+A= ( (z(1). Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems. . XnYl X n Y2 XnYn (We can assume Y i= 0. Yn ) .z(n») o o .y)(x.

51980-6 (a) The improper integral has two apparent singularities. Conversely. Hence l' (xo) = for all xo. Put g+ = ~(Igl + g). 0. so that f must be a constant function.. and then let y tend to X-Xo f'(xo) -f( Xo ) = -d log2 f(x)1 _ x d ::. If g(x) = cosxlx 2. = xo. g.g). we get ::.. So we need j exists and is finite. at x x = 00. ° A similar argument with y ::. the integral only check that 101 si~x dx makes sense. then cos 1 . so that g+ and g.= ~(Igl.x. 2(x-y)2 =} log2 f(x) -Iogz f(y) ::.- b co~ x dx _jb x cosb jb cosx dx -- x2 so that limb-+oo Igl exists and is finite. Now oo sinx d 1 X _ . (x _ y)2.00].2: 0. Xo gives f' (xo) If (xo) 2: 0.Exam #15-1980 101 51980-5 ~~~~ If we fix x xo. Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems. any constant function satisfies the condition. This implies that 1imb-+00 lIb g( x) dx exists and is finite by an argument similar to the one used to show that an absolutely convergent series is convergent. b 1 lib ~ 0. But as the function = °and f(x) = { sinx ( ' xolO x=o is continuous on [0. divide by y .are increasing functions of b that are each bounded above I: lb Ig(x)1 dx 50 lb :2 dx = 1- ~ I: I: .. Then g+ 2: 0. with y > xo.I'1m jb 1 -X sinx d b-+oo x jb 1 sin x dx X = _ cos x I = XII and Icotbl ::. g.xo.

~) + . x Similarly. if a :::.O. . 0. 1 o 00 sin ax . limb-+oo I: g. x Therefore. Look under Integration in the Index for similar problems.L 2k = L k + L n + k .102 by so that Solutions It Igl.k=l k L k=l k=l k=l k=l L n +k' k=l n 2n 2 n 1 n 1 n 1 1 = Look under Finite Sums in the Index for similar problems.O.. + (~ 2 2 3 4 4 2n 1 n 2) 2n = L k .. 1 o 00 sin ax dx x = -1 0 00 sin x dx. Then 00. It now follows that 1000 Si~ x dx is convergent. (1000 SinxQx dx) 2 = (1000 Si~ x dx) 2 is constant for a i=.. hence limb-+oo I: g+. Hence its derivative with respect to a is 0 for any a i=. 51980-7 We have = 1 + (~ . The derivative fails to exist at a = 0 because of the discontinuity at that point.dx X = l'1m b-+oo lb 0 -X sin ax d x = l'1m b-+oo lQb 0 -- sin Y d y Y = 1 -00 0 sin x dx.~) + ~ + (~ .both exist and are finite has a finite limit as b -7 (b) Fix a 2 O.

. Continuing in this manner. 10 + 10 . ao ... to find S = 88 steers.3Sr.2 + . from which we can obtain the result by long division in base 7. 6 = S . .. and subtracting equation (3) from four times equation (1) gives 200v = 384r . Go denote the initial amount of grass per acre. a1 must be the greatest integer in a1 = 4. substitute.. t the number of weeks until the grass is depleted. Since 7 ... . so = 2. 6. ~ = a1 + a! + . Look under Systems of Equations in the Index for similar problems. 8 = 18 . and r the rate of consumption of the grass per week. 51981-2 Letting A denote the number of acres. r . 2 7 7 21 8 16 8 a1 a2 or 5 a1 a2 + .Exam #16-1981 103 Exam #16-1981 5198 I-I If then 7· 7 =ao +7"+72 + . r . Solve for v. 3 a1 a2 that is. For an alternate solution. 7 -=-+-+-+ . Consequently. The information given yields the following equations: (1) Go· 10 + 10· v . 8. we find a2 = 2. Subtracting equation (2) from (1) gives 40v = 24r. 16 (2) (3) = 12· r . Go· 40 + 40 . v . (iho = (. a4 Apparently..24)r.. we have 310 810 3. we have the relationship GoA + Avt = Srt. so that ao must be the greatest integer in 281 .. Go . S the number of steers. a3 = 4. v . 16. v the growth rate of the grass per acre per week.= 8 7 = 2. and cancel the r. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.

V3 . . If C' is the center of the sphere of radius r that we seek. v'3 -1 r = -v'3=-3-+-1 .1 = r(1 + V3). V3 = 1 + r + rV3. On this plane. O~------~---*~~~------. and we have 2 teams to choose from. (n~ 1) . and the point P of tangency of the given sphere with one side of the comer. (n~1)/2n-1 is the probability of winning exactly 3 of the previous n . 2 2n .104 Solutions 51981-3 Draw a plane passing through the center C of the given sphere.1 2-__1 (n . as illustrated below. then C'O = rv'3. i.1) 1 2n 3 ' since 1/2 is the probability of winning the nth game. the comer 0.1 games. Since the radius of the given sphere is 1. We have Pr(n = 4) = ~. Pr(n = 5) = Pr( n = 6) = 156' Pr( n = 7) = 156' which sum to one. we have the trace of the given sphere and the trace of the sphere whose radius we seek. 51981-4 The probability of winning the world series in exactly n games is ~. Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. we know that CO = v'3. Thus CO = CQ + QC' + C'O. Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems.

y2 = 125/24. Thus s + 2 = 2r. where r = reO) is some function of O. after some simplification we arrive at 3125 + 400t 2 . Then y = 50 . measured from the horizontal. we find s + 2 = 2ct. Taking square roots. and integrating gives r = K exp(O/V3) for some constant K. K = 1.16t2.jf. 1. so ds = 2dr.Exam #16-1981 105 51981·5 Let y be the position at time t. then Since dx = -r sin 0 dO + cos 0 dr. separating the variables. and then y. and so y = -100/3 feet below the observer's eye level. Equating the distance s + 2 that the destroyer has gone at the time t of interception with the distance 2ct that the submarine has gone. . and dy = r cos 0 dO + sin 0 dr. = rsinO. Since r = 1 when 0 = 0. . If s denotes arclength along the destroyer's path as illustrated below. By the quadratic formula. Therefore y2 + 1002 (-32) - 100 -100(2y) dy 32t (y2 + 1002)2 dt = O. 0 = tan -1 160' and by the chain rule. Since the submarine is moving at a constant rate c. dO dO dy = dt dy dt y2 100 + 100 (-32t). Look under MaxIMin Problems in the Index for similar problems. and thus 3(dr)2 = r2(dO)2. Substituting for 1.192t4 = O.jf = -32t. the distance r that it travels in a straight line is given by r = ct. Consequently. 51981-6 Suppose the path of the destroyer is given by x y = r cos 0.

Let Then we have Let a'. Exam #17-1982 51982-1 Let Xl. Then . Xl X2 X3 C . X2. b'. c' be the corresponding coefficients of the cubic whose roots are reciprocals of the original cubic. It is known that the coefficients of a polynomial are symmetric functions in the roots. 111 1 c =----=-. X3 be the roots of x3 + ax2 + bx + c.106 Solutions Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems.

51982-4 f (x) is differentiable at x = 0 if -1/h lim f(h) . of the rectangle. c c c Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems. 1. The area of triangle ACB is ~hAB :::. Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. Join them by a line.f ( 0 ) = lim _e_ h~O h h~O h 2 . where hand h' are the altitudes of the triangles. and conditions of this problem. Given a set ofn-k slashes. 5. Xl X2 X3 XlX2X3 c Therefore the desired cubic is 3 X b a 1 + -x 2 + -x +-. 51982-3 Let the two points that are furthest apart be denoted A and B. wlog horizontal. We consider the quadrilateral formed by ACBD. 7} with n = 8 can be represented as /-//-/-/. For example. There will be points C and D on the top and bottom. = _ (~ + ~ + ~) = _ XlX2 + XlX3 + X2 X 3 = ~. Thus the area of the rectangle is (h + h')AB = hAB + h' AB :::. 1 and the area of triangle ABD is ~h' AB :::. the separated subset {2. there are n . respectively. Thus there are (n-~+l) different separated subsets. vertical sides through A and B. 2 + 2 = 4.k slashes where no two dashes are adjacent. Look under EnUllleration in the Index for similar problems. 51982-2 A separated subset of order k from a set of order n can be represented by a sequence of k dashes and n .k + 1 places to possibly place the k dashes (this includes before the first slash and after the last slash). Now draw the smallest rectangle containing all of the points with top and bottom sides parallel to the line AB.Exam #17-1982 107 _1_ XlX2 b' and a' = + _1_ + _1_ = XlX3 X2X3 Xl + X2 + X3 XlX2X3 a C .

. It follows that the probability that a random cube ends with the digits 11 is 1/100. and 21 modulo 25. then _1/h 2 Solutions lim _e_ _ h--+O h = lim yl/2e-Y = y--+oo o.b2 = 7f2 • 47fa a . 51982-6 If a 3 ends in the digits 11. Now.lOS exists. 6. By the Chinese remainder theorem. 3 is the only residue satisfying a 3 == 11 modulo 4. 21 3 = (-4)3 = -64 = -14 = 11. That means we need only check the cubes of 1. 51982-7 Using the disk method for finding volumes of revolution. 6 = 11 . 3 2 3 Look under Volumes in the Index for similar problems. there is only one number satisfying a == 3 (mod 4) and a == 21 (mod 25) (that number is 71). we obtain the integral 7f f a ( ( -a va2 . Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems. Look under Differentiation in the Index for similar problems. This is equivalent to the two conditions a 3 == 11 == 3 (mod 4) and a3 == 11 (mod 25). then a 3 == 11 (mod 100). 1. 163 = 256· 16 = 6· 16 = 96 = 21. By an easy calculation. 11. a 3 == 11 (mod 25) =} a 3 == 1 (mod 5). 13 = 1.y2 + b) 2) dy . By another easy calculation. So a = 21 is the only solution modulo 25. Look under Number Theory or Probability in the Index for similar problems. Set y = Ilh 2 . b + --. 51982-5 If a :::. a = 1 is the only residue modulo 5 which satisfies this equation. 16. 6 = 16. then f is uniformly continous on its domain.63 = 36 .

51983-2 There are 210 possible outcomes when one flips a com 10 times.. Also. Each such sequence must either start with HT followed by a sequence of length n . . T 2 .x) = ~rJ2(a 2 x) + ~r(a - r= ------~--~~--~~---- (a-x)(a-x) x) (a .x) + (a - + J2(a - x) 2+J2· .Exam # 18-1983 109 Exam #18-1983 51983-1 n~~ lim \YrJ> n~~ lim ~(n/2t/2 = n~oo lim v:.x) 2 2 ' a-x Since we have the relationship ~(a 2 we see that x)(a . S2 = 3.• .ri = 00 Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems. Let Ti be the result of the ith flip. Let Sn be the number of sequences of length n without 2 consecutive occurrences of H. Therefore Sn = Sn-l + Sn-2..x)x + 7fr2. Hence S7 = Fg = 34. Ts = T and we wish to know how many sequences of length 7 have no adjacent H's. It follows that there are 34 possible outcomes which satisfy our condition.1 with no consecutive H's. T s . We see then that Sn = Fn+2 where Fi denotes the ith Fibonacci number. x) + ~r(a . (We have solved a more general version of the problem: if 10 is replaced by an arbitrary n E N.2 with no consecutive H's or start with T followed by a sequence of length n . T g • Certainly then. The probability that such an outcome occurs is then 34/1024. then the probability that we stop after the nth flip is Fn_I/2n. SI = 2. we want to maximize f(x) = (a .) Look under Fibonnacci Sequences or Probability in the Index for similar problems. 51983-3 From the illustration below. We want to compute the number of possible outcomes which have Tg = TlO = H and no adjacent H's in T 1 .

The dimensions of the rectangle and circle easily follow. 1. Every bounded monotone sequence converges. we can write + Aa2.}. the sequence {ti} is monotone increasing. 1/3. Since zero is a limit point of S. we must have t . 1/2.ti).1) + x(a . so ti ---+ s for some . which has a critical point at x = a(1 . a a Look under Geometry or MaxIMin Problems in the Index for similar problems. x:::. 51983-4 Solution 1. 1 gives us f"(x) = 2(A . Define f(x) = max{~ E S : ~ :::. Finally.ti =1= 0 for all i. 1/4. ti+l = ti + f(t .2A)/2(1 . we have ti < t for all i so that {til is bounded above. O. Now.A). define to = f(t).1) + a(1. f(x) = x 2(A . Since t is not a finite sum of elements from S.1) :::. f is well defined for x > O. Letting A = 7f/(2 + V2)2. x}. Suppose that t E R is not a finite sum of elements from S = {1. Further this is a maximum since A :::.x)x + (2 + V2)2' where 0:::. since f only attains positive values.2A). since f(t .2aA) Differentiating gives us f'(x) = 2x(A .ti) < t .·· .110 Thus we want to maximize Solutions 7f(a-x)2 f(x) = (a . Furthermore.ti.

But now xn > nx n...y)[zn-l + yzn-2 + .1 implies x > n.hb2 b3 ... there is a finite sum S = L:~=l 2k~1 such that M = S + q with 0 < q < 1. II > m lit contradiction. p. Then p has a binary representation of the form P = O. Itlr which s . Look under Diophantine Equations in the Index for similar problems. diverges. + yn-l] > (1)[x n. Without loss of generality we have x :s. .. y < z < n.. so there exists II t. = b1 "2 + h4" + b38 + . then let ~ = f(t . From ~his. + xn-l] = nx n 1...1 + x n. C Solution 2..l)n(n + l)(n + 2) + 1 = n 4 + 2n3 =(n2+n-1)2. y. 51983-6: Assume that there is a solution with z < n.s). Applying case 1 to this q gives the result. Case 1: assume that our positive number.ti + ~ > .1 + . - n2 - 2n + 1 Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.~. ti --t S. i Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems. satisfies o < p < 1.ti < 1. and therefore x :s.. . }.Exam # 18-1983 III s E R.. N = (n . It follows immediately that ti+l . If s < t. 1 1 1 with each bk either zero or one.. S1983-7 N is a perfect square. Since the series ~ + + ~ + . 1/4. 1/8. S1983-5 This is a repeat of problem # 3 on Exam # 7 (1972). Case 2: assume that our positive number M satisfies M 2:: 1.. Therefore t = s.. = (z . a contradiction. This gives a representation of p as a sum (possibly infinite) of a subset of the numbers {1/2.

1].005.005. x < y =} g(x) > g(y) =} g2(X) < g2(y) so that g2 is increasing on [0. .1. .001 is equal to (1001)5 75(11 5) 135. k=l then P( x) is a polynomial of degree at most n . note that Pk(Xk) = 1 (this is obvious from the definition) and = 0 for j i= k (because of the x .1 because each Pk (x) is a polynomial of degree n . y E [0. . Now if 9 is decreasing on [0. Using the above argument we see that g2(x) = x must hold. . Suppose that 9 is increasing on [0.1]. it follows that P(x) has n distinct zeros. then for x E [0. . Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. =} gm-l(x) > gm(x).1. Since the Xj are distinct. Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems. Any polynomial of degree at most n .1]. x < g(x) g(x) < g2(X) -1 gm-l(x) < gm(x). Look under Real-Valued Functions in the Index for similar problems. Any injective real-valued continuous function must be strictly monotone on its domain. therefore P(x) = 0 which implies 2:~=lPk(X) = 1. =} .Xj term in the numerator). But notice that for each Xj.1]' then for x.010. X> g(x) hence x > gm (x) -1 g(x) > g2(X) =} . so that x < gm(x) = X. Let n P(X) = LPk(X) . therefore 9 is injective. 51983-9 g(X) = g(y) =} gm(x) = gm(y) =} X = y. Also.1 with n zeros must be identically zero.112 Solutions 51983-8 Pk(Xj) First.010. =x =} which is obviously false. Exam #19-1984 51984-1 By the binomial theorem 1.1]. SO we must have g(x) = x.

Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems. a ° If m is an integer. 51984-3 Door D is changed by the nth person if and only if n divides D. 4 slanting left and any such path joins A to B.. which we offer without proof. since p and q are relatively prime. enable one to do the stated problem with a little trial and error. p . 5 slanting right.Exam #19-1984 113 51984-2 Every path from A to B goes along 9 edges. Corollary. Thus there are (. . then every integer greater than n is in the semigroup S.. then so does D / n. Lemma 2.1 so that m = ap + bq. 68 = 8(7) + 1(12). 9. 67 = 1(7) + 5(12). Let m = ap + bq where a and b are integers. If n divides D. Thus..16. b are nonnegative integers} generated by p = 7 and q = 12 and asks "What is the largest integer not in S?" (In the general solution here. Then m = a' p + b' q if and only if there is an integer k so that a' = a + kq and b' = b. doors 1. are unique integers a and b Now since 65 = (11)7 + (-1)12 and 65 = 7a + 12b with a and b nonnegative implies a :s. all variables will be integers and p and q will denote relatively prime positive integers. the uniqueness in the corollary shows that it is not possible to give exact change of 65 quanta.2. every integer can be expressed in the form ap + bq for some integers a and b. q . then there :s. those with an odd number are open. Doors that have an even number of divisors are closed. the rest are closed.kp. . . 51984-4 This problem concerns the numerical semigroup S = {ap + bql a. Lemma 1. with :s.) In this question the emphasis is on the nonnegativity because. thus D has an even number of divisors unless D is a perfect square. Two fairly easy observations.) = 126 paths.9.. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. If n is a positive integer such that for each k = 0. Moreover.1 there are nonnegative ak and bk with n + k = akP + bkq. .since 66 = 6(7) + 2(12).4. are open. 69 = 3(7) + 4(12).1.

The easiest way to find the required probability is to represent the two points chosen in the interval as an ordered pair from the unit square and decide which pairs lead to triangles.c). If p and q are relatively prime positive integers and S is the numerical semigroup generated by p and q.114 Solutions 70 = 10(7) + 0(12). so that (x. If p and q are relatively prime positive integers. (Proof omitted. dJ is just (b . this means that none of the segments formed may have length greater than or equal to 1/2. (Proof omitted. the probability that the first point is chosen from the interval [a. bJ and the second from the interval [c. This is actually a special case of an old (1884) theorem by Sylvester.1) (q . the region corresponding to possible triangles has been shaded. then (p . More generally. Lenuna 1 shows 65 is the largest such price.1 cannot be written in the form ap + bq for nonnegative integers a and b.a) (d .) Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. but every larger integer can be.1) . it is necessary and sufficient that the sum of the lengths of any two segments must be greater than the length of the third. 1]. 71 = 5(7) + 3(12). In the figure below. ~------~~------~------------ x Because of the independence and uniformity assumptions. the probability that the points x and y are chosen from [0. In our situation. 51984-5 In order for three segments to form the sides of a triangle.) The following theorem. shows that there are 33 prices for which Subsylvanians cannot give exact change. then there are (p -1) (q -1) /2 positive integers not in S. also by Sylvester in 1884. y) is in the subset A . and 72 = 0(7) + 6(12). Theorem. Theorem.

the other point must be in the interval (1/2. the functional equation shows that Cn+l = Cn +2. we have x --+ 00 lim f(x) = xlim --+ 1 (x/[x + 1]) - 2 = 1(1) - 2 = 3. Since l/(n + 1) equals (l/n)/[(l/n) + 1].1/2) = 1 .) Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems. the probability of having a triangle is 11/2 x=O xdx+ 11 (1-x)dx=1/4. when 0 :::. X2. x :::. . . letting X be the random variable for the choice of the first point..3. hence that Cn+1 = C1 + 2n. . •. i=l In our situation. in order for a triangle to be formed. Since 1(x) is continuous on 0 < x < 00. Recall that if Xl. then this becomes Pr(a triangle) = l~o Pr(a triangle X = x) dx.Exam # 19-1984 115 of the unit square. 1/2. the function g(x) = (2/x) cos(2n/x) + 3 has the property that g(l/n) = 2n + 3 for n = 1. 1/4. it has a finite minimum value on every bounded closed interval. When 1/2 < x :::. x=1/2 (This might be interesting to verify with a computer simulation.. which has probability 1/2 . is equal to the area of A. Thus. 51984-6 (a) From the functional equation and the continuity of 1 at 1.1/2). ex) (b) We note first of all that it is not sufficient to observe that 1(1/ n) = 2n + 3 for n = 1.3. Now.1/2 + x).(x . limx-+o+g(x) -=J +00. l/n].2. . Thus the probability that a triangle can be formed is the area of the shaded region in the figure. in order for a triangle to be formed. then n Pr(z) = LPr(zlxi) Pr(xi). but certainly. We may obtain the same result more analytically with the principles of conditional probability. .2. which has probability (x + 1/2) ..x. Let c be the minimum value of 1 on the interval [l/(n + 1).. 1.. Xn form a partition of the space of outcomes and z is any event. the second point must be in the interval (x -1/2.x = x.

we notice that an n unit train is either an n .1). BHB. etc. f(2) = 3 (BB. HH. and so on until we arrive at 241 and f(40) = 3' our answer. that f(n) = f(n . we want to count the number of trains of total weight 40 units. More importantly. f(4) = 11 (BFF.2) where f(l) = 1 and f(2) = 3 implies: 22k - 1 f(2k-1)= for k = 1.HBB).1 unit train with a boxcar stuck on the end or an n .. That is. (c) The given conditions relate the values of f on the intervals [1. 51984-7 It is helpful to consider 25 tons as one unit of weight. FH. BH.00) such that limx--+±oo g(x) = 0.116 Thus. f(3) = 5 (BF. HF.2 unit train with a flat car or hopper car stuck on the end. .HB). but besides f(l) = 5 and limx--+oo f(x) = 3. (It is easy to prove by induction.3. we have m~n+l f(x) 2: inf Cn = cn+l = Cl + 2n which means limx--+o+ f(x) = +00. Let f (n) denote the number of trains of total weight n units: we want to find f (40). but perhaps hard to discover. A succinct way of say this is: if 9 is any continuous function on (-00.BBB.BBB.. (0). [1/3. [1/2.FBB. f(7) = 43 + 42 = 85. ) 3 and f(2k) = 22k+l 3 +1 Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems. FF. It is easy to find f(n) when n is small: f(l) = 1 (the only train is B). then f(x) = 3 + (2/x) + g(cot(7r/x)) satisfies the given conditions and any solution can be written in this way for some g..1) + 2f(n . BFB. . . Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems. F.FB.. (0). H). 1/(1 Solutions + n). to each other and specify the values at the end points. f satisfies f(n) = f( n-1)+2f(n-2) where f(l) = 1 and f(2) = 3. Thus f(5) = 11 + 10 = 21. the function f is an arbitrary continuous function on [1.1/2). f(6) 21 + 22 = 43.2. if 0 < x::.. BBH.

51985-3 Clearly U is the multiplicative group of units modulo 21.6). Since 6 is a square-free integer and U is abelian. 1 .a)(i . and then x = -i.d)i and = (i . 4.. Some more problems of this type: (i) 22221111 + 11112222 + 5555 2222 is divisible by 3.(J)(i -. 8. each subgroup to be found is cyclic. multiplication of the corresponding sides of the two equalities above yields Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems.a)( -i . the . Noting that (u+vi)( u.6).. where i = to get A.c + e + (b . 2.)( -i .6). 1 .(J)( -i -.(b .)(x .16.)(i ..vi) = u 2 +v 2 . first put x = i. we have 3333 4444 +4444 3333 == 14444 + == 0 (_1)3333 (mod 7) == 1-1 (mod 7). (iii) 2222 5555 is divisible by 7.d)i = (-i .a)(x . (ii) 11114444 + 44441111 is divisible by 5. In the above equality.11}. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.(J)(x -. (iv) 8888833333 + 3333388888 is divisible by 11.c + e .Exam #20-1985 117 Exam #20-1985 51985-1 We have X4 + bx 3 + CX 2 + dx + e = (x . Hence the subgroup along the solid path could be {I. 51985-2 Since 3333 == 1 (mod 7) and 4444 == -1 (mod 7).

4. e~O) = 6 . We find the number of triangles of the first type as follows: Select 3 of the 4 sides of the square (this can be done in (i) or 4 ways) and then select 1 of the 100 points of subdivision on each of these 3 sides (this can be done in 1003 ways). r! (r . 5. or 2 vertices lie on one side and the third on another side..l)an-2]' Iterating this relation n . an n! and an-l (n -I)! L.16. 17}.J r=2 ~ (a r _ ar-l ) = ~ (-It = ~ (-It.000..99.16. 51985-5 From an = (n . 1002. Thus an = n! ( (-It) L--.20.1003 + 6.3 times. and the one along the dotted path could be {I.I)! L. Thus. we get an . The total number of triangles of the type is 4 .940. The number of triangles of the second type is found as follows: Select 1 side of the square (4 ways of doing this) and 2 of the division points on this side ( C~O) ways) and then select 1 of the 3 remaining sides (3 ways) and 1 of the 100 points of subdivision (100 ways) on this side. 19}.(n .J r=2 r! L. we have Hence. 100 . Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems. 99 . 13. 51985-4 There are 2 types of triangles that can be formed: either each vertex lies on a different side of the square.:yn r=O .100 2 = 9.J r=O r! Since al = 0.liS Solutions one along the dashed path could be {I. there are 4.nan-l = . 3 .4. Hence the required number is 4.. the sum on the left telescopes to %3-. Look under Group Theory in the Index for similar problems.10.1003 triangles of the first kind.1)(an -l + an-2).[an-l .

where k is an integer ~ 2. assume m + 1 is not in S. some element b of Sl is a multiple of some other element a of Sl. Let Sl be the set obtained from S by throwing out 2m + 1 and 2m + 2 and putting in m + 1.e.. Then Sl contains m + 1 integers between 1 and 2m. i. S1985-6 We will prove this result by induction. l. Then Sl has m + 1 integers between 1 and 2m.x) > (b 2 . then since 2m + 2 is a multiple of band b is a multiple of a. and thus the result is true for S. Now a cannot be m + 1. (bx-(b-l)a)(bx-(b+l)a) <0. By the induction hypothesis. Suppose S contains both 2m + 1 and 2m + 2.e. Substituting in xy we get b2 x(2a . Thus the result is true for S.. S1985-7 From x+y = 2a. Let S be a set of m + 2 integers between 1 and 2m + 2. Hence a must be in S. If b is m + 1. b2 x 2 - > [(b 2 -1)/b2 Ja 2 .1 .(Of course if neither 2m + 1 nor 2m + 2 is in S.Exam #20-1985 and n--+oo 119 lim an = lim ~ (-It n! n--+oo ~ r! r=O = e. 2ab2 x + (b 2 - l)a 2 < 0.) Look under Limit Evaluation or Sequences in the Index for similar problems. Let Sl be the subset of S not containing 2m + 1 or 2m + 2. the result is true for Sl and therefore for S. Assume the result true for n = m. Suppose S does not contain both 2m + 1 and 2m + 2. If a and b are both in S. 2m + 2 is a mUltiple of a. If m + 1 is in S. i. (Observe that an is the number of derangements of a set of n objects . . then 2m + 2 is a multiple of S.e. The result is clearly true for n = 1. then the result is true for S. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. we have y = 2a-x. then by the induction assumption. Therefore. But Sl does not contain such integers.l)a 2 . (b-l)a (b+l)a b <x< a .. By the induction hypothesis. Because the only positive integers m + 1 can divide other than itself are k(m + 1). the result is already true for S ).

4i] which implies that {3 = 1 + i. the number of favorable cases is Solutions (b + 1)a b (b . o 0 1 +i To find the eigenvalues we set det(A . . Exam #21-1986 51986-1 See Solution #1 on Exam #14. b2 . 51986-3 ii = (e 7ri / 2)i = e-7r/2. {3 = V2 + V2i or {3 = -V2 .V2i. Look under Complex Numbers in the Index for similar problems. b3 }. with respect to B is given by A= (~~ ~) . The matrix of ¢.{3] [{32 . 51986-2 Let B = {b 1 . and hence is 2a.110 Thus. Look under Complex Numbers or Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems.{3I) = 0 = [(1 + i) .1)a b 2a b· The number of all possible cases is when 0 < x < 2a . 51986-4 For every four distinct points of the N points there is one and only one pair of segments that intersect and have the given four points as endpoints. The required probability is therefore 2a/b 2a 1 b· Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems.

x 3 = 2V2 + 6(x . X2) is not continuous at (0.36x = 18x 4 + 24x2 +8 or Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems.0). 2 Thus f(xl. Then x 2 = 2 + 2V2( ij3) + (ij3)2. X2) as (Xl. (ij3)2 = ij9 = x 2 .0) now becomes X2--+0 lim f(x~. then the limit exists along any path to (0.3) . 24 Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems. x 3 = 2V2 + 3(2( ij3)) + 3V2( ij3)2 + 3.0). X2) = X2--+0 lim 2X~4 x = 2 ! -1= o. Squaring both sides gives + 36x2 + 9 + 12x4 - 6x.V2) = 2V2 + 6x - + 3V2(x2 . X2) tends to (0.2 . so - ij9 = x 2 Now 2 . Similarly But V'3 = x- V2. X2) exists as (Xl.2)(n . Then the limit of f(xl.12x + 6V2 + 3 6x = 2V2 + 3V2x2 Thus x 3 x6 + 3.Exam #21-1986 121 Thus the number of intersections is given by: ( n) 4 = n(n . X2) tends to (0. + 6x .2V2(x .V2) = x 2 . 51986-5 Let x = V2 + (V'3).l)(n .3 = V2(3x2 + 2).2V2ij3. 51986-6 (a) If the limit of f(xl.2V2x + 2) + 3 6V2 + 3V2x2 . In particular the limit must exist along the path defined by Xl = x~. .0).2V2x + 2.

Look under Multivariate Calculus in the Index for similar problems..0). the kth having k balls on each edge. Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems. + n)) 6 =~(n(n+l)(2n+l) + n(n+l)) 2 = "6n(n + 1)(n + 2). . . + k 2 -"2 + cannonballs. 11!+3. so the sequence 27722.. For example.. but a calculation shows that these numbers are much too large..0). 11 = 27720... 32 .. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.. 7 . . 5 . An appropriate idea is present though.11. + n 2 ) + (1 + 2 + . we should replace 11! by a number divisible by 2.. .. but it is not clear wheilier it bounces for an infinite time. the smallest solution is the sequence beginning with 114.. !(Xl. There are smaller solutions.27723. The total number of cannonballs in a stack is therefore 1 2((1 2 + 1) + (22 + 2) + .X2) is not differentiable at (0.3.122 Solutions (b) Since !(Xl.27731 is a solution. the least common mUltiple of these integers is 23 .. Thus. it must bounce an infinite number of times.. + (n 2 +n)) = ~((12 + 2 2 22 + . . 1 51987-3 If the ball obeys the law exactly.. We should . each layer has _k(k+l)_I(k2 k) 1 + 2 + . .11!+11. 51987-2 Each layer is a triangle of cannonballs.X2) is not continuous at (0. Exam #22-1987 51987-1 The well-known proofthat there are arbitrarily long sequences of composite integers suggests that the solution should be 11!+2.

.8 seconds. Sfo)· Pr(Sf n S2 n··· n Sfo) = 1 . U S1O) = 1. it will require vT6/4 = 1 second to fall to the ground. decide if it converges. the series converges and its sum is 1 1 + v'2 __--c::: 1-1/v'2 v'2+1 v'2-1' Thus. we see that the total time is the sum of the series 1 + 2(VS/4) + 2(V4/4) + 2(v'2/4) +"'. 51987-4: Let Sj denote the event that the jth senior draws hi1> or her own name from the hat.:'012:'01O Pr(Sj.. n Sj2) + PreS)1 n S· n S· ) . Since it is dropped from a height of 16 feet.Pr(S1 U S2 U . we want Pr(Sf n We may expand this as S2 n .[ L 1:'OiI:'01O Pr(Sj. We wish to find the probability that none of these events occurs.Exam #22-1987 123 find the infinite series that represents the total time. )2 )3 . the constant 1/2 in this problem is called the coefficient of restitution of the ball.. this model is in fair agreement with experiment.. or 1+ "4 ~J8/2j=1+v'2~ v'2 00 00 ( (2) 1)j Since this is a geometric series with ratio less than 1.. requiring VS/4 second to rise and VS / 4 second to fall to the ground again. and if it converges compute the sum.) Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems... It then bounces to a height of 8 feet. this model predicts the ball will bounce slightly more than 5.) - L 1:'Oj. that is. Continuing. (In fact.

Pr(Sf n S~ n··· Sfo) = ~ .6... Clearly.e. the idea comes from the inductive step from dimension 2 to dimension 3. but I will begin here with dimension 1. the coordinates must be (±-J3/2. The three most distant points in the unit ball in dimension 2. where D' is the more distant intersection of the sphere and the line perpendicular to the disk determined by A. the unit disk. B. the two most distant points in the unit ball of dimension 1. . are the vertices of any equilateral triangle with vertices on the unit circle. being symmetrically placed. Since the number of ways to choose k indices from lOis e~).e.C20) 18~! + C~) 17~! -. -1/2).+ . The four most distant points in the unit ball in dimension 3 are four equidistant points on the sphere. if not. have coordinates (?.368. the other two points. 1 CI0) :~! . To find the coordinates of such points. B..1~!] 111 1 = . C.+ . then assuming A and B are on the circle and the length of AC is least. D' is an improvement. then the 4-tuple A. B. B.. This construction and plausibility argument can be made into a proof. B.. i.. we choose the north pole (0. the unit interval. 1) as the first point and note that the center of gravity of the three points must be the origin. where C' is the more distant intersection of the perpendicular bisector of AB and the circle. and at opposite ends of the segment (the I-dimensional case).124 Solutions But Pr( Sj. assuming A. and C are points of the disk that do not satisfY this condition. i. if A. are the points + 1 and -l. . . + - 51987-5 A geometric construction: We give a construction that is an induction on the dimension. (As before. -1/2). 6.. Indeed. the above becomes .. C' is an improvement. Thus.G~) 11~!] -[ = 1 [:! -... Since they are on the circle. and C are on the sphere and and the length of AD is least. For me. but the analytic proof below is more concise. then the triple A.! + :! -. = and Pr( Sjl n S12) = 18 and so forth. where the logic begins. I! 2! 3! 1O! Look under Derangements or Probability in the Index for similar problems.

if.) Again assuming the north pole (0.0.0. since the third coordinate is -1/3.7. then i#j ::::. (±/578. To be on the sphere. -1/4) and the mutual distance is V512. -V5/48. we see Now. we find S ::::. -V5/24. -1/3) and (±y'273.the solution to the problem is J879.j But so . the scale factor must be so the three points are (0.7.. these three points solve the problem for the disk they determine. -1/4). 40 + 10 = 50.X5 are any vectors in the unit ball of R 4 . -1/4). Assuming the north pole is one of the points..0. that is. that.Exam #22-1987 125 and C and through the center.LXiXj::::. The solution to the stated problem is five equidistant points on the unit sphere in dimension 4. (0.7.1) to be one of the points. -1/4). they are a scaled version of the solution of the 2-dimensional problem. 40 . i#j Combining this with the earlier inequality. j.V5 An analytic proof: Letting Vl. Moreover. and the scale factor must be VI5/16.'" . the others have coordinates (7.2 LXiXj. .1). That is. for all i.5. VI5/16. (0. -1/3). be the five vectors above. we find that the other three points must have coordinates (7. Since the sum for S contains 20 terms. J879 (0. -V5/48.5 or there is at least one of the terms that is less than 2. if Xl. V576. The first three coordinates must be a scaled version of the solution to the 3-dimensional problem. the minimum .0. Thus. -y'279. -1/3). . 5. either all of the terms are 2.

126 Solutions distance between points is no more than optimal. that is. we want the total change in () when VJ changes from 7r /2 to 0. her path is along the hypotenuse of a right triangle with north-south and east-west legs and. V5fi and the above solution is Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. 1r/2 SlllVJ which means Jane crosses the Greenwich Meridian infinitely often. the total change in () is then 11° Exam #23-1988 S1988-1 _. To see how many times she crosses the Greenwich Meridian. the total distance she flies before reaching the north pole is 2000J27r miles. so she flies further. S1987-6 If Jane were flying straight north. at each instant. we want The north-south leg of the triangle has length 4000dVJ whereas the east-west leg of the triangle has length 4000 sin VJd(J since the parallel corresponding to VJ is a circle of radius 4000 sin VJ. she would fly 2l7r(4000)/4 = 20007r miles. Thus. Instead. Suppose x(O) = 2 . we look at the same infmitesimal triangle and relate the latitude and longitude angles.1 d(VJ) I = 00. Since this is true at every instant of her journey. since the surface of a sphere is locally like the Euclidean plane. that is. Let x(t) denote distance between x's car and the finish line. longitude corresponds to the angle (J and (north) latitude corresponds to 7r /2 . she would fly a quarter of the way around the earth before reaching the north pole. her path is northwest. To be precise. the distance along the hypotenuse is J2 times the distance along the north-south leg.VJ. Look under Integration in the Index for similar problems. In the usual spherical coordinates with the origin at the center of the earth. Thus. and y(t) denote the distance between y's car and the finish line.

For t > 0. Then dyl dt all t dxl dt t=O -1 b and y(O) = 5 together imply y(t) = 5 Finally. 0> dxl dt t=O -1 b implies b > O.=} ty = 5b 5 since t. 51988-2 Let x and y denote any two members of the group. hence. dt 2 .Exam #23-1988 127 and y(O) = 5. = dxl dt tl We have 2 1 dxl dt o· 1=2+ In( ~ a b ) and atl -1 +b 1-1 = 2(T)' implying that a = In 2. In2 5b. Driver x finishes first. . a > 0 be such that x(tt) = 1 and. 3 In 2 > .ad=} dt . Look under Group Theory in the Index for similar problems. Look under Differential Equations in the Index for similar problems. Then o = x (tx) and a = In 2 together imply tx = 1~b2' Let ty be the time required for driver y to reach the finish line. * X =} X * Y = Y * x. d2x _ (dX)2 dx _ ~ () _ -In(at+b) + c. Then x * x-I * Y = e * y = y = y * e = y * x-I by the given cancellation rule.at+ b =} x t t a But x(O) = 2 =} c = 2 + Let it Inb a =} x(t) = 2 + In(-b-) Hat. Let tx be the time required for driver x to reach the finish line. so that ty = >3b = t x.

using induction on n. + [2(5n + 5) .128 Solutions 51988-3 Note that So if sand t are as prescribed.v'3 2 + ~l 3 . Look under Number Theory or Sequences in the Index for similar problems. So the area of 5 is Jo {'i f(O)2 dO = a 2 2 2 [1. that 5 5n = 5n + 10kn where k n is a positive integer for each n.. 51988-5 The desired area is 8 times that of the shaded region 5 in shown below. If the circle has radius a. + 9 2) = 5n + 10kn + 10jn + 165 = 5(n + 1) + 10kn +1) 1]2 where kn+1 = k n + jn + 16.. Assuming the result true for n gives 5 5(n+1) = 5 5n+5 = 5 5n + [2(5n + 1) - + .cosO]. then a Cartesian equation for the curve bounding 5 on the right is (x + a)2 + y2 = 2a2... 51988-4 The unit's digit of 512345 = 5.1]2 = 5 5n + (1On + 1)2 + (IOn + 3)2 + . 55 = 12 + 32 + 52 + 72 + 9 2 = 165 = 5 + 10(16). To verify this it suffices to show.. + (IOn + 9)2 = 5 5n + 10jn + (12 + 3 2 + . Changing to polar coordinates gives the polar equation r = f(O) = a[yll + cos 2 0 ..

Extend straight lines AD and BC downward until they intersect in a point E.Exam #23-1988 129 after much work. Look under Geometry or Integration in the Index for similar problems. Thus PE is perpendicular to line L. p B~----'-----~----~~--~L To prove this. where Band Dare opposite ends of the diameter lying within L. 51988-6 First draw the two straight lines BAP and CDP. the desired area is 2a 2 [1 . notice that line segments EA and PC are altitudes of 6BP E. Since these segments are concurrent with the line segment through BD. Hence. that line segment must also be an altitude of 6BPE. P E is then a straight line perpendicular to L.v'3 + iJ . Look under Analytic Geometry or Geometry in the Index for similar problems. .

It follows that A scored 4 + 8 + 8.l = H n.2. we deduce that 2a = d. y = 4. Look under Logic in the Index for similar problems. Thus C came in second on the Geometry test.130 Solutions 51988-7 There are 210 = 1024 possible lO-flip sequences...l + Tn. B scored 8+ I + 1. we see that limn-too Xn = X m • By uniqueness of limits. 2. and C scored 1 + 4 + 4.l and Hn = H n. Exam #24-1989 51989-1 It is easy to show that there are three tests and that x + y + z = 13.4' Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems. so that z = 1. We need HlO + TlO = 89 + 55 = 144 and the desired probability is /o~~ = . Let Hn denote the number of n-flips sequences not having two or more tails in a row but ending with heads and let Tn denote the number of n-flips sequences not having two or more tails in a row but ending with a tail... 51989-2 Any constant sequence satisfies the hypothesis of the problem. and HlO = 89. so that {Xl. From C's total we deduce that 3z ~ 9. . So H3 = H2 + HI = 2 + 1 = 3. For n 2:: 3. ••• } must be a constant sequence. Tn = H n. . Look under Sequences in the Index for similar problems. if we fix m and let n tend to infinity. we deduce that Xl = X2 = . . . H4 = 3 + 2 = 5.x = 8. Hg = 55. The only solution satisfYing all the constraints of the problem is z = 1. or 3.l + H n. 2(a + h + e + b) = d + g + j + c + f + i. X2. 2(a+h) =d+g+j. 51989-3: If we label the figure as shown below and compare areas. Conversely. Clearly H2 = 2 and T2 = HI = 1.

= b + e + h. Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. and this is equivalent to the assertion of the problem. = a 2i 2(f + cO and + d + g.Exam #24-1989 These equations may be reduced to 131 2a= d. 2g = i + j. 2c= f. 2(e+b)=c+f+i. In a similar fashion we have 2b = e. . 2(d + a) From these nine equations we deduce that 6j = a + b + c + d + e + f + 9 + h + i. 2h = 9 + j. = h + j.

.\ = 1 + XlYl + . 51989-5 Let the y. 51989-6 The characteristic equation is Hence the eigenvalues are .and z-axes be the axes of the cylinders.\ = 1 (multiplicity n ..132 Solutions 51989-4 Assuming independence. Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems. Hence the volume is [aa 4b (1 _ ::) dx = 16. . + XnYn' Look under Integration or Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems. + XnYn' The determinant. then the probability of obtaining the results noted is ~'G)(~)2(~)1 - 1 4 Hence it is more likely that the biased coin was the one flipped only once.b 2 2 • Look under Volumes in the Index for similar problems. then the probability of obtaining the results noted is - 2 9 On the other hand.. is 1 + XIYl + . the cross-sectional areas are all squares (by symmetry). being the product of the eigenvalues.. if the fair coin is the one flipped only once. If we slice the intersection by planes parallel to the yz-plane.1) and . if the biased coin is the one flipped only once.

A and the subsets AI' . Therefore k :::. Exam #25-1990 1990-1 Write n = 10 k ak + 10 k.. . N.al)al = a6 . the left-hand side of (*) is at least 10 k . 6 x 12. + lOal + ao.. + (10 - adal = a6 - ao + 1.. is repeated.9. However AN or NA might occur twice . I. where the universe U is the set of arrangements of I. (*) The right-hand side of (*) is at most 9 2 . A complete solution requires lengthy discussion to eliminate many potential solutions.l ak_l and ak 2: 1.. 48 = 3 x 16. NO. Clearly.g. and AI could occur at most once. ' A6 are those arrangements in which each possible digraph lA. A. so 35 or 75 are the only solutions... where ai E {O. It is easy to check that the only solutions to (10 .. We assume + . there are no 1 digit solutions. Look under Logic in the Index for similar problems.. D. but here the answers are always two YESes and one NO.ao + 1 are ao = 5. 1990-2 This is an inclusion-exclusion problem. NI. Since ak 2: 1.9} which implies (10 k .. e. then neither IN. Note: The students were told at the beginning of the contest to assume that the sides of Smith's ranch are parallel to the side of Todd county. nor NA can occur at all. 1. NO to the question "is the short side strictly less than half the long side?" Several other possible areas admit triple factorizations. IA is repeated. AN. If. NA. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. and 8 x 9 with answers YES. 4 x 12 and 6 x 8. A key ingredient is the fact that the number 72 has three "admissible" factorizations: 4 x 18. say. N.Exam #25-1990 133 51989-7 The dimensions are 4 x 18.9 + 1 = 73. . AI.ak)ak + . al = 3 or 7. IN.

Solutions Continuing in this way.f' _ _7_ cos 271" cos]I . Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.. If IA and AN are repeated. l' is differentiable and f"(x) = f'(x It follows that f(x) = Cle 2 = Cl and C2e-2 = + 1) = f(x + 2) . which can be done in 3!/(2! ·1!) = 3 ways. 7 .f = LGAK = LLAB. 3 = 468. we find that 6 of the pairs Ai n Aj are possible and none of the 20 tuples Ai n Aj n Ak may occur simultaneously. 51990-4 A variety of approaches work.2. D. N. and LKAL = so LAKL = LALK = The law of sines applied to r and to sand l gives 2. 51990-3 Since f' (x) = f (x + 1) . (IA). then we need to arrange (IAN). 2 + cle x + C2e-x. since f(x + 2) C2 = f(x). 3. Note that lUI = 7!/[(2!)3 .. 2. Since the exterior angle to a regular heptagon has measure LGAB = 5.7 cos J. and. I!] = 630. This one refers to the figure below. so Cl = C2 = o. Since LGAF subtends an arc of J.2 = f(x) .sin 571" ' 7 7 so r= sin ]I sin 371" 7 7. Thus the total number of possibilities (by symmetry) is assuming Ai n Aj is possible.. In other words..f on the circle. I!] = 30 ways. then we wish to write (IA). r s sin 371" . 30 + 6 .2. N in some order which can be done in 5!/ [(2!)2 .(IAN). D.6 . If IA is repeated. its measure is J.. Thus the desired answer is 630 ..134 if the tuples IA or NIA were repeated.sin 271" 7 7 and s 1 sin]I . sin 271" sin 571" 7 7 This may be reduced to (among others): sin ]I sin 371" 7 7 sin2 271" 7 7r 1 2cos.

:. so the vertices of the hexagon are (0. etc. n n 2 1 1 n 2 J1 1 + i/n + j/n 2 ' which in the limit. ±1).23/ 2 + 13/2) (.0).~x2 and y = -1 + ~x2.::::0 . The parabolas must have the form y = ax 2 + {3. and dropping a perpendicular from K to AG.4V2 + 1) 3 = i(3 3 / 2 2. (±4. Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. A routine calculation . gives us Jo Jo [1 [1 v'1 dXdY +x +y 1 = [\2J1+x+y)l y =odx Jo = 10 1 (2v'2 + x 3 _ 2v'1 + x) dx = i(3V3 . which intersect at (±1. Look under Limit Evaluation or Riemann Sums in the Index for similar problems. 51990-6 Insert a coordinate system centered at the center of the hexagon.:. 51990-5 Construct the Riemann sum -2 n tt 1 yn 2 i=1 j=1 + ni + j = 8 ~:. ±~). and the points show that they are y = 1 .719).Exam #25-1990 135 Other proofs use the law of cosines.

V3/2). 8. so between 1 and 1. S1991-2 The number of k-digit numbers without any 1's is 8 X 9 k . 5. so there are 96 -1 = 531. (±1/2. 51991-3 Label the areas of the eleven regions inside the parallelogram as illustrated below. V3/2) and (±1. 6. The enclosed area (that of six equilateral triangles of unit edge length) is 6 x 1/2 x 1 x 1 x V3/2 = 3V3/2. But 000000 is not between 1 and 1.1/2]' Y = V3/2. The curve is a regular hexagon of edge length 1 with vertices (±1/2. + 95 ) = 96 . 3. -1/2].000.440 numbers without 1's and 468. = K/2 = r3 . Let K be the area of the parallelogram ABGD. Y = V3(l-x).0). clearly symmetric with respect to both the x-axis and the y-axis. 9 is 96 . On [1/2..440 numbers without 1's and 468.000.l . lies on or between the lines x = ±l. On [-1. i 8V2 . 4. On [-1/2. Exam #26-1991 51991-1 The curve.000.000 inclusive there are 8(1 + 9 + 92 + .1 = 531.9 2V3 8V6 .560 with l's.9V3 6 Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems. Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems.136 Solutions shows that the area between the parabolas is V6 and that of the hexagon is 6· so the total area of the shaded region is "'1. Y = ±V3(x+ 1).. 1]. 7. 2. area ARD + area BRG = K/2 = r2 + Wl + rl + r4 + W4 + r5. then (1) area ABR (2) + W2 + W3 + W5 + b.560 numbers with 1 'so Alternate Solution The number of ways of filling six spaces with digits 0. Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.

b (from (3)) in the right side.2ab + 2bc . so the sum -a + b + c is even since parity is not affected by a sign change in a summand.b. we get red area less the blue area is K/2 regardless of the choices of points F.2bc .2bc . Look under Enumeration or Geometry in the Index for similar problems. Using K as the sum of the reds + sum of the "whites" + blue.2ca . . Substituting T3 = Wl + b + W4 from (3) in the left side of (4) and Wl + W4 = T3 . so T3 = (4) (5) Wl + b + W4' From (1) and (2). ( -a+b+c)2 =n+ bc 2 ' ' and ( a-b+c)2 =n+ ba 2 ( a+b-c)2 = n+ abo 2 Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.4bc suggests taking a 2 + b2 + c2 .2ab . 51991-4 The sum a + b + c is even.2ca = a 2 + b2 + c2 . T3 +W2+W3 +W5 +b = T2 +Wl +Tl +T4 +W4 +T5. and R. z= Wi + 2b = z= Ti .2ca n= ----------------------4 Indeed. The identity a 2 + b2 + c2 .2ab .Exam #26-1991 137 r---------~------------------~c A~~------------------------~~ (3) area QAB = area QAF. Q.

+ .138 Solutions 51991-5 Remark: Ifn = a 2+b 2 and m = c2+rf2. 1 or 2 mod 4 for any i~tegers a and b.. From the example 32 +4 2 = 52 = 25.) 1 1 1 . = _1_. it is not possible to have four consecutive positive integers which are sums of two squares. n + 1 are consecutive sums of two squares. the product of two sums of squares is also a sum of squares.+ . 12 +5 2 = 26. namely 82 + 15 2 = 172 = 289.74 = 52 + 72.+ . 51991-6 We have n-+oo Hn 1) (. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. (b) If n .!. 12 + 172 = 290. (a) Take a = c and b = d.-) 1 + l/n 1 + 2/n 1 + n/n n k=l 1 1 + k/n = Jo [1 1 1 +x dx = In(l + x)l~ = In2.73 = 32 + 82. lim Hn n-+oo . 32 + 32 = 18 leads to infinitely many more. n. + -:--_1-. This integer cannot be a sum of squares since a 2 + b2 == 0. take 72 = 62 + 62.1. n In2 Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems. Therefore. Any Pythagorean triple will serve as a starting point. one can generate infinitely many more by taking (3k)2 + (4k)2 = (5k)2 = 25k 2 and 12 + (5k)2 = 1 + 25k 2. then (a 2 ...!.) ( (. The first example 12 + 4 2 = 17.b2)2 + (2ab)2 = (a 2 + b2)2. then -1 = (n -l)(n + 1).. n 2 . It follows that if n is a sum of two squares... Thus. then nm = (ac-bd)2+(ad+bc)2. For starters. and so on. Therefore. n 2 + 1 are consecutive sums of two squares.) t n 1 + 1 + . then n 2 is a sum of two squares.. n2 (c) In any set of four consecutive positive integers one must be congruent to 3 modulo 4. 1l mn = 1· lmn ( n-+oo n n+ 1 n+ 2 n+ n = lim n-+oo - lim n-+oo (.

Look under Integration in the Index for similar problems. 51992-2 Observe that the ith tallest person is viewable if and only ifhe is in front of all the people 1. Look under Analytic Geometry or Enumeration in the Index for similar problems.1). -1).: . column.0). or diagonal.cos(t)) dt 127r V4sin2(t/2)dt = -4cos(t/2)1~7r = 8. . It is now easy to show that it is impossible to place the fifth without completing a row. The existence of three lattice points with a lattice point as centroid is equivalent to having a row. 27r. two rows would contain just two points each. (0.2. If only four or fewer squares were occupied by the nine points.1). Therefore.cos t for t ::. Exam #27-1992 51992-1 The curve is a cycloid which can be parameterized as x = t . -1).sin t and y = 1 . (-1. I)}. (0. -1).cOS(t))2 + (sin(t))2 dt = = 127r J2(1. i-I. (0. i=l n 1 n Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems. In n + 0. the answer is t. or diagonal (broken diagonals included) of a 3 x 3 square array completely occupied.. ... To avoid three points in a row.0). This happens with probability Therefore. (1.: :. (-1.. each can be identified with one of the nine points in the square array S: {( -1. . (1.3. 127r J(l. L . (1. (possibly broken).0).5772157. then one or more would be occupied by at least three points which would have a lattice point as centroid.. at least five of the squares in the 3 x 3 square array must be occupied. column. The arc length is given by °: .Exam #27-1992 139 51991-7 By reducing the coordinates of each of the nine given points modulo 3.

But the first forces . so at least n . {e. There are (7~.) of these. whereas Z4 only has 2. proper subgroups. For n = 4. First have all n -1 other people send a letter with their scandal to Va. We shall now show that no group of order n ::::: 5 has so many subgroups. Thus we have found 2 groups that satisfy this condition.1 more letters are required. For n = 3.140 Solutions 51992-3 Select a head gossip Va. then have Va distribute the assembled information via n . But for n ::::: 6 this requires every subset of order 2 and 3 be a subgroup. That is. For any odd n = 2k + 1.2 subgoups. This gives a bound of 2n . Z2 works because it has 1 subgroup. every subgroup contains the identity element. we need 4 subgroups. 4. No one can know all the scandal until at least n . we can find at most L t=l (7 ~ :) = 2 2k - 1 = 2n .1 letters have been sent. but only if every set of order l ~ J is a subgroup. For n :s. this is true of Z2 and K 4 . a. Then each subsequent letter can inform one more person. this yields at most 8 (7 ~ n< k 22k 2n 2 1 = subgroups. and the largest subgroup order i is at most l ~ J. Zl has no proper subgroup.2 letters is the minimum. a} and {e. For any even n = k 2k. The Klein 4-group works.2 which we have already achieved above. First. for we need a sub graph of arcs unilaterally connected with directed paths from every vertex into whichever vertex becomes fully informed. Let each letter be represented by an arc in a directed graph.{ e }.1 selected from G . For n = 2.1 letters to everyone else. contrary to the stated condition. That is just barely enough. so the number of subgroups of order i cannot exceed the number of subsets of order i . 51992-4 For n = 1. Look under Enumeration in the Index for similar problems. e. We claim that this total of 2n . Z3 fails because it has 1. b} must both be subgroups. and not 2. namely Z2 and K 4 .

Therefore I = Vi. 3 This gives p=(-1 -2 1) 3 and therefore and p-l = (2 1) 1 1 . 51992-6 (a) The characteristic polynomial of A is X2 -13X +36 = (X -4)(X . = _r2 -He 10 (Xl = H. all four choices of B = PCp-l give :3) yield C 2 = (~ ~).Exam #27-1992 141 the order of a to be 2 while the second requires the order of a to be 3. ' A (b) = (-1 1) (4 0) (2 1) 3 -2 0 9 3 Clearly all four choices of signs in C = (~2 Therefore. We find that the eigenvectors for A are C-~/) and C2).9). a contradiction. . Look under Integration in the Index for similar problems. Look under Group Theory in the Index for similar problems.

we apply L'H6pital's Rule to get VI e.142 as desired. we may square Now this has the form ~ so we may apply L'H6pital's Rule to get lim x--+o+ 2x 2 4xe. 2 Therefore L = ± (1/ V2). this reduces to . Therefore L = +(1/ V2). Solutiou 2 Since the form is lim g. These are Solutions B = 5 1) ( -6 0 ' ( -5 6 -1) (13 0 ' -30 -12' 5) ( -13 30 -15 ) 12 . there is no maximum. x--+o+ lim VI - e. = ± 2n-i ( 0 2i) .2x2 ~ 1. 51992-7 Solutiou 1 x/VI .2x2 A =1= o. for any i with 0:::. But L 2: 0 since the fraction is positive on the domain. This can be rewritten as 1 = 2b2 (2a+ I? .2x2 2xe. 0 Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems. L = ±(I/V2). i :::. namely. 2x provided this limit exists.2x = L2 = !. We Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems. (c) If A has a repeated eigenvalue. as above. we can find at least 2(n + 1) different B's. n we may have B Thus.2 x 2 x--+o+ Since e. But this also equals L/2 provided L find L = so that. 51992-8 We want integer solutions to a2 + (a + 1)2 = - b2 . for example if A = 2n I.e- 2x2 Since y to get x 2 is a continuous function.

We find that bn = (2-4J2) (3+vs)n+ (2+4J2) (3-vs)n. we can show that Cn satisfies the same recurrence. the list includes every possible solution. cn) = (3b n+ 1 . we find the solutions (b 2 .2c. + .. In general. cn). Can we find an explicit solution of the simultaneous recurrence? Applying the recurrences repeatedly we find bn+1 = 3bn + 2cn = 3bn + 2( 4bn . c) is the smallest solution not on our indexed list. c). (b 3 .Exam #27-1992 143 Upon replacing c = 2a + 1. Namely Cn+! = 6cn . Consequently.1 + 6( -4bn + 3cn ) = -21bn + 8bn.1 + 18cn· Now nine times the first equation minus the last yields Similarly.2Cn +l.c2 • The first solution is bl = Cl = 1.1 + 3Cn -l) = 3bn + 8bn .7). C3) = (29. Can there be any other solutions? We can also write the recurrence in reverse as (bn .Cn-I' The roots of x 2 . -4bn+ 1 + 3cn+d.vs)n.. namely r = 3 ± VS. given a solution (b n . Upon applying the reverse recurrence we find that (3b . we can generate another solution because Thus. (b 4 ..( J22 1) (3 .6x + 1 are associated with this recurrence. we have a Pell equation 1 = 2b 2 . C4) = (169. . Suppose that (b.239).41). -4b + 3c) is another smaller solution that also cannot be in our list. But this contradicts our selection of (b. C n = ( J22 ) (3 + vs)n -1 . C2) = (5.

144 Solutions and recall an = en. we write f and 9 for f(a) and g(a) and omit parentheses. (P" (x ) ) 2 2 P'(x) . Look under Diophantine Equations in the Index for similar problems. P" (x) = 6ax + 2b.4(3a)e < 4b2 .l = ( \1"24. Exam#2S-1993 51993-1 Let P(x) = ax 3 + bx 2 + ex + d. < (p"(x)) 2. and pili (x) = 6a. . The following inequalities are equivalent: pili (X ) P'(x) 2P'(x)P"'(x) 2(3ax2 < ! . the last inequality holds and the result follows. + 2bx + e)(6a) < (6ax + 2b)2. 51993-2 For simplicity of notation. 12ae (2b)2 .1 ) (3 + V8)n _ ( \1"24+ 1) (3 _ V8)n. Since P' (x) has distinct zeros. Then P'(x) = 3ax 2 + 2bx + e. f = gff = (fg!)ff = f(gff)f = fff = = ff(gff) =g. 36a 2x 2 + 24abx + 12ae < 36a 2x 2 + 24abx + 4b2 . f(fg!)f = fgf Look under Group Theory in the Index for similar problems. Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems. > O.

(Let j be the first number. . C equals the trace of C . Now assume that O(k) = 2k . XT) is a 1 x 1 matrix. n} we create two orderly permutations of {I. 3 must follow the 2. it has at least one nonzero row.YH_n_ 2 . r. A2 = (XT . . we see that 0 (k + 1) = 2k... (XT . .) Thus. Therefore we have 1 = trace of A = trace of (r . 2. a. 2. k} must begin with 1 or k. we can reverse the process and obtain the orderly permutation of {I. P.k} which created it. (k + I)} as follows: 1) place (k + 1) at the begining of P. and so on and inductively. r) = XT . XT. . r. 'n<a <2 so -~-. . r) . r = A. 2. 0(2) = 22 .1 = 2.. for any orderly permutation of {I.1 . 2. Therefore there is a 1 x n row vector X for which A = XT . . 2. of {I. for any p x q and q x p matrices Band C.1 and note that any orderly permutation of {I.. j must follow the 1. (The last equality holds since (r .. we create 51423 and 12534. . . n}. Since. n + an. (k + I)}. and each of its rows is a multiple of r. .) For any orderly permutation. . or 2) increase each number in P by 1 and place 1 at the beginning.) This process thus creates 2k distinct orderly permutations of {I. . B.... . completing our induction. 2 must follow it. 2.+l = . with k = 4 and P = 1423..Exam #28-1993 145 51993-3 Since A has rank 1. XT) = r . . We will prove by induction that O(n) = 2n . 51993-4 Let O(n) be the number of orderly permutations of {I. r = XT . Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems. Look under Permutations in the Index for similar problems. Wherever the 1 is. Since both 12 and 21 are orderly. (For example. one can show by induction that n an n 1 2 .. (k + I)}. . 2. (r· XT) . 51993-5 Solution 1 Since a...... Now. the trace of B .

using an -700. shows - an n -7-.an a. in turn. Note that is divisible by 2n+l. since 0 < (J3 . + an. . + an . An is divisible by 2n. - one has an+1 an = va. + an . va. 1 2 Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems. 51993-6 First note that there are integers An and En for which and further that Thus.a. + an + an 1 Next since al = 1. the same calculations show that This.+l = a. it follows that Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. the an's are increasing and the calculations above show that so an -7 00. 1)2n < 1. Next. since (A n /2 n ) is an integer.146 Solutions Solution 2 Since a. Finally.

B. Look under Logic or Systems of Equations in the Index for similar problems. is odd. A + C = 546.Exam #28-1993 147 51993-7 If there are only two distinct integers. =C= +D = 791. 691. we must have A + B = 401. E then there would be at most three distinct sums of pairs of them: X + X < X + Y < Y + Y. X < Y. from which we obtain A = 128. 5) A < B = C < D = E. C. B 128. . E = 563. B. E = 563. A and = 128. C. D. Therefore there are exactly three distinct integers among A. there are three collections of integers satisfYing the given conditions: A = 128. in case (5) we have = 273. A 2B = A + D = 546. which yields = 128. B A + B = 401. W < X < Y < Z among A. In case (4). B 273. and 2D = 836. B = 273. and 2C In case (6) we have A +B = 401. C = D = E = = 418. 3) A = B < C < D = E. B = C = D = 273. (Why?) This yields A = 128. E then there would be at least five distinct sums of pairs of them: W + X < W + Y < X + Y < X + Z < Y + Z. C. if there are at least four distinct integers. 6) A < B < C = D = E. B. In summary. 4) A < B = C = D < E. Also. A = = C = 273. 1) A = B = C < E. B = C = D Similarly. and B +E = 836. D. D = E = 418. D. E and we have the following six cases: < D < E. B +C = = 836. 418. A + E = 691. among A. 2) A = B = <C D The first three cases are impossible since the smallest sum 401. C = D = E = 418. D = E B = 273. 2B = 546.

. since Ba = £ = 6 and Aa = £ = 3' 2 ba 1 ad 2 LAaB contains 6~3 = 9 units. 2.. . Similarly. since area of ABC D = 48. we see that ABCD contains 2 x 10 + 2 x 9 + 1 = 39 units.. +:. we see that LAdD contains 5x4 = 10 units . Exam #29-1994 51994-1 Using L'H6pital's Rule.+ . and 6 are replaced by w. We will determine the area of ABCD in units. then the area of abed is wy(w + x)(y + z) xz + (w + x)(y + z)· Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. . and z.. ( .148 Solutions 51993-8 Let the area of abed be one 'unit'. and ~~ = ~ = 4.: 2)n/2 >n. Look under Inequalities in the Index for similar problems. · 11m Jo fX et2dt 2 x--+oo eX / x = x--+oo x·2xe x -eX l' 1m --~2-~2 e x2 x2 = x--+oo 2X2 - lim x2 1 1 2"' Look under Limit Evaluation in the Index for similar problems. Finally. Note: In general it can be shown that if 1.. Since ~~ = ~ = 5. 5. 51994-2 We have (1 2 + J2/n)n = 1 + n~ + n(n 2-1) . y. + (2)n/2 n n =n+~+ Now take nth roots. we see that the area of abed is i~. x. Noting that 6AdD = 6CbB and 6AaB = 6CeD.

Then cos 2A = 2 cos 2 A . it follows that f(p) < 0 when p > 1. Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems. 1.1 = 1/8 and it follows that. 3}. then the law of cosines gives cos C = 1/8 and cos A = 3/4.p + p-l. Since f(l) = 0. . and e. and =5 implies 5e = 5. 51994-5 Let the integers in non-decreasing order be a. implies 2e = 5 + e. since A and C are between 0 and 7f. are both rational. a contradiction. 2}. y2 y x Let f(p) = Inp2 . 1. Look under Inequalities in the Index for similar problems. Then abede a + b + e + d + e ::. (-A/2. d.B /2). {1. . 1.Exam #29-1994 149 51994-3 The inequality is x2 X Y In-<---. 51994-4 If C is the largest and A the smallest angle of the triangle. implies 3e = 6 + e. This implies the inequality. e = 2 is impossible. B. and {1. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. for p > 1. But then the coordinates of the center. 1. 5.1)2 < 0. Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. 2A = C. The three solutions are thus {1. but since d gives e = 2 and the second is impossible. and C. so e = 5. Then l' (p) = _p-2(p .2. 51994-6 Suppose that the circle contains three distinct rational points. 5}. There are five cases: = =1 abed = 2 abed = 3 abed abed = 4 abed implies e = 4 + e. the first = 8 + e. implies 4e = 6 + e or 4e = 7 + e.2. b.2. Then. so e = 3. substituting their coordinates in x 2 + y2 + Ax + By + C = 0 determines rational values for A. 1. c. 3. 5e so abed::. impossible.

z~.z~. Then w is a root of x 3 .(zr - z~)1 = IZ212. 1 = Izr . (lui + IV\)2 = lul 2+ 21uvl + Ivl 2= 21z112 + 21z212 + 21zr - Again. with w i=.-/zr .1)(x 2 + X + 1) = 0. 2zl. But.z21)2. S1995-2 Let w be a complex cube root of unity. by the Parallelogram Identity. we must have w2 + w + 1 = 0.v1 2 ) = 21z112 + 21zr from above.z21 which establishes the required result. 21z112 + 21z212 = IZ1 + z21 2+ IZ1 .z212. (1 + w2)3n = 8 + w28 1 + w82.1. luvl z~l. and lul 2+ Ivl2 = 2(1u + vl 2 + lu . (1 + w)3n = 8 + w8 1 + w2 8 2 . this yields lui + Ivl = IZ1 + z21 + IZ1 .z~1 = IZ1 + z21·lz1 . (1 .150 Solutions Exam #30-1995 S1995-1 Let u = Z1 + -/zr . we see that (lui + IV\)2 = (IZ1 + z21 + IZ1 . and v = Z1 . Then u+v = u . Since both bases are nonnegative.1 = (x . 8 _ 1 - ~ ( 3k+ 1) ' 3n 6 k=O k=O 8 = I: 2 3 (3k : 2)' Use w3 = 1 and the Binomial Theorem to get + 1)3n = 8 + 8 1 + 8 2 .v = 2-/zr . Look under Complex Numbers in the Index for similar problems.z~. Noting that Izr .z21. Let 8 be the given sum. Since w i=. Hence z~l.1. By the Parallelogram Identity.

5(p-l)/2 + P .~) = f (.2)p.!' = (y'5 + 2)P . since w3 = l.~) = f' (. 22 . 51995-4 Let Then !. 1· 5(p-3)/2 2 . and(1 + w 2)3n = (_w)3n = (_1) 3n w3n = (_1)n.Exam #30-1995 151 Use 1+w+w 2 = 0. But ° ° N + f . so that (1+w)3n = (_w 2)3n = (_1) 3n w6n = (_1)n.2P+ 1 f . 3 . Look under Finite Sums in the Index for similar problems. since < y'5 .2 < 1. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.2) = !' (1) = !' (.1. + p . which must be 22P..f' < 1. and add the three results above to get Hence 23n + 2. r :::. 51995-3 ° Let (y'5 + 2)P . 3· 23 . p is an integer. 2P. + p .. Hence -1 < .(x) = 12(x 2 + X + 1)2(2x + 1) - 27(2x(x + 1) + 2x 2(x + 1)). since -1 < f ..2).1 . 1 .2P+ 1 = N + f. .. Let f' = (y'5 . 2 . Thus N = 4 ... 5(p-3)/2 + . We can easily verify that °= f (1) = f ( .f' < 1. p . 5(p-5)/2 + ...2)P = 2(p . and -1 < f . This shows that 20p divides N. 5 + 2P) . (-1)n S = ---:3.2 . Hence = 0.f' < 0. Then.2P+1 - (y'5 . 5(p . where N is an integer and < f < 1. since p is odd.-'-------'-. We need to show 20p divides N.. we have < f' < 1. + pp - But p is an odd prime implies p divides pr for every r such that 1 :::.f' is an integer.

. 51995-6 Let G be the centroid of the triangle. we conclude that 1. As the leading coefficient of f(x) is 4. + (n + n + . and -2 are double zeroes of f (x) and that f (x) has no other zeros.3 Look under Inequalities or Integration in the Index for similar problems.2 2 .. This establishes the result. Hence..33 . + n 2 ) n(n + 1) 2n(n + 1)(2n + 1) 2n+ 1 3 6n(n + 1) But the geometric mean of k unequal positive nUlllbers is always less than their arithmetic mean. . Then G is b+! 3 units above L... N 2/ n (n+l) < 2n + 1/3. and their arithmetic mean equals 1 + (2 + 2) + (3 + 3 + 3) + . Then there are n(n + 1) 2 1+2+3+"'+n= factors in N. nn. 2n+ 1)n(n+l)/2 N< ( .152 Solutions Since f (x) is a sextic.. their geometric mean is N2/n(n+l). 51995-5 Let N = 11 .= -4. we now see that f(x) = (x .square umts.~. The area of the triangle aV3 . ..1)2(2x + 1)2(x + 2)2. + n) -2- n(n+l) 2(1 + 22 + 32 + . (aV3) =b+~=c 2 2V3 1 aV3 2 ="2 a ' -2.. that is. Look under Polynomials in the Index for similar problems.

C be respectively (a cos 0i. i = 1. t. 0.sm 2 . is the circumcenter of triangle ABC. (02 3 +0 )) 2 cos 2 ' sm ."" acoso' -"" asino' . AH is parallel to the vector \ II I cos \ II I cos (02+03) (02 3 (02 3 (02 3 -0 ). Hare collinear and that OG : OH = 1 : 3. 2. Observe that the origin. Since. it proves that 0. a sin Oi) . H are collinear and OG : OH = 1 : 3. i.lBC. Hence AHIIOL. If L is the middle point of BC. we see that the coordinates of Hare (t. by looking at the coordinates of the vertices. 3~ "3~ t i=l i=l Clearly. Look under Volumes in the Index for similar problems.) Let A. In fact. a cos Oi. a sin Oi). and H be the orthocenter. we see that the circumcenter of the triangle is the origin.Exam #30-1995 153 By Pappus's Theorem. G. 2 cos 2 2 . B.lBC also. the required volume V= (27rc) a 2 J3 4 = 7ra 2 J3 (b+~) 2 2J3 7ra 2 J3 7ra 3 =--+- 'f 4 or = 7r: (2J3b + a) cubic units.e. G. 3. by geometry. But AH.. then OL. Let H be the orthocenter of the triangle. +0 ) -0 )) (02+03) . S1995-7 Solution 1 Let G be the centroid of the triangle. 0. Solution 2 (Solution 2 does not use the property of the Euler line quoted and used in Solution 1. 0. Then G has coordinates 1 3 1 3 ) ( .

we see that y a sin Dl + a sin D2 + a sin Thus the coordinates of H are D3. -a sin Dl + asinD2 2a sm (ct 1 -2 .D2 2 . t E R. the parametric equations of BH are X { = aCOSD2 + UCOS(<>3t<») Y = a sin D2 +usin(<>3t<>3) . t Thus. y). where = -aCOSDl + aCOSD2 . These two lines meet at H(x. Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. . the parametric equations of AH are { Solutions = aCOSDl + tcOS(<>2t<») . D2 ) cos ( ct3 . D2 ) cos ( D3 . x = a cos ctl + 2a cos ( D3 . D2 ) = a cos ctl + a cos D2 + a cos D3. Similarly.154 Hence. = Since y is obtained from x by replacing cos with sin. = 2acos D3 . (D2 + D3) 2 = = - 3 usm (ct + Dl ) 2 . t Y = a sin Dl + t sin( <>2t<>3 ) X E R. 2 and tsm . = 2asm (ct 1 -2 D2) sm (Dl + D2) . D2) cos (Dl + D2) ' 2 Solving for t we find.

n} = Note: We have used the following results. + = = (~)(n+1)(n+2)} = t (~}2n ~ ta (~) ~ ta (~)(2n+ ~ ta (~)k(k ~ k=O . .k + 1)(2n . ~ k "2 ~(k The coefficient of x2n is ~{(~)(2n+1)(2n+2)+ (7) (2n)(2n + 1) + .3(9n 2 + 19n + 8).k}{ (2n + 1) - (k . obtained by putting x = 1 in the binomial expansion of (1 + x)n and in the results obtained by differentiating with respect to x once and twice..2 + 1 ~ ta (~)k(k -1) 1) = "2 (4n 2 + 6n + 2)2n .4n(2n + 1) + n 2 .3{ 4(4n 2 + 6n + 2) .2n: 1 ta (~)(2k -1) + -1) = ~(4n2 +4n+ 1 +2n+ 1) ta (~) - (2n+ 1) ta (~)k 1)2 n.1)} 1)2 . + "2 n (n - 1 = 2n.x)3 (~(n) x k) {1~ + 1)(k + 2)x k} .(2n + 1)(n· 2n 2n ..k + 2) {(2n + 1) .Exam #30-1995 155 51995-8 We have (1+x)n = (1.

so either a = 4.5.. If 5 divides both factors. 1. But for this problem. .5.9 or b = 0.. one of the factors must be divisible by 25.::: 32. We may assume that P is convex.cos E = . and in fact by 50 since the two factors differ by the even number 2c. c such that n = lOa + b .c)/10 is a mUltiple of 5..6 = 37 numbers of this form and thus 36 others besides 43 2 = 1849. we see that (lOa + b + c)(10a + b . kx k=O k-2 1 1. Thus one of a + (b + c)/10).2 cos(C + E). k=O ~ k 1 (1 _ x )2 oo ~ k-l . b. lOa + b . we have also assumed that Solutions Ixl < 1.5. then 5 divides their sum 20a + 2b and therefore divides b. by the law of cosines. x.cos C . a + (b . There are 30 + 13 .9.c) is divisible by 100. 1 1 (1. l. (area(EBCD)) 2 = 11 V2 16 .156 Of course.x and = L.4. Since band c are digits.. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. Then the area oftriangle EAB is 1/2 and quadrilateral T = EBCD has sides y'2. 51996-2 Let ABCDE denote the pentagon P with LA = 90°.::: v1000 and n 2 . 224 Squaring and adding both equations. Note that area(EBCD) = area(BCD) + area(DEB) = 1/2sinC + V2/2sinE.x )3 = 2 L: k(k-1)x k=O . Factoring. 1.c2 is divisible by 100. 1. (b ± c)/10) must be 0 or 1 and a = 0. Otherwise. Exam #31-1996 51996-1 The problem is equivalent to finding digits (integers from 0 to 9) a. =2- 2cosC =3- 2V2cosE so 1 y'2 -1 . so that = L. BD2 Also.

5. Equivalently. 51996-4 Let the two x coordinates of the square's vertices be a and b with a> b. 25. So calculating f(2 6 ) = 5. 2 Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. Substituting a = b3 .Exam #31-1996 157 This is clearly maximized when C + E = n. and consider the nth cat. 12. b6 - 4b4 + 4b 2 + b4 b6 b6 - - 2b 2 + b2 = 3. 3. and f(22 ·3·5) = 4 gives the 96th cat to gain the most with $8. the cat breaks even. b2 = 1 +-v2. 100. Then a 3 -3a = b3 -3b = a-b so a = b3 -2b and b = 4a-a 3 .32 ) = 6. he'll lose a dollar.4. 2. f(2 5 ·3) = 8. Finally. . note that if a < 2. If a = 1. 1)3 = 2. then the number of even divisors is a rr~=2 (ai + 1) and the number of odd divisors is rr~=2 (ai + 1). Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. 3b4 + 3b2 (b 2 1 = 2. f(2 3 . then b ::::. a and if2 a b ::::.1) rr~=2 (ai + 1). 1. If n = 2a rr~=l p~i. (a) Number the cats from 1 to 100. (b) To maximize f(n). i. (c) The total amount the rats left with is 100 2) _1)k-ll1~0 J = k=l 68. and there are 25 of these.2b. for a = 6. 3. 3b4 + 3b2 = - 3. so 50 cats lose money. f(n) ::::. he will get a dollar and for each odd divisor. the remaining 25 cats profit. b ::::. (which is true if and only if EBCD is a trapezoid) and the area of EBCD is Jll 51996-3 16 + yf2 . (a-b)(a 2 +ab+b2) = 3(a-b) so a 2 + ab + b2 = 3. b ::::. Hence the nth cat will get f (n) = (a . The cat loses money if a = 0. 6.e. n is odd. For each even divisor of n. Subtracting.. b ::::. a 3 = 4a-b and b3 = a+2b. b ::::.

2n 1 .1 n 2n . 2n 1 . 3 .ISS The area of the square is Solutions (b 3 _ 3b)2 = b2(b 2 _ = 3)2 + ?'2)(?'2 . Thus r encloses a region of area ~ (VB)2 = 4. 51996-5 Reflecting ABC about the y-axis and then the result about the x-axis. say of radius r. P.l) .1 2n .l) 2 . 2 .. (2n . 4 .. Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems. (2n ....------=----''-------'. 5· . 6 .2 2n 2n 22446 . (2n . 4 ....... so r= and the length of 'Y is vf41ir 'Y 1 1 = -(27fr) = -(27f) ~ = Vi· 4 4 7f Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.----:---:--'---::----'- 1·3·5· . (2n .. 2n 2 .l) 1 ·3·5· .l) =n-----------=----''------~---'---~ 2 . 2 . 5 .4?'2) = 6 .3~ = 6 + {I-108 (1 = {l216 + {I-108 so A + B = 108.2)2 = (1 + ?'2)( ~ + 4 . the length of r is minimized when r is a circle. 2 .. 4 . Therefore r is a circle. 2n (2·4·6···2n)2 (2·4·6··· 2n)2 = n -.-------:-:::- 1 . 6 . 4 .. By the isoperimetric theorem.. nPn = (1/2)4n(2n)2 = (2n)!(2n)! n n n (2nn!)4 = n-. with 7fr2 = 4. 6 . Thus.--------:--::..-. 51996-6 Such an event is mathematically possible if out of the 2n children. 2n 13355 2n . 3 . can be written as n are males. gives a closed curve r bisecting the area of a square of side length VB.. exactly = (~) 2n The expression n . if a closed curve r encloses a fixed area. 2n . 3 . 3 . Pn 2 e:).------.

iY4i = 0 or 4. 3} equals 1. I} or {4. LYi = 1 i=l 4 and LY.Exam #31-1996 159 Thus. This is possible in two different ways: 27 = 25 + 1 + 1 = 9 + 9 + 9.. 2 2 hm np n--+oo n 13355 2 = . = 22446 n by Wallis' formula. and the answer is 1/ yI7f.. 2n ( 2n) ~ (~)2nV27f2n = 2 n [( ~ )ny'2nn] 2 y7m whence Vii . then we must have three odd squares which add to 27. X4} is statistically equivalent to {I.. X2. i=l 4 Letting Yi = Xi - 6. 6} then 4 LXi = 4(1 + 9 + 9 + 6) i=l 1 4 1 so that ~. i=l 4 Since squares are congruent to either 0 or 1 mod 4. we have Y~ + 3 == 43 mod 8 whence Y4 must be a multiple of 4. If iY4i = 4. Since each iYii < 7. 1.=l Xi = 25. S 1996-7 If {Xl. Y3) must be odd and one (say Y4) must be even. Pn ~ fir· Look under Limit Evaluation or Probability in the Index for similar problems. An alternate solution can be found using Stirling's Formula: Since n! ~ (~)ny'2nn. three of the Yi (say Yl. . X3. Checking to see if any of the signed sums of the elements from {5. As odd squares are congruent to 1 mod 8.. Y2... 3. 9. . If (J" is the standard deviation. = 43. 4. 3. 9. then and we must have LX: = 12 + 92 + 92 + 62 = 199..

.. 9.0715 Look under Enumeration or Probability in the Index for similar problems. if all the digits coincide then there are ten combinations.000 = 0. 7.. Look under Diophantine Equations in the Index for similar problems. and 4 . Look under Differentiation in the Index for similar problems. we must have three odd squares which add to 43. Take the limit as b --+ a (and a fortiori b --+ c. we have Y = 4X2 + Ax + B. This is possible only one way: 43 = 9 + 9 + 25. f(a)) and (b.. and 1233).J(b)) be arbitrary points on the graph with b > a b • We are given that and let c = at or equivalently. then there are 3 C20) = 135 combinations (e. then there are 3 . 2} generate three combinations 1112.1 = 1. If the four digits are all different.5 = 1..4 + 1 . 5} equals 1. 1.f(a) = _. then there are C40) = 210 combinations. c --+ a) to see that f" (a) = 8. the digits {1. 7. Then Xi = Yi + 6 = {1. the digits {1.g..160 Solutions we find 5 . 9. 3. 3.:b'----=c'---::--_---=c'----=a=--_ b. The total number of combinations is 210 + 360 + 135 + 10 = 715 and the probability is p = 715/10. If we have three different digits.a 8. If we have two different digits. 1223. 2. If IY41 = 0. Checking to see if any of the signed sums of the elements from {O. and 1222). 7}. 9.g. 2. Exam #32-1997 51997-1 We will consider combinations of the last four digits only. and {10. 5}. we find 0 + 3 + 3 . 1122. 51996-8 Let (a. f(b) . {10. C30) = 360 combinations (e. Since a was arbitrary.f(c) f(c) . The Xi = Yi + 6 = {11. 3}.3 = 1.5 + 1 + 1 = 1. 1123. . Finally.3 + 3 . 4 . 3} generate three combinations. 3. 6}.

3)(z2 - 2).Exam #32-1997 161 S1997-2 We calculate sums directly. S 1997-3 Note first that z4 .3\ ~ \\z2\ . y > 0. \z2 .5z 2 + 6 = (z2 .-. then equality holds.42 1 2 So letting A = 1/2 we get an upper bound.= -. 2 \z4 .3\\z2 . Look under Finite Sums in the Index for similar problems. which implies lnx Iny x y .2\ ~ \\Z2\_ 2\ = \\Z\2 .::---:-. By using two well-known formulas the above is equal to ~ (n(n+ 1)(2n+ 1) 2 6 + n(n+ 1)). A is the smallest upper bound since if Z = ±3. But we know that \Zl - Z2\ ~ \\Zl\-\Z2\\ for all Zl and Z2 in C... Further. 2 SimplifYing we get our answer n(n + 1)(n + 2)/6.3\ = 6 and \Z2 .3)(z2 . Thus. Look under Complex Numbers in the Index for similar problems.2\. S 1997-4 If x Y = yX for x.5z 21 + 6\ 21 .5z 2 + 6\ = \(z2 .3\ = \\Z\2 . Finally.--..< .3\ = \9 . It is interesting to note that these numbers appear as the first n numbers in the 3rd diagonal of Pascal's triangle.2\ ~ (6)(7) = 42.2\ = 7.. So \z4 .3\\Z2 . So \z2 .2\ = \9 .----.2)\ = \Z2 . then taking the natural logarithm of each side we obtain y In x = x In y. .

call it rl. namely. Let y = tx where t > 0 and t =1= 1. We adopt the convention that a line in our system can be described by the four points that it contains. By Axiom 6 and Axiom 2. Then y = tx = tt!(t-l). and A4 be the other three points on line Cl. and D 1 . we now add three new lines. Simplifying we get tl!(t-l) = x. tt!(t-l)) satisfy the original equation. we write rl = AlBlClD l . and . call them AI. C2 = BlB2B3B4. there are three new lines r2 = A 2B 2C 2D 2. We now have the 16 points in our system. Ci. We also note that this is possible only if x. Then lntx = mtx. t = 3/2 =} (9/4. The fact that we also have 16 lines will become apparent later. t = 3 =} (J3. The six axioms will guide us in constructing what is essentially a 4 x 4 array. So in particular. and r4 = A 4B 4C 4D 4. Let us begin the construction. there is at least one line. So suppose x =1= y.3J3). Each row (and column) will contain four points.162 Solutions Obviously all the above is true if x y. y > 1 and m > O.) Some pairs include: t = 2 =} (2. (If we restrict t > 1 we get all solutions with x < y. So all pairs of the form (tl!(t-l). Hence In y = my and In x = mx.27/8). The proof that this is the fewest number of points and lines will be deferred to the solution of part (b) below. By Axiom 1. and Di for 1 :S i :S 3. C l . In t + lnx = t(mx). Now by Axiom 3 and Axiom 2. Cl. 51997-5 We claim that 16 points and 16 lines satisfy the six axioms.4). C3 = C l C 2C 3C 4. By Axiom 5. Then if we graph the function v = In u.lnx) and (y. lnt + lnx = tlnx. These lines together add a total of nine new points. Let A 2. and D l . A 3. r3 = A3B3C3D3. there are exactly four points on this line. thus giving us 16 points in our solution. B i .lny) goes through the origin and has equation v=mu. we see that the line through the points (x. By Axiom 6. there is a line Cl that contains the point Al but does not contain any of the points B l . BI.

We now want to satisfy Axiom 3 for the point B I .Pn' For each i. (c) (f) A I C2 B 3 D4 . there exists another line y that contains p. To satisfy Axiom 3. For each line.P2. n > 1. Let Xl denote x.2 ::. However. (ii) C I D 2 A 3 B 4 . the problem statement associates a set of six axioms to n. and r4 and four column lines CI.Exam #32-1997 163 C4 = DID2D3D4. and no n-conjiguration with fewer points or fewer lines exists. we say that x and y are parallel if they share no points in C. If an n-conjiguration exists. By Axiom 3. C3. For each positive integer n. and no configuration with fewer points or fewer lines will do. and let C be an n-configuration. This system of 16 points and 16 lines satisfies all of the axioms. Then by Axiom 2. then there is one with n 2 points and n 2 lines. r3. say PI = P. In a similar fashion we choose the following four lines to complete our system: (i) C I A 2 B 3 D4 . The rest of the solution to part (b) follows from the following: Theorem. Y contains exactly n points. Let x be any line of C and choose a point P on x. we must exclude lines (b). there is a configuration with two points and two lines that satisfies the axioms. A I D 2 B 3 C4 · Let us choose line (a). Proof Let n be an integer. we can choose line (d) and that gives us four lines that contain point AI. there is by Axiom 6 a unique line Xi containing Pi and parallel to x. Say that a collection of points and lines satisfying these axioms is an n-configuration. Note that this simple construction satisfies all of the axioms except Axiom 3. i ::. and C4. Let n be a positive integer with n > 1. A I C2D 3 B4 . If C is an n-configuration and x. By Axiom 1. . For n = 1. We start by satisfying Axiom 3 for the point AI' The possible lines through Al are: (a) (d) A I B 2 C3 D 4 . Note that Axiom 3 is also satisfied for the points C 3 and D 3 . n. As above. It is now easy to picture the 4 x 4 array: we have four row lines rb r2. we must add more lines (this is the tricky part). (c). Axiom 2 limits the possible lines that we can choose. The possible lines through Blare: We choose lines (1) and (3) to satisfy Axiom 3 for B I .'" . C2. the set consisting of the line and all those parallel to it is a family of parallels. y are lines in C. and (e).

Therefore C has exactly n 2 points. (-1. (-1. The second set of points {x E R2 : Ilxlloo = 1} is the square in the plane with vertices (1. and thus B is an n-configuration. Again by Axiom 6. there Camlot be two lines through P and parallel to z. Suppose that k > n. . Choose any family of parallel lines and discard it to obtain a collection B of n 2 points and k . and (1. (-1. Thus. We have shown that any n-configuration must have at least (exactly) 2 points and at least n 2 lines. 51997-6 Part (a) is a standard exercise in norms. Let k be the number of families of parallels for C.1 families of parallel lines. It is then clear that every line has exactly n lines in its family of parallels. -1). For part (b). This shows that C must have at least n 2 lines. Then there exists (by Axiom 6) a unique line z through Q and parallel to Xl. xn together contain n 2 points. It is clear that we may continue in this fashion and discard families of parallel lines until we have a minimum of n families of parallel lines. Look under Synthetic Geometry in the Index for similar problems. -1). Y2). so Q is on Xj.164 Solutions Using Axiom 6. X2 + Y2). The first set of points {x E R2 : Ilxlh = 1} is the square in the plane with vertices (1. The resulting n-configuration then has n 2 points and n 2 lines. .0). Each point of B is on at least n lines of B. Since we discarded an entire family of parallels. Since each point is on exactly one line from each family. then x + y = (Xl + Yl. Thus n 2 is the fewest number of points and lines for an n-configuration. If (Yl.. We wish to show that these are all the points of C. and 5.1). so Xi is parallel to Xj when i -# j. We also showed that if an n-configuration n exists. -1). 1). Axiom 3 implies k ~ n. which is a contradiction. so Axiom 3 is satisfied. Then x = (Xl. (0.. B satisfies Axiom 6. 4. let Q be any point of C that is not on Xl. B satisfies Axioms 1. and (0.0). Since n > 1 and C is an n-configuration.1). To this end. This proves the Theorem. we first consider the 1-norm. 2. the n lines Xl. then there is one with exactly n 2 points and exactly n 2 lines. necessarily z meets y. So since z is parallel to Xl. it is easy to verify that "equal to or parallel to" defmes an equivalence relation on the set of lines of C. say at Pj' But then z must be Xj. X2) and y = .

max{l xII. X2) E R2 : Xl :::: -IX21}. (d) R4 = {(Xl. IX2 + Y21}. IY21}. The solution is easier to view geometrically.X21} + max{IYII. it . max{IYII. (c) R3 = {(Xl. Ilx + Ylloo holds if and only if = Ilxlloo + IIYlloo max{IXI + YII. Then + Yil :::. 51997-7 The volume of water can be found by multiplying the cross-sectional area of the remaining water with the length (4 feet) of the trough. and (3) above. IY21} = and equality holds if and only if each of the following holds: (1) (2) (3) IXil IYil = Xi and Yi have the same sign. X max{lxII.Exam #32-1997 165 holds if and only if Equality holds in this second equation if and only if Thus. X2) E R2 : Xl :::: IX21}. (2). (b) R2 = {(Xl. IX2 + Y21} = max{lxII. The proof easily follows from the properties (l). X2) E R2 : X2 :::. The diagonals Y = Y = -x partition the plane into the following four parts: and IXII}. -IXII}. = {(Xl. For the oo-norm. this means that x and y must be in the same quadrant. Xl and YI must have the same sign and similarly for X2 and Y2. IX21} + max{IYII. IY21}· Let IXi + Yil IXi = max{lxI + YII. IXil + IYil :::. Look under Analytic Geometry in the Index for similar problems. X2) E R2 : X2 :::: (a) RI Then Ilx + ylloo = Ilxll oo + IIYlloo holds if and only if X and Y lie in the same part. Geometrically. IX21}. Thus.

a? + y2 = r2. bxd and (X2' -bX2). Now mUltiplying by the length of the trough. respectively. as illustrated. and let the lines P E and PC have equations y = bx and y = -bx. To find the cross-sectional area of the remaining water (region W) we subtract the areas of the sector on the left and the isosceles triangle in the middle of the figure above.166 Solutions suffices to find the cross-sectional area of the remaining water when the trough is tilted through an angle a with the horizontal. we get the area of the triangle Atriangle = ~bh = ~(2cosa)(sina) = cos a sin a. Let C have equation (x . are (Xl.a 2). D. where Xl and X2 are the positive and negative (resp. Using trigonometry. One can show that the angle subtended by the arc in the sector is 2a.a)2 + b2x 2 = r2. Note that the slopes of these two lines are opposite since D must lie on the y-axis and LCP D = LDP E. vr2 . to get 7r /2 .) roots of the equation (x . The isosceles triangle has congruent angles of measure a. The coordinates of E and C. we calculate distances: PE = xIVl+b 2. D = (0. Furthermore. we get the volume of the remaining water 27r . then.cos a sin a for the cross-sectional area of the remaining water. Now. we know that their product is the ratio of the . E in the upper half-plane.4 cos a sin a feet 3 . Since Xl and X2 are solutions of the same quadratic equation.4a . We subtract these areas from the total area of the cross-section. Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. PC = -x2Vl+b2. So the area of the sector is Asector 1 = 2(2a)r2 = a. Exam #33-1998 51998-1 Here is a Cartesian proof: put P at the origin with AB along the x-axis and C. respectively. which is 7r /2.

h-l) is on one of the hyperbolas.iLl . we see that all points of':S are on one of these hyperbolas (and they alternate between the two). Since n is odd.q > 1 observe that p . inductively. iLl . 1) is on one of the hyperbolas. then we set p = (8 + t)/2 and q = (8 . we verify that R . Therefore. PE. 51998-2 Let k = n/7 and m = (nwu . D" and E". use induction. 70m = 7k . if n = 8t with 8 2: t > 1.ik-dk-2 .r2)(1 + b2 ) = r2 _ a 2 = PD 2 (1 + b2 ) A transformational proof: reflect through AB to obtain 0". Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems.q = t.(fk-l + ik-2)!k-l = /. then observe that P E" is a continuation of PC and PO" is a continuation of PE. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. p and q are nonnegative integers.t)/2.q2. Thus. Thus. then n = (p + q) (p .Exam #33-1998 167 constant term of that equation to the leading term. PO = -XlX2(1 + b2 ) = -(a 2 .21u so that k is an integer if and only if m is an integer .q2.ik-dk-2 . Then. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. Apply "mean proportional" to the chords D D" and 0 E". with n = p2 .-1 = ILl + 2ik-dk-2 + IL2 .2u)/7.hh-l - ILl = (fk-l + h_2)2 . To see that p . . observe that (0. 51998-3 One direction is obvious: if n = p2 .iLl -iLl + ik-dk-2 + iL2 ==F1. First. Then. that is. Then.R-2 = ±1. In the other direction.q) and both of these factors are greater than 1. both 8 and t must be odd. 51998-4 For part (a). assume that (fk-2. so that both their sum and difference are even.

(1. ao): it is clear that this is still a fIrst-quadrant integer point and that bo . Also. b) is a fIrst-quadrant integer point on one of these hyperbolas and a 2:: 2. We now show that this point is on one of the hyperbolas: a6 . we will repeatedly need the following solution of y in terms of x for fIrst quadrant points (the choice of sign corresponds to the choice of hyperbola): y= x + V5x 2 ± 4 =x 1 + J5 ± 4/ x 2 . then we have only a few possibilities to consider (a = 0 and a = 1) with both sign choices).168 Solutions For part (b). . b) which is an integer.2). then b :s. Next. bo).ao.1). all of which are in F. fIrst-quadrant point on one of the two hyperbolas. but is not in F. Denote by A 2 (y) the area of the portion of R(r.(1. we observe a few preliminary facts: if (a. bo) must have been in F as well. 9).(b o . leading to three integer points: (0. bo) be such a point with ao as small as possible. Consider the point (b o .ao)2 = a6 . 2ao.ao)ao . bo :s. From above.(b o . using this.b5 + 2boao - a5 = a6 + boao - b6 = ±1 since (ao. Let (ao. bo) is on one of the hyperbolas. Furthermore. Furthermore. bo). if a < 2 and is a nonnegative integer. we know that ao 2:: 2 and that ao :s. there is exactly one point at which bo = 2ao. 2 2 Now. 1) and (1. ao. then b 2:: a (since 5 ± 4/ a2 2:: 4). assume that there is a point (a.ao. implying by our assumption that it must be in F.2) so that (b o .\y)) lying between h and h.ao :s. Look under Analytic Geometry or Fibonnacci Sequences in the Index for similar problems. contradicting our choice of (ao. 2a (since 5 ± 4/ a2 :s. But. ao) has a strictly smaller fIrst coordinate than (ao. if a 2:: 2. namely.boao + a5 . then (ao.Then. 51998-5 Denote by Al(X) the area of the portion of R(x) lying between fo and h.

.. A2(Y) = io r r.1)y13 (. i=n+1 Since this latter series is an alternating series with terms decreasing in absolute value.8 + 1)a 13 a. for n > 0 we have part (b).1(t) y r.8f3 fz(x) = (a.1 dt.f:..a 13+1 • Integrating and solving a bit further.Exam #33-1998 169 Furthermore. the condition that it bisect fo and as A 2(y) = A1U. . we find that x f3 a f3 +1. This latter form is useful for part (b): Since e=L-·.-. its limit has absolute value strictly less than the absolute value of the first term which is 1/ (n + 1). we find that l o f 2 (t)dt=y13 -1 13+1 (. So. 51998-6 (a) An inclusion-exclusion argument gives D n =nl-n(n-1)1+ Rewriting this a bit gives (.a)f3· Look under Integration in the Index for similar problems. z.. Now.8+1)a13 13+1· Solving for f:.(~)(n-3)1+ .1 and then inverting.8 + 1 . i=O 00 (_1)i it is clearly sufficient for part (b). to show that \n!/e-Dn \=\ L 00 (-1)in' z.)(n-2)1..1(y)) or h in area may be rephrased 13+1 l t1/f3 _ 1/13 -1 _ o a y f2 dt - (a .8 + 1 . ·\<1/2.1(t)dt = io r t1/f3 a 1/f3 .

Dn+In! . An alternate form would be v1AT = [A ± v'det AI].170 Solutions For part (c). which has determinant 1 (do this by dividing A by the square root of its determinant. but occasionally one of the two will be singular. then(A±I)2 = (tr A±2)A so that one simple method of coming up with two square roots of [A] is to find a representative of the class. using the expression above. There are two such. Generally. then adding or subtracting I. We calculate that a2 e(a + d) + be b(a + d)) d 2 +be' . diagonal and nondiagonal.. Any square roots [D] of [0] correspond to square roots [B.. one very simple method is to observe that the example generalizes in the following way: if det A = 1. say 0 = BAB. yields the following expression for the radius: . This occurs when =Fv'det A is an eigenvalue of A which occurs only when A has a repeated eigenvalue. n!(n + I)! L:~!OI (_. say A'." The way to see this is to take a representative of the equivalence class which has determinant 1 and put it in Jordan canonical form.1 DB] of [A]. which is possible since we're dealing with complex matrices). for classes other than the class of the identity. together with the ratio test method for computing radius of convergence.=l. we are reduced to examining determinant 1 Jordan forms. Consider the nondiagonal form first. (b) This provides us with one or two distinct square roots. So. .I is in Jordan form. Is this all? The answer. Here 0 = (~ ~) and we are looking for D = (~ ~) such that ( a e b) 2 d ( D2 = wO for some w.=o (-..! . is "yes. In this case. n--+oo Dn(n + I)! n--+oo (n + l)!n! L:~=o (-i~)' = lim 1+ n--+oo ( _l)n+I (n + 1) "n L. . one of the two square roots will be singular (and its square will be the zero matrix).. 51998-7 For part (a). this will produce two distinct valid square roots.~)i hm = hm . Look under Derangements in the Index for similar problems.1)' .

giving infinitely many equivalence classes of square roots of [1]. bare Exam #34-1999 51999-1 The key observation is that the procedure never alters the parity (even/odd count) of the orange balls. a 2 + be = W A and d2 + be = W A-1. So. a2 + be = d 2 + be. consider the matrices arbitrary complex numbers. (! ~l) where a. [(~ l/Jx)] = e(a + d) and [(~ -1~v1)] which are equivalent to the two square roots computed by the simpler method above. The former implies that either b = e = 0 or a + d = 0. . But. Its color must be orange since the original number of such balls is odd. These are all satisfied whenever a + d = 0. we must have a = d. So we must have b = e = 0. we apply the calculations for part (b) and obtain: b(a + d) = 0. For part (c). Look under Logic in the Index for similar problems. so that. Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems.Exam #34-1999 171 For this to be equal to (~ ~) we need e(a + d) = 0 and b(a + d) = a2 O. just one is left. The first equation (together with one of the latter) implies that e = 0 and a + d =1= O. the latter two cannot hold. we have b( a + d) = e( a + d) = 0. namely [( ~ In the diagonal case. A~ = (~ 1) with A =1= A-I (otherwise C is equivalent to J). since clearly a 2 = d 2 . Thus we are reduced to 2ab = a 2 which gives us one W =1= + be = d2 + be = equivalence class. in addition to the obvious fact that [1] is its own square root. Each performance results in a loss of one ball from the urn. To show that there are infinitely many nonequivalent square roots. a2 = WA and d2 = WA -1. This gives us two classes of square roots. since this would force WA = WA -1. but if a = -d. eventually. C ~) ].

Iff is a convex jUnction.172 Solutions 51999-2 Various correct proofs can be given. then the Riemann sums (over uniform partitions) do tend monotonically to the integral. where A. is to consider area. This is true whether the sums are evaluated at the right-hand endpoints (as they are here). B. Look under Geometry in the Index for similar problems. however. (ii) Cancellation leads to the simpler inequality (iii) Squaring again gives (iv) or (v) Inequalities (i) to (v) are all equivalent. The standard area formula (~base x height) for triangles then shows that the constant of the problem is the altitude of T. The simplest and most elegant proof. 51999-3 The inequality may be rewritten as (i) We square both sides. in attempting to eradicate the radicals. increasing or not. Look under Inequalities in the Index for similar problems. 51999-4 There is a grain of truth to the claim mentioned in the question. so that the same is true of (i). We have area of T = area of AB P + area of BC P + area of CAP. A counterexample to . or at the left. (v) is valid. 2x2 + 2V2x Vx 2 + y2 + x 2 + y2. or whether they are inscribed or circumscribed. giving 5x 2 + 2xy + y :s. and C are the vertices of T. some using trigonometry. some via analytic geometry. with equality only when y = x.

The desired probability is the ratio of the shaded area to the total area of the square.0) . 1. { 6x-3. if 2/3 :::. ±1). The points closer to the center than the edge are those enclosed by four parabolic arcs as illustrated. x :::.0) p _ _---I (1. f(1/2) and + f(l) = 1/2 2 ' 2/3 -. 1/2. f(x)= 1. (1.Exam #34-1999 173 the claim is provided by the piecewise linear function 0. if1/2:::. x :::. 51999-5 We take the dartboard to be the square centered at the origin with comers at (±1. 1) (0. The symmetry of the problem enables us to compute this ratio by restricting our attention to the triangle indicated below. It is clear that if 0:::. f(1/3) + f(2/3) + f(l) _ 3 Look under Riemann Sums in the Index for similar problems.2/3.x:::.

}2-1).y2)/2. but this occurs too slowly for convergence because of the logarithm. while Q is the intersection of the arc with the line y = x. say stand in the ratio 1 : 2 : 3 if and only if n-k n-k-l 3 and k+l k+2 2 These equations. -.q2)/2.2.= 2 51999-7 The series diverges. :Z::::.:O=l (-1)k / k. we prove (2n+i)"- e L cos(1og k) > (n=I... k = 4. P is the point (1/2.0). 41- 5.174 Solutions The parabolic arc is the locus of points equidistant from (0. solution: n = 14. We have x 2 + y2 = 1 . k=e(2n- i)"- k . and those of the (convergent) alternating harmonic series. J so that the equation of the arc is x = (1.:O=ll/k. :Z::::. We show that the partial sums of our series are not Cauchy: more precisely. so the probability is Look under Probability in the Index for similar problems. Letting Q = (q. There is some cancellation in our series. . The shaded area of the triangle is 4}2-5 6 The total area of the triangle is 1/2. we must have q = (1 . ).0) and the line l..x. courtesy of the cosine. Its terms lie between those of the (divergent) harmonic series. q). obtained by expanding the binomial coefficients as prescribed in the question. so that Q=(}2-1. 51999-6 Three consecutive entries of the nth row. and only one. may be rephrased as n = 3k + 2 and 2n = 5k + 8. There is one..

there exist nonzero vectors x and y with (1 ..0. we observe that cos x .A)x = y....y2 > M whenever 1 so that cos (log k) .Exam #34-1999 175 To do this. + Am-l) = Look under Matrix Algebra in the Index for similar problems. 1 .. by (**). + Am-1)y = 0 so that 1 + A + . + Am-l is singular and det(1 + A + . so that (1 + A + .1)(1 - A)x = 0 no matter what the vector x. Since 1 .::: whenever V2 1 The series (*) contains at least terms. all of which are greater than 1 Look under Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems. 51999-8 The standard formula for the sum of a finite geometric series has a matrix analogue.. But then. (1 +A+ .Am = 0 by hypothesis. ... o.A i=. + A m.

We show the Sn < 2 for all n and thus we have convergence. the other three are lying. 52000-3 It converges. we have x Thus we see that + ffx < 2x - 2. This means that Ducky is telling the truth. Therefore Cindy is the only possibility. . 8. and 11 are 400.176 Solutions Exam #35-2000 52000-1 If Cindy didn't do it. For x:::::: 6. Becky must be lying. 820. In particular. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems. (b) 1885 = 1111 12 .1. b::. Mb < 2000. 585. Since N < 2000. Let Since n + vn + 1 > n. 52000-2 The solution to part (a) is 2000 = 5555 7 . we have N :::::: 1885 whence b4 > 1885 so that b :::::: 7. b . Sn+1 :::::: Sn and therefore Sn are increasing. 1464 and no multiples of these lie between 1885 and 2000. 1111. The values of Mb for b = 7. a ::. 10. Let the number be N = aaaab = aMb where Then since 1 ::. 12 and since 111112 = 1885. 9. Look under Logic in the Index for similar problems.

2 ..Exam #35-2000 177 Sn < ~ ~2+)3+'" + Vn. let nk be the number of elements of order k. Look under Sequences in the Index for similar problems. VI V2 < VI + v'5 < The actual value is 1. and can therefore be 1. and both A and B divide 15.)3 + 3 2. n5 = 4. 5. B == 1 (mod 5).75793 . Thus A = B = 1 and n3 = 2.. or 15.. . n15 = 15 .4 = 8 > O... We'll show that n15 > 0 (an element x of order 15 exists) and so G =< x > is cyclic. A == 1 (mod 3). Since 3 and 5 are prime. by Sylow's theorem.1 ..2 1+ -6 < ~'+)2+V3+ . Since nl + n3 + n5 + n15 = 15. Clearly nl = 1... < 1+~2+)3+V4+V5+v'iO < < ~ 1+)2+ V3+ V4+V9 + +. 52000-4 The order of an element divides the order of G. Look under Group Theory in the Index for similar problems.2+ Vn-1 + y2n. 3. +Vn-2+V2n=4 <~ 1 + )2+ V3+'" + Vn. For these k. Suppose G has A subgroup(s) of order 3 and B subgroup(s) of order 5.3+ y2n < .

we have ~(1 .178 Solutions 52000-5 Since ~Tk V5 = - ~(1 - V5 T)k is an integer for k 2: 1.cosh Vs) + l. 52000-6 The desired ratio is p = K / 7f R2.f(x).1) = where x = cos BE (1/2. We use the law of sines. by the double angle formula cosh 2x = 2 sinh2 x Look under Fibonnacci Sequences or Infinite Series in the Index for similar problems.: sm = = 2. and 11 Fk TI < 1.1).T)k _l_ T k - V5 V5 so ~ (-l)kFk = __2. Thus we seek the maximum of p = . where K denotes the area of the triangle. 7f 4 f(x) = (1 . .) = ~(1. A . sinG = c/2R and the area formula K = ~absinG to write p = (a/R) (b/R) sinG 27f = .sinh (V5) k=O ~ k! J5e 2 and (~ ~~ ) (~ (-li!k Fk ) = ~4 sinh2 (V.x) on (1/2..x 2)3/2(4x 3 . B .1). G sm sm ~ sin2BsinBsin3B 7f 7f 7f ~ cos Bsin3 B(4cos2 B-1) ~x(l X2)3/2(4x 2 .

(~+ ~v'iO))3/2 (4 (~+ ~v'iO) -1) V3 + ~v'iO . it is a counterexample. 52000-8 If D f = 1'. which yields five linearly independent solutions. Look under Number Theory in the Index for similar problems.1) + (4x 3 = (1 .X 2)1/2(_2x) x)( ~3x)] = (1.x 2)3/2(12x 2 -1) + (4x 3 - x)(3/2)(1.1. the characteristic polynomial factors as (D2 + 1)(D .X 2)1/2 [(1. which can be combined under the Principle of superposition to yield the general solution f(x) = LCieTiX.24x4) so 16x 2 . If x is rational. .1)(D2 + D + 1)f = 0. 52000-7 Consider x = J2v'2. y = xv'2 is a counterexample since y = 2 is rational. Thus the answer is ig( -1l)3/2(4g 2 7r This can be written as - 1).Exam #35-2000 179 f'(x) = (1.x 2)(12x2 .1 . Otherwise. i (1.X 2)1/2(16x 2 . h 12 7r 3 12 3 12 = 7v'IO 1087r 2 /22 V + 4v'iO (7v'IO 547r 2)( V20 + J2) 1087r 34J2 +5V5 Look under Geometry or MaxIMin Problems in the Index for similar problems.24x4 =0 or x =--12 ' 2 4+v'IO the other root being less than 1/2.

Re(ri) < 0 and f(x) = Ae iw + Be iw . 1.ISO Solutions where ri is a root of the characteristic polynomial (±i. B = -A and f(x) = Ae-X/2[eixv'3/2 _ e. Since limf(x) = 0. w). with w = (-1 + v3i)/2. Look under Differential Equations in the Index for similar problems.ix v'3/2] = Ce- x/2 (sin V. . w. x) for some constant C. Since f(O) = 0.

1976-5. 1979-3. 1998-6 Differentiation 1966-4. 1994-6. 1982-4. 1991-1. 1997-3 Derangements 1987-4. 1996-4. 1979-6. 1978-2. 1980-3. 1986-2. 1981-6. 1995-1.Index by Problem Type Algebraic Structures 1971-1. 1971-3. 1968-7. 1986-3. 1988-1. 1998-4 Arclength 1992-1 Binomial Coefficients 1999-6 Complex Numbers 1967-5. 1997-6. 1996-8 Differential Equations 1969-4. 1988-6. 1991-7. 1990-6. 1976-3. 1971-7 Analytic Geometry 1967-2.2000-8 181 .

1970-4. 1968-8. 1982-2. 1983-4. 1972-4.1982-3. 2000-5 . 1988-5. 1969-5. 1992-4. 1966-8. 1994-3. 1981-3. 1993-2. 1998-4. 1987-2. 1984-7. 1993-8. 1995-5. 1996-5.2000-4 Inequalities 1980-1. 1967-6. 1987-3. 1999-2. 1967-8. 1970-3. 1994-2. 1985-3. 1991-3. 1987-5. 1991-2. 1988-2. 1983-3. 2000-5 Finite Sums 1978-3. 1990-2. 1995-7. 1994-4. 1978-5. 1975-3. 1998-1. 1986-4. 1968-6. 1984-2. 1968-5. 1971-6. 1990-4. 1997-2 Fundamental Theorem of Calculus 1988-3 Geometry 1966-2. 1974-2.182 Index by Problem Type Diophantine Equations 1966-1. 1999-7. 1991-3.2000-6 Group Theory 1972-7. 1989-3. 1997-7. 1971-4. 1988-6. 1999-3 Infinite Series 1967-7. 1995-2. 1975-1. 1968-2. 1983-6. 1974-6. 1985-4. 1980-7. 1992-3. 1996-2. 1992-8. 1968-4. 1997-1 Field and Ring Theory 1973-5 Fibonnacci Sequences 1983-2. 1975-2. 1967-4. 1996-7 Enumeration 1966-5. 1991-7.

1970-1. 1999-1. 1982-6. 1983-2. 1996-6. 1985-7. 1980-4. 1991-6. 1975-5. 1984-3. 1980-2. 1971-5.1973-8. 1989-6. 1985-2. 1982-6. 1973-4. 1979-5 Multivariate Calculus 1968-3. 1972-1. 1998-5 limit Evaluation 1966-6. 1990-1.1968-5. 1987-6. 1996-1. 1983-1. 1985-6. 1983-3. 1992-6. 1976-2. 1989-7. 1981-1. 1978-6. 1977-5. 1977-3. 1992-7. 1993-6. 1998-3. 1974-3.1973-4. 1993-4 Probability 1973-9. 1984-1. 1996-3. 1993-5. 1998-2.1971-2.1970-5. 1984-6. 1993-3. 1986-6 Number Theory 1966-3.2000-7 Permutations 1972-5.1969-3. 1981-5. 1991-5.1977-2. 1984-5.1998-7.Index by Problem Type 183 Integration 1971-3. 1978-1. 1992-1. 1999-5 .2000-1 Matrix Algebra 1967-1. 1990-5. 1975-4. 1983-7. 1973-7. 1996-6 logic 1989-1. 1987-4. 1976-6. 1989-6.1986-2. 1988-7. 1989-4. 1988-5. 1995-5.1999-8 Max/Min Problems 1973-2. 1973-1. 1984-4. 1991-4. 1988-4. 1993-7. 1992-2. 1972-2. 1995-3.1987-1. 1974-4. 1981-4. 1997-1. 1985-5.1969-2. 1979-1. 2000-6 Miscellaneous 1966-7.2000-2. 1992-5. 1980-6. 1994-5. 1994-1.

1978-4. 1995-4 Real-Valued Functions 1966-4. 1969-6. 1976-1. 1990-5. 1980-5. 1969-1. 1973-6.184 Index by Problem Type Polar Coordinates 1972-6 Polynomials 1967-5. 1974-1. 1979-2 . 1985-1. 1981-2. 1989-2. 1988-4. 1983-9 Riemann Sums 1968-1. 1993-1. 1982-1. 1982-5. 1974-5. 1970-2. 1986-5. 1983-8. 1968-5. 1976-3. 1972-3. 2000-3 Solving Equations 1997-4 Systems of Equations 1976-5. 1977-1. 1977-4. 1999-4 Sequences 1985-5. 1993-7 Statistics 1996-7 Synthetic Geometry 1997-5 Taylor Series 1995-8 Trigonometry 1977-2.1967-3. 1976-4.

1995-6 . 1989-5.Index by Problem Type 185 Volumes 1979-4. 1982-7.

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