Field Study

Episode 2 “MY ATM Card” (Available Tests & Measures)

Learning Assessment Strategies

Name of FS Student: Maria Cristina Honrada Course: BACHELOR OF SECONDARY EDUCATION Year and Section: IV Resource Teacher: MR. FURIGAY School: UNIVERSITY OF PERPETUAL HELP SYSTEM DALTA Your Tools As you visit schools, study the teachers’ objectives, formulate test items, and interpret results, make a clear documentation of your tasks using the activity forms provided for you in this book. For your pen-and-paper test items, customize a table of specification, and prepare the test items, customize a table of specification, and prepare the test material based on the prescriptions of the school where you do class observation. INITIAL NOTES Name of the School Observed: UPHSD HIGHSCHOOL BUILDING School Address: PAMPLONA, LAS PINAS CITY Date of Visit: st th Grade/Year Level: 1 Year and 4 Year Subject Area: English – SVA and Preposition Teacher’s Learning Objectives: • Recognizing the basic pattern of present-tense verbs. • Crossing out prepositional phrases that come between subject and verb. • Learning the singular indefinite pronouns (each, either neither, all the bodies, all the ones, and all the things) and using them correctly with singular verbs. • Using the correct verb when a subject follows the verb. • Using plural verbs with compound subjects joined by and. • Making the verb agree with the part of the subject closest to it when a compound subject is joined by or. Desired conditions and criterion levels of the learning objectives:
APPLY A RULE: To state a rule as it applies to a situation, object or event that is being analyzed. The statement must convey analysis of a problem situation and/or its solution, together with the name or statement of the rule that was applied. ASSESS: To stipulate the conditions by which the behavior specified in an objective may be ascertained. Such stipulations are usually in the form of written descriptions. For obvious reasons, assess is rarely used as a verb in learning objectives at the elementary school level.

CLASSIFY: To place objects, words, or situations into categories according to defined criteria for each category. The criteria must be made known to the student. COMPOSE: To formulate a composition in written, spoken, musical or artistic form. CONSTRUCT: To make a drawing, structure, or model that identifies a designated object or set of conditions. DEFINE: To stipulate the requirements for inclusion of an object, word, or situation in a category or class. Elements of one or both of the following must be included: (1) The characteristics of the words, objects, or situations that are included in the class or category. (2) The characteristics of the words, objects, or situations that are excluded in the class or category. To define is to set up criteria for classification. DEMONSTRATE: The student performs the operations necessary for the application of an instrument, model, device, or implement. NOTE: There is a temptation to use demonstrate in objectives such as, "the student will demonstrate his knowledge of vowel sounds." As the verb is defined, this is improper use of it. DESCRIBE: To name all of the necessary categories of objects, object properties, or event properties that are relevant to the description of a designated situation. The objective is of the form, "The student will describe this order, object, or event," and does not limit the categories that may be used in mentioning them. Specific or categorical limitations, if any, are to be given in the performance standards of each objective. When using this verb in an objective, it is helpful to include a statement to the effect of what the description, as a minimum, must reference. DIAGRAM: To construct a drawing with labels and with a specified organization or structure to demonstrate knowledge of that organization or structure. Graphic charting and mapping are types of diagramming, and these terms may be used where more exact communication of the structure of the situation and response is desired. DISTINGUISH: To identify under conditions when only two contrasting identifications are involved for each response. ESTIMATE: To assess the dimension of an object, series of objects, event or condition without applying a standard scale or measuring device. Logical techniques of estimation, such as are involved in mathematical interpolation, may be used. See MEASURE. EVALUATE: To classify objects, situations, people, conditions, etc., according to defined criteria of quality. Indication of quality must be given in the defined criteria of each class category. Evaluation differs from general classification only in this respect. IDENTIFY: To indicate the selection of an object of a class in response to its class name, by pointing, picking up, underlining, marking, or other responses. INTERPRET: To translate information from observation, charts, tables, graphs, and written material in a verifiable manner. LABEL: To stipulate a verbal (oral or written) response to a given object, drawing, or composition that contains information relative to the known, but unspecified structure of these objects, drawings, or compositions. Labeling is a complex behavior that contains elements of naming and identifying. LOCATE: To stipulate the position of an object, place, or event in relation to other specified objects, places, or events. Ideational guides to location such as grids, order arrangements and time may be used to describe location. Note: Locate is not to be confused with IDENTIFY. MEASURE: To apply a standard scale or measuring device to an object, series of objects, events, or conditions, according to practices accepted by those who are skilled in the use of the device or scale. NAME: To supply the correct name, in oral or written form for an object, class of objects, persons, places, conditions, or events which are pointed out or described.

. STATE A RULE: To make a statement that conveys the meaning of the rule. 3. to the classroom teacher. Make a two-way Table of Specification. Administer the test to the class for which the test is designed. Then check the papers and record students’ scores.ORDER: To arrange two or more objects or events in accordance with stated criteria. Get their comments and suggestions to improve your TOS. (Please use pencil in writing your test items to economize on the use of index cards. Show it to your classmates for their comments and suggestions. indicating the subject matter and the desired level of learning behavior to be addressed. and that you target the higher levels of learning behaviors. 7. The problem solution must contain all the elements required for the requested solution. With approved TOS. TRANSLATE: To transcribe one symbolic form to another of the same or similar meaning. theory or principle. Prepare a test paper of the finalized items. then to the classroom teacher. or object that is presented. and may contain extraneous elements that are not required for solution. 6. 5. please remember to: 1. Do an item analysis and make inferences out of the result. in writing or orally. SOLVE: To effect a solution to a given problem. Show your TOS to your FS teacher.. The problem must be posed in such a way that the student that the student is able to determine the type of response that is acceptable. REPRODUCE: To imitate or copy an action. among others. then to your FS teacher for checking.) 4. and finally. Get the classroom teacher’s permission to administer the test. Please adopt the TOS format prescribed by the school where you do your class observation. 8. formulate your test items. It is not necessary that the rule or principle be stated. 2. DESIGNING PEN-AND-PAPER TEST To help you prepare your pen-and-paper test which you will soon administer in the class you have observed. Indicate the item analysis results of each item on the index card where you wrote the item. construction. If the school has TOS templates ask permission to use it. Make an Item Bank by organizing the index cards containing your test items. 9. Write each test item in an index card. PREDICT: To use a rule or principle to predict an outcome or to infer some consequence. Make sure that you focus on the current subject matter of the class you observed.

.ENGLISH 12 TABLE OF SPECIFICATIONS AND DESCRIPTION OF EXAMINATION TABLE OF SPECIFICATIONS CURRICULUM ORGANIZER EXAMINATION PART RI Part A: Reading Comprehension: Stand-Alone Text Reading and Viewing 1 multiple choice READING CATEGORIES RM 2 multiple choice IT 3 multiple choice 1 written response 2 multiple choice 4 multiple choice 7 multiple choice AT 1 multiple choice 23% QUESTION TOTALS WEIGHTING Part B: Reading Comprehension: Synthesis Texts 1 and 2 Part C: Reading Comprehension: Analysis of Synthesis Texts 1 and 2 — 16% — — — 2 multiple choice 1 written response 31% 4% Writing and Representing Part D: Composition 7% 27% 32% Weighting of examination for reading: 70% 30% Weighting of examination for writing: 30% WRITING 1 written response TOTALS 22 multiple choice 3 written response 100% The number of questions given for each reading category is approximate. The Table of Specifications provides weightings for the reading categories and for writing. Actual numbers may fluctuate.

students will be expected to comprehend at the literal. Responses should be constructed using complete and effective sentences and adhere to the conventions of standard written English. and between fact and opinion. Part C: Reading Comprehension – Analysis of Synthesis Texts 1 and 2 Students will respond to two multiple-choice questions and one written-response question based on Synthesis Texts 1 and 2. Students will be provided with one question for response. including historical background and setting. context statements may explain the action or events that preceded the passage. punctuation and syntax. In interpreting informational text. A brief context statement may be provided above reading passages where appropriate to give relevant information about the passage. The texts may be informational. The texts may be informational. poetry or literary prose. students should be able to develop a multiparagraph essay of at least 300 words. poetry or literary prose. In answering the written-response question. Students will be provided with one question. they should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the terms and devices relevant to the discussion of the work and be able to support a position or interpretation by citing specific details. As well. For these reasons. As excerpts from longer works are sometimes used. or author. They should be able to generate and shape their ideas using varied sentences and an appropriate level of diction. inferential and critical levels. At least one question will be asked on the graphic. developing an argument. students should be encouraged to read context statements. Students will be expected to differentiate between subjective and objective language. The graphic may be placed with any of the three genres: informational. . They should also demonstrate an understanding of the conventions of standard written English by monitoring their spelling. students will be expected to demonstrate comprehension at the literal. The text may be informational. In answering the written-response synthesis question. Part B or Part C of the examination. Students should be able to identify and analyze ways of manipulating language to create a desired effect such as presenting information. Part B: Reading Comprehension – Synthesis Texts 1 and 2 Students will read two texts and respond to multiple-choice questions on both.DESCRIPTION OF THE PROVINCIAL EXAMINATION The provincial examination is divided into four parts: Part A: Reading Comprehension – Stand-Alone Text Students will read one text and respond to multiple-choice questions and one written-response question. At least one graphic will be included to support texts in Part A. poetry or literary prose. poetry or literary prose. features and information from the poem or passage. In interpreting poetry and literary prose. features and information from the texts. students should be able to develop a unified and coherent paragraph of at least 150 words. Students will be asked to identify stylistic and persuasive techniques used by writers to achieve their purpose. inferential and critical levels. and supporting a thesis. grammar. source. Students should be able to support a position or interpretation by citing specific details.

situations. In addressing the topic. places. their reading (including reading passages in the examination) and their experiences. persuasive and argumentative styles. • narrative. punctuation and syntax. poor transitions. real or imaginary. graphics. constructing effective sentences. interviews.TYPES OF READING PASSAGES • poems • short stories or excerpts • novel excerpts • newspaper and magazine articles. • descriptive. . and using conventions of standard written English. Failure to comply may result in the paper being awarded a zero. including use of first. run-ons. In writing a multi-paragraph original composition of at least 300 words. Holistic impressions do not place undue emphasis on any one writing error i. second and third person. misspellings. misplaced modifiers. including: • expository.. journals. events. time lines. paragraph structure. charts. using effective transitions within and between sentences and paragraphs. grammar. Students may draw support from the experiences of others or from any aspect of their lives. cartoons • non-fiction prose (such as essays.. students should be able to limit the topic. etc. web pages. decide on their purpose and audience and present a thesis statement as appropriate. personal and reflective writing. Students should be able to maintain a focus on the topic while developing ideas to support their thesis. Remind students to use language and content appropriate to the purpose and audience of this examination. informative. students may apply any effective and appropriate method of development. etc. They should also demonstrate an understanding of the conventions of standard written English by monitoring their spelling. including descriptions of characters. fragments. There may be a subtle thematic connection of the writing topic with the reading passages included in the examination.e. maps. Students may argue against the basic premise of the topic. biographies) Part D: Composition Students should be able to demonstrate the skills of written expression such as organizing ideas. Students will be provided with one topic for response. Note to Teachers: Students’ written responses are scored holistically. They should be able to generate and shape their ideas using varied sentences and an appropriate level of diction.

Students may. . the BC Performance Standards and some Prescribed Learning Outcomes. While the overall number of items in each reading category will remain constant.ENGLISH 10 TABLE OF SPECIFICATIONS CURRICULUM ORGANIZERS LITERARY P ROSE MULTIGENRE DOMAINS READING CATEGORIES POETRY INFORMATIONAL WEIGHTINGS Reading READING AND VIEWING Retrieve Information (RI) Recognize Meaning (RM) Interpret Texts (IT) Analyze Texts (AT) 3 MC 3 MC 3 MC – 3 MC 3 MC 3 MC – 3 MC 3 MC 3 MC – – – – 2 MC 1 WR 14% 14% 14% 21% WRITING AND REPRESENTING Writing 1 WT 37% MC = Multiple-choice question / WR = Written-response question / WT = Writing Examination Configuration: Multiple-choice format — 29 questions Written-response format — 2 questions The time allotted for the provincial examination is two hours. take up to 60 minutes of additional time to finish. however. Reading Categories provides a description of what each Reading Category means and shows relationships among the Reading Categories of the examination. their distribution among the genres may vary.

longer units of discourse. tone (from very personal to quite formal). 4. describing. Beyond the pragmatic purpose of shaping messages to others. and interactive process. interpretive. the text. graphic. explaining. dispositions. (narrating. ‘the world’). classmates.” National Council of Teachers of English Writing is defined as a constructive. Meaning is constructed in the interaction between reader and text in the context of a particular reading experience. writing serves both public and personal needs of students. and culturally and socially derived expectations. Texts are broadly defined to include print. No. purpose (from discovering and expressing personal feelings and values to conducting the impersonal ‘business’ of everyday life). interpretive. Learning to write and to write increasingly well involves developing increasing skill and sensitivity in selecting from and combining these variables to shape particular messages. know. purpose and tone of the message. and culturally and socially derived expectations. Thus. (NCTE) 1997. and background knowledge to the task of reading. This understanding of writing corresponds to that used in the English Language Arts curriculum and the BC Performance Standards for Writing. persuading). Meaning is constructed in the context of a particular writing experience. Writing The definition of writing in the Grade 10 English examination is taken from Support for Learning and Teaching of English (SLATE Vol. reporting. cognitive. April 1979) “Writing is the process of selecting. and digital forms. arranging. The reader brings a repertoire of skills.” The definition reflects numerous current theories. This understanding of reading corresponds to that used in the English Language Arts curriculum and the BC Performance Standards for Reading. writing can be a means of self-discovery.ENGLISH 10 DESCRIPTION OF THE PROVINCIAL EXAMINATION Definitions of the Domains of Reading and Writing Reading The Grade 10 English examination takes its definition of reading from the National Council of Teachers of English. and metacognitive strategies. a teacher. combining. . and the context. Writing can be a deeply personal act of shaping our perception of the world and our relationships to people and things in the world. and cannot find words or circumstances to say to others. “Reading is the process of constructing meaning from a written text. and interactive process. which define reading as a constructive. possible audiences (oneself. 2. It is an active process involving the constant interaction between the mind of the reader. paragraphs and. form (from a limerick to a formal letter to a long research report). and developing ideas in effective sentences. The process requires the writer to cope with a number of variables: method of development. It also involves learning to conform to conventions of the printed language appropriate to the age of the writer and to the form. often. of finding out what we believe.

diagrams. While the curriculum addresses many aspects of English Language Arts. Test Design The examination design includes some “process” aspects of both reading and writing. It includes computer-marked and written-response questions. the Grade 10 English examination addresses only reading and writing. charts...g. The Grade 10 English examination passages include informational texts and literary texts. web pages). students are introduced to the theme. The other aspects of the curriculum are better served through classroom assessment. numerical data. cartoons. The examination booklet is based on a broad theme.Focus of the Provincial Examination The Grade 10 English examination is a provincial large-scale assessment which is based on the English Language Arts curriculum. recipes) and material presented in visual or graphical formats (e. Students read three passages and answer nine multiple-choice questions on each passage. The informational passages may contain discontinuous text (e. maps. In Part A. Students do not need to refer to the reading passages when writing the composition. In Part C. and reading/writing connections. Pre-reading/thinking Literary Prose 9 Multiple Choice about the theme (2–3 min) 35 min + Poetry 9 Multiple Choice + Information 9 Multiple Choice 2 Linking Multiple Choice (based on 2 of the 3 passages) 1 hr 10 min + Written Response (based on 2 of the 3 passages) 35 min Pre-writing/thinking (2–3 min) Long Writing (based on theme) 50 min . timetables. In Part B. students answer two multiple-choice questions based on two of the passages and a “synthesis” written-response question. both prose and poetry. schedules. students read a short section “Getting Ready to Write” and a writing prompt based on the broad theme.g.

Learning outcomes. describe the knowledge. Subsequent categories subsume the preceding categories.” The diagram serves to illustrate that the categories are interconnected and overlapping. Strategies Reading and Viewing: Purposes. Performance Standards describe levels of achievement in key areas of learning. the learning outcomes of the curriculum are presented in the form of Integrated Resource Packages (IRPs). Strategies. attitudes and skills students are expected to learn in each grade level.Relationship of the Grade 10 English Examination (Reading) with the BC Curriculum and Performance Standards In British Columbia. Performance Standards support teachers in making consistent and accurate judgments about how well students are performing in relation to the prescribed learning outcomes. rather than discrete constructs. Features Reading and Viewing: Thinking BC Performance Standards Strategies Comprehension Grade 10 English Examination Specifications Not appropriate for large-scale testing • Retrieve Information • Recognize Meaning • Interpret Texts • Analyze Texts Response and Analysis Connections Among the Four Reading Categories The following diagram (Figure 1) illustrates the connections among the four categories in the reading component of the Table of Specifications. “retrieving information” is generally a prerequisite to “recognizing meaning. although closely related. For example. The table below summarizes the relationship of the Grade 10 English Examination (Reading) with the BC Curriculum and Performance Standards. BC Language Arts IRP Oral Language: Purposes. or content standards. Analyze Texts Interpret Texts Recognize Meaning Retrieve Information Figure 1 .

The information is usually contained within a phrase or sentence. 4) illustrates. by showing relationships with some of the descriptions from the BC Performance Standards. “filled-in” or linked across parts of a text. The information is generally derived across the text. Analyze Texts The reader takes a stance. craft and effectiveness. Information may need to be inferred. Recognize Meaning The reader uses information provided in the text and understands an equivalent statement or reformulates it in her/his own words. or synthesize information from multiple texts. • accurately identifies main ideas and restates them in own words • deals effectively with obvious themes • offers logical predictions and speculations • uses subtle clues in the text to build inferences and interpretations • interpret and evaluate ideas. web sites and electronic media • logically describes and analyzes elements and key features. Learning outcomes for this category are not included in the IRP as these outcomes are considered appropriate for lower grade levels. relevant detail as needed IRP Outcomes Learning outcomes for this category are not included in the IRP as these outcomes are considered appropriate for lower grade levels. and some of the Prescribed Learning Outcomes from the IRPs. No inferences or interpretations are required. Interpret Texts The reader integrates ideas and information to show an understanding or interpretation. lower level categories are subsumed in higher level categories. but may sometimes be found in a word or sentence. As Figure 1 (p. The evaluation may require information to be integrated or transformed.) Reading Categories Retrieve Information The reader locates information that is found in the text. offering an interpretation that goes beyond retelling • explains relationships among ideas. 4) illustrates.Reading Categories with Examples from the BC Curriculum and Performance Standards The following table further illustrates the nature of the Specifications. information and understandings from texts • make and support reasoned judgements • compare information from a variety of sources including magazines. lower level categories are subsumed in higher level categories. offers logical predictions. evaluating and making judgments about aspects of the text or the author’s purpose. BC Performance Standards • uses text features to preview and locate information • provides specific. or on critical analysis. speculations. and conclusions based on specific evidence from the text • compare ideas and elements among texts • synthesize and extend thinking about texts . As Figure 1 (p. newspapers. The evaluation may focus on personal reactions and opinions. perspective. The information may be implicit and open to interpretation. The reader comprehends the use of literary and stylistic terms and devices. (Note: The examples are not comprehensive or exhaustive. The information is usually contained within a phrase or sentence. The reader may make connections with other texts.

supported judgments. to complete a template or answer a question) • identify the sequence of explicitly stated events or steps • locate the definition of a word or phrase provided in the text Recognize Meaning For example: • identifies main ideas that are straightforward.Examples of Examination Tasks for the Four Reading Categories Reading Literature Retrieve Information For example: • identify explicit information about characters. social. and events • identify setting (where and when) • recount events • locate details relevant to a particular task (e. characters. and evaluations • makes comparisons with other texts • offers logical predications. style) Reading Information For example: • locate details relevant to a particular task (e.g. to complete a template or answer a question) • identify explicitly stated topic or main idea • identify the sequence of explicitly stated events or steps • locate the definition of a word or phrase provided in the text For example: • identifies main ideas that are straightforward.g.. relating it to other elements • explains relationship among ideas • analyzes main ideas and provides textual support • analyzes author’s purpose/intent and provides textual support • compares two characters • compares features of two texts (e.g. and restates in own words • describes basic cause-effect relationships • re-states conclusions or generalizations • explains the meaning of technical or specialized words or phrases in context • classifies information • makes notes using logical categories For example: • infers main ideas • provides relevant details/supports inferences • compares information from two parts of a text • integrates information to develop a generalization or conclusion • draws conclusions about an author’s viewpoints and opinions • develops categories that reflect the underlying framework of a text For example: • provides logical. and restates in own words • describes setting and main character • determines explicitly described character traits and motivation • determines a character’s feelings from his or her actions or reactions • describes basic relationships between two characters • describes story elements or key features • identifies more obvious themes Interpret Texts For example: • makes logical predictions • infers character traits and motivation • infers main ideas • infers a character’s feelings from his or her actions or reactions • interprets themes or message • infers mood or tone • suggests alternatives to character’s actions • integrates information to support a generalization or conclusion Analyze Texts For example: • makes connections to other selections • offers an insightful analysis • generalizes about a theme. or cultural context on a text . themes... speculations and conclusions supported by evidence • provides thoughtful questions and connections • analyzes author’s purpose/intent and provides textual support • interprets the influence of historical.

expository F Falling action Figurative language First person point of view . persuasive Plot Point of view Propaganda Protagonist G Genre H Hyperbole R Refrain Resolution Rhyme Rhyme scheme Rhythm Rising action Round character I Image Imagery Indirect presentation Irony J Jargon S Sarcasm Satire Setting Simile Slang Sonnet Speaker Stanza Static character Stereotyped character Style Suspense Symbol.E xa m in ab le T er m s an d D ev ic es in Li te ra tu re A Alliteration Allusion Antagonist Aside Atmosphere Audience Flashback Flat character Foil Foreshadowing Free verse P Paradox Personification Persuasion. external) Connotation Contrast D Denotation Description Dialogue Direct presentation Drama Dynamic character E Exposition. symbolism L Limited omniscient point of view Lyric M Metaphor Mood N Narration Narrative Narrator T Theme Tone Tragedy O Objective point of view Omniscient point of view Onomatopoeia Oxymoron B Ballad Bias Blank verse U Understatement C Character Chronological order Cliché Climax Colloquial Comedy Compare Conflict (internal.

maps. tables. web pages. newspaper columns. charts. journals. timelines) • non-fiction prose (diaries.g. letters. magazine articles) • • • • plays poetry novels short fiction .Types of Reading Passages or Excerpt Sources • essays (formal or informal style) • discontinuous texts (e. graphs..

It is also important to note that there are at least thirteen sources of invalidity. but not very valid. A history test written for high validity will have many essay and fill-in-the-blank questions. Perhaps this is because their social purpose demands the absence of any error. The answers will vary between individuals. Peace Concept on Focus: Fairness In assessment. a subject-matter-valid test of knowledge of driving rules is appropriate while a predictively-valid test would assess whether the potential driver could follow those rules. Asking random individuals to tell the time without looking at a clock or watch is sometimes used as an example of an assessment which is valid. Thus. plus the other quality attributes noted above for a specific context and purpose. because theories are theories . educational testing. the less certain we are that we are actually measuring that aspect of attainment. but can easily be scored with great precision. It is well to distinguish between "subject-matter" validity and "predictive" validity. but difficult to score completely accurately. In many fields. fairness is not only a matter of teachers’ attitude towards students. The latter. In practice. No.  A good assessment has both validity and reliability. It will be a good measure of mastery of the subject.. Your Reflections Write you personal reflection of thoughts and feelings regarding the Peace Concept on Focus. such as medical research. You cannot assess results without knowing what the learning objectives were. . They never are. If it will materialize . which can be estimated for individual students in test situations. It is very reliable. used widely in the workplace. predicts the score a student would get on a similar test but with different questions. Why did you have to study the teacher’s learning objectives prior to developing an assessment tool? An assessment tool is intended to see if learning objectives were met. It also involves the use of assessment tools that are appropriate. and validity errors are usually so high that they would destabilize the whole assessment industry. The former. It isn't as good at measuring knowledge of history. an assessment is rarely totally valid or totally reliable.Your Analysis Do you think the teacher’s learning objective was appropriately assessed by your test items? Yes it may. A ruler which is marked wrong will always give the same (wrong) measurements. We may generalize from this. and psychology. A history test written for high reliability will be entirely multiple choice. predicts performance. Share your reflection with your FS teacher and classmates. The more reliable our estimate is of what we purport to measure. used widely in education. there will often be a trade-off between reliability and validity.. but the average answer is probably close to the actual time. but not reliable.

MY REVIEW NOTES Please use this sheet to outline the essential information about authentic assessment that you draw from the articles you read. please document your engagement in the tasks using the Activity Sheets provided for you. For your reading of selected articles on the new trends of classroom assessment. Year and Section: Signature: ______________________ REFLECTIVE JOURNAL What were your personal strategies in choosing relevant articles to read? What are your insights and feelings about the new trends in classroom assessment? .Field Study Episode 3 Learning Assessment Strategies “MY ASSESSMENT LIST” Name of FS Student: Course: Resource Teacher: School: Your Tools For this episode. please use the sheet below.

When the questions are finalized write them down on the sheet below. please go over your Review Notes. Based on these. Spare some space between questions where you will write down the teacher’s response to each question. MY INTERVIEW NOTES REFLECTIVE JOURNAL How did you feel about the teacher’s experience in the use of authentic assessment? What do you think have been the gains enjoyed by the teacher and his/her students from using authentic assessment? Which part of the teacher’s use of authentic assessment do you feel like improving or revising? . please draft possible questions you will ask the teacher and confer with your FS teacher.What is your most meaningful learning from this activity Before interviewing a teacher on his/her experiences in using authentic assessment.

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MY CHECKLIST . note down your significant observation of the performance-based activity in the classroom.Field Study Episode 4 Learning Assessment Strategies “WORK ME ON” Name of FS Student: Course: Resource Teacher: School: Your Tools As you observe a class. For your proposed plan for process-oriented assessment. it is recommended that you use the format that you agreed in your Assessment-2 class. Then. make a checklist of the tasks. Please use “My Checklist” for this purpose. please use the Activity Forms provided for you. make a checklist of the important things you wish to consider in your performance-based assessment plan. Year and Section: Signature: ______________________ Subject Area: Based on your observation. Please remember that the rubrics are part and parcel of your assessment plan. OBSERVATION NOTES Name of the School Observed: School Address: Date of Visit: Grade/ Year Level: Subject Matter: Describe in bullets the performance-based activity you observe.

NOTES ON MY PROCESS-ORIENTED ASSESSMENT PLAN Name of School: School Address: Grade/Year Level: Section: Subject Area: Subject Matter: What are the best features of my process-oriented performance assessment design? What specific conditions are necessary for a successful use of my process-oriented performance assessment design? What basic points should the user of this design consider? Prepared by: _____________________________________ Signature of FS Student over Printed Name Organize your process-oriented performance assessment plan in a Show Portfolio with the following suggested entries: • • • • • Learning Objectives General Performance Task Learning Episodes (described in terms of students’ specific learning tasks/ activities) Assessment Tasks (described in terms of acceptable standards of learning behavior) Rubrics for Assessing Learning . Please use the sheet below. write down a few notes about your plan.After making your process-oriented assessment plan on a separate paper using your agreed format.

Your Analysis Do you think your originally designed process-oriented performance assessment can appropriately assess the teacher’s learning objective? Why?/ Why not? Why do teachers need to give attention to the students’ process-oriented tasks? Why do you need to assess them? In what conditions can the process-oriented performance assessment be used more appropriately? Your Reflections Write your personal reflections of thoughts and feelings about your personal strategies for making your efforts successful in this part of your FS. .

it is recommended that you use the format that you agreed in your Assessment-2 class. make an assessment check of these tasks. .Field Study Episode 5 Learning Assessment Strategies “BUILD ME UP” Name of FS Student: Course: Resource Teacher: School: Your Tools As you observe a class. Please remember that the rubrics are part and parcel of your assessment plan. For your proposed plan for product-oriented assessment. compose your thoughts and think about what productoriented assessment design you think is more appropriate for the classroom you have observed. please use the Activity Forms provided for you. list the procedures of your proposed assessment in the box below. Then. In bullet form. OBSERVATION NOTES Name of the School Observed: School Address: Date of Visit: Grade/ Year Level: Subject Matter: Describe in bullets the product-oriented activity you observe. note down your significant observation of the product-oriented activity in the classroom. Year and Section: Signature: ______________________ Subject Area: Your Plan Now that you noted your observation.

Please use “My Plan” for this purpose. Please use the sheet below. MY PLAN Learning Objectives: General product-oriented Performance Task: Target Skills: Learning Activities (Specific Tasks): Assessment Tasks: Please write down a few notes about your plan.From the procedures you have listed in the preceding activity form. NOTES ON MY PRODUCT-ORIENTED ASSESSMENT PLAN Name of School: School Address: Grade/Year Level: Section: Subject Area: Subject Matter: What are the best features of my product-oriented performance assessment design? What specific conditions are necessary for a successful use of my product-oriented performance assessment design? What basic points should the user of this design consider? . make a final plan of your product-oriented assessment design.

Also draw some insights from your classmates’ sharing and note them on the right-hand side column of this page.Prepared by: _____________________________________ Signature of FS Student over Printed Name Organize your product-oriented performance assessment plan in a Show Portfolio with the following suggested entries: • • • • • Learning Objectives General Performance Task Learning Episodes (described in terms of students’ specific learning tasks/ activities) Assessment Tasks (described in terms of acceptable standards of learning behavior) Rubrics for Assessing Learning Your Analysis Do you think your originally designed product-oriented performance assessment can appropriately assess the teacher’s learning objective? Why?/ Why not? Why do teachers need to give attention to the students’ product-oriented tasks? Why do you need to assess them? In what conditions can the product-oriented performance assessment be used more appropriately? Your Reflections Write your reflection of thoughts. . feelings. personal learning strategies. or new understanding from your experience in using authentic assessment. Then share your reflection with your FS teacher and classmates. insights.

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