Grade 5

Grammar
PRACTICE BOOK
Published by Mocmilloh/Mc0row-Hill, o! Mc0row-Hill Lduco!ioh, o divisioh o! The Mc0row-Hill Compohies, Ihc.,
Two Pehh Plozo, New York, New York |0|2|.
Copyrigh! © by Mocmilloh/Mc0row-Hill. All righ!s reserved. No por! o! !his publico!ioh moy be reproduced or
dis!ribu!ed ih ohy !orm or by ohy meohs, or s!ored ih o do!obose or re!rievol sys!em, wi!hou! !he prior wri!!eh
cohseh! o! The Mc0row-Hill Compohies, Ihc., ihcludihg, bu! ho! limi!ed !o, he!work s!oroge or !rohsmissioh, or
broodcos! !or dis!ohce leorhihg.
Prih!ed ih !he Uhi!ed S!o!es o! Americo
B
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 |0 024 09 08 07 06
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Contents
Sentence Types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Commands and Exclamations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Test: Sentence Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Review: Sentence Types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Subjects and Predicates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Compound Subjects and Predicates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Test: Subjects and Predicates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Review: Subjects and Predicates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Sentence Combining. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Conjunctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Test: Sentence Combining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Review: Sentence Combining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
More Sentence Combining. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Complex Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Test: More Sentence Combining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Review: More Sentence Combining. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Run-on Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Correcting Run-on Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Test: Run-on Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Review: Run-on Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31, 32
School Contests
Miss Alaineus
American Legends
Davy Crockett Saves
the World
Trees for Life
Time For Kids:
Forests of the World
Exploring Space
Ultimate Field Trip 5:
Blasting Off to Space
Academy
Rescue Dogs
Pipiolo and the
Roof Dogs
Unit 1 Review: Sentences
Unit 1 • Challenges
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People Helping Animals
Shiloh
Slithery Snakes!
Rattlers!
Remembering the Past
Time For Kids:
Maya Lin:
Architect of Memory
The Caribbean Islands
The Night of San Juan
Cowboys and Cowgirls
Black Cowboy Wild
Horses
Unit 2 Review: Nouns
Common and Proper Nouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Using Proper Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Test: Common and Proper Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Review: Common and Proper Nouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Singular and Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Making Special Forms of Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Test: Singular and Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Review: Singular and Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
More Plural Nouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
More Plural Nouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Test: Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Review: Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Singular Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Singular and Plural Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Test: Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Review: Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Plurals and Possessives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Plurals and Possessives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Test: Plurals and Possessives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Review: Plurals and Possessives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63, 64
Unit 2 • Discoveries
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Unit 3 • Turning Points
The American
Revolution
Sleds on Boston
Common
The Right to Vote
When Esther Morris
Headed West
Protecting the
Environment
Time For Kids:
Beyond the Horizon
Desert Habitats
My Great-Grandmother’s
Gourd
Into the Future
Zathura
Unit 3 Review: Verbs
Action Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Action Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Test: Action Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Review: Action Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Present Tense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Past Tense and Future Tense. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Test: Verb Tenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Review: Verb Tenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Main and Helping Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
More Helping Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Test: Main and Helping Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Review: Contractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Linking Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Linking Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Test: Linking Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Review: Linking Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Irregular Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Irregular Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Test: Irregular Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Review: Irregular Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95, 96
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Unit 4 • Experiences
Civil Rights
Goin’ Someplace Special
Animal Defenses
Carlos and the Skunk
Democracy
Time For Kids:
Getting Out the Vote
Extreme Weather
Hurricanes
Trickster Tales
The Catch of the Day:
A Trickster Play
Unit 4 Review: Pronouns
Pronouns and Antecedents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Test: Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Review: Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Subject and Object Pronouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Subject and Object Pronouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Test: Subject and Object Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Review: Subject and Object Pronouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Pronoun-Verb Agreement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
The Verbs Have and Be . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Test: Pronoun-Verb Agreement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Review: Pronoun-Verb Agreement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Possessive Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Ways to Use Possessive Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Test: Possessive Pronouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Review: Possessive Pronouns and Hyphens . . . . . . . . 120
Pronouns and Homophones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Homophones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Test: Pronouns and Homophones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Review: Possessive Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127, 128
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Unit 5 • Achievements
North Pole, South Pole
Spirit of Endurance
Fantastic Foods
Weslandia
Learning from Nature
Time For Kids:
A Historic Journey
Talking in Codes
The Unbreakable Code
Whales
The Gri Gri Tree
Unit 5 Review: Adjectives
Adjectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Demonstrative Adjectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Test: Adjectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Review: Adjectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
The Articles A, An, and The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Articles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Test: Articles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Review: Articles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Adjectives That Compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
More Adjectives That Compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Test: Adjectives That Compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Review: Adjectives That Compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Comparing with More and Most . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Comparing with More and Most . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Test: Comparing with More and Most. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Review: Comparing with More and Most . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Comparing with Good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Comparing with Bad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Test: Comparing with Good and Bad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Review: Comparing with Good and Bad . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159, 160
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Unit 6 • Great Ideas
Fairy Tales
The Golden Mare, the
Firebird, and the Magic
Ring
Camping Out
Skunk Scout
Improving Lives
Time For Kids:
A Dream Comes True
Balloon Flight
Up in the Air:
The Story of Balloon
Flight
Scientists at Work
Hidden Worlds
Unit 6 Review: Adverbs
Adverbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Adverbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Test: Adverbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Review: Adverbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Adverbs That Compare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Adverbs That Compare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Test: Adverbs That Compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Review: Adverbs That Compare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Negatives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Negatives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Test: Negatives and Double Negatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Review: Negatives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Prepositions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Prepositional Phrases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Test: Prepositions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Review: Commas and Prepositional Phrases . . . . . . . . 184
Sentence Combining. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Sentence Combining. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Test: Sentence Combining and Punctuation Marks . . . 189
Review: Sentence Combining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191, 192
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Grammar
Name
Sentence Types
• A sentence is a group of words that express a complete thought.
• A sentence fragment is a group of words that does not
express a complete thought.
• Every sentence begins with a capital letter and ends with a
punctuation mark.
• A statement is a sentence that tells something. It ends with a
period.
• A question is a sentence that asks something. It ends with a
question mark.
Read each group of words. Place a period on the line at the end if it
is a sentence. If it is a sentence fragment, write an F on the line.
1. Sage missed vocabulary day because she had a cold
2. Finished defning the vocabulary words
3. Sage liked to make up her own defnitions
Place a period on the line at the end of the sentence if it is a statement.
Place a question mark at the end of the sentence if it is a question.
4. Is “Musical Performance” the theme for this week
5. She was looking forward to the Tenth Annual Vocabulary Parade
6. Starr went to the end of the line after she spelled the word correctly
Rewrite these sentences. Be sure to use the correct end mark.
7. Sage turned red when she heard everyone laughing
8. do you have a collection of unrelated objects
9. Mrs. Page asked the students to spell and defne the words
10. why were they laughing
Miss Alaineus • Grade 5/Unit 1 1
At Home: Write two statements and two questions about
Sage’s story.
Grammar
Name
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Commands and
Exclamations
• A command tells someone to do something. It ends with a period.
• An exclamation expresses strong feeling. It ends with an
exclamation mark.
Read each sentence. Decide if each sentence is a command or an
exclamation, and write your choice on the line. Then rewrite the
sentences with the correct end marks.
1. Please tell me what the vocabulary words are for this week




2. Write each word fve times


3. Be sure to include each word’s defnition


4. Oh my, she hung up the phone with a crash




5. Line up by the board for the Vocabulary Parade




6. How sad for Sage to feel so devastated




7. Wow, that’s an amazing gold trophy that Sage won




8. Oh no, Mr. Bell’s suit is all soggy


2 Miss Alaineus • Grade 5/Unit 1
At Home: Write a story about a task that seems impossible.
Include two commands and two exclamations.
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Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• Every sentence begins with a capital letter.
• A statement ends with a period.
• A question ends with a question mark.
• A command ends with a period.
• An exclamation ends with an exclamation mark.
Read each sentence. On the line, place a period if the sentence
is a statement or command, an exclamation mark if it is an
exclamation, or a question mark if it is a question. Circle any
letters that should be capitals.
1. Write the vocabulary words on a sheet of paper
2. Forest is a boy in Sage’s class
3. Oh no, Starr, you’re late for baseball practice
4. her head felt as though it were stuffed with cotton
5. Have you seen her gigantic red dictionary
6. what does Miss Alaineus have to do with categories
7. Go get some of that long Italian bread and two sticks of butter
8. She was so excited to see Miss Alaineus
9. miss alaineus is not on the spaghetti box
10. Sage’s mother had a great idea
Rewrite each statement or command below as a question.
11. We have many vocabulary words this week.
12. Please pass me that eraser.
13. We will see Miss Alaineus tomorrow.
Miss Alaineus • Grade 5/Unit 1 3
At Home: Choose a television program that you enjoy and
write one statement, one question, and one command about it.
Grammar
Name
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Proofreading
• Begin every sentence with a capital letter.
• Place a period at the end of a statement.
• Place a question mark at the end of a question.
• Place a period at the end of a command.
• Place an exclamation point at the end of an exclamation.
Rewrite the paragraph below. Use the correct capitalization and
punctuation marks.
I like spelling? it’s my favorite subject! Each week, our teacher gives
us twenty spelling words? I always write the words in my notebook! the
boy who sits next to me sneezed? How sick I became. I could not be at
school the day our teacher gave us the spelling words? I called my friend
to get the words for the week? I feel confdent that I will get all the words
right on the test! this is going to be easy? i hope i’m not sick the day of
the spelling test!












4 Miss Alaineus • Grade 5/Unit 1
At Home: Write a dialogue between Sage and Starr using at
least one of each type of sentence.
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Grammar
Name
Test:
Sentence Types
Read each sentence. Write whether it is a statement, a question, a
command, or an exclamation. Then rewrite the sentence so that its
end mark and capitalization are correct.
1. Why did Sage miss Vocabulary Day
2. call Starr and ask her for the words
3. Sage was propped up in bed with a box of tissues
4. How hard it is to study while you’re blowing your
nose
5. do you have a spork in your miscellaneous drawer
6. have you ever seen a fossil
7. Oh, I love your Vocabulary Parade costume
8. did you see the look on Mr. Bell’s face
9. Ask Mrs. Page when the next parade is scheduled
10. what will your costume be
Miss Alaineus • Grade 5/Unit 1 5
Grammar
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Name
Review:
Sentence Types
• A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete
thought. A sentence fragment is a group of words that does
not express a complete thought.
• Every sentence begins with a capital letter and ends with a
punctuation mark.
• A statement is a sentence that tells something. It ends with a
period.
• A question is a sentence that asks something. It ends with a
question mark.
• A command tells someone to do something. It ends with a
period.
• An exclamation expresses strong feeling. It ends with an
exclamation mark.
Read each group of words. Add words to make each group a
statement, a question, a command, or an exclamation. State which
you have made. Use the correct capitalization and end mark.
1. nervous at the spelling contest.
2. some students spell
3. what did our teacher
4. I can’t believe I
5. please say
6. won the contest
6 Miss Alaineus • Grade 5/Unit 1
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Grammar
Name
Subjects and
Predicates
Read each sentence. Circle the simple subject, and underline the
complete subject.
1. A brave man lived in the mountains.
2. Davy’s pet bear danced in the forest.
3. The big, bad comet hurtled toward America.
4. Davy Crockett’s red-hot enemy was discombobulated.
5. The beautiful Sally Sugartree married Davy.
Read each sentence. Circle the simple predicate, and underline the
complete predicate.
6. The President received piles of letters.
7. Davy learned all the latest dances.
8. Sally climbed a 50-foot hickory tree.
9. Halley’s Comet howled when it saw Davy.
10. The people elected Davy to Congress when he returned home.
• The complete subject includes all of the words in the subject.
It tells exactly who or what the sentence is about.
• The simple subject is the main word in the complete subject.
• The complete predicate includes all of the words in the
predicate.
• The simple predicate is the main word in the complete
predicate.
The subject of a sentence tells who or what the sentence is about. The
predicate of a sentence tells what the subject does or is.
Davy Crockett Saves the World
Grade 5/Unit 1
7
At Home: Write four sentences about the story, and circle
the simple subjects and simple predicates.
Grammar
Name
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Compound Subjects
and Predicates
• A compound subject contains two or more simple subjects
that have the same predicate.
• A compound predicate contains two or more simple
predicates that have the same subject.
• You can combine two sentences by joining two subjects or two
predicates with and or or.
Read each sentence. Write S on the line if the sentence has a
compound subject. Write P on the line if the sentence has a
compound predicate.
1. Davy and Death Hug danced in the forest.
2. Davy combed his hair with a rake and shaved his beard with an ax.
3. The President and Davy posed for pictures.
4. Davy climbed to the top of Eagle Eye Peak and waited for the comet.
Rewrite each set of sentences as one sentence. Combine the
compound subject or compound predicate in each pair with
and or or.
5. Davy jumped over the comet’s shoulder. Davy planted his teeth around its
neck.
6. Sally Sugartree was happy to see Davy return. The community was happy to
see Davy return.
8
Davy Crockett Saves the World
Grade 5/Unit 1
At Home: Make up pairs of sentences that can be combined
using and or or in the subject or predicate.
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Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• Use commas to separate three or more words in a series.
• Commas separate subjects, predicates, and adjectives in a series.
• Do not use a comma after the last word in a series.
Correct each sentence. Add commas where they are needed.
1. Davy needed a comb a rake and an ax.
2. The biggest scariest meanest ball of fre was called Halley’s Comet.
3. Davy grabbed Halley’s Comet spun it around and hurled it back into space.
4. He could drink the water from lakes rivers and oceans.
5. Sally Sugartree was friendly pretty and smart.
6. Davy’s pet bear was so fast that rocks trees cows and snakes few out from
beneath its feet.
7. Every river tree and lake could be seen from the top of Eagle Eye Peak.
8. Halley’s Comet shot out sparks lightning and thunder.
Davy Crockett Saves the World
Grade 5/Unit 1
9
At Home: Write five sentences that each include a series of
three or more words. Use commas correctly.
Grammar
Name
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Proofreading
• Be sure that every sentence begins with a capital letter and
ends with the correct punctuation mark.
• Use commas to separate three or more words or phrases in a
series.
• When combining subjects and predicates, use the words and or or.
Rewrite the passage, combining sentences and adding commas
where needed. Use correct capitalization and punctuation.
davy Crockett was a frontiersman. He chopped wood hunted wild animals
and ran a powder mill. Every morning he got up early to see the sunrise. He
got up early to eat breakfast.
one day, Sally Sugartree asked Davy to dance. Davy wouldn’t dance
because his boots were too big. He wouldn’t dance because he would step on
her toes. sally then asked Davy to sing. His voice was so strong that it made
the trees sway the clouds move and the animals scatter. Sally liked Davy’s
voice so much that she decided to marry him.
10
Davy Crockett Saves the World
Grade 5/Unit 1
At Home: Write your own folk tale about a strong hero, and
include compound subjects and compound predicates.
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Grammar
Name
Test: Subject
and Predicate
Circle the letter for each correct answer.
1. Which of the following groups of words is a complete sentence?
a. Davy’s ax and rake.
b. Was elected to Congress after saving the world.
c. Davy could drink the Mississippi River dry.
d. Very strong and brave.
2. Which of the following groups of words is a sentence fragment?
a. The pretty girl was Sally Sugartree.
b. The President’s law that Halley’s Comet couldn’t crash into Earth.
c. Death Hug liked to dance.
d. Davy was fast.
3. In which sentence is the simple subject underlined?
a. Davy enjoyed spending time in the forest.
b. Sally danced better than anyone.
c. Davy hurled Halley’s Comet back into space.
d. The President thanked him for his help.
Follow each direction below.
4. Underline the simple subject of this sentence.
Davy saved the United States from trouble.
5. Underline the complete subject of this sentence.
Sally Sugartree and Davy Crockett got married after the parade.
6. Underline the complete predicate in this sentence. Circle the simple
predicate.
Davy wears a coonskin cap on his head.
Davy Crockett Saves the World
Grade 5/Unit 1
11
Grammar
Name
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Review: Subjects
and Predicates
• The complete subject includes all of the words in the subject.
• The simple subject is the main word in the complete subject.
• The complete predicate includes all of the words in the
predicate.
• The simple predicate is the main word in the complete
predicate.
Read the following paragraphs. In each sentence, underline the
complete subject once and the complete predicate twice. Circle the
simple predicate.
The real Davy Crockett was an American frontiersman. He enjoyed the
outdoors and hunted wild animals. Davy and his wife owned a gristmill
and a powder mill. Davy won an election to Congress in 1832. He lost his
reelection to Congress in 1836 and decided to help Texas in its fght against
Mexico. He died while defending the Alamo against Mexican troops.
Davy Crockett achieved many things in his life. Stories about Davy are
still told today. He is a hero to many people because of his bravery and
strength.
Correct the sentence fragments by adding a subject or predicate.
Rewrite the complete sentence.
1. was a frontiersman who enjoyed the outdoors


2. Davy Crockett and his wife


3. remember him because he valued the American frontier


12
Davy Crockett Saves the World
Grade 5/Unit 1
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Grammar
Name
Sentence Combining
• Two related sentences can be joined with a comma and and,
but, or or.
• A sentence that contains two sentences joined by and, but, or
or is called a compound sentence.
Read each pair of sentences. Rewrite them as a single sentence,
using and, but, or or along with a comma.
1. Pakenham went searching for trees. He wrote a book about them.
2. General Sherman is the name of a person. It is also the name of a giant
sequoia.
3. Would you like to visit a coniferous forest biome? Would you like to see a
deciduous forest?
4. The fallen leaves enrich the soil. They allow all kinds of plant life to grow.
5. Oak, beech, ash, and maple trees are typical of a deciduous forest. Many
types of insects and animals live in that habitat.
Forests of the World • Grade 5/Unit 1 13
At Home: Write pairs of sentences and ask a helper to
combine them by using a comma and a conjunction.
Grammar
Name
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Conjunctions
• A conjunction joins words or groups of words. And, but, and
or are conjunctions.
• A sentence that contains two sentences joined by and, but, or
or is called a compound sentence.
• In a compound sentence, a comma is placed before the
conjunction.
Read each sentence below. Underline the conjunction, and put a
comma in the correct place.
1. Limited rainfall or lengthy drought can cause wildfres but these fres can
also be caused by campfres or a stray match.
2. Helicopters can drop chemicals to slow fames and frefghters can set up
fre lines.
3. Tiny bonsai trees may look like young plants but they are full grown.
4. Many areas in the world are covered with trees but the Arctic tundra is
treeless.
5. Moisture is absorbed and then it evaporates and falls as rain.
Read each sentence below. If it is a compound sentence, write C
on the line. If it is not a compound sentence, leave the line blank.
6. There are no leaves to decompose and make the ground suitable for
growth.
7. Some plants will not thrive in a coniferous forest, but some animals
do well in this biome.
8. North America, Europe, and eastern Asia all have deciduous
forests.
14 Forests of the World • Grade 5/Unit 1
At Home: Write six compound sentences joined by and or
but with a comma before each conjunction.
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Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• Use a comma before and, but, or or when you join two
sentences to form a compound sentence.
• Begin every sentence with a capital letter.
• When you form a compound sentence, do not begin the second
part with a capital letter.
Read each group of words. Then write them as correct sentences
on the lines. Be sure to use capital letters and commas in the
correct places.
1. trees produce oxygen and they reduce the effects of carbon dioxide.
2. Trees should be planted in certain areas or the soil could be carried away
by wind and water.
3. a stone wall might be an effective way to cut down noise but a row of trees
is usually more attractive
4. arbor Day was successful in 1872 but it was even more successful in 2002.
5. trees are considered to be among nature’s hardest workers and this is true
in any climate.
6. Could you identify the trees in your neighborhood by yourself or would you
need some help?
Forests of the World • Grade 5/Unit 1 15
At Home: Write four sentences about the story, and
underline the complete subjects.
Grammar
Name
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Proofreading
• Use commas to separate three or more words in a series.
• Two related sentences can be joined with a comma and and,
but, or or.
Read the passage below. Circle mistakes in capitalization and
punctuation. Then rewrite the passage.
Almost half of the world’s rain forests are in Brazil but many are
found in Asia Africa South america Central America and on many Pacifc
Islands. the vegetation in a rain forest is thick and this means that a great
deal of moisture is absorbed into the atmosphere. The moisture eventually
evaporates. The moisture falls back to Earth as rain. Amazingly, tropical rain
forests receive 70 inches of rain a year?
A rain forest has three layers. the canopy is the tallest. The understory
is in the middle. The forest foor is on the bottom. The forest foor is very
dense. It is covered with ferns and mosses.
16 Forests of the World • Grade 5/Unit 1
At Home: Read a magazine article about rain forests. Find
the conjunctions and compound sentences.
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Grammar
Name
Test: Sentence
Combining
Circle the letter for each correct answer.
1. Which of the following sentences has a conjunction?
a. What are the fve most common trees in the United States?
b. I like black cherry trees.
c. We planted a black cherry tree, and it is doing very well.
2. Which of the following sentences uses a comma correctly?
a. Tiny bonsai trees are from Japan and they can be less than a foot tall.
b. Tiny bonsai trees are from Japan, and they can be less than a foot tall.
c. Tiny bonsai trees are from Japan and they, can be, less than a foot tall.
3. Which of the following sentences is a compound sentence?
a. Trees absorb carbon dioxide and keep it from harming the environment.
b. Trees absorb carbon dioxide, and keep it from harming the environment.
c. Trees absorb carbon dioxide, and this absorption keeps the carbon
dioxide from harming the environment.
4. Which of the following compound sentences uses a conjunction correctly?
a. Deciduous trees lose their leaves, in the natural decaying enriches the
soil.
b. Deciduous trees lose their leaves, or the natural decaying enriches the
soil.
c. Deciduous trees lose their leaves, and the natural decaying enriches
the soil.
5. In the space below, draw a picture of the type of forest you like best. Under
the picture, write a compound sentence that explains why you like this type
of forest.
Forests of the World • Grade 5/Unit 1 17
Grammar
Name
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Review: Sentence
Combining
Read the paragraph. Underline each compound sentence, and
circle the conjunctions.
Thomas Pakenham has a very interesting job. He searches for fascinating
trees. He takes many pictures of the trees, and he writes about their
interesting “personalities.” Some of the trees are small, but some of the trees
are quite large. The Montezuma cypress, for example, is 190 feet around. Mr.
Pakenham hopes that his pictures will remind us not to take trees for granted.
Write a paragraph about the types of trees that are found in your
neighborhood. Are there small trees or large trees or no trees
at all? In what ways do they affect the climate where you live?
Are there any trees that cut down noise? Use five compound
sentences joined by and, but, or or in your paragraph. Be sure to
use correct capitalization and punctuation.
18 Forests of the World • Grade 5/Unit 1
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Grammar
Name
More Sentence
Combining
• The conjunctions and, but, and or are used to form compound
sentences.
• Some conjunctions tell where, when, why, how, or under what
conditions. These conjunctions include after, although, as,
because, before, if, since, so that, until, when, whether, and
while.
Combine each pair of sentences, using the conjunction in
parentheses.
1. Some tasted space food. Others wore spacesuits. (and)
2. Gum and drinks are not allowed. They can create disasters in the dirt-free
zone. (because)
3. The students were told to remove their jewelry. They would not be injured.
(so that)
4. The trainer would hold onto the chair. The last student had a turn. (until)
5. He volunteered to sit in the gravity chair. He realized how hard it was to
move around. (before)
The Ultimate Field Trip
Grade 5/Unit 1
19
At Home: Write two simple sentences about what you would
like to do at space camp. Use a conjunction to combine the
sentences.
Grammar
Name
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Complex Sentences
• If the complex sentence begins with the conjunction, then a
comma should follow the last word in that part of the sentence.
• Sometimes the comma is unnecessary if the conjunction
appears in the middle of the sentence.
From each pair of conjunctions in parentheses, choose the
conjunction that combines the sentences into a single sentence
that makes sense. Write the new sentence, using a comma if
necessary.
1. The Hubble Telescope must be powerful. It can spot a frefy ten thousand
miles away. (because/although)
2. I was feeling brave. I saw how fast the multi-axis trainer was spinning. (so
that/before)
3. Bethany held on to the 5DF Chair. The kids practiced moving along the
wall. (while/because)
4. The moon does not have an atmosphere. There is no wind to blow the
prints away. (until/since)
A sentence that contains two related ideas joined by a conjunction other
than and, but, or or is called a complex sentence. These conjunctions
include after, although, as, because, before, if, since, so that, until, when,
whether, and while. The conjunction can appear at the beginning of the
sentence or in the middle of the sentence.
20
The Ultimate Field Trip
Grade 5/Unit 1
At Home: Look in a newspaper or magazine to find
examples of the conjunctions listed above.
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Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• Begin the greeting and the closing of a letter with capital letters.
• Use a comma after the greeting in a friendly letter and the
closing in all letters.
• Use a comma between the names of a city and a state.
• Use a comma to separate the day and year in a date.
Correct the following letter.
July 1 2007
dear mom and dad
Thank you for letting me go to the Space Academy. I’m having so much
fun. We’ve eaten space food and tried on spacesuits. Today we used a special
chair that helped us move around. Tomorrow we’re going to get into a
machine that will spin us around. Please write back to the address below.
your son
Kyle
P.O. Box 345
Huntsville Alabama
The Ultimate Field Trip
Grade 5/Unit 1
21
At Home: Write a letter to a friend explaining what you did
today. Use correct punctuation.
Grammar
Name
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Proofreading
• If a complex sentence begins with a conjunction, then a
comma should follow the last word in that part of the sentence.
• Sometimes a comma is necessary if the conjunction appears in
the middle of the sentence.
Read the diary entry below. Correct errors in capitalization and
punctuation. Use commas where needed.
February 18 2008
dear diary:
you’ll never believe what I did today. I got to use a gravity chair. Before I sat
down I made sure to watch the person in front of me so I would know what to do. I
was scared at first but the team leaders made me relax and have fun. I can’t wait to
try it again tomorrow.
your friend
Lindsay
• Begin the greeting and the closing of a letter with capital letters.
• Use a comma after the greeting in a friendly letter and the
closing in all letters.
• Use a comma between the names of a city and a state.
• Use a comma to separate the day and the year in a date.
22
The Ultimate Field Trip
Grade 5/Unit 1
At Home: Write a friendly letter to a distant relative you have
not seen in awhile.
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Grammar
Name
Test:
More Sentence
Combining
A. Circle the letters of the sentences that best combine the sentence pairs below.
1. Pay attention to the leader. You do not hurt yourself while training.
a. Pay attention to the leader so that you do not hurt yourself while training.
b. Pay attention to the leader unless you do not hurt yourself while training.
c. Pay attention to the leader while you do not hurt yourself while training.
2. They practiced for a long time. The environment was so different from that
of Earth.
a. They practiced for a long time before the environment was so different
from that of Earth.
b. They practiced for a long time because the environment was so different
from that of Earth.
c. They practiced for a long time, while the environment was so different
from that of Earth.
3. They got ready for the MAT. The students removed everything from their
pockets.
a. Until they got ready for the MAT, the students removed everything from
their pockets.
b. They got ready for the MAT since the students removed everything from
their pockets.
c. Before they got ready for the MAT, the students removed everything
from their pockets.
4. Their time wasn’t very good. The students did build the cube.
a. Because their time wasn’t very good, the students did build the cube.
b. Their time wasn’t very good if the students did build the cube.
c. Although their time wasn’t very good, the students did build the cube.
B. Circle the letter of the conjunction that best completes each
complex sentence.
5. ___________ the students arrived at the camp, they tried on spacesuits.
a. When
b. Although
c. Whether
6. He did do the bunny hop, ___________ it was diffcult at frst.
a. when
b. although
c. whether
The Ultimate Field Trip
Grade 5/Unit 1
23
Grammar
Name
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Review:
More Sentence
Combining
• A sentence that contains two related ideas joined by a
conjunction other than and, but, or or is called a complex
sentence.
• Some conjunctions tell where, when, why, how or under what
conditions. These conjunctions include after, although, as,
because, before, if, since, so that, until, when, whether, and
while.
• If a complex sentence begins with the conjunction, then a
comma should follow the last word in that part of the sentence.
• Sometimes a comma is necessary if the conjunction appears in
the middle of the sentence.
List the conjunctions that you have learned this week. Then choose
a conjunction and match it with one of the following sentences. Use
that conjunction to combine the sentence with a sentence of your
own. (If the conjunction doesn’t seem to make sense, match it with
another sentence.) Write the new sentence on the line. Add a comma
to your sentence if one is needed.
1. The training center is a dirt-free zone.
2. They learned how to eat in space.
3. The other teams jumped high enough to dunk a basketball.
4. He landed on his back and couldn’t get up.
24
The Ultimate Field Trip
Grade 5/Unit 1
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Grammar
Name
Run-On Sentences
• A run-on sentence joins together two or more sentences that
should be written separately.
• You can correct run-on sentences by separating the complete
ideas into separate sentences or by rewriting run-on sentences
as compound sentences.
Correct the following run-on sentences.
1. San Pablo Etla is on the edge of a valley Lupe’s father built their house on
the mountainside.
2. Lupe found Pipiolo asleep inside an old shoe she saw greatness when he
opened his eyes.
3. The roof dogs guarded the roofs they would bark furiously down at Lupe
and Pipiolo.
4. Pipiolo slipped into a cornfeld Lupe followed him.
5. Pipiolo barked all the dogs jumped down onto the pile of oranges in the
truck.
6. Lupe took a walk over to the village of Viquera it was a longer route to her
school.
Pipiolo and the Roof Dogs
Grade 5/Unit 1
25
At Home: Proofread a recent writing assignment, looking for
and correcting run-on sentences.
Grammar
Name
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Correcting Run-On
Sentences
• Correct a run-on sentence by separating its complete
thoughts into separate sentences.
• Correct a run-on sentence by rewriting it as a compound sentence.
Correct the run-on sentences below either by separating them as
two sentences or by rewriting them as a compound sentence.
1. Lupe lived in San Pablo Etla the village is in southern Mexico.
2. The roof dogs would run to the edge of their roofs they would bark furiously
at Lupe and Pipiolo.
3. The dogs didn’t frighten Lupe she knew they were the ones who were
frightened.
4. Pipiolo was lucky Lupe didn’t have a fat roof Papa would have put him up
there.
5. Lupe gave each roof dog a tuft of grass she saved the piece with a fower
for Chulita.
6. Lupe continued to dig up grass Pipiolo slept in the shade.
You can correct a run-on sentence in several ways.
26
Pipiolo and the Roof Dogs
Grade 5/Unit 1
At Home: Write about your experiences with dogs or other
animals, using one long run-on sentence. Then correct the
sentence.
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Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• A run-on sentence joins together two or more sentences that
should be written separately. You can correct a run-on sentence
by separating the two complete ideas into two sentences. You
can also rewrite a run-on sentence as a compound sentence.
• A sentence fragment is a group of words that does not contain
a complete thought. A fragment may be missing a subject, a
verb, or both. You can correct a fragment by adding the missing
part of speech.
Correct the run-on sentences below by writing separate sentences
or compound sentences.
1. Pipiolo was a perky puppy he loved to run in the mountains.
2. The village of San Pablo Etla is very small it is on the edge of a wide valley
in southern Mexico.
3. The roof dogs smelled the aromas of freedom they missed the smell of
freshly dug earth.
Correct the sentence fragments below by adding a subject, a verb,
or both. Write the new sentences on the lines provided.
4. Commanded the roof dogs to escape.
5. Was the only dog left on the truck.
6. The big truck.
Pipiolo and the Roof Dogs
Grade 5/Unit 1
27
At Home: Write a journal entry about dogs. Proofread a
partner’s paper for capitalization and punctuation.
Grammar
Name
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Proofreading
• A run-on sentence joins together two or more sentences that
should be written separately.
• A run-on sentence can be broken into two separate sentences
or rewritten as a compound or complex sentence.
• Remember to add a comma before and, but, or or when
changing a run-on sentence into a compound sentence. Also, use
commas to separate three or more words or phrases in a series.
Proofread the following paragraph. Rewrite it correctly on the lines
provided.
Pipiolo and Chulita went on many adventures together they traveled
over mountains across prairies and through forests. Wherever they went,
they helped more roof dogs escape to freedom they even made a few friends
along the way.
one day, they came across the village of Viquera there were many dogs
trapped on the fat, concrete roofs. Pipiolo came up with a plan to set them
all free Chulita told the dogs about the plan. Because they were so excited
they barked loudly all day long.
28
Pipiolo and the Roof Dogs
Grade 5/Unit 1
At Home: Write another story about Pipiolo, checking your
story for run-on sentences.
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Grammar
Name
Test: Run-On
Sentences
Correct the run-on sentences below. To do so, you may write
two shorter sentences, or you may add a conjunction to create a
compound sentence.
1. The people of San Pablo Etla had roof dogs the dogs protected their
homes from trespassers.
2. Lupe’s cousin Inocencia thought that the roof dogs’ escape was a miracle
everyone else was upset about it.
3. Pipiolo barked loudly all of the dogs understood his message.
4. Lupe found Pipiolo when he was just a puppy he was so small he ft inside
a shoe.
5. The Tienda Soliz had the only television in town its only channel showed
old American westerns.
6. John Wayne jumped onto a wagon full of hay that is what gave Pipiolo the
idea to free the roof dogs.
Pipiolo and the Roof Dogs
Grade 5/Unit 1
29
Grammar
Name
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Review: Run-On
Sentences
Read each run-on sentence below. Circle the letter of the sentence
that shows the best way to correct the run-on sentence.
1. The roof dogs of the village were happy Pipiolo showed them how to escape.
a. The roof dogs of the village were happy after Pipiolo showed them how
to escape.
b. The roof dogs of the village were happy and Pipiolo showed them how to
escape.
c. The roof dogs of the village were happy, Pipiolo showed them how to
escape.
2. Because Lupe felt sorry for the roof dogs she wanted them to smell real
earth.
a. Because Lupe felt sorry for the roof dogs and she wanted them to smell
real earth.
b. Because Lupe felt sorry for the roof dogs, she wanted them to smell real
earth.
c. Because Lupe felt sorry for the roof dogs, so she wanted them to smell
real earth.
3. Using her school ruler, Lupe dug up the grass she gave Chulita a piece
with a fower.
a. Using her school ruler, Lupe dug up the grass although she gave Chulita
a piece with a fower.
b. Using her school ruler, Lupe dug up the grass because she gave Chulita
a piece with a fower.
c. Using her school ruler, Lupe dug up the grass. She gave Chulita a piece
with a fower.
4. Pipiolo is a smart dog Lupe must have been surprised by what he could do.
a. Pipiolo is a smart dog if Lupe must have been surprised by what he
could do.
b. Pipiolo is a smart dog. Lupe must have been surprised by what he could
do.
c. Pipiolo is a smart dog when Lupe must have been surprised by what he
could do.
30
Pipiolo and the Roof Dogs
Grade 5/Unit 1
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Grammar
Name
Sentences
Read each passage and look at the underlined phrase. Could it be
written a better way? If so, fill in the letter of the best choice below.
on Tuesday Sage called her friend Starr Sage needed Starr to tell her the
(1)
spelling words. Starr gave Sage most of the words, but then her mother called.
Starr had to leave quickly and Sage did not get the spelling of the last word.
this was frustrating Sage would have to learn the final word on her own.
(2)
1. Ꭽ On Tuesday Sage called her friend Starr?
Ꭾ on Tuesday Sage called her friend Starr!
Ꭿ On Tuesday Sage called her friend Starr.
൳ No mistake.
2. ൴ This was frustrating
൵ this was frustrating!
൶ This was frustrating!
൷ No mistake.
Davy Crockett and Death Hug the bear were in the forest. Death Hug teaching
(3)
Davy to dance. Practiced for two weeks. At last Davy knew all the dances that
(4)
Death Hug knew. He was ready to ask Sally Sugartree to dance with him at a
party.
3. Ꭽ Death Hug taught Davy to dance.
Ꭾ Death Hug teaching Davy to dance always.
Ꭿ Death Hug often teaching Davy to dance
൳ No mistake.
4. ൴ Practiced every day for two weeks.
൵ Davy and Death Hug practiced for two weeks.
൶ Practiced dancing for two weeks.
൷ No mistake.
Unit 1 Review • Grade 5/Unit 1 31
Grammar
Name
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Sentences
At the Space Academy, the students used machines that simulated conditions in
space. They learned how to walk on the moon. They learned to work without
(5)
gravity. These machines were the same ones that real astronauts used. The real
astronauts trained for years before they went to space. The students had only a
week to try the machines. (6)
5. Ꭽ They learned how to walk on the moon and, to work without gravity.
Ꭾ They learned how to walk on the moon, and they learned to work without
gravity.
Ꭿ They learned how to walk on the moon, work without gravity.
൳ No mistake.
6. ൴ The real astronauts trained for years before they went to space but, the
students had only a week to try the machines.
൵ The real astronauts trained for years before they went to space, but the
students had only a week to try the machines.
൶ The real astronauts trained for years before they went to space and the
students had only a week to try the machines.
൷ No mistake.
One night I stepped into the yard. I saw Pipiolo going into the cornfield. The night was
(7)
dark and the dog’s shadow was very faint. I knew I could follow I could see him or
(8)
not. I could hear him sniffing at everything he passed. All I had to do was follow the
sniffing sounds.
7. Ꭽ One night I stepped into the yard that I saw Pipiolo going into the cornfeld.
Ꭾ One night I stepped into the yard, I saw Pipiolo going into the cornfeld.
Ꭿ One night I stepped into the yard, and I saw Pipiolo going into the cornfeld.
൳ No mistake.
8. ൴ I knew I could follow whether I could see him or not.
൵ I knew I could follow as if I could see him or not.
൶ I knew I could follow, I could see him or not.
൷ No mistake.
32 Unit 1 Review • Grade 5/Unit 1
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Grammar
Name
Common and
Proper Nouns
• A noun names a person, place, or thing.
• A common noun names any person, place, or thing.
• A proper noun names a particular person, place, or thing.
• A proper noun begins with a capital letter.
Underline each common noun in the list. Circle each proper noun.
Some of the words are not nouns.
Becky Shiloh town money him
trouble family bathroom father cobbler
he skin an argue Judd Travers
dog Murphy Sunday head porch
because leg minute town Marty Preston
Complete each sentence by using two of the nouns from the list
above.
1. There may be

ahead for

.
2. He has taken in a runaway

that belongs
to

.
3. Marty’s

likes

very much.
4. Marty’s

takes the ticks out of Shiloh’s
.
5. Marty wants to earn

by working in

.
Shiloh • Grade 5/Unit 2 33
At Home: Divide a sheet of paper into two columns:
“Common Nouns” and “Proper Nouns.” Choose nouns from
a page in Shiloh and write them in the correct columns.
Grammar
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Using Proper Nouns
• A proper noun names a particular person, place, or thing.
• Some proper nouns contain more than one word.
• Days of the week, months of the year, and holidays are proper
nouns.
• A person’s title is a proper noun.
Read each sentence. Then write it correctly on the line.
1. This story takes place in the state of west virginia.
2. marty hopes that dad will go to see judd travers.
3. marty thinks that he can earn money by delivering papers on fridays.
4. If marty fnds work in town, he can pay doc murphy.
5. marty looks for work in friendly, west virginia.
6. dara lynn brushes shiloh with an old hairbrush.
7. Even david howard had something to say about the dog.
8. marty asks mr. wallace about delivering newspapers.
9. Marty’s father’s name is ray preston.
10. By sunday, marty must bring the dog back to mr. travers.
34 Shiloh • Grade 5/Unit 2
At Home: List the days of the week and the months of the
year. Using these nouns, write 10 sentences.
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Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• A proper noun always begins with a capital letter.
• When a proper noun contains more than one word, capitalize
each important word.
• Capitalize the first letter of a common noun only if it is the first
word in a sentence.
Write a proper noun that names an example of each common noun.
1. day of the week

2. month

3. name of a state

4. name of a country

5. name of a holiday

Write the following sentences correctly.
6. marty thinks it’s strange having shiloh in the house.
7. marty could work on thursdays, fridays, and saturdays.
8. He could work in july, and in august, too.
9. marty talks about shiloh with dara lynn and becky.
10. At the grocery store, mr. wallace sees marty looking at the bulletin board.
Shiloh • Grade 5/Unit 2 35
At Home: Draw a scene from the story and label common
and proper nouns. Then write a one-sentence caption.
Grammar
Name
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Proofreading
• Capitalize every proper noun.
• Capitalize important words in proper nouns with more than
one word.
• Capitalize common nouns only when they begin a sentence.
Circle capitalization mistakes. Then rewrite the passage correctly.
marty preston takes home a runaway Dog. It seems to marty as though
the dog has been mistreated by his Owner, judd travers. mr. travers has the
reputation of being mean and nasty.
mr. and mrs. preston, Marty’s Parents, know that their son has grown fond
of the dog, whom he has named shiloh. marty takes the dog to the Animal
Doctor, doc murphy. judd travers is angry when he fnds out that the Dog has
been injured. mr. preston says that his son will pay for the Animal Doctor.













36 Shiloh • Grade 5/Unit 2
At Home: Make up a short story about a stray animal
including the day, month, and place of the story.
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Grammar
Name
Test: Common and
Proper Nouns
In the sentences below, underline each common noun once.
Underline proper nouns twice. Rewrite each sentence correctly.
1. shiloh is a runaway Dog that marty rescues.
2. Marty tells mr. Travers why He brought shiloh to his House.
3. Many People take Their animals to doc murphy.
4. everyone hopes that The Dog will feel better.
5. Mr. wallace has A list of six People for county Carrier.
6. Shiloh leans Away when judd travers reaches out.
7. marty preston lives in friendly, West virginia.
8. Dara lynn brushes Shiloh with an Old Hairbrush.
Shiloh • Grade 5/Unit 2 37
Grammar
Name
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Review: Common
and Proper Nouns
• A noun names a person, place, or thing.
• A common noun names any person, place, or thing.
• A proper noun names a particular person, place, or thing.
• A proper noun begins with a capital letter.
Read each sentence. Underline all nouns. Underline proper nouns
twice.
1. When Dad came home, he found Shiloh in the house.
2. While Marty was in the bathroom, Dad let the dog lick the plate.
3. Marty is worried about paying Doc Murphy’s bill.
4. Ma hums to Shiloh as though he were a baby in a cradle.
5. Mr. Wallace runs a grocery in Friendly, West Virginia.
6. Shiloh is a very friendly dog.
7. At frst, Marty tries to keep Shiloh a secret.
8. Becky feeds the dog little pieces of toast.
9. Marty and Shiloh become great friends.
10. Shiloh is like a member of the family.
38 Shiloh • Grade 5/Unit 2
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Grammar
Name
Singular and
Plural Nouns
Write the plural of each noun.
1. color

2. pattern

3. food

4. warning

5. sound

6. head

7. bite

8. section

9. button

10. fang

Rewrite each sentence. Correct the underlined nouns.
11. There are 30 different kind of rattlers.


12. Rattlers can be found in almost all 50 state.


13. Rattlers live in different habitat.


14. Canebrake rattlers live in swamp.


• A singular noun names one person, place, or thing.
• A plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing.
• Most plural nouns are formed by adding -s or -es.
Rattlers • Grade 5/Unit 2 39
At Home: Write five sentences about rattlers. Include at
least one plural noun in each sentence.
Grammar
Name
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Making Special
Forms of
Plural Nouns
• Add -es to form the plural of singular nouns that end in s, sh,
ch, or x.
• To form the plural of nouns ending in a consonant and y,
change the y to i and add -es.
• To form the plural of nouns ending in a vowel and y, add -s.
Write the plural of each noun.
1. enemy

2. valley

3. moss

4. bush

5. country

6. inch

7. box

8. baby

9. patch

10. family

Read each sentence. On the line provided, write the correct plural
for each underlined word.
11. Squirrels and rabbits make good lunch

for rattlers.
12. Rattlers live in deserts and prairies rather than in city

.
13. The McCrystals spend many day

helping protect
rattlers.
14. Sometimes coyotes and fox

eat rattlers.
40 Rattlers • Grade 5/Unit 2
At Home: Write a short paragraph about rattlesnakes.
Include five plurals of nouns that end in y, s, ch, sh, or x.
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Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• In a friendly letter, the greeting, the closing, and all of the
proper nouns begin with capital letters.
• An abbreviation is the shortened form of a word.
• Most abbreviations end with a period.
• Begin the abbreviation for a proper noun with a capital letter.
Correct the letter. Put capital letters and periods where needed.
12 oak st
beeville, tx 78102
january 14, 2008
dear grandpa,
On february 16, a scientist will talk to our class about rattlesnakes. The
scientist is dr Tom madison. He’s going to show us a film of a rattlesnake
being milked to get its venom! I can’t wait!
love,
luke
Rattlers • Grade 5/Unit 2 41
At Home: Write a letter about something you learned from
reading “Rattlers!” Include at least two abbreviations.
Grammar
Name
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Proofreading
• A singular noun names one person, place, or thing.
• A plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing.
• Most plural nouns are formed by adding -s.
• Add -es to form the plural of singular nouns that end in s, sh,
ch, or x.
• To form the plural of nouns ending in a consonant and y,
change the y to i and add -es.
• To form the plural of nouns ending in a vowel and y, add -s.
Rewrite each sentence. Correct the plural forms.
1. Dad and I walked across wide stretchs of land.
2. We hiked over tall hills and down into rocky ditchies.
3. We listened for the soundes that rattlers make.
4. Any rattlers nearby could feel vibrationes as we walked.
5. The pites on their faces help them feel our body heat.
6. We knew that they would rather strike rabbites than people.
7. People are enemys of rattlers, though, so we were careful.
8. We saw one long snake with diamond-shaped blotchies on its skin.
9. More snakes could have been hidden in the grassies.
10. We heard a hawk’s crys as we walked back to our car.
42 Rattlers • Grade 5/Unit 2
At Home: Write three sentences that incorrectly use singular
nouns instead of plural nouns. Correct your sentences.
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Grammar
Name
Test: Singular and
Plural Nouns
In each group of words, circle the letter beside the plural noun that
is NOT correct.
1. a. hawks
b. rattlers
c. skys
d. enemies
2. a. targets
b. branchies
c. hikers
d. discoveries
3. a. emergencyes
b. births
c. delays
d. reptiles
4. a. coyotes
b. ashes
c. medicines
d. decoyes
5. a. scents
b. predators
c. gulchs
d. classes
6. a. searchies
b. wetlands
c. creatures
d. crashes
7. a. days
b. gullys
c. mountains
d. seconds
8. a. snakes
b. edges
c. rescues
d. foxs
9. a. masses
b. splashs
c. places
d. temperatures
10. a. memorys
b. tracks
c. mammals
d. diamondbacks
Rattlers • Grade 5/Unit 2 43
Grammar
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Review: Singular
and Plural Nouns
• A singular noun names one person, place, or thing.
• A plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing.
• In a formal letter, the greeting, the closing, and all of the proper
nouns begin with capital letters.
• An abbreviation is the shortened form of a word.
Rewrite each sentence, correcting any mistakes. Look for incorrect
plurals and abbreviations. Check your work with a partner.
1. There are many different kindes of rattlesnakes.
2. Rattlers live in almost all parts of the Us.
3. Sometimes rattlers warn their enemys before biting them.
4. Rattlesnakes have live babys instead of laying eggs.
5. Rattlers can be different sizes, from 20 to 48 inchies.
6. The american international rattlesnake museum is in albuquerque, new
mex. 87104.
7. The museum is open Mon. through sun almost all year.
8. It is closed on major holidayes, though.
44 Rattlers • Grade 5/Unit 2
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Grammar
Name
More Plural Nouns
Write the plural of each noun.
1. thief

2. leaf

3. roof

4. half

5. chief

Read each sentence. On the line provided, write the correct form of
any incorrect plural nouns.
6. Library shelf are flled with books about brave people.

7. They may have acted to improve or to save other people’s life.

8. They often acted to defend strong belief.

9. Women who acted bravely were often wife and mothers.

10. They sometimes sacrifced themself to help others in need.

• To form the plural of most nouns ending in f or fe, add -s.
• For other nouns, change the f to v and add -es.
Maya Lin • Grade 5/Unit 2 45
At Home: Write a paragraph about someone who acted
bravely. Include two plurals of nouns that end in f or fe.
Grammar
Name
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More Plural Nouns
• To form the plural of nouns that end with a vowel and o, add -s.
• To form the plural of nouns that end with a consonant and o,
add -s or -es.
• Some nouns have special forms.
• A few nouns have the same singular and plural forms.
Write the plural of each noun.
1. radio

2. piano

3. stereo

4. banjo

5. kangaroo

Read each sentence. On the line provided, write the correct form of
any incorrect plural nouns.
6. Learning about the past is like hearing echos from history.

7. Monuments and museums help us remember American heros.

8. Architect Maya Lin designed a civil rights monument that is nine foots
high.
9. Memorials have been built to honor both men and womans.

10. We can learn about brave people by reading books or watching
videoes.
46 Maya Lin • Grade 5/Unit 2
At Home: Find and circle all of the plural nouns in a
newspaper article that end in -s or -es.
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Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• To form the plural of most nouns ending in f or fe, add -s.
• For other nouns, change the f to v and add -es.
• To form the plural of nouns that end with a vowel and o, add -s.
• To form the plural of nouns that end with a consonant and o,
add -s or -es.
• Some nouns have special forms.
• A few nouns have the same singular and plural forms.
Write the plural of each noun.
1. silo

6. tomato

2. calf

7. sheep

3. mouse

8. goose

4. ox

9. yourself

5. igloo

10. gentleman

Rewrite each sentence. Correct the underlined nouns.
11. The leafs of 700 trees shade the National Museum of the American Indian.
12. More than 150 different specieses of plants are on the museum grounds.
13. One museum show tells about American Indian believes about the universe.
14. A café at the museum serves foods the American Indians cooked, such
as cakes made from mashed potatos.
Maya Lin • Grade 5/Unit 2 47
At Home: Write four sentences that use the correct plural
forms of nouns ending in f, fe, and o.
Grammar
Name
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Proofreading
• To form the plural of most nouns ending in f or fe, add -s.
• For other nouns, change the f to v and add -es.
• To form the plural of nouns that end with a vowel and o, add -s.
• To form the plural of nouns that end with a consonant and o,
add -s or -es.
• Some nouns have special forms.
• A few nouns have the same singular and plural forms.
Read the following paragraph. Then rewrite the paragraph,
changing any incorrect plural nouns.
Adults and childs enjoy visiting the National Air and Space Museum.
This museum has the largest collection of aircraftes in the world. It is hard to
believe that persones few in some of those early planes. They were brave to
risk their lifes.
48 Maya Lin • Grade 5/Unit 2
At Home: Write five sentences that include plural nouns
ending in f, fe, or o.
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Grammar
Name
Test: Plural Nouns
In each group of words, circle the letter beside the plural noun that
is NOT correct.
1. a. selves
b. scarfs
c. igloos
d. deer
2. a. people
b. pianos
c. knives
d. discoverys
3. a. mice
b. chieves
c. patios
d. gentlemen
4. a. roofs
b. series
c. childrens
d. radios
5. a. lifes
b. predators
c. yourselves
d. tomatoes
6. a. heroes
b. leafs
c. wolves
d. feet
7. a. stereoes
b. themselves
c. women
d. banjos
8. a. wives
b. videos
c. tooths
d. oxen
9. a. studioes
b. species
c. aircraft
d. autos
10. a. shelves
b. men
c. calfs
d. thieves
Maya Lin • Grade 5/Unit 2 49
Grammar
Name
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Review: Plural Nouns
• To form the plural of most nouns ending in f or fe, add -s.
• For other nouns, change the f to v and add -es.
• To form the plural of nouns that end with a vowel and o, add -s.
• To form the plural of nouns that end with a consonant and o,
add -s or -es.
• Some nouns have special forms.
• A few nouns have the same singular and plural forms.
Rewrite each sentence, correcting the plural nouns.
1. Our family took a lot of photoies when we visited Muir Woods.
2. Using a map, we explored the woods by ourselfs.
3. Some of the redwoods we saw were hundreds of foots tall.
4. We saw trouts in Redwood Creek.
5. We saw foxes, but we did not see any wolfs.
6. Many specieses of plants and animals live in the woods.
7. Animals in the woods may be as large as deers or as small as moles.
8. Visitors to Muir Woods should turn off their radioes.
50 Maya Lin • Grade 5/Unit 2
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Grammar
Name
Possessive Nouns
Write the possessive form of each noun.
1. sister

2. lady

3. driver

4. friend

5. balcony

Rewrite each sentence. Write the correct possessive for each
underlined noun.
11. Amalia idea was a good one.


12. She suggested that they ask José Manuel grandma to let him play.


13. As they planned, the girls bought ice cream from a vendor cart.


14. The sisters watched a vendor fll a woman basket with vegetables.


• A possessive noun is a noun that shows who or what owns or
has something.
• A singular possessive noun is a singular noun that shows
ownership.
• Form a singular possessive noun by adding an apostrophe (’)
and an -s to a singular noun.
6. tree

7. port

8. night

9. moon

10. sea

The Night of San Juan • Grade 5/Unit 2 51
At Home: Write a short paragraph about a new friend.
Include at least three possessive nouns.
Grammar
Name
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Plural
Possessive Nouns
• A singular possessive noun is a singular noun that shows
ownership.
• A plural possessive noun is a plural noun that shows
ownership.
• To form the possessive of a plural noun that ends in s, add an
apostrophe.
• To form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in s,
add an apostrophe and -s.
Read each sentence. Write the correct possessive noun on the line.
1. José Manuel found the three girls note in the basket.

2. All the houses balconies had beautiful railings.

3. Both doors hinges squeaked.

4. Grandmas frown made them feel a little frightened.

5. Amalia called her sisters names to get their attention.

6. The girls smelled the corn fritters aroma, so they stayed longer.

7. When the girls got home, Mamis face showed that she was upset.

8. The sisters hadn’t asked their mothers permission to invite José Manuel.

9. The childrens trip to the beach was special because José Manuel
joined them.

10. Evelyns wish for José Manuel will come true.

52 The Night of San Juan • Grade 5/Unit 2
At Home: Describe what it’s like to eat something truly
delicious. Include at least five singular or plural possessive
nouns.
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Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• Most singular nouns do not end in s. To show the possessive
form, add an apostrophe and -s to a singular noun.
• To form the possessive of a plural noun that ends in s, add an
apostrophe.
• To form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in s,
add an apostrophe and -s.
• Do not confuse plural possessive nouns with plural nouns.
Study each underlined noun in these paragraphs. If it is correct,
write Correct on the line with the matching number. If it is not,
write the correct form.
Puerto Rico is a commonwealth of the United States. (1) Puerto
Ricos’ name means “rich port” in Spanish. The (2) islands people
celebrate holidays with (3) festival’s. One of the (4) tradition’s there is
walking backward into the sea at midnight. This is done to bring good
luck during the next year.
The streets of Old San Juan are paved with special bricks. The
(5) brick’s light-absorbing (6) qualities’ are said to make them show
special colors. (7) Tourists’ time is often spent exploring the colorful
(8) shop’s of Old San Juan.
1. 5.
2. 6.
3. 7.
4. 8.
The Night of San Juan • Grade 5/Unit 2 53
At Home: Choose three nouns from this page and write
a sentence for each noun, using either the plural or the
possessive.
Grammar
Name
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Proofreading
• A possessive noun is a noun that shows who or what owns or
has something.
• A singular possessive noun is a singular noun that shows
ownership.
• Form a singular possessive noun by adding an apostrophe (’)
and -s to a singular noun.
• A plural possessive noun is a plural noun that shows
ownership.
• To form the possessive of a plural noun that ends in s, add an
apostrophe.
• To form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in s,
add an apostrophe and -s.
Read the following paragraph. Then rewrite the paragraph,
correcting any mistakes in singular and plural possessive nouns
and plural nouns.
In Old San Juan, three sisters notice that José Manuel never gets to play
outside. The girls’ decide to help him. They hurry through the square and see a
vegetable vendor who can send a note to José Manuel. After reading the note,
José Manuel drop’s a ball. The girls’ return the ball and ask José Manuels
grandma whether he can join their familys trip to the beach that night.
54 The Night of San Juan • Grade 5/Unit 2
At Home: Write a short story that includes four singular and
four plural possessive nouns.
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Grammar
Name
Test:
Possessive Nouns
Rewrite each sentence, using the correct form of the possessive nouns.
1. Puerto Ricos mild climate makes it a popular place to visit.


2. The islands capital and largest city is San Juan.

3. The citizens main language is Spanish.

4. In the evenings, tree frogs chirps can be heard.

5. The streets interesting color comes from Spanish stones.

6. Touring Old San Juan on foot is a good idea because of the citys steep
streets.


7. Old San Juans main square has four statues.

8. One of the nations main attractions is a fort called El Morro.


9. From this forts walls, the views of San Juan Bay are amazing.


10. Several museums exhibits tell about the history of San Juan.


The Night of San Juan • Grade 5/Unit 2 55
Grammar
Name
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Review:
Possessive Nouns
• A possessive noun is a noun that shows who or what owns or
has something.
• A singular possessive noun is a singular noun that shows
ownership.
• Form a singular possessive noun by adding an apostrophe (’)
and -s to a singular noun.
• A plural possessive noun is a plural noun that shows
ownership.
• To form the possessive of a plural noun that ends in s, add an
apostrophe.
• To form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in s,
add an apostrophe and -s.
• Do not confuse plural possessive nouns with plural nouns.
Rewrite each sentence below, adding apostrophes to all the
possessive nouns. Be sure that you do not confuse plurals with
possessives.
1. The three sisters note probably confused José Manuel at frst.
2. He fgured out the notes meaning quickly, though.
3. The three girls visit gave José Manuel hope.
4. Aitzas excuse seemed cowardly.
5. The full moons glow made the night special.
56 The Night of San Juan • Grade 5/Unit 2
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Grammar
Name
Plurals and
Possessives
Underline each noun that names more than one person, place, or
thing. (Some sentences contain more than one plural noun.)
1. Bob Lemmons rode to the bluff’s edge and looked down at the other
cowboys.
2. They were just beginning to do their morning chores.
3. Bob’s horse, Warrior, was eager to run across the plains.
4. Bob looked at the ground for tracks and other clues.
5. In the afternoon, he saw the hoofprints of mustangs.
6. Bob got down on his hands and knees to study the tracks.
7. Bob’s knowledge did not come from books.
8. He could study the ground and tell about the animals that had been there.
9. He made the horses accept him as though he were one of them.
10. Bob looked for eight mares, a colt, and a stallion that had passed two
days earlier.
• A plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing.
• Add -s or -es to most nouns to form the plural. Do not use an
apostrophe.
• A possessive noun shows who or what owns or has
something.
Black Cowboy, Wild Horses
Grade 5/Unit 2
57
At Home: Brainstorm a list of plural nouns that tell about
what a cowboy’s daily chores might be.
Grammar
Name
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Plurals and
Possessives
• A possessive noun shows who or what owns or has
something.
• Add an apostrophe and -s to a singular noun to make it
possessive.
• Add an apostrophe to make most plural nouns possessive.
Read these paragraphs and study the noun choices in
parentheses. In each case, draw a line under the correct noun
form.
Bob knew that he had to have the (earth’s/earths) smell on him before the
(horses/horses’) would accept him. He couldn’t even build a fre because the
animals could smell the smoke on his clothes from (miles’/miles) away.
At the (dawn’s/dawns) early light, Bob saddled up to search for the herd.
When a storm struck, Warrior reared and pawed at the air with his (hooves’/
hooves). Lightning brightened the sky, and Bob saw the (mustangs’/
mustangs) for the frst time.
The storm had washed away the (herds, herd’s) tracks, but Bob knew
where to look for them. He rode to the big river and waited. Finally, the
herd arrived. The lead stallion sniffed the air and looked in (Bobs, Bob’s)
direction. Bob remained perfectly still. When the (horses/horse’s) began to
graze, he knew he had been accepted. If the stallion trusted him, Bob would
have the (mares’/mares) trust, too.
58
Black Cowboy, Wild Horses
Grade 5/Unit 2
At Home: Write four sentences: two sentences with plural
nouns and two sentences with possessive nouns.
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Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• Capitalize the first word, the last word, and all of the important
words in a title.
• Underline or use italics for titles of books, newspapers,
magazines, or movies.
• Put quotation marks around titles of poems, short stories,
songs, articles, and book chapters.
Correct each sentence. Underline titles of books, newspapers,
magazines, and movies. Put quotation marks around titles of any
poems, short stories, songs, articles, and book chapters. Be sure
to capitalize all of the important words in titles.
1. The book black cowboy, wild horses was written by Julius Lester.
2. Bob Lemmons was a real cowboy who is mentioned in another book called
the mustangs.
3. An artist helped him turn his story, the man who was a horse, into a picture
book.
4. Some well-known songs are about cowboys, such as Home on the Range
and Back in the Saddle Again.
5. A friend of mine wrote a poem called riding the open range.
Black Cowboy, Wild Horses
Grade 5/Unit 2
59
At Home: Write five sentences that include the title of a
book, magazine, short story, poem, movie, or song.
Grammar
Name
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Proofreading
• A plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing.
• Add -s or -es to most nouns to form the plural. Do not use an
apostrophe.
• A possessive noun shows who or what owns or has
something.
• Add an apostrophe and -s to a singular noun to make it
possessive.
• Add an apostrophe to make most plural nouns possessive.
Read the following paragraph. Then rewrite the paragraph,
correcting mistakes in the formation of singular and plural
possessive nouns and plural nouns.
Cowboy’s spent a lot of time on horseback. Horses’ allowed them to
cover great distances when herding ranchers cattle. The cowboys rode horses
called mustangs. Mustangs were fast and strong, so they made good cow
ponie’s. The mustang’s had to be tamed before anyone could ride them.
60
Black Cowboy, Wild Horses
Grade 5/Unit 2
At Home: Write a sentence that contains both the
possessive and plural forms of the same noun.
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Grammar
Name
Test:
Plurals and
Possessives
A. Read each group of words. Write Plural if the underlined noun
names more than one person, place, or thing. Write Possessive
if the underlined noun shows ownership.
1. the corral’s gate

2. the cowboys at the ranch

3. a stallion’s hooves

4. all the horses’ dark eyes

5. muscles and bones in their bodies

6. the herd’s leader

B. Read each sentence below. On the line, write correctly any word
that needs an apostrophe. If no apostrophes are needed in a
sentence, write None after the sentence.
7. The mustangs began to follow Bob.

8. Bobs horse, Warrior, swerved as they reached the corral.

9. The other horses moved into the fenced area.

10. Warriors whinnies told Bob that his horse longed to run free.

Black Cowboy, Wild Horses
Grade 5/Unit 2
61
Grammar
Name
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Review:
Plurals and
Possessives
• A plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing.
• Add -s or -es to most nouns to form the plural. Do not use an
apostrophe.
• A possessive noun shows who or what owns or has
something.
• Add an apostrophe and -s to a singular noun to make it
possessive.
• Add an apostrophe to make most plural nouns possessive.
Read each sentence below, and fill in the blank with a possessive
or plural noun. Underline or add quotation marks to any titles.
Circle any words in a title that should have capital letters.
1. Bob Lemmons was a cowboy whose job was to fnd a herd
of wild

.
2. Julius Lester frst told the story of

life in a book called
long journey home: stories from black history.
3. Bob Lemmon found the herd by following the


hoofprints on the ground.
4. When Bob heard a

rattle and saw a colt fall, he knew
that it was time to challenge the lead stallion.
• Capitalize the first word, the last word, and all of the important
words in a title.
• Underline or use italics for titles of books, newspapers,
magazines, or movies.
• Put quotation marks around titles of poems, short stories,
songs, articles, and book chapters.
62
Black Cowboy, Wild Horses
Grade 5/Unit 2
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Grammar
Name
Nouns
Read the passages below and look at the underlined sections. Is
there a mistake in the underlined section? What type of mistake is
it? Circle the letter of your answer.
Marty had hoped that Shiloh would be better by the time Judd Travers came
to claim him. Unfortunately, Shiloh still wore Dr Murphy’s bandage when
(1)
Judd arrived. Judd told Marty to return Shiloh by sunday or there would be
trouble. (2)
1. A. Capitalization
B. Punctuation
C. Spelling
D. No mistake.
Many people are afraid of rattlesnaks, but these snakes rarely bite people. To
(3)
find out more about rattlesnakes, read the article “rattlers!” by Ellen
Lambeth. (4)
3. A. Capitalization
B. Punctuation
C. Spelling
D. No mistake.
National monuments are an important way for us to honor the lifes of people
(5)
who have helped shape our country’s history. For example, the Civil Rights
Memorial reminds us of the many women and man who died fighting for
equal rights. (6)
5. A. Capitalization
B. Punctuation
C. Spelling
D. No mistake.
4. E. Capitalization
F. Punctuation
G. Spelling
H. No mistake.
2. E. Capitalization
F. Punctuation
G. Spelling
H. No mistake.
6. E. Capitalization
F. Punctuation
G. Spelling
H. No mistake.
Unit 2 Review • Grade 5/Unit 2 63
Grammar
Name
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Nouns
Amalia ran after José Manuels red ball as it rolled down the street. She would
(7)
return it to José Manuel and invite him to go to the beach for the Night of San
Juan. She worried that it would be difficult for him to get his grandmother’s
permission. (8)
7. A. Capitalization
B. Punctuation
C. Spelling
D. No mistake.
Bob Lemmons could read the land like a book. If he saw an animals’ paw
(9)
prints on the ground, he could tell which animal had made them and when.
He loved to track mustangs across the plains. A Rodeo’s fences and ropes
were not for Bob. (10)
9. A. Capitalization
B. Punctuation
C. Spelling
D. No mistake.
8. E. Capitalization
F. Punctuation
G. Spelling
H. No mistake.
10. E. Capitalization
F. Punctuation
F. Spelling
H. No mistake.
64 Unit 2 Review • Grade 5/Unit 2
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Grammar
Name
Action Verbs
• A verb is a word that shows what the subject of a sentence
does or is.
• An action verb is a word that expresses action. It tells what a
subject does or did.
Write the action verb on the line following the sentence. If the
sentence does not contain an action verb, leave the line blank.
1. Many Americans opposed King George’s laws.
2. Sam Adams and John Hancock were two famous patriots.
3. Henry’s father sold various items in his shop.
4. General Thomas Gage was the new royal governor.
5. In June of 1774, King George closed the harbor.
6. The harbor’s closing stopped trade.
7. Henry walked by Province House on his way to school.
8. Only King George’s ships sailed out of the harbor.
9. Henry’s father drew the maps.
10. King George’s top general lived in Province House.
Sleds on Boston Common
Grade 5/ Unit 3
65
At Home: Describe the situation in Boston in 1774. Use
action verbs to write your description.
Grammar
Name
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Action Verbs
• An action verb is a word that tells what happens or happened.
• A verb must agree with its subject. A singular subject takes a
singular verb. A plural subject takes a plural verb.
• Add -s to most verbs in the present tense if the subject is
singular.
• If the subject is plural, the verb must be plural. Do not add -s to
the verb if the subject is a plural noun.
Circle each action verb in these sentences. If the verb does not
agree with the subject, write the correct verb on the line following
the sentence. All sentences should be in the present tense.
1. Rebels fghts for independence.
2. The British troops destroys the children’s snow forts.
3. Henry’s father make a sled for Henry.
4. The soldiers break the ice in the pond.
5. Henry’s brothers walks to school with Henry.
6. General Gage help the children.
7. King George punishes the colonists.
8. The children pulls their sleds through the snow.
66
Sleds on Boston Common
Grade 5/ Unit 3
At Home: Write six present-tense sentences with action
verbs, checking for subject-verb agreement.
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Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• A verb must agree with its subject. A singular subject takes a
singular verb. A plural subject takes a plural verb.
• Add -s to most verbs in the present tense if the subject is
singular.
• If the subject is plural, the verb must be plural. Do not add -s to
the verb if the subject is a plural noun.
Think about the story “Sleds on Boston Common.” Then use a
verb from the box to complete each sentence in a way that makes
sense. On the line following each sentence, write whether the
subject of the sentence is singular or plural.
practice listen camps rides brings
ride camp bring studies listens
1. Henry his sled down the hill.
2. General Gage to Henry.
3. The British soldiers on Boston Common.

4. Henry’s sister corn bread and apple jam to the school.

5. The children handwriting at school.
Sleds on Boston Common
Grade 5/ Unit 3
67
At Home: Write six sentences using action verbs: three
sentences with singular subjects, and three sentences with
plural subjects.
Grammar
Name
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Proofreading
In the passage below, circle verbs that don’t agree with their
subjects. Also, circle mistakes in spelling, capitalization, or
punctuation. Then rewrite the passage, adding commas where
needed.
The sun rest over the still water. Henry, joshua and Nathan sit at the edge
of the pier and gaze out at the empty sea. The only movement in the harbur
is at the far end, where British soldiers are getting a ship ready to sail.
Joshua, the yungest man in the group, reach into his pockets. “I have no
money,” he announces to Henry and nathan.
Nathan looks at Joshua and says “None of us has money,”
Henry run his fngers through his grey hair and says, “we need to get back
to work.” He pauses and looks out at the sea? “We need our harbor back.”
• Be sure that the verb agrees with the subject.
• Be sure that each sentence begins with a capital letter and
ends with the correct punctuation mark.
• Use commas to separate three or more words or phrases in a series.
68
Sleds on Boston Common
Grade 5/ Unit 3
At Home: Write a short passage and ask a helper to correct
any mistakes.
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Grammar
Name
Test: Action Verbs
A. Write the action verb on the line that follows each sentence.
1. The students walk home for lunch.
2. Henry wears mittens and boots.
3. The soldiers dress in red coats.
4. General Gage’s children live in England.
5. The children play together.
6. Some soldiers work at a fort.
B. Change the verbs so that they agree with the subjects. Keep the
sentences in the present tense.
7. Americans pays taxes to King George.
8. Henry color the maps.
9. Mr. Andrews teach the lessons.
10. British ships sails out to sea.
11. Henry study hard at school.
12. Henry’s friends worries about the harbor.
Sleds on Boston Common
Grade 5/ Unit 3
69
Grammar
Name
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Review: Action Verbs
• An action verb is a word that tells what happens or happened.
• A verb must agree with its subject. A singular subject takes a
singular verb. A plural subject takes a plural verb.
• Add -s to most verbs in the present tense if the subject is
singular.
• If the subject is plural, the verb must be plural. Do not add -s to
the verb if the subject is a plural noun.
Pretend that you live in Boston in the winter of 1774. Write a
passage about your experiences. Keep your passage in the
present tense, and use action verbs in each sentence.















70
Sleds on Boston Common
Grade 5/ Unit 3
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Grammar
Name
Present Tense
• A verb in the present tense tells what is happening now.
• To form present-tense singular verbs, add -s to most verbs.
Add -es to verbs that end in s, ss, ch, sh, x, or z.
• If a verb ends with a consonant and y, change the y to i before
adding -es.
Read each sentence. Change the underlined verb in the sentence
to the correct form of the present tense.
1. Esther Morris tryes to change the law.

2. Colonel William Bright agree with Esther.

3. Benjamin Sheeks postpone the discussion until the Fourth of July.
4. Mr. Sheeks wishs he didn’t misbehave in court.

5. Colonel Bright fnished his career in Washington, D.C.

6. The professor pile the stones in South Pass City.

7. She rememberes what happened in South Pass City.

8. The Secretary of State announce a change to the Constitution.
9. Time pass before the United States Constitution changes.
10. Wyoming give women the right to vote before any other state.
When Esther Morris Headed West
Grade 5/Unit 3
71
At Home: Write four sentences, using the verbs try, wish,
announce, and change in the present tense.
Grammar
Name
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Past Tense and
Future Tense
• A verb in the past tense tells about an action that already
happened.
• If a verb ends in e, drop the e before adding -ed.
• If a verb ends in one vowel and one consonant, double the
consonant before adding -ed.
• If a verb ends in a consonant and y, change y to i before adding
-ed.
• A verb in the future tense tells about an action that is going to
happen. To write about the future, use the word will in front of
the verb.
Complete each sentence with the past tense of one of the verbs in
the box above.
1. Both men and women

in elections.
2. Women in Wyoming

the right to vote.
3. She

stones to build a memorial.
4. The government

the Constitution.
Complete each sentence with the future tense of one of the verbs
in the box above.
5. Much time

before the Constitution changes again.
6. Many people

Esther Morris forever.
7. The mayor of South Pass City

the citizens to a
dedication ceremony.
8. Esther Morris

as a judge in South Pass City.
collect change remember invite
pass gain serve vote
72
When Esther Morris Headed West
Grade 5/Unit 3
At Home: Choose five verbs, and use them in the present,
past, and future tenses in sentences.
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Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• In poetry, a line may not be a complete thought or sentence.
A thought or sentence may “break” into two or more lines.
• If a line of poetry ends with a comma or a period, the reader
should pause. No pause is necessary if a line ends without
punctuation.
• In many poems, each new line begins with a capital letter.
Rewrite the poem. Punctuate it correctly, using commas and periods
where necessary. Be sure to capitalize letters correctly. Next to each line
of the poem, write whether the line is written in the past, present, or future
tense.
The windows, like eyes, will help all people see

you can’t shut all the doors and call people “free”

People break through the glass to take back their rights

And run out of darkness and into the light.

women, like warriors, fought for their Votes,

took back their freedom, and realized their hopes?

All was well once esther morris went west

She had a vision to change the law for the best









When Esther Morris Headed West
Grade 5/Unit 3
73
At Home: Write an original poem about something you care
about.
Grammar
Name
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Proofreading
• A verb in the present tense tells what is happening now.
• A verb in the past tense tells about an action that already
happened.
• A verb in the future tense tells about an action that is going to
happen.
Rewrite the following passage. Change incorrect verbs to the
proper tenses. Correct any errors in capitalization or punctuation.
Esther morris traveled by carriage to South pass city, When she arrived,
she thought, “I will paid a call on Colonel William Bright.” colonel Bright
was busy getting his beard trimmed, so she wait outside of the barber shop.
After some time will pass, Mr. Benjamin Sheeks walked by and asked her
if she thought South Pass City was a pleasant place to visit. Esther say that her
vote was yes to that question. Mr. Sheeks was surprise by her reply. He said
that women were not allowed to vote. Esther will smile, and asked him why he
had asked her the question if he thought she couldn’t have an opinion.
74
When Esther Morris Headed West
Grade 5/Unit 3
At Home: Write a short story about someone like Esther.
Choose either present, past, or future tense for the story.
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Grammar
Name
Test: Verb Tenses
Read each sentence. Change the underlined verb in the the
sentence to a verb in the past tense.
1. Women have the right to vote in Wyoming in 1869.

2. The physician determine that voting was safe for women.

3. The man will refuse to hand over the court docket.

4. Esther Morris challenges the law that prevented women from voting.
Choose the correct name for the tense of the underlined verb in
each sentence. Circle your answer.
5. Mr. Sheeks apologized for his 7. Mr. Sheeks went to Salt Lake
behavior. City.
a. present a. present
b. past b. past
c. future c. future
6. Gold fever will bring more 8. People remember Esther
people to Wyoming. Morris.
a. present a. present
b. past b. past
c. future c. future
When Esther Morris Headed West
Grade 5/Unit 3
75
Grammar
Name
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Review: Verb Tenses
• A verb in the present tense tells what is happening now.
• To form present-tense singular verbs, add -s to most verbs.
Add -es to verbs that end in s, ss, ch, sh, x, or z.
• If a verb ends with a consonant and y, change the y to i before
adding -es.
• A verb in the past tense tells about an action that already
happened. Add -ed to most verbs to show past tense.
• A verb in the future tense tells about an action that is going to
happen. To write about the future, use the verb will.
Rewrite the sentences. Spell all the verbs correctly.
1. Everybody worryes about their rights.


2. Nobody will forgett the day that Esther Morris came to Wyoming.


3. Mr. Sheeks argueed against allowing women to vote.


4. The professor invitd the inhabitants of South Pass City to the ceremony.




5. Esther Morris tryed very hard to be a fair judge.


6. She singes as she pass by the courthouse.


7. In 1920, all women gaineded the right to vote.


8. Nineteen people will attends the dedication ceremony.




76
When Esther Morris Headed West
Grade 5/Unit 3
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Grammar
Name
Main and
Helping Verbs
• The main verb in a sentence shows what the subject does or is.
• A helping verb helps the main verb show an action or make a
statement.
• Have, has, and had are helping verbs.
Read the sentences. Underline the helping verb. Circle the main
verb.
1. Scientists have discovered global warming.
2. Acid rain has occurred before.
3. Everyone has become more enlightened on the subject.
4. Fifth graders in Michigan have established Environmental Awareness
Day.
5. Scientists have researched how long our natural resources might last.
6. Recycling glass bottles has saved a lot of electricity.
7. We have begun to see positive results.
8. Animals in the wilderness have suffered from pollution.
9. The standard of living has improved steadily.
10. People had believed that technology was the answer to every problem.
Beyond the Horizon • Grade 5/Unit 3 77
At Home: Write three sentences about the environment
using have, has, and had and verbs ending in -ed.
Grammar
Name
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More Helping Verbs
• Is, are, am, was, and were can be helping verbs.
• Forms of be can be used as helping verbs. Make sure that the
helping verb agrees with the subject. Use is and was with a
singular subject. Use are and were with a plural subject or you.
Use am or was with I.
Choose a form of be as a helping verb in each sentence.
1. The students working to create a safer and more
healthful environment.
2. I trying to recycle all of my cans and bottles.
3. The world risking the danger of global warming.
4. Acid rain harming trees and wild animals.
5. Environmental organizations growing around the
world.
6. The result showing up in improved living standards
worldwide.
7. Years ago, scientists becoming concerned about the
effects of technology.
8. McDougald’s class sending out a message about our
responsibility to protect the wilderness.
9. I doing my part to protect the forests of America.
10. Once more, parks becoming beautiful places to picnic.
78 Beyond the Horizon • Grade 5/Unit 3
At Home: Write a short essay using as many helping verbs
as possible.
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Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• A contraction is a shortened form of two words.
• A contraction can be made by combining certain verbs with the
word not.
• Sometimes the form of the verb changes when the verb
becomes part of a contraction.
Rewrite each sentence. Write a contraction in place of the underlined words.
1. Many people are not concerned about global warming.


2. Natural resources will not last forever.


3. People cannot continue to throw away recyclables.


4. Do not ignore environmental warnings because they could greatly affect
our future.




5. It is not helpful to try to recycle materials that cannot be recycled.


6. Some people are not educated on the importance of recycling plastic.




7. Have not you considered the long-term effects of technology?




8. You should not create your own paths in Graybeard Wilderness.




Beyond the Horizon • Grade 5/Unit 3 79
At Home: Write a dialogue between a child and a park
ranger, using contractions.
Grammar
Name
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Proofreading
• The main verb in a sentence shows what the subject does or is.
• A helping verb helps the main verb show an action or make a
statement.
Rewite the following passage. Change the helping verbs to match
the subject. Add commas where necessary.
According to many scientists around the world, the environment are
getting worse. Global warming am a serious threat to healthy living. I were
a college student in southern Ohio. I has researched the subject, and I had
come to the conclusion that we need to decrease pollution recycle our cans
and bottles and conserve our natural resources. The time have come to take
more responsibility for our actions.
I have begun an environmental organization called Help Us Breathe. Our
group am working to get more people to take a train or bus to work. We also
was trying to educate people on the importance of recycling.












80 Beyond the Horizon • Grade 5/Unit 3
At Home: Write an advertisement for an environmental
organization, using helping and main verbs.
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Grammar
Name
Test:
Main and
Helping Verbs
A. Write a main verb and a helping verb to complete each
sentence.
1. Scientists that global warming will cause many
problems.
2. Trees to make paper.
3. I to recycle more bottles, cans, and paper.
4. Technology very far in the past twenty years.
5. Kof Annan two visions for the future.
B. Write a sentence using each helping verb.
6. (has)
7. (am)
8. (was)
9. (have)
10. (were)
Beyond the Horizon • Grade 5/Unit 3 81
Grammar
Name
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Review:
Contractions
• A contraction is a shortened form of two words.
• A contraction can be made by combining a verb with the word
not.
• An apostrophe shows that the letter o has been left out.
Proofread the sentences to make sure that all contractions are
spelled correctly. Write the correct spelling in the spaces provided.
1. The environment shouldnt be abused.
2. Dont throw that bottle away.
3. Paper isnent supposed to be wasted.
4. I didnet see any signs of the weather changing.
5. Donnt forget to ask your relatives whether they recycle.
6. The children werent worried about the forest.
7. You are’not supposed to walk off the path.
8. Grandpa wasnt happy with technology.
9. Animals and plants cant live healthily in a polluted environment.
10. I haventt seen the new plan for neighborhood recycling.
82 Beyond the Horizon • Grade 5/Unit 3
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Grammar
Name
Linking Verbs
• A linking verb does not show action. A linking verb shows a
state of being or states a condition.
• Common linking verbs are am, is, are, was, were, will be,
seem, appear, look, taste, feel, felt.
• A linking verb links the subject to a noun or an adjective.
• Subjects and linking verbs must agree.
Draw one line under the subject of each sentence. Draw two lines
under the linking verb in each sentence.
1. Fatima was the frst user of the water pump.
2. The people of the village are excited.
3. The water tasted very good.
4. I am proud of my grandmother.
5. We were amazed by the new invention.
Write the correct form of the linking verb be on the line beside
each sentence.
6. My grandmother always (was, am) strong.
7. The people of the village (was, were) mean to my grandmother.
8. The baobab tree (are, is) a great resource for water.
9. I (is, am) a hard worker.
10. You (are, is) extremely smart.
My Great-Grandmother’s Gourd
Grade 5/Unit 3
83
At Home: Write a short letter to Fatima about the water
pump and the baobab tree, using linking verbs.
Grammar
Name
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Linking Verbs
• A linking verb links the subject of a sentence to a noun or an
adjective in the predicate.
• The noun that follows a linking verb renames or identifies the
subject.
• The adjective that follows a linking verb describes the subject.
Read each sentence. Underline the word that is connected to the
subject by a linking verb.
1. The water pump is broken.
2. My grandmother is worried about the baobab trees.
3. I felt proud of my grandmother’s accomplishment.
4. The village was concerned about the lack of water.
5. People in our village seem very thankful for my grandmother’s generosity.
Complete each sentence with a linking verb. Then underline the
word that names or describes the subject.
6. The desert a dry, hot landscape.
7. I thankful for the baobab trees.
8. All of the villagers fascinated with new technology.
9. I a little nervous when no water spilled from the pump.
10. Water better from the baobab tree.
11. The villagers say that she a mysterious old woman.
12. The desert flled with water someday.
84
My Great-Grandmother’s Gourd
Grade 5/Unit 3
At Home: Develop a word search using ten linking verbs.
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Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• Use quotation marks to set off a direct quotation from the rest
of a sentence.
• Use a comma before the quotation when the speaker’s name
comes first.
• Use a comma, a question mark, or an exclamation mark to end
the quotation when the speaker’s name comes last.
Add the correct punctuation to each sentence.
1. People always say The desert is no place for the thirsty dog.
2. My grandmother said, It’s important to have more than one means to get
water.
3. “Hurray ” the people cheered.
4. To survive in the desert, one must be sharp as a cactus said my uncle.
5. How long do you plan on using the water pump? asked my neighbor.
Rewrite the following passage. Add the correct punctuation.
Fatima’s grandmother tapped her on the shoulder. “Fatima, would
you please come with me she asked. Fatima agreed and followed her
grandmother outside the village limits.
When they were away from the villagers, Fatima’s grandmother pointed
to the baobab trees and said, “We should use these trees to store our own
water.
My Great-Grandmother’s Gourd
Grade 5/Unit 3
85
At Home: Write a dialogue between friends living in a
desert.
Grammar
Name
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Proofreading
• A linking verb does not show action. A linking verb
shows a state of being or states a condition.
• A linking verb links the subject of a sentence to a noun or
an adjective in the predicate.
• The noun that follows a linking verb renames or identifies
the subject.
Rewrite the passage. Use the correct verb forms.
The time has come for me to make my journey into the desert. I is only
eighteen. But, all children my age am required to make the journey to be
accepted as adult members of the community. The village chief told me that
it were very important to take plenty of water and materials to build a tent.
The mission seem long and hard. I tastes the fresh water from my
canteen, and the sun feel too hot to bear. I travel many days and many nights.
After seven days, I return home with relief. As I arrive back at my
village, the villagers appears so proud of me.
86
My Great-Grandmother’s Gourd
Grade 5/Unit 3
At Home: Write a few paragraphs about a trip that you have
taken, using linking verbs.
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Grammar
Name
Test: Linking Verbs
Choose the linking verb that best completes the sentence. Circle
the letter of the correct answer.
1. Ibrahim’s words 3. Her grandmother
encouraging. wise.
a. is a. is
b. was b. are
c. am c. be
d. were d. appear
2. She proud of 4. She hopes that the villagers
their culture.

thankful
someday.
a. am a. are
b. appear b. will be
c. seems c. is
d. were d. appear
Choose the word that the linking verb connects to the subject of
the sentence. Circle the letter of the correct answer.
5. The water tastes very fresh. 7. The baobab tree seems healthy for
a. very its age.
b. water a. age
c. fresh b. for
d. tastes c. tree
d. healthy
6. The cactus is taller than most 8. Fatima is very pleased with the
I’ve seen. water pump.
a. taller a. pump
b. most b. Fatima
c. is c. pleased
d. cactus d. is
My Great-Grandmother’s Gourd
Grade 5/Unit 3
87
Grammar
Name
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Review: Linking Verbs
• A linking verb links the subject of a sentence to a noun or an
adjective in the predicate.
• The noun that follows a linking verb renames or identifies the
subject.
• The adjective that follows a linking verb describes the subject.
• Use quotation marks to set off a direct quotation from the rest
of a sentence.
• Use a comma before the quotation when the speaker's name
comes first.
Work with a partner. Take turns reading the sentences aloud. The
person who listens should add a linking verb to each sentence.
Then look at the sentences together. Add quotation marks and the
correct punctuation where necessary.
1. My uncle said Desert sandstorms unbearable.
2. The villagers excited when they see the new water
pump said Ibrahim.
3. Why doesn’t anyone remember that baobab trees
important for survival asked my grandmother
4. I always said that a snake happy in the desert.
5. The journey across the desert magnifcent exclaimed
Carlos
6. I so satisfed with the work that I did to help my
grandmother prepare the baobab tree said Fatima.
88
My Great-Grandmother’s Gourd
Grade 5/Unit 3
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Grammar
Name
Irregular Verbs
• An irregular verb is a verb that does not use -d or -ed to form
the past tense.
Rewrite these sentences. Change all of the incorrect verbs to their
correct past tense forms.
1. Danny fnded a game in the park.
2. The meteorite maked a huge hole in the ceiling.
3. Walter and Danny goed into outer space.
4. Danny throwed the ball at his brother.
5. A pirate ship fied by the boys’ house.
6. The black hole rised over Walter’s body.
7. The spaceship gived off a faint glow.
8. They runned away from the strange vehicle.
Zathura • Grade 5/Unit 3 89
At Home: Write out the present and past tenses of five
irregular verbs.
Grammar
Name
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Irregular Verbs
• An irregular verb is a verb that does not use -d or -ed to form
the past tense.
• Some irregular verbs have special endings when used with the
helping verbs have, has, or had.
Change the following verbs so that they can be used with the
helping verb.
1. begin had
2. choose have
3. eat has
4. drink had
5. take have
6. get has
7. speak had
8. grow has
9. fy have
10. know had
90 Zathura • Grade 5/Unit 3
At Home: Write a short passage about what the future will
be like, using irregular verbs.
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Mechanics
• A verb is used to show action or state a condition.
• Use the present tense of a verb if the action or condition is
happening now.
• Use the past tense of a verb to show an action that has been
completed in the past.
• Some verbs do not take -ed to show the past tense. Remember
which verbs are irregular.
• Some irregular verbs take special endings when they are used
with the helping verbs have, has, or had. Remember which
verbs use an irregular form.
Rewrite the following passage. Correct the underlined verbs.
Centuries ago people thinked that their technology was advanced. They
also believe that space travel was impossible. Our ancestors feeled that they
knowed so much.
Now we known that space travel is possible. We have few on airplanes
and driven in cars. Today’s scientists discovered new things about our world
every day. Today’s medicine fought diseases in many different ways. We are
lucky to live in such an advanced world.
Zathura • Grade 5/Unit 3 91
At Home: Find books about technology and notice the verb
tenses and the irregular verbs in the books.
Grammar
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Proofreading
• Be sure that verbs are in the correct form.
• Be sure that each sentence begins with a capital letter and
ends with the correct punctuation mark.
Circle verbs that are in the incorrect form. Also, circle mistakes in
capitalization and punctuation. Then rewrite the passage, adding
commas where needed.
Luther and i have always been great friends. We have do fun things together
and have saw many crazy sights. Last Thursday we seen the craziest sight ever,
We were walking down an alley when a space alien jumped out from
behind a pile of tall smelly wet trash.
The space alien was large blue, and plump, He moved toward us. He
leaved slimy sludge on the ground when he walked, and he smelled like a
dirty garbage can. when he got close to us, he standed up tall, stretch his four
arms out and wrapped them around us. He gived us a quick, gentle, loving
squeeze and then went back behind the pile of trash.
92 Zathura • Grade 5/Unit 3
At Home: Write a tale about an encounter with a space
alien, including irregular verbs.
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Grammar
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Test: Irregular Verbs
Write the correct form of the irregular verbs in parentheses. Use
the past tense in each sentence.
1. (write) Authors of the past many books about the
future.
2. (break) Danny his brother’s walkie-talkie.
3. (go) The boys’ parents out for the evening.
4. (fall) The robot had down beside the wall.
5. (see) Danny the game leaning against the tree.
6. (give) The game the boys an interesting evening.
7. (think) Walter that his brother was a pain in the neck.
8. (fght) Danny and Walter with each other too much.
9. (eat) They could not see what the alien had .
10. (feel) Danny as though he was dreaming.
11. (spin) The room slowly around.
12. (get) Walter the game before his brother could grab it.
Zathura • Grade 5/Unit 3 93
Grammar
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Review:
Irregular Verbs
• An irregular verb is a verb that does not use -d or -ed to form
the past tense.
• Some irregular verbs have special endings when used with the
helping verbs have, has, or had.
Use at least five of the ten verbs below in a short science fiction
story. Use the past tense form of the verbs.
speak know begin go fly
see throw think fall run
94 Zathura • Grade 5/Unit 3
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Grammar
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Verbs
Read the following sentences. Tell whether the underlined verb
is an action verb, a linking verb, or a helping verb. Then write
whether the verb is written in the present, past, or future tense.
1. The colonists were ready to defend their homes.

2. General Gage will listen closely to the boy’s words.

3. In 1869, the Wyoming legislature voted for women’s rights.

4. Esther Morris demonstrates courage in her actions.

5. My grandmother is working very hard.

6. I am proud to be the frst person to use the new water pump.

7. Walter will show Danny the game board and the card.

8. Danny had rolled the dice with excitement.

Read the following sentences. Choose the verb that completes the
sentence correctly. Circle the letter beside your answer.
9. The American Revolution the colonists about courage
and independence.
a. teached
b. will taught
c. taught
d. teaching
10. Many villagers have using the baobab tree to store
water again.
a. beginned
b. began
c. beganned
d. begun
95 Unit 3 Review • Grade 5/Unit 3
Grammar
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Read the following sentences. Choose the linking verb that completes
the sentence correctly. Circle the letter beside your answer.
11. Esther Morris a great leader and person.
a. were
b. are
c. appear
d. was
12. I ready to roll the dice.
a. am
b. were
c. are
d. appears
Read the following sentences. Choose the action verb that best
completes each sentence. Circle the letter beside your answer.
13. General Gage’s soldiers food over the fre.
a. slept
b. cooked
c. studied
d. played
14. We

to the top of the hill in Boston.
a. swam
b. practiced
c. skated
d. climbed
15. The water pump if too many people use it.
a. breaks
b. starts
c. quickens
d. destroys
16. The villagers

at my grandmother as she dug around
the baobab tree.
a. passed
b. questioned
c. laughed
d. cried
Verbs
96 Unit 3 Review • Grade 5/Unit 3
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Grammar
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• A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns.
• A pronoun may be singular or plural.
• An antecedent is the noun (or nouns) to which a pronoun refers.
On the lines following the sentences, write the antecedents for the
underlined pronouns.
1. ’Tricia Ann was excited because she was going someplace special.


2. “Someplace Special” is important to ’Tricia Ann; it is her favorite spot.


3. Mama Frances said to ’Tricia Ann, “Act like you belong to somebody.”


4. People got on the bus. They were carrying bags of fruits and vegetables.


5. A little boy approached ’Tricia Ann and said that he was six years old.


Read the sentences below. If the underlined pronoun is correct,
write “C.” If the pronoun is incorrect, write the correct pronoun.
6. ’Tricia Ann said that her was ready to go out by herself.


7. When ’Tricia Ann and Mama Frances rode the bus, she had to sit in the
back.

8. At the market, ’Tricia Ann met Mrs. Grannell. We was a friend of Mama
Frances.

9. The bus stopped in the street; it was having engine trouble.


10. Jimmy Lee gave ’Tricia Ann a pretzel, and then they pointed to a sign in
Monroe’s restaurant.

Pronouns and
Antecedents
97
Goin’ Someplace Special
Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Retell a favorite story using as many pronouns as
you can.
Grammar
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Think about “Goin’ Someplace Special.” Then complete each
sentence by writing the correct pronoun or pronouns.
1. “Hurry up,” said Mama Frances, “before

change my mind.”
2. ’Tricia Ann blew her grandmother a kiss, and then

rushed
out the door.
3. Mama Frances told ’Tricia Ann, “Those signs can tell


where to sit, but

can’t tell

what to think.”
4. “

am going to Someplace Special,” thought ’Tricia Ann
as

looked out the window.
5. No seats were left in the rear of the bus.

had been taken
by the crowd of people who got on at the Farmer’s Market.
6. Mrs. Grannell and ’Tricia Ann don’t like the Jim Crow laws.
think the laws are unfair.
7. Jimmy Lee’s brother works in Monroe’s Restaurant, where
is a cook.
8. ’Tricia Ann bought a soda;

helped wash down Jimmy
Lee’s pretzel.
9. When Mr. Willis referred to ’Tricia Ann as an angel,


smiled at

and said, “No sir. It’s just

.”
10. The hotel manager said to ’Tricia Ann, “What makes


think that

can come inside?”
• A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns.
• A singular noun takes a singular pronoun. A plural noun takes a
plural pronoun.
• The antecedent of a pronoun is the noun (or nouns) to which a
pronoun refers.
Pronouns
98
Goin’ Someplace Special
Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: With a helper, look for ten examples of pronouns
in a favorite short story or novel.
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Grammar
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• Pronouns take the place of nouns.
• A singular noun takes a singular pronoun. A plural noun takes a
plural pronoun.
• The antecedent of a pronoun is the noun (or nouns) to which a
pronoun refers.
Each sentence contains an incorrect pronoun. (There are correct
pronouns in some sentences, too.) Rewrite each sentence so that
all of the pronouns are correct.
1. ’Tricia Ann was excited because we was going someplace special by herself.
2. Jim Crow laws upset ’Tricia Ann; she thinks that it are unfair.
3. When ’Tricia Ann glanced at the seats in the front of the bus, she saw that
them were empty.
4. ’Tricia Ann’s grandfather was a stonemason, and they worked on Peace
Fountain.
5. Jimmy Lee agreed with ’Tricia Ann about Jim Crow laws; you, too, thought
they were unfair.
Mechanics
99
Goin’ Someplace Special
Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Write a dialogue about meeting a famous person.
Include different kinds of pronouns in the dialogue.
Grammar
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• A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns.
• A singular noun takes a singular pronoun. A plural noun takes a
plural pronoun.
• The antecedent of a pronoun is the noun (or nouns) to which a
pronoun refers.
Circle the pronouns that do not agree with their antecedents. Then
rewrite the paragraph, using the correct pronouns.
I likes “Goin’ Someplace Special” very much. He is a work of
historical fction. They is set during the time when Jim Crow laws were
in force. It were harsh laws that treated African Americans unfairly. Them
had to sit in the back of buses. Us could not eat at the same restaurants
as white people. The same was true for schools, hotels, swimming pools,
and even drinking fountains. My grandmother says that he remembers
Jim Crow laws. Her says that me wouldn’t have liked living in those
times. We agree with them.
Proofreading
100
Goin’ Someplace Special
Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Write a letter using ten pronouns describing
what you might see and whom you might meet in a city like
’Tricia Ann’s.
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Grammar
Name
Rewrite each sentence so that the pronouns are correct. Underline
the antecedent of each pronoun.
1. ’Tricia Ann asked Mama Frances, “May me go to Someplace Special today?”
2. When the bus arrived, she came to a jerky stop and hissed.
3. ’Tricia Ann bounded up the stairs, and then her dropped the bus fare in
the collection box.
4. When Mrs. Grannell and ’Tricia Ann spoke, he talked about Jim Crow laws.
5. ’Tricia Ann enjoyed the fountain’s spraying waters even though she made
’Tricia Ann dizzy.
6. On the bench was a sign; we read FOR WHITES ONLY.
7. ’Tricia Ann greeted Jimmy Lee, and you handed the girl a pretzel.
8. ’Tricia Ann pulled her shoulders back; her fxed her thoughts on being in a
place that had no Jim Crow signs.
Test: Pronouns
101
Goin’ Someplace Special
Grade 5/ Unit 4
Grammar
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• A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns.
• A singular noun takes a singular pronoun. A plural noun takes a
plural pronoun.
• The antecedent of a pronoun is the noun (or nouns) to which a
pronoun refers.
Think about “Goin’ Someplace Special.” Complete each sentence
by writing the correct pronoun. Underline the antecedent of each
pronoun.
1. When ’Tricia Ann came to the Grand Music Palace, a little boy spoke to
.
2. The boy asked ’Tricia Ann whether

was coming in.
3. Another girl said, “Colored people can’t come in the front door.
got to go ’round back.”
4. Hickey smiled at ’Tricia Ann and then cried to the other girl, “I want to go
where

is going.”
5. Hickey then pulled ’Tricia Ann through the door.

was
now open.
6. ’Tricia Ann did not want to go to the matinee because


was on her way to another place.
7. ’Tricia Ann saw a building rising above everything that surrounded
.
8. Both ’Tricia Ann and Mama Frances loved the library;


felt comfortable there.
9. ’Tricia Ann was glad that Mama Frances had allowed


to go the library.
Review: Pronouns
102
Goin’ Someplace Special
Grade 5/ Unit 4
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Grammar
Name
• Use a subject pronoun as the subject of a sentence.
• I, you, he, she, it, we, and they are subject pronouns.
• Use an object pronoun after an action verb or after a preposition.
• Me, you, him, her, it, us, and them are object pronouns.
Read each sentence. Write the correct subject or object pronoun
on the line.
1. Carlos and Gloria are friends.

have known each other
for a long time.
2. When Gloria and her friend were little, Gloria’s mother propped
on the kitchen table.
3. watched the children as

made
tortillas.
4. Now Carlos wanted Gloria to pay attention to

.
5. Carlos started showing off for

.
6. One evening

saw a familiar skunk.
7. The children had named

Dos Dedos.
8. Carlos said, “

know just how to catch a skunk.”
9. When Carlos grabbed the skunk’s tail, Dos Dedos sprayed Carlos’s
clothes so badly that Carlos had to take

off.
10. At home,

left his shoes at the back door.
Subject and Object
Pronouns
103
Carlos and the Skunk
Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Describe an afternoon playing outside with
friends, using subject and object pronouns.
Grammar
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• Use a subject pronoun as the subject of a sentence.
• Use an object pronoun after an action verb or after a word
such as for, at, of, with, or to.
Correct each sentence by circling the incorrect pronoun and
writing the correct pronoun on the line. Then write whether the
pronoun is a subject or object pronoun.
1. As Carlos and Gloria walked down the road, them saw Dos Dedos.
2. “Me will catch Dos Dedos,” Carlos said.

3. Carlos’s clothes smelled terrible; in fact the smell of they was unbearable.
4. When his mother came into the kitchen, her noticed the smell.
5. Carlos did not want to talk about the smell, so him slipped out the back
door.

6. Carlos picked tomatoes from the garden and squeezed they into the
bathtub.

7. Him scrubbed with a cloth soaked in tomato juice.

8. The next day Carlos went to church; him sat near the back.
9. Carlos was embarrassed by the smell of his shoes; everyone in church
could smell they.

10. At dinner his parents said, “Us think Carlos is unusually quiet.”
Subject and Object
Pronouns
104
Carlos and the Skunk
Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Write a letter telling how your parents reacted to
something you did. Use at least five subject and object pronouns.
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Grammar
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• Subject pronouns are the subjects in a sentence.
• Object pronouns receive the action of a verb or follow a
preposition.
Each sentence contains an incorrect pronoun. (There are correct
pronouns in some sentences, too.) Rewrite each sentence so that
all of the pronouns are correct.
1. Carlos forgot to clean his shoes, so them smelled very bad.
2. Him wore they to church the next day.
3. The priest sneezed as him walked toward the altar.
4. “Papá, me think us should go home now,” whispered Carlos.
5. Carlos didn’t want anyone to know that him was the source of the smell.
6. If him and Gloria walked home together, her would notice the smell of his shoes.
7. Him did hear Gloria calling to he.
8. While them were eating, Carlos’s parents noticed that him was very quiet.
Mechanics
105
Carlos and the Skunk
Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Write a dialogue between Carlos and his father
going shopping. Use subject and object pronouns.
Grammar
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• Subject pronouns are the subjects in a sentence.
• Object pronouns receive the action of a verb or follow a
preposition.
Circle all of the incorrect subject and object pronouns. Then rewrite the
passage.
Carlos and Gloria were good friends. Them often played together
after them fnished their chores and homework. When Carlos and Gloria
were together, they noticed Dos Dedos, a skunk them had named. Carlos
wanted to show off for Gloria, so him tried to catch the skunk by the tail.
The skunk sprayed he, and Carlos was embarrassed. The smell remained
on Carlos’s shoes. When him wore they to church the next day, everyone
noticed the awful smell. Carlos’s father took he shopping for a new pair
of shoes.
Proofreading
106
Carlos and the Skunk
Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Write a paragraph about an embarrassing
incident, including subject and object pronouns.
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Grammar
Name
Circle the letter of the pronoun that correctly completes each sentence.
1. Carlos could not remember how
long

and
Gloria had been friends.
a. him
b. he
c. us
d. we
2. lived in the
Española Valley in the mountains
of northern New Mexico.
a. They
b. We
c. Her
d. Them
3. When Carlos grabbed the skunk,
the animal had a surprise for
.
a. him
b. they
c. her
d. us
4. “You know what


heard?” said Carlos.
a. her
b. I
c. you
d. me
5. Carlos’s mother prepared breakfast;

made tortillas,
fried eggs, and salsa.
a. me
b. he
c. her
d. she
6. “When

leave,
I’ll get my shoes,” Carlos said to his
mother.
a. him
b. he
c. we
d. us
Test: Subject
and Object Pronouns
107
Carlos and the Skunk
Grade 5/ Unit 4
Grammar
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• Subject pronouns are the subjects in a sentence.
• Object pronouns receive the action of a verb or follow a
preposition.
Work with a partner such as a parent or helper. Each partner reads
half of the paragraph aloud. Notice the words that sound incorrect.
Then rewrite the paragraph, correcting all errors.
Carlos wanted to show off for Gloria. Them had been friends for a
long time. However, instead of showing off, him got very embarrassed.
The skunk them called Dos Dedos sprayed all over Carlos’s clothes.
Him had to run away and take they off. Them smelled awful. Then
Carlos forgot to clean his shoes, and them smelled at church the next
day. Carlos’s parents understood what happened. Carlos’s father said,
“You and me should go shopping for a new pair of shoes.”
Review: Subject
and Object Pronouns
108
Carlos and the Skunk
Grade 5/ Unit 4
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Grammar
Name
• A present-tense verb must agree with its subject pronoun.
• Add -s to most action verbs when their subjects are he, she,
and it.
• Do not add -s to an action verb in the present tense when you
use the pronouns I, we, you, and they.
• The verbs have and be have special forms in the present tense.
Read each sentence. On the lines provided, write the correct form
of each incorrect verb.
1. John Pike walks around Las Vegas as he ask his neighbors to vote.
2. He believe that voting is important.

3. As citizens in a democracy, we agrees.

4. It form the basis of our system of government.
5. A famous musician is giving a concert because she, too, think that voting
is important.
6. She want to encourage all citizens to vote.
7. Political groups are active; they tries to register new voters.
8. Members of these groups go to concerts where they meets young people
who can vote.

9. All United States citizens can vote when they turns eighteen.
10. Does you think that voting is important?
Pronoun-Verb
Agreement
109 Getting Out the Vote • Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Interview someone about voting practices. Write
in the present tense.
Grammar
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• The verbs have and be take special forms in the present tense.
Rewrite each sentence. Correct all errors in pronoun-verb agreement.
1. Our country has two major political parties; they is the Democratic party
and the Republican party.
2. They has animals that represent each party.
3. The Democrats have their animal; it are a donkey.
4. The Republicans have theirs, too; it am an elephant.
5. The donkey is associated with Andrew Jackson; it be a symbol of strong will.
6. Cartoonist Thomas Nast made the symbols famous; they is in his cartoons.
7. Republicans like the elephant, and they has no problem with it.
8. Democrats like their donkey because it are smart and brave.
The Verbs Have
and Be
110 Getting Out the Vote • Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Write a paragraph suggesting a different animal
for a political party. Use have and be in the present tense.
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Grammar
Name
• An abbreviation is the shortened form of a word.
• An abbreviation begins with a capital letter and ends with a
period.
• Abbreviate titles before names, days of the week, streets, and
most months.
Read the sentences. Fill in each blank with an abbreviation from the list.
Ms. Dr. Mr. Sen. Nov. Tues. D.C. A.M.
1. The capital of the United States is Washington,

.
2. We met one of our representatives in the U. S. Senate,
Michael Eberling.
3. He encouraged us to tell our friends and families to vote in the
election.
4. Election Day is always the frst

of that month.
5. Polls open as early as 7

.
Read the sentences. Write the abbreviation for any word that can
be abbreviated.
6. The president is inaugurated in January.

7. My neighbor, Mister Adams, volunteers on Election Day.
8. He gives voters their ballots at the precinct on Vine Street.
9. Many people volunteer, including Doctor Peterson.

10. Her offce is always closed for a few hours in early November.
Mechanics
111 Getting Out the Vote • Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Write a letter to a state representative, inviting him
or her to visit your school. Use some abbreviations.
Grammar
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• The verbs have and be take special forms in the present tense.
Rewrite the passage, using the correct forms of have and be.
Russia are located in both Europe and Asia. It have mountains, plains,
and large forests. Also, it be rich in natural resources such as gold and coal.
Since 1991 Russia have been an independent nation. The president of Russia
be elected by the Russian people. The government in Russia be considered a
democracy.
Before 1991, Russia belonged to a group of countries called the Union
of Soviet Socialist Republics, or U.S.S.R. The U.S.S.R. had a form of
government called communism. In communist countries, the government
have control of most property and businesses.
Proofreading
112 Getting Out the Vote • Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Write a paragraph describing your town, using
four examples of have and be.
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Read the following paragraph. Then rewrite it, correcting any
errors in pronoun-verb agreement.
What do you know about the Great Seal of the United States? You sees it
on the back of a one-dollar bill. It are used on some government documents,
too. At the center of the seal you sees the bald eagle. It are our national bird.
In its beak it hold a banner. In one claw it hold an olive branch, a symbol of
peace. In its other claw it carry arrows to symbolize war. We has a picture of
the Great Seal in our classroom. I believes that it be a symbol of our country.
Test: Pronoun-Verb
Agreement
113 Getting Out the Vote • Grade 5/ Unit 4
Grammar
Name
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Look at the drawings. Then find the subject pronouns in the
paragraph that do not agree with their verbs. Rewrite the
sentences, using the correct pronoun-verb agreement.
These animals are the symbols of the two major American political
parties. They is the Democratic party donkey and the Republican party
elephant. The Democrats like their donkey. They considers it strong and
brave. Similarly, the Republicans like their elephant. It are strong and brave,
according to the Republicans. I wishes I could choose an animal as a symbol
for myself. I are strong and brave, and I runs fast. What does you think I
should be?











Review: Pronoun-Verb
Agreement
114 Getting Out the Vote • Grade 5/ Unit 4
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• A possessive pronoun takes the place of a possessive noun.
It shows who or what owns something.
• Some possessive pronouns are used before nouns (my, your,
his, her, its, our, your, their).
• Some possessive pronouns stand alone in a sentence and
function as nouns (mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, yours, theirs).
Read each sentence. Fill in the missing possessive pronoun.
1. English word hurricane comes from people who lived
in the tropics long ago.
2. The ancient Mayan people called

storm god
Hunraken, and an evil Taino god was called Huracan.
3. Possibly

name or Hunraken’s is the source of
hurricane.
4. A hurricane is the strongest type of tropical storm;


winds blow at speeds of 74 miles an hour or more.
5. cousin Frances lives in an area that has no
hurricanes;

house will not be in danger.
6. If you live in an area that does have hurricanes, keep


emergency supplies handy.
7. We keep

in the back of the big closet in
brother’s room.
8. We keep a fashlight, a radio, food, and bottled water in
emergency kit.
9. When my mom heard news of a hurricane watch, she left
offce to come home early.
10. The more we learn about hurricanes, the better


chances of coming through them safely.
Possessive Pronouns
115 Hurricanes • Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Describe preparations for a hurricane. Use at
least three possessive pronouns.
Grammar
Name
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• Some possessive pronouns are used before nouns (my, your,
his, her, its, our, your, their).
• Some possessive pronouns stand alone in a sentence and
function as nouns (mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, yours, theirs).
Read each sentence. Find the incorrect possessive pronoun and
write it correctly on the line.
1. What kinds of storms do you have in yours town?

2. In my, there are hurricanes.

3. Mine home is located near the coast of North Carolina.
4. Hurricane Fran caused a lot of damage to ours house.


5. During the last hurricane, my sister was frightened when strong winds
broke a window in hers room.

6. Many large trees fell in Phil and Gina’s yard and ruined theirs shed.
7. Three big trees fell on top of the shed, crashing through her roof.
8. However, the roof on ours house was not damaged.

9. We have learned about hurricanes in mine science class.
10. The people in ours neighborhood help one another when hurricanes
hit.

Ways to Use
Possessive Pronouns
116 Hurricanes • Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Write a newspaper account of a hurricane. Use at
least four examples of possessive pronouns.
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• Use a hyphen to show the division of a word at the end of a
line. Divide the word between syllables.
• Use a hyphen to connect two words to form some compound
words.
Choose the correct way to divide the words in these sentences.
Circle the letter beside the correct answer.
1. a. Hurricanes are huge spinning storms that de-
velop in warm areas around the equator.
b. Hurricanes are huge spinning storms that dev-
elop in warm areas around the equator.
2. a. The peak hurricane months are August and Septe-
mber.
b. The peak hurricane months are August and Sep-
tember.
3. a. Hurricanes begin in the warm, moist atmos-
phere over tropical ocean waters.
b. Hurricanes begin in the warm, moist atm-
osphere over tropical ocean waters.
Each of these sentences contains a compound word. Rewrite the
sentences, adding a hyphen to the compound word.
4. Tropical depressions have steady wind speeds of thirty eight miles per hour
or less.
5. During hurricanes, people living in low lying areas often go to safer places.
6. A battery driven radio is important to have during a severe storm.
Mechanics
117 Hurricanes • Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Write five sentences using the following words to
make compound words: self, well, much, fifty, life.
Grammar
Name
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• A possessive pronoun can take the place of a possessive
noun. It shows who or what has or owns something.
• Some possessive pronouns are used before nouns. Some
possessive pronouns stand alone in a sentence and function
as nouns.
Read the following passage. Circle all of the incorrect possessive
pronouns. Circle all of the incorrect or missing hyphens. Then rewrite
the passage.
In mine hometown, the most dangerous storms are tornadoes. In fact,
a town near my was destroyed twice by tornadoes. Ours cousins live in
that town. Many people lost possessions, and some lost theirs homes.
Ours cousins’ home wasn’t destroyed, although theirs yard was in bad
shape. My cousin said that hers house is more vulnerable to tornadoes
than hers neighbor’s house because hers house is more exposed than his’.
It sits on top of a hill, and its’ big windows face toward the southwest.
I’m glad ours house is in a well protected area and that we have several
battery powered radios for emergencies.











Proofreading
118 Hurricanes • Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Write a journal entry that describes a severe
storm. Use at least five possessive pronouns.
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Rewrite each sentence, correcting all pronoun errors.
1. Does yours hometown get hurricanes or tornadoes?
2. Luisa and I live in Florida, and our get many hurricanes.
3. The worst hurricane to hit ours city was Hurricane Andrew in 1992.
4. Luisa’s parents remember Hurricane Andrew and our heavy winds.
5. The roof of my uncle’s garage was damaged, but luckily her car was
untouched.
6. Along Biscayne Bay, near mine house, storm tides reached 17 feet.
7. Luisa says that’s about as high as the two stories in hers house.
8. Weather forecasters can give advance warning of storms so that people
can get theirs emergency equipment ready.
Test: Possessive
Pronouns
119 Hurricanes • Grade 5/ Unit 4
Grammar
Name
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• A possessive pronoun can take the place of a possessive
noun. It shows who or what owns something.
• Some possessive pronouns are used before nouns. Some
possessive pronouns stand alone in a sentence and function
as nouns.
• Use a hyphen to show the division of a word at the end of a
line. Divide the word between syllables.
• Use a hyphen to connect two words to form some compound
words.
Work with a partner. One partner reads a sentence aloud, and the
other proofreads it. Write any incorrect possessive pronouns or
compound words that need hyphens correctly on the lines.
1. In ours country, hurricanes occur
in the summer and in the fall.
2. Our can be quite bad,
but I don’t know whether
other places have
worse hurricanes.
3. Hurricanes are given
theirs own names.
4. Hurricane Andrew caused
much damage to the land
and buildings in it’s path.
5. However, fewer than ffty fve
people died as a result of the storm.


6. The local weather forecaster tries
to give people early warning so that
they can make our arrangements to
leave the area or stay.


7. Families should make such
arrangements, and it is important
to know your.


8. Make sure that you have a three
day supply of water and food.


Review: Possessive
Pronouns and Hyphens
120 Hurricanes • Grade 5/ Unit 4
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• Homophones are words that sound the same but have
different spellings and meanings.
• Its, their, and your are possessive pronouns.
• It’s, they’re, and you’re are contractions meaning it is, they
are, and you are.
• Do not confuse possessive pronouns with contractions that
sound the same.
Read each sentence. The underlined pronouns and contractions
are used incorrectly. Write the correct usage on the line.
1. Do you think your ready for the story?

2. Clap you’re hands twice.

3. Its a story about a fsher who plays a trick on some people.
4. At frst their fooled, but then they trick the fsher.

5. Its’ a bad day for the fsher because he has not caught any fsh to sell.
6. He tricks people into leaving they’re wares on the other side of the river.
7. Their afraid of falling into the river because the log bridge is shaky.
8. They’re swimming skills are not very good.

9. “Leave some baskets before you cross; its the only way to do it,” the
fsher tells the basketmaker.

10. The fsher promises to hold the unsteady log in it’s place.


Pronouns and
Homophones
121 Catch of the Day! • Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Write about a time that a trick was played on
someone. Use four pronouns and homophones on this page.
Grammar
Name
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• Its, their, and your are possessive pronouns. It’s, they’re,
and you’re are contractions. These possessive pronouns and
contractions are homophones, words that sound the same, but
are spelled differently.
• Contractions always use apostrophes.
Rewrite each sentence. Use possessive pronouns, homophones,
and contractions correctly.
1. The fsher tricks some people on there way to the market.
2. He stands their next to the log bridge and shakes it.
3. There likely to be frightened by the shaky log.
4. They will think that their going to fall into the river.
5. They could lose there merchandise or even drown.
6. “Put some of you’re baskets down before you cross,” the fsher says.
7. He tells the others to leave some of there food before crossing the log.
8. As they go to the market, there easily tricked.
9. However, on they’re way home, they see nothing wrong with the bridge.
10. They decide that there going to trick the fsher.
Homophones
122 Catch of the Day! • Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Write a poem about a trickster. Use several
examples of there, their, and they’re.
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• Some possessive pronouns and contractions are
homophones. Homophones sound the same, but they are
spelled differently.
• An apostrophe takes the place of letters in a contraction.
• Possessive pronouns do not have apostrophes.
Rewrite each of these sentences. Look for incorrect apostrophe
usage and correct any errors.
1. Your probably wondering what the people did to trick the fsher.
2. The people think that its a good idea to trick the fsher.
3. They meet the next day to make they’re plan.
4. Its’ a simple plan, but everyone thinks it will work well.
5. They put the fsh from the next village in there buckets.
6. “Be careful on the bridge, or your sure to fall in,” the people warn the fsher.
7. The fsher doesn’t know that their playing a trick on him.
8. He is not aware of they’re plan.
Mechanics
123 Catch of the Day! • Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Write an interview between the fisher and a
reporter. Use pronouns and contractions on this page.
Grammar
Name
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• Its, their, and your are possessive pronouns. It’s, they’re,
and you’re are contractions. These possessive pronouns and
contractions are homophones.
• The word there means “in that place.” It is a homophone of
they’re and their.
• Do not confuse possessive pronouns with contractions.
Circle all mistakes in the use of possessive pronouns,
homophones, and contractions. Then rewrite the passage.
This play is an original trickster story. It’s main character is a fsher
who is hungry because he can’t catch any fsh to eat or to sell. He decides
to trick people into leaving the goods that there bringing to market on
the other side of the river. He does this by pretending that the log bridge
is unsteady and that he will hold it in it’s place. He tells the people that
there in danger if they cross with too much merchandise. So they leave
there goods their on the ground before they cross. Then the fsher crosses
over and picks up the goods right their where the people left them.











Proofreading
124 Catch of the Day! • Grade 5/ Unit 4
At Home: Write a one- or two-paragraph summary of this
play. Use the homophones in this unit.
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Name
Rewrite each sentence, correcting any pronoun and homophone
errors. If there are no errors, write correct on the line.
1. What’s you’re favorite trickster story?
2. There certainly are many to choose from.
3. I like stories in which its the trickster who gets tricked.
4. Their is a lesson for the trickster.
5. Sometimes, however, characters are tricked because of there faults.
6. There not innocent like the characters in “The Catch of the Day.”
7. For example, a fox tricks a crow to get it’s meal.
8. “You’re song is so lovely,” the fox tells the crow, and asks it to sing.
9. As the crow sings, it drops the piece of cheese it had in it’s mouth.
10. The cheese lands right their at the fox’s feet.
Test: Pronouns and
Homophones
125 Catch of the Day! • Grade 5/ Unit 4
Grammar
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• Its, their, and your are possessive pronouns. It’s, they’re,
and you’re are contractions. These possessive pronouns and
contractions are homophones.
• The word there means “in that place.” It is a homophone of
they’re and their.
• Contractions always use apostrophes. Possessive pronouns do
not have apostrophes.
Read the sentences about the picture. Rewrite them, correcting all
pronoun and contraction errors.
1. The fsher is tricking the people into leaving they’re goods.
2. “Leave some of you’re goods on the ground,” he says.
3. Its dangerous to cross a shaky log bridge.
4. Their afraid of losing they’re goods or there lives.
5. So they leave they’re things their.
6. Are you ready to tell you’re story?
Review: Possessive
Pronouns
126 Catch of the Day! • Grade 5/ Unit 4
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Name
Pronouns
Look at the underlined section in the following passages.Then look
at the answer choices. Circle the letter that best describes how to
correct the underlined section.
’Tricia Ann was going to Someplace Special. They was going by herself.
(1)
’Tricia Ann’s special place was the library. It was a place where she felt
welcome. He was not like many other places, with their Jim Crow signs.
(2)
1. A. Change “They” to “her.”
B. Change “herself” to “themselves.”
C. Change “They” to “She.”
D. No mistake.
Carlos often saw a skunk while doing chores after school. Carlos’s sister
warned him not to go near the skunk, but him got too close to it. The skunk
(3)
was afraid of Carlos, so it faced away from him and raised its tail. Then they
shot a smelly spray at him.
(4)
3. A. Change “got” to “gets.”
B. Change “him” to “he.”
C. Change “it” to “him.”
D. No mistake
2. E. Change “He” to “She.”
F. Add a verb.
G. Change “He” to “It.”
H. No mistake
4. E. Change “they” to “It.”
F. Change “him” to “it.”
G. Change “a” to “an.”
H. No mistake
127 Unit 4 Review • Grade 5/ Unit 4
Grammar
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Many people who can vote in American elections do not do so. Them give
many excuses for not voting. People say that they are too busy or that they
(5)
are out of town on election day. Many signs and posters are displayed before
elections, so it should be easy for people to remember to vote. Some people
still say that its too difficult to remember to vote.
(6)
5. A. Add “why” after “excuses.”
B. Change “Them” to “Us.”
C. Change “for” to “about.”
D. Change “Them” to “They.”
The fisher wanted to trick people so that they would give him food. He told
people that the log bridge was dangerous. Their was really no danger; the log
(7)
bridge was very steady. The fisher cheated other people in the village to get
what he wanted. Finally the people caught on, and the basketmaker shook
the log while the fisher was standing on it. The fisher fell off it and tumbled
(8)
into the river.
7. A. Change “was” to “were.”
B. Change “Their” to “There.”
C. Change “no” to “any.”
D. No mistake
8. E. Change “it” to “its.”
F. Change “it” to “they.”
G. Change “into” to “in.”
H. No mistake.
6. E. Change “say” to “says.”
F. Add “why” after “remember.”
G. Change “its” to “it’s.”
H. No mistake.
Pronouns
128 Unit 4 Review • Grade 5/ Unit 4
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• An adjective is a word that describes a noun or pronoun.
• An adjective tells what kind or how many.
• An adjective can follow the noun it describes. When it does, a
linking verb connects the noun and the adjective.
Complete each sentence with an adjective from the box.
solid terrifying furious uninhabited fifteen
exhausted dreary desperate vast tattered
1. Shackleton and his crew became after walking for
many miles.
2. men pulled each boat.
3. The sight of an approaching storm flled the men with
dread.
4. After he crossed the mountains, his clothes were dirty and
.
5. They walked safely across the ice.
6. On dark winter days, Elephant Island was a place.
7. Shackleton knew that his crew was to be rescued.
8. The men landed on an island.
9. Fierce, winds shook the Endurance during the storm.
10. The crew crossed sheets of ice that stretched for
miles.
Adjectives
129 Spirit of Endurance • Grade 5/ Unit 5
At Home: Write a journal entry describing a day as a
Shackleton crew member. Use at least six adjectives.
Grammar
Name
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• A demonstrative adjective tells which one. The words this, that,
these, and those are demonstrative adjectives.
• Demonstrative adjectives come before a noun.
• Use this and that with singular nouns. Use these and those with plural nouns.
• This and these refer to people or things that are nearby. That and
those point to nouns that are far away.
Read each sentence. Then rewrite it, using the correct form of the
demonstrative adjective.
1. The sailors wanted to land on those island.
2. The men asked, “Will these ice ahead crush the boat?”
3. The sailor said, “That seals on the beach are huge.”
4. Do not step on this snow over there.
5. The skipper warned, “This boats are heavy.”
6. The sailor called, “That waves out there are getting bigger!”
7. These is the stormiest ocean in the world.
8. The captain asked them to change that torn sails on the mast.
Demonstrative
Adjectives
130 Spirit of Endurance • Grade 5/ Unit 5
At Home: Write a poem of five lines about the ocean. Include
three demonstrative adjectives and circle all the adjectives.
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• A proper adjective is formed from a proper noun.
• A proper adjective begins with a capital letter.
Rewrite each sentence. Add the correct proper adjective for each
underlined proper noun. Use the dictionary for help with spelling.
1. Many of the sailors were england.
2. The Antarctica continent was mostly uninhabited.
3. Some of the men liked France food.
4. Some explorers were britain.
5. Some boats were made from America wood.
6. He took a Chile ship.
7. Many of the men wanted italy food.
8. An Alaska sled dog could be used to transport goods.
9. The men thought that south america fruit would be delicious.
10. The cook ran out of india spices.
Mechanics
131 Spirit of Endurance • Grade 5/ Unit 5
At Home: Read several news articles and choose five
proper adjectives from the articles.
Grammar
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Read the paragraph below. Rewrite it correctly on the lines provided.
Can you picture yourself on a boat during an antarctic storm? The
waves are Huge and toss your boat up and down. Winds furious howl all
around you. Your clothes dry become Soaked as rain pours from the sky.
Those would not be a fun boat ride!
Proofreading
132 Spirit of Endurance • Grade 5/ Unit 5
At Home: Write a six-sentence review of an adventure book.
Include six adjectives and two demonstrative adjectives.
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Add adjectives to the following sentences.
1. Shackleton took men to fnd help.
2. The ocean current pulled them out to sea.
3. On a day, they sailed away.
4. The whalers brought them food.
5. Shackleton and his crew were very .
6. The weather made sailing diffcult.
7. The waves washed over the tiny boat.
8. The sailors became when they saw their
rescuers.
9. The crew could not see through the snow.
10. The sailor asked, “What was that card game we
used to play?”
Test: Adjectives
133 Spirit of Endurance • Grade 5/ Unit 5
Grammar
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• An adjective is a word that describes a noun and tells what
kind or how many.
• An adjective can come after the noun it describes. When it
does, a linking verb connects the noun and adjective.
• A demonstrative adjective tells which one.
• Use this and that with singular nouns. Use these and those with
plural nouns.
• This and these refer to nouns that are nearby. That and those
refer to nouns that are farther away.
Use the following adjectives to help you write a paragraph about the
crew of the Endurance. Then draw a scene from your paragraph below.
determined frantic rugged miserable
mighty patient grim Antarctic
Review: Adjectives
134 Spirit of Endurance • Grade 5/ Unit 5
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• Articles are special kinds of adjectives.
• The words a, an, and the are articles.
• Use a, an, or the before nouns.
• Use a or an to refer to any person, place, thing, or idea.
• Use the to refer to a specific item or idea, or to nouns that are plural.
Rewrite each sentence, adding the correct article a or an.
1. Wesley jumped over garbage can to escape.


2. When I was in school, I read book about crops.


3. There was garden in his backyard.


4. The piece of fruit did not taste or look like apple.


5. The robe gave Wesley opportunity to have more pockets.




6. Each kid bought bottle of oil for 10 dollars.


7. They played game that used parts of the plant.


8. Wesley created alphabet that had 80 letters.


9. After evening playing his fute, Wesley slept.


10. His parents went on tour of Weslandia.


The Articles A, An,
and The
Weslandia • Grade 5/ Unit 5 135
At Home: Write a short nature poem. Use the articles a, an, and the
correctly.
Grammar
Name
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• Use a and an with singular nouns.
• Use a if the next word starts with a consonant sound.
• Use an if the next word starts with a vowel sound.
• Use the to refer to a particular person, place, thing, or idea, or
to nouns that are plural.
Write a, an, or the on the line before each noun.
1. plants 6. watch
2. fute 7. hats
3. alphabet 8. sounds
4. fruits 9. wind
5. sport 10. idea
Fix each incorrect article in the following sentences. Rewrite the
sentences correctly.
11. Weslandia is a interesting place.
12. The kids took turns crushing a seeds.
13. Is there an platform up there?
14. Cloth can be made using an loom.
15. Wesley ignored a cereals in his kitchen.
Articles
136 Weslandia • Grade 5/ Unit 5
At Home: Write directions for completing a simple task,
such as making a sandwich. Circle each article.
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Grammar
Name
• A colon (:) is a form of punctuation that means “pay attention to
what follows.”
• Use colons at the beginning of a list.
• In plays and screenplays, a colon follows the name of a character.
The words that follow are the lines that the character says.
• When a character’s words follow a colon, the words are not
placed in quotation marks.
Rewrite each sentence below. Place colons where they are needed.
1. Characters include Wesley, Mother, Father, a neighbor, and children.
2. Mother Wesley is unhappy and has no friends.
3. Father I know. I wish he would cut his hair like the other boys!
4. Wesley I made many different things oil, clothes, futes, and ink.
5. Neighbor Are those weeds?
Write a dialogue between two characters in the play. Write one part
of the dialogue on each line. Be sure to place colons where they are
needed.
6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

Mechanics
Weslandia • Grade 5/ Unit 5 137
At Home: Look through newspapers or magazines for
colons used in a sentence. Find four examples.
Grammar
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Read the paragraph below. Rewrite the paragraph correctly on the
lines provided.
Dear Diary,
this summer I grew an huge garden. My neighbor thought a plants that
grew in it were Weeds. Well, they were not weeds! Made I the hat with a
leaves. I ate a roots. I had a exciting summer.
Proofreading
138 Weslandia • Grade 5/ Unit 5
At Home: Write a diary entry about your day that includes
several articles used correctly.
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Grammar
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Rewrite the following sentences, using the correct articles.
1. Wesley didn’t like any of a following foods: pizza, soda, and candy.
2. Growing an garden is a excellent idea.
3. He will pull off an brown leaf.
4. One boy crushed a seeds.
5. Wesley used a petals to tell time.
6. What is an garden?
7. An other kids played games with Wesley.
8. Wesley used to wear an watch.
9. The garden presented a opportunity to invent things.
10. Wesley started school with an smile.
Test: Articles
Weslandia • Grade 5/ Unit 5 139
Grammar
Name
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Draw a picture of a garden filled with amazing plants. You can draw
a real garden or a pretend garden.
When you are finished drawing your picture, write five sentences
describing it. Use at least one article correctly in each sentence.
Review: Articles
140 Weslandia • Grade 5/ Unit 5
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Grammar
Name
• Adjectives describe people, places, or things.
• Add -er to most short adjectives to compare two people, places,
or things.
• Add -est to most short adjectives to compare more than two
people, places, or things.
Think about the comparisons in each sentence. Then rewrite the
sentence with the correct form for each underlined adjective.
1. Samoa is probably warm than Canada.
2. Fire ants are small than a fngernail.
3. He said that Mr. Andrews was the smart teacher he had ever had.


4. Lewis and Clark traveled long than some other explorers.


5. Lewis thought that they were the odd squirrels in the world.


6. The next day, he saw an even tough buffalo.


7. Two hundred years ago, it was hard to cross the country than it is today.


8. Birds can change direction fast than a plane.


Adjectives That
Compare
Historic Journey • Grade 5/ Unit 5 141
At Home: Choose 10 comparative adjectives and use them
in short phrases.
Grammar
Name
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• For adjectives ending in e, drop the e before adding -er or -est.
• For adjectives ending in a consonant and y, change the y to i
before adding -er or -est.
• For one-syllable adjectives that have a single vowel before the final
consonant, double the final consonant before adding -er or -est.
Read each sentence. Rewrite it with the correct adjective form.
1. One of the healing plants was leafy than the others.
2. Even the tiny insects can teach scientists important things about nature.
3. He felt like the lucky science teacher in the country.
4. E. O. Wilson worked to make our planet healthy than it was.
5. Neither Clark nor Lewis was brave than the other.
6. Lewis and Clark are two of the brave men in history.
7. Keeping a journal is easy for some people than it is for others.
8. The men thought it was hot today than it was yesterday.
More Adjectives
That Compare
142 Historic Journey • Grade 5/ Unit 5
At Home: Write a paragraph that compares two plants
or animals by using adjectives that compare.
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Grammar
Name
• A proper noun begins with a capital letter.
• The name of a day, month, or holiday begins with a capital letter.
• Capitalize the titles of family members when they refer to specific
people.
• Capitalize the titles of people that appear before their names.
Correct each sentence. Rewrite on the line any words that should be
capitalized.
1. paul cox learned about healing plants in Samoa.
2. mr. Andrews teaches at jones Lane Elementary.
3. Gaithersburg, maryland, is home to many “earthkeepers.”
4. Edward osborne Wilson watched fre ants in alabama.
5. The explorers began their trip in may of 1804.
6. He may have said, “Let’s send one back to president Jefferson.”
7. Lewis and clark wanted to reach the pacifc Ocean.
8. Many people travel on planes to visit family at thanksgiving.
9. He said that uncle bob knows how to fy a plane.
10. Last tuesday we visited Hudson county.
Mechanics
Historic Journey • Grade 5/ Unit 5 143
At Home: Write a journal entry about exploring a new place.
Use at least five nouns that need to be capitalized.
Grammar
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Read the paragraph below. Rewrite it correctly on the
lines provided.
Welcome to the Columbus history Museum! We have made a few
changes. First, we have a large exhibit about lewis and Clark than we
did before. Now we room have for a map from 1804. It is the old map in
the museum. Also, The lights are bright than before. People say that it is
easiest to read signs now.
Proofreading
144 Historic Journey • Grade 5/ Unit 5
At Home: Describe a museum exhibit using natural or
historical items. Write your own sign for each object. Each
sign should include an adjective.
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Grammar
Name
Read the sentence. Look at the adjective in parentheses. Fill in the
correct form of the adjective on the line to complete the sentence.
1. Paul Cox climbed one of the trees in Samoa. (tall)
2. His family thought Samoa was the island in the South
Pacifc. (pretty)
3. Mr. Andrews says it is to learn about nature when you
are outside. (easy)
4. Summer in Alabama is than summer in Ohio. (hot)
5. E. O. Wilson made a discovery at a age than many
other scientists. (young)
6. The journey was than some of the men expected it to
be. (long)
7. The part of the trip was not having a good map. (hard)
8. They thought that prairie dogs were the animals they
had ever seen. (odd)
9. Are these feathers than those feathers? (white)
10. Seagulls are some of the eaters that I’ve ever seen!
(messy)
Test: Adjectives
That Compare
Historic Journey • Grade 5/ Unit 5 145
Grammar
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• Add -er to most short adjectives to compare two people, places, or things.
• Add -est to most short adjectives to compare more than two people,
places, or things.
• For adjectives ending in e, drop the e before adding -er or -est.
• For adjectives ending in a consonant and y, change the y to i before
adding -er or -est.
• For one-syllable adjectives that have a single vowel before the final
consonant, double the final consonant before adding -er or -est.
Read the postcard carefully. Look for errors in adjectives, spelling,
or capitalization. Then rewrite the postcard correctly.
Review: Adjectives
That Compare
146 Historic Journey • Grade 5/ Unit 5
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Grammar
Name
• In general, for adjectives of three or more syllables, use more
and most to compare people, places, and things.
• Use more to compare two people, places, or things.
• Use most to compare more than two.
Rewrite the sentences. Correct any adjectives that are used incorrectly.
1. John tried to fnd the more pleasant place of all to stay.
2. He thought the Navajo language made the mostest amazing code.
3. Grandfather’s home was most beautiful than the school.
4. Hiking was no diffculter than hauling water.
5. The Navajo language was the United States’ more secret weapon.
6. Some soldiers were most experienced than others.
7. This code was most effcient than any other.
8. This is the more interesting story of all.
Comparing with
More and Most
Unbreakable Code • Grade 5/ Unit 5 147
At Home: Write a note to a friend using more and most to
describe a favorite TV program.
Grammar
Name
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• When you use more and most, do not use the ending -er or -est.
Read the paragraphs. Then rewrite each paragraph, correcting any
mistakes. Be sure that more and most are used correctly and that
all adjectives are spelled correctly.
When Grandfather was young, he thought that the clouds were most
beautifulest in the hills. Being outside was always more pleasanter than
being in school. Grandfather was the happier when he could stay outside.
Creating a code is very more diffcult, but it is even most diffculter to
break a code. In the past, breaking a code was one of the more crucial skills
of all. Sometimes governments didn’t realize that a code had been broken,
and they continued to send their most secretest messages in that code.
Comparing with
More and Most
148 Unbreakable Code • Grade 5/ Unit 5
At Home: Develop six sentences that use more and most to
describe an exciting event.
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Grammar
Name
• Never add -er and more to the same adjective.
• Never add -est and most to the same adjective.
Read the sentences. If the sentence is correct, write correct on the
line. If it is not correct, rewrite the sentence using the correct form of
the adjective.
1. Most importantest was that the Navajo language had no alphabet.
2. This story is the most interestingest that I have ever read.
3. Everyone tries to contribute his or her most sincere efforts in wartime.
4. The most dangerousest time was the day that the enemy shot at Grandfather.
5. It was more fascinatinger to watch the stars than to go to school.
6. John wanted to learn to write more diffcult codes.
7. The Navajo language was considered more secreter than other languages.
8. A wild horse feels more comfortabler without a rope around its neck.
Mechanics
Unbreakable Code • Grade 5/ Unit 5 149
At Home: Write a journal entry about what you did today.
Include four sentences that use more and most with an
adjective.
Grammar
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In the following paragraph, identify the errors in the use of more and
most with adjectives. Then rewrite the paragraph, correcting any
mistakes.
Codes have been used for a long time. Codes are a way to make a
message more harder to understand than if the message had been written
in everyday language. Some of the most diffcultest codes change the
order of the letters in words. Other codes use an uncommon language. An
example of this type is the Navajo code used during World War II. It was
one of the bestest choices because few people know Navajo. No matter
how hard the Japanese tried, they could not break this code. Navajo code
was one of the most importantest weapons for the United States during
World War II.
Proofreading
150 Unbreakable Code • Grade 5/ Unit 5
At Home: Write a paragraph continuing the story,
“Unbreakable Code.” Use more and most with adjectives
at least twice.
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Grammar
Name
Circle the letter beside the correct form of the adjective.
1. That language was the 5. Her grandmother’s advice was
weapon of all. the of all.
a. most secret a. more wise
b. more secretest b. wisest
c. most secretest c. more wisest
2. The words 6. The island was

stood for letters. than before.
a. more commoner a. more beautiful
b. most commonest b. beautifuler
c. most common c. beautifulest
3. Code talkers fought in the 7. Hundreds of the
battles. messages were passed.
a. most terriblest a. more vitaler
b. most terrible b. most vitalest
c. more terribler c. most vital
4. The canyon was the 8. It was the

place that he
had ever been. code ever used.
a. most thrilling a. more brillianter
b. most thrillingest b. most brilliant
c. more thrillinger c. more brilliant
Test: Comparing
with More and Most
Unbreakable Code • Grade 5/ Unit 5 151
Grammar
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• In general, for adjectives of three or more syllables, use more
and most to compare people, places, and things.
• Use more to compare two people, places, or things.
• Use most to compare more than two.
• Never add -er and more to the same adjective. Never add -est
and most to the same adjective.
Work with a partner. One of you will read the sentence aloud. The other will
proofread. Look for the proper forms of more and most with adjectives. Take
out more and most if they are not needed. Rewrite the sentences correctly.
1. The Navajo code was more complicateder than others.
2. It was the most rapidest way to send messages.
3. These horses are more bigger than most others.
4. The war was the terriblest in history.
5. Going away was the more frightening event of all.
6. It was more diffculter for Grandfather to speak English than Navajo.
7. The hills were the most beautifulest he’d ever seen.
8. John’s grandfather was one of the most adventurousest people in the
world.
Review: Comparing
with More and Most
152 Unbreakable Code • Grade 5/ Unit 5
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Grammar
Name
• In comparisons, the adjective good has an irregular form.
Better and best are the irregular forms of good.
• Use better to compare two people, places, or things.
• Use best to compare more than two.
Read each sentence. If the form of the adjective is correct, write correct
on the line. If it is wrong, circle it and write the correct form.
1. Ana Rosa imagines that being a writer would be the better job in the world.
2. Mami makes better dulces than batatas fritas.
3. Many tourists think that Sosúa Bay is the bestest part of the República
Dominicana.
4. Some people thought that one plan was best than the other.
5. Mami thought that Ana Rosa’s story was the best story that she had ever heard.
6. Seeing a whale is even gooder than seeing a sea monster.
7. The sea monster went to the bestest underwater festa in the ocean.
8. Writing a story was better than putting up a billboard.
9. Mami is the goodest cook in town.
10. Ana Rosa thinks her gri gri tree is the better spot for looking around.
Comparing with Good
The Gri Gri Tree • Grade 5/ Unit 5 153
At Home: Write four sentences about a tropical island. Use
the adjectives better and best.
Grammar
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• In comparisons, the adjective bad has an irregular form. Worse
and worst are the irregular forms of bad.
• Use worse to compare two people, places, or things.
• Use worst to compare more than two.
Rewrite each sentence, correcting the form of bad where necessary.
1. Winter is the worse time to visit the República Dominicana.
2. Making a fuss about the sea monster would be worst than not telling anybody.
3. Guario thinks that sitting in a gri gri tree is the worser way to spend time.
4. Roberto complained that washing dishes was a worst chore than sweeping.
5. Spring is a worst time than winter for whales to migrate.
6. Spotting the sea monster was not the worse thing that happened that day.
7. Roberto was a worser domino player than Papi.
8. Ana Rosa had a worst time at the gathering than her neighbors.
Comparing with Bad
154 The Gri Gri Tree • Grade 5/ Unit 5
At Home: Read a book about whales and write a paragraph
about the worst environmental threats to whales.
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Grammar
Name
• In comparisons, the adjectives good and bad have irregular
forms. Better and best are the irregular forms of good. Worse
and worst are the irregular forms of bad.
Read the paragraphs. Circle any errors. Rewrite each paragraph
correctly in the spaces provided.
Ana Rosa knew that her gri gri tree was the bestest perch in all of Sosúa
Bay. She climbed her tree almost every day but thought that sunny days
were gooder than gloomy ones. Ana Rosa had her goodest ideas for stories
when she was in the gri gri tree. She was always in a more better mood after
sitting in her tree.
One day, the worstest storm Ana Rosa had ever seen struck the town. This
was far worst than a gloomy day! For Ana Rosa, the worser part of the storm
was watching the trees through her bedroom window. Ana Rosa hoped that
her gri gri tree would be all right, but she dreaded that her most worst fear
would come true.
Mechanics
The Gri Gri Tree • Grade 5/ Unit 5 155
At Home: Write about six foods you’ve eaten. Describe
three as good, better, and best and three as bad, worse, and
worst.
Grammar
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Read the paragraph below. Rewrite the paragraph correctly on the
lines provided.
Once, far beneath the sailboats that foat on the sea, lived the most best
swimmer in the ocean. He could swim faster than the fastest dolphin, and
no fsh was gooder at diving deep, deep down. This fne swimmer was also
the biggest creature in all the sea, and he scared away the baby fsh. The
worstest thing about his size was that the other ocean creatures called him
a sea monster, and no one wanted to be his friend. He thought there was
nothing worser than being so big.
Proofreading
156 The Gri Gri Tree • Grade 5/ Unit 5
At Home: Write five sentences, using good and bad in
comparisons about living in the ocean.
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Grammar
Name
A. Circle the letter of the adjective that completes the sentence
correctly.
1. It was the day 4. Tourist season is
of Ana Rosa’s life. than summer.
a. goodest a. worst
b. better b. worse
c. best c. worstest
2. Angela is a 5. Whales are

helper than Roberto. swimmers than penguins.
a. worst a. best
b. better b. gooder
c. best c. better
3. The story would have been 6. The wind was

if Señora Perez in the evening.
had written it. a. worse
a. worse b. most worse
b. more worse c. worser
c. worser
B. Circle the letter of the proper adjective in each sentence.
7. The American tourists enjoyed 9. The gri gri tree is a
seeing the whales in Sosúa Bay. South American plant.
a. Sosúa a. South American
b. American b. gri gri
c. Bay c. plant
8. Humpback whales inhabit 10. The Caribbean islands have
Atlantic waters. tropical climates.
a. whales a. tropical
b. Humpback b. Caribbean
c. Atlantic c. climates
Test: Comparing
with Good and Bad
The Gri Gri Tree • Grade 5/ Unit 5 157
Grammar
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• Use better to compare two people, places, or things. Use best
to compare more than two.
• Use worse to compare two people, places, or things. Use worst
to compare more than two.
• A proper adjective is formed from a proper noun.
• A proper adjective begins with a capital letter.
Read the letter below. Rewrite it correctly on the lines provided.
Look for forms of the adjectives good and bad. Make sure that all
proper adjectives are capitalized.
Dear Ana Rosa,
How are you? Is your writing getting gooder? I am sure that with practice
you will become one of the most best south american writers. Does Roberto
have a more worse cold than he had last winter? Please tell me when would
be the bestest time for me to visit.
Your brother,
Guario
Review: Comparing
with Good and Bad
158 The Gri Gri Tree • Grade 5/ Unit 5
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Grammar
Name
Read the passage and choose the word or group of words that
belongs in each space. Fill in the circle beside your answer.
On April 24, 1916, Ernest Shackleton took (1) members of his
crew and set sail for South Georgia Island. The men faced strong winds
and bitter temperatures as they struggled to reach their goal. When they
finally got to the island, the (2) sailors realized that they had landed
on the opposite side from the whaling station.
1. Ꭽ weak 2. ൴ friendly
Ꭾ fve ൵ different
Ꭿ uncomfortable ൶ confdent
൳ ridiculous ൷ exhausted
Wesley grew (3) crop of dense, tall plants. It provided shelter not
only for animals and insects, but also for Wesley himself. In fact, Wesley
could sit in the shade of (4) plants and enjoy their splendid fruit. The
fruit was purple and juicy.
3. Ꭽ an 4. ൴ a
Ꭾ and ൵ the
Ꭿ a ൶ an
൳ or ൷ and
Studying plants and animals is the way that humans learn from nature.
Lewis and Clark were probably exhausted on their expedition, but they
still observed nature. They wrote about (5) mountains and (6)
plains.
5. Ꭽ brilliant 6. ൴ blank
Ꭾ rugged ൵ delicate
Ꭿ central ൶ peculiar
൳ chilly ൷ vast
Adjectives
Unit 5 Review • Grade 5/ Unit 5 159
Grammar
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During the war, the military decided to use the Navajo language because
it would be the (7) code to break. To do this, the military had to
seek out Navajo soldiers. These soldiers underwent (8) training than
many others.
7. Ꭽ more diffcult 8. ൴ most demandingest
Ꭾ most diffcult ൵ most demanding
Ꭿ most diffcultest ൶ more demanding
൳ more diffculter ൷ more demandinger
Ana Rosa loved to sit high in her gri gri tree. She thought that it was
the (9) place to daydream and think up stories. Her brother Guario
complained that she was not thinking enough about her future, but Ana
Rosa believed that worrying was (10) than daydreaming.
9. Ꭽ best 10. ൴ worser
Ꭾ goodest ൵ worse
Ꭿ most best ൶ more worse
൳ better ൷ badder
Adjectives
160 Unit 5 Review • Grade 5/ Unit 5
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Grammar
Name
Underline the adverb in each sentence. On the line, write whether
the adverb describes how, when, or where.
1. Alexi walked slowly through the woods.


2. The Golden Mare left early to reach the Lake of the Sun.

3. Angry at the Tsar’s words, Alexi trembled inside.


4. The Golden Mare galloped rapidly through the forest.


5. The Firebird cried softly in its cage.


6. He hunted late into the night.

7. The Tsar treated the Firebird cruelly.


8. The Firebird few high into the sky.


9. Alexi and Yelena the Fair were happily married.


10. Alexi and the Golden Mare always remained friends.


• An adverb is a word that tells more about a verb, an adjective,
or another adverb.
• An adverb can tell how, when, or where an action takes place.
Adverbs
The Golden Mare • Grade 5/ Unit 6 161
At Home: Write the first paragraph of a fairy tale. Use
adverbs to tell where, when, and how events take place.
Grammar
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• An adverb can describe a verb. It can also describe an adjec-
tive or another adverb.
In these sentences, the adverbs describe verbs, adverbs, or adjectives.
Underline each adverb. Some sentences contain more than one adverb.
1. The Golden Mare spoke quietly.
2. Yelena the Fair realized that she would be in danger very soon.
3. The Tsar was terribly angry about Alexi’s success.
4. The Lake of the Sun shone brilliantly in the morning.
5. The Water of Youth began to boil very quickly.
Complete each sentence with an adverb that describes the
underlined word. Choose from the adverbs in the box.
almost very completely finally quite rather too
6. The Tsar acted

greedily.
7. They poured water into the iron pot until it was

full.
8. The ship moved

gracefully across the water.
9. Alexi stayed awake

late that night.
10. Alexi and the Golden Mare

defeated the Tsar.
Adverbs
162 The Golden Mare • Grade 5/ Unit 6
At Home: Write a paragraph that describes an adventure.
Use at least one adverb in each sentence.
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• Good is an adjective and is used to describe nouns.
• Well is an adverb that describes a verb. Well tells how an action
takes place.
• Do not confuse the adjective good with the adverb well.
Read both sentences in each pair. Circle the letter of the sentence
that uses good or well correctly.
1. a. The Golden Mare was a good friend to Alexi.
b. The Golden Mare was a well friend to Alexi.
2. a. Yelena the Fair hid her plan good.
b. Yelena the Fair hid her plan well.
3. a. Alexi ruled good.
b. Alexi ruled well.
4. a. They played a good trick on the Tsar.
b. They played a well trick on the Tsar.
5. a. The Tsar did not treat Alexi well.
b. The Tsar did not treat Alexi good.
Write well or good to complete each sentence correctly. Then
underline the word that good or well describes.
6. Alexi was a

ruler to his people.
7. The Tsar thought that if he planned

, he could wed
Yelena the Fair.
8. The Tsar would not be a

husband.
9. Alexi and the Golden Mare worked

together.
10. The Golden Mare promised to serve Alexi

.
Mechanics
The Golden Mare • Grade 5/ Unit 6 163
At Home: Write a poem about The Golden Mare. Use the
descriptive words good and well in your poem.
Grammar
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Read the paragraph below. Rewrite the paragraph correctly on the
lines provided.
The Golden Mare was real old when she met Alexi. Because she was
amazing, she looked quitely healthy and young. The Golden Mare could
gallop quick through the forest as though she were made of wind. Her
hooves hard hit the ground when she ran. Alexi could not believe his well
fortune when he saw this mysterious creature. He rough rubbed his eyes,
expecting the horse to disappear sudden.
Proofreading
164 The Golden Mare • Grade 5/ Unit 6
At Home: Write a paragraph describing what you would do if
you were granted one wish. Include four adverbs.
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A. Rewrite each sentence twice. Each time, add an adverb that tells
when, where, or how.
1. The Golden Mare ran.
2. Alexi hunted.
3. Yelena the Fair sailed on the Lake of the Sun.
4. The Tsar gave orders.
5. The Firebird few.
B. Write well or good to complete each sentence correctly.
6. The Tsar did not rule

.
7. The Golden Mare advised Alexi

.
8. The crab was a

swimmer.
9. The beautiful Firebird few

after it had been set free.
10. Yelena the Fair had a

heart.
Test: Adverbs
The Golden Mare • Grade 5/ Unit 6 165
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• An adverb is a word that tells more about a verb, an adjective,
or another adverb.
• An adverb can tell how, when, or where an action takes place.
Write good or well to complete the sentences correctly. Underline
the word that good or well describes. Then draw a picture about
the sentences.
1. The Golden Mare ran fast and

.
2. Alexi was a

rider.
3. Together, Alexi and the Golden Mare made a

pair.
4. They served the Tsar

.
Review: Adverbs
166 The Golden Mare • Grade 5/ Unit 6
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• An adverb can compare two or more actions.
• Add -er to most short adverbs to compare two actions.
• Add -est to most short adverbs to compare more than two actions.
Read the sentences. Write the correct form of the adverb in parentheses.
1. (hard) Teddy pounded the tent stakes

than Bobby did.
2. (near) Of the three, Teddy was the one standing

to the
raccoon.
3. (fast) It was Teddy who ran

of all.
4. (soon) Bobby wished that he had spoken up

than he
did.
5. (high) The mountain rose

than any of San Francisco’s
skyscrapers.
6. (hard) Of the three of them, Uncle Curtis laughed

.
7. (fast) Teddy walked

than Bobby and Uncle Curtis.
8. (soon) The raccoon arrived

of all.
9. (late) They arrived at the campsite

than Uncle Curtis
expected.
10. (fast) The other campers pitched their tents

than Uncle
Curtis did.
Adverbs That Compare
Skunk Scout • Grade 5/ Unit 6 167
At Home: Compare two actions, using the following
adverbs: hard, short, fast.
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• Use more or most to form comparisons with adverbs that end in
-ly and with most other adverbs having two or more syllables.
• Use more to compare two actions; use most to compare more
than two.
• When you use more or most, do not use the ending -er or -est.
Read the sentences. Write the correct form of the adverb in parentheses.
1. (hungrily) Of them all, it was Teddy who stared at the hotdogs
.
2. (patiently) Bobby waited

than Teddy did.
3. (quietly) Bobby worked

of them all.
4. (quickly) Teddy walked

than Bobby did.
5. (easily) Uncle Curtis got lost

than Teddy did.
Read each sentence. If the adverb is correct, write correct on the line. If
it is not correct, rewrite the sentence with the correct form of the adverb.
6. Uncle Curtis grinned happiliest of all.
7. Bobby learned more quicklier than Teddy.
8. Uncle Curtis ate slowlier than the boys.
9. Teddy treated the map more carefully than Uncle Curtis did.
10. Teddy eats more noisily of all.
Adverbs That Compare
168 Skunk Scout • Grade 5/ Unit 6
At Home: Write descriptions of a character in the story,
comparing the character’s actions to other characters.
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Name
• Never add -er and more to the same adverb.
• Never add -est and most to the same adverb.
Read each sentence. If the sentence uses more and most correctly, write
correct. Otherwise, rewrite the sentence correctly using more and most.
1. The ranger spoke most knowledgeably than Uncle Curtis.
2. Teddy unpacked the car more hurriedlier than Bobby did.
3. Uncle Curtis turned more promptlier the third time they neared the exit.
4. Of the three of them, it was Teddy who looked at the raccoon most angrily.
5. The experienced campers found the trail more easilier than Uncle Curtis did.
6. Bobby asked questions most eagerly than Teddy did.
7. It was Teddy who unrolled his sleeping bag most roughliest of all.
8. The raccoon found the marshmallows more quickly than Teddy did.
Mechanics
Skunk Scout • Grade 5/ Unit 6 169
At Home: Write a short story about a camping trip. Include
at least five adverbs that compare.
Grammar
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Read the letter below. Rewrite the letter correctly on the lines
provided.
Dear Mom and Dad,
I know you think that I’m messy, but I clean more carefullier than
Mother Nature does. There are dirt and rocks everywhere in the woods!
Since we’ve been at the campsite, we’ve been eating most poorly than we
do at home. You cook much more expert than Uncle Curtis does. Of all
the campers, it’s the mosquitoes who seem to be eating happiliest. I hope
we come home more sooner rather than late.
Your son,
Teddy
Proofreading
170 Skunk Scout • Grade 5/ Unit 6
At Home: Suppose that you are on a camping trip. Write a
letter that compares camping to being at home.
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A. Choose the sentence in each group that is written incorrectly.
Circle the letter of the incorrect sentence.
1. a. Bobby awoke sooner than Teddy did.
b. Bobby awoke most soonest of all.
c. Bobby awoke soonest of all.
2. a. Uncle Curtis looked around more eagerly than Teddy.
b. Uncle Curtis looked around most eagerly of all.
c. Uncle Curtis looked around more eagerlier than Teddy.
3. a. Bobby works more harder than Teddy does.
b. Bobby works hardest of all.
c. Bobby works harder than Teddy does.
4. a. Uncle Curtis eyed the hot dogs more hopefully than Teddy did.
b. It was Uncle Curtis who eyed the hot dogs most hopefully.
c. Uncle Curtis eyed the hot dogs most hopefully than Teddy did.
5. a. Teddy missed home more stronglier than Bobby did.
b. Teddy missed home more strongly than Bobby did.
c. Of the three campers, Teddy was the one who missed home most
strongly.
B. Choose the comparing adverb that best completes the sentence.
Circle the letter of your answer.
6. Teddy looked for the marshmallows

than he looked for
frewood.
a. eagerly
b. most eagerly
c. more eagerly
7. Uncle Curtis snored

than Bobby.
a. most loudly
b. loudlier
c. more loudly
8. Bobby searched

of all.
a. more happily
b. most happily
c. happily
Test: Adverbs
That Compare
Skunk Scout • Grade 5/ Unit 6 171
Grammar
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• Add -er to most short adverbs to compare two actions. Add -est
to most short adverbs to compare more than two actions.
• Use more or most to form comparisons with adverbs that end in
-ly or most other adverbs with two or more syllables. Use more
to compare two actions; use most to compare more than two.
• Never add -er and more or -est and most to the same adverb.
With a partner, take turns reading these sentences aloud. Listen
for adverb errors. Together, rewrite the sentences correctly.
1. No one plans most carefully than Uncle Curtis.
2. Bobby started to enjoy himself more soon than Teddy did.
3. Of the three, Teddy ran quickliest to the car.
4. Teddy listened more closer to the ranger than Uncle Curtis did.
5. Never had Teddy wanted Spam most desperately than he did that day.
6. Bobby had dressed more warmer than Uncle Curtis had.
7. Teddy would think most clearer after he ate.
8. It was Teddy who reacted more angrily of all.
Review: Adverbs
That Compare
172 Skunk Scout • Grade 5/ Unit 6
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• A negative is a word that means “no,” such as not, never,
nobody, nowhere, and the contraction n’t.
• Do not use two negatives in the same sentence.
• You can fix a sentence with two negatives by removing one
of the negatives.
Correct the sentences by removing one of the negatives.
1. Some children never not exercise.


2. Until now, nobody never learned how to sail.


3. Yesterday she couldn’t give no directions to the taxi driver.




4. Athletes don’t never give up.


5. Hannah couldn’t play on no playgrounds.


6. Nothing nowhere was written in Braille.


7. The girl had never played with no other kids.


8. Matthew never had no fun on the swings.


9. Jennifer never forgets no kind words.


10. She can’t not stop trying.


Negatives
Dream Comes True
Grade 5/ Unit 6
173
At Home: Design an inspirational poster that includes a
sentence in which one negative is used correctly.
Grammar
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Rewrite each sentence, replacing one of the negative words with a
positive word.
1. The kids never have nothing bad to say about gym class.
2. No one never passes up a chance to learn kickboxing.
3. No person nowhere should be without a new GPS device.
4. What if you couldn’t fnd nobody to give you directions?
5. None of the athletes say nothing negative.
6. There weren’t no playgrounds where she could play.
• Correct a sentence with two negatives by changing one nega-
tive word to a positive word.
Negative Positive
no, none any
never ever
nothing anything
nobody anybody
no one anyone
nowhere anywhere
Negatives
174
Dream Comes True
Grade 5/ Unit 6
At Home: Look in a book or listen to a song for sentences
that include a correctly used negative.
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• A negative is a word that means “no,” such as not, never,
nobody, nowhere, and the contraction n’t.
• Do not use two negatives in the same sentence.
• You can fix a sentence with two negatives by removing one
of the negatives.
• You can correct a sentence with two negatives by changing
one negative to a positive word.
Read each group of sentences. Cross out the sentence that is incorrect.
1. Exercising inside is never as much fun as exercising outside.
Exercising inside is not as much fun as exercising outside.
Exercising inside is not never as much fun as exercising outside.
2. None of the kids remain active when they become adults.
No kids never remains active when they become adults.
No kids remain active when they become adults.
3. Carmen never goes nowhere without it.
Carmen never goes anywhere without it.
Carmen doesn’t go anywhere without it.
4. They don’t let anything hold them back.
They don’t let nothing hold them back.
They let nothing hold them back.
Read the sentences. Rewrite each sentence two different ways.
5. She couldn’t never play in the sandbox.
6. The playgrounds didn’t have no signs in Braille.
Mechanics
Dream Comes True
Grade 5/ Unit 6
175
At Home: Write a story about a time that you or someone
else reached a goal. Include negative sentences.
Grammar
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Read the paragraph below. Rewrite the paragraph correctly on the
lines provided.
Thank you, Sara, and good morning, everyone. There aren’t no boring
sports headlines today! First, the Paralympics began last night. None of
the athletes had no trouble showing spirit. The fans, too, never showed
nothing but excitement. During the frst basketball game, nobody couldn’t
get no shot past Jennifer Howitt. She didn’t defend the basket with no
fancy moves—she just played well. Her team had never won no games
before last night. They couldn’t not be more proud. The players on the
other team weren’t never sorry that they lost. These Paralympic athletes
are not never sore losers. The positive energy at the game was thrilling!
And now back to you, Sara, for the day’s weather.
Proofreading
176
Dream Comes True
Grade 5/ Unit 6
At Home: Find a picture and describe what it does not show.
Use negatives correctly.
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Name
If the sentence is correct, write correct on the line. If it is not correct,
rewrite it correctly.
1. The classes aren’t never boring.
2. Why can’t we sail nowhere today?
3. Nobody never stays active.
4. Carmen wouldn’t walk around her neighborhood none.
5. I’ve never eaten no Spanish food.
6. The guide dog didn’t want treats.
7. Isn’t no one going to the playground?
8. Matthew has never said nothing about his wheelchair.
9. No one should never have to wait until high school to go on a swing.
10. Jennifer has not never been lazy.
Test: Negatives and
Double Negatives
Dream Comes True
Grade 5/ Unit 6
177
Grammar
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Read the story. Rewrite it on the lines below, and correct any
double negatives.
I had never played in no playgrounds until my ffteenth birthday. I
can’t never describe how happy I was on that day! I got to go on a swing
for the frst time! My mom said that nobody nowhere looked happier than
I did on that swing. My friends told me there wasn’t nothing I deserved
more than the freedom to play. I wrote a thank-you card to Matthew
Cavedon for helping our town get a playground that I could use. No one
never wrote such an excited thank-you for such a simple birthday present.
Review: Negatives
178
Dream Comes True
Grade 5/ Unit 6
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• A preposition comes before a noun or pronoun and relates
that noun or pronoun to another word in the sentence.
• Common prepositions are about, above, across, after, at, be-
hind, down, for, from, in, near, of, on, over, to, and with.
Read each sentence. Underline the prepositions. There may be
more than one preposition in each sentence.
1. The balloon few above the village.
2. Jean-Pierre Blanchard foated over the English Channel.
3. A duck, a rooster, and a sheep rode in the basket of the balloon.
4. The balloon rose to a height of one hundred feet.
5. They foated in a new direction.
6. Weather balloons give us information about the atmosphere.
7. Buoyancy keeps balloons in the air.
8. Bertrand Piccard stayed in a balloon for 20 days.
9. The balloon dropped gently from the sky.
10. The balloon landed in a forest behind a feld.
Prepositions
Up in the Air • Grade 5/ Unit 6 179
At Home: Write a paragraph describing what you might see
flying in a hot-air balloon. Circle all prepositions.
Grammar
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Underline the preposition in each sentence. Circle the object of the
preposition.
1. Jacques Charles learned about hydrogen.
2. They waved from the balloon.
3. Balloonists cannot be afraid of heights.
4. François Pilâtre De Rozier anchored his balloon with a tether.
5. The frst human passenger few over Paris.
Complete each sentence with a prepositional phrase.
6. The wind was strong

that they left.
7. There were 25 members

.
8. A duck, a rooster, and a sheep rode

.
9. , the balloonists prepared to launch.
10. The balloons

were a beautiful sight.
• A prepositional phrase is a group of words that begins with a
preposition and ends with a noun or pronoun.
• A prepositional phrase makes a connection between two nouns
or pronouns in a sentence.
• The object of a preposition is the noun or pronoun that follows
the preposition.
Prepositional Phrases
180 Up in the Air • Grade 5/ Unit 6
At Home: Rewrite sentences 6 through 10, adding a new
prepositional phrase to each sentence.
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• A prepositional phrase may come at the beginning of a sentence.
A prepositional phrase that begins a sentence is also called an
introductory phrase.
• If a prepositional phrase that begins a sentence is four or more
words, place a comma after the phrase.
Read the following two paragraphs. Place commas where they are
needed.
In the year 1783 scientifc progress met old-fashioned beliefs. On an
otherwise normal day a group of French villagers got quite a surprise.
Down from the sky a strange creature slowly foated. With pitchforks
and other farm tools the villagers struck the creature. Under this furious
attack the creature fnally stopped moving.
To the eighteenth-century villagers the object from the sky looked like
a monster. At the time of the monster’s visit very few people had ever
seen a balloon. From his science studies Professor Jacques A. C. Charles
had learned that a newly discovered gas called hydrogen weighed less
than air. When he flled a sack with this gas, the sack foated into the
air. From the heart of Paris Charles had released his balloon and then
watched as it foated away. In their attack the villagers destroyed the frst
hydrogen balloon.
Mechanics
Up in the Air • Grade 5/ Unit 6 181
At Home: Write a sentence for each of the following
prepositions: about, at, behind, down, for, from, in, of, on, with.
Grammar
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Read the paragraph below. Rewrite the paragraph correctly on the lines
provided. Be sure to add commas where needed and to remove incorrect
commas. Replace any prepositions that are used incorrectly.
From her balloon perch Cynthia looked at the world laid out beneath
her. As she passed in the balloon the trees reached from her as though to
tickle the balloon basket. The lakes and rivers sparkled and winked on
the sun. The green above the grass looked brighter than Cynthia had ever
thought it could. With a sigh to contentment she wished that she could
stay about her balloon, forever.
Proofreading
182 Up in the Air • Grade 5/ Unit 6
At Home: Write a poem about riding in a hot-air balloon. Include at
least five prepositional phrases.
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Name
Circle the letter of the preposition that fits best in each sentence.
1. Experiments

science led to the discovery of hydrogen gas.
a. near
b. in
c. at
2. The villagers

the ground looked up at the balloon.
a. on
b. in
c. after
3. all the balloons in the sky, Carl liked the red and yellow
one best.
a. Of
b. To
c. Down
4. Bertrand Piccard few around the world

twenty days.
a. on
b. with
c. in
5. the end of the day, the balloon drifted to the ground.
a. At
b. Across
c. Of
6. A breeze blew the balloons

the sky.
a. with
b. after
c. across
7. The frst fight in North America was

Philadelphia.
a. about
b. near
c. down
8. Many early balloon fights occurred

France.
a. on
b. in
c. under
Test: Prepositions
Up in the Air • Grade 5/ Unit 6 183
Grammar
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• Common prepositions are about, above, across, after, at, be-
hind, down, for, from, in, near, of, on, over, to, and with.
• A prepositional phrase is a group of words that begins with a
preposition and ends with a noun or pronoun.
• If a prepositional phrase that begins a sentence is four or more
words, place a comma after the prepositional phrase.
• The object of a preposition is the noun or pronoun that follows
the preposition.
Work with a partner. One of you will read the sentence aloud, and the
other will proofread. Look for a place in each sentence that needs a
comma. Rewrite the sentences, adding the missing commas.
1. In the early morning the balloonists took fight.
2. Across the entire feld balloons were spread out like sheets.
3. Below the green balloon the ground swept by quickly.
4. Of all the early balloonists who was the greatest?
5. After crossing the English Channel they landed in a forest.
Review: Commas and
Prepositional Phrases
184 Up in the Air • Grade 5/ Unit 6
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• A simple sentence expresses one complete thought.
• If two simple sentences deal with the same subject, they can
be combined into a compound sentence.
• Sometimes you can combine two sentences by joining similar
ideas.
Combine each pair of sentences. Leave out words that repeat or
mean the same thing.
1. Dennis went fshing. His dad went fshing.


2. It was fun looking at creatures. The creatures were tiny.


3. Dennis studied plants. Dennis studied insects.


4. Dennis used microscopes. He used them to help other scientists.


5. He observed nature. He observed it every day.


6. Scientists ask questions. They look for answers.


7. There was a volcano blast. It was in 1980.


8. They saw dead trees. The trees were covered with ash.


9. Frogs returned to the lakes. Fish returned to the lakes.


10. Tell someone that you want to learn. Tell a scientist.


Sentence Combining
Hidden Worlds • Grade 5/ Unit 6 185
At Home: Write six sentences about an outdoor activity.
Then combine the six sentences to make three sentences.
Grammar
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• You can combine two sentences that tell about the same noun
by adding an adjective to one of the sentences.
• You can combine two sentences that tell about the same action
by adding an adverb to one sentence.
• You can also combine two sentences that tell about the same
location by adding a prepositional phrase to one sentence.
Read each pair of sentences. Combine them with an adjective, an
adverb, or a prepositional phrase.
1. Dennis walked to a pond. The pond was small.
2. He worked in the lab. It was a science lab.
3. He went to college. The college was in Seattle.
4. Dennis helped others. He helped them happily.
5. The scientists traveled to a camp. It was a mountain camp.
6. Rivers were fooded by mud. They were fooded quickly.
7. The helicopter few over the blast zone. It few low.
8. Dennis found living things. He found them in the lakes.
Sentence Combining
186 Hidden Worlds • Grade 5/ Unit 6
At Home: Interview a friend or family member about an area
of science. Summarize the interview in a short paragraph.
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Grammar
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• Begin every sentence with a capital letter.
• Use the correct end mark, such as a period, question mark,
or exclamation point, for each sentence.
• If a prepositional phrase of four or more words starts a sentence,
place a comma after the phrase.
Rewrite the sentences. Add capitalization, end punctuation, and
commas where they are needed.
1. do you want to study science
2. at the science lab there are samples to study
3. he grew up in Iowa
4. dennis went to college and became a scientist
5. near his Hawaii home dennis observes nature
6. dennis dipped bottles into lakes
7. in the blast zone everything was covered with ash
8. helicopters few over the lakes and streams
9. do you know that there is a volcano near Seattle
10. living things returned to the lake
Mechanics
Hidden Worlds • Grade 5/ Unit 6 187
At Home: Draw a picture of a volcano. Write four sentences
about what can happen after a volcano erupts.
Grammar
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Read the paragraph below. Rewrite the paragraph, combining short
sentences that deal with the same subject and correcting punctuation.
dennis went to school He went to school to become a scientist. scientists
study. They study nature Dennis knew that he would like to be a scientist.
He knew because he liked to study nature. he learned how to dive. He
learned in order to study ocean plants. One day he flew in a helicopter.
He flew in one and collected water samples These samples helped
scientists learn. They helped scientists learn about how living things
survive. do you think science is important Study nature as Dennis did. Go
to school like dennis did. Then you can become a scientist, too
Proofreading
188 Hidden Worlds • Grade 5/ Unit 6
At Home: Look through newspapers and magazines for
sentences that could be combined, and combine them.
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Grammar
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Combine each pair of sentences. Write the new sentence on the line.
1. Dennis cared for pets. They were the family pets.
2. He went on trips. He went to collect things.
3. There was a college. It was in his home town.
4. She studied plants. They were fowering plants.
5. The boxes are full. The bottles are full.
6. They could see for miles. They could see ash.
Rewrite each sentence. Add punctuation and capitals.
7. scientists explore many different places
8. in only a few weeks living things returned to the lakes
9. what is your favorite thing to do outside
10. to learn more about science talk to a scientist
Test: Sentence
Combining and
Punctuation Marks
Hidden Worlds • Grade 5/ Unit 6 189
Grammar
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Read each sentence pair. Write the correctly combined sentences
on the lines provided.
How to Become a Scientist
1. Learn to observe. Learn to observe nature.
2. Find a topic that you like. Learn about a topic that you like.
3. Ask questions. Ask a scientist.
Read the following paragraph. Rewrite the paragraph with correctly
combined sentences.
When I became a scientist, I went to places. The places were
interesting. I saw beaches. I saw deserts. My microscope became a tool. It
became an important tool. It helped me study. It helped me study shells. I
like being a scientist. I like it because my work helps our planet.
Review: Sentence
Combining
190 Hidden Worlds • Grade 5/ Unit 6
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Grammar
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Read each passage and look at the underlined sentences. Choose the best
way to rewrite each sentence. Fill in the circle beside the correct answer.
Alexi served the Tsar good, but the Tsar was not pleased.
(1)
The Tsar sly planned to win the Golden Mare for himself.
(2)
1. Ꭽ Alexi served the Tsar gooder, but the Tsar was not pleased.
Ꭾ Alexi served the Tsar well, but the Tsar was not pleased.
Ꭿ Alexi served the Tsar goodly, but the Tsar was not pleased
൳ No mistake.
2. ൴ The Tsar slily planned to win the Golden Mare for himself.
൵ The Tsar slyly to win the Golden Mare for himself.
൶ The Tsar slyly planned to win the Golden Mare for himself.
൷ No mistake.
Uncle Curtis drove more fast than Teddy and Bobby’s parents. When they arrived,
(3)
Uncle Curtis began unpacking. He was so excited that he moved quickliest of all.
(4)
3. Ꭽ Uncle Curtis drove fastest than Teddy and Bobby’s parents.
Ꭾ Uncle Curtis drove more faster than Teddy and Bobby’s parents.
Ꭿ Uncle Curtis drove faster than Teddy and Bobby’s parents.
൳ No mistake.
4. ൴ He was so excited that he moved most quickly of all.
൵ He was so excited that he moved more quickly of all.
൶ He was so excited that he moved most quickliest of all.
൷ No mistake.
Adverbs
191 Unit 6 Review • Grade 5/ Unit 6
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Many of the first ballooning experiments were conducted in France. Professor
(5)
Jacques Charles launched the first hydrogen balloon from Paris. In another
landmark flight De Rozier was the first person to ride in a balloon.
(6)
5. Ꭽ Many of the frst ballooning experiments were conducted on France.
Ꭾ Many over the frst ballooning experiments were conducted in France.
Ꭿ Many of the frst, ballooning experiments were conducted in France.
൳ No mistake.
6. ൴ To another landmark fight De Rozier was the frst person to ride in a
balloon.
൵ In another landmark fight, De Rozier was the frst person to ride in a
balloon.
൶ In another landmark fight De Rozier, was the frst person to ride in a
balloon.
൷ No mistake.
Dennis and the other scientists collected samples. They collected water samples.
(7)
They looked at the water samples. They used microscopes to look at the samples.
(8)
7. Ꭽ Dennis and the other scientists collected samples, they collected water
samples.
Ꭾ Dennis collected water samples. The other scientists collected water
samples.
Ꭿ Dennis and the other scientists collected water samples.
൳ No mistake.
8. ൴ They used microscopes to look at the water samples.
൵ They looked at the water samples they used microscopes.
൶ They used microscopes.
൷ No mistake.
Adverbs
192 Unit 6 Review • Grade 5/ Unit 6

B

Unit 1 • Challenges School Contests
Miss Alaineus

Contents
Sentence Types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Commands and Exclamations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Test: Sentence Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Review: Sentence Types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Subjects and Predicates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Compound Subjects and Predicates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Test: Subjects and Predicates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Review: Subjects and Predicates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Sentence Combining. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Conjunctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Test: Sentence Combining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Review: Sentence Combining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 More Sentence Combining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Complex Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Test: More Sentence Combining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Review: More Sentence Combining. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Run-on Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Correcting Run-on Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Test: Run-on Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Review: Run-on Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31, 32

American Legends
Davy Crockett Saves the World

Trees for Life
Time For Kids: Forests of the World

Exploring Space
Ultimate Field Trip 5: Blasting Off to Space Academy

Rescue Dogs
Pipiolo and the Roof Dogs
© Macmillan /McGraw-Hill

Unit 1 Review: Sentences

iii

Unit 2 • Discoveries People Helping Animals
Shiloh Common and Proper Nouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Using Proper Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Test: Common and Proper Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Review: Common and Proper Nouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Singular and Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Making Special Forms of Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Test: Singular and Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Review: Singular and Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 More Plural Nouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 More Plural Nouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Test: Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Review: Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Singular Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Singular and Plural Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Test: Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Review: Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Plurals and Possessives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Plurals and Possessives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Test: Plurals and Possessives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Review: Plurals and Possessives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63, 64

Slithery Snakes!
Rattlers!

Remembering the Past
Time For Kids: Maya Lin: Architect of Memory

The Caribbean Islands
The Night of San Juan

Cowboys and Cowgirls
Black Cowboy Wild Horses

Unit 2 Review: Nouns

iv

© Macmillan /McGraw-Hill

. . . . . . . . . 72 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . 87 Review: Linking Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Test: Linking Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Past Tense and Future Tense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Review: Contractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Review: Verb Tenses. . . 74 Test: Verb Tenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Unit 3 • Turning Points The American Revolution Sleds on Boston Common Action Verbs . . . . . . . . 93 Review: Irregular Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Review: Action Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Test: Action Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 The Right to Vote When Esther Morris Headed West Protecting the Environment Time For Kids: Beyond the Horizon Desert Habitats My Great-Grandmother’s Gourd Into the Future Zathura © Macmillan /McGraw-Hill Unit 3 Review: Verbs v . . 95. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Linking Verbs . . . . . . . . . .80 Test: Main and Helping Verbs. . . . . . . 92 Test: Irregular Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Mechanics . . . . . . . 83 Linking Verbs . . 78 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Mechanics . . 85 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Action Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Present Tense . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Irregular Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Proofreading . . . . . . . . .88 Irregular Verbs. . . . . . . 76 Main and Helping Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 More Helping Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127. . . . . 99 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Homophones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Mechanics . 107 Review: Subject and Object Pronouns. . . 108 Pronoun-Verb Agreement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Subject and Object Pronouns. . . . . 98 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Review: Possessive Pronouns and Hyphens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Possessive Pronouns . . . . . 111 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Unit 4 • Experiences Civil Rights Goin’ Someplace Special Pronouns and Antecedents . . . . . 106 Test: Subject and Object Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Subject and Object Pronouns. . . . . . . 97 Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Test: Possessive Pronouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Test: Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Animal Defenses Carlos and the Skunk Democracy Time For Kids: Getting Out the Vote Extreme Weather Hurricanes Trickster Tales The Catch of the Day: A Trickster Play Unit 4 Review: Pronouns vi © Macmillan /McGraw-Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Ways to Use Possessive Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Test: Pronouns and Homophones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Proofreading . . 112 Test: Pronoun-Verb Agreement . . . . . . . . 101 Review: Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Review: Possessive Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Review: Pronoun-Verb Agreement . . . . 120 Pronouns and Homophones. 126 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 The Verbs Have and Be . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 Mechanics . 151 Review: Comparing with More and Most . . .Unit 5 • Achievements North Pole. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Proofreading . . . . . . . 160 Fantastic Foods Weslandia Learning from Nature Time For Kids: A Historic Journey Talking in Codes The Unbreakable Code Whales The Gri Gri Tree © Macmillan /McGraw-Hill Unit 5 Review: Adjectives vii . . . . . . . . . 140 Adjectives That Compare . . . . . . . 159. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Test: Comparing with More and Most. . 138 Test: Articles . . . . . . 135 Articles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Test: Comparing with Good and Bad . . . . . . . . . . 132 Test: Adjectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Comparing with More and Most . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and The . . . . . 139 Review: Articles. . . . . 129 Demonstrative Adjectives . . . An. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Review: Comparing with Good and Bad . . . . . . . . 134 The Articles A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Comparing with More and Most . . . . . . 143 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Review: Adjectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 Comparing with Good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . 144 Test: Adjectives That Compare . 155 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 More Adjectives That Compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Comparing with Bad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . South Pole Spirit of Endurance Adjectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Review: Adjectives That Compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . the Firebird. . . . . 182 Test: Prepositions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Adverbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Proofreading . . . . . . . . 174 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Sentence Combining. . . 176 Test: Negatives and Double Negatives . 186 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Test: Adverbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Unit 6 • Great Ideas Fairy Tales The Golden Mare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and the Magic Ring Adverbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Review: Adverbs That Compare. . . . . 170 Test: Adverbs That Compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Test: Sentence Combining and Punctuation Marks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Negatives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Adverbs That Compare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 Review: Sentence Combining . . . . . . . . . 167 Adverbs That Compare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 Sentence Combining. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Prepositions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Review: Commas and Prepositional Phrases . 162 Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 Negatives. . . . . . . . 175 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 Camping Out Skunk Scout Improving Lives Time For Kids: A Dream Comes True Balloon Flight Up in the Air: The Story of Balloon Flight Scientists at Work Hidden Worlds Unit 6 Review: Adverbs viii © Macmillan /McGraw-Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 . . . . . . . . . . 168 Mechanics . . . . . 179 Prepositional Phrases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Review: Negatives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Review: Adverbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

• A sentence fragment is a group of words that does not express a complete thought. Place a period on the line at the end if it is a sentence. She was looking forward to the Tenth Annual Vocabulary Parade 6. • A statement is a sentence that tells something. Starr went to the end of the line after she spelled the word correctly Rewrite these sentences. Sage turned red when she heard everyone laughing 8. Miss Alaineus • Grade 5/Unit 1 1 . If it is a sentence fragment. Sage missed vocabulary day because she had a cold 2. Read each group of words.Grammar Name Sentence Types • A sentence is a group of words that express a complete thought. write an F on the line. It ends with a question mark. 1. • A question is a sentence that asks something. Sage liked to make up her own definitions Place a period on the line at the end of the sentence if it is a statement. • Every sentence begins with a capital letter and ends with a punctuation mark. Be sure to use the correct end mark. 7. Mrs. Page asked the students to spell and define the words 10. Place a question mark at the end of the sentence if it is a question. Finished defining the vocabulary words 3. 4. Is “Musical Performance” the theme for this week 5. do you have a collection of unrelated objects © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 9. It ends with a period. why were they laughing At Home: Write two statements and two questions about Sage’s story.

How sad for Sage to feel so devastated 7. Bell’s suit is all soggy 2 Miss Alaineus • Grade 5/Unit 1 At Home: Write a story about a task that seems impossible. Wow. Read each sentence. It ends with a period. • An exclamation expresses strong feeling. Mr. Oh no. she hung up the phone with a crash 5.Grammar Name Commands and Exclamations • A command tells someone to do something. and write your choice on the line. 1. Please tell me what the vocabulary words are for this week 2. Then rewrite the sentences with the correct end marks. that’s an amazing gold trophy that Sage won 8. Include two commands and two exclamations. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Write each word five times 3. Oh my. Decide if each sentence is a command or an exclamation. It ends with an exclamation mark. Be sure to include each word’s definition 4. Line up by the board for the Vocabulary Parade 6.

one question. • A command ends with a period. • A question ends with a question mark. • A statement ends with a period. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 12. Oh no. an exclamation mark if it is an exclamation. Read each sentence. Circle any letters that should be capitals. We have many vocabulary words this week. Please pass me that eraser. She was so excited to see Miss Alaineus 9. Miss Alaineus • Grade 5/Unit 1 3 . 1. 11. Starr. On the line. miss alaineus is not on the spaghetti box 10. Write the vocabulary words on a sheet of paper 2. We will see Miss Alaineus tomorrow. or a question mark if it is a question. 13. and one command about it. At Home: Choose a television program that you enjoy and write one statement. Forest is a boy in Sage’s class 3. Have you seen her gigantic red dictionary 6. • An exclamation ends with an exclamation mark. what does Miss Alaineus have to do with categories 7.Grammar Name Mechanics • Every sentence begins with a capital letter. Sage’s mother had a great idea Rewrite each statement or command below as a question. Go get some of that long Italian bread and two sticks of butter 8. you’re late for baseball practice 4. her head felt as though it were stuffed with cotton 5. place a period if the sentence is a statement or command.

Place an exclamation point at the end of an exclamation. Use the correct capitalization and punctuation marks. I like spelling? it’s my favorite subject! Each week. our teacher gives us twenty spelling words? I always write the words in my notebook! the boy who sits next to me sneezed? How sick I became. Place a period at the end of a command. Rewrite the paragraph below. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Place a period at the end of a statement. I could not be at school the day our teacher gave us the spelling words? I called my friend to get the words for the week? I feel confident that I will get all the words right on the test! this is going to be easy? i hope i’m not sick the day of the spelling test! 4 Miss Alaineus • Grade 5/Unit 1 At Home: Write a dialogue between Sage and Starr using at least one of each type of sentence. Place a question mark at the end of a question.Grammar Name Proofreading • • • • • Begin every sentence with a capital letter.

Then rewrite the sentence so that its end mark and capitalization are correct. Oh. Page when the next parade is scheduled 10. I love your Vocabulary Parade costume 8. Sage was propped up in bed with a box of tissues 4. Ask Mrs. Write whether it is a statement. have you ever seen a fossil 7. what will your costume be Miss Alaineus • Grade 5/Unit 1 5 . 1. a command. Bell’s face 9. nose How hard it is to study while you’re blowing your 5. a question. call Starr and ask her for the words 3. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill did you see the look on Mr. do you have a spork in your miscellaneous drawer 6. Why did Sage miss Vocabulary Day 2.Grammar Name Test: Sentence Types Read each sentence. or an exclamation.

• An exclamation expresses strong feeling. a command. It ends with a period. State which you have made. nervous at the spelling contest. • A question is a sentence that asks something. some students spell 3. A sentence fragment is a group of words that does not express a complete thought. It ends with a question mark. or an exclamation. • A statement is a sentence that tells something. It ends with a period. It ends with an exclamation mark. 1. • A command tells someone to do something. Use the correct capitalization and end mark. I can’t believe I 5. Read each group of words. 2. won the contest © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 6 Miss Alaineus • Grade 5/Unit 1 . please say 6.Grammar Name Review: Sentence Types • A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete thought. • Every sentence begins with a capital letter and ends with a punctuation mark. a question. what did our teacher 4. Add words to make each group a statement.

bad comet hurtled toward America. Read each sentence. Davy Crockett’s red-hot enemy was discombobulated. Read each sentence. 5. • The complete predicate includes all of the words in the predicate. At Home: Write four sentences about the story. The big. 1. 10. Davy’s pet bear danced in the forest.Grammar Name Subjects and Predicates The subject of a sentence tells who or what the sentence is about. Davy learned all the latest dances. The President received piles of letters. 7. 4. The beautiful Sally Sugartree married Davy. 6. • The complete subject includes all of the words in the subject. It tells exactly who or what the sentence is about. Halley’s Comet howled when it saw Davy. Davy Crockett Saves the World Grade 5/Unit 1 7 . • The simple predicate is the main word in the complete predicate. Circle the simple subject. • The simple subject is the main word in the complete subject. The predicate of a sentence tells what the subject does or is. 2. 3. Circle the simple predicate. A brave man lived in the mountains. and underline the complete predicate. and underline the complete subject. 9. Sally climbed a 50-foot hickory tree. The people elected Davy to Congress when he returned home. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. and circle the simple subjects and simple predicates.

Davy and Death Hug danced in the forest. Davy combed his hair with a rake and shaved his beard with an ax. Sally Sugartree was happy to see Davy return. • You can combine two sentences by joining two subjects or two predicates with and or or. Write S on the line if the sentence has a compound subject. Combine the compound subject or compound predicate in each pair with and or or. Read each sentence. . 4. Rewrite each set of sentences as one sentence. Write P on the line if the sentence has a compound predicate. Davy jumped over the comet’s shoulder. 2. 3. Davy planted his teeth around its neck. 1.Grammar Name Compound Subjects and Predicates • A compound subject contains two or more simple subjects that have the same predicate. 5. 8 Davy Crockett Saves the World Grade 5/Unit 1 At Home: Make up pairs of sentences that can be combined using and or or in the subject or predicate. The President and Davy posed for pictures. The community was happy to see Davy return. Davy climbed to the top of Eagle Eye Peak and waited for the comet. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 6. • A compound predicate contains two or more simple predicates that have the same subject.

Sally Sugartree was friendly pretty and smart. 8. Every river tree and lake could be seen from the top of Eagle Eye Peak. Davy Crockett Saves the World Grade 5/Unit 1 9 . 6. 3. • Do not use a comma after the last word in a series. 5.Grammar Name Mechanics • Use commas to separate three or more words in a series. and adjectives in a series. Davy needed a comb a rake and an ax. Davy’s pet bear was so fast that rocks trees cows and snakes flew out from beneath its feet. He could drink the water from lakes rivers and oceans. Halley’s Comet shot out sparks lightning and thunder. Davy grabbed Halley’s Comet spun it around and hurled it back into space. predicates. 4. Use commas correctly. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 7. Add commas where they are needed. Correct each sentence. 2. At Home: Write five sentences that each include a series of three or more words. • Commas separate subjects. The biggest scariest meanest ball of fire was called Halley’s Comet. 1.

sally then asked Davy to sing. use the words and or or. Use correct capitalization and punctuation. Davy wouldn’t dance because his boots were too big. He chopped wood hunted wild animals and ran a powder mill.Grammar Name Proofreading • Be sure that every sentence begins with a capital letter and ends with the correct punctuation mark. • Use commas to separate three or more words or phrases in a series. combining sentences and adding commas where needed. • When combining subjects and predicates. Sally Sugartree asked Davy to dance. 10 Davy Crockett Saves the World Grade 5/Unit 1 At Home: Write your own folk tale about a strong hero. Rewrite the passage. His voice was so strong that it made the trees sway the clouds move and the animals scatter. one day. Every morning he got up early to see the sunrise. He got up early to eat breakfast. He wouldn’t dance because he would step on her toes. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . and include compound subjects and compound predicates. davy Crockett was a frontiersman. Sally liked Davy’s voice so much that she decided to marry him.

Underline the complete predicate in this sentence. Davy enjoyed spending time in the forest. Death Hug liked to dance. 4. c. Davy hurled Halley’s Comet back into space. Davy was fast. The President’s law that Halley’s Comet couldn’t crash into Earth. c. Davy’s ax and rake. 3. Follow each direction below. Which of the following groups of words is a sentence fragment? a. 5. b. Davy could drink the Mississippi River dry. d. The pretty girl was Sally Sugartree. Which of the following groups of words is a complete sentence? a. Sally Sugartree and Davy Crockett got married after the parade. b. 1. The President thanked him for his help. Davy saved the United States from trouble. b. Underline the complete subject of this sentence. c. Underline the simple subject of this sentence. Davy wears a coonskin cap on his head. 6.Grammar Name Circle the letter for each correct answer. Circle the simple predicate. 2. d. Very strong and brave. Was elected to Congress after saving the world. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Test: Subject and Predicate Davy Crockett Saves the World Grade 5/Unit 1 11 . In which sentence is the simple subject underlined? a. Sally danced better than anyone. d.

The real Davy Crockett was an American frontiersman. Circle the simple predicate. was a frontiersman who enjoyed the outdoors 2. Davy Crockett and his wife 3. He enjoyed the outdoors and hunted wild animals. • The simple subject is the main word in the complete subject. Rewrite the complete sentence. Read the following paragraphs. In each sentence. underline the complete subject once and the complete predicate twice. Correct the sentence fragments by adding a subject or predicate. He lost his reelection to Congress in 1836 and decided to help Texas in its fight against Mexico. Davy and his wife owned a gristmill and a powder mill.Grammar Name Review: Subjects and Predicates • The complete subject includes all of the words in the subject. • The complete predicate includes all of the words in the predicate. Davy Crockett achieved many things in his life. 1. He died while defending the Alamo against Mexican troops. Davy won an election to Congress in 1832. He is a hero to many people because of his bravery and strength. remember him because he valued the American frontier 12 Davy Crockett Saves the World Grade 5/Unit 1 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . • The simple predicate is the main word in the complete predicate. Stories about Davy are still told today.

Grammar
Name
Sentence Combining

• Two related sentences can be joined with a comma and and, but, or or. • A sentence that contains two sentences joined by and, but, or or is called a compound sentence. Read each pair of sentences. Rewrite them as a single sentence, using and, but, or or along with a comma. 1. Pakenham went searching for trees. He wrote a book about them.

2. General Sherman is the name of a person. It is also the name of a giant sequoia.

3. Would you like to visit a coniferous forest biome? Would you like to see a deciduous forest?

4. The fallen leaves enrich the soil. They allow all kinds of plant life to grow.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

5. Oak, beech, ash, and maple trees are typical of a deciduous forest. Many types of insects and animals live in that habitat.

At Home: Write pairs of sentences and ask a helper to combine them by using a comma and a conjunction.

Forests of the World •

Grade 5/Unit 1

13

Grammar
Name
Conjunctions

• A conjunction joins words or groups of words. And, but, and or are conjunctions. • A sentence that contains two sentences joined by and, but, or or is called a compound sentence. • In a compound sentence, a comma is placed before the conjunction. Read each sentence below. Underline the conjunction, and put a comma in the correct place. 1. Limited rainfall or lengthy drought can cause wildfires but these fires can also be caused by campfires or a stray match. 2. Helicopters can drop chemicals to slow flames and firefighters can set up fire lines. 3. Tiny bonsai trees may look like young plants but they are full grown. 4. Many areas in the world are covered with trees but the Arctic tundra is treeless. 5. Moisture is absorbed and then it evaporates and falls as rain. Read each sentence below. If it is a compound sentence, write C on the line. If it is not a compound sentence, leave the line blank. 6. There are no leaves to decompose and make the ground suitable for growth. 7. Some plants will not thrive in a coniferous forest, but some animals do well in this biome. forests.
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8. North America, Europe, and eastern Asia all have deciduous

14

Forests of the World •

Grade 5/Unit 1

At Home: Write six compound sentences joined by and or but with a comma before each conjunction.

Grammar
Name
Mechanics

• Use a comma before and, but, or or when you join two sentences to form a compound sentence. • Begin every sentence with a capital letter. • When you form a compound sentence, do not begin the second part with a capital letter. Read each group of words. Then write them as correct sentences on the lines. Be sure to use capital letters and commas in the correct places. 1. trees produce oxygen and they reduce the effects of carbon dioxide.

2. Trees should be planted in certain areas or the soil could be carried away by wind and water.

3. a stone wall might be an effective way to cut down noise but a row of trees is usually more attractive

4. arbor Day was successful in 1872 but it was even more successful in 2002.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

5. trees are considered to be among nature’s hardest workers and this is true in any climate. 6. Could you identify the trees in your neighborhood by yourself or would you need some help?

At Home: Write four sentences about the story, and underline the complete subjects.

Forests of the World •

Grade 5/Unit 1

15

Grammar
Name
Proofreading

• Use commas to separate three or more words in a series. • Two related sentences can be joined with a comma and and, but, or or.

Read the passage below. Circle mistakes in capitalization and punctuation. Then rewrite the passage.

Almost half of the world’s rain forests are in Brazil but many are found in Asia Africa South america Central America and on many Pacific Islands. the vegetation in a rain forest is thick and this means that a great deal of moisture is absorbed into the atmosphere. The moisture eventually evaporates. The moisture falls back to Earth as rain. Amazingly, tropical rain forests receive 70 inches of rain a year? A rain forest has three layers. the canopy is the tallest. The understory is in the middle. The forest floor is on the bottom. The forest floor is very dense. It is covered with ferns and mosses.

16

Forests of the World •

Grade 5/Unit 1

At Home: Read a magazine article about rain forests. Find the conjunctions and compound sentences.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

5. b. in the natural decaying enriches the soil. Which of the following sentences uses a comma correctly? a. and the natural decaying enriches the soil. What are the five most common trees in the United States? b. b. draw a picture of the type of forest you like best. Which of the following sentences has a conjunction? a. b. Trees absorb carbon dioxide. and this absorption keeps the carbon dioxide from harming the environment. I like black cherry trees. less than a foot tall. Which of the following compound sentences uses a conjunction correctly? a. Trees absorb carbon dioxide. write a compound sentence that explains why you like this type of forest. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Test: Sentence Combining Forests of the World • Grade 5/Unit 1 17 . 1. 3. 4. can be. or the natural decaying enriches the soil. In the space below. Trees absorb carbon dioxide and keep it from harming the environment. c. Tiny bonsai trees are from Japan. Tiny bonsai trees are from Japan and they. Deciduous trees lose their leaves. Under the picture. c. c.Grammar Name Circle the letter for each correct answer. and keep it from harming the environment. Deciduous trees lose their leaves. and it is doing very well. and they can be less than a foot tall. c. Tiny bonsai trees are from Japan and they can be less than a foot tall. We planted a black cherry tree. Which of the following sentences is a compound sentence? a. Deciduous trees lose their leaves. 2.

18 Forests of the World • Grade 5/Unit 1 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . He searches for fascinating trees. and circle the conjunctions.” Some of the trees are small.Grammar Name Review: Sentence Combining Read the paragraph. Are there small trees or large trees or no trees at all? In what ways do they affect the climate where you live? Are there any trees that cut down noise? Use five compound sentences joined by and. is 190 feet around. but some of the trees are quite large. Thomas Pakenham has a very interesting job. He takes many pictures of the trees. or or in your paragraph. and he writes about their interesting “personalities. Pakenham hopes that his pictures will remind us not to take trees for granted. Underline each compound sentence. Write a paragraph about the types of trees that are found in your neighborhood. Mr. but. The Montezuma cypress. Be sure to use correct capitalization and punctuation. for example.

and while. Gum and drinks are not allowed. whether. They would not be injured. They can create disasters in the dirt-free zone. The trainer would hold onto the chair. when. using the conjunction in parentheses. 1. Use a conjunction to combine the sentences. but. and or are used to form compound sentences. if. since. how. Combine each pair of sentences. (before) At Home: Write two simple sentences about what you would like to do at space camp. when. as. (because) 3. or under what conditions. The Ultimate Field Trip Grade 5/Unit 1 19 . until. because. • Some conjunctions tell where. (until) © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 5.Grammar Name More Sentence Combining • The conjunctions and. (so that) 4. He volunteered to sit in the gravity chair. The students were told to remove their jewelry. These conjunctions include after. The last student had a turn. although. so that. (and) 2. why. He realized how hard it was to move around. Others wore spacesuits. Some tasted space food. before.

or or is called a complex sentence. until. using a comma if necessary. From each pair of conjunctions in parentheses. • Sometimes the comma is unnecessary if the conjunction appears in the middle of the sentence. Bethany held on to the 5DF Chair. before. so that. I was feeling brave. because. if. It can spot a firefly ten thousand miles away. The Hubble Telescope must be powerful. whether. The conjunction can appear at the beginning of the sentence or in the middle of the sentence. • If the complex sentence begins with the conjunction. The kids practiced moving along the wall. . although. (because/although) 2. and while. when. (so that/before) 3. but. There is no wind to blow the prints away. 1. (until/since) 20 The Ultimate Field Trip Grade 5/Unit 1 At Home: Look in a newspaper or magazine to find examples of the conjunctions listed above.Grammar Name Complex Sentences A sentence that contains two related ideas joined by a conjunction other than and. since. Write the new sentence. I saw how fast the multi-axis trainer was spinning. The moon does not have an atmosphere. then a comma should follow the last word in that part of the sentence. choose the conjunction that combines the sentences into a single sentence that makes sense. (while/because) © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 4. These conjunctions include after. as.

• Use a comma to separate the day and year in a date. I’m having so much fun. your son Kyle P.O. July 1 2007 dear mom and dad Thank you for letting me go to the Space Academy. Today we used a special chair that helped us move around. Box 345 Huntsville Alabama © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill At Home: Write a letter to a friend explaining what you did today. Use correct punctuation. • Use a comma between the names of a city and a state.Grammar Name Mechanics • Begin the greeting and the closing of a letter with capital letters. Tomorrow we’re going to get into a machine that will spin us around. Please write back to the address below. Correct the following letter. The Ultimate Field Trip Grade 5/Unit 1 21 . • Use a comma after the greeting in a friendly letter and the closing in all letters. We’ve eaten space food and tried on spacesuits.

Use commas where needed. Correct errors in capitalization and punctuation. • Sometimes a comma is necessary if the conjunction appears in the middle of the sentence. Read the diary entry below. then a comma should follow the last word in that part of the sentence. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . • Begin the greeting and the closing of a letter with capital letters. Before I sat down I made sure to watch the person in front of me so I would know what to do. your friend Lindsay 22 The Ultimate Field Trip Grade 5/Unit 1 At Home: Write a friendly letter to a distant relative you have not seen in awhile. • Use a comma to separate the day and the year in a date. I got to use a gravity chair. • Use a comma between the names of a city and a state.Grammar Name Proofreading • If a complex sentence begins with a conjunction. February 18 2008 dear diary: you’ll never believe what I did today. I was scared at first but the team leaders made me relax and have fun. I can’t wait to try it again tomorrow. • Use a comma after the greeting in a friendly letter and the closing in all letters.

Grammar
Name
Test: More Sentence Combining

A. Circle the letters of the sentences that best combine the sentence pairs below. 1. Pay attention to the leader. You do not hurt yourself while training. a. Pay attention to the leader so that you do not hurt yourself while training. b. Pay attention to the leader unless you do not hurt yourself while training. c. Pay attention to the leader while you do not hurt yourself while training. 2. They practiced for a long time. The environment was so different from that of Earth. a. They practiced for a long time before the environment was so different from that of Earth. b. They practiced for a long time because the environment was so different from that of Earth. c. They practiced for a long time, while the environment was so different from that of Earth. 3. They got ready for the MAT. The students removed everything from their pockets. a. Until they got ready for the MAT, the students removed everything from their pockets. b. They got ready for the MAT since the students removed everything from their pockets. c. Before they got ready for the MAT, the students removed everything from their pockets. 4. Their time wasn’t very good. The students did build the cube. a. Because their time wasn’t very good, the students did build the cube. b. Their time wasn’t very good if the students did build the cube. c. Although their time wasn’t very good, the students did build the cube. B. Circle the letter of the conjunction that best completes each complex sentence.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

5. ___________ the students arrived at the camp, they tried on spacesuits. a. When b. Although c. Whether 6. He did do the bunny hop, ___________ it was difficult at first. a. when b. although c. whether
The Ultimate Field Trip
Grade 5/Unit 1

23

Grammar
Name
Review: More Sentence Combining

• A sentence that contains two related ideas joined by a conjunction other than and, but, or or is called a complex sentence. • Some conjunctions tell where, when, why, how or under what conditions. These conjunctions include after, although, as, because, before, if, since, so that, until, when, whether, and while. • If a complex sentence begins with the conjunction, then a comma should follow the last word in that part of the sentence. • Sometimes a comma is necessary if the conjunction appears in the middle of the sentence. List the conjunctions that you have learned this week. Then choose a conjunction and match it with one of the following sentences. Use that conjunction to combine the sentence with a sentence of your own. (If the conjunction doesn’t seem to make sense, match it with another sentence.) Write the new sentence on the line. Add a comma to your sentence if one is needed. 1. The training center is a dirt-free zone.

2. They learned how to eat in space.

3. The other teams jumped high enough to dunk a basketball.
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4. He landed on his back and couldn’t get up.

24

The Ultimate Field Trip
Grade 5/Unit 1

Grammar
Name
Run-On Sentences

• A run-on sentence joins together two or more sentences that should be written separately. • You can correct run-on sentences by separating the complete ideas into separate sentences or by rewriting run-on sentences as compound sentences. Correct the following run-on sentences. 1. San Pablo Etla is on the edge of a valley Lupe’s father built their house on the mountainside.

2. Lupe found Pipiolo asleep inside an old shoe she saw greatness when he opened his eyes.

3. The roof dogs guarded the roofs they would bark furiously down at Lupe and Pipiolo.

4. Pipiolo slipped into a cornfield Lupe followed him.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

5. Pipiolo barked all the dogs jumped down onto the pile of oranges in the truck.

6. Lupe took a walk over to the village of Viquera it was a longer route to her school.

At Home: Proofread a recent writing assignment, looking for and correcting run-on sentences.

Pipiolo and the Roof Dogs
Grade 5/Unit 1

25

Grammar
Name
You can correct a run-on sentence in several ways. • Correct a run-on sentence by separating its complete thoughts into separate sentences. • Correct a run-on sentence by rewriting it as a compound sentence. Correct the run-on sentences below either by separating them as two sentences or by rewriting them as a compound sentence. 1. Lupe lived in San Pablo Etla the village is in southern Mexico.
Correcting Run-On Sentences

2. The roof dogs would run to the edge of their roofs they would bark furiously at Lupe and Pipiolo.

3. The dogs didn’t frighten Lupe she knew they were the ones who were frightened.

4. Pipiolo was lucky Lupe didn’t have a flat roof Papa would have put him up there.

6. Lupe continued to dig up grass Pipiolo slept in the shade.

26

Pipiolo and the Roof Dogs
Grade 5/Unit 1

At Home: Write about your experiences with dogs or other animals, using one long run-on sentence. Then correct the sentence.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

5. Lupe gave each roof dog a tuft of grass she saved the piece with a flower for Chulita.

Pipiolo was a perky puppy he loved to run in the mountains. Was the only dog left on the truck. • A sentence fragment is a group of words that does not contain a complete thought. Write the new sentences on the lines provided. At Home: Write a journal entry about dogs. Pipiolo and the Roof Dogs Grade 5/Unit 1 27 . 3. 6. A fragment may be missing a subject. 4. 1. The roof dogs smelled the aromas of freedom they missed the smell of freshly dug earth. You can also rewrite a run-on sentence as a compound sentence. or both. or both. Correct the run-on sentences below by writing separate sentences or compound sentences. You can correct a run-on sentence by separating the two complete ideas into two sentences. The village of San Pablo Etla is very small it is on the edge of a wide valley in southern Mexico. You can correct a fragment by adding the missing part of speech. 2. Correct the sentence fragments below by adding a subject. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 5. The big truck. Commanded the roof dogs to escape. a verb.Grammar Name Mechanics • A run-on sentence joins together two or more sentences that should be written separately. a verb. Proofread a partner’s paper for capitalization and punctuation.

Pipiolo came up with a plan to set them all free Chulita told the dogs about the plan. checking your story for run-on sentences. use commas to separate three or more words or phrases in a series. • A run-on sentence can be broken into two separate sentences or rewritten as a compound or complex sentence. Rewrite it correctly on the lines provided. but. one day.Grammar Name Proofreading • A run-on sentence joins together two or more sentences that should be written separately. Proofread the following paragraph. Wherever they went. Also. concrete roofs. they came across the village of Viquera there were many dogs trapped on the flat. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Because they were so excited they barked loudly all day long. Pipiolo and Chulita went on many adventures together they traveled over mountains across prairies and through forests. they helped more roof dogs escape to freedom they even made a few friends along the way. 28 Pipiolo and the Roof Dogs Grade 5/Unit 1 At Home: Write another story about Pipiolo. • Remember to add a comma before and. or or when changing a run-on sentence into a compound sentence.

Pipiolo barked loudly all of the dogs understood his message. The people of San Pablo Etla had roof dogs the dogs protected their homes from trespassers. Lupe found Pipiolo when he was just a puppy he was so small he fit inside a shoe. you may write two shorter sentences. 3. or you may add a conjunction to create a compound sentence. 4. 5. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 6. 1. Pipiolo and the Roof Dogs Grade 5/Unit 1 29 . To do so.Grammar Name Test: Run-On Sentences Correct the run-on sentences below. John Wayne jumped onto a wagon full of hay that is what gave Pipiolo the idea to free the roof dogs. Lupe’s cousin Inocencia thought that the roof dogs’ escape was a miracle everyone else was upset about it. 2. The Tienda Soliz had the only television in town its only channel showed old American westerns.

Using her school ruler. She gave Chulita a piece with a flower.Grammar Name Review: Run-On Sentences Read each run-on sentence below. Pipiolo is a smart dog if Lupe must have been surprised by what he could do. Because Lupe felt sorry for the roof dogs and she wanted them to smell real earth. she wanted them to smell real earth. so she wanted them to smell real earth. 4. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill a. Lupe must have been surprised by what he could do. c. The roof dogs of the village were happy after Pipiolo showed them how to escape. Using her school ruler. The roof dogs of the village were happy and Pipiolo showed them how to escape. a. Because Lupe felt sorry for the roof dogs. Pipiolo showed them how to escape. 1. a. Pipiolo is a smart dog. 30 Pipiolo and the Roof Dogs Grade 5/Unit 1 . The roof dogs of the village were happy Pipiolo showed them how to escape. Using her school ruler. b. b. Circle the letter of the sentence that shows the best way to correct the run-on sentence. Pipiolo is a smart dog Lupe must have been surprised by what he could do. Because Lupe felt sorry for the roof dogs she wanted them to smell real earth. Lupe dug up the grass although she gave Chulita a piece with a flower. Lupe dug up the grass because she gave Chulita a piece with a flower. Pipiolo is a smart dog when Lupe must have been surprised by what he could do. c. The roof dogs of the village were happy. Lupe dug up the grass she gave Chulita a piece with a flower. 2. c. c. Lupe dug up the grass. Using her school ruler. b. Because Lupe felt sorry for the roof dogs. 3. a. b.

3. On Tuesday Sage called her friend Starr? on Tuesday Sage called her friend Starr! On Tuesday Sage called her friend Starr.Grammar Name Sentences Read each passage and look at the underlined phrase. At last Davy knew all the dances that (4) Death Hug knew. Practiced every day for two weeks. but then her mother called. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Death Hug taught Davy to dance. Death Hug teaching (3) Davy to dance. No mistake. He was ready to ask Sally Sugartree to dance with him at a party. Practiced dancing for two weeks. (2) 1. Death Hug often teaching Davy to dance No mistake. this was frustrating Sage would have to learn the final word on her own. Practiced for two weeks. on Tuesday Sage called her friend Starr Sage needed Starr to tell her the (1) spelling words. No mistake. Davy Crockett and Death Hug the bear were in the forest. 4. fill in the letter of the best choice below. Unit 1 Review • Grade 5/Unit 1 31 . Death Hug teaching Davy to dance always. Starr had to leave quickly and Sage did not get the spelling of the last word. This was frustrating this was frustrating! This was frustrating! No mistake. 2. Starr gave Sage most of the words. Could it be written a better way? If so. Davy and Death Hug practiced for two weeks.

the students had only a week to try the machines. They learned how to walk on the moon. No mistake. One night I stepped into the yard that I saw Pipiolo going into the cornfield. I knew I could follow whether I could see him or not. These machines were the same ones that real astronauts used. I could hear him sniffing at everything he passed. One night I stepped into the yard. I could see him or not. They learned how to walk on the moon. They learned to work without (5) gravity. and I saw Pipiolo going into the cornfield. and they learned to work without gravity. I knew I could follow I could see him or (8) not. The real astronauts trained for years before they went to space. One night I stepped into the yard. The real astronauts trained for years before they went to space but. the students used machines that simulated conditions in space. I knew I could follow as if I could see him or not. to work without gravity. 6. (6) 5. 7. They learned how to walk on the moon and. The night was (7) dark and the dog’s shadow was very faint. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 32 Unit 1 Review • Grade 5/Unit 1 . The students had only a week to try the machines. I saw Pipiolo going into the cornfield. work without gravity.Grammar Name Sentences At the Space Academy. I knew I could follow. No mistake. One night I stepped into the yard. No mistake. but the students had only a week to try the machines. The real astronauts trained for years before they went to space. I saw Pipiolo going into the cornfield. The real astronauts trained for years before they went to space and the students had only a week to try the machines. No mistake. They learned how to walk on the moon. All I had to do was follow the sniffing sounds. 8.

At Home: Divide a sheet of paper into two columns: “Common Nouns” and “Proper Nouns. He has taken in a runaway to 3. A proper noun names a particular person. Underline each common noun in the list. place. . Circle each proper noun. Marty wants to earn takes the ticks out of Shiloh’s by working in . Some of the words are not nouns. or thing. Marty’s © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill ahead for that belongs . Shiloh • Grade 5/Unit 2 33 . 4. There may be 2. 5. or thing. Becky trouble he dog because Shiloh family skin Murphy leg town bathroom an Sunday minute money father argue head town him cobbler Judd Travers porch Marty Preston Complete each sentence by using two of the nouns from the list above. A proper noun begins with a capital letter. place.Grammar Name Common and Proper Nouns • • • • A noun names a person. A common noun names any person. 1.” Choose nouns from a page in Shiloh and write them in the correct columns. Marty’s . likes very much. place. or thing.

or thing. write 10 sentences. . Using these nouns. 1. travers. 4. By sunday. If marty finds work in town. marty must bring the dog back to mr. 2. west virginia. • Days of the week. dara lynn brushes shiloh with an old hairbrush. Read each sentence. marty hopes that dad will go to see judd travers. place. 10. • A person’s title is a proper noun. months of the year. • Some proper nouns contain more than one word. 6. Marty’s father’s name is ray preston. 5. marty looks for work in friendly. wallace about delivering newspapers. 9. marty asks mr. Even david howard had something to say about the dog. he can pay doc murphy. and holidays are proper nouns. 3. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 34 Shiloh • Grade 5/Unit 2 At Home: List the days of the week and the months of the year. 8.Grammar Name Using Proper Nouns • A proper noun names a particular person. Then write it correctly on the line. This story takes place in the state of west virginia. marty thinks that he can earn money by delivering papers on fridays. 7.

At the grocery store. At Home: Draw a scene from the story and label common and proper nouns. He could work in july. Then write a one-sentence caption. • When a proper noun contains more than one word. • Capitalize the first letter of a common noun only if it is the first word in a sentence. wallace sees marty looking at the bulletin board. month 3. and saturdays. name of a country 5. 10. 1. marty talks about shiloh with dara lynn and becky. name of a holiday Write the following sentences correctly. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 9. Shiloh • Grade 5/Unit 2 35 . name of a state 4. 6. marty could work on thursdays. 7. fridays.Grammar Name Mechanics • A proper noun always begins with a capital letter. too. capitalize each important word. and in august. day of the week 2. marty thinks it’s strange having shiloh in the house. Write a proper noun that names an example of each common noun. mr. 8.

Then rewrite the passage correctly. and mrs. • Capitalize common nouns only when they begin a sentence. and place of the story. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . preston says that his son will pay for the Animal Doctor. doc murphy. mr. marty preston takes home a runaway Dog. It seems to marty as though the dog has been mistreated by his Owner.Grammar Name Proofreading • Capitalize every proper noun. month. • Capitalize important words in proper nouns with more than one word. judd travers is angry when he finds out that the Dog has been injured. mr. 36 Shiloh • Grade 5/Unit 2 At Home: Make up a short story about a stray animal including the day. travers has the reputation of being mean and nasty. whom he has named shiloh. Marty’s Parents. Circle capitalization mistakes. preston. judd travers. marty takes the dog to the Animal Doctor. know that their son has grown fond of the dog. mr.

7. Underline proper nouns twice. Shiloh leans Away when judd travers reaches out. 3. Many People take Their animals to doc murphy. Dara lynn brushes Shiloh with an Old Hairbrush. 2. 4. 5. Travers why He brought shiloh to his House.Grammar Name Test: Common and Proper Nouns In the sentences below. West virginia. 6. 1. underline each common noun once. Shiloh • Grade 5/Unit 2 37 . Mr. Rewrite each sentence correctly. wallace has A list of six People for county Carrier. shiloh is a runaway Dog that marty rescues. everyone hopes that The Dog will feel better. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. Marty tells mr. marty preston lives in friendly.

or thing. Marty tries to keep Shiloh a secret. Marty is worried about paying Doc Murphy’s bill. Wallace runs a grocery in Friendly. Shiloh is a very friendly dog. 5. Mr. Ma hums to Shiloh as though he were a baby in a cradle. A proper noun names a particular person. Dad let the dog lick the plate. 3. 7. When Dad came home. 1. place. Becky feeds the dog little pieces of toast. A proper noun begins with a capital letter. Marty and Shiloh become great friends. place. 10. Underline all nouns. 6. At first. or thing. While Marty was in the bathroom. 4. 8. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 38 Shiloh • Grade 5/Unit 2 . he found Shiloh in the house. or thing. 2. West Virginia. A common noun names any person. Shiloh is like a member of the family.Grammar Name Review: Common and Proper Nouns • • • • A noun names a person. place. Read each sentence. 9. Underline proper nouns twice.

Rattlers live in different habitat. There are 30 different kind of rattlers. Canebrake rattlers live in swamp. pattern 3. sound 6. bite 8. fang Rewrite each sentence. Rattlers • Grade 5/Unit 2 39 . Correct the underlined nouns. section 9.Grammar Name Singular and Plural Nouns • A singular noun names one person. head 7. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 14. food 4. Rattlers can be found in almost all 50 state. Include at least one plural noun in each sentence. warning 5. • Most plural nouns are formed by adding -s or -es. 12. Write the plural of each noun. color 2. or thing. At Home: Write five sentences about rattlers. place. 13. or thing. button 10. place. 11. 1. • A plural noun names more than one person.

write the correct plural for each underlined word. 1. • To form the plural of nouns ending in a consonant and y. s. box 8. Squirrels and rabbits make good lunch 12. 14. • To form the plural of nouns ending in a vowel and y. Include five plurals of nouns that end in y. add -s. sh. 11. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill for rattlers. moss 4. Write the plural of each noun. Sometimes coyotes and fox helping protect eat rattlers. 40 Rattlers • Grade 5/Unit 2 At Home: Write a short paragraph about rattlesnakes. family Read each sentence. ch. . inch 7. patch 10. or x. valley 3. . Rattlers live in deserts and prairies rather than in city 13. The McCrystals spend many day rattlers. change the y to i and add -es. bush 5. country 6. baby 9. On the line provided. enemy 2. or x. sh. ch.Grammar Name Making Special Forms of Plural Nouns • Add -es to form the plural of singular nouns that end in s.

the closing. • Most abbreviations end with a period. Put capital letters and periods where needed. 2008 dear grandpa. • An abbreviation is the shortened form of a word. the greeting. On february 16. The scientist is dr Tom madison. a scientist will talk to our class about rattlesnakes. Rattlers • Grade 5/Unit 2 41 . tx 78102 january 14. • Begin the abbreviation for a proper noun with a capital letter. luke © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill At Home: Write a letter about something you learned from reading “Rattlers!” Include at least two abbreviations. 12 oak st beeville.Grammar Name Mechanics • In a friendly letter. and all of the proper nouns begin with capital letters. He’s going to show us a film of a rattlesnake being milked to get its venom! I can’t wait! love. Correct the letter.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. Most plural nouns are formed by adding -s. More snakes could have been hidden in the grassies. add -s. Add -es to form the plural of singular nouns that end in s. Correct your sentences. 9. Correct the plural forms. Rewrite each sentence. so we were careful. 5. We listened for the soundes that rattlers make. or x. sh. change the y to i and add -es. 3. or thing. 7. 10.Grammar Name Proofreading • • • • A singular noun names one person. • To form the plural of nouns ending in a consonant and y. ch. We hiked over tall hills and down into rocky ditchies. 1. place. Any rattlers nearby could feel vibrationes as we walked. We heard a hawk’s crys as we walked back to our car. A plural noun names more than one person. 6. We saw one long snake with diamond-shaped blotchies on its skin. . place. 4. People are enemys of rattlers. 2. though. or thing. Dad and I walked across wide stretchs of land. 42 Rattlers • Grade 5/Unit 2 At Home: Write three sentences that incorrectly use singular nouns instead of plural nouns. We knew that they would rather strike rabbites than people. The pites on their faces help them feel our body heat. • To form the plural of nouns ending in a vowel and y.

c. c. 1. d. a. a. c. a. searchies wetlands creatures crashes days gullys mountains seconds snakes edges rescues foxs masses splashs places temperatures memorys tracks mammals diamondbacks © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Rattlers • Grade 5/Unit 2 43 . b. b. d. a. c. d. c. b. b. b. d. a.Grammar Name Test: Singular and Plural Nouns In each group of words. c. b. d. d. d. 7. d. 3. hawks rattlers skys enemies targets branchies hikers discoveries emergencyes births delays reptiles coyotes ashes medicines decoyes scents predators gulchs classes 6. c. b. c. a. a. 4. a. a. circle the letter beside the plural noun that is NOT correct. 5. 8. b. d. d. b. 9. a. b. 10. 2. c. c.

new mex. 4. 7.Grammar Name Review: Singular and Plural Nouns • A singular noun names one person. and all of the proper nouns begin with capital letters. place. The american international rattlesnake museum is in albuquerque. 5. the closing. Rattlesnakes have live babys instead of laying eggs. though. Rattlers can be different sizes. 44 Rattlers • Grade 5/Unit 2 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . through sun almost all year. 8. There are many different kindes of rattlesnakes. Check your work with a partner. 1. The museum is open Mon. or thing. 3. correcting any mistakes. • An abbreviation is the shortened form of a word. 2. place. Rewrite each sentence. the greeting. Sometimes rattlers warn their enemys before biting them. Look for incorrect plurals and abbreviations. from 20 to 48 inchies. Rattlers live in almost all parts of the Us. 6. 87104. • In a formal letter. It is closed on major holidayes. • A plural noun names more than one person. or thing.

roof 4. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 10. Women who acted bravely were often wife and mothers. change the f to v and add -es. leaf 3. write the correct form of any incorrect plural nouns. Maya Lin • Grade 5/Unit 2 45 . They may have acted to improve or to save other people’s life. At Home: Write a paragraph about someone who acted bravely. chief Read each sentence. They often acted to defend strong belief. They sometimes sacrificed themself to help others in need. thief 2. Include two plurals of nouns that end in f or fe. • For other nouns. half 5. On the line provided. 8.Grammar Name More Plural Nouns • To form the plural of most nouns ending in f or fe. 6. 1. Write the plural of each noun. 7. Library shelf are filled with books about brave people. 9. add -s.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 10. banjo 5. • To form the plural of nouns that end with a consonant and o.Grammar Name More Plural Nouns • To form the plural of nouns that end with a vowel and o. 7. Write the plural of each noun. add -s or -es. piano 3. 46 Maya Lin • Grade 5/Unit 2 At Home: Find and circle all of the plural nouns in a newspaper article that end in -s or -es. Memorials have been built to honor both men and womans. kangaroo Read each sentence. • A few nouns have the same singular and plural forms. Learning about the past is like hearing echos from history. • Some nouns have special forms. Monuments and museums help us remember American heros. stereo 4. 6. write the correct form of any incorrect plural nouns. On the line provided. We can learn about brave people by reading books or watching videoes. 1. radio 2. Architect Maya Lin designed a civil rights monument that is nine foots high. 8. add -s. 9. .

At Home: Write four sentences that use the correct plural forms of nouns ending in f. goose 9. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 14. mouse 4. yourself 10. igloo 6. Maya Lin • Grade 5/Unit 2 47 . 12.Grammar Name Mechanics • • • • To form the plural of most nouns ending in f or fe. sheep 8. and o. 11. Correct the underlined nouns. calf 3. such as cakes made from mashed potatos. The leafs of 700 trees shade the National Museum of the American Indian. To form the plural of nouns that end with a vowel and o. One museum show tells about American Indian believes about the universe. 13. Write the plural of each noun. add -s or -es. • A few nouns have the same singular and plural forms. add -s. ox 5. change the f to v and add -es. • Some nouns have special forms. tomato 7. 1. A café at the museum serves foods the American Indians cooked. add -s. silo 2. gentleman Rewrite each sentence. More than 150 different specieses of plants are on the museum grounds. To form the plural of nouns that end with a consonant and o. fe. For other nouns.

or o. • A few nouns have the same singular and plural forms. add -s. This museum has the largest collection of aircraftes in the world. Then rewrite the paragraph. Adults and childs enjoy visiting the National Air and Space Museum. add -s or -es. change the f to v and add -es. fe. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Read the following paragraph. 48 Maya Lin • Grade 5/Unit 2 At Home: Write five sentences that include plural nouns ending in f. For other nouns.Grammar Name Proofreading • • • • To form the plural of most nouns ending in f or fe. To form the plural of nouns that end with a consonant and o. changing any incorrect plural nouns. • Some nouns have special forms. add -s. To form the plural of nouns that end with a vowel and o. It is hard to believe that persones flew in some of those early planes. They were brave to risk their lifes.

b. b. a. 2. 9. b. b. 1. d. d. a. d. d. 4. d. c. d. b. c. a. b. a. d. d. b. c. a. selves scarfs igloos deer people pianos knives discoverys mice chieves patios gentlemen roofs series childrens radios lifes predators yourselves tomatoes 6. b. c. a. c. circle the letter beside the plural noun that is NOT correct. c. b. 10. d. a. 8. 5. c. c. heroes leafs wolves feet stereoes themselves women banjos wives videos tooths oxen studioes species aircraft autos shelves men calfs thieves © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Maya Lin • Grade 5/Unit 2 49 . 7. c. a. a.Grammar Name Test: Plural Nouns In each group of words. b. 3. d. c. a.

4. Using a map. 50 Maya Lin • Grade 5/Unit 2 . Animals in the woods may be as large as deers or as small as moles.Grammar Name Review: Plural Nouns • • • • To form the plural of most nouns ending in f or fe. we explored the woods by ourselfs. add -s. add -s. 3. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 7. but we did not see any wolfs. Rewrite each sentence. We saw trouts in Redwood Creek. 1. For other nouns. Visitors to Muir Woods should turn off their radioes. add -s or -es. correcting the plural nouns. 2. • Some nouns have special forms. Our family took a lot of photoies when we visited Muir Woods. To form the plural of nouns that end with a vowel and o. Many specieses of plants and animals live in the woods. We saw foxes. 8. Some of the redwoods we saw were hundreds of foots tall. change the f to v and add -es. • A few nouns have the same singular and plural forms. 6. 5. To form the plural of nouns that end with a consonant and o.

Grammar Name Possessive Nouns • A possessive noun is a noun that shows who or what owns or has something. At Home: Write a short paragraph about a new friend. She suggested that they ask José Manuel grandma to let him play. tree 7. night 9. friend 5. port 8. Amalia idea was a good one. moon 10. As they planned. 11. sea Rewrite each sentence. 1. balcony 6. The sisters watched a vendor fill a woman basket with vegetables. 12. • Form a singular possessive noun by adding an apostrophe (’) and an -s to a singular noun. lady 3. 13. Write the correct possessive for each underlined noun. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 14. sister 2. Include at least three possessive nouns. driver 4. The Night of San Juan • Grade 5/Unit 2 51 . • A singular possessive noun is a singular noun that shows ownership. the girls bought ice cream from a vendor cart. Write the possessive form of each noun.

Read each sentence. The girls smelled the corn fritters aroma. 52 The Night of San Juan • Grade 5/Unit 2 At Home: Describe what it’s like to eat something truly delicious. . Evelyns wish for José Manuel will come true. José Manuel found the three girls note in the basket. add an apostrophe. • To form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in s. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 9. Both doors hinges squeaked. Amalia called her sisters names to get their attention. 8. • To form the possessive of a plural noun that ends in s.Grammar Name Plural Possessive Nouns • A singular possessive noun is a singular noun that shows ownership. All the houses balconies had beautiful railings. • A plural possessive noun is a plural noun that shows ownership. Write the correct possessive noun on the line. so they stayed longer. 10. 2. The childrens trip to the beach was special because José Manuel joined them. When the girls got home. add an apostrophe and -s. 6. 7. 5. The sisters hadn’t asked their mothers permission to invite José Manuel. Grandmas frown made them feel a little frightened. Mamis face showed that she was upset. 3. 1. 4. Include at least five singular or plural possessive nouns.

To show the possessive form. add an apostrophe and -s. 4. Puerto Rico is a commonwealth of the United States. • To form the possessive of a plural noun that ends in s. • To form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in s. (1) Puerto Ricos’ name means “rich port” in Spanish. 2. write Correct on the line with the matching number. If it is correct. At Home: Choose three nouns from this page and write a sentence for each noun. add an apostrophe. The streets of Old San Juan are paved with special bricks. The (5) brick’s light-absorbing (6) qualities’ are said to make them show special colors. add an apostrophe and -s to a singular noun. 1.Grammar Name Mechanics • Most singular nouns do not end in s. 8. (7) Tourists’ time is often spent exploring the colorful (8) shop’s of Old San Juan. One of the (4) tradition’s there is walking backward into the sea at midnight. If it is not. The (2) islands people celebrate holidays with (3) festival’s. using either the plural or the possessive. 7. • Do not confuse plural possessive nouns with plural nouns. This is done to bring good luck during the next year. write the correct form. 6. Study each underlined noun in these paragraphs. 3. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 5. The Night of San Juan • Grade 5/Unit 2 53 .

three sisters notice that José Manuel never gets to play outside. They hurry through the square and see a vegetable vendor who can send a note to José Manuel. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . • To form the possessive of a plural noun that ends in s. José Manuel drop’s a ball.Grammar Name Proofreading • A possessive noun is a noun that shows who or what owns or has something. In Old San Juan. • To form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in s. • Form a singular possessive noun by adding an apostrophe (’) and -s to a singular noun. add an apostrophe and -s. 54 The Night of San Juan • Grade 5/Unit 2 At Home: Write a short story that includes four singular and four plural possessive nouns. add an apostrophe. After reading the note. Read the following paragraph. • A plural possessive noun is a plural noun that shows ownership. The girls’ decide to help him. • A singular possessive noun is a singular noun that shows ownership. The girls’ return the ball and ask José Manuels grandma whether he can join their familys trip to the beach that night. correcting any mistakes in singular and plural possessive nouns and plural nouns. Then rewrite the paragraph.

In the evenings. Old San Juans main square has four statues. 8. using the correct form of the possessive nouns. The islands capital and largest city is San Juan. Puerto Ricos mild climate makes it a popular place to visit. 7. 6. 1. 3. Touring Old San Juan on foot is a good idea because of the citys steep streets. tree frogs chirps can be heard. One of the nations main attractions is a fort called El Morro. The Night of San Juan • Grade 5/Unit 2 55 . The streets interesting color comes from Spanish stones. Several museums exhibits tell about the history of San Juan.Grammar Name Test: Possessive Nouns Rewrite each sentence. 4. From this forts walls. The citizens main language is Spanish. 5. 2. the views of San Juan Bay are amazing. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 10. 9.

add an apostrophe and -s. The full moons glow made the night special. • A singular possessive noun is a singular noun that shows ownership. add an apostrophe. The three sisters note probably confused José Manuel at first. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 5. 4. Rewrite each sentence below. The three girls visit gave José Manuel hope. He figured out the notes meaning quickly. adding apostrophes to all the possessive nouns.Grammar Name Review: Possessive Nouns • A possessive noun is a noun that shows who or what owns or has something. 3. Aitzas excuse seemed cowardly. 2. • To form the possessive of a plural noun that ends in s. Be sure that you do not confuse plurals with possessives. 1. 56 The Night of San Juan • Grade 5/Unit 2 . • To form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end in s. • A plural possessive noun is a plural noun that shows ownership. • Form a singular possessive noun by adding an apostrophe (’) and -s to a singular noun. though. • Do not confuse plural possessive nouns with plural nouns.

7. • Add -s or -es to most nouns to form the plural. Bob’s horse. In the afternoon. 6. 8. 2.Grammar Name Plurals and Possessives • A plural noun names more than one person.) 1. Bob looked at the ground for tracks and other clues. (Some sentences contain more than one plural noun. 4. 10. They were just beginning to do their morning chores. • A possessive noun shows who or what owns or has something. Bob looked for eight mares. or thing. 3. Bob Lemmons rode to the bluff’s edge and looked down at the other cowboys. a colt. He could study the ground and tell about the animals that had been there. Bob got down on his hands and knees to study the tracks. Bob’s knowledge did not come from books. or thing. At Home: Brainstorm a list of plural nouns that tell about what a cowboy’s daily chores might be. he saw the hoofprints of mustangs. Warrior. 5. Black Cowboy. was eager to run across the plains. He made the horses accept him as though he were one of them. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 9. Wild Horses Grade 5/Unit 2 57 . place. place. and a stallion that had passed two days earlier. Underline each noun that names more than one person. Do not use an apostrophe.

Lightning brightened the sky. Warrior reared and pawed at the air with his (hooves’/ hooves). and Bob saw the (mustangs’/ mustangs) for the first time. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . 58 Black Cowboy. When a storm struck. • Add an apostrophe to make most plural nouns possessive. At the (dawn’s/dawns) early light. • Add an apostrophe and -s to a singular noun to make it possessive. He couldn’t even build a fire because the animals could smell the smoke on his clothes from (miles’/miles) away. Bob knew that he had to have the (earth’s/earths) smell on him before the (horses/horses’) would accept him. herd’s) tracks. he knew he had been accepted. Bob’s) direction. Bob would have the (mares’/mares) trust. He rode to the big river and waited. Read these paragraphs and study the noun choices in parentheses. the herd arrived. In each case. The storm had washed away the (herds. Bob saddled up to search for the herd. too. Finally. Wild Horses Grade 5/Unit 2 At Home: Write four sentences: two sentences with plural nouns and two sentences with possessive nouns. Bob remained perfectly still. When the (horses/horse’s) began to graze. If the stallion trusted him. draw a line under the correct noun form. but Bob knew where to look for them.Grammar Name Plurals and Possessives • A possessive noun shows who or what owns or has something. The lead stallion sniffed the air and looked in (Bobs.

or song. magazine. articles. short stories. Black Cowboy. Bob Lemmons was a real cowboy who is mentioned in another book called the mustangs. songs. Underline titles of books. movie. and movies. magazines. Correct each sentence. A friend of mine wrote a poem called riding the open range. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 5. 2. • Put quotation marks around titles of poems. 1. An artist helped him turn his story. The book black cowboy.Grammar Name Mechanics • Capitalize the first word. or movies. At Home: Write five sentences that include the title of a book. and all of the important words in a title. such as Home on the Range and Back in the Saddle Again. newspapers. 4. • Underline or use italics for titles of books. the last word. Be sure to capitalize all of the important words in titles. into a picture book. magazines. and book chapters. and book chapters. songs. short story. articles. short stories. Wild Horses Grade 5/Unit 2 59 . wild horses was written by Julius Lester. Some well-known songs are about cowboys. 3. Put quotation marks around titles of any poems. poem. newspapers. the man who was a horse.

The cowboys rode horses called mustangs. Wild Horses Grade 5/Unit 2 At Home: Write a sentence that contains both the possessive and plural forms of the same noun. • Add an apostrophe to make most plural nouns possessive. correcting mistakes in the formation of singular and plural possessive nouns and plural nouns. Mustangs were fast and strong. 60 Black Cowboy. Do not use an apostrophe. place. Read the following paragraph. Horses’ allowed them to cover great distances when herding ranchers cattle. or thing.Grammar Name Proofreading • A plural noun names more than one person. • Add -s or -es to most nouns to form the plural. Cowboy’s spent a lot of time on horseback. Then rewrite the paragraph. The mustang’s had to be tamed before anyone could ride them. • A possessive noun shows who or what owns or has something. • Add an apostrophe and -s to a singular noun to make it possessive. so they made good cow ponie’s. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill .

9. swerved as they reached the corral. If no apostrophes are needed in a sentence. Bobs horse. Wild Horses Grade 5/Unit 2 61 . the cowboys at the ranch 3.Grammar Name Test: Plurals and Possessives A. write correctly any word that needs an apostrophe. place. all the horses’ dark eyes 5. or thing. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Black Cowboy. muscles and bones in their bodies 6. a stallion’s hooves 4. Write Possessive if the underlined noun shows ownership. Warrior. Read each sentence below. the herd’s leader B. 7. Write Plural if the underlined noun names more than one person. write None after the sentence. 1. On the line. Warriors whinnies told Bob that his horse longed to run free. The mustangs began to follow Bob. Read each group of words. 10. The other horses moved into the fenced area. the corral’s gate 2. 8.

songs. 62 Black Cowboy. • Add -s or -es to most nouns to form the plural. and fill in the blank with a possessive or plural noun.Grammar Name Review: Plurals and Possessives • A plural noun names more than one person. short stories. he knew that it was time to challenge the lead stallion. place. • Put quotation marks around titles of poems. 3. or movies. or thing. • Underline or use italics for titles of books. • Add an apostrophe and -s to a singular noun to make it possessive. Do not use an apostrophe. Read each sentence below. 4. Bob Lemmons was a cowboy whose job was to find a herd of wild . Underline or add quotation marks to any titles. articles. Circle any words in a title that should have capital letters. Bob Lemmon found the herd by following the hoofprints on the ground. and all of the important words in a title. When Bob heard a rattle and saw a colt fall. and book chapters. • A possessive noun shows who or what owns or has something. • Add an apostrophe to make most plural nouns possessive. life in a book called 2. Wild Horses Grade 5/Unit 2 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Julius Lester first told the story of long journey home: stories from black history. the last word. newspapers. magazines. 1. • Capitalize the first word.

No mistake. Punctuation G. A. Unit 2 Review • Grade 5/Unit 2 63 . E. Marty had hoped that Shiloh would be better by the time Judd Travers came to claim him. 4. Unfortunately. Spelling D. Punctuation C. Capitalization F. but these snakes rarely bite people. (6) 5. Spelling H. Capitalization B. Shiloh still wore Dr Murphy’s bandage when (1) Judd arrived.Grammar Name Nouns Read the passages below and look at the underlined sections. No mistake. Punctuation C. No mistake. Spelling D. 2. Capitalization F. To (3) find out more about rattlesnakes. No mistake. A. Spelling H. No mistake. Many people are afraid of rattlesnaks. For example. Is there a mistake in the underlined section? What type of mistake is it? Circle the letter of your answer. Punctuation C. read the article “rattlers!” by Ellen Lambeth. Spelling H. Capitalization B. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill National monuments are an important way for us to honor the lifes of people (5) who have helped shape our country’s history. Judd told Marty to return Shiloh by sunday or there would be trouble. (4) 3. Capitalization B. E. Punctuation G. E. Capitalization F. (2) 1. Punctuation G. A. Spelling D. the Civil Rights Memorial reminds us of the many women and man who died fighting for equal rights. 6. No mistake.

No mistake. 64 Unit 2 Review • Grade 5/Unit 2 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Spelling D. Spelling D.Grammar Name Nouns Amalia ran after José Manuels red ball as it rolled down the street. 8. Capitalization B. Bob Lemmons could read the land like a book. No mistake. he could tell which animal had made them and when. Spelling H. A Rodeo’s fences and ropes were not for Bob. Punctuation C. Punctuation F. No mistake. She worried that it would be difficult for him to get his grandmother’s permission. She would (7) return it to José Manuel and invite him to go to the beach for the Night of San Juan. Punctuation C. Spelling H. A. 10. E. Punctuation G. If he saw an animals’ paw (9) prints on the ground. E. A. Capitalization B. Capitalization F. (10) 9. He loved to track mustangs across the plains. No mistake. Capitalization F. (8) 7.

Grammar
Name
Action Verbs

• A verb is a word that shows what the subject of a sentence does or is. • An action verb is a word that expresses action. It tells what a subject does or did.

Write the action verb on the line following the sentence. If the sentence does not contain an action verb, leave the line blank. 1. Many Americans opposed King George’s laws. 2. Sam Adams and John Hancock were two famous patriots. 3. Henry’s father sold various items in his shop. 4. General Thomas Gage was the new royal governor. 5. In June of 1774, King George closed the harbor. 6. The harbor’s closing stopped trade. 7. Henry walked by Province House on his way to school. 8. Only King George’s ships sailed out of the harbor. 9. Henry’s father drew the maps.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

10. King George’s top general lived in Province House.

At Home: Describe the situation in Boston in 1774. Use action verbs to write your description.

Sleds on Boston Common
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65

Grammar
Name
Action Verbs

• An action verb is a word that tells what happens or happened. • A verb must agree with its subject. A singular subject takes a singular verb. A plural subject takes a plural verb. • Add -s to most verbs in the present tense if the subject is singular. • If the subject is plural, the verb must be plural. Do not add -s to the verb if the subject is a plural noun.

Circle each action verb in these sentences. If the verb does not agree with the subject, write the correct verb on the line following the sentence. All sentences should be in the present tense. 1. Rebels fights for independence. 2. The British troops destroys the children’s snow forts. 3. Henry’s father make a sled for Henry. 4. The soldiers break the ice in the pond. 5. Henry’s brothers walks to school with Henry. 6. General Gage help the children. 7. King George punishes the colonists. 8. The children pulls their sleds through the snow.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

66

Sleds on Boston Common
Grade 5/ Unit 3

At Home: Write six present-tense sentences with action verbs, checking for subject-verb agreement.

Grammar
Name
Mechanics

• A verb must agree with its subject. A singular subject takes a singular verb. A plural subject takes a plural verb. • Add -s to most verbs in the present tense if the subject is singular. • If the subject is plural, the verb must be plural. Do not add -s to the verb if the subject is a plural noun.

Think about the story “Sleds on Boston Common.” Then use a verb from the box to complete each sentence in a way that makes sense. On the line following each sentence, write whether the subject of the sentence is singular or plural. practice ride 1. Henry 2. General Gage 3. The British soldiers listen camp camps bring rides studies brings listens

his sled down the hill. to Henry. on Boston Common.

4. Henry’s sister

corn bread and apple jam to the school.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

5. The children

handwriting at school.

At Home: Write six sentences using action verbs: three sentences with singular subjects, and three sentences with plural subjects.

Sleds on Boston Common
Grade 5/ Unit 3

67

Grammar
Name
Proofreading

• Be sure that the verb agrees with the subject. • Be sure that each sentence begins with a capital letter and ends with the correct punctuation mark. • Use commas to separate three or more words or phrases in a series.

In the passage below, circle verbs that don’t agree with their subjects. Also, circle mistakes in spelling, capitalization, or punctuation. Then rewrite the passage, adding commas where needed.

The sun rest over the still water. Henry, joshua and Nathan sit at the edge of the pier and gaze out at the empty sea. The only movement in the harbur is at the far end, where British soldiers are getting a ship ready to sail. Joshua, the yungest man in the group, reach into his pockets. “I have no money,” he announces to Henry and nathan. Nathan looks at Joshua and says “None of us has money,” Henry run his fingers through his grey hair and says, “we need to get back to work.” He pauses and looks out at the sea? “We need our harbor back.”

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Sleds on Boston Common
Grade 5/ Unit 3

At Home: Write a short passage and ask a helper to correct any mistakes.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

Henry study hard at school. Keep the sentences in the present tense. The children play together. Write the action verb on the line that follows each sentence. Henry’s friends worries about the harbor.Grammar Name Test: Action Verbs A. 2. 1. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Sleds on Boston Common Grade 5/ Unit 3 69 . 9. British ships sails out to sea. 8. 12. Andrews teach the lessons. The students walk home for lunch. 3. Americans pays taxes to King George. Some soldiers work at a fort. 10. 4. 11. B. The soldiers dress in red coats. 7. Henry wears mittens and boots. Mr. General Gage’s children live in England. 6. 5. Henry color the maps. Change the verbs so that they agree with the subjects.

70 Sleds on Boston Common Grade 5/ Unit 3 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . and use action verbs in each sentence. Do not add -s to the verb if the subject is a plural noun. • A verb must agree with its subject. • Add -s to most verbs in the present tense if the subject is singular. A singular subject takes a singular verb. Write a passage about your experiences. • If the subject is plural. A plural subject takes a plural verb. the verb must be plural. Pretend that you live in Boston in the winter of 1774.Grammar Name Review: Action Verbs • An action verb is a word that tells what happens or happened. Keep your passage in the present tense.

Add -es to verbs that end in s. 9. and change in the present tense. The professor pile the stones in South Pass City.Grammar Name Present Tense • A verb in the present tense tells what is happening now. The Secretary of State announce a change to the Constitution. She rememberes what happened in South Pass City. 1. ch. D. 5. Colonel Bright finished his career in Washington. Read each sentence. ss. 7. Change the underlined verb in the sentence to the correct form of the present tense. Wyoming give women the right to vote before any other state. using the verbs try. At Home: Write four sentences. Sheeks wishs he didn’t misbehave in court. • To form present-tense singular verbs. Colonel William Bright agree with Esther. sh. announce. Benjamin Sheeks postpone the discussion until the Fourth of July. x. Esther Morris tryes to change the law. add -s to most verbs. • If a verb ends with a consonant and y. or z. When Esther Morris Headed West Grade 5/Unit 3 71 .C. 6. 4. Mr. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 10. change the y to i before adding -es. wish. Time pass before the United States Constitution changes. 8. 2. 3.

8. Much time 6. double the consonant before adding -ed. use the word will in front of the verb. the Constitution. and use them in the present. 1. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 5. Both men and women 2. Many people 7. change y to i before adding -ed. collect pass change gain remember serve invite vote Complete each sentence with the past tense of one of the verbs in the box above. The mayor of South Pass City dedication ceremony. drop the e before adding -ed. 72 When Esther Morris Headed West Grade 5/Unit 3 At Home: Choose five verbs. Esther Morris before the Constitution changes again. The government in elections. . • If a verb ends in one vowel and one consonant. past. • If a verb ends in e. Women in Wyoming 3.Grammar Name Past Tense and Future Tense • A verb in the past tense tells about an action that already happened. She 4. Complete each sentence with the future tense of one of the verbs in the box above. • A verb in the future tense tells about an action that is going to happen. the citizens to a as a judge in South Pass City. Esther Morris forever. the right to vote. stones to build a memorial. To write about the future. • If a verb ends in a consonant and y. and future tenses in sentences.

or future tense. will help all people see you can’t shut all the doors and call people “free” People break through the glass to take back their rights And run out of darkness and into the light. The windows. Rewrite the poem. Be sure to capitalize letters correctly. using commas and periods where necessary. the reader should pause. Next to each line of the poem. write whether the line is written in the past. and realized their hopes? All was well once esther morris went west She had a vision to change the law for the best © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill At Home: Write an original poem about something you care about. A thought or sentence may “break” into two or more lines. • If a line of poetry ends with a comma or a period. like eyes. fought for their Votes.Grammar Name Mechanics • In poetry. No pause is necessary if a line ends without punctuation. like warriors. When Esther Morris Headed West Grade 5/Unit 3 73 . took back their freedom. Punctuate it correctly. each new line begins with a capital letter. • In many poems. present. a line may not be a complete thought or sentence. women.

Grammar Name Proofreading • A verb in the present tense tells what is happening now. He said that women were not allowed to vote. 74 When Esther Morris Headed West Grade 5/Unit 3 At Home: Write a short story about someone like Esther. past. • A verb in the past tense tells about an action that already happened. • A verb in the future tense tells about an action that is going to happen. Benjamin Sheeks walked by and asked her if she thought South Pass City was a pleasant place to visit. Mr. Esther morris traveled by carriage to South pass city. Esther say that her vote was yes to that question. When she arrived. Change incorrect verbs to the proper tenses. she thought. Rewrite the following passage. or future tense for the story. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . so she wait outside of the barber shop. Correct any errors in capitalization or punctuation. and asked him why he had asked her the question if he thought she couldn’t have an opinion.” colonel Bright was busy getting his beard trimmed. Esther will smile. Mr. “I will paid a call on Colonel William Bright. After some time will pass. Choose either present. Sheeks was surprise by her reply.

future © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill When Esther Morris Headed West Grade 5/Unit 3 75 . a. 4. The man will refuse to hand over the court docket. past c. present b. future 8. past c. a. a. Circle your answer. Sheeks went to Salt Lake City. present b. Change the underlined verb in the the sentence to a verb in the past tense. past c. present b. Test: Verb Tenses Choose the correct name for the tense of the underlined verb in each sentence. 1. past c. 5. Women have the right to vote in Wyoming in 1869. People remember Esther Morris. 3. Esther Morris challenges the law that prevented women from voting. 2. present b. future 7. Mr.Grammar Name Read each sentence. future 6. The physician determine that voting was safe for women. Mr. Gold fever will bring more people to Wyoming. Sheeks apologized for his behavior. a.

ch. Add -ed to most verbs to show past tense. ss. 2. • A verb in the past tense tells about an action that already happened. • If a verb ends with a consonant and y. 8. sh. Rewrite the sentences. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 76 When Esther Morris Headed West Grade 5/Unit 3 . 1. Everybody worryes about their rights. 3. She singes as she pass by the courthouse. Nineteen people will attends the dedication ceremony. Nobody will forgett the day that Esther Morris came to Wyoming. 4. or z. Esther Morris tryed very hard to be a fair judge. change the y to i before adding -es. Mr. Spell all the verbs correctly. use the verb will. In 1920. The professor invitd the inhabitants of South Pass City to the ceremony. add -s to most verbs. Sheeks argueed against allowing women to vote. 7. 6. 5.Grammar Name Review: Verb Tenses • A verb in the present tense tells what is happening now. • A verb in the future tense tells about an action that is going to happen. all women gaineded the right to vote. x. • To form present-tense singular verbs. Add -es to verbs that end in s. To write about the future.

Underline the helping verb. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 10. Circle the main verb. 4. 8. 5. has. 1. 6. At Home: Write three sentences about the environment using have. People had believed that technology was the answer to every problem. Fifth graders in Michigan have established Environmental Awareness Day.Grammar Name Main and Helping Verbs • The main verb in a sentence shows what the subject does or is. 9. Acid rain has occurred before. and had and verbs ending in -ed. 3. has. We have begun to see positive results. Scientists have researched how long our natural resources might last. Read the sentences. The standard of living has improved steadily. Scientists have discovered global warming. Animals in the wilderness have suffered from pollution. 7. Beyond the Horizon • Grade 5/Unit 3 77 . • A helping verb helps the main verb show an action or make a statement. Recycling glass bottles has saved a lot of electricity. • Have. 2. and had are helping verbs. Everyone has become more enlightened on the subject.

scientists effects of technology. was. risking the danger of global warming. Use am or was with I. 7. and were can be helping verbs. 1. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. I 10. am. 2. parks doing my part to protect the forests of America. growing around the showing up in improved living standards becoming concerned about the 9. working to create a safer and more trying to recycle all of my cans and bottles. Use is and was with a singular subject. Use are and were with a plural subject or you. The students healthful environment. Acid rain 5. becoming beautiful places to picnic. 6. The result worldwide. harming trees and wild animals. McDougald’s class sending out a message about our responsibility to protect the wilderness. Choose a form of be as a helping verb in each sentence. 78 Beyond the Horizon • Grade 5/Unit 3 At Home: Write a short essay using as many helping verbs as possible. Years ago. I 3. Environmental organizations world. Make sure that the helping verb agrees with the subject. are. The world 4. • Forms of be can be used as helping verbs. . Once more.Grammar Name More Helping Verbs • Is.

Write a contraction in place of the underlined words. Natural resources will not last forever. People cannot continue to throw away recyclables. 1. At Home: Write a dialogue between a child and a park ranger. Do not ignore environmental warnings because they could greatly affect our future. Many people are not concerned about global warming. You should not create your own paths in Graybeard Wilderness. using contractions. • Sometimes the form of the verb changes when the verb becomes part of a contraction. It is not helpful to try to recycle materials that cannot be recycled. 3. Beyond the Horizon • Grade 5/Unit 3 79 . Have not you considered the long-term effects of technology? 8. Rewrite each sentence.Grammar Name Mechanics • A contraction is a shortened form of two words. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 7. 6. 4. 2. • A contraction can be made by combining certain verbs with the word not. 5. Some people are not educated on the importance of recycling plastic.

The time have come to take more responsibility for our actions. According to many scientists around the world. 80 Beyond the Horizon • Grade 5/Unit 3 At Home: Write an advertisement for an environmental organization. using helping and main verbs. Change the helping verbs to match the subject. I has researched the subject. Global warming am a serious threat to healthy living. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . the environment are getting worse. Add commas where necessary. I have begun an environmental organization called Help Us Breathe. • A helping verb helps the main verb show an action or make a statement. We also was trying to educate people on the importance of recycling. Our group am working to get more people to take a train or bus to work. I were a college student in southern Ohio. and I had come to the conclusion that we need to decrease pollution recycle our cans and bottles and conserve our natural resources.Grammar Name Proofreading • The main verb in a sentence shows what the subject does or is. Rewite the following passage.

Write a main verb and a helping verb to complete each sentence. (have) 10. Kofi Annan that global warming will cause many Test: Main and Helping Verbs to make paper. Scientists problems. very far in the past twenty years. (was) © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 9. Trees 3. B. 1. Technology 5. 2. cans. Write a sentence using each helping verb. two visions for the future. (were) Beyond the Horizon • Grade 5/Unit 3 81 . 6. (has) 7. and paper. to recycle more bottles.Grammar Name A. (am) 8. I 4.

I didnet see any signs of the weather changing. I haventt seen the new plan for neighborhood recycling. Proofread the sentences to make sure that all contractions are spelled correctly. 8. 6. 10. Animals and plants cant live healthily in a polluted environment. Paper isnent supposed to be wasted. You are’not supposed to walk off the path. 2. 82 Beyond the Horizon • Grade 5/Unit 3 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . • An apostrophe shows that the letter o has been left out.Grammar Name Review: Contractions • A contraction is a shortened form of two words. Donnt forget to ask your relatives whether they recycle. The environment shouldnt be abused. Dont throw that bottle away. 9. The children werent worried about the forest. 1. 5. 7. 3. Write the correct spelling in the spaces provided. 4. • A contraction can be made by combining a verb with the word not. Grandpa wasnt happy with technology.

Fatima was the first user of the water pump. 5. • Subjects and linking verbs must agree.Grammar Name Linking Verbs • A linking verb does not show action. The water tasted very good. am) a hard worker. will be. were. • A linking verb links the subject to a noun or an adjective. The baobab tree (are. The people of the village (was. Draw one line under the subject of each sentence. 1. is) extremely smart. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 9. Write the correct form of the linking verb be on the line beside each sentence. A linking verb shows a state of being or states a condition. are. am) strong. 2. 8. I (is. 10. is. I am proud of my grandmother. using linking verbs. We were amazed by the new invention. • Common linking verbs are am. 3. The people of the village are excited. 6. seem. feel. appear. taste. My grandmother always (was. is) a great resource for water. You (are. Draw two lines under the linking verb in each sentence. felt. At Home: Write a short letter to Fatima about the water pump and the baobab tree. My Great-Grandmother’s Gourd Grade 5/Unit 3 83 . 7. look. was. 4. were) mean to my grandmother.

My grandmother is worried about the baobab trees. Then underline the word that names or describes the subject. Complete each sentence with a linking verb. 5. I felt proud of my grandmother’s accomplishment. The water pump is broken. 84 My Great-Grandmother’s Gourd Grade 5/Unit 3 At Home: Develop a word search using ten linking verbs. The desert a dry. People in our village seem very thankful for my grandmother’s generosity. I 10. The village was concerned about the lack of water. . © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill a mysterious old woman. 4. Water 11. filled with water someday. Underline the word that is connected to the subject by a linking verb. a little nervous when no water spilled from the pump. better from the baobab tree. thankful for the baobab trees.Grammar Name Linking Verbs • A linking verb links the subject of a sentence to a noun or an adjective in the predicate. fascinated with new technology. • The noun that follows a linking verb renames or identifies the subject. 1. The desert 7. hot landscape. All of the villagers 9. 6. Read each sentence. 2. I 8. 3. • The adjective that follows a linking verb describes the subject. The villagers say that she 12.

“We should use these trees to store our own water. How long do you plan on using the water pump? asked my neighbor. 5. 1. My Great-Grandmother’s Gourd Grade 5/Unit 3 85 . Add the correct punctuation to each sentence. • Use a comma before the quotation when the speaker’s name comes first. a question mark. My grandmother said.Grammar Name Mechanics • Use quotation marks to set off a direct quotation from the rest of a sentence. Add the correct punctuation. • Use a comma. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill At Home: Write a dialogue between friends living in a desert. 2. It’s important to have more than one means to get water. To survive in the desert. one must be sharp as a cactus said my uncle. Fatima’s grandmother tapped her on the shoulder. “Hurray ” the people cheered. When they were away from the villagers. 3. would you please come with me she asked. “Fatima. People always say The desert is no place for the thirsty dog. 4. or an exclamation mark to end the quotation when the speaker’s name comes last. Fatima’s grandmother pointed to the baobab trees and said. Rewrite the following passage. Fatima agreed and followed her grandmother outside the village limits.

As I arrive back at my village. • The noun that follows a linking verb renames or identifies the subject. I travel many days and many nights. 86 My Great-Grandmother’s Gourd Grade 5/Unit 3 At Home: Write a few paragraphs about a trip that you have taken. Rewrite the passage. • A linking verb links the subject of a sentence to a noun or an adjective in the predicate. I tastes the fresh water from my canteen.Grammar Name Proofreading • A linking verb does not show action. the villagers appears so proud of me. The time has come for me to make my journey into the desert. and the sun feel too hot to bear. I return home with relief. The village chief told me that it were very important to take plenty of water and materials to build a tent. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Use the correct verb forms. all children my age am required to make the journey to be accepted as adult members of the community. A linking verb shows a state of being or states a condition. The mission seem long and hard. using linking verbs. After seven days. I is only eighteen. But.

5. will be c. am d. She their culture. Fatima is very pleased with the water pump. a. b. appear Choose the word that the linking verb connects to the subject of the sentence. a. water c. appear 4. is b. pump b. be d. is b. very b. pleased d. are b. is © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill My Great-Grandmother’s Gourd Grade 5/Unit 3 87 . Circle the letter of the correct answer. a. a. The cactus is taller than most I’ve seen. Her grandmother wise. Ibrahim’s words encouraging. was c. She hopes that the villagers thankful someday. is d. for c. age b. a. cactus 7. am appear seems were proud of 3. tree d. d. The water tastes very fresh. taller b. were 2. 1. a. fresh d. is d. Circle the letter of the correct answer. c. tastes 6. The baobab tree seems healthy for its age.Grammar Name Test: Linking Verbs Choose the linking verb that best completes the sentence. are c. most c. healthy 8. a. a. Fatima c.

Work with a partner. I so satisfied with the work that I did to help my grandmother prepare the baobab tree said Fatima. 88 My Great-Grandmother’s Gourd Grade 5/Unit 3 . I always said that a snake 5.Grammar Name Review: Linking Verbs • A linking verb links the subject of a sentence to a noun or an adjective in the predicate. • The adjective that follows a linking verb describes the subject. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill magnificent exclaimed 6. Why doesn’t anyone remember that baobab trees important for survival asked my grandmother 4. Add quotation marks and the correct punctuation where necessary. 1. The person who listens should add a linking verb to each sentence. • Use a comma before the quotation when the speaker's name comes first. My uncle said Desert sandstorms 2. unbearable. excited when they see the new water 3. The villagers pump said Ibrahim. Then look at the sentences together. Take turns reading the sentences aloud. • Use quotation marks to set off a direct quotation from the rest of a sentence. The journey across the desert Carlos happy in the desert. • The noun that follows a linking verb renames or identifies the subject.

1. Change all of the incorrect verbs to their correct past tense forms.Grammar Name Irregular Verbs • An irregular verb is a verb that does not use -d or -ed to form the past tense. 7. They runned away from the strange vehicle. 6. 5. The spaceship gived off a faint glow. Zathura • Grade 5/Unit 3 89 . Danny throwed the ball at his brother. Danny finded a game in the park. A pirate ship flied by the boys’ house. The black hole rised over Walter’s body. 2. Walter and Danny goed into outer space. 3. 4. At Home: Write out the present and past tenses of five irregular verbs. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. Rewrite these sentences. The meteorite maked a huge hole in the ceiling.

begin 2. know had have has had have has had has have had © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 90 Zathura • Grade 5/Unit 3 At Home: Write a short passage about what the future will be like. speak 8. . take 6. has. drink 5.Grammar Name Irregular Verbs • An irregular verb is a verb that does not use -d or -ed to form the past tense. grow 9. choose 3. eat 4. get 7. using irregular verbs. Change the following verbs so that they can be used with the helping verb. or had. • Some irregular verbs have special endings when used with the helping verbs have. 1. fly 10.

• Use the present tense of a verb if the action or condition is happening now. We have flew on airplanes and driven in cars. Our ancestors feeled that they knowed so much. Centuries ago people thinked that their technology was advanced. We are lucky to live in such an advanced world.Grammar Name Mechanics • A verb is used to show action or state a condition. • Some verbs do not take -ed to show the past tense. Remember which verbs use an irregular form. Rewrite the following passage. Today’s scientists discovered new things about our world every day. or had. Zathura • Grade 5/Unit 3 91 . Now we known that space travel is possible. Remember which verbs are irregular. has. They also believe that space travel was impossible. • Some irregular verbs take special endings when they are used with the helping verbs have. • Use the past tense of a verb to show an action that has been completed in the past. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill At Home: Find books about technology and notice the verb tenses and the irregular verbs in the books. Correct the underlined verbs. Today’s medicine fought diseases in many different ways.

stretch his four arms out and wrapped them around us. he standed up tall. He moved toward us. Then rewrite the passage. and plump. We were walking down an alley when a space alien jumped out from behind a pile of tall smelly wet trash. Luther and i have always been great friends. and he smelled like a dirty garbage can.Grammar Name Proofreading • Be sure that verbs are in the correct form. loving squeeze and then went back behind the pile of trash. including irregular verbs. We have do fun things together and have saw many crazy sights. He gived us a quick. Also. when he got close to us. He leaved slimy sludge on the ground when he walked. The space alien was large blue. • Be sure that each sentence begins with a capital letter and ends with the correct punctuation mark. gentle. adding commas where needed. Circle verbs that are in the incorrect form. circle mistakes in capitalization and punctuation. Last Thursday we seen the craziest sight ever. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . 92 Zathura • Grade 5/Unit 3 At Home: Write a tale about an encounter with a space alien.

1. (eat) They could not see what the alien had 10. 12. (see) Danny 6. the game leaning against the tree. slowly around. (give) The game 7. (think) Walter 8. (spin) The room © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill many books about the his brother’s walkie-talkie. Use the past tense in each sentence. the boys an interesting evening. (go) The boys’ parents 4. (feel) Danny 11. (write) Authors of the past future. with each other too much. (break) Danny 3. . (fall) The robot had 5. down beside the wall. 2. (fight) Danny and Walter 9. as though he was dreaming.Grammar Name Test: Irregular Verbs Write the correct form of the irregular verbs in parentheses. (get) Walter Zathura • Grade 5/Unit 3 93 . the game before his brother could grab it. out for the evening. that his brother was a pain in the neck.

Grammar Name Review: Irregular Verbs • An irregular verb is a verb that does not use -d or -ed to form the past tense. or had. • Some irregular verbs have special endings when used with the helping verbs have. speak see know throw begin think go fall fly run 94 Zathura • Grade 5/Unit 3 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Use the past tense form of the verbs. has. Use at least five of the ten verbs below in a short science fiction story.

The colonists were ready to defend their homes. Walter will show Danny the game board and the card. 5. or future tense. 2. 7.Grammar Name Read the following sentences. Read the following sentences. begun the colonists about courage Verbs © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill using the baobab tree to store Unit 3 Review • Grade 5/Unit 3 95 . I am proud to be the first person to use the new water pump. 3. Choose the verb that completes the sentence correctly. 8. In 1869. beganned d. teaching 10. General Gage will listen closely to the boy’s words. the Wyoming legislature voted for women’s rights. teached b. Many villagers have water again. will taught c. My grandmother is working very hard. or a helping verb. 9. Danny had rolled the dice with excitement. a. beginned b. taught d. a linking verb. a. Circle the letter beside your answer. Then write whether the verb is written in the present. 6. 4. Tell whether the underlined verb is an action verb. 1. past. began c. Esther Morris demonstrates courage in her actions. The American Revolution and independence.

General Gage’s soldiers a. was 12. destroys 16. Choose the action verb that best completes each sentence. studied d. were b. swam b. are c. at my grandmother as she dug around 96 Unit 3 Review • Grade 5/Unit 3 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Read the following sentences. appear d. cooked c. a. 11. if too many people use it. I a. Circle the letter beside your answer. questioned c. d. cried food over the fire. 13. to the top of the hill in Boston. We a. The villagers the baobab tree. slept b. b. am were are appears a great leader and person. Esther Morris a. starts c. laughed d. c. climbed 15. practiced c. played 14. ready to roll the dice. breaks b. skated d. Circle the letter beside your answer.Grammar Name Verbs Read the following sentences. Choose the linking verb that completes the sentence correctly. quickens d. The water pump a. passed b.

10. 2. They were carrying bags of fruits and vegetables. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. When ’Tricia Ann and Mama Frances rode the bus. 7. On the lines following the sentences.” If the pronoun is incorrect. 3. write the antecedents for the underlined pronouns. People got on the bus. it is her favorite spot. it was having engine trouble.” 4. ’Tricia Ann met Mrs. 5. Goin’ Someplace Special Grade 5/ Unit 4 97 . • A pronoun may be singular or plural. ’Tricia Ann was excited because she was going someplace special. If the underlined pronoun is correct. Mama Frances said to ’Tricia Ann. • An antecedent is the noun (or nouns) to which a pronoun refers. Grannell. At Home: Retell a favorite story using as many pronouns as you can.Grammar Name Pronouns and Antecedents • A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns. and then they pointed to a sign in Monroe’s restaurant. “Someplace Special” is important to ’Tricia Ann. she had to sit in the back. “Act like you belong to somebody. write “C. Read the sentences below. Jimmy Lee gave ’Tricia Ann a pretzel. write the correct pronoun. ’Tricia Ann said that her was ready to go out by herself. We was a friend of Mama Frances. 1. 6. The bus stopped in the street. At the market. A little boy approached ’Tricia Ann and said that he was six years old. 9.

“Those signs can tell where to sit.” said Mama Frances.” rushed 5. look for ten examples of pronouns in a favorite short story or novel. Lee’s pretzel.” am going to Someplace Special. It’s just can come inside?” . Grannell and ’Tricia Ann don’t like the Jim Crow laws. ’Tricia Ann blew her grandmother a kiss. “before 2. A plural noun takes a plural pronoun. had been taken by the crowd of people who got on at the Farmer’s Market. Mrs. No seats were left in the rear of the bus. 3. smiled at think that helped wash down Jimmy © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 9. Think about “Goin’ Someplace Special.” thought ’Tricia Ann change my mind. 7. where is a cook. Mama Frances told ’Tricia Ann. 8.Grammar Name Pronouns • A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns. but 4. Jimmy Lee’s brother works in Monroe’s Restaurant. “What makes 98 Goin’ Someplace Special Grade 5/ Unit 4 At Home: With a helper.” 10. “Hurry up. “ as can’t tell looked out the window. . think the laws are unfair. ’Tricia Ann bought a soda. • The antecedent of a pronoun is the noun (or nouns) to which a pronoun refers. 6.” Then complete each sentence by writing the correct pronoun or pronouns. and said. Willis referred to ’Tricia Ann as an angel. and then out the door. • A singular noun takes a singular pronoun. The hotel manager said to ’Tricia Ann. When Mr. 1. what to think. “No sir.

Each sentence contains an incorrect pronoun. Goin’ Someplace Special Grade 5/ Unit 4 99 . and they worked on Peace Fountain. Include different kinds of pronouns in the dialogue. she thinks that it are unfair.) Rewrite each sentence so that all of the pronouns are correct. 3. ’Tricia Ann was excited because we was going someplace special by herself. too. • The antecedent of a pronoun is the noun (or nouns) to which a pronoun refers. A plural noun takes a plural pronoun. you. 2.Grammar Name Mechanics • Pronouns take the place of nouns. thought they were unfair. she saw that them were empty. Jim Crow laws upset ’Tricia Ann. (There are correct pronouns in some sentences. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 5. 1. too. 4. ’Tricia Ann’s grandfather was a stonemason. Jimmy Lee agreed with ’Tricia Ann about Jim Crow laws. • A singular noun takes a singular pronoun. At Home: Write a dialogue about meeting a famous person. When ’Tricia Ann glanced at the seats in the front of the bus.

We agree with them. • A singular noun takes a singular pronoun. Her says that me wouldn’t have liked living in those times. Them had to sit in the back of buses. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . hotels. • The antecedent of a pronoun is the noun (or nouns) to which a pronoun refers. I likes “Goin’ Someplace Special” very much. 100 Goin’ Someplace Special Grade 5/ Unit 4 At Home: Write a letter using ten pronouns describing what you might see and whom you might meet in a city like ’Tricia Ann’s.Grammar Name Proofreading • A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns. Circle the pronouns that do not agree with their antecedents. They is set during the time when Jim Crow laws were in force. My grandmother says that he remembers Jim Crow laws. using the correct pronouns. He is a work of historical fiction. swimming pools. Then rewrite the paragraph. It were harsh laws that treated African Americans unfairly. Us could not eat at the same restaurants as white people. The same was true for schools. and even drinking fountains. A plural noun takes a plural pronoun.

she came to a jerky stop and hissed. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. 6. ’Tricia Ann enjoyed the fountain’s spraying waters even though she made ’Tricia Ann dizzy. and you handed the girl a pretzel. he talked about Jim Crow laws. When the bus arrived. 1. 7. “May me go to Someplace Special today?” 2. and then her dropped the bus fare in the collection box. 3. her fixed her thoughts on being in a place that had no Jim Crow signs. we read FOR WHITES ONLY. ’Tricia Ann bounded up the stairs. Underline the antecedent of each pronoun. ’Tricia Ann asked Mama Frances. 4. 5. Goin’ Someplace Special Grade 5/ Unit 4 101 . ’Tricia Ann greeted Jimmy Lee. When Mrs. Grannell and ’Tricia Ann spoke. ’Tricia Ann pulled her shoulders back.Grammar Name Test: Pronouns Rewrite each sentence so that the pronouns are correct. On the bench was a sign.

Grammar
Name
Review: Pronouns

• A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns. • A singular noun takes a singular pronoun. A plural noun takes a plural pronoun. • The antecedent of a pronoun is the noun (or nouns) to which a pronoun refers. Think about “Goin’ Someplace Special.” Complete each sentence by writing the correct pronoun. Underline the antecedent of each pronoun. 1. When ’Tricia Ann came to the Grand Music Palace, a little boy spoke to . 2. The boy asked ’Tricia Ann whether got to go ’round back.” 4. Hickey smiled at ’Tricia Ann and then cried to the other girl, “I want to go where now open. 6. ’Tricia Ann did not want to go to the matinee because was on her way to another place. 7. ’Tricia Ann saw a building rising above everything that surrounded . 8. Both ’Tricia Ann and Mama Frances loved the library; 9. ’Tricia Ann was glad that Mama Frances had allowed to go the library.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

was coming in.

3. Another girl said, “Colored people can’t come in the front door.

is going.” was

5. Hickey then pulled ’Tricia Ann through the door.

felt comfortable there.

102

Goin’ Someplace Special
Grade 5/ Unit 4

Grammar
Name
Subject and Object Pronouns

• • • •

Use a subject pronoun as the subject of a sentence. I, you, he, she, it, we, and they are subject pronouns. Use an object pronoun after an action verb or after a preposition. Me, you, him, her, it, us, and them are object pronouns.

Read each sentence. Write the correct subject or object pronoun on the line. 1. Carlos and Gloria are friends. for a long time. have known each other

2. When Gloria and her friend were little, Gloria’s mother propped on the kitchen table. 3. tortillas. 4. Now Carlos wanted Gloria to pay attention to 5. Carlos started showing off for 6. One evening 7. The children had named 8. Carlos said, “
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

watched the children as

made

. .

saw a familiar skunk. Dos Dedos. know just how to catch a skunk.”

9. When Carlos grabbed the skunk’s tail, Dos Dedos sprayed Carlos’s clothes so badly that Carlos had to take 10. At home, off.

left his shoes at the back door.

At Home: Describe an afternoon playing outside with friends, using subject and object pronouns.

Carlos and the Skunk
Grade 5/ Unit 4

103

Grammar
Name
Subject and Object Pronouns

• Use a subject pronoun as the subject of a sentence. • Use an object pronoun after an action verb or after a word such as for, at, of, with, or to. Correct each sentence by circling the incorrect pronoun and writing the correct pronoun on the line. Then write whether the pronoun is a subject or object pronoun. 1. As Carlos and Gloria walked down the road, them saw Dos Dedos. 2. “Me will catch Dos Dedos,” Carlos said. 3. Carlos’s clothes smelled terrible; in fact the smell of they was unbearable. 4. When his mother came into the kitchen, her noticed the smell. 5. Carlos did not want to talk about the smell, so him slipped out the back door. 6. Carlos picked tomatoes from the garden and squeezed they into the bathtub. 7. Him scrubbed with a cloth soaked in tomato juice. 8. The next day Carlos went to church; him sat near the back. 9. Carlos was embarrassed by the smell of his shoes; everyone in church 10. At dinner his parents said, “Us think Carlos is unusually quiet.”
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

could smell they.

104

Carlos and the Skunk
Grade 5/ Unit 4

At Home: Write a letter telling how your parents reacted to something you did. Use at least five subject and object pronouns.

Grammar
Name
Mechanics

• Subject pronouns are the subjects in a sentence. • Object pronouns receive the action of a verb or follow a preposition. Each sentence contains an incorrect pronoun. (There are correct pronouns in some sentences, too.) Rewrite each sentence so that all of the pronouns are correct. 1. Carlos forgot to clean his shoes, so them smelled very bad.

2. Him wore they to church the next day. 3. The priest sneezed as him walked toward the altar. 4. “Papá, me think us should go home now,” whispered Carlos.

5. Carlos didn’t want anyone to know that him was the source of the smell.

6. If him and Gloria walked home together, her would notice the smell of his shoes.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill

7. Him did hear Gloria calling to he. 8. While them were eating, Carlos’s parents noticed that him was very quiet.

At Home: Write a dialogue between Carlos and his father going shopping. Use subject and object pronouns.

Carlos and the Skunk
Grade 5/ Unit 4

105

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Carlos and Gloria were good friends. including subject and object pronouns. 106 Carlos and the Skunk Grade 5/ Unit 4 At Home: Write a paragraph about an embarrassing incident. a skunk them had named.Grammar Name Proofreading • Subject pronouns are the subjects in a sentence. The smell remained on Carlos’s shoes. When Carlos and Gloria were together. Them often played together after them finished their chores and homework. The skunk sprayed he. and Carlos was embarrassed. Circle all of the incorrect subject and object pronouns. Carlos wanted to show off for Gloria. everyone noticed the awful smell. • Object pronouns receive the action of a verb or follow a preposition. When him wore they to church the next day. they noticed Dos Dedos. Carlos’s father took he shopping for a new pair of shoes. so him tried to catch the skunk by the tail. Then rewrite the passage.

we d. and salsa. I’ll get my shoes.” Carlos said to his mother. made tortillas. him b. he c. a. us d. “When leave. he c. me b. “You know what heard?” said Carlos. When Carlos grabbed the skunk. Carlos’s mother prepared breakfast. me 5. lived in the Española Valley in the mountains of northern New Mexico. her b. We c. the animal had a surprise for . her d. she 6. us Carlos and the Skunk Grade 5/ Unit 4 107 .Grammar Name Test: Subject and Object Pronouns Circle the letter of the pronoun that correctly completes each sentence. us © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 4. Her d. him b. a. him b. a. Carlos could not remember how and long Gloria had been friends. Them 3. I c. They b. we 2. a. 1. her d. fried eggs. he c. you d. a. a. they c.

Him had to run away and take they off. Then Carlos forgot to clean his shoes. Carlos’s parents understood what happened. him got very embarrassed. Then rewrite the paragraph. However. Notice the words that sound incorrect. correcting all errors. Each partner reads half of the paragraph aloud. Them had been friends for a long time. Them smelled awful. Work with a partner such as a parent or helper. instead of showing off. and them smelled at church the next day. Carlos wanted to show off for Gloria. The skunk them called Dos Dedos sprayed all over Carlos’s clothes.Grammar Name Review: Subject and Object Pronouns • Subject pronouns are the subjects in a sentence. “You and me should go shopping for a new pair of shoes. • Object pronouns receive the action of a verb or follow a preposition.” 108 Carlos and the Skunk Grade 5/ Unit 4 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Carlos’s father said.

All United States citizens can vote when they turns eighteen. 6. He believe that voting is important. A famous musician is giving a concert because she. 10. Does you think that voting is important? © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill At Home: Interview someone about voting practices. 8. 2. 4. Political groups are active. and it. Getting Out the Vote • Grade 5/ Unit 4 109 . they tries to register new voters. Write in the present tense.Grammar Name Pronoun-Verb Agreement • A present-tense verb must agree with its subject pronoun. think that voting is important. It form the basis of our system of government. • Add -s to most action verbs when their subjects are he. 5. write the correct form of each incorrect verb. Read each sentence. She want to encourage all citizens to vote. 9. • Do not add -s to an action verb in the present tense when you use the pronouns I. As citizens in a democracy. too. 7. we. John Pike walks around Las Vegas as he ask his neighbors to vote. On the lines provided. 3. she. we agrees. and they. Members of these groups go to concerts where they meets young people who can vote. you. • The verbs have and be have special forms in the present tense. 1.

it are a donkey. 110 Getting Out the Vote • Grade 5/ Unit 4 At Home: Write a paragraph suggesting a different animal for a political party. Republicans like the elephant. Use have and be in the present tense. Correct all errors in pronoun-verb agreement. Our country has two major political parties. 1.Grammar Name The Verbs Have and Be • The verbs have and be take special forms in the present tense. and they has no problem with it. . it am an elephant. they is in his cartoons. Democrats like their donkey because it are smart and brave. 6. The donkey is associated with Andrew Jackson. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. 4. 7. The Republicans have theirs. it be a symbol of strong will. 2. too. 3. Rewrite each sentence. 5. they is the Democratic party and the Republican party. They has animals that represent each party. The Democrats have their animal. Cartoonist Thomas Nast made the symbols famous.

Getting Out the Vote • Grade 5/ Unit 4 111 . including Doctor Peterson. and most months. Her office is always closed for a few hours in early November. Dr. Ms. Read the sentences. D. volunteers on Election Day. 8. Tues. The capital of the United States is Washington. My neighbor. Write the abbreviation for any word that can be abbreviated. • Abbreviate titles before names. Polls open as early as 7 . Mister Adams. of that month. Election Day is always the first 5. 2. We met one of our representatives in the U.Grammar Name Mechanics • An abbreviation is the shortened form of a word. Sen. 6. 1.M. 9. Nov. Many people volunteer. streets. inviting him or her to visit your school. The president is inaugurated in January. days of the week. He encouraged us to tell our friends and families to vote in the election. Use some abbreviations. Read the sentences. 3. 7. 4. 10. Fill in each blank with an abbreviation from the list. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill At Home: Write a letter to a state representative. A. Mr. Senate. • An abbreviation begins with a capital letter and ends with a period. He gives voters their ballots at the precinct on Vine Street. S. .C. Michael Eberling.

R. Since 1991 Russia have been an independent nation. it be rich in natural resources such as gold and coal.S. and large forests. The president of Russia be elected by the Russian people. plains.S. using four examples of have and be. had a form of government called communism. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill .Grammar Name Proofreading • The verbs have and be take special forms in the present tense. 112 Getting Out the Vote • Grade 5/ Unit 4 At Home: Write a paragraph describing your town. using the correct forms of have and be. The government in Russia be considered a democracy. Before 1991.S. It have mountains.R. Russia are located in both Europe and Asia. Russia belonged to a group of countries called the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. or U.S. Also. The U. In communist countries. Rewrite the passage. the government have control of most property and businesses.

At the center of the seal you sees the bald eagle.Grammar Name Read the following paragraph. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Getting Out the Vote • Grade 5/ Unit 4 113 . a symbol of peace. too. Then rewrite it. correcting any errors in pronoun-verb agreement. We has a picture of the Great Seal in our classroom. It are used on some government documents. It are our national bird. In its beak it hold a banner. In one claw it hold an olive branch. Test: Pronoun-Verb Agreement What do you know about the Great Seal of the United States? You sees it on the back of a one-dollar bill. I believes that it be a symbol of our country. In its other claw it carry arrows to symbolize war.

It are strong and brave. What does you think I should be? 114 Getting Out the Vote • Grade 5/ Unit 4 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Rewrite the sentences. Then find the subject pronouns in the paragraph that do not agree with their verbs. They considers it strong and brave. the Republicans like their elephant. according to the Republicans. I are strong and brave.Grammar Name Look at the drawings. using the correct pronoun-verb agreement. The Democrats like their donkey. and I runs fast. I wishes I could choose an animal as a symbol for myself. They is the Democratic party donkey and the Republican party elephant. Review: Pronoun-Verb Agreement These animals are the symbols of the two major American political parties. Similarly.

It shows who or what owns something. 2. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 9. our. If you live in an area that does have hurricanes. winds blow at speeds of 74 miles an hour or more. The more we learn about hurricanes. We keep in the back of the big closet in brother’s room. your. 1. Possibly hurricane. his. his. Fill in the missing possessive pronoun. Hurricanes • Grade 5/ Unit 4 115 . We keep a flashlight. English word hurricane comes from people who lived in the tropics long ago. At Home: Describe preparations for a hurricane. yours. yours. and an evil Taino god was called Huracan. 10. hers.Grammar Name Possessive Pronouns • A possessive pronoun takes the place of a possessive noun. a radio. Use at least three possessive pronouns. its. The ancient Mayan people called storm god Hunraken. When my mom heard news of a hurricane watch. Read each sentence. keep emergency supplies handy. • Some possessive pronouns stand alone in a sentence and function as nouns (mine. A hurricane is the strongest type of tropical storm. • Some possessive pronouns are used before nouns (my. 6. 7. name or Hunraken’s is the source of 4. your. 3. theirs). 5. the better chances of coming through them safely. and bottled water in emergency kit. food. cousin Frances lives in an area that has no house will not be in danger. her. hurricanes. ours. its. their). she left office to come home early. 8.

hers. Three big trees fell on top of the shed. The people in ours neighborhood help one another when hurricanes hit. 3. your. his. ours. 4. their). there are hurricanes. 6. . her. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 10. 5. crashing through her roof. Many large trees fell in Phil and Gina’s yard and ruined theirs shed. 1. Find the incorrect possessive pronoun and write it correctly on the line. In my. the roof on ours house was not damaged. Read each sentence. Use at least four examples of possessive pronouns. yours. • Some possessive pronouns stand alone in a sentence and function as nouns (mine. Mine home is located near the coast of North Carolina. Hurricane Fran caused a lot of damage to ours house. your.Grammar Name Ways to Use Possessive Pronouns • Some possessive pronouns are used before nouns (my. 116 Hurricanes • Grade 5/ Unit 4 At Home: Write a newspaper account of a hurricane. What kinds of storms do you have in yours town? 2. its. its. theirs). During the last hurricane. yours. 8. We have learned about hurricanes in mine science class. his. my sister was frightened when strong winds broke a window in hers room. 7. our. 9. However.

Grammar Name Mechanics • Use a hyphen to show the division of a word at the end of a line. people living in low lying areas often go to safer places. Hurricanes begin in the warm. 6. 3. A battery driven radio is important to have during a severe storm. moist atmosphere over tropical ocean waters. Divide the word between syllables. adding a hyphen to the compound word. During hurricanes. Tropical depressions have steady wind speeds of thirty eight miles per hour or less. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 5. The peak hurricane months are August and September. Hurricanes are huge spinning storms that develop in warm areas around the equator. 2. The peak hurricane months are August and September. a. b. a. At Home: Write five sentences using the following words to make compound words: self. Each of these sentences contains a compound word. Choose the correct way to divide the words in these sentences. a. b. well. much. life. b. Rewrite the sentences. Hurricanes • Grade 5/ Unit 4 117 . 4. • Use a hyphen to connect two words to form some compound words. Hurricanes are huge spinning storms that develop in warm areas around the equator. Circle the letter beside the correct answer. fifty. Hurricanes begin in the warm. moist atmosphere over tropical ocean waters. 1.

Circle all of the incorrect or missing hyphens. although theirs yard was in bad shape. Many people lost possessions.Grammar Name Proofreading • A possessive pronoun can take the place of a possessive noun. Use at least five possessive pronouns. It shows who or what has or owns something. I’m glad ours house is in a well protected area and that we have several battery powered radios for emergencies. 118 Hurricanes • Grade 5/ Unit 4 At Home: Write a journal entry that describes a severe storm. Circle all of the incorrect possessive pronouns. Ours cousins’ home wasn’t destroyed. a town near my was destroyed twice by tornadoes. My cousin said that hers house is more vulnerable to tornadoes than hers neighbor’s house because hers house is more exposed than his’. Read the following passage. and its’ big windows face toward the southwest. In fact. It sits on top of a hill. Ours cousins live in that town. • Some possessive pronouns are used before nouns. the most dangerous storms are tornadoes. Then rewrite the passage. Some possessive pronouns stand alone in a sentence and function as nouns. In mine hometown. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . and some lost theirs homes.

correcting all pronoun errors.Grammar Name Rewrite each sentence. but luckily her car was untouched. The roof of my uncle’s garage was damaged. The worst hurricane to hit ours city was Hurricane Andrew in 1992. 4. Luisa says that’s about as high as the two stories in hers house. Luisa’s parents remember Hurricane Andrew and our heavy winds. near mine house. 1. 5. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. Weather forecasters can give advance warning of storms so that people can get theirs emergency equipment ready. storm tides reached 17 feet. and our get many hurricanes. Along Biscayne Bay. 3. Hurricanes • Grade 5/ Unit 4 119 . Does yours hometown get hurricanes or tornadoes? Test: Possessive Pronouns 2. Luisa and I live in Florida. 7. 6.

hurricanes occur in the summer and in the fall. • Use a hyphen to show the division of a word at the end of a line. and it is important to know your. 6. Make sure that you have a three day supply of water and food. Families should make such arrangements. 3. 7. Hurricane Andrew caused much damage to the land and buildings in it’s path. Divide the word between syllables. 120 Hurricanes • Grade 5/ Unit 4 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. However. Some possessive pronouns stand alone in a sentence and function as nouns. Hurricanes are given theirs own names. and the other proofreads it. • Some possessive pronouns are used before nouns. Work with a partner. 5. 1. It shows who or what owns something. In ours country. fewer than fifty five people died as a result of the storm. Our can be quite bad. but I don’t know whether other places have worse hurricanes.Grammar Name Review: Possessive Pronouns and Hyphens • A possessive pronoun can take the place of a possessive noun. Write any incorrect possessive pronouns or compound words that need hyphens correctly on the lines. The local weather forecaster tries to give people early warning so that they can make our arrangements to leave the area or stay. 4. 2. • Use a hyphen to connect two words to form some compound words. . One partner reads a sentence aloud.

• Do not confuse possessive pronouns with contractions that sound the same. “Leave some baskets before you cross. their. 6. He tricks people into leaving they’re wares on the other side of the river. 1. Clap you’re hands twice. The underlined pronouns and contractions are used incorrectly. 8. 7. Do you think your ready for the story? 2. • Its. 10. its the only way to do it. and your are possessive pronouns. they’re. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 9.Grammar Name Pronouns and Homophones • Homophones are words that sound the same but have different spellings and meanings. Its’ a bad day for the fisher because he has not caught any fish to sell. Their afraid of falling into the river because the log bridge is shaky. 4. At Home: Write about a time that a trick was played on someone. At first their fooled. 3.” the fisher tells the basketmaker. They’re swimming skills are not very good. they are. • It’s. Use four pronouns and homophones on this page. Its a story about a fisher who plays a trick on some people. Write the correct usage on the line. and you’re are contractions meaning it is. and you are. 5. Catch of the Day! • Grade 5/ Unit 4 121 . Read each sentence. but then they trick the fisher. The fisher promises to hold the unsteady log in it’s place.

Use possessive pronouns. • Contractions always use apostrophes. He tells the others to leave some of there food before crossing the log. their. homophones. on they’re way home. 4. 3. They could lose there merchandise or even drown. He stands their next to the log bridge and shakes it. However. 5. but are spelled differently. These possessive pronouns and contractions are homophones.” the fisher says. they see nothing wrong with the bridge. Rewrite each sentence. words that sound the same. they’re. and contractions correctly. 9. They decide that there going to trick the fisher. They will think that their going to fall into the river. The fisher tricks some people on there way to the market. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. and they’re. 10. . 2. 1. there easily tricked. There likely to be frightened by the shaky log. and your are possessive pronouns. “Put some of you’re baskets down before you cross. their. As they go to the market. and you’re are contractions. 7. It’s.Grammar Name Homophones • Its. Use several examples of there. 122 Catch of the Day! • Grade 5/ Unit 4 At Home: Write a poem about a trickster. 6.

• Possessive pronouns do not have apostrophes. 1. Its’ a simple plan. Use pronouns and contractions on this page. but they are spelled differently.” the people warn the fisher. 5. Look for incorrect apostrophe usage and correct any errors. or your sure to fall in. Your probably wondering what the people did to trick the fisher. Homophones sound the same. The fisher doesn’t know that their playing a trick on him. Catch of the Day! • Grade 5/ Unit 4 123 . 8. “Be careful on the bridge.Grammar Name Mechanics • Some possessive pronouns and contractions are homophones. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 7. 4. 2. He is not aware of they’re plan. • An apostrophe takes the place of letters in a contraction. At Home: Write an interview between the fisher and a reporter. They put the fish from the next village in there buckets. 6. The people think that its a good idea to trick the fisher. 3. Rewrite each of these sentences. but everyone thinks it will work well. They meet the next day to make they’re plan.

Circle all mistakes in the use of possessive pronouns. It’s main character is a fisher who is hungry because he can’t catch any fish to eat or to sell. He does this by pretending that the log bridge is unsteady and that he will hold it in it’s place. 124 Catch of the Day! • Grade 5/ Unit 4 At Home: Write a one.Grammar Name Proofreading • Its. This play is an original trickster story. Then the fisher crosses over and picks up the goods right their where the people left them. Use the homophones in this unit. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . So they leave there goods their on the ground before they cross. their. and you’re are contractions. • The word there means “in that place. It’s. These possessive pronouns and contractions are homophones.or two-paragraph summary of this play. homophones. Then rewrite the passage. • Do not confuse possessive pronouns with contractions. and your are possessive pronouns. He tells the people that there in danger if they cross with too much merchandise. they’re.” It is a homophone of they’re and their. He decides to trick people into leaving the goods that there bringing to market on the other side of the river. and contractions.

it drops the piece of cheese it had in it’s mouth. 1.Grammar Name Test: Pronouns and Homophones Rewrite each sentence.” 7. and asks it to sing. however. There certainly are many to choose from. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 9. I like stories in which its the trickster who gets tricked. What’s you’re favorite trickster story? 2. 10. a fox tricks a crow to get it’s meal. 5. write correct on the line. 6. Their is a lesson for the trickster. 3. If there are no errors. 8. “You’re song is so lovely. correcting any pronoun and homophone errors.” the fox tells the crow. For example. Sometimes. As the crow sings. There not innocent like the characters in “The Catch of the Day. 4. Catch of the Day! • Grade 5/ Unit 4 125 . The cheese lands right their at the fox’s feet. characters are tricked because of there faults.

Are you ready to tell you’re story? 126 Catch of the Day! • Grade 5/ Unit 4 . their. Read the sentences about the picture. Its dangerous to cross a shaky log bridge. So they leave they’re things their. and your are possessive pronouns. Possessive pronouns do not have apostrophes. It’s. “Leave some of you’re goods on the ground. Rewrite them. 6. Their afraid of losing they’re goods or there lives. These possessive pronouns and contractions are homophones.” he says. 3. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 5. they’re. The fisher is tricking the people into leaving they’re goods. 4.Grammar Name Review: Possessive Pronouns • Its. and you’re are contractions.” It is a homophone of they’re and their. 1. • Contractions always use apostrophes. 2. • The word there means “in that place. correcting all pronoun and contraction errors.

” D. Change “they” to “It. Add a verb.” G. Change “They” to “She.” C.” F.” B. No mistake © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 4. Change “herself” to “themselves. Change “him” to “it.” D. No mistake. Change “him” to “he. A. E.Grammar Name Pronouns Look at the underlined section in the following passages. but him got too close to it.” B. Change “They” to “her. It was a place where she felt welcome.” C. A. No mistake Carlos often saw a skunk while doing chores after school. G. (4) 3. Change “He” to “She. with their Jim Crow signs. so it faced away from him and raised its tail. Change “got” to “gets.” H.” F. Change “He” to “It. (2) 1. (1) ’Tricia Ann’s special place was the library. No mistake Unit 4 Review • Grade 5/ Unit 4 127 . ’Tricia Ann was going to Someplace Special. 2. Circle the letter that best describes how to correct the underlined section. The skunk (3) was afraid of Carlos. They was going by herself. Change “it” to “him.Then look at the answer choices. He was not like many other places. Change “a” to “an. E.” H. Carlos’s sister warned him not to go near the skunk. Then they shot a smelly spray at him.

” D. Some people still say that its too difficult to remember to vote. Change “it” to “they. E.” F. 128 Unit 4 Review • Grade 5/ Unit 4 . Change “into” to “in.” B. A. Change “its” to “it’s. Change “it” to “its. Change “no” to “any.” G. The fisher fell off it and tumbled (8) into the river. (6) 5.” B. Change “Their” to “There. He told people that the log bridge was dangerous. Their was really no danger. Add “why” after “excuses. Change “Them” to “They.” © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill H. Change “for” to “about. Change “was” to “were. A.” H.” 6. Finally the people caught on. Add “why” after “remember. No mistake. and the basketmaker shook the log while the fisher was standing on it.” D. Them give many excuses for not voting. The fisher cheated other people in the village to get what he wanted. 7. the log (7) bridge was very steady. The fisher wanted to trick people so that they would give him food. People say that they are too busy or that they (5) are out of town on election day. No mistake 8. Many signs and posters are displayed before elections. E. No mistake.Grammar Name Pronouns Many people who can vote in American elections do not do so. Change “Them” to “Us.” G. so it should be easy for people to remember to vote.” F.” C. Change “say” to “says.” C.

When it does. 5. • An adjective can follow the noun it describes. solid exhausted terrifying dreary furious desperate uninhabited vast fifteen tattered after walking for 1. Shackleton knew that his crew was 8. At Home: Write a journal entry describing a day as a Shackleton crew member. Use at least six adjectives. Complete each sentence with an adjective from the box. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill men pulled each boat.Grammar Name Adjectives • An adjective is a word that describes a noun or pronoun. sight of an approaching storm filled the men with 4. After he crossed the mountains. The crew crossed miles. Shackleton and his crew became many miles. his clothes were dirty and ice. The men landed on an 9. Fierce. to be rescued. 2. winds shook the Endurance during the storm. The dread. . Elephant Island was a 7. • An adjective tells what kind or how many. sheets of ice that stretched for 10. Spirit of Endurance • Grade 5/ Unit 5 129 . island. place. They walked safely across the 6. a linking verb connects the noun and the adjective. On dark winter days. 3.

2. Include three demonstrative adjectives and circle all the adjectives. and those are demonstrative adjectives. The skipper warned. The sailor called. Read each sentence. The captain asked them to change that torn sails on the mast. The men asked. Do not step on this snow over there. “This boats are heavy. using the correct form of the demonstrative adjective. • Demonstrative adjectives come before a noun.” 6. • Use this and that with singular nouns. 8. 5. The words this. . Use these and those with plural nouns. Then rewrite it. “Will these ice ahead crush the boat?” 3. “That waves out there are getting bigger!” © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 7.” 4. “That seals on the beach are huge. That and those point to nouns that are far away.Grammar Name Demonstrative Adjectives • A demonstrative adjective tells which one. 130 Spirit of Endurance • Grade 5/ Unit 5 At Home: Write a poem of five lines about the ocean. • This and these refer to people or things that are nearby. These is the stormiest ocean in the world. that. these. The sailors wanted to land on those island. The sailor said. 1.

10. Some explorers were britain. Add the correct proper adjective for each underlined proper noun. He took a Chile ship. 7. 4. At Home: Read several news articles and choose five proper adjectives from the articles. • A proper adjective begins with a capital letter. 3. Some of the men liked France food. An Alaska sled dog could be used to transport goods. 5. Many of the sailors were england. Spirit of Endurance • Grade 5/ Unit 5 131 . 1. 2.Grammar Name Mechanics • A proper adjective is formed from a proper noun. Rewrite each sentence. Some boats were made from America wood. 6. Many of the men wanted italy food. 8. Use the dictionary for help with spelling. The Antarctica continent was mostly uninhabited. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 9. The men thought that south america fruit would be delicious. The cook ran out of india spices.

Those would not be a fun boat ride! 132 Spirit of Endurance • Grade 5/ Unit 5 At Home: Write a six-sentence review of an adventure book. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Winds furious howl all around you. Can you picture yourself on a boat during an antarctic storm? The waves are Huge and toss your boat up and down. Your clothes dry become Soaked as rain pours from the sky. Include six adjectives and two demonstrative adjectives.Grammar Name Proofreading Read the paragraph below. Rewrite it correctly on the lines provided.

they sailed away. day. The 7. ocean current pulled them out to sea. 9. The sailors became rescuers. The sailor asked. The crew could not see through the 10. Shackleton took 2. Test: Adjectives 4.Grammar Name Add adjectives to the following sentences. Shackleton and his crew were very 6. food. when they saw their snow. waves washed over the tiny boat. The 8. 1. “What was that used to play?” weather made sailing difficult. On a men to find help. card game we © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Spirit of Endurance • Grade 5/ Unit 5 133 . . The whalers brought them 5. The 3.

• Use this and that with singular nouns. Use the following adjectives to help you write a paragraph about the crew of the Endurance. When it does. a linking verb connects the noun and adjective. Use these and those with plural nouns. determined mighty frantic patient rugged grim miserable Antarctic 134 Spirit of Endurance • Grade 5/ Unit 5 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . • A demonstrative adjective tells which one.Grammar Name Review: Adjectives • An adjective is a word that describes a noun and tells what kind or how many. That and those refer to nouns that are farther away. Then draw a scene from your paragraph below. • An adjective can come after the noun it describes. • This and these refer to nouns that are nearby.

At Home: Write a short nature poem. There was garden in his backyard. 6. 5. 1. 10. Rewrite each sentence. an. Wesley jumped over garbage can to escape. or to nouns that are plural. 9. Wesley created alphabet that had 80 letters. or the before nouns. The piece of fruit did not taste or look like apple. 3. 7. When I was in school. or idea. 2. Weslandia • Grade 5/ Unit 5 135 . and The • • • • • Articles are special kinds of adjectives. Each kid bought bottle of oil for 10 dollars. His parents went on tour of Weslandia. and the correctly. place. Use the to refer to a specific item or idea. The words a. Use a.Grammar Name The Articles A. 4. Use the articles a. thing. They played game that used parts of the plant. adding the correct article a or an. Use a or an to refer to any person. an. Wesley slept. and the are articles. an. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. An. The robe gave Wesley opportunity to have more pockets. After evening playing his flute. I read book about crops.

2. Use an if the next word starts with a vowel sound. Use a if the next word starts with a consonant sound. or idea. Wesley ignored a cereals in his kitchen. Circle each article.Grammar Name Articles • • • • Use a and an with singular nouns. Is there an platform up there? 14. an. 136 Weslandia • Grade 5/ Unit 5 At Home: Write directions for completing a simple task. 13. 8. 1. plants flute alphabet fruits sport 6. 11. 5. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Weslandia is a interesting place. 10. 3. Write a. Rewrite the sentences correctly. thing. place. 4. Cloth can be made using an loom. or the on the line before each noun. 7. 12. The kids took turns crushing a seeds. Use the to refer to a particular person. 9. or to nouns that are plural. watch hats sounds wind idea Fix each incorrect article in the following sentences. 15. such as making a sandwich.

and ink. a colon follows the name of a character. 5. 1. Neighbor Are those weeds? Write a dialogue between two characters in the play. Place colons where they are needed. Mother. Father. Be sure to place colons where they are needed. 8. Rewrite each sentence below. and children. 9. Find four examples. Characters include Wesley. 3.” • Use colons at the beginning of a list. • In plays and screenplays. 2. I wish he would cut his hair like the other boys! 4. Mother Wesley is unhappy and has no friends. Weslandia • Grade 5/ Unit 5 137 . the words are not placed in quotation marks. 10. The words that follow are the lines that the character says.Grammar Name Mechanics • A colon (:) is a form of punctuation that means “pay attention to what follows. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill At Home: Look through newspapers or magazines for colons used in a sentence. a neighbor. Write one part of the dialogue on each line. clothes. Wesley I made many different things oil. 6. flutes. 7. Father I know. • When a character’s words follow a colon.

I ate a roots.Grammar Name Proofreading Read the paragraph below. 138 Weslandia • Grade 5/ Unit 5 At Home: Write a diary entry about your day that includes several articles used correctly. My neighbor thought a plants that grew in it were Weeds. Dear Diary. I had a exciting summer. they were not weeds! Made I the hat with a leaves. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Rewrite the paragraph correctly on the lines provided. this summer I grew an huge garden. Well.

5. Wesley used a petals to tell time. 1. 6. Wesley started school with an smile. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 9. 3. 4. One boy crushed a seeds.Grammar Name Rewrite the following sentences. Wesley didn’t like any of a following foods: pizza. and candy. soda. Wesley used to wear an watch. using the correct articles. Weslandia • Grade 5/ Unit 5 139 . What is an garden? 7. An other kids played games with Wesley. The garden presented a opportunity to invent things. 10. 8. Test: Articles 2. He will pull off an brown leaf. Growing an garden is a excellent idea.

When you are finished drawing your picture. 140 Weslandia • Grade 5/ Unit 5 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . You can draw a real garden or a pretend garden. write five sentences describing it. Use at least one article correctly in each sentence.Grammar Name Review: Articles Draw a picture of a garden filled with amazing plants.

places. At Home: Choose 10 comparative adjectives and use them in short phrases. or things. Birds can change direction fast than a plane. 6. Samoa is probably warm than Canada. He said that Mr. Lewis thought that they were the odd squirrels in the world. The next day. 4. or things. 1. Fire ants are small than a fingernail. Andrews was the smart teacher he had ever had. Two hundred years ago. places. 2. • Add -est to most short adjectives to compare more than two people.Grammar Name Adjectives That Compare • Adjectives describe people. it was hard to cross the country than it is today. or things. he saw an even tough buffalo. • Add -er to most short adjectives to compare two people. Lewis and Clark traveled long than some other explorers. 3. Think about the comparisons in each sentence. Historic Journey • Grade 5/ Unit 5 141 . Then rewrite the sentence with the correct form for each underlined adjective. places. 5. 8. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 7.

Read each sentence. Lewis and Clark are two of the brave men in history.Grammar Name More Adjectives That Compare • For adjectives ending in e. Wilson worked to make our planet healthy than it was. 142 Historic Journey • Grade 5/ Unit 5 At Home: Write a paragraph that compares two plants or animals by using adjectives that compare. E. Even the tiny insects can teach scientists important things about nature. 4. 5. . change the y to i before adding -er or -est. 8. He felt like the lucky science teacher in the country. 2. The men thought it was hot today than it was yesterday. • For one-syllable adjectives that have a single vowel before the final consonant. Keeping a journal is easy for some people than it is for others. double the final consonant before adding -er or -est. drop the e before adding -er or -est. 1. 3. Neither Clark nor Lewis was brave than the other. Rewrite it with the correct adjective form. • For adjectives ending in a consonant and y. One of the healing plants was leafy than the others. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 7. 6. O.

Rewrite on the line any words that should be capitalized. The explorers began their trip in may of 1804. Edward osborne Wilson watched fire ants in alabama. Use at least five nouns that need to be capitalized. 9. • The name of a day.Grammar Name Mechanics • A proper noun begins with a capital letter. • Capitalize the titles of people that appear before their names.” 7. is home to many “earthkeepers. Andrews teaches at jones Lane Elementary. Correct each sentence. 3. 6. 2. Historic Journey • Grade 5/ Unit 5 143 . Many people travel on planes to visit family at thanksgiving. “Let’s send one back to president Jefferson.” 4. maryland. mr. Gaithersburg. Lewis and clark wanted to reach the pacific Ocean. or holiday begins with a capital letter. paul cox learned about healing plants in Samoa. • Capitalize the titles of family members when they refer to specific people. He said that uncle bob knows how to fly a plane. He may have said. 1. month. 10. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. At Home: Write a journal entry about exploring a new place. Last tuesday we visited Hudson county. 5.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . 144 Historic Journey • Grade 5/ Unit 5 At Home: Describe a museum exhibit using natural or historical items. First. Proofreading Welcome to the Columbus history Museum! We have made a few changes. It is the old map in the museum. Now we room have for a map from 1804. we have a large exhibit about lewis and Clark than we did before. Rewrite it correctly on the lines provided. People say that it is easiest to read signs now.Grammar Name Read the paragraph below. Write your own sign for each object. The lights are bright than before. Each sign should include an adjective. Also.

O. (easy) to learn about nature when you 4. Seagulls are some of the (messy) eaters that I’ve ever seen! Historic Journey • Grade 5/ Unit 5 145 . (hot) 5. (tall) 2. Mr. (young) age than many 6. Look at the adjective in parentheses. Fill in the correct form of the adjective on the line to complete the sentence.Grammar Name Test: Adjectives That Compare Read the sentence. Are these feathers than those feathers? (white) 10. E. Summer in Alabama is than summer in Ohio. The journey was be. His family thought Samoa was the Pacific. (long) than some of the men expected it to 7. The part of the trip was not having a good map. 1. Paul Cox climbed one of the trees in Samoa. (pretty) island in the South 3. (odd) © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill animals they 9. Andrews says it is are outside. Wilson made a discovery at a other scientists. They thought that prairie dogs were the had ever seen. (hard) 8.

places. Look for errors in adjectives. or capitalization. places. Read the postcard carefully. change the y to i before adding -er or -est. drop the e before adding -er or -est. or things. spelling. • For one-syllable adjectives that have a single vowel before the final consonant. • For adjectives ending in e. double the final consonant before adding -er or -est. Then rewrite the postcard correctly.Grammar Name Review: Adjectives That Compare • Add -er to most short adjectives to compare two people. • Add -est to most short adjectives to compare more than two people. 146 Historic Journey • Grade 5/ Unit 5 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . or things. • For adjectives ending in a consonant and y.

At Home: Write a note to a friend using more and most to describe a favorite TV program. This code was most efficient than any other. 1. Hiking was no difficulter than hauling water. Correct any adjectives that are used incorrectly. places. • Use most to compare more than two. or things. Some soldiers were most experienced than others.Grammar Name Comparing with More and Most • In general. for adjectives of three or more syllables. This is the more interesting story of all. 5. John tried to find the more pleasant place of all to stay. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 7. 2. Grandfather’s home was most beautiful than the school. places. Unbreakable Code • Grade 5/ Unit 5 147 . 4. The Navajo language was the United States’ more secret weapon. • Use more to compare two people. 6. and things. use more and most to compare people. 3. Rewrite the sentences. He thought the Navajo language made the mostest amazing code. 8.

Creating a code is very more difficult. Read the paragraphs. 148 Unbreakable Code • Grade 5/ Unit 5 At Home: Develop six sentences that use more and most to describe an exciting event. When Grandfather was young. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . and they continued to send their most secretest messages in that code. but it is even most difficulter to break a code. Grandfather was the happier when he could stay outside. Then rewrite each paragraph. do not use the ending -er or -est. Sometimes governments didn’t realize that a code had been broken. he thought that the clouds were most beautifulest in the hills. In the past. correcting any mistakes.Grammar Name Comparing with More and Most • When you use more and most. Being outside was always more pleasanter than being in school. Be sure that more and most are used correctly and that all adjectives are spelled correctly. breaking a code was one of the more crucial skills of all.

• Never add -est and most to the same adjective. 1. If the sentence is correct. The Navajo language was considered more secreter than other languages. A wild horse feels more comfortabler without a rope around its neck. Read the sentences. Most importantest was that the Navajo language had no alphabet. write correct on the line. At Home: Write a journal entry about what you did today. John wanted to learn to write more difficult codes. 2. If it is not correct. Unbreakable Code • Grade 5/ Unit 5 149 . 4. 5. Everyone tries to contribute his or her most sincere efforts in wartime. rewrite the sentence using the correct form of the adjective. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 7. The most dangerousest time was the day that the enemy shot at Grandfather. 6. 3. Include four sentences that use more and most with an adjective. It was more fascinatinger to watch the stars than to go to school. 8. This story is the most interestingest that I have ever read.Grammar Name Mechanics • Never add -er and more to the same adjective.

No matter how hard the Japanese tried. Then rewrite the paragraph. Other codes use an uncommon language. they could not break this code. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Some of the most difficultest codes change the order of the letters in words. identify the errors in the use of more and most with adjectives. It was one of the bestest choices because few people know Navajo. “Unbreakable Code. Codes have been used for a long time.” Use more and most with adjectives at least twice. 150 Unbreakable Code • Grade 5/ Unit 5 At Home: Write a paragraph continuing the story. Codes are a way to make a message more harder to understand than if the message had been written in everyday language. Navajo code was one of the most importantest weapons for the United States during World War II.Grammar Name Proofreading In the following paragraph. An example of this type is the Navajo code used during World War II. correcting any mistakes.

most vital © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 4. Her grandmother’s advice was the of all. wisest c. That language was the weapon of all. The canyon was the place that he had ever been. a. beautifuler c. a. more terribler 7. more thrillinger 8. most terriblest b. It was the code ever used. a. a. most brilliant c. more brillianter b. a. Code talkers fought in the battles. most terrible c.Grammar Name Circle the letter beside the correct form of the adjective. Test: Comparing with More and Most 1. more vitaler b. more brilliant Unbreakable Code • Grade 5/ Unit 5 151 . most vitalest c. Hundreds of the messages were passed. most thrillingest c. a. most commonest c. more wisest 2. more secretest c. most secret b. more beautiful b. a. beautifulest 3. most common 6. The words stood for letters. most secretest 5. The island was than before. most thrilling b. a. more commoner b. more wise b.

Never add -est and most to the same adjective. It was the most rapidest way to send messages. Going away was the more frightening event of all. Look for the proper forms of more and most with adjectives. 4. • Use most to compare more than two. 1. The other will proofread. 152 Unbreakable Code • Grade 5/ Unit 5 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 7. Take out more and most if they are not needed. These horses are more bigger than most others. use more and most to compare people. 3. or things.Grammar Name Review: Comparing with More and Most • In general. The Navajo code was more complicateder than others. 8. The war was the terriblest in history. places. Work with a partner. for adjectives of three or more syllables. . John’s grandfather was one of the most adventurousest people in the world. It was more difficulter for Grandfather to speak English than Navajo. • Never add -er and more to the same adjective. 2. The hills were the most beautifulest he’d ever seen. • Use more to compare two people. 5. places. Rewrite the sentences correctly. 6. and things. One of you will read the sentence aloud.

4. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill At Home: Write four sentences about a tropical island. The Gri Gri Tree • Grade 5/ Unit 5 153 . 1. 10. 6. Mami makes better dulces than batatas fritas. Use the adjectives better and best. • Use better to compare two people.Grammar Name Comparing with Good • In comparisons. Seeing a whale is even gooder than seeing a sea monster. Better and best are the irregular forms of good. 3. places. the adjective good has an irregular form. circle it and write the correct form. write correct on the line. Mami is the goodest cook in town. Many tourists think that Sosúa Bay is the bestest part of the República Dominicana. 7. If it is wrong. or things. Mami thought that Ana Rosa’s story was the best story that she had ever heard. Some people thought that one plan was best than the other. 8. • Use best to compare more than two. Ana Rosa thinks her gri gri tree is the better spot for looking around. 2. 5. 9. The sea monster went to the bestest underwater fiesta in the ocean. Writing a story was better than putting up a billboard. Read each sentence. Ana Rosa imagines that being a writer would be the better job in the world. If the form of the adjective is correct.

places.Grammar Name Comparing with Bad • In comparisons. the adjective bad has an irregular form. 4. 5. • Use worse to compare two people. or things. Roberto complained that washing dishes was a worst chore than sweeping. 3. 154 The Gri Gri Tree • Grade 5/ Unit 5 At Home: Read a book about whales and write a paragraph about the worst environmental threats to whales. Winter is the worse time to visit the República Dominicana. 6. . Making a fuss about the sea monster would be worst than not telling anybody. Ana Rosa had a worst time at the gathering than her neighbors. Worse and worst are the irregular forms of bad. 1. Guario thinks that sitting in a gri gri tree is the worser way to spend time. Spring is a worst time than winter for whales to migrate. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 7. 8. 2. • Use worst to compare more than two. Roberto was a worser domino player than Papi. Rewrite each sentence. Spotting the sea monster was not the worse thing that happened that day. correcting the form of bad where necessary.

but she dreaded that her most worst fear would come true. worse. and worst. The Gri Gri Tree • Grade 5/ Unit 5 155 . Better and best are the irregular forms of good. Ana Rosa hoped that her gri gri tree would be all right. Ana Rosa knew that her gri gri tree was the bestest perch in all of Sosúa Bay. She was always in a more better mood after sitting in her tree. This was far worst than a gloomy day! For Ana Rosa. the worstest storm Ana Rosa had ever seen struck the town. Rewrite each paragraph correctly in the spaces provided. better. Ana Rosa had her goodest ideas for stories when she was in the gri gri tree. and best and three as bad. Circle any errors. Describe three as good.Grammar Name Mechanics • In comparisons. the worser part of the storm was watching the trees through her bedroom window. Worse and worst are the irregular forms of bad. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill At Home: Write about six foods you’ve eaten. One day. She climbed her tree almost every day but thought that sunny days were gooder than gloomy ones. Read the paragraphs. the adjectives good and bad have irregular forms.

Grammar Name Proofreading Read the paragraph below. 156 The Gri Gri Tree • Grade 5/ Unit 5 At Home: Write five sentences. and he scared away the baby fish. lived the most best swimmer in the ocean. using good and bad in comparisons about living in the ocean. Rewrite the paragraph correctly on the lines provided. far beneath the sailboats that float on the sea. He could swim faster than the fastest dolphin. and no one wanted to be his friend. and no fish was gooder at diving deep. He thought there was nothing worser than being so big. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . This fine swimmer was also the biggest creature in all the sea. Once. deep down. The worstest thing about his size was that the other ocean creatures called him a sea monster.

more worse c. a. The story would have been if Señora Perez had written it. South American b. worse c. worst b. most worse c. a. Sosúa b. Tourist season is than summer. Caribbean c. better c. a. American c. The wind was in the evening. worse b. a. a. tropical b. Humpback whales inhabit Atlantic waters. whales b. It was the of Ana Rosa’s life. Atlantic day 4. The gri gri tree is a South American plant. Bay 8. Angela is a helper than Roberto. Whales are swimmers than penguins. 1. Humpback c. a. gri gri c. Circle the letter of the proper adjective in each sentence. The American tourists enjoyed seeing the whales in Sosúa Bay. best 3. best 2. worstest 5. 9. better c. worser 7. worst b. best b. a. worser B.Grammar Name Test: Comparing with Good and Bad A. better 6. The Caribbean islands have tropical climates. a. plant 10. gooder c. climates © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill The Gri Gri Tree • Grade 5/ Unit 5 157 . worse b. a. Circle the letter of the adjective that completes the sentence correctly. a. goodest b.

Grammar Name Review: Comparing with Good and Bad • Use better to compare two people. places. places. Guario 158 The Gri Gri Tree • Grade 5/ Unit 5 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Look for forms of the adjectives good and bad. Use best to compare more than two. Does Roberto have a more worse cold than he had last winter? Please tell me when would be the bestest time for me to visit. or things. • A proper adjective begins with a capital letter. or things. Rewrite it correctly on the lines provided. Read the letter below. Dear Ana Rosa. • A proper adjective is formed from a proper noun. Make sure that all proper adjectives are capitalized. Your brother. How are you? Is your writing getting gooder? I am sure that with practice you will become one of the most best south american writers. • Use worse to compare two people. Use worst to compare more than two.

Ernest Shackleton took (1) members of his crew and set sail for South Georgia Island. brilliant rugged central chilly 6. When they finally got to the island. 1916. but also for Wesley himself. tall plants. Fill in the circle beside your answer. The men faced strong winds and bitter temperatures as they struggled to reach their goal. Adjectives On April 24. an and a or 4. Wesley could sit in the shade of (4) plants and enjoy their splendid fruit. a the an and Studying plants and animals is the way that humans learn from nature. 1. They wrote about (5) mountains and (6) plains. It provided shelter not only for animals and insects.Grammar Name Read the passage and choose the word or group of words that belongs in each space. The fruit was purple and juicy. Lewis and Clark were probably exhausted on their expedition. In fact. 3. but they still observed nature. friendly different confident exhausted Wesley grew (3) crop of dense. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 5. blank delicate peculiar vast Unit 5 Review • Grade 5/ Unit 5 159 . weak five uncomfortable ridiculous 2. the (2) sailors realized that they had landed on the opposite side from the whaling station.

the military had to seek out Navajo soldiers. but Ana Rosa believed that worrying was (10) than daydreaming. Her brother Guario complained that she was not thinking enough about her future. most demandingest most demanding more demanding more demandinger Ana Rosa loved to sit high in her gri gri tree. best goodest most best better 10. more difficult most difficult most difficultest more difficulter 8.Grammar Name Adjectives During the war. 9. 7. These soldiers underwent (8) training than many others. She thought that it was the (9) place to daydream and think up stories. To do this. worser worse more worse badder 160 Unit 5 Review • Grade 5/ Unit 5 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . the military decided to use the Navajo language because it would be the (7) code to break.

The Tsar treated the Firebird cruelly. Angry at the Tsar’s words. Use adverbs to tell where. 8. 6. The Firebird cried softly in its cage. 1. 3. 9. The Golden Mare galloped rapidly through the forest. write whether the adverb describes how. 10. On the line. or another adverb. Alexi trembled inside. Alexi and Yelena the Fair were happily married. The Golden Mare • Grade 5/Unit 6 161 . 2. He hunted late into the night. The Golden Mare left early to reach the Lake of the Sun. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill At Home: Write the first paragraph of a fairy tale. an adjective. Underline the adverb in each sentence. when. or where. The Firebird flew high into the sky.Grammar Name Adverbs • An adverb is a word that tells more about a verb. 4. and how events take place. 5. 7. Alexi walked slowly through the woods. when. • An adverb can tell how. or where an action takes place. when. Alexi and the Golden Mare always remained friends.

162 The Golden Mare • Grade 5/Unit 6 At Home: Write a paragraph that describes an adventure. defeated the Tsar. almost very completely finally quite rather too 6. 5. full. The Tsar was terribly angry about Alexi’s success. Alexi stayed awake 10.Grammar Name Adverbs • An adverb can describe a verb. It can also describe an adjec- tive or another adverb. 4. the adverbs describe verbs. Yelena the Fair realized that she would be in danger very soon. 1. 3. Underline each adverb. Use at least one adverb in each sentence. Complete each sentence with an adverb that describes the underlined word. adverbs. In these sentences. The Golden Mare spoke quietly. Choose from the adverbs in the box. The Water of Youth began to boil very quickly. They poured water into the iron pot until it was 8. The Tsar acted greedily. 7. 2. Some sentences contain more than one adverb. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . late that night. Alexi and the Golden Mare gracefully across the water. or adjectives. The ship moved 9. The Lake of the Sun shone brilliantly in the morning.

b. Write well or good to complete each sentence correctly. They played a well trick on the Tsar. Read both sentences in each pair. together. Yelena the Fair hid her plan well. The Golden Mare promised to serve Alexi At Home: Write a poem about The Golden Mare. The Golden Mare was a good friend to Alexi. b. a. The Golden Mare • Grade 5/Unit 6 163 . 7. The Tsar did not treat Alexi good. a. Well tells how an action takes place. 2.Grammar Name Mechanics • Good is an adjective and is used to describe nouns. he could wed husband. a. The Golden Mare was a well friend to Alexi. Circle the letter of the sentence that uses good or well correctly. • Well is an adverb that describes a verb. . • Do not confuse the adjective good with the adverb well. Then underline the word that good or well describes. a. Use the descriptive words good and well in your poem. They played a good trick on the Tsar. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. The Tsar did not treat Alexi well. The Tsar would not be a 9. b. 4. a. Alexi ruled good. 6. Alexi and the Golden Mare worked 10. b. 3. 5. . The Tsar thought that if he planned Yelena the Fair. Yelena the Fair hid her plan good. Alexi was a ruler to his people. Alexi ruled well. 1. b.

Because she was amazing. Alexi could not believe his well fortune when he saw this mysterious creature. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Include four adverbs. The Golden Mare could gallop quick through the forest as though she were made of wind. expecting the horse to disappear sudden. Rewrite the paragraph correctly on the lines provided.Grammar Name Proofreading Read the paragraph below. The Golden Mare was real old when she met Alexi. He rough rubbed his eyes. Her hooves hard hit the ground when she ran. 164 The Golden Mare • Grade 5/Unit 6 At Home: Write a paragraph describing what you would do if you were granted one wish. she looked quitely healthy and young.

3. The crab was a 9. 5. Alexi hunted. 6. . The Tsar did not rule 7. where. Yelena the Fair had a The Golden Mare • Grade 5/Unit 6 165 . The Golden Mare advised Alexi © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . The Firebird flew. Each time. 8. or how. Rewrite each sentence twice. 2. Yelena the Fair sailed on the Lake of the Sun. 4. 1. Write well or good to complete each sentence correctly. swimmer. B. The beautiful Firebird flew 10. heart. The Tsar gave orders.Grammar Name Test: Adverbs A. add an adverb that tells when. after it had been set free. The Golden Mare ran.

Alexi was a rider. or another adverb. when. an adjective. Write good or well to complete the sentences correctly. . 3. Alexi and the Golden Mare made a 4. Together. Then draw a picture about the sentences. or where an action takes place. Underline the word that good or well describes. • An adverb can tell how. 166 The Golden Mare • Grade 5/Unit 6 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . The Golden Mare ran fast and 2. 1. pair.Grammar Name Review: Adverbs • An adverb is a word that tells more about a verb. They served the Tsar .

• Add -est to most short adverbs to compare more than two actions. of all. Write the correct form of the adverb in parentheses. 10. (hard) Teddy pounded the tent stakes 2. • Add -er to most short adverbs to compare two actions. (late) They arrived at the campsite expected.Grammar Name Adverbs That Compare • An adverb can compare two or more actions. to the than any of San Francisco’s 6. 5. of all. (fast) Teddy walked 8. (fast) The other campers pitched their tents Curtis did. (hard) Of the three of them. Uncle Curtis laughed 7. Read the sentences. fast. short. Skunk Scout • Grade 5/ Unit 6 167 . Teddy was the one standing raccoon. (fast) It was Teddy who ran 4. . 3. using the following adverbs: hard. than Bobby and Uncle Curtis. than Uncle Curtis © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill than Uncle At Home: Compare two actions. (soon) Bobby wished that he had spoken up did. (soon) The raccoon arrived 9. (near) Of the three. 1. (high) The mountain rose skyscrapers. than he than Bobby did.

9.Grammar Name Adverbs That Compare • Use more or most to form comparisons with adverbs that end in -ly and with most other adverbs having two or more syllables. (quickly) Teddy walked 5. of them all. than Bobby did. Read each sentence. Uncle Curtis grinned happiliest of all. Write the correct form of the adverb in parentheses. Uncle Curtis ate slowlier than the boys. Bobby learned more quicklier than Teddy. 7. it was Teddy who stared at the hotdogs . 6. Teddy treated the map more carefully than Uncle Curtis did. 1. If it is not correct. (quietly) Bobby worked 4. comparing the character’s actions to other characters. 2. • When you use more or most. use most to compare more than two. 168 Skunk Scout • Grade 5/ Unit 6 At Home: Write descriptions of a character in the story. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . write correct on the line. • Use more to compare two actions. rewrite the sentence with the correct form of the adverb. Teddy eats more noisily of all. 10. do not use the ending -er or -est. (patiently) Bobby waited 3. Read the sentences. 8. than Teddy did. (hungrily) Of them all. (easily) Uncle Curtis got lost than Teddy did. If the adverb is correct.

• Never add -est and most to the same adverb. it was Teddy who looked at the raccoon most angrily. At Home: Write a short story about a camping trip.Grammar Name Mechanics • Never add -er and more to the same adverb. 1. 4. 2. Of the three of them. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 7. The experienced campers found the trail more easilier than Uncle Curtis did. 6. It was Teddy who unrolled his sleeping bag most roughliest of all. 3. Read each sentence. 8. If the sentence uses more and most correctly. Bobby asked questions most eagerly than Teddy did. Include at least five adverbs that compare. Skunk Scout • Grade 5/ Unit 6 169 . Teddy unpacked the car more hurriedlier than Bobby did. Uncle Curtis turned more promptlier the third time they neared the exit. write correct. rewrite the sentence correctly using more and most. The raccoon found the marshmallows more quickly than Teddy did. 5. Otherwise. The ranger spoke most knowledgeably than Uncle Curtis.

Proofreading Dear Mom and Dad. You cook much more expert than Uncle Curtis does. Rewrite the letter correctly on the lines provided.Grammar Name Read the letter below. Teddy 170 Skunk Scout • Grade 5/ Unit 6 At Home: Suppose that you are on a camping trip. but I clean more carefullier than Mother Nature does. we’ve been eating most poorly than we do at home. I know you think that I’m messy. I hope we come home more sooner rather than late. Write a letter that compares camping to being at home. Your son. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Of all the campers. There are dirt and rocks everywhere in the woods! Since we’ve been at the campsite. it’s the mosquitoes who seem to be eating happiliest.

Uncle Curtis snored © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill than he looked for than Bobby. most eagerly c. a. more eagerly 7. a. Uncle Curtis eyed the hot dogs most hopefully than Teddy did. loudlier c. Of the three campers. Uncle Curtis looked around more eagerlier than Teddy. c. most happily c. Bobby awoke sooner than Teddy did. Bobby works hardest of all. B. c. Bobby works harder than Teddy does. a. Teddy missed home more strongly than Bobby did. more happily b. more loudly 8. a. c. a. 5. Teddy was the one who missed home most strongly. b. c. Uncle Curtis eyed the hot dogs more hopefully than Teddy did. Bobby awoke soonest of all. Skunk Scout • Grade 5/ Unit 6 171 .Grammar Name Test: Adverbs That Compare A. Circle the letter of the incorrect sentence. b. b. b. 3. Choose the sentence in each group that is written incorrectly. 1. Uncle Curtis looked around more eagerly than Teddy. Uncle Curtis looked around most eagerly of all. a. Bobby awoke most soonest of all. It was Uncle Curtis who eyed the hot dogs most hopefully. Teddy missed home more stronglier than Bobby did. Choose the comparing adverb that best completes the sentence. most loudly b. eagerly b. c. a. 6. Teddy looked for the marshmallows firewood. Circle the letter of your answer. b. Bobby works more harder than Teddy does. 4. 2. happily of all. Bobby searched a.

Bobby had dressed more warmer than Uncle Curtis had. use most to compare more than two. 3. Teddy ran quickliest to the car. Bobby started to enjoy himself more soon than Teddy did. Listen for adverb errors. 172 Skunk Scout • Grade 5/ Unit 6 . It was Teddy who reacted more angrily of all. Use more to compare two actions. Together. 8. rewrite the sentences correctly. Never had Teddy wanted Spam most desperately than he did that day. 1. 4. 6. No one plans most carefully than Uncle Curtis. • Never add -er and more or -est and most to the same adverb. Teddy listened more closer to the ranger than Uncle Curtis did. take turns reading these sentences aloud. With a partner. Of the three. Teddy would think most clearer after he ate. Add -est to most short adverbs to compare more than two actions. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 7. 2. • Use more or most to form comparisons with adverbs that end in -ly or most other adverbs with two or more syllables. 5.Grammar Name Review: Adverbs That Compare • Add -er to most short adverbs to compare two actions.

© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. Jennifer never forgets no kind words. never. nowhere. She can’t not stop trying. 7. and the contraction n’t. 4.Grammar Name Negatives • A negative is a word that means “no. 9.” such as not. 2. 5. nobody never learned how to sail. • You can fix a sentence with two negatives by removing one of the negatives. Yesterday she couldn’t give no directions to the taxi driver. The girl had never played with no other kids. 10. Some children never not exercise. Matthew never had no fun on the swings. • Do not use two negatives in the same sentence. Hannah couldn’t play on no playgrounds. Until now. 6. At Home: Design an inspirational poster that includes a sentence in which one negative is used correctly. Athletes don’t never give up. Nothing nowhere was written in Braille. nobody. Correct the sentences by removing one of the negatives. 3. 1. Dream Comes True Grade 5/ Unit 6 173 .

none any never ever nothing anything nobody anybody no one anyone nowhere anywhere Rewrite each sentence. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . None of the athletes say nothing negative. What if you couldn’t find nobody to give you directions? 5.Grammar Name Negatives • Correct a sentence with two negatives by changing one nega- tive word to a positive word. The kids never have nothing bad to say about gym class. 6. 3. No person nowhere should be without a new GPS device. 4. Negative Positive no. 2. 174 Dream Comes True Grade 5/ Unit 6 At Home: Look in a book or listen to a song for sentences that include a correctly used negative. There weren’t no playgrounds where she could play. replacing one of the negative words with a positive word. 1. No one never passes up a chance to learn kickboxing.

Exercising inside is not as much fun as exercising outside. • You can fix a sentence with two negatives by removing one of the negatives. Exercising inside is not never as much fun as exercising outside. 3. 4. Exercising inside is never as much fun as exercising outside. • Do not use two negatives in the same sentence. The playgrounds didn’t have no signs in Braille. No kids never remains active when they become adults. and the contraction n’t. 1. Carmen doesn’t go anywhere without it. She couldn’t never play in the sandbox. Dream Comes True Grade 5/ Unit 6 175 . Rewrite each sentence two different ways. None of the kids remain active when they become adults. They don’t let nothing hold them back. Include negative sentences. Read each group of sentences. At Home: Write a story about a time that you or someone else reached a goal. They don’t let anything hold them back. Read the sentences. nobody. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 6. Carmen never goes anywhere without it. They let nothing hold them back. • You can correct a sentence with two negatives by changing one negative to a positive word. 2. Carmen never goes nowhere without it.” such as not.Grammar Name Mechanics • A negative is a word that means “no. 5. never. nowhere. Cross out the sentence that is incorrect. No kids remain active when they become adults.

Rewrite the paragraph correctly on the lines provided. Use negatives correctly. 176 Dream Comes True Grade 5/ Unit 6 At Home: Find a picture and describe what it does not show. There aren’t no boring sports headlines today! First. The players on the other team weren’t never sorry that they lost. Her team had never won no games before last night. She didn’t defend the basket with no fancy moves—she just played well. The fans. They couldn’t not be more proud. and good morning. Thank you. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Sara. too. never showed nothing but excitement. These Paralympic athletes are not never sore losers. for the day’s weather. the Paralympics began last night. During the first basketball game. None of the athletes had no trouble showing spirit. Sara. The positive energy at the game was thrilling! And now back to you.Grammar Name Proofreading Read the paragraph below. nobody couldn’t get no shot past Jennifer Howitt. everyone.

7. No one should never have to wait until high school to go on a swing. 4. 6. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 10. Dream Comes True Grade 5/ Unit 6 177 . 5. write correct on the line. 1. The classes aren’t never boring. Carmen wouldn’t walk around her neighborhood none. Jennifer has not never been lazy. rewrite it correctly. Why can’t we sail nowhere today? 3.Grammar Name Test: Negatives and Double Negatives If the sentence is correct. Matthew has never said nothing about his wheelchair. If it is not correct. 9. Nobody never stays active. I’ve never eaten no Spanish food. Isn’t no one going to the playground? 8. The guide dog didn’t want treats. 2.

and correct any double negatives. My friends told me there wasn’t nothing I deserved more than the freedom to play. 178 Dream Comes True Grade 5/ Unit 6 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . I can’t never describe how happy I was on that day! I got to go on a swing for the first time! My mom said that nobody nowhere looked happier than I did on that swing. I wrote a thank-you card to Matthew Cavedon for helping our town get a playground that I could use.Grammar Name Read the story. Review: Negatives I had never played in no playgrounds until my fifteenth birthday. Rewrite it on the lines below. No one never wrote such an excited thank-you for such a simple birthday present.

Up in the Air • Grade 5/ Unit 6 179 . • Common prepositions are about. The balloon landed in a forest behind a field. near. a rooster. A duck. Bertrand Piccard stayed in a balloon for 20 days. for. above. 8. Weather balloons give us information about the atmosphere. The balloon dropped gently from the sky. in. Underline the prepositions. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 9. over. and a sheep rode in the basket of the balloon. At Home: Write a paragraph describing what you might see flying in a hot-air balloon. to. Jean-Pierre Blanchard floated over the English Channel. Read each sentence. The balloon flew above the village. The balloon rose to a height of one hundred feet. across. There may be more than one preposition in each sentence. Circle all prepositions. 7. 4. of. down. Buoyancy keeps balloons in the air. They floated in a new direction. 5. 1. 3. 6. 10. after. 2. behind. and with.Grammar Name Prepositions • A preposition comes before a noun or pronoun and relates that noun or pronoun to another word in the sentence. from. at. on.

1. Jacques Charles learned about hydrogen. were a beautiful sight. Underline the preposition in each sentence. 5. . Balloonists cannot be afraid of heights. 10. A duck. a rooster. They waved from the balloon. The first human passenger flew over Paris. . adding a new prepositional phrase to each sentence. The balloons . . François Pilâtre De Rozier anchored his balloon with a tether. The wind was strong 7. 3. • A prepositional phrase makes a connection between two nouns or pronouns in a sentence.Grammar Name Prepositional Phrases • A prepositional phrase is a group of words that begins with a preposition and ends with a noun or pronoun. Circle the object of the preposition. 2. and a sheep rode 9. the balloonists prepared to launch. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill that they left. 6. There were 25 members 8. 180 Up in the Air • Grade 5/ Unit 6 At Home: Rewrite sentences 6 through 10. Complete each sentence with a prepositional phrase. • The object of a preposition is the noun or pronoun that follows the preposition. 4.

Place commas where they are needed. In their attack the villagers destroyed the first hydrogen balloon. From the heart of Paris Charles had released his balloon and then watched as it floated away. With pitchforks and other farm tools the villagers struck the creature. At the time of the monster’s visit very few people had ever seen a balloon. A prepositional phrase that begins a sentence is also called an introductory phrase. from. Up in the Air • Grade 5/ Unit 6 181 . at. C. in. the sack floated into the © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill air. for. Read the following two paragraphs. of. with. behind. down. At Home: Write a sentence for each of the following prepositions: about. From his science studies Professor Jacques A. Down from the sky a strange creature slowly floated. Charles had learned that a newly discovered gas called hydrogen weighed less than air. • If a prepositional phrase that begins a sentence is four or more words. Under this furious attack the creature finally stopped moving. To the eighteenth-century villagers the object from the sky looked like a monster. In the year 1783 scientific progress met old-fashioned beliefs. When he filled a sack with this gas.Grammar Name Mechanics • A prepositional phrase may come at the beginning of a sentence. place a comma after the phrase. on. On an otherwise normal day a group of French villagers got quite a surprise.

With a sigh to contentment she wished that she could stay about her balloon. Be sure to add commas where needed and to remove incorrect commas. As she passed in the balloon the trees reached from her as though to tickle the balloon basket. Replace any prepositions that are used incorrectly. forever. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . Rewrite the paragraph correctly on the lines provided. 182 Up in the Air • Grade 5/ Unit 6 At Home: Write a poem about riding in a hot-air balloon. The lakes and rivers sparkled and winked on the sun. From her balloon perch Cynthia looked at the world laid out beneath her.Grammar Name Proofreading Read the paragraph below. Include at least five prepositional phrases. The green above the grass looked brighter than Cynthia had ever thought it could.

in 5. in c. all the balloons in the sky. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill France. after c. a. The first flight in North America was a. Bertrand Piccard flew around the world a. Carl liked the red and yellow the end of the day. across 7. Of 6. 1. under the sky. on b. in c. Of b. Down 4. the balloon drifted to the ground. Up in the Air • Grade 5/ Unit 6 183 . science led to the discovery of hydrogen gas. Philadelphia. the ground looked up at the balloon. on b. Many early balloon flights occurred a. one best. Experiments a.Grammar Name Test: Prepositions Circle the letter of the preposition that fits best in each sentence. The villagers a. on b. down 8. Across c. At b. near c. with b. To c. A breeze blew the balloons a. about b. in c. twenty days. with c. near b. after 3. a. at 2.

. • If a prepositional phrase that begins a sentence is four or more words. 4. on. Work with a partner. After crossing the English Channel they landed in a forest. and the other will proofread. above. • The object of a preposition is the noun or pronoun that follows the preposition. near. and with. Look for a place in each sentence that needs a comma. for. 2. Of all the early balloonists who was the greatest? 184 Up in the Air • Grade 5/ Unit 6 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 5. adding the missing commas. In the early morning the balloonists took flight. Across the entire field balloons were spread out like sheets. place a comma after the prepositional phrase. One of you will read the sentence aloud. Below the green balloon the ground swept by quickly. across. to. after. 1. 3. • A prepositional phrase is a group of words that begins with a preposition and ends with a noun or pronoun. of. down. Rewrite the sentences. in. over. be- hind. at. from.Grammar Name Review: Commas and Prepositional Phrases • Common prepositions are about.

9. 2. Leave out words that repeat or mean the same thing. 4. His dad went fishing. Tell someone that you want to learn. There was a volcano blast. Hidden Worlds • Grade 5/ Unit 6 185 . Dennis went fishing. He observed it every day. • If two simple sentences deal with the same subject. He observed nature. It was in 1980. they can be combined into a compound sentence. Dennis used microscopes. 10. 5. 8. 6. • Sometimes you can combine two sentences by joining similar ideas.Grammar Name Sentence Combining • A simple sentence expresses one complete thought. They look for answers. Fish returned to the lakes. Dennis studied plants. The creatures were tiny. Dennis studied insects. Combine each pair of sentences. 3. They saw dead trees. Frogs returned to the lakes. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill At Home: Write six sentences about an outdoor activity. 7. He used them to help other scientists. Then combine the six sentences to make three sentences. The trees were covered with ash. 1. Scientists ask questions. Tell a scientist. It was fun looking at creatures.

1. The scientists traveled to a camp. Summarize the interview in a short paragraph. 4. . He went to college. Combine them with an adjective. It flew low. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 8. Dennis helped others.Grammar Name Sentence Combining • You can combine two sentences that tell about the same noun by adding an adjective to one of the sentences. 3. It was a mountain camp. 2. Dennis walked to a pond. 7. • You can also combine two sentences that tell about the same location by adding a prepositional phrase to one sentence. He worked in the lab. The college was in Seattle. He found them in the lakes. Dennis found living things. It was a science lab. They were flooded quickly. • You can combine two sentences that tell about the same action by adding an adverb to one sentence. He helped them happily. Read each pair of sentences. The pond was small. Rivers were flooded by mud. The helicopter flew over the blast zone. an adverb. 5. 6. 186 Hidden Worlds • Grade 5/ Unit 6 At Home: Interview a friend or family member about an area of science. or a prepositional phrase.

do you want to study science 2. dennis went to college and became a scientist 5.Grammar Name Mechanics • Begin every sentence with a capital letter. question mark. Write four sentences about what can happen after a volcano erupts. Rewrite the sentences. helicopters flew over the lakes and streams 9. such as a period. for each sentence. living things returned to the lake © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill At Home: Draw a picture of a volcano. he grew up in Iowa 4. at the science lab there are samples to study 3. • Use the correct end mark. place a comma after the phrase. Add capitalization. in the blast zone everything was covered with ash 8. and commas where they are needed. near his Hawaii home dennis observes nature 6. • If a prepositional phrase of four or more words starts a sentence. or exclamation point. dennis dipped bottles into lakes 7. 1. Hidden Worlds • Grade 5/ Unit 6 187 . end punctuation. do you know that there is a volcano near Seattle 10.

Grammar Name Proofreading Read the paragraph below. Go to school like dennis did. They helped scientists learn about how living things survive. combining short sentences that deal with the same subject and correcting punctuation. One day he flew in a helicopter. He learned in order to study ocean plants. too 188 Hidden Worlds • Grade 5/ Unit 6 At Home: Look through newspapers and magazines for sentences that could be combined. Then you can become a scientist. He flew in one and collected water samples These samples helped scientists learn. scientists study. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . dennis went to school He went to school to become a scientist. he learned how to dive. and combine them. Rewrite the paragraph. do you think science is important Study nature as Dennis did. He knew because he liked to study nature. They study nature Dennis knew that he would like to be a scientist.

Add punctuation and capitals. There was a college. They could see ash. He went on trips. 5. to learn more about science talk to a scientist Hidden Worlds • Grade 5/ Unit 6 189 . 2. scientists explore many different places 8. Rewrite each sentence. They could see for miles. 1.Grammar Name Test: Sentence Combining and Punctuation Marks Combine each pair of sentences. They were flowering plants. Dennis cared for pets. 4. The boxes are full. It was in his home town. 6. what is your favorite thing to do outside © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill 10. in only a few weeks living things returned to the lakes 9. 3. She studied plants. He went to collect things. 7. They were the family pets. Write the new sentence on the line. The bottles are full.

I saw deserts. I went to places. 2. Ask a scientist. It helped me study shells. 3. Learn to observe nature. My microscope became a tool. How to Become a Scientist 1. The places were interesting. I like it because my work helps our planet. Rewrite the paragraph with correctly combined sentences. Write the correctly combined sentences on the lines provided. Find a topic that you like. I saw beaches. Learn about a topic that you like.Grammar Name Review: Sentence Combining Read each sentence pair. When I became a scientist. Read the following paragraph. I like being a scientist. 190 Hidden Worlds • Grade 5/ Unit 6 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . It helped me study. Learn to observe. It became an important tool. Ask questions.

but the Tsar was not pleased. Uncle Curtis drove more faster than Teddy and Bobby’s parents. Alexi served the Tsar gooder. He was so excited that he moved most quickliest of all. (1) The Tsar sly planned to win the Golden Mare for himself. (2) 1. 4. Alexi served the Tsar well. When they arrived. The Tsar slyly to win the Golden Mare for himself. (4) 3. Choose the best way to rewrite each sentence. Alexi served the Tsar goodly. Alexi served the Tsar good. He was so excited that he moved most quickly of all. Uncle Curtis drove faster than Teddy and Bobby’s parents.Grammar Name Adverbs Read each passage and look at the underlined sentences. but the Tsar was not pleased. but the Tsar was not pleased. No mistake. Uncle Curtis drove more fast than Teddy and Bobby’s parents. The Tsar slyly planned to win the Golden Mare for himself. Uncle Curtis drove fastest than Teddy and Bobby’s parents. No mistake. He was so excited that he moved quickliest of all. No mistake. © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Unit 6 Review • Grade 5/ Unit 6 191 . 2. Fill in the circle beside the correct answer. (3) Uncle Curtis began unpacking. He was so excited that he moved more quickly of all. but the Tsar was not pleased No mistake. The Tsar slily planned to win the Golden Mare for himself.

ballooning experiments were conducted in France. They used microscopes to look at the samples. Dennis and the other scientists collected samples. 192 Unit 6 Review • Grade 5/ Unit 6 © Macmillan/McGraw-Hill . The other scientists collected water samples. In another landmark flight De Rozier. (6) 5.Grammar Name Adverbs Many of the first ballooning experiments were conducted in France. 8. Dennis collected water samples. Dennis and the other scientists collected water samples. they collected water samples. To another landmark flight De Rozier was the first person to ride in a balloon. Many of the first ballooning experiments were conducted on France. They used microscopes to look at the water samples. They collected water samples. Many of the first. Dennis and the other scientists collected samples. They looked at the water samples they used microscopes. No mistake. No mistake. Many over the first ballooning experiments were conducted in France. In another landmark flight. was the first person to ride in a balloon. They used microscopes. (8) 7. No mistake. 6. In another landmark flight De Rozier was the first person to ride in a balloon. No mistake. De Rozier was the first person to ride in a balloon. Professor (5) Jacques Charles launched the first hydrogen balloon from Paris. (7) They looked at the water samples.

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