Lean Maintenance

Workshop by Professor John Sharp
COrE Research Group, University of Salford, UK
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

What is a Process ?
Any activity or group of activities that takes An ‘input’, adds value to it, and provides an output to an internal or external customer Processes are at the heart of maintenance management.
INPUT List
- Resources Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

That are turned into
Transformation PROCESS - Activity

OUTPUT List
- Results
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“Lean Maintenance”

What is process management?

Inputs

Organisation as a series of activities

Output

Measure against targets, learn & improve
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Functional v. Process Based organisation
CEO Funtional Dept. 1 Input Dept. 2 Dept. 3 Hierarchy Dept. 4 Dept. 5

1 2 3 4
Output

5

6
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Work processes flow across departments

Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

•USA had top male sprinters in 2004 Olympics yet

did not win the gold medal!

•Great Britain won the gold medal. How?

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Why process management?
• The problems in organisations often occur between changeovers, when one process step flows to another process step in a different department or to a different specialist ….business processes are like a relay race, with the baton passing from one person to another within the organisation. • The Olympic relay team don’t practice running

together, they only practice the baton changes! • Having only good runners will not get you the www.ipamc.org gold medal!
Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Introducing Lean (Manufacturing)
• Eiji Toyoda visited Ford for 3 months • Determined mass production not for Toyota because:
– – – – Diverse product range Limited capital resources Lack of space No natural resources

• Toyota developed Lean to make it one of the world’s top car makers.
Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

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“Lean Maintenance”

What is lean ?
Lean manufacturing is the reduction in the time from customer order to manufacturing and delivery of products by elimination of non-value added waste in the production stream.
Key points:
– One-piece flow – Continuous improvement
Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

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“Lean Maintenance”

Lean Principles
5. Perfection

4. Pull

1. Specify Value

3. Creating Flow

2. Identify value stream

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Step 1: Specifying value of the product or service
• Specify value of a product or service from the ultimate customers' point of view • It must be defined in terms of specific products with specific capabilities offered at specific prices through a dialogue with specific customers • Providing the wrong product or service the right way is 'muda' (Japanese word for waste) • Eliminating waste is the greatest potential source of improvement in corporate performance and customer service.
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Step 2: Identifying the value stream
Identify business and transformation processes to deliver a product or service to the customer. • Begin to manage the value stream as a whole instead of independent steps or processes and eliminate all non-value adding steps. There are three critical management tasks: • the problem-solving task running from concept through detailed design and engineering to production launch, • the information management task running from order-taking to delivery, • and the physical transformation task proceeding from raw materials to finished products.
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Step 3: Creating flow
• Arrange the remaining value adding steps to flow • Eliminate waste that prohibit continuous material or information flow • Eliminate the traditional mindset of working in functional silos and batch-and-queue that only create inefficient work.

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Step 4: Producing to the pull of the customer
• Change method of production from a large batch production to producing only what is demanded by the customer • Allow the customers to pull products rather than pushing them to the customers • This involves also work in process throughout the entire value stream
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Step 5: Pursuing perfection
• Include every asset and every action that adds value to the product or service for the customer • Create a continuous improvement culture in the organisation • Sustain improvement activities

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Lean characteristics
• Purposeful & directed focus on interests of customer • Close integration of all departments • Collaboration with suppliers • Respect for all • TQM orientated environment • Skills and contributions of all valued • Process development is directed towards continuous improvement and OEE improvements
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Lean maintenance is the application of lean philosophy, tools and techniques to the maintenance function. Lean is about eliminating wasted time, effort and material (and resulting cost) while improving throughput and quality. Therefore reduce/eliminate activities that do not add value to the product (service) stream.
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Lean maintenance tools
• 5S process • Elimination of 7 deadly wastes (7Mudas) • Kaizen (continuous improvement) & Poka Yoke • Jokoda (quality at the source) • JIT (Just In Time) & TPM (Total Productive Maintenance)
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

What are the 5S’s?
1. Structure
Distinguish needed items from not needed and eliminate the latter

2. Systemise
Keep needed items in the correct place to allow for easy & quick retrieval

5. Self-discipline
Making a habit of maintaining the set conditions Keep the workshop swept and clean

The condition people support when maintain the first three S’s

4. Standardise

3. Sweeping
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

SEIRI: Structure (organisation)
• Differentiate from what is needed and what is not needed to do the job • Keep at your workspace only what you need • Discard what you don’t need or store elsewhere • Red tag can be used to identify problems • To differentiate between items needed and not needed
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

SEITON: Systemise (neatness)
• • • • • Deciding where to store and keep items A place for everything Everything in its place Visualising everything in the workplace Do not waste time looking for items. A PLACE FOR EVERYTHING AND EVERYTHING IN ITS PLACE
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

SEITON: Systemise (neatness)
Usage • • Average • • High • • • Degree of Need (Frequency of use) Things not used in the past Things only used once in the last 6-12 months Things only used once in the last 2-6 months Things used more than once a month Things used once a week Things used everyday Things used hourly • • Storage Method Low Throw them out Store at a distance

Store in a central place in the workplace

Store near the work site or carry by person

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

SEISO: Sanitize/Cleaning
• To regularly clean the workplace • Maintain a safe workplace • Eliminate dirt and grime • Find and eliminate causes • Cleaning is checking/inspecting • Cleaning can detect faults before breakdown • Cleaning should be done daily
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

SEIKETSU: Standardise
• First 3S’s are being maintained at all times • 4th ‘S’ is a condition not an activity • Maintain a clean and tidy workplace with standards • Discovering reasons why things get disorganised • Finding root cause of why problems appear • Problems should be eliminated, not hidden • Use checklists, photographs, procedures or work instructions as reference
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

SHITSUKE: Self-Discipline
• Always following specific and standardised procedures • Understanding the rules and sticking to them • Developing simple 5S checklists • Self-discipline means motivation for continuous improvement activities • Self discipline is a process of practice and repetition • Involves breaking old habits and employing new ones
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Step 5

SHITSUKE: Self-Discipline
Preventive cleaning up Why do unnecessary items still appear Why does storage get in disarray Why does it get dirty Why are the rules not working Preventive organising

5 WHYS 1 How

Preventive cleaning Preventive training and discipline

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance” COrE Research Group

OLC (Europe)

Make things simple, visible and clean
•Clear, shiny aisle ways •Color coded areas •Slogans, banners

•No work-in-process ( WIP ) •One-Piece Flow •Standardized Work Sheets

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Improving handling/storage through 5S
Items labelled and visible

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

SEITON: Systemise (neatness)
Tool

Shadow Board
Eliminates searching

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

SEITON: Systemise (neatness)
At the work place

Eliminates searching for dies

Die Storage

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

SEITON: Systemise (neatness)

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Areas for 5S to be applied
Office Environment

Organised work systems and work space Information storage and retrieval systems

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

WHY 5S?
• Simple • Eliminates/reduces waste and non-valueadding activities • Involves every employee • Highly visible (visual systems) • The starting point for all continuous improvement activity (basic kaizen) • The starting point for culture change • Improves health and safety, quality and delivery and costs
Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

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“Lean Maintenance”

Beamish Industrial (Victorian) Museum in Durham (cc1800)

A sign on a machine “Workers not cleaning machines and lubricating slideways will be fined 1/4d (a farthing!)”
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

WHY 5S CAN FAIL?
Companies only follow 3S THERE IS A NEED TO FOCUS ON THE LAST 2S ALL THE TIME WHICH INVOLVES MANAGING CHANGE

Can you implement 5S in your organisation?
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

The need to eliminate wastes
• The work place gets overrun with waste over time
– New equipment, tools, cabinets, parts, information etc. clutter the work space – Product flow is inhibited and time is wasted on unnecessary actions – Focus on customer needs are lost (QCD www.ipamc.org suffers) Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK – Safety is compromised! “Lean Maintenance”

The seven deadly wastes (7 Mudas)
1 Searching: walking behind machines; searching for tools, people, parts, etc; reaching, bending, sidestepping, asking, storing, retrieving, putting down / picking up, counting.

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

The seven deadly wastes (7 Mudas)
2 Delays: Waiting for work, information, and/or approvals; waiting for parts, materials, tools, equipment availability, etc.

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

The seven deadly wastes (7 Mudas)
3 Transportation/Material handling: Moving work over short and long distances. Value is only added to a product or part when that part is actually being processed or worked on it.

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

The seven deadly wastes (7 Mudas)

4 Making Defects: Not doing it right first time; causing rework or scrap. Defects can occur at any stage from raw material to finished product.

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

5

The seven deadly wastes Over processing: (7 Mudas)
Drilling a hole where no hole is needed; inspecting checking your own work or that of another; handling parts, products, tools and/or paperwork.

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

6

The seven deadly wastes (7 Mudas) Over producing:
Producing more units than ordered – just in case; creating inventory.

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

The seven deadly wastes (7 Mudas)
7 Storing inventory/Work-inprogress: Storing units, however briefly, that are not yet ordered or can not yet be delivered. Material or product often gets built up at bottlenecks in manufacturing causing waste of space, time and money tied in stock.

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Identifying Wastes Exercise
• In small groups:
– Tour your work areas and see if you can identify any of the seven wastes – Make a list or document any you find – Use photographs

• Following the tour review your findings and develop a strategy for improvement
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Value and non-value activities
Activities which add value ONLY ActivitiesTHE VALUE THAT GETS TODAY’S CUSTOMERS WILL PAY FOR which add cost Processing it Printing it Assembling it Cutting it Drilling it Packing it Painting it Despatching it Polishing it Welding it Plating it
ADDED INTO A PRODUCT.

Sorting it Inspecting it Finding it Reworking it Handling it Snagging it Moving it Scrapping it Counting it Recalling it Repairing it
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Professor John University What adds valueSharp,your organisation? inMaintenance”of Salford, UK “Lean

Kaizen (PDCA) CI cycle

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Poka-Yoke
• Developed by Shigeo Shingo at Toyota • Poka-yoke – Japanese for mistake-proofing. • Poka-yoke device – any device used to prevent a mistake from being made
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Jidoka (Quality at the Source)
• • • • • • • Quality should be built in, not inspected in If machinery not running right stop and correct Expectation of quality, right first time Effective skills of all personnel Maximise planning by capturing all knowledge “Post-maintenance” reviews (PDCA) Investigate all “rework” to determine the cause
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

JIT Definition
Just in time is producing:

WHAT you want WHEN you want QUANTITIES you want
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Kanban Rules
Process A

Process A
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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

X

“Lean Maintenance”

Total Productive Maintenance

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Preconditions of successful Lean maintenance
• The business must be integrated in its approach to servicing the customer • Minimise wasteful activities • Eliminate non value added activities • Effective teamwork and flexible working practices • Primary function is to serve its customers and to meet all of their expectations and needs • Work closely with suppliers • Establish and apply best working practices • Continuously seek to improve. www.ipamc.org
Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Implementing Lean principles
• Accurate information on what the customer really wants, and exactly what, where and when • Short lead times in all areas of the business • Flexible production processes which make the products efficiently and effectively • Emphasis on product flow, resolution of bottleneck problems, and good management of capacity and priorities
Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

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“Lean Maintenance”

Implementing Lean principles
• Lean demands that maintenance personnel maintain technical knowledge and skills but also develop new competences:- Knowledge of tools/techniques • ICT (to support their decision-making capabilities) • Enhance interpersonal competences (developing teaming skills, partnering and change management)

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

CONCLUSIONS
Maintenance can be improved using lean principles. It can eliminate wasteful activities from all the maintenance processes and thus improve the service it gives to its customers.

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Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

“Lean Maintenance”

Thank you for your attention.

Questions ?
Professor John Sharp, University of Salford, UK

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“Lean Maintenance”

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